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Sample records for glaucoma radiation retinopathy

  1. Radiation retinopathy

    Lumbroso, L.; Desjardins, L.; Dendale, R.; Fourquet, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a retinal micro-angiopathy, observed after irradiation of the eye. It can rarely lead to neo-vascular glaucoma and enucleation due to pain. It is due to a progressive retinal capillary then vascular occlusion. Total irradiation dose, dose fraction, and surface of the irradiated retina seem to be strong predictive factors for radiation retinopathy. Patients who underwent an irradiation near the eye (skull base tumors, nasal and paranasal tumors, or brain tumors) should be followed by periodic ophthalmologic examination to detect and treat when necessary the non perfusion areas. (authors)

  2. Radiation retinopathy; Les retinopathies radio-induites

    Lumbroso, L.; Desjardins, L. [Institut Curie, Serv. d' Ophtalmologie, 75 - Paris (France); Dendale, R.; Fourquet, A. [Institut Curie, Serv. de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-09-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a retinal micro-angiopathy, observed after irradiation of the eye. It can rarely lead to neo-vascular glaucoma and enucleation due to pain. It is due to a progressive retinal capillary then vascular occlusion. Total irradiation dose, dose fraction, and surface of the irradiated retina seem to be strong predictive factors for radiation retinopathy. Patients who underwent an irradiation near the eye (skull base tumors, nasal and paranasal tumors, or brain tumors) should be followed by periodic ophthalmologic examination to detect and treat when necessary the non perfusion areas. (authors)

  3. Radiation retinopathy

    Parker, R.G.; Withers, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    A letter to the editor discusses the effectiveness and risk of radiation treatment of Grave's ophthalmopathy. The authors are unable to document a single instance in which retinopathy can be attributed to therapy with a total dose of 2000 cGy when delivered in daily increments of 180 to 200 cGy

  4. Radiation retinopathy

    Wara, W.M.; Irvine, A.R.; Neger, R.E.; Howes, E.L. Jr.; Phillips, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    The records were reviewed of all patients treated with irradiation to the eye at the University of California, San Francisco, between 1960 and 1975. Eight patients were identified who had developed radiation retinopathy 1 to 3 years postrirradiation. Lesions included retinal vascular occlusions, hemorrhages, microaneurysms, exudates, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachments, and optic atrophy with blindness. Four patients had received less than 5000 rad in 6 weeks to the retina, a dose usually considered within normal tissue tolerance

  5. Purtscher's retinopathy followed by neovascular glaucoma

    Kuroda M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Masasko Kuroda,1 Akihiro Nishida,1 Masashi Kikuchi,2 Yasuo Kurimoto11Department of Ophthalmology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan; 2Kikuchi Eye Clinic, Kobe, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: We report the case of a 66-year-old Japanese man who developed neovascular glaucoma secondary to Purtscher's retinopathy following a head injury. The patient presented at our hospital with blurred vision and a visual field abnormality in his left eye 1 month after suffering from a head injury. Upon initial presentation, his best-corrected visual acuity on a decimal chart was 1.5 oculus dexter and 0.6 oculus sinister. The intraocular pressure (IOP was 12 mmHg in both eyes. Fundus examination of the left eye revealed multiple white lesions in the posterior pole. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal edema, particularly in the inner retina. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of Purtscher's retinopathy was made. One month after the initial examination, the visual acuity in the left eye deteriorated to 0.01 in decimal chart, and the IOP increased to 37 mmHg. Gonioscopy showed angle neovascularization. The patient received an intravitreal bevacizumab injection and panretinal photocoagulation. Subsequently, the IOP normalized and the angle neovascularization regressed.Keywords: blurred vision, visual field, retinal edema, head injury, head trauma

  6. Radiation retinopathy in diabetes mellitus

    Dhir, S.P.; Joshi, A.V.; Banerjee, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    A case of radiation retinopathy in a diabetic individual who received a total dose of 45 Gy for lymphoblastic lymphoma of the orbit is reported. The relationship between radiation retinopathy and diabetes mellitus is discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Four cases of radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy

    Konari, Kenji; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Takashi

    1996-01-01

    We observed retinopathy and optic neuropathy in 4 patients after radiation for malignancies in the paranasal sinus or the brain. The dosis ranged from 56 Gy for 14 days to 64 Gy for 32 days. The interval between the termination of radiation and onset of fundus lesions ranged from 1 to 36 months, average 16.6 months. The retinopathy appeared as retinal hemorrhage, soft exudates and vitreous hemorrhage. Neovascular glaucoma developed in one eye. The optic neuropathy appeared as pallor of optic disc, disc edema or optic papillitis. Histological studies of one eye with retinopathy showed thickening of retinal capillary walls and rubeosis iridis with angle closure. (author)

  8. Four cases of radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy

    Konari, Kenji; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Takashi [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We observed retinopathy and optic neuropathy in 4 patients after radiation for malignancies in the paranasal sinus or the brain. The dosis ranged from 56 Gy for 14 days to 64 Gy for 32 days. The interval between the termination of radiation and onset of fundus lesions ranged from 1 to 36 months, average 16.6 months. The retinopathy appeared as retinal hemorrhage, soft exudates and vitreous hemorrhage. Neovascular glaucoma developed in one eye. The optic neuropathy appeared as pallor of optic disc, disc edema or optic papillitis. Histological studies of one eye with retinopathy showed thickening of retinal capillary walls and rubeosis iridis with angle closure. (author).

  9. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and ... Kids Glaucoma Healthy Vision Tips Leber Congenital Amaurosis Low Vision Refractive Errors Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish ...

  10. Glaucoma

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  11. Glaucoma

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  12. Detection of Glaucoma and Its Association With Diabetic Retinopathy in a Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Program.

    Gangwani, Rita A; McGhee, Sarah M; Lai, Jimmy S M; Chan, Christina K W; Wong, David

    2016-01-01

    To determine the type of glaucoma in subjects with diabetes mellitus detected during a diabetic retinopathy screening program and to determine any association between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma. This is a population-based prospective cross-sectional study, in which subjects with diabetes mellitus underwent screening for DR in a primary care outpatient clinic. Digital fundus photographs were taken and graded for presence/absence and severity of DR. During this grading, those fundus photographs showing increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) (≥0.6) were identified and these patients were referred to the specialist ophthalmology clinic for detailed examination. The presence of glaucoma was established based on CDR and abnormal visual field (VF) defects according to Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson's criteria. An elevation of intraocular pressure was not required for the diagnosis of glaucoma. The patients said to have definite glaucoma were those with vertical CDR>/=0.6, glaucomatous defects on VF examination, or retinal nerve fiber thinning if VF was unreliable. Of the 2182 subjects who underwent screening, 81 subjects (3.7%) had increased CDR and 40 subjects (1.8%) had confirmed glaucoma. Normal-tension variant of primary open-angle glaucoma was the most prevalent type (1.2%) We did not find any evidence that DR is a risk factor for glaucoma [odds ratio for DR vs. no DR=1.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-2.51)]. The overall prevalence of glaucoma in this diabetic population, based on finding increased cupping of optic disc in a teleretinal screening program was 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0).

  13. Preventing radiation retinopathy with hyperfractionation

    Monroe, Alan T.; Bhandare, Niranjan; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with the development of radiation retinopathy in a large series of patients with head-and-neck cancer. In particular, we addressed whether the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy was effective in reducing the risk of retinopathy. Methods and materials: One hundred eighty-six patients received a significant dose to the retina as part of curative radiotherapy. Primary sites included: nasopharynx, 46; paranasal sinus, 64; nasal cavity, 69; and palate, 7. Prescription doses varied depending on primary site and histology. Hyperfractionated (twice-daily) radiation was delivered to 42% of the patients in this study, typically at 1.10 to 1.20 Gy per fraction. The remainder were treated once-daily. Retinal doses were determined from computerized dosimetry plans when available. For all other patients, retinal doses were retrospectively calculated using reconstructed off-axis dosimetry taken from contours through the center of the globes. Retinal dose was defined as the minimum dose received by at least 25% of the globe. The median retinal dose was 56.85 Gy. Patients were followed for a median of 7.6 years. Results: Thirty-one eyes in 30 patients developed radiation retinopathy, resulting in monocular blindness in 25, bilateral blindness in 1, and decreased visual acuity in 4. The median time to the diagnosis of retinopathy was 2.6 years (range, 11 months to 5.3 years). The actuarial incidence of developing radiation retinopathy was 20% at both 5 and 10 years. The incidence of developing ipsilateral blindness due to retinopathy was 16% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. Site-specific incidences varied considerably, with ethmoid sinus (9 of 25, 36%), nasal cavity (13 of 69, 19%), and maxillary sinus (6 of 35, 17%) being the most common sites associated with radiation retinopathy. Three of 72 patients (4%) receiving retinal doses less than 50 Gy developed retinopathy. Higher retinal doses resulted in a

  14. Photocoagulation treatment of radiation retinopathy

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Chittum, M.E.; Wells, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the visual and anatomic effects of focal photocoagulation for clinically significant radiation macular edema in five eyes of four patients and panretinal photocoagulation for proliferative radiation retinopathy in six eyes of three patients. Focal and limited scatter photocoagulation was successful in preventing further vision loss in all five eyes treated for macular edema. Three eyes treated with panretinal photocoagulation had regression of neovascularization. The other three eyes treated for proliferative retinopathy subsequently had dense vitreous hemorrhages that required vitrectomy for restoration of useful vision

  15. Clinical features of radiation retinopathy

    Tabuchi, Shoko; Oda, Itsuo; Okawa, Tomohiko

    1977-01-01

    The clinical features of 25 cases with radiation retinopathy are described. Retinopathy was induced following therapeutic irradiation of paraobital malignancies with megavoltage Linac x-ray of 3,000 rads or more. Retinal vessels, particularly the proximal portion of retinal arteries, seemed to be the primary site of damage due to radiation. According to the type of lesion and dosage, fundus features simulated papillitis, retinal angiosclerosis, or hard exudates due to capillary obliteration. Acute obstruction of the central retinal artery and ischemic optic neuropathy could result from heavy irradiation of over 5,000 rads. (Evans, J.)

  16. Open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy at the Puerto Rico Medical Center.

    Cruz-lñigo, Yousef; Izquierdo, Natalio J; García, Omar; Pérez, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    The association of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) with diabetes mellitus remains controversial. We report on the frequency of open-angle glaucoma in patients having diabetic retinopathy in a population of the Puerto Rico Medical Center. A cross-sectional study of 1,442 patients was done. Only the chart of patients 40 years-of-age and older, with a diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and/or open-angle glaucoma were included. Descriptive analysis was done. Unadjusted and gender-adjusted logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk of developing open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy for each subsequent decade. 1,040 patients were diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy from July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2009. Also, 402 patients were diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2009. Of the 1,040 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 64 patients (6.15%) also had OAG. According to our gender-adjusted logistic regression analysis the estimated risk of developing open-angle glaucoma for patients 40 years-of-age with diabetic retinopathy increased for each subsequent decade until the seventh decade, odds ratio = 5.07 (95% confidence interval: 1.62-15.86). Thereafter, it decreased, odds ratio = 2.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.36-11.82). Our findings suggest that Puerto Rico patients between 40 to 79 years of age with diabetic retinopathy have an increased risk of developing open-angle glaucoma with each subsequent decade. Screening for open-angle glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathy is of utmost importance in the aging Puerto Rico population to prevent blindness.

  17. Bilateral Ocular Decompression Retinopathy after Ahmed Valve Implantation for Uveitic Glaucoma

    Javier Flores-Preciado

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Case Report: We report the case of a 29-year-old man who underwent Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes as treatment for uveitic glaucoma, subsequently presenting with bilateral ocular decompression retinopathy in the postoperative period. Discussion: Ocular decompression retinopathy is a rare complication of filtering surgery in patients with glaucoma; however, the course is benign in most cases, with spontaneous resolution of bleedings and improvement of visual acuity.

  18. Glaucoma

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  19. Glaucoma

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  20. Two cases of radiation retinopathy

    Shoda, Miho; Yuzawa, Mitsuko; Matsui, Mizuo; Kaneko, Akihiro.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is characterized by retinal micovascular abnormalities after radiation therapy of the eye and its surrounding structures. The authors performed focal laser photocoagulation in two cases of radiation retinopathy. Case 1 was a 16 year old woman with radiation retinopathy who had been treated for retioblastoma in her right eye using cobalt 60-applicator 16 years prior to the first visit. Her corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 0.4. Ophthalmoscopy revealed large macular deposits, soft exudates, and retinal hemorrhage. Fluorescein angiography showed hyperpermeability of capillaries in the vicinity of the lower temporal retinal vessels. The visual acuity improved to 1.2 after the photocoagulation. Case 2 was a 16 year old man who had received 50 gray of external beam for a primary rhabdo-myosarcoma in the temporal region. Retinal avascular areas in the posterior pole of his both eyes were observed and the area showed increased retinal vessel permeability in the right eye was photocoagulated. The visual acuity in his right eye increased from 0.08 to 1.0 following the treatment. (author)

  1. Glaucoma

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  2. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand (Princess Margaret Hospital, Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto (Canada)), e-mail: gpgiuliari@gmail.com; Sadaka, Ama (Schepens Eye Research Inst., Boston, MA (United States)); Hinkle, David M. (Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    2011-01-15

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  3. Diagnosis System for Diabetic Retinopathy and Glaucoma Screening to Prevent Vision Loss

    Siva Sundhara Raja DHANUSHKODI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetic retinopathy (DR and glaucoma are two most common retinal disorders that are major causes of blindness in diabetic patients. DR caused in retinal images due to the damage in retinal blood vessels, which leads to the formation of hemorrhages spread over the entire region of retina. Glaucoma is caused due to hypertension in diabetic patients. Both DR and glaucoma affects the vision loss in diabetic patients. Hence, a computer aided development of diagnosis system for Diabetic retinopathy and Glaucoma screening is proposed in this paper to prevent vision loss. Method: The diagnosis system of DR consists of two stages namely detection and segmentation of fovea and hemorrhages. The diagnosis system of glaucoma screening consists of three stages namely blood vessel segmentation, Extraction of optic disc (OD and optic cup (OC region and determination of rim area between OD and OC. Results: The specificity and accuracy for hemorrhages detection is found to be 98.47% and 98.09% respectively. The accuracy for OD detection is found to be 99.3%. This outperforms state-of-the-art methods. Conclusion: In this paper, the diagnosis system is developed to classify the DR and glaucoma screening in to mild, moderate and severe respectively.

  4. Glaucoma

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  5. Radiation retinopathy as an experimental model for ischemic proliferative retinopathy and rubeosis iridis

    Irvine, A.R.; Wood, I.S.

    1987-01-01

    We produced radiation retinopathy in capuchin monkeys and studied them with fluorescein angiography and light and electron microscopy. The animals were followed up from ten days to 3 1/2 years after radiation in order to determine whether this could provide an experimental model for other chronic ischemic-proliferative retinopathies, such as diabetes. The first change detected after radiation was the focal loss of capillary endothelial cells and pericytes. As the areas of acellular capillaries became confluent, cotton-wool spots became visible ophthalmoscopically. These increased in number and then faded away, leaving large areas of retinal capillary perfusion. Histologic studies showed occlusion first of the deeper, smaller retinal vessels and then gradually of the larger vessels. Intraretinal neovascularization as well as apparent recanalization then developed, but no new vessels extended through the internal limiting lamina into the vitreous. Rubeosis iridis with neovascular glaucoma developed 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 years postirradiation, and vitreous aspirate demonstrated a high level of angiogenic factor

  6. A case of early-onset radiation retinopathy

    Sato, Yoko; Den, Seika; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2001-01-01

    We encountered a 27-year-old male early caused by radiation retinopathy five months after radiotherapy (51 Gy) for astrocytoma. The retinopathy was the proliferative retinopathy, with several dot and blot hemorrhages, hard and soft exudate, increased capillary permeability, macula edema and avasucular areas. So it was treated with panretial photocoagulation like diabetic retinopathy. Now hemorrhage, exudate, edema and avascular areas were improved. Photocoagulation treatment is effective to stop the progression of radiation retinopathy. Radiation retinopathy is sometimes early caused, therefore long-term follow up is recommended on starting radiotherapy. (author)

  7. A case of early-onset radiation retinopathy

    Sato, Yoko; Den, Seika; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tsunehiko [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    We encountered a 27-year-old male early caused by radiation retinopathy five months after radiotherapy (51 Gy) for astrocytoma. The retinopathy was the proliferative retinopathy, with several dot and blot hemorrhages, hard and soft exudate, increased capillary permeability, macula edema and avasucular areas. So it was treated with panretial photocoagulation like diabetic retinopathy. Now hemorrhage, exudate, edema and avascular areas were improved. Photocoagulation treatment is effective to stop the progression of radiation retinopathy. Radiation retinopathy is sometimes early caused, therefore long-term follow up is recommended on starting radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Radiation Retinopathy: Case report and review

    Young Lorna

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular damage from radiation treatment is a well established phenomenon. Many factors are now known to influence the incidence of radiation retinopathy, including total dosage and daily fraction size. Patients who are diabetic, hypertensive or received previous chemotherapy are more susceptible to radiation retinopathy. Case Presentation A 55 year old male was referred from the oncology department with epiphora. His medical history included Type 2 Insulin treated Diabetes Mellitus and hypertension. One year prior to presentation he had undergone a total rhinectomy with a 4 week course of post-operative radiotherapy for an aggressive sqaumous cell carcinoma of the nose. On examination the visual acuity was noted to be 6/36 left eye and 6/9 right eye. Posterior segment examination revealed marked retinal ischaemia present in the posterior pole and macular region of both eyes. The appearance was not thought to be typical of diabetic changes, radiation retinopathy being the more likely diagnosis especially in view of his history. Over the next four months the vision in both eyes rapidly deteriorated to 3/60 left eye and 1/60 right eye. Bilateral pan retinal photocoagulation was thought to be appropriate treatment at this point. Conclusion This case highlights the importance for ophthalmologists and oncologists to be aware of the close relationship between diabetes and radiation treatment and the profound rapid impact this combination of factors may have on visual function. Radiation is being used with increasing frequency for ocular and orbital disease, because of this more cases of radiation retinopathy may become prevalent. Factors which may potentiate radiation retinopathy should be well known including, increased radiation dosage, increased fraction size, concomitant systemic vascular disease and use of chemotherapy. Counselling should be offered in all cases at risk of visual loss. As no effective treatment currently exists

  9. Automated diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma using fundus and OCT images

    Pachiyappan Arulmozhivarman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe a system for the automated diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma using fundus and optical coherence tomography (OCT images. Automatic screening will help the doctors to quickly identify the condition of the patient in a more accurate way. The macular abnormalities caused due to diabetic retinopathy can be detected by applying morphological operations, filters and thresholds on the fundus images of the patient. Early detection of glaucoma is done by estimating the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL thickness from the OCT images of the patient. The RNFL thickness estimation involves the use of active contours based deformable snake algorithm for segmentation of the anterior and posterior boundaries of the retinal nerve fiber layer. The algorithm was tested on a set of 89 fundus images of which 85 were found to have at least mild retinopathy and OCT images of 31 patients out of which 13 were found to be glaucomatous. The accuracy for optical disk detection is found to be 97.75%. The proposed system therefore is accurate, reliable and robust and can be realized.

  10. Effective panphotocoagulation in a case of radiation retinopathy

    Mori, Tatsuhiko; Tochikubo, Tetsuo; Shinohara, Atsuko; Komoto, Michiji; Tabata, Toshifumi.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a case of radiation retinopathy caused by 60 Co and Ra radiation therapy following surgery for carcinoma of the maxillary sinus in a 42-year-old male. The retinopathy was found at onset of vitreous hemorrhage; the proliferative retinopathy was disclosed by fluorescein angiography (FAG). The retinopathy was treated a total of five times with both argon and krypton laser photocoagulation (PHC). As a result, both the subjective and objective symptoms improved. When radiation retinopathy is suspected, FAG must be conducted as soon as possible, to decide whether PHC is needed or not. (author)

  11. Radiation Retinopathy Associated with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Yan; Liu; FengWen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of radiation retinopathy associated with central retinal vein occlusion.Methods: The clinical features and fundus fluorescein angiography of this case were analyzed.Results: The patient had been treated with radiotherapy for her nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and presented with sudden visual loss in the left eye. The funduscopic examination and fluorescein angiography showed the features of radiation retinopathy in both eyes, and central retinal vein occlusion in the left eye.Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy can be associated with central retinal vein occlusion in the same eye, and it seems that the endothelial cell loss caused by radiation retinopathy may lead to retinal vein occlusion.

  12. Retinopathy secondary to radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma

    Groomer, A.E.; Gutwein, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses a case of radiotherapy-induced retinopathy following treatment of squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment of the carcinoma with external beam radiotherapy to the supraorbital region and base of the skull was followed by the onset of retinopathy. The sensory retina, as well as other central nervous system tissues, is highly resistant to radiation damage; however, the retinal vasculature is extremely sensitive to radiation damage, producing a retinopathy that is characteristic of other vascular occlusive diseases. Management is discussed

  13. Radiation retinopathy after external-beam irradiation: Analysis of time-dose factors

    Parsons, J.T.; Bova, F.J.; Mendenhall, W.M.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the risk of radiation-induced retinopathy according to total radiation dose and fraction size, based on both retorspective and prospectively collected data. Between October 1964 and May 1989, 68 retinae in 64 patients received fractionated external-beam irradiation during the treatment of primary extracranial head and neck tumors. All patients had a minimum of 3 years of ophthalmologic follow-up (range, 3 to 26 years; mean, 9 years; median, 8 years). Twenty-seven eyes in 26 patients developed radiation retinopathy resulting in visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. The mean and median times to the onset of symptoms attributable to retinal ischemia were 2.8 and 2.5 years, respectively. Fourteen of the injured eyes developed rubeosis iridis and/or neovascular glaucoma. Radiation retinopathy was not observed at doses below 45 Gy, but increased steadily in incidence at doses ≥45Gy. In the range of doses between 45 and 55 Gy, there was an increased risk of injury among patients who received doses per fraction of ≥1.9Gy (p - .09). There was also a trend toward increased risk of injury among patients who received chemotherapy (two of two vs. four of ten in the 45-51 Gy range; p - .23). The lowest dose associated with retinopathy was 45 Gy delivered to a diabetic patient by twice-a-day fractionation. The data did not suggest an increased risk of radiation retinopathy with increasing age. The current study suggests the importance of total dose as well as dose per fraction, and adds support to a small body of literature suggesting that patients with diabetes mellitus or who receive chemotherapy are at increased risk of injury. A sigmoid dose-response curve is constructed from our current data and data from the literature. 36 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Radiation retinopathy following treatment of posterior nasal space carcinoma

    Thompson, G.M.; Migdal, C.S.; Whittle, R.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Posterior nasal space carcinoma has a high mortality and most patents are treated with radiotherapy. Radiation retinopathy was encountered in 7 out of 10 survivors included in this study. Five of the affected patients lost vision as a result of the retinopathy. One patient required laser photocoagulation and responded well to this treatment. There was a variation in the severity of the retinopathy among the patients studied despite the fact that all patients received a similar dose of radiotherapy. We suspect that previously unrecognised factors in the planning of radiotherapy fields may explain this difference. (author)

  15. Glaucoma

    ... glaucoma Images Eye Slit-lamp exam Visual field test Glaucoma References Anderson DR. The optic nerve in glaucoma. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology 2013 . Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 3, chap 48. Giaconi JA, ...

  16. Glaucoma

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  17. Features of ophthalmoneuroprotection in patients with open-angle glaucoma in combination with diabetic retinopathy

    O. I. Borzunov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: of this study is to evaluate ophthalmoneuroprotectional treatment of patients with POAG and diabetes mellitus type II in a specialized hospital.Material and methods: We have performed retro — and prospective analysis of the combined treatment of 130 patients (248 eyes with a combination of primary open-angle glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment was conducted on the following criteria: the severity of the hypotensive effect, the degreeof improvement and duration of remission of major ophthalmic indicators. The patients were divided into four clinical — homogeneous groups: primary — 40 people (77 eyes, the comparison group I — 37 persons (71 eyes, the comparison group II — 33 people (60 eyes, the control group — 20 people (40 eyes.Results: Combination of different treatment strategy of laser and conservative treatment was tested. The result has been designed for optimal balance improving performance and reducing ocular side effects. Retinalamin ® 5 mg parabulbare number 10, Tanakan 1 tablet 3 times a day — 3 months. The optimal timing of re-treatment (at least 1time in 9 months, in the case of significant progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy — the timing is solved individually.

  18. Clinical Investigation of Radiation Retinopathy Fundus and Fluorescein Angiographic Features

    LiMei; QiuGT

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:To investigate the fundus and fluorescein angiographic features in the patients with radiation retinopathy.Clinical Materials:Color fundus photography and/or fluorescein angiography from 13 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas received external beam radiation were retrospectively analyzed.Reslts:In this study,26 damaged eyes of 13 patients eveloped some degree of radiation retinopathy.The earliest and most common finding was macular microvascular changes (microaneurysms and/or telangiectasia),which was observed in 100%(26/26)of the eyes.Intraretinal hemorrhages,macular capillary nonperfusion,and macular edema were noted in 84%,50%,and 42% of the eyes,respectively.Conclusions:Radiation retinopathy is common after external beam radiation of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.The prominent changes include maular microvascular changes,intraretinal hemorrhages and macular capillary nonperfusion.

  19. Radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Kalina, R.E.; Brower, S.A.; Mills, R.P.; Johnson, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy is sometimes beneficial, particularly for dysthyroid optic neuropathy, and is not associated with serious complications. We are aware, however, of four patients who were found to have radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Grave's ophthalmopathy. All four patients have decreased central acuity, and three of the four are legally blind in one or both eyes. Computer reconstruction of the dosimetry, based on computed tomography and beam profiles, shows that errors in dosage calculations and radiotherapy technique probably account for the radiation retinopathy in three of the four patients. Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy should be administered only by competent radiotherapists who are experienced in the treatment of this disease. Similar errors in dosage calculations and treatment techniques may account for other reports of radiation retinopathy after reportedly safe dosages

  20. A case of radiation retinopathy treated with panretinal photocoagulation

    Ohde, Hisao; Ayaki, Masahiko; Fujimura, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Noriko

    1993-01-01

    A 29-year-old male developed radiation retinopathy one year and three months after 60 Gy of radiotherapy was delivered by a linear accelerator for a grade III astrocytoma. Fundus examination at the initial visit showed several dot and blot hemorrhages and cotton-wool patches. One month later, mascular edema developed due to increased capillary permeability in the left eye, while proliferative changes and preretinal hemorrhages were noted in the right eye. Since panretinal photocoagulation was effective in treating both eyes, it may be the treatment of choice for radiation retinopathy with extensive avascular areas. (author)

  1. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos: Glaucoma Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: Glaucoma ... *PDF files require the free Adobe® Reader® software for viewing. This website is maintained by the ...

  2. Glaucoma

    Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye's optic nerve. It is a leading ... no symptoms at first. Without treatment, people with glaucoma will slowly lose their peripheral, or side vision. ...

  3. Subretinal neovascularization from the retina in radiation retinopathy

    Boozalis, G.T.; Schachat, A.P.; Green, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    In a 66-year-old woman with radiation retinopathy, subretinal neovascularization was present, originating from telangiectatic retinal vessels in the macular area. The patient showed no clinical or histologic evidence of age-related macular degeneration or other conditions that may have contributed to the subretinal neovascularization

  4. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and Aging Program African American Program Training and ...

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    Full Text Available ... Education Programs National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low ... Macular Degeneration Amblyopia Animations Blindness Cataract Convergence Insufficiency Diabetic Eye Disease Dilated Eye Exam Dry Eye For ...

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  8. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Director Laboratories, Sections and Units Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications eyeGENE Research Directors Office Office ... Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Hispanic/Latino Program Vision and ...

  9. Glaucoma

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  10. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S.; Schild, Steven E.; Stafford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 ± 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 ± 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 ± 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the

  11. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S. [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Stafford, Scott, E-mail: stafford.scott@mayo.edu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 {+-} 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 {+-} 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 {+-} 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the

  12. Glaucoma

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  13. Glaucoma

    Full Text Available ... Glaucoma Listen NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia Animations Blindness Cataract Convergence ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  14. Glaucoma

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  15. Glaucoma

    ... considerably, providing more precise visual assessment tests and biologic markers for the disease. NIH-sponsored research led to the development of prostaglandins, a new class of drugs that offers excellent IOP control with fewer side effects. The Early Manifest Glaucoma ...

  16. Following-up study on radiation-induced retinopathy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Zhang Qingping; Zhou Weiwei; Xie Chengxi; Huang Guangwu; Ruan Lin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the frequency of ocular complication and the quality of patient's life after radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 254 NPC patients who initially received radiation were followed and analysed. Visual acuity, automational visual field, slit-lamp microscopic findings, pattern visual evoked potential (P-VEP) and fundal findings were determined before, during and after radiation therapy. The severity of retinal impairment was assessed according to the international criteria on late tissue effects. Results: The radiation dose was more than 70 Gy in 241 (94.9%)NPC patients, giving a radiation retinopathy incidence of 8.7% (22) patients after a mean of 46.8±14.4 months. After being diagnosed as radiation retinopathy, 16 patients received combined-modality therapy of the modern medicine and Chinese traditional medicine. The disease condition was controlled in 56%(9) patients but progressed into optic neuropathy in 7 patients, 3 of whom developed radiation encephalopathy in 14 to 20 months after onset of retinopathy. The morbidity of radiation retinopathy was not associated with the patient's age, but was related to the radiation dose. The retinopathy rate was as high as 13.6% in the 75-79 Gy group, which is significantly higher than 5.6% in the 70-74 Gy group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy in NPC patients is related to the radiation dose and individual difference in radiosensitivity. Optic nerve and brain damage are already present when clinical manifestations of radiation retinopathy occur. Therefore CT and MRI of the brain should be carried out. The importance of long-term follow-up should be stressed for early diagnosis and treatment of radiation sequelae for the sake of complete return of visual function and good quality of life

  17. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  18. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of the EX-PRESS Filtration Device in Patients with Advanced Neovascular Glaucoma and Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    Rana Hanna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prognosis of conventional filtration surgery in eyes with neovascular glaucoma (NVG is limited due to increased fibrovascular proliferation or bleeding. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the EX-PRESS filtration device in the management of NVG associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR. Methods: In this retrospective case series, we reviewed the medical records of patients diagnosed as having NVG associated with PDR who underwent EX-PRESS filtration surgery. The main outcome measures were: postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP, the percent of IOP drop, the number of glaucoma medications, visual acuity, and complications of surgery. Successful surgery was defined as an IOP <22 mm Hg and >5 mm Hg with or without additional glaucoma surgery, and no loss of light perception or less than a 2-line decrease on the Snellen chart of the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA. Results: Five patients (5 eyes were included in this study. The mean preoperative IOP was 33.4 ± 5.9 mm Hg compared to an IOP of 17.0 ± 3.0 mm Hg at the last follow-up (p = 0.003. The mean number of preoperative anti-glaucoma medications was 3.8 ± 0.4 compared to 2.2 ± 1.5 (p = 0.06 at the last follow-up visit. Final visual acuity improved or stabilized within 1 Snellen line in all 5 patients. Three patients had a “hypertensive phase” (defined as an IOP >21 mm Hg during the first 6 postoperative months which resolved within 2 months. Two patients developed a hyphema that resolved spontaneously. None of the patients experienced any serious complications. Conclusion: EX-PRESS filtration device has a good IOP-lowering effect and a low rate of complications in patients with advanced NVG associated with PDR. In addition, there was no loss of light perception or no line decrease of the BCVA.

  19. Glaucoma severity affects diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the optic nerve and optic radiation

    Sidek, S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Medical Imaging Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selangor (Malaysia); Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Ramli, N.M.; Abdulrahman, F. [Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tan, L.K. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To evaluate whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiation in glaucoma patients provides parameters to discriminate between mild and severe glaucoma and to determine whether DTI derived indices correlate with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods: 3-Tesla DTI was performed on 90 subjects (30 normal, 30 mild glaucoma and 30 severe glaucoma subjects) and the FA and MD of the optic nerve and optic radiation were measured. The categorisation into mild and severe glaucoma was done using the Hodapp–Parrish–Anderson (HPA) classification. RNFL thickness was also assessed on all subjects using OCT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient was carried out. Results: FA and MD values in the optic nerve and optic radiation decreased and increased respectively as the disease progressed. FA at the optic nerve had the highest sensitivity (87%) and specificity (80%). FA values displayed the strongest correlation with RNFL thickness in the optic nerve (r = 0.684, p ≤ 0.001) while MD at the optic radiation showed the weakest correlation with RNFL thickness (r = −0.360, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: The high sensitivity and specificity of DTI-derived FA values in the optic nerve and the strong correlation between DTI-FA and RNFL thickness suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of disease severity.

  20. Glaucoma severity affects diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the optic nerve and optic radiation

    Sidek, S.; Ramli, N.; Rahmat, K.; Ramli, N.M.; Abdulrahman, F.; Tan, L.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiation in glaucoma patients provides parameters to discriminate between mild and severe glaucoma and to determine whether DTI derived indices correlate with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods: 3-Tesla DTI was performed on 90 subjects (30 normal, 30 mild glaucoma and 30 severe glaucoma subjects) and the FA and MD of the optic nerve and optic radiation were measured. The categorisation into mild and severe glaucoma was done using the Hodapp–Parrish–Anderson (HPA) classification. RNFL thickness was also assessed on all subjects using OCT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient was carried out. Results: FA and MD values in the optic nerve and optic radiation decreased and increased respectively as the disease progressed. FA at the optic nerve had the highest sensitivity (87%) and specificity (80%). FA values displayed the strongest correlation with RNFL thickness in the optic nerve (r = 0.684, p ≤ 0.001) while MD at the optic radiation showed the weakest correlation with RNFL thickness (r = −0.360, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: The high sensitivity and specificity of DTI-derived FA values in the optic nerve and the strong correlation between DTI-FA and RNFL thickness suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of disease severity

  1. Successful treatment of radiation retinopathy with panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in a patient of orbital MALT lymphoma

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Chikuda, Makoto; Kadoya, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    Report a case of satisfactory progress radiation retinopathy after radiation for mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. A 26-year-old male patient, referred to our department for lacrimal sac tumor. Biopsy was done by otolaryngology and radiation therapy was performed (total irradiation of 41.4 Gy) as pathological examination revealed MALT lymphoma. Soft exudates and macula edema appeared in posterior pole of the right fundus after radiotherapy. Right vision became 0.5 because of macula edema, and panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was performed. After PRP, macula edema withdrew and right vision improved to 1.2. It is suggested that the fundus must be monitored after radiation therapy, and early treatment, such as PRP is effective in radiation retinopathy. (author)

  2. Radiation Retinopathy Is Treatable With Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Bevacizumab (Avastin)

    Finger, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report on bevacizumab treatment for radiation retinopathy affecting the macula. Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients with radiation retinopathy (edema, hemorrhages, capillary dropout, and neovascularization) and a subjective or objective loss of vision were treated. Treatment involved intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (1.25 mg in 0.05 mL) every 6-12 weeks. Treatment was discontinued at patient request or if there was no measurable response to therapy. Main outcome measures included best corrected visual acuity, ophthalmic examination, retinal photography, and angiography. Results: Bevacizumab treatment was followed by reductions in retinal hemorrhage, exudation, and edema. Visual acuities were stable or improved in 86% (n = 18). Three patients discontinued therapy. Each was legally blind before treatment (n = 1), experienced little to no subjective improvement (n = 2), or was poorly compliant (n = 2). Three patients (14%) regained 2 or more lines of visual acuity. No ocular or systemic bevacizumab-related side effects were observed. Conclusions: Intravitreal bevacizumab can be used to treat radiation retinopathy. In most cases treatment was associated with decreased vascular leakage, stabilization, or improved vision. An anti-vascular endothelial growth factor strategy may reduce tissue damage associated with radiation vasculopathy and neuropathy

  3. Fellow Eye Macular Edema Improvement after Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Radiation Retinopathy

    Isis A. S. Brito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation retinopathy (RR is a progressive, chronic condition directly related to the amount of radiation administered to the retina. We report a 37-year-old patient with medulloblastoma that was treated with external beam radiation and presented to us with bilateral cystoid macular edema. He was treated with monthly bevacizumab injections only in his worst seeing eye. There was a significant improvement in his fellow eye, with marked retinal thickness reduction. Therefore, we present clinical evidence of systemic absorption and fellow eye activity of the drug (bevacizumab. One must be aware of distant side effects after intravitreal injections.

  4. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 female who received 250-1000 mCi during 131I therapy and on ophthalmological follow up for a year after the last treatment were included in the study. Mean age of the study group was 50 years (range 25-70 years. In ophthalmologic examination, visual acuity was measured in order to determine visual loss. Intraocular pressure was measured in all the patients. Then lens examination was carried out with slit lamp biomicroscopy in order to investigate cataract or partial lens opacities. Fundus observation was carried out through the dilated pupil with slit lamp biomicroscopy using 90 D noncontact lens. Result: The best corrected visual aquity with Snellen chart was found as 1.0 in 36 eyes (90% and between 0.6 and 0.9 (10% in 4 eyes (10%. At the biomicroscopic fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage consistent with radiation retinopathy, microaneurysm, microinfarction, edema or exudation, vitreus hemorrhage, partial or total optical disc pallor indicating papillopathy in the optic disc were not observed in any of the eyes. Conclusion: This result indicates that there is not any significant correlation between repeated high-dose radioiodine therapy and radiation retinopathy in differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Even though there is not a significant restriction in use of higher doses of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, more extensive studies are needed in order to obtain more accurate data on possible occurrence of retinopathy.

  5. Philadelphia Telemedicine Glaucoma Detection and Follow-Up Study

    2017-05-02

    Glaucoma; Glaucoma Suspect; Diabetic Retinopathy; Ocular Hypertension; Cataract; Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion; Branch Retinal Arterial Occlusion; Central Retinal Vein Occlusion; Central Retinal Artery Occlusion; Epi-retinal Membrane; Macular Degeneration; Drusen; Loss of Vision

  6. Colour Doppler analysis of ophthalmic vessels in the diagnosis of carotic artery and retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma: systematic review of test accuracy studies.

    Bittner, Mario; Faes, Livia; Boehni, Sophie C; Bachmann, Lucas M; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Schmid, Martin K

    2016-12-07

    Colour Doppler analysis of ophthalmic vessels has been proposed as a promising tool in the diagnosis of various eye diseases, but the available diagnostic evidence has not yet been assessed systematically. We performed a comprehensive systematic review of the literature on the diagnostic properties of Colour Doppler imaging (CDI) assessing ophthalmic vessels and provide an inventory of the available evidence. Eligible papers were searched electronically in (Pre) Medline, Embase and Scopus, and via cross-checking of reference lists. The minimum requirement to be included was the availability of original data and the possibility to construct a two-by-two table. Study selection, critical appraisal using the QUADAS II instrument and extraction of salient study characteristics was made in duplicate. Sensitivity and specificity was computed for each study. We included 11 studies (15 two-by-two tables) of moderate methodological quality enrolling 820 participants (range 30 to 118). In 44.4% participants were female (range 37-59% in specific subgroups). CDI was assessed for internal carotid stenosis, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and branch or central retinal vein occlusion diagnosis. There was insufficient data to pool the results for specific illnesses. For the assessments of ophthalmic arteries, mean sensitivity was 0.69 (range 0.27-0.96) with a corresponding mean specificity of 0.83 (range 0.70-0.96). Mean sensitivity of the central retinal artery assessments was 0.58 (range 0.31-0.84) and the corresponding mean specificity was 0.82 (range 0.63-0.94). Robust assessments of the diagnostic value of colour Doppler analysis remain uncommon, limiting the possibilities to extrapolate its true potential for clinical practice. PROSPERO 2014:CRD42014014027.

  7. Glaucoma evolution in patients with diabetes.

    Apreutesei, Nicoleta Anton; Chiselita, D; Motas, O I

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma and diabetes are two chronic diseases with a long suspected pathogenic relationship. Screening for glaucoma in patients with diabetes. A retrospective study on 92 eyes from 46 patients with primitive open angle glaucoma (POAG) (normal and hypertensive) and intraocular hypertension (OHT) receiving medication and/or surgery associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) (type I, type II, mixed) is presented. Participants were divided into two groups as following: 16 eyes with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy changes (group 1) and 76 eyes with glaucoma and without diabetic retinopathy changes (group 2). The following parameters were analysed: ocular pressure (Goldmann aplanotonometry), perimeter development (computerized perimetry) and fundus condition (absence, presence or progression of diabetic retinopathy). In patients with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy (8 patients) we found a mean difference between treated intraocular pressure (IOP) and IOP last untreated control of 4.95 mmHg; a depreciation of the MD by 4.18 dB and an average number of glaucoma medications used of 0.889 +/- 1.054. Predominant changes in proliferative diabetic retinopathy were mild. In patients with glaucoma in the absence of diabetic retinopathy, the average difference between untreated IOP and IOP under treatment at the last check-up was 1.63 mmHg, the MD depreciation was by 0.65 dB and the average number of glaucoma medications used was 0.795 +/- 0.978. No statistically significant differences in terms of initial and final pressure were found. No statistically significant differences in the evolution of changes in perimeter between the two groups were observed. The presence of non-proliferating diabetic retinopathy influenced (only marginally statistically) the glaucomatous disease progression. Large comparative prospective studies are needed for the long-term follow up.

  8. Experimental and clinical research on the inhibition of scarring formation after glaucoma surgery 90Sr radiation

    Wei Meien; Wang Guzhu; Li Shuqing

    1994-01-01

    Beta radiation of 90 Sr can inhibit the scarring formation so that the success rate of filtration surgery may be improved. After success in animal experiment, trabeculectomy was performed with small sclera flap on 31 eyes of 23 cases of patients with a high risk of scarring formation. Local 90 Sr radiation with a total dosage of 30.24 Gy were given by several times 3 days postoperatively, combined with local use of steroids. The patients were followed-up at 1 to 24 months, averaging 7 months. The intraocular pressure were successfully controlled in 90.3% of the patients. No lens impairment and other complications were observed. This procedure is an adoptive method in preventing scarring formation after glaucoma filtering surgery

  9. A magnetization transfer imaging study of bilateral optic radiation and visual cortex in patients with primary glaucoma

    Liang Wenwen; Zhang Xuelin; Jiang Xiaoyong; Xu Yongming; Yang Zhihui; Zhang Yan; Chang Renmin; Wang Jianping; Wu Guijun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the changes in bilateral optic radiation and visual cortex in patients with primary glaucoma detected by magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), and try to explore the influence of the disease on posterior visual pathway. Methods: MTI was performed in 20 patients with primary glaucoma with normal signal on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The same scanning was performed in 31 matched healthy controls. MTI was obtained using spoiled gradient recalled acquisition sequence (SPGR). Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of bilateral optic radiation and visual cortex was measured after post-processing. The MTR value differences of the same area between two groups were compared by independent-sample t test or Satterthwaite t test if variances were not equality. Result: The MTR value in the left and right optic radiation were (32.8 ± 2.2)% and (32.7 ± 2.0)% in the glaucoma group, (34.6 ± 1.4 )% and (34.8 ± 1.3)% in the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (left t=3.284, right t=4.040; P<0.01). The MTR value of the left and right visual cortex were (30.1± 2.0)% and (30.8 ± 1.8)% in the glaucoma group, and (32.3 ± 1.2 )% and (32.4 ± 1.2)% in the control group. Statistically significant difference was found between the two groups (left t=4.319, right t=3.445; P<0.01). Conclusions: Potential neuropathology changes occurring in the posterior visual pathway of patients with glaucoma indicate that the whole visual pathway may be involved by glaucoma.The micro physiological changes can be detected by MTI which can not be found by conventional MRI. It is a useful method of studying trans-synaptic damage of visual pathway n vivo glaucoma which provides more information for guiding the clinic diagnosis, cure and prognosis of glaucoma. (authors)

  10. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) evaluation of the metabolite concentration of optic radiation in primary open angle glaucoma

    Sidek, Sabrilhakim [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (UMRIC), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Universiti Teknologi MARA, Medical Imaging Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Sg Buloh, Selangor (Malaysia); Ramli, Norlisah; Rahmat, Kartini; Kuo, Tan Li [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (UMRIC), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ramli, Norlina Mohd; Abdulrahman, Fadzlina [University of Malaya, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-12-15

    To compare the metabolite concentration of optic radiation in glaucoma patients with that of healthy subjects using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS). 1H-MRS utilising the Single-Voxel Spectroscopy (SVS) technique was performed using a 3.0Tesla MRI on 45 optic radiations (15 from healthy subjects, 15 from mild glaucoma patients, and 15 from severe glaucoma patients). A standardised Volume of Interest (VOI) of 20 x 20 x 20 mm was placed in the region of optic radiation. Mild and severe glaucoma patients were categorised based on the Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson (HPA) classification. Mean and multiple group comparisons for metabolite concentration and metabolite concentration ratio between glaucoma grades and healthy subjects were obtained using one-way ANOVA. The metabolite concentration and metabolite concentration ratio between the optic radiations of glaucoma patients and healthy subjects did not demonstrate any significant difference (p > 0.05). Our findings show no significant alteration of metabolite concentration associated with neurodegeneration that could be measured by single-voxel 1H-MRS in optic radiation among glaucoma patients. (orig.)

  11. [OCT and neovascular glaucoma].

    Bellotti, A; Labbé, A; Fayol, N; El Mahtoufi, A; Baudouin, C

    2007-06-01

    Neovascular glaucoma is a chronic and sight-threatening disease. Four different grades have been described. Anterior chamber optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging technique allowing the visualization of the anterior segment. The purpose of our study was to describe the appearance of the different neovascular glaucoma grades with the OCT in order to refine the clinical analysis of this disease. Eleven patients (nine men and two women) with different grades of neovascular glaucoma were analyzed in this study. Neovascular glaucoma complicated central retinal vein occlusion in seven patients and diabetic retinopathy in four patients. All patients had bilateral biomicroscopical examination and OCT analysis. OCT images and clinical examination were then compared. No modifications could be observed using OCT in patients with grade 1 neovascular glaucoma. For grade 2, a slightly hyper-reflective linear iris secondary to neovascularization was observed. For grade 3, OCT images showed a thickened hyper-reflective iridocorneal angle with possible iridocorneal synechiae. For grade 4, the iridocorneal angle was closed and associated with iris contraction and uveae ectropion. OCT is a new promising technique for the precise analysis of different grades of neovascular glaucoma. It certainly helps in the management of such cases.

  12. Changes of Radial Diffusivity and Fractional Anisotopy in the Optic Nerve and Optic Radiation of Glaucoma Patients

    Tobias Engelhorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study was to evaluate with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI changes of radial diffusivity (RD and fractional anisotropy (FA in the optic nerve (ON and optic radiation (OR in glaucoma and to determine whether changes in RD and FA correlate with disease severity. Therefore, glaucoma patients and controls were examined using 3T. Regions of interest were positioned on RD and FA maps, and mean values were calculated for ON and OR and correlated with optic nerve atrophy and reduced spatial-temporal contrast sensitivity (STCS of the retina. We found, that RD in glaucoma patients was significantly higher in the ON (0.74 ± 0.21 versus 0.58 ± 0.17⋅10−3 mm2 s−1; P0.77. In conclusion, DTI at 3 Tesla allows robust RD and FA measurements in the ON and OR. Hereby, the extent of RD increase and FA decrease in glaucoma correlate with established ophthalmological examinations.

  13. Effect of laser UV radiation on the eye scleral tissue in patients with open-angle glaucoma

    Razhev, A. M.; Iskakov, I. A.; Churkin, D. S.; Orishich, A. M.; Maslov, N. A.; Tsibul'skaya, E. O.; Lomzov, A. A.; Ermakova, O. V.; Trunov, A. N.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2018-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of the effect of short-pulse laser UV radiation on the eye scleral tissue. As samples, we used isolated flaps of the eye scleral tissue from the patients with open-angle glaucoma of the second and third stages. The impact was implemented using the radiation of an excimer XeCl laser with a wavelength of 308 nm and a laser with a wavelength tunable within from 210 to 355 nm. Depending on the problem to be solved, the energy density on the surface of the irradiated tissue varied from a fraction of mJ cm-2 to 15 J cm-2. For the first time we studied the optical properties of the intraocular fluid in the UV and blue spectral range. The study of the ablation process under the action of radiation with a wavelength of 308 nm showed that the rate of material evaporation can vary within 24%–30% at an energy density above 7 J cm-2, depending on the glaucoma stage and the individual features of a patient. The excitation–emission matrices of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the eye scleral tissue were studied experimentally using a laser with a wavelength tuned in the range 210–355 nm. We found the differences in the LIF spectra caused by the excitation wavelength and the openangle glaucoma stage.

  14. Glaucoma Symptoms

    ... up You can help find a cure for glaucoma Give now Signs & Symptoms The most common types ... have completely different symptoms. Symptoms of Open-Angle Glaucoma Most people who develop open-angle glaucoma don’ ...

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy

    ... pregnancy may have rapid onset or worsening of diabetic retinopathy. Symptoms and Detection What are the symptoms of diabetic retinopathy and ... with diabetes protect their vision? Vision lost to diabetic retinopathy is ... However, early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of blindness ...

  16. Facts about Glaucoma

    ... Information » Glaucoma » Facts About Glaucoma Listen Facts About Glaucoma This information was developed by the National Eye ... is the best person to answer specific questions. Glaucoma Defined What is Glaucoma? Glaucoma is a group ...

  17. Glaucoma: Symptoms and Causes

    ... types of glaucoma include the following: Open-angle glaucoma Open-angle glaucoma is the most common form ... re even aware of a problem. Angle-closure glaucoma Angle-closure glaucoma, also called closed-angle glaucoma, ...

  18. Palladium-103 plaque radiation therapy for ciliary body melanoma through a functioning glaucoma filtering bleb.

    Pathan, Arif H K; Barash, Alexander; Tena, Lawrence B; Finger, Paul T

    2018-01-01

    To provide a clinical description of the long-term outcome of a 103 Pd plaque-irradiated ciliary body melanoma with extrascleral extension while attempting to preserve a subadjacent glaucoma filtering bleb. A 75-year-old woman with pseudoexfoliative glaucoma for 17 years, 16 years status post argon laser trabeculoplasty, and 15 years status post trabeculectomy in the left eye, was diagnosed with an ipsilateral ciliary body melanoma with visible extrascleral extension. Treatment involved insertion of a 103 Pd radioactive plaque over the functioning trabeculectomy, with removal 7 days later. At plaque insertion, amniotic membrane grafts were used to cover the plaque and protect the filtering site. The tumor was successfully treated without clinical evidence of harm to the filtering bleb, with resultant stable intraocular pressure. However, the patient developed blebitis 1.5 years later. Though it resolved with topical antibiotic therapy, the bleb became less succulent. Two years postoperatively, she developed a spontaneous hyphema that resolved after one injection of transscleral bevacizumab 1.25 mg. Her tumor continually regressed in thickness. Without additional glaucoma surgery, her intraocular pressure remained well-controlled on topical medications for 6 years. Ciliary body melanoma with minimal extrascleral extension beneath a functioning filtering bleb can be treated using radioactive plaque therapy. In this case, we were able to achieve both tumor regression and glaucoma control by covering the plaque with an amniotic membrane graft.

  19. Glaucoma (image)

    Glaucoma is a condition of increased fluid pressure inside the eye. The increased pressure causes compression of ... nerve which can eventually lead to nerve damage. Glaucoma can cause partial vision loss, with blindness as ...

  20. Glaucoma Foundation

    ... Options: SIZE CONTRAST Search Home About TGF About Glaucoma About Exfoliation Syndrome Research Center Contact Us Get ... tear glands, and a common preservative in many glaucoma medications can worsen the symptoms. The main treatment ...

  1. Glaucoma Research Foundation

    ... born with glaucoma. Read her story » Learn About Glaucoma Glaucoma is a complicated disease in which damage ... Christopher doesn't ever want to go blind » Glaucoma 360 Glaucoma 360 — three days of events uniting ...

  2. A link between diabetes mellitus and glaucoma

    Horwitz, A.; Petrovski, B.E; Petrovski, G.

    2016-01-01

    -year follow-up period. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for glaucoma medication and anti-diabetic drugs. Comorbidities with diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy were identified using the ICD-10 classification......-diabetic drugs at any time during the study period had a significantly higher overall relative risk of glaucoma (RR = 5.11, p age, gender, diabetic retinopathies and calendar year-fixed effects (RR = 2.05, p ... of glaucoma overall, while treatment with β-blocker and RAS, in combination, are associated with a significantly lower risk (HR = 0.87). Conclusions Use of anti-diabetic drugs is strongly associated with use of anti-glaucomatous drugs. Diabetic complication as well as concomitant antihypertensive medications...

  3. Clinical Metabolomics and Glaucoma.

    Barbosa-Breda, João; Himmelreich, Uwe; Ghesquière, Bart; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2018-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide. However, there are no biomarkers that accurately help clinicians perform an early diagnosis or detect patients with a high risk of progression. Metabolomics is the study of all metabolites in an organism, and it has the potential to provide a biomarker. This review summarizes the findings of metabolomics in glaucoma patients and explains why this field is promising for new research. We identified published studies that focused on metabolomics and ophthalmology. After providing an overview of metabolomics in ophthalmology, we focused on human glaucoma studies. Five studies have been conducted in glaucoma patients and all compared patients to healthy controls. Using mass spectrometry, significant differences were found in blood plasma in the metabolic pathways that involve palmitoylcarnitine, sphingolipids, vitamin D-related compounds, and steroid precursors. For nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a high glutamine-glutamate/creatine ratio was found in the vitreous and lateral geniculate body; no differences were detected in the optic radiations, and a lower N-acetylaspartate/choline ratio was observed in the geniculocalcarine and striate areas. Metabolomics can move glaucoma care towards a personalized approach and provide new knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of glaucoma, which can lead to new therapeutic options. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Equine Glaucoma.

    Michau, Tammy Miller

    2017-12-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial neurodegenerative ocular disease leading to progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons that form the optic nerve, causing blindness. Knowledge of the pathogenesis and development of equine glaucoma is in its infancy compared with human glaucoma. Glaucoma occurs most commonly secondary to uveitis and may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed in horses suffering from uveitis. Recognition and clinical diagnosis of glaucoma in the horse is improved with clinician awareness and the availability of handheld tonometers. Therapy for glaucoma is aimed at decreasing aqueous humor production through medical and surgical means. Even with therapy, long-term prognosis for vision is poor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A preliminary study on visual cortex and optic radiation with diabetic retinopathy by 1H-MR spectroscopy

    Zhang Xiang; Li Baoqing; Hong Hai; Chen Ping; Chen Jukun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the metabolic change of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) in the visual cortex and optic radiation region of patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods: 1 H-MRS was performed in 20 patients with DR and 20 healthy volunteers on GE 1.5 T MR system respectively. Metabolic peaks of N-acetylasparte (NAA), creatine (Cr, in 3.02 and 3.94 ppm), choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (mi) were observed, and the ratios were analyzed by each other. Independent-samples t test was performed between two sets of data. Results: In both visual cortex and optic radiation, the ratios of mI/Cr and mI/Cr sec in DR group (0.664±0.052 and 1.453± 0.068 in visual cortex, 0.717±0.074 and 1.484±0.114 in optic radiation) were significant higher than those in normal group (0.602±0.047 and 1.249±0.044 in visual cortex, 0.679±0.075 and 1.334± 0.089 in optic radiation, P sec /Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr in visual cortex and optic radiation were 0.458±0.043 and 0.488±0.052, 0.481±0.057 and 0.807±0.110, 1.633±0.105 and 1.709±0.140 respectively. In control group, the ratios of those were 0.484±0.041 and 0.502±0.056, 0.471±0.065 and 0.786±0.109, 1.625±0.098 and 1.716±0.135 respectively. The ratios of Cr sec /Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr had no statistic difference between two groups (P sec is a typical change in the visual cortex and optic radiation region, 1 H-MRS as a noninvasive examination could provide biochemical and metabolic informations for diabetic patients. (authors)

  6. What Is Glaucoma?

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Glaucoma Sections What Is Glaucoma? What Are the Symptoms ... Diagnosis Glaucoma Treatment Glaucoma Vision Simulator What Is Glaucoma? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es el glaucoma? Written ...

  7. Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy.

    Yusuf, I H; Sharma, S; Luqmani, R; Downes, S M

    2017-06-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ; Plaquenil) is used increasingly in the management of a variety of autoimmune disorders, with well established roles in dermatology and rheumatology and emerging roles in oncology. Hydroxychloroquine has demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus; some clinicians advocate its use in all such patients. However, Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine (CQ) have been associated with irreversible visual loss due to retinal toxicity. Hydroxychloroquine retinal toxicity is far more common than previously considered; an overall prevalence of 7.5% was identified in patients taking HCQ for greater than 5 years, rising to almost 20% after 20 years of treatment. This review aims to provide an update on HCQ/CQ retinopathy. We summarise emerging treatment indications and evidence of efficacy in systemic disease, risk factors for retinopathy, prevalence among HCQ users, diagnostic tests, and management of HCQ retinopathy. We highlight emerging risk factors such as tamoxifen use, and new guidance on safe dosing, reversing the previous recommendation to use ideal body weight, rather than actual body weight. We summarise uncertainties and the recommendations made by existing HCQ screening programmes. Asian patients with HCQ retinopathy may demonstrate an extramacular or pericentral pattern of disease; visual field testing and retinal imaging should include a wider field for screening in this group. HCQ is generally safe and effective for the treatment of systemic disease but because of the risk of HCQ retinal toxicity, modern screening methods and ideal dosing should be implemented. Guidelines regarding optimal dosing and screening regarding HCQ need to be more widely disseminated.

  8. What Is Diabetic Retinopathy?

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  9. Glaucoma, Open-Angle

    ... Home » Statistics and Data » Glaucoma, Open-angle Listen Glaucoma, Open-angle Open-angle Glaucoma Defined In open-angle glaucoma, the fluid passes ... 2010 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Glaucoma by Age and Race/Ethnicity The prevalence of ...

  10. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Symptoms, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... vision, without any pain. Photo courtesy of NEI Glaucoma Symptoms At first, open-angle glaucoma has no ...

  11. Get Tested for Glaucoma!

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Get Tested for Glaucoma! Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Taylor ... aoa.org/ When were you finally diagnosed with glaucoma? Not until 1969, after a game of basketball. ...

  12. Diabetic retinopathy

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  13. Monitoring dynamics of aqueous humor in glaucoma

    Vyborny, P.; Hornova, J.

    1985-01-01

    Aqueous humor dynamics was observed in patients treated for glaucoma. Aqueous flow was measured using the radionuclide method of contact application of 22 NaCl and the detection of gamma radiation with external detectors. The sample of 184 eyes was divided into three groups: open-angle glaucoma with therapy, open-angle glaucoma without therapy and angle-closure glaucoma 47 eyes were used as controls. Changes were observed in 22 Na outflow half-time in dependence on the duration of the disease, therapy, intraocular pressUre and changes in the perimeter. The new technique has been fully proven in practice, is a contribution to the diagnosis of glaucoma and an indicator of the compensation of the disease. (author)

  14. Quality assurance for diabetic retinopathy telescreening.

    Schneider, S; Aldington, S J; Kohner, E M; Luzio, S; Owens, D R; Schmidt, V; Schuell, H; Zahlmann, G

    2005-06-01

    TOSCA was an EU-Commission supported international research project designed to develop telescreening services in diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper describes the quality assurance methods developed for the diabetic retinopathy telescreening service within the TOSCA project. The study was performed in 1895 patients with diabetes between 2000 and 2002 at diabetic retinopathy screening sites in five European countries. Data were analysed centrally. Patients attending each clinic's diabetic retinopathy screening service received standardized retinal photography. The images and associated data were transferred electronically to a remote location for grading. Each photographer uploading images and each grader downloading images for assessment was controlled by a systematic quality management approach. The quality assurance measures defined were image quality, intragrader reliability. A cockpit chart was developed for the management and presentation of relevant results and quality measures. For the intragrader reliability tests, 10% of the images were processed for a second grading. An algorithm for calculating differences between repeated gradings was developed. The assessment of image quality for the different sites showed that only 0-0.7% were unassessable. One hundred per cent agreement for both gradings was achieved in 50-85% of graded cases, depending on site and grader, and an agreement better than 95% in 71-100% of cases. A telemedicine-supported quality assurance process is practical and advantageous. The cockpit charts have proven to be useful tools when monitoring the performance of a telescreening service. Grader feedback showed high satisfaction with the quality assurance process.

  15. Hypertensive retinopathy (image)

    ... retina from high blood pressure is called hypertensive retinopathy. It occurs as the existing high blood pressure ... flame hemorrhages and cotton wool spots. As hypertensive retinopathy progresses, hard exudates can appear around the macula ...

  16. Nondiabetic retinal pathology - prevalence in diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Nielsen, Nathan; Jackson, Claire; Spurling, Geoffrey; Cranstoun, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of photographic signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology in Australian general practice patients with diabetes. Three hundred and seven patients with diabetes underwent retinal photography at two general practices, one of which was an indigenous health centre. The images were assessed for signs of pathology by an ophthalmologist. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were detected in 31% of subjects with adequate photographs. Features suspicious of glaucoma were detected in 7.7% of subjects. Other abnormalities detected included signs of age related macular degeneration (1.9%), epiretinal membranes (2.4%), vascular pathology (9.6%), chorioretinal lesions (2.9%), and congenital disc anomalies (2.9%). Indigenous Australian patients were more likely to have signs of retinal pathology and glaucoma. Signs of nondiabetic retinal pathology were frequently encountered. In high risk groups, general practice based diabetic retinopathy screening may reduce the incidence of preventable visual impairment, beyond the benefits of detection of diabetic retinopathy alone.

  17. A comparison of dose-response characteristics of four NTCP models using outcomes of radiation-induced optic neuropathy and retinopathy

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Song, William Y; Mell, Loren K; Bhandare, Niranjan

    2011-01-01

    Biological models are used to relate the outcome of radiation therapy to dose distribution. As use of biological models in treatment planning expands, uncertainties associated with the use of specific models for predicting outcomes should be understood and quantified. In particular, the question to what extent model predictions are data-driven or dependent on the choice of the model has to be explored. Four dose-response models--logistic, log-logistic, Poisson-based and probit--were tested for their ability and consistency in describing dose-response data for radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) and retinopathy (RIRP). Dose to the optic nerves was specified as the minimum dose, D min , received by any segment of the organ to which the damage was diagnosed by ophthalmologic evaluation. For retinopathy, the dose to the retina was specified as the highest isodose covering at least 1/3 of the retinal surface (D 33% ) that geometrically covered the observed retinal damage. Data on both complications were modeled separately for patients treated once daily and twice daily. Model parameters D 50 and γ and corresponding confidence intervals were obtained using maximum-likelihood method. Model parameters were reasonably consistent for RION data for patients treated once daily, D 50 ranging from 94.2 to 104.7 Gy and γ from 0.88 to 1.41. Similar consistency was seen for RIRP data which span a broad range of complication incidence, with D 50 from 72.2 to 75.0 Gy and γ from 1.51 to 2.16 for patients treated twice daily; 72.2-74.0 Gy and 0.84-1.20 for patients treated once daily. However, large variations were observed for RION in patients treated twice daily, D 50 from 96.3 to 125.2 Gy and γ from 0.80 to 1.56. Complication incidence in this dataset in any dose group did not exceed 20%. For the considered data sets, the log-logistic model tends to lead to larger D 50 and lower γ compared to other models for all datasets. Statements regarding normal tissue

  18. Glaucoma in Asian Populations

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Glaucoma In Asian Populations email Send this article to ... lower than in their Asian counterparts. Normal Tension Glaucoma affects Japanese Japanese populations, however, have a substantially ...

  19. African Americans and Glaucoma

    ... Us Donate In This Section African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to a friend by ... and eventually, in developing more effective treatments. Does glaucoma treatment differ? Although treatment varies for all individuals, ...

  20. Screening for Glaucoma

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Glaucoma The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Glaucoma . This final recommendation statement ...

  1. Five Common Glaucoma Tests

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Five Common Glaucoma Tests en Español email Send this article to ... year or two after age 35. A Comprehensive Glaucoma Exam To be safe and accurate, five factors ...

  2. Opportunistic detection of glaucomatous optic discs within a diabetic retinopathy screening service.

    Treacy, Maxwell P; O'Neill, Evelyn C; Murphy, Melissa; O'Toole, Louise; Delaney, Yvonne; O'Brien, Colm; Connell, Paul P

    2016-06-10

    To determine the prevalence of glaucoma among patients referred to a glaucoma service with suspicious disc photographs from the diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening program. A clinical audit of all patients attending a single-center DR screening program in the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, between July 2010 and October 2011 was conducted with a minimum follow-up of 30 months. The DR screening service uses trained technician graders to assess 2-field color retinal photographs for the features of DR. Recently, the service was enhanced so that optic discs are also assessed for signs of glaucoma. In the 16-month study period, 3,697 diabetic patients were photographed. Following photograph grading, 91 (2.46%) were judged to require referral for assessment at the glaucoma clinic. Of these, 63 (69.23%) presented for assessment. Thirteen patients (20.63%) were diagnosed with glaucoma, comprising 7 cases of low-tension glaucoma and 6 cases of primary open-angle glaucoma. Thirty-six patients (57.14%) were classified as glaucoma suspects and 14 patients (22.22%) were discharged back to the DR screening program following normal ocular examination. Only 6 (9.52%) of the 63 patients examined had an intraocular pressure greater than 21 mm Hg. The assessment of DR screening photographs for signs of glaucomatous optic nerve damage should be considered as part of a strategy to improve glaucoma case detection and to reduce the burden of this disease on society.

  3. VEGF concentration in aqueous humor and its significance to radiation retinopathy%放射性视网膜病变患者房水中VEGF的浓度及其临床意义

    刘清云; 李加青; 袁玲; 李涛; 李建桥; 胡旭颋; 唐仕波

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究放射性视网膜病变(Radiation Retinopathy)患者房水中血管内皮生长因子(Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor.VEGF)的浓度,明确其对发病的意义.方法 选择2007年3月至2009年3月就诊的放射性视网膜病变患者4例8只眼,增殖性糖尿病性视网膜病变(Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathv,PDR)9名患者10只眼,在行玻璃体腔注入Bevcizumab(1.5mg)治疗前分别抽取100μl前房水;年龄相关性白内障患者10例10只眼,在超声乳化白内障吸除术前,分别抽取lOOμl前房水,所有房水样本均用酶联免疫吸附试验(Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay,ELISA)检测VEGF浓度.用Kruskal-Wallis H检验对三组患者术前房水中VEGF浓度进行分析,用Mann-Whitney U分别比较三组之间的差异,以P<0.05为差异有统计学意义.结果 放射性视网膜病变与PDR患者房水中VEGF浓度无显著性差异,二者均显著高于白内障患者房水中VEGF水平.结论 放射性视网膜病变患者房水中VEGF浓度显著升高,VEGF可能是引起放射性视网膜病变的重要因素.%Objective To investigate VEGF concentration in aqueous humor and its significance to radiation retinopathy. Methods Patients with radiation retinopathy totally 8 eyes of 4 patients and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) totally 10 eyes of 9 patients from March 2007 to March 2009 came to our hospital were included. Aqueous humor from all these patients was collected before intravitreally injection of Bevacizumab (1.5mg). Ten eyes of 10 age-related cataracts were as controls. Aqueous humor was collected before phacomulcification in cataract patients. VEGF concentrations were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). VEGF concentrations were compared with Kruskal-Wallis H test among three groups. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the differences between two of them. For all statistical tests, P<0.05 was considered significant. Results There was no significant difference between

  4. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of Nonmydriatic Fundus Photography for the Detection of Glaucoma in Diabetic Patients

    Francisco J. Muñoz-Negrete

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the diagnostic accuracy for glaucoma of a set of criteria with nonmydriatic monoscopic fundus photography (NMFP in diabetics. Methods. Diabetics recruited from a screening program for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic glaucoma patients recruited from our glaucoma unit were included. Any patient with evidence of diabetic retinopathy was excluded. Diabetic patients had to have no visual field defects to be included as controls. Glaucoma patients had to have a glaucomatous field defect in at least one eye to be included. One NMFP was taken per eye for all subjects. These photographs were evaluated by two masked glaucoma specialists for the presence of the following: bilateral cup to disc (C/D ratio ≥0.6, notching or thinning of the neuroretinal rim, disc hemorrhages, and asymmetry in the C/D ratio between both eyes ≥0.2. This evaluation led to a dichotomous classification: if any of the above criteria was present, the patient was classified as glaucoma. If none were present, the patient was classified as normal. Results. 72 control subjects and 72 glaucoma patients were included. Evaluation of NMFP had a sensitivity of 79.17% and a specificity of 80.56% for specialist 1 and a sensitivity of 72.22% and a specificity of 88.88% for specialist 2 for the detection of glaucoma. The overall accuracy was 79.83% and 80.55%, respectively. Discussion. NMFP evaluation by a glaucoma specialist may be useful for the detection of glaucoma in diabetics.

  6. Glaucoma Medication Preferences among Glaucoma Specialists in Mexico

    Lazcano-Gomez, Gabriel; Alvarez-Ascencio, Daniela; Haro-Zuno, Cindy; Turati-Acosta, Mauricio; Garcia-Huerta, Magdalena; Jimenez-Arroyo, Jesus; Castañeda-Diez, Rafael; Castillejos-Chevez, Armando; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Dominguez-Dueñas, Francisca; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine the glaucoma specialists’ preferences for the different brands of topical glaucoma medications available in Mexico. Materials and methods A web-based survey was sent to 150 board-certified glaucoma specialists in Mexico, with 14 questions related to brand preferences for all glaucoma medications available in Mexico. Participants were asked to select each glaucoma medication class by brand and to state the factors leading to their choice. Results Data from 111 (74%) glaucoma s...

  7. Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Steinweg, Sue Byrd; Griffin, Harold C.; Griffin, Linda W.; Gingras, Happy

    2005-01-01

    The eyes of premature infants are especially vulnerable to injury after birth. A serious complication is called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is abnormal growth of the blood vessels in an infant's eye. Retinopathy of prematurity develops when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, which is the nerve tissue at the…

  8. Update on the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Jennifer L. Wilkinson-Berka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy is the most feared complication of diabetes, compromising quality of life in most sufferers. Almost all patients with type 1 diabetes will develop retinopathy over a 15- to 20-year period, and approximately 20–30% will advance to the blinding stage of the disease[1]. Greater than 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes will have retinopathy. This situation is highlighted by the frightening statistic that diabetic retinopathy (DR remains the most common cause of vision impairment in people of working age in Western society. With the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, this predicament is set to worsen as over 360 million people are projected to suffer from diabetes and its complications by 2030. Vision loss from diabetes is due to a number of factors, including haemorrhage from new and poorly formed blood vessels, retinal detachment due to contraction of deposited fibrous tissue, and neovascular glaucoma resulting in an increase in intraocular pressure. Diabetic macular oedema is now the principal cause of vision loss in diabetes and involves leakage from a disrupted blood-retinal barrier. In terms of treatment, there is clear evidence that strict metabolic and blood pressure control can lower the risk of developing DR and reduce disease progression. Laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy are effective in preventing severe vision loss in DR, particularly in the most advanced stages of the disease. However, both procedures have limitations. This review examines evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that shows that targeting inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids, protein kinase C, growth hormone, and advanced glycation end-products are potential treatments for DR.

  9. Proliferative retinopathy predicts nephropathy

    Karlberg, Charlotte; Falk, Christine; Green, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to examine proliferative retinopathy as a marker of incident nephropathy in a 25-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients and to examine cross-sectional associations between nephropathy and retinopathy in long-term surviving patients of the same...... cohort. All type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, were identified as of 1 July 1973. One hundred and eighty four patients were examined in 1981-1982 (baseline) and in 2007-2008 (follow-up). The level of retinopathy was graded by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and nine-field digital colour fundus...... and proliferative retinopathy, respectively. In conclusion, proliferative retinopathy is an independent marker of long-term nephropathy in type 1 diabetes. Upcoming studies should examine whether these microvascular complications are also causally linked in type 1 diabetes....

  10. Prevalence of blindness and diabetic retinopathy in northern Jordan.

    Rabiu, Mansur M; Al Bdour, Muawyah D; Abu Ameerh, Mohammed A; Jadoon, Muhammed Z

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of blindness, visual impairment, diabetes, and diabetic retinopathy in north Jordan (Irbid) using the rapid assessment of avoidable blindness and diabetic retinopathy methodology. A multistage cluster random sampling technique was used to select participants for this survey. A total of 108 clusters were selected using probability proportional to size method while subjects within the clusters were selected using compact segment method. Survey teams moved from house to house in selected segments examining residents 50 years and older until 35 participants were recruited. All eligible people underwent a standardized examination protocol, which included ophthalmic examination and random blood sugar test using digital glucometers (Accu-Chek) in their homes. Diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients was assessed through dilated fundus examination. A total of 3638 out of the 3780 eligible participants were examined. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of blindness, severe visual impairment, and visual impairment with available correction were 1.33% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.73), 1.82% (95% CI 1.35-2.25), and 9.49% (95% CI 8.26-10.74), respectively, all higher in women. Untreated cataract and diabetic retinopathy were the major causes of blindness, accounting for 46.7% and 33.2% of total blindness cases, respectively. Glaucoma was the third major cause, accounting for 8.9% of cases. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 28.6% (95% CI 26.9-30.3) among the study population and higher in women. The prevalence of any retinopathy among diabetic patients was 48.4%. Cataract and diabetic retinopathy are the 2 major causes of blindness and visual impairment in northern Jordan. For both conditions, women are primarily affected, suggesting possible limitations to access to services. A diabetic retinopathy screening program needs to proactively create sex-sensitive awareness and provide easily accessible screening services with prompt treatment.

  11. Clinical effect of neovascular glaucoma treated by vitrectomy and cyclophotocoagulation

    Yi-Xuan Jin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the postoperative intraocular pressure(IOPand operation safety in the eyes of the neovascular glaucoma pateints treated by intraocular cyclophotocoagulation which needed vitrectomy at the same time. METHODS: A total of 12 neovascular glaucoma cases(14 eyessecondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment surgery and trauma were reviewed in our study. This procedure mainly used intraocular photocoagulation catheter to highlight the ciliary processes until the ciliary became white atrophy or plosion after vitreous surgery treatment. The intraocular photocoagulation catheter was performed at a power of 300-500mW, for a duration of 0.1-0.2ms. Postoperative follow-up was at least for 6mo. The observation of 14 postoperative neovascular glaucoma was performed at 1wk, 1, 6mo observing the IOP and complications. RESULTS: IOP of the 11 eyes was significantly declined and controlled in normal. After cyclophotocoagulation, average IOP at 1wk was 16.7±14.4mmHg, 15.7±8.8mmHg at 1mo and 12.9±4.5mmHg at 6mo, which compared with untreatment(39.6 ±10.0mmHgwas statistically significant different(PCONCLUSION: The intraocular cyclophotocoagulation and vitrectomy simultaneously can deal with the primary disease and secondary neovascular glaucoma. The operation can be accurately performed under direct cyclophotocoagulation and it is a safe and effective way for neovascular glaucoma which needs vitreous surgery.

  12. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Jenkins, Alicia J.; Joglekar, Mugdha V.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Keech, Anthony C.; O'Neal, David N.; Januszewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  13. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  14. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    R. Sivakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker.

  15. [Diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy.

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Rasmussen, K.L.; Laugesen, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to evaluate the prevalence and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dilated fundal photography was performed at approximately 10 and 28 gestational weeks in 58 and 18 women with type 1 and type...... 2 diabetes, respectively. Retinopathy was classified as five stages +/- macular oedema. Progression was defined as deterioration corresponding to at least one stage between the two examinations. Clinical parameters were obtained from the medical records. RESULTS: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 36...... (62%) women with type 1 and three (17%) with type 2 diabetes at the first examination. In 26 (34%) retinopathy progressed; four women developed proliferations, three macular oedema and three reduction of visual acuity >/=0.2 on Snellen's chart in at least one eye. HbA1c in early pregnancy was the only...

  16. [Music and Glaucoma].

    Plange, N

    2017-02-01

    Music may have multiple influences on the human organism. A possible therapeutic effect for patients with glaucoma has been postulated, aside from the known impact of music on the cardiovascular system, psychogenic effects and a short-term improvement in mental performance (Mozart effect). The higher level of mental stress in patients with glaucoma and type-A personality behaviour may be related to higher intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma. Relaxing music may have a positive impact in these patients, related to a reduction in intraocular pressure or its fluctuations. However, only limited data exist on the effects of music on intraocular pressure. No clinical studies have yet been performed to investigate the effect of music or music therapy on glaucoma progression. The music of Mozart may influence visual field examinations, possibly due to a positive short term effect on mental performance. This factor needs to be addressed in studies dealing with the effect of music in glaucoma. The relevance of intraocular pressure increases in professional wind instrument players is controversial. An increased level of care might be advisable in patients with advanced glaucoma. The influences of music on humans, altered personality profiles in patients with glaucoma and the studies showing some effect of stress on intraocular pressure stress the relevance of psychological support for glaucoma patients, who are confronted with a disease with a high longterm risk of blindness. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Nanotechnology Applications for Glaucoma.

    Cetinel, Sibel; Montemagno, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, and the antiglaucoma treatments currently available suffer from various complications. Nanotechnology-based treatments show a great deal of promise in overcoming these complications and form the basis for next-generation glaucoma treatment strategies, with the help of applications such as controlled release, targeted delivery, increased bioavailability, diffusion limitations, and biocompatibility. Significant progress has been made in nanomedicine in the efficiency of antiglaucoma medications, nanofabrication systems such as microelectromechanical systems that remove the limitations of nanodevices, and tissue regeneration vesicles for developing glaucoma treatments not based on intraocular pressure. With the use of these advanced technologies, the prevention of glaucoma-induced blindness will be possible in the near future. Herein, we reviewed the recent advances in nanotechnology-based treatment strategies for glaucoma.

  18. Glaucoma: Screening Can Save Your Sight!

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Screening Can Save Your Sight! Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents People with glaucoma see the world through a tunnel. Glaucoma is ...

  19. Retinopathy after low dose irradiation for an intracranial tumor of the frontal lobe

    Elsaas, T.; Thorud, E.; Jetne, V.; Conradi, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    A 32-year-old man underwent an operation for an oligodendroglioma of the left frontal lobe. Postoperatively he was irradiated to a target dose of 54 Gy. One year later hedeveloped bilateral retinopathy quite similar to diabetic retinopathy. There were no clinical or biochemical signs of diabetes or hematological disease. The calcultated maximum dose to the retina was 11 Gy. This is to our knowledge the lowest retinal dose of ionizing radiation reported to produce retinopathy. (author)

  20. Daily Life with Glaucoma

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  1. Glaucoma in developing countries

    Ravi Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the background and strategy required for the prevention of blindness from glaucoma in developing countries. Materials and Methods: Extrapolation of existing data and experience in eye care delivery and teaching models in an unequally developed country (India are used to make recommendations. Results: Parameters like population attributable risk percentage indicate that glaucoma is a public health problem but lack of simple diagnostic techniques and therapeutic interventions are barriers to any effective plan. Case detection rather than population-based screening is the recommended strategy for detection. Population awareness of the disease is low and most patients attending eye clinics do not receive a routine comprehensive eye examination that is required to detect glaucoma (and other potentially blinding eye diseases. Such a routine is not taught or practiced by the majority of training institutions either. Angle closure can be detected clinically and relatively simple interventions (including well performed cataract surgery can prevent blindness from this condition. The strategy for open angle glaucoma should focus on those with established functional loss. Outcomes of this proposed strategy are not yet available. Conclusions: Glaucoma cannot be managed in isolation. The objective should be to detect and manage all potential causes of blindness and prevention of blindness from glaucoma should be integrated into existing programs. The original pyramidal model of eye care delivery incorporates this principle and provides an initial starting point. The routine of comprehensive eye examination in every clinic and its teaching (and use in residency programs is mandatory for the detection and management of potentially preventable blinding pathology from any cause, including glaucoma. Programs for detection of glaucoma should not be initiated unless adequate facilities for diagnosis and surgical intervention are in place and

  2. Glaucoma after corneal replacement.

    Baltaziak, Monika; Chew, Hall F; Podbielski, Dominik W; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    Glaucoma is a well-known complication after corneal transplantation surgery. Traditional corneal transplantation surgery, specifically penetrating keratoplasty, has been slowly replaced by the advent of new corneal transplantation procedures: primarily lamellar keratoplasties. There has also been an emergence of keratoprosthesis implants for eyes that are high risk of failure with penetrating keratoplasty. Consequently, there are different rates of glaucoma, pathogenesis, and potential treatment in the form of medical, laser, or surgical therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Arginase in Retinopathy

    Narayanan, S. Priya; Rojas, Modesto; Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Toque, Haroldo A.; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic retinopathies, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinopathy of prematurity and retinal vein occlusion are a major cause of blindness in developed nations worldwide. Each of these conditions is associated with early neurovascular dysfunction. However, conventional therapies target clinically significant macula edema or neovascularization, which occur much later. Intraocular injections of anti-VEGF show promise in reducing retinal edema, but the effects are usually transient and the need for repeated injections increases the risk of intraocular infection. Laser photocoagulation can control pathological neovascularization, but may impair vision and in some patients the retinopathy continues to progress. Moreover, neither treatment targets early stage disease or promotes repair. This review examines the potential role of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic retinopathy. Arginase metabolizes L-arginine to form proline, polyamines and glutamate. Excessive arginase activity reduces the L-arginine supply for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), causing it to become uncoupled and produce superoxide and less NO. Superoxide and NO react and form the toxic oxidant peroxynitrite. The catabolic products of polyamine oxidation and glutamate can induce more oxidative stress and DNA damage, both of which can cause cellular injury. Studies indicate that neurovascular injury during retinopathy is associated with increased arginase expression/activity, decreased NO, polyamine oxidation, formation of superoxide and peroxynitrite and dysfunction and injury of both vascular and neural cells. Furthermore, data indicate that the cytosolic isoform arginase I (AI) is involved in hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction and injury of vascular endothelial cells whereas the mitochondrial isoform arginase II (AII) is involved in neurovascular dysfunction and death following hyperoxia exposure. Thus, we postulate that activation of the arginase

  4. Neuroprotection in glaucoma

    Azadeh Doozandeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice.

  5. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation in Vitrectomized Eyes

    Nimet Yeşim Erçalık

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV implantation in vitrectomized eyes. Materials and Methods. The medical records of 13 eyes that developed glaucoma due to emulsified silicon oil or neovascularization following pars plana vitrectomy and underwent AGV implantation were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcome measures were intraocular pressure (IOP, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, number of antiglaucoma medications, and postoperative complications. Surgical success was defined as last IOP ≤21 mmHg or ≥6 mmHg and without loss of light perception. Results. The mean follow-up duration was 11.7 ± 5.5 (range, 6–23 months. The mean IOP before the AGV implantation was 37.9 ± 6.7 mmHg with an average of 3.5 ± 1.2 drugs. At the final visit, the mean IOP was 15.9 ± 4.6 mmHg (p=0.001 and the mean number of glaucoma medications decreased to 2.3 ± 1.3 (p=0.021. At the last visit, 11 eyes (84.4% had stable or improved VA and one eye (7.7% had a final VA of no light perception. Surgical success was achieved in 11 of the 13 eyes (84.4%. Postoperative complications were bleb encapsulation (69.2%, early hypotony (38.5%, hyphema (23.1%, decompression retinopathy (23.1%, choroidal detachment (15.4%, intraocular hemorrhage (7.7%, and late endophthalmitis (7.7%. One eye (7.7% was enucleated because of late endophthalmitis. Conclusions. Despite complications necessitating medical and surgical interventions, vitrectomized eyes were effectively managed with AGV implantation.

  6. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation in Vitrectomized Eyes.

    Erçalık, Nimet Yeşim; İmamoğlu, Serhat

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in vitrectomized eyes. The medical records of 13 eyes that developed glaucoma due to emulsified silicon oil or neovascularization following pars plana vitrectomy and underwent AGV implantation were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcome measures were intraocular pressure (IOP), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), number of antiglaucoma medications, and postoperative complications. Surgical success was defined as last IOP ≤21 mmHg or ≥6 mmHg and without loss of light perception. The mean follow-up duration was 11.7 ± 5.5 (range, 6-23) months. The mean IOP before the AGV implantation was 37.9 ± 6.7 mmHg with an average of 3.5 ± 1.2 drugs. At the final visit, the mean IOP was 15.9 ± 4.6 mmHg ( p =0.001) and the mean number of glaucoma medications decreased to 2.3 ± 1.3 ( p =0.021). At the last visit, 11 eyes (84.4%) had stable or improved VA and one eye (7.7%) had a final VA of no light perception. Surgical success was achieved in 11 of the 13 eyes (84.4%). Postoperative complications were bleb encapsulation (69.2%), early hypotony (38.5%), hyphema (23.1%), decompression retinopathy (23.1%), choroidal detachment (15.4%), intraocular hemorrhage (7.7%), and late endophthalmitis (7.7%). One eye (7.7%) was enucleated because of late endophthalmitis. Despite complications necessitating medical and surgical interventions, vitrectomized eyes were effectively managed with AGV implantation.

  7. New Tool to Predict Glaucoma

    ... In This Section A New Tool to Predict Glaucoma email Send this article to a friend by ... Close Send Thanks for emailing that article! Tweet Glaucoma can be difficult to detect and diagnose. Measurement ...

  8. Does Your Child Have Glaucoma?

    ... Donate In This Section Does Your Child Have Glaucoma? email Send this article to a friend by ... a pediatric ophthalmologist. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Glaucoma What to watch for in children under the ...

  9. Does Marijuana Help Treat Glaucoma?

    ... time, reducing side vision. It sometimes leads to blindness. One cause of optic nerve damage in glaucoma ... high doses, can cause problems with short-term memory and concentration. As scientists learn more about glaucoma, ...

  10. Diabetic retinopathy in acromegaly

    Said Azzoug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although growth hormone (GH has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR, DR is deemed to be rare in patients with GH excess. Our aim was to study its prevalence in subjects with acromegaly suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM, to analyze its characteristics, and to look for predictive factors such as age at diagnosis, GH concentration and duration, DM duration, DM control, and family background. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with acromegaly and DM (21 males, 19 females, median age = 50 years, underwent a systematic ophthalmological examination with dilated funduscopy to seek diabetic retinopathy. Results: Among this population, 05 (12.5% had DR. It was at an early stage or background retinopathy in 3 cases and at a more advanced stage or proliferative retinopathy in 2 cases. We did not find any correlation with age at diagnosis, GH levels and duration, DM duration and family history of DM, but poor glycemic control seems to play a role although statistical analysis showed borderline significance. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that prevalence of DR in patients with acromegaly is 12.5%, and it is slight or moderate. Among studied factors, only poor glycemic control seems to be implicated in its development.

  11. Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Retinopathy Diagnosis Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Vision Simulator Non-Proliferative Diabetic ...

  12. [Uveitic Secondary Glaucoma].

    Lommatzsch, Claudia; Heinz, Carsten

    2018-05-01

    An intraocular pressure increase with development of glaucomatous damage is a common complication of uveitis. The prevalence has a wide range depending on various factors such as the underlying uveitis type and the duration of the disease. Pathogenetically, a distinction must be made between a secondary angle closure component and the more frequently occurring open-angle glaucoma. In diagnostics, in addition to the clinical optic nerve head assessment, perimetry and tonometry, the use of imaging examination equipment, such as OCT and HRT, are recommended. In the context of uveitic glaucoma, it must be considered in the evaluation, because the glaucoma-typical changes are generally less pronounced or can be concealed by retinal swelling in comparison with other forms of glaucoma. Therapeutically, drug therapy in the form of eye drops continues to be a first-line recommendation, with the use of topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors or beta-blockers primarily preferred, depending on the contraindications. An operative therapy follows after unsuccessful or inadequate conservative therapy: the adequate surgical technique depends on the respective finding and includes actually techniques such as filtering procedures and glaucoma drainage devices. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Development and Validation of a Deep Learning System for Diabetic Retinopathy and Related Eye Diseases Using Retinal Images From Multiethnic Populations With Diabetes.

    Ting, Daniel Shu Wei; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Lim, Gilbert; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Quang, Nguyen D; Gan, Alfred; Hamzah, Haslina; Garcia-Franco, Renata; San Yeo, Ian Yew; Lee, Shu Yen; Wong, Edmund Yick Mun; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Baskaran, Mani; Ibrahim, Farah; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Finkelstein, Eric A; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Ian Y; Bressler, Neil M; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Varma, Rohit; Jonas, Jost B; He, Ming Guang; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cheung, Gemmy Chui Ming; Aung, Tin; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong Li; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-12-12

    A deep learning system (DLS) is a machine learning technology with potential for screening diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases. To evaluate the performance of a DLS in detecting referable diabetic retinopathy, vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy, possible glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in community and clinic-based multiethnic populations with diabetes. Diagnostic performance of a DLS for diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases was evaluated using 494 661 retinal images. A DLS was trained for detecting diabetic retinopathy (using 76 370 images), possible glaucoma (125 189 images), and AMD (72 610 images), and performance of DLS was evaluated for detecting diabetic retinopathy (using 112 648 images), possible glaucoma (71 896 images), and AMD (35 948 images). Training of the DLS was completed in May 2016, and validation of the DLS was completed in May 2017 for detection of referable diabetic retinopathy (moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or worse) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or worse) using a primary validation data set in the Singapore National Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Program and 10 multiethnic cohorts with diabetes. Use of a deep learning system. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and sensitivity and specificity of the DLS with professional graders (retinal specialists, general ophthalmologists, trained graders, or optometrists) as the reference standard. In the primary validation dataset (n = 14 880 patients; 71 896 images; mean [SD] age, 60.2 [2.2] years; 54.6% men), the prevalence of referable diabetic retinopathy was 3.0%; vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy, 0.6%; possible glaucoma, 0.1%; and AMD, 2.5%. The AUC of the DLS for referable diabetic retinopathy was 0.936 (95% CI, 0.925-0.943), sensitivity was 90.5% (95% CI, 87.3%-93.0%), and specificity was 91.6% (95% CI, 91.0%-92.2%). For

  14. Trabeculectomy versus Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation in neovascular glaucoma

    Shen, Christopher C; Salim, Sarwat; Du, Haiming; Netland, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare surgical outcomes in neovascular glaucoma patients who underwent trabeculectomy with mitomycin C versus Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective comparative case series. We reviewed 40 eyes of 39 patients with underlying diagnosis of neovascular glaucoma, divided into two groups: Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (N = 20) and trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (N = 20). Surgical success was defined as 6 mm Hg ≤ intraocular pressure ≤21 mm Hg, with or without the use of glaucoma medications, with no further glaucoma surgery, and light perception or better vision. Early postoperative hypotony was defined as intraocular pressure Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group and 25 months (6–77 months) for the trabeculectomy group. Although the mean number of postoperative intraocular pressure-lowering medications was significantly higher in the trabeculectomy group compared with the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group at 3 and 6 month time points, there was no statistically significant difference at any other time point. There was no statistically significant difference between both groups in postoperative visual acuity and intraocular pressure. Success was 70% and 65% at 1 year and 60% and 55% at 2 years after Ahmed Glaucoma Valve and trabeculectomy, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival curve analysis showed no significant difference in success between the two groups (P = 0.815). Hyphema was the most common complication in both groups. Conclusion: We found similar results after trabeculectomy with mitomycin C and Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation in eyes with neovascular glaucoma. PMID:21468334

  15. Glaucoma treatment trends: a review.

    Conlon, Ronan; Saheb, Hady; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing. The aim of the present review is to describe the current medical and surgical treatment trends in the management of open-angle glaucoma. There has been an increase in the availability of glaucoma medications and the use of laser trabeculoplasty over the past decade, with a subsequent decrease in invasive incisional surgery. In addition, a new class of glaucoma procedures, termed microinvasive glaucoma surgery, has emerged, which aims to fill the gap between conservative medical management and more invasive surgery. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric glaucoma: current perspectives

    Marchini G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Marchini, Marco Toscani, Francesca Chemello Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Abstract: “Childhood glaucoma” is a heterogeneous group of severe pediatric conditions often associated with significant visual loss and characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP and optic-disk cupping. Successful IOP control is crucial but challenging and most often achieved surgically, with medical therapy playing a supportive role. There are many classifications of childhood glaucoma, but they can simply be divided into primary, in which a developmental abnormality of the anterior chamber angle only exists, and secondary, in which aqueous outflow is reduced due to independent mechanisms that secondarily impair the function of the filtration angle. The worldwide prevalence of childhood blindness ranges from 0.03% in high-income countries to 0.12% in undeveloped countries. The majority of cases do not have an identified genetic mutation and, where the mutation is known, the genes often account for only a small proportion of cases. Several pathogenetic mechanisms are known to contribute to the development of childhood glaucoma. Whatever the cause, it results in a reduced aqueous outflow at the level of the trabecular meshwork. Age of onset and magnitude of the elevated IOP largely determine the clinical manifestation the high variability of clinical manifestations. Glaucoma from any cause in a neonate and infant is characterized by the classic triad of epiphora, photophobia, and blepharospasm, and could be associated with eye enlargement (buphthalmos and Haab striae. The eye examination, usually performed under general anesthesia, includes: tonometry, anterior-segment examination, gonioscopy, corneal diameter and axial length measurement, dilated fundoscopy with optic-nerve-head evaluation. Medical therapy, considering the high frequency of side effects, is generally used as

  17. Glaucoma: Hot Topics in Pharmacology.

    Balendra, Shiama I; Shah, Parth Arvind; Jain, Mishank; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Cordeiro, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    Glaucoma comprises a group of neurodegenerative diseases resulting in retinal ganglion cell death within the optic nerve head. It is projected to affect almost 80 million people worldwide by 2020. The condition's asymptomatic nature translates to over half of glaucoma sufferers being unaware of their condition. By the time of diagnosis, irreversible blindness is likely to have occurred. Prime areas of glaucoma research therefore include identification and optimization of risk factors for the disease, accurate and early diagnostic tools and novel therapeutic methods. The goal of this review was to summarize main areas of latest glaucoma research into risk factors of glaucoma, diagnostic tools and treatments. PubMed was used to search for terms including glaucoma risk factors, glaucoma diagnostics, glaucoma treatment, glaucoma drug delivery and glaucoma IOP. The evidence for risk factors of low CSF pressure, IOP, smoking, vascular risk factors and light toxicity is described. Latest diagnostic and monitoring techniques for glaucoma include SD-OCT, DARC and IOP telemetry. Current and emerging medical and surgical treatments in glaucoma are discussed. Rho kinase inhibitors have the potential to both lower IOP and also provide neuroprotection, several of which are in clinical trials. Several other new medical treatments such as calcium channel blockers and neurotrophic agents also have the capacity to provide neuroprotection. Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) devices provide an improved safety profile compared to traditional trabeculectomy; the latest ab interno and ab externo devices are described. Novel drug delivery methods, including punctual plugs and contact lenses, help overcome the challenges with patient adherence. The ultimate goals are to reduce the individual patient risk factors associated with glaucoma, diagnose the condition early and to find treatments that not only reduce IOP but also reverse neurodegeneration of RGCs. The usage of combinations

  18. Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Tang, Johnny; Kern, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities in the retina, but which of these abnormalities contribute to recognized features of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is less clear. Many of the molecular and physiologic abnormalities that have been found to develop in the retina in diabetes are consistent with inflammation. Moreover, a number of anti-inflammatory therapies have been found to significantly inhibit development of different aspects of DR in animal models. Herein, we review the inflammatory mediators and their relationship to early and late DR, and discuss the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches to inhibit development of different stages of the retinopathy. We focus primarily on information derived from in vivo studies, supplementing with information from in vitro studies were important. PMID:21635964

  19. Retinopathy of prematurity

    Benavides Vargas, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity has been the leading cause of childhood blindness. Early and effective screening has helped to diagnose the visual target of an infant by the difference between growing up with a disability or not. A joint effort between ophthalmologists and neonatologists is proposed to control this disease, ensuring success. An appropriate, early, effective and timely treatment has been the laser and cryotherapy like good choices for the neonate to prevent disease progression. Evaluation of screening program, to determine the incidence, compare statistics variables have been measures as other medical pathologies should be encouraged as research topics. A decrease in the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity is expected, controlling the risk factors during the child's stay in intrahospital neonatal unit [es

  20. Linezolid induced retinopathy.

    Park, Dae Hyun; Park, Tae Kwann; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Jong Sook; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-12-01

    While optic neuropathy is a well-known cause of visual disturbances in linezolid-treated patients, the possibility of linezolid-related retinopathy has not been investigated. Here, we report a case of retinopathy demonstrated by multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) in a linezolid-treated patient. A 61-year-old man with extensively drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis treated with linezolid for 5 months presented with painless loss of vision in both eyes. The patient's best corrected visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/100 in the left eye. Fundus examination revealed mild disc edema, and color vision was defective in both eyes. Humphrey visual field tests showed a superotemporal field defect in the right eye and central and pericentral field defect in the left eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed only mild optic disc swelling. In mfERG, central amplitudes were depressed in both eyes. Four months after the cessation of linezolid, visual acuity was restored to 20/20 right eye and 20/25 left eye. The color vision and visual field had improved. The OCT and mfEFG findings improved as well. Although the clinical features were similar to linezolid-induced optic neuropathy, the mfERG findings suggest the possibility of a retinopathy through cone dysfunction.

  1. Glaucoma Monitoring in a Clinical Setting Glaucoma Progression Analysis vs Nonparametric Progression Analysis in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Heeg, Govert P.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    Objective: To compare prospectively 2 perimetric progression detection algorithms for glaucoma, the Early Manifest Glaucoma Trial algorithm (glaucoma progression analysis [GPA]) and a nonparametric algorithm applied to the mean deviation (MD) (nonparametric progression analysis [NPA]). Methods:

  2. Prevalence of comorbid retinal disease in patients with glaucoma at an academic medical center

    Griffith JF

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joseph F Griffith,1 Jeffrey L Goldberg2 1Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 2Shiley Eye Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Background: Patients with various retinal diseases and patients who have undergone retinal procedures and surgeries have an increased risk of developing ocular hypertension and glaucoma. Little is known about the epidemiology of comorbid retinal diseases in glaucoma patients. This study evaluated the prevalence of retinal comorbidities in a population of patients with five types of glaucoma.Methods: A longitudinal, retrospective study was conducted using International Classification of Disease (ICD-9 billing records from 2003 to 2010 at an academic medical center. Patients were classified as having primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, low tension open-angle glaucoma (NTG, pigmentary open-angle glaucoma, chronic-angle closure glaucoma (CACG, or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PXG if they had at least three clinic visits with the same ICD-9 code. Patients were classified as having a retinal comorbidity if they had two visits with the same code. Variables were analyzed with the independent t-test, χ2 test, analysis of variance, or Fisher’s exact test.Results: A total of 5,154 patients had glaucoma, and 14.8% of these had a retinal comorbidity. The prevalence of comorbid retinal disease was higher in patients with POAG (15.7% than in those with NTG (10.7%, PXG (10.1%, or pigmentary open-angle glaucoma (3.7%; P<0.05. Two hundred and two patients had diabetic retinopathy, with POAG patients (4.5% having a higher prevalence than those with CACG (1.4% or PXG (0.6%; P<0.001. There were 297 patients who had macular degeneration and both POAG (2.0% and PXG patients (2.9% had a higher prevalence of nonexudative macular degeneration than those with CACG (0%; P<0.01. Patients with comorbid retinal disease had a higher prevalence of blindness and low vision than those without comorbid

  3. Challenges in Glaucoma Management

    James Standefer

    Glaucoma has been referred to as the 'orphan child' of Vision. 2020 because, though it is the world's leading cause of irreversible blindness, it was not included in its initial list. The main reasons include the inability to restore lost vision, and the need for upgrading the substandard clinical skill levels of many developing ...

  4. Classic papers in glaucoma

    Ritch, Robert; Caronia, Ronald M

    1999-01-01

    ... Elimination of Intraocular Fluid J.S. Friedenwald The Formation of the Intraocular Fluid. Proctor Award Lecture of the Association for Research in Ophthalmology W.M. Grant, Tonographic Method for Measuring the Facility and Rate of Aqueous Flow in Human Eyes P.A. Chandler , Malignant Glaucoma B. Becker, Decrease in Intraocular Pressure in Man by a Carbo...

  5. Pesquisaje de glaucoma

    Aldo Sigler Villanueva

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Se efectuó un pesquisaje de glaucoma mediante un chequeo masivo al 92,1 % (210 pacientes de la población mayor de 40 años de edad atendida en un consultorio del médico de la familia del municipio Morón. Se encontró que el 9,6 % (20 pacientes presentaban cifras de tensión ocular por encima de los valores normales, así como 3 pacientes que tenían tensión ocular normal, pero con excavaciones de papilas sospechosas y 2 pacientes con antecedentes familiares de glaucoma, los cuales se enviaron a la consulta especializada del Hospital General Provincial Docente de Moron para confirmar o no el diagnóstico.The 92,1 % (210 patients of the population over 40 years treated at a family physician's office in Morón municipality took part in a glaucoma mass screening. It was found that 9,6 % (20 patients showed figures of ocular tension exceeding normal values and that 3 patients had normal ocular tension but presented suspicious excavation of the optic disc. Two patients having glaucoma family history were referred to the specialist at the Provincial General Teaching Hospital of Moron in order to confirm the diagnosis.

  6. open angle glaucoma (poag)?

    there is a build up of pressure due to poor outflow of aqueous humor. The outflow obstruction could occur at the trabecular meshwork of the anterior chamber angle or subsequently in the episcleral vein due to raised venous pressure. Such build up of pressure results in glaucoma . Elevated intraocular pressure remains the ...

  7. Glaucomas in Africas

    Murdoch

    happens in all secondary glaucomas. There was confusion some years ago in our understanding of the disease, since intraocular pressure was included in the definition of the disease. With the advent of population studies it became apparent that, in some populations, a significant proportion of those with the characteristic ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: early-onset glaucoma

    ... called a syndrome. If glaucoma appears before the age of 5 without other associated abnormalities, it is called primary congenital glaucoma. Other individuals experience early onset of primary open-angle glaucoma, the most ...

  9. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms and Diagnosis Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes. Often ...

  10. Trabeculectomy versus Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation in neovascular glaucoma

    Netland, Peter; Shen,Chris; Salim,Sarwat; Du,Haiming

    2011-01-01

    Christopher C Shen1, Sarwat Salim2, Haiming Du2, Peter A Netland31Glaucoma Consultants Northwest, Seattle, WA, USA; 2University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA; 3University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USAPurpose: To compare surgical outcomes in neovascular glaucoma patients who underwent trabeculectomy with mitomycin C versus Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective comparative case series. We reviewed 40 e...

  11. Lipasin, a biomarker of diabetic retinopathy.

    Fang, Chen; Huang, Yun; Guo, Heming; Gao, Yan; Ji, Xiaoyan; Hu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    The present study recruited 74 participants with type 2 diabetes, among which 23 had retinopathy. Those with retinopathy had a longer duration of diabetes and higher levels of lipasin compared with those without retinopathy. Logistic regression revealed that lipasin was independently and significantly associated with retinopathy even after adjustments for confounders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neovascular glaucoma after helium ion irradiation for uveal melanoma

    Kim, M.K.; Char, D.H.; Castro, J.L.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Stone, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Neovascular glaucoma developed in 22 of 169 uveal melanoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation. Most patients had large melanomas; no eyes containing small melanomas developed anterior segment neovascularization. The mean onset of glaucoma was 14.1 months (range, 7-31 months). The incidence of anterior segment neovascularization increased with radiation dosage; there was an approximately three-fold increase at 80 GyE versus 60 GyE of helium ion radiation (23% vs. 8.5%) (P less than 0.05). Neovascular glaucoma occurred more commonly in larger tumors; the incidence was not affected by tumor location, presence of subretinal fluid, nor rate of tumor regression. Fifty-three percent of patients had some response with intraocular pressures of 21 mmHg or less to a combination of antiglaucoma treatments

  13. Glaucoma in patients with uveitis.

    Panek, W C; Holland, G N; Lee, D A; Christensen, R E

    1990-01-01

    The records of 100 patients (161 eyes) with uveitis were reviewed retrospectively to determine the prevalence of increased intraocular pressure, the forms of uveitis most commonly associated with glaucoma, and the forms that require specific glaucoma therapy. Secondary glaucoma was present in 23 patients (31 eyes): three of 24 patients with acute uveitis (three eyes, 12% of acute uveitis patients) and 20 of 76 patients with chronic uveitis (28 eyes, 26% of chronic uveitis patients). Eighteen ...

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of glaucoma in rural central India. The Central India Eye and Medical Study.

    Vinay Nangia

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the prevalence of glaucoma in rural Central India. METHODS: The population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study is a population-based study performed in a rural region of Central India. The study included 4711 subjects (aged 30+ years. A detailed ophthalmic and medical examination was performed. Glaucoma was defined by glaucomatous optic disc morphology, and in a second step, by the criteria of the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology (ISGEO. RESULTS: Optic disc photographs were available for 4570 (97.0% subjects. Glaucoma was detected in 122 subjects (51 unilateral (2.67% (95%CI: 2.20, 3.14. Glaucoma prevalence for the age groups of 30-39yrs, 40-49yrs, 50-59yrs, 60-69yrs, 70-79yrs, and 80+ years was 0.54% (95%CI: 0.11, 0.98, 1.03% (95%CI: 0.49, 1.57, 1.40% (95%CI: 0.58, 2.23, 6.62% (95%CI: 4.92, 8.31, 8.71% (95%CI: 5.55, 11.75, and 14.3% (95%CI: 4.13, 24.4, respectively. In multivariable analysis, glaucoma was associated with higher age (P<0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.025, lower blood hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.03, higher intraocular pressure (P<0.001, disc hemorrhages (P<0.001, higher prevalence of myopic retinopathy (P<0.001, lower level of education (P = 0.03, longer axial length (P<0.001, thinner retinal nerve fiber layer (P<0.001, higher vertical cup/disc diameter ratio (P<0.001, and narrow anterior chamber angle (P = 0.02. Ratio of open-angle glaucoma to angle-closure glaucoma was 7.7:1 (1.93% (95%CI: 1.64, 2.22 to 0.24% (95%CI: 0.14, 0.34. Using the ISGEO criteria, glaucoma prevalence was 2.8% (95%CI: 2.3, 3.3 with a less clear association with older age. CONCLUSIONS: Glaucoma prevalence in remote rural Central India is comparable to other regions. Associated factors were older age, lower body mass index, lower blood concentration of hemoglobin, lower level of education, higher intraocular pressure, disc hemorrhage, myopic retinopathy, and longer axial

  15. Cambridge community Optometry Glaucoma Scheme.

    Keenan, Jonathan; Shahid, Humma; Bourne, Rupert R; White, Andrew J; Martin, Keith R

    2015-04-01

    With a higher life expectancy, there is an increased demand for hospital glaucoma services in the United Kingdom. The Cambridge community Optometry Glaucoma Scheme (COGS) was initiated in 2010, where new referrals for suspected glaucoma are evaluated by community optometrists with a special interest in glaucoma, with virtual electronic review and validation by a consultant ophthalmologist with special interest in glaucoma. 1733 patients were evaluated by this scheme between 2010 and 2013. Clinical assessment is performed by the optometrist at a remote site. Goldmann applanation tonometry, pachymetry, monoscopic colour optic disc photographs and automated Humphrey visual field testing are performed. A clinical decision is made as to whether a patient has glaucoma or is a suspect, and referred on or discharged as a false positive referral. The clinical findings, optic disc photographs and visual field test results are transmitted electronically for virtual review by a consultant ophthalmologist. The number of false positive referrals from initial referral into the scheme. Of the patients, 46.6% were discharged at assessment and a further 5.7% were discharged following virtual review. Of the patients initially discharged, 2.8% were recalled following virtual review. Following assessment at the hospital, a further 10.5% were discharged after a single visit. The COGS community-based glaucoma screening programme is a safe and effective way of evaluating glaucoma referrals in the community and reducing false-positive referrals for glaucoma into the hospital system. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  16. Clinical outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in pediatric glaucoma.

    Pakravan, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Hamed; Yazdani, Shahin; Doozandeh, Azadeh; Dastborhan, Zahra; Gerami, Ebrahim; Kheiri, Bahareh; Pakravan, Parastou; Yaseri, Mehdi; Hassanpour, Kiana

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in refractory primary congenital glaucoma as well as primary procedure in aphakic glaucoma. In this retrospective study, medical records of patients who underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for refractory glaucoma and aphakic glaucoma were reviewed. Primary outcome measures were the surgical success defined as intraocular pressure ≤21 mm Hg and decreased ≥20% and no secondary glaucoma surgery. Secondary outcome measures were the number of glaucoma medications, complications, best corrected visual acuity, and intraocular pressure. A total of 62 eyes of refractory primary congenital glaucoma patients (group 1) and 33 eyes of aphakic glaucoma patients (group 2) were included in our study. Mean follow-up was 51 ± 33 months in group 1 and 49 ± 41 months in group 2 (p = 0.82). The cumulative probability of success was 90% in both groups at the first year; however, the success rate was 52.5% in group 1 and 71.5% in group 2 at 5 years' follow-up visit. In group 1, the mean intraocular pressure ± standard deviation was 33.1 ± 8.6 mm Hg at the baseline and decreased to 17.1 ± 5.3 mm Hg at 1 year and 18.5 ± 6.4 at 3 years postoperatively (all p's glaucoma medications was 3 ± 0.7 that decreased to 2 ± 0.8 at final follow-up (p = 0.02). Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation has a moderate success rate in the management of refractory primary congenital glaucoma with an increased chance of tube-related complications. The surgical success rate is higher in case of primary Ahmed glaucoma valve implant for aphakic glaucoma with acceptable safety profile.

  17. Neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma

    Song W

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wei Song, Ping Huang, Chun Zhang Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glaucoma is the second leading cause for blindness worldwide. It is mainly caused by glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss, which leads to visual field defect and blindness. Up to now, the main purpose of antiglaucomatous therapies has been to lower intraocular pressure (IOP through surgeries and medications. However, it has been found that progressive GON is still present in some patients with effective IOP decrease. Therefore, risk factors other than IOP elevation, like neurotrophin deprivation and excitotoxicity, contribute to progressive GON. Novel approaches of neuroprotection may be more effective for preserving the function of the optic nerve. Keywords: glaucoma, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, retinal ganglion cells, neuro­protection

  18. Neuroprotection in glaucoma

    Vasudevan, Sushil K; Gupta, Viney; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Recent evidence suggests that intraocular pressure (IOP) is only one of the many risk factors for this disease. Current treatment options for this disease have been limited to the reduction of IOP; however, it is clear now that the disease progression continues in many patients despite effective lowering of IOP. In the search for newer modalities in treating this disease, much data have emerged from experimental research the world over, suggesting various pathological processes involved in this disease and newer possible strategies to treat it. This review article looks into the current understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma, the importance of neuroprotection, the various possible pharmacological approaches for neuroprotection and evidence of current available medications. PMID:21150020

  19. Ceratoplastia penetrante e glaucoma Penetrating keratoplasty and glaucoma

    Márcio Eulálio Barreto Soares

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é discutir os conhecimentos atuais sobre a abordagem clínica e terapêutica da ceratoplastia penetrante e do glaucoma a ela associado.The aim of this article is to make a review about glaucoma associated with penetrating keratoplasty, describing since its incidence and risk factors until the different options for treatment.

  20. Automated screening for retinopathy

    A. S. Rodin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinal pathology is a common cause of an irreversible decrease of central vision commonly found amongst senior population. Detection of the earliest signs of retinal diseases can be facilitated by viewing retinal images available from the telemedicine networks. To facilitate the process of retinal images, screening software applications based on image recognition technology are currently on the various stages of development.Purpose: To develop and implement computerized image recognition software that can be used as a decision support technologyfor retinal image screening for various types of retinopathies.Methods: The software application for the retina image recognition has been developed using C++ language. It was tested on dataset of 70 images with various types of pathological features (age related macular degeneration, chorioretinitis, central serous chorioretinopathy and diabetic retinopathy.Results: It was shown that the system can achieve a sensitivity of 73 % and specificity of 72 %.Conclusion: Automated detection of macular lesions using proposed software can significantly reduce manual grading workflow. In addition, automated detection of retinal lesions can be implemented as a clinical decision support system for telemedicine screening. It is anticipated that further development of this technology can become a part of diagnostic image analysis system for the electronic health records.

  1. Neovascularization in Purtscher's retinopathy

    Chan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Annie Chan, Douglas R Fredrick, Theodore Leng Department of Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: We report a case of neovascularization secondary to Purtscher's retinopathy that showed minimal improvement with photocoagulation treatment. A 14-year-old boy with a history of cerebellar medulloblastoma presented with blurry vision and floaters after being struck by a motor vehicle while riding his bike. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/400 in his right eye and counting fingers in his left eye. Fundus examination showed disk edema, retinal whitening, and retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated thinning of the temporal retina and disruption of the inner segment–outer segment junction of the photoreceptor layer in the right eye and thickening and edema of the nasal macula, as well as a central foveal hyper-reflectivity, in the left eye. At the initial visit, there was no ischemia or neovascularization (NV. One month later, the patient developed NV of the disk and ischemia in the mid-periphery of the left eye. The patient underwent treatment with pan-retinal photocoagulation. The NV regressed, but visual outcome remained poor at his 5-month follow-up visit. Keywords: Purtscher's retinopathy, neovascularization, laser photocoagulation, disk edema

  2. Endocrinological disturbances in diabetic retinopathy

    Hafiez, A.A.; Shalaby, E.; Atia, H.; Abdel-Hafez, M.A.; Hammad, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus were extensively studied from various points of view. The aim was to elucidate the possible interaction of insulin, glucagon, prolactin, growth hormone, T 3 , and T 4 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Forty patients with diabetic retinopathy (group II) and twenty age-matched controls (group I) were investigated. Plasma levels of both insulin and glucagon were significantly elevated in group II versus group I, whereas other hormones were insignificantly changed. This shows the role that might be played by T 3 , T 4 , growth hormone, and prolactin in the established cases of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  3. Glaucoma Medication Preferences among Glaucoma Specialists in Mexico.

    Lazcano-Gomez, Gabriel; Alvarez-Ascencio, Daniela; Haro-Zuno, Cindy; Turati-Acosta, Mauricio; Garcia-Huerta, Magdalena; Jimenez-Arroyo, Jesus; Castañeda-Diez, Rafael; Castillejos-Chevez, Armando; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Dominguez-Dueñas, Francisca; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    To determine the glaucoma specialists' preferences for the different brands of topical glaucoma medications available in Mexico. A web-based survey was sent to 150 board-certified glaucoma specialists in Mexico, with 14 questions related to brand preferences for all glaucoma medications available in Mexico. Participants were asked to select each glaucoma medication class by brand and to state the factors leading to their choice. Data from 111 (74%) glaucoma specialists were collected. Imot (timolol 0.5%; Sophia, Mexico) was the preferred brand for the beta-blockers (BB) class by 71% (n = 79) of the participants. Azopt (brinzolamide 1%; Alcon Lab, US) was the preferred carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (CAI) by 54% (n = 60) of the glaucoma specialists. Lumigan (bimatoprost 0.01% and 0.03%; Allergan Inc., U.S.) was the first choice for the prostaglandin analogues (PGAs) in 62% (n = 70) of the answers. The most frequently prescribed alpha-agonist (AA) was Agglad (brimonidine 0.2%; Sophia Lab, Mexico) in 44% (n = 49) of the answers. Medication accessibility (31%), cost (29%), and recommended dose (23%) were the three main factors influencing the glaucoma specialists' preferences. Medication cost and accessibility, as well as posology, remain the main factors influencing brand preferences among glaucoma doctors. In our professional opinion, the therapeutic effect must be the leading factor when prescribing topical medications in the daily practice, so that patients receive the best treatment option. This survey provides an understanding of the decision-making process when prescribing glaucoma medications by glaucoma specialists in a Latin American developing country. Ideally, patient treatment should be individualized and aimed to achieve the best results possible for their specific condition. How to cite this article: Lazcano-Gomez G, Alvarez-Ascencio D, Haro-Zuno C, Turati-Acosta M, Garcia-Huerta M, Jimenez-Arroyo J, Castañeda-Diez R, Castillejos-Chevez A, Gonzalez

  4. Glaucoma: a brief update for 2017

    glaucoma. Predictions are that glaucoma will affect almost ... Abstract. Glaucoma is a complex condition of the eye and the second leading cause of blindness around the globe. ..... a stinging sensation upon instilling the drops into the eyes, as well as dry eyes .... Dimitriou C, Broadway D. Pathophysiology of glaucoma.

  5. Arguments Against Funding Glaucoma Treatment and Rebuttal

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... for the treatment of glaucoma at no cost to IWG at the point of delivery toward reducing glaucoma,s harmful impact on the .... and logistic reasons. Nigeria doesn .... cataract unlike from glaucoma can be reversed. This does not.

  6. Experience with the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve

    Design:Aprospective study of three glaucoma patients who had the Ahmed glaucoma valve implant at the. University of Benin ... Key words: glaucoma, glaucoma valve implant, ... introduced the micro-trephination with a diameter of. 0.6mm in ...

  7. The future of glaucoma surgery

    Arsham Sheybani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma surgery is ripe for innovation. In the last few years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of devices approaching commercialization. While not all that is new is necessarily good, the role of these devices in changing glaucoma surgery is equally important in terms of both success and failure. Trabeculectomy, the most commonly performed incisional filtration surgery for glaucoma, is subjective by nature and certainly has risks. As devices aim to standardize glaucoma surgery, specifically subconjunctival filtration surgery, predictability and in turn safety should theoretically improve. This may allow the glaucoma surgeon to intervene earlier in the disease process, prevent more advanced vision loss and potentially decrease the burden of medications.

  8. Automatic diabetic retinopathy classification

    Bravo, María. A.; Arbeláez, Pablo A.

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a disease in which the retina is damaged due to augmentation in the blood pressure of small vessels. DR is the major cause of blindness for diabetics. It has been shown that early diagnosis can play a major role in prevention of visual loss and blindness. This work proposes a computer based approach for the detection of DR in back-of-the-eye images based on the use of convolutional neural networks (CNNs). Our CNN uses deep architectures to classify Back-of-the-eye Retinal Photographs (BRP) in 5 stages of DR. Our method combines several preprocessing images of BRP to obtain an ACA score of 50.5%. Furthermore, we explore subproblems by training a larger CNN of our main classification task.

  9. Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography: a new modality for early detection of angle neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy.

    Azad, Rajvardhan; Arora, Tarun; Sihota, Ramanjit; Chandra, Parijat; Mahajan, Deepankur; Sain, Siddarth; Sharma, Yograj

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the role of Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography in detecting neovascularization of the angle and correlate the same with gonioscopy in diabetic retinopathy. One hundred and fifty eyes of 150 patients (25 each of mild, moderate, severe, very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR); and PDR with high-risk characteristics) were recruited. They underwent complete ocular examination including applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography, and fundus fluorescein angiography. Using Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography, of 150 eyes neovascularization of the angle was detected in 37 eyes (24.66%) compared with 22 eyes (14.66%) on gonioscopy (P = 0.04). Small newly formed vessels were evident only with Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography. In 10 of 50 patients (20%) with severe/very severe NPDR, angle neovascularization was appreciable on Retcam fluorescein angiography compared with 5 patients (10%) on gonioscopy. Similarly, 25 of 50 patients (50%) with PDR/PDR with high-risk characteristics had neovascularization of the angle on Retcam gonioangiography compared with 17 (34%) on gonioscopy. Retcam fluorescein gonioangiography is a novel technique for early detection of angle neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy and hence preventing progression to neovascular glaucoma. The objective nature of this test helps in precise decision making compared with gonioscopy for early intervention especially in cases of pre-PDR.

  10. Segmentation of retinal blood vessels using artificial neural networks for early detection of diabetic retinopathy

    Mann, Kulwinder S.; Kaur, Sukhpreet

    2017-06-01

    There are various eye diseases in the patients suffering from the diabetes which includes Diabetic Retinopathy, Glaucoma, Hypertension etc. These all are the most common sight threatening eye diseases due to the changes in the blood vessel structure. The proposed method using supervised methods concluded that the segmentation of the retinal blood vessels can be performed accurately using neural networks training. It uses features which include Gray level features; Moment Invariant based features, Gabor filtering, Intensity feature, Vesselness feature for feature vector computation. Then the feature vector is calculated using only the prominent features.

  11. Watch Out for Glaucoma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Watch Out for Glaucoma Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents A ... used to check eye pressure for signs of glaucoma. Photo courtesy of NEI Glaucoma is a group ...

  12. THE TREATMENT OF OPEN- AND NARROW-ANGLE GLAUCOMA

    1971-04-10

    Apr 10, 1971 ... glaucoma will be considered: narrow-angle glaucoma. (acute glaucoma) and ... emotional or a physical crisis. The pain is in the distribu- .... ness, not increased pressure, haunts people suffering from glaucoma'.' The saga of ...

  13. Aqueous shunts for glaucoma.

    Tseng, Victoria L; Coleman, Anne L; Chang, Melinda Y; Caprioli, Joseph

    2017-07-28

    Aqueous shunts are employed to control intraocular pressure (IOP) for people with primary or secondary glaucomas who fail or are not candidates for standard surgery. To assess the effectiveness and safety of aqueous shunts for reducing IOP in glaucoma compared with standard surgery, another type of aqueous shunt, or modification to the aqueous shunt procedure. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 8), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to August 2016), Embase.com (1947 to August 2016), PubMed (1948 to August 2016), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database) (1982 to August 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 15 August 2016, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 15 August 2016. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic search for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 15 August 2016. We also searched the reference lists of identified trial reports and the Science Citation Index to find additional trials. We included randomized controlled trials that compared various types of aqueous shunts with standard surgery or to each other in eyes with glaucoma. Two review authors independently screened search results for eligibility, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data from included trials. We contacted trial investigators when data were unclear or not reported. We graded the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We followed standard methods as recommended by Cochrane. We included 27 trials with a total of 2099 participants with mixed diagnoses and comparisons of interventions. Seventeen studies reported adequate methods of randomization, and seven reported adequate allocation concealment. Data collection and follow-up times varied.Four trials compared an aqueous shunt (Ahmed or Baerveldt) with trabeculectomy, of which

  14. Micronutrients and Diabetic Retinopathy A Systematic Review

    Lee, Chee-Tin Christine; Gayton, Emma L.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; Flanagan, Declan W.; Adler, Amanda I.

    Background: We have evaluated the evidence for the association between intake and blood levels of micronutrients and diabetic retinopathy. Treatment for diabetic retinopathy requires significant clinical input and specialist ophthalmologic care. Micronutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin E, and

  15. Evaluation of a glaucoma patient

    Thomas, Ravi; Loibl, Klaus; Parikh, Rajul

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of glaucoma is usually made clinically and requires a comprehensive eye examination, including slit lamp, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy and dilated stereoscopic evaluation of the optic disc and retina. Automated perimetry is obtained if glaucoma is suspected. This establishes the presence of functional damage and provides a baseline for follow-up. Imaging techniques are not essential for the diagnosis but may have a role to play in the follow-up. We recommend a comprehensive eye examination for every clinic patient with the objective of detecting all potentially sight-threatening diseases, including glaucoma. PMID:21150033

  16. Evaluation of a glaucoma patient

    Thomas Ravi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of glaucoma is usually made clinically and requires a comprehensive eye examination, including slit lamp, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy and dilated stereoscopic evaluation of the optic disc and retina. Automated perimetry is obtained if glaucoma is suspected. This establishes the presence of functional damage and provides a baseline for follow-up. Imaging techniques are not essential for the diagnosis but may have a role to play in the follow-up. We recommend a comprehensive eye examination for every clinic patient with the objective of detecting all potentially sight-threatening diseases, including glaucoma.

  17. Acupuncture for glaucoma.

    Law, Simon K; Li, Tianjing

    2013-05-31

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by an acquired loss of retinal ganglion cells at levels beyond normal age-related loss and corresponding atrophy of the optic nerve. Although many treatments are available to manage glaucoma, glaucoma is a chronic condition. Some patients may seek complementary or alternative medicine approaches such as acupuncture to supplement their regular treatment. The underlying plausibility of acupuncture is that disorders related to the flow of Chi (the traditional Chinese concept translated as vital force or energy) can be prevented or treated by stimulating relevant points on the body surface. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with glaucoma. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2013), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (January 1937 to January 2013), ZETOC (January 1993 to January 2013), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to January 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine web site (NCCAM) (http://nccam.nih.gov). We did not use any language or date restrictions in the search for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 8 January 2013 with the exception of NCCAM which was last searched on 14 July 2010. We also handsearched Chinese

  18. 'Teaching corner': Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

    based interventions in three areas: primary prevention of retinopathy by optimum ... disease and management of established retinopathy to prevent or mitigate visual loss. ... of retinopathy and timely treatment all diminish the risk of ... types: macular oedema and macular ischaemia which may .... Variation in age of onset.

  19. [Secondary glaucoma in Paraguay. Etiology and incidence].

    Strohl, A; Pozzi, S; Wattiez, R; Roesen, B; Miño de Kaspar, H; Klauss, V

    1999-06-01

    Glaucoma is the third-most-frequent cause of blindness in the world, with a total of 5.2 million blind people as a result of this disease; 80% live in developing countries. In Paraguay, after cataract it is the second-most-frequent-cause. Early detection of the risk factors and groups can help to avoid progress of this disease. Trauma, cataract and infectious uveitis represent special risks for developing secondary glaucoma, which is a more frequent cause of blindness in third-world countries than in industrialized nations. Until now there has been little data regarding the causes, disease course, and options for therapy. Therefore, secondary glaucoma was examined in Paraguay to obtain information on the situation in Latin America. The aim of the study was to explore the causes of secondary glaucoma for programs concerning prevention and therapy. From November 1996 to February 1997 patients with secondary glaucoma were examined at the University Hospital of Asunción, Paraguay. After the clinical examination the secondary glaucomas were classified. Patients with primary glaucoma were included in the same period of time as well in order to get the rate of secondary glaucoma. Altogether 293 patients were examined: 61 with secondary and 232 with primary glaucoma. The causes of secondary glaucoma in 73 eyes were: 20 (27%) with pseudoexfoliation glaucoma, 19 (26%) with post-traumatic glaucoma, 16 (22%) with neovascular glaucoma, 4 (5%) with lens-related glaucoma, 3 (4%) with glaucoma associated with ocular surgery, 2 (3%) with pigmentary and 2 (3%) with corticoid-induced glaucoma. A ratio of 4:1 primary glaucomas to secondary glaucomas was found. The development of special measures for prevention and early therapy is only possible if the causes of this severe disease are explored. The results of this study represent basic information and could help to introduce of prevention programs.

  20. Synergism between diabetic and radiation retinotherapy: case report and review

    Viebahn, M.; Barricks, M.E.; Osterloh, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    It is suspected that radiation retinopathy is more likely to develop in an eye with preexisting diabetic retinopathy than in a normal eye. However, there is only one report of this occurring, at a radiation dose of 4500 rads. We present a woman with minimal diabetic retinopathy who had breast carcinoma which was treated with chemotherapy but metastasised to the choroid. Within nine months of external beam radiation (3000 rads in fractions of 200 rads) a fulminant retinopathy evolved in that eye, while the non-radiated eye showed no change. The histopathology of radiation and diabetic retinopathy and causes for possible synergism are discussed. As this case report shows, radiation oncologists and ophthalmologists need to be aware of the risk that patients with minimal diabetic retinopathy who have undergone chemotherapy may suffer a dramatic visual loss from radiation therapy despite a radiation dose which is considered adequate, safe, and properly fractionated. (author)

  1. Scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma.

    Dada, Tanuj; Sharma, Reetika; Angmo, Dewang; Sinha, Gautam; Bhartiya, Shibal; Mishra, Sanjay K; Panda, Anita; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-11-01

    Glaucoma is an acquired progressive optic neuropathy which is characterized by changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). White-on-white perimetry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of glaucoma. However, it can detect defects in the visual field only after the loss of as many as 40% of the ganglion cells. Hence, the measurement of RNFL thickness has come up. Optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) are the techniques that utilize the evaluation of RNFL for the evaluation of glaucoma. SLP provides RNFL thickness measurements based upon the birefringence of the retinal ganglion cell axons. We have reviewed the published literature on the use of SLP in glaucoma. This review elucidates the technological principles, recent developments and the role of SLP in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, in the light of scientific evidence so far.

  2. The medical management of glaucoma

    medical and surgical interventions are accessible in the management of glaucoma. This article ..... Cannabinoids. With the recent attention cannabis has been receiving in the management of pain and other cancer related conditions, it.

  3. Intravitreal ranibizumab as adjuvant treatment for neovascular glaucoma

    Flavia Gazze Ticly

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe a prospective case series of 5 eyes treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injection for neovascular glaucoma (NVG. Five patients with clinically uncontrolled NVG secondary to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (4 patients and central retinal vein occlusion (1 patient, non-responsive to maximal tolerable medication and panretinal photocoagulation, received intravitreal ranibizumab injection (0.5 mg. Patients were seen at 1st, 3rd and 7th day after the ranibizumab injection and when it was necessary. Success was defined as intraocular pressure (IOP 21, despite maximal tolerable medication, underwent trabeculectomy with 0.5mg/ml mitomycin C (MMC for 1 minute. Failure was defined as IOP > 21 mmHg, phthisis bulbi, loss of light perception or additional glaucoma surgery. The primary outcome was 6-month IOP control. Mean IOP before the ranibizumab injection was 37 mmHg (7 mmHg SD. Two out of five eyes underwent only ranibizumab injection, having an IOP control after the procedure. Three patients were submitted to trabeculectomy with MMC on the 7th day after the injection. At 6-month follow-up, the mean IOP was 12mmHg (3 mmHg SD. All eyes showed regression of rubeosis iridis and IOP control. Visual acuity improved in 2 eyes worsened in 1 eye, and remained stable in 2 eyes. These data suggest that intravitreal ranibizumab injection may be a useful tool in the treatment of NVG.

  4. Lahore general hospital protocol for treatment of neovascular glaucoma caused by retinal disease

    Khaqan, H.A.; Haider, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy of LGH (Lahore General Hospital) protocol for treatment of neovascular glaucoma caused by retinal diseases. Material and Methods: This case series was performed on 9 consecutive eyes of nine patients with uncontrolled neovascular glaucoma at Department of Ophthalmology, Unit II, Lahore General Hospital/PGMI, Lahore. All nine patients completed six months follow up. Among them 6 patients were having PDR (proliferative diabetic retinopathy) and 3 patients having CRVO (central retinal vein occlusion). LGH protocol for treatment of neovascular glaucoma was: To give intravitreal injection of avastin and then PRP (Pan Retinal Photocoagulation) or Trabeculectomy with MMC (Mitomycin C), if PRP and intravitreal avastin fails to control the intra ocular-pressure (IOP). Results: Three patients had IOP control after intravitreal injection of avastin and PRP, 5 patients had uncontrolled IOP after intravitreal avastin and two sessions of PRP, so they under went trabeculectomy with MMC. One patient had uncontrolled IOP despite of full treatment protocol. All other 8 patients IOP remained stable for six months. Conclusion: Significant decrease in intraocular pressure was achieved after observing LGH protocol for treatment of NVG (Neovascular Glaucoma) caused by retinal diseases. (author)

  5. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  6. [Retinopathy of prematurity].

    Promelle, V; Milazzo, S

    2017-05-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity is a retinal vasoproliferative disease affecting extremely preterm infants exposed to high concentrations of oxygen therapy. Infants born before 32 post-menstrual weeks or with a birth weight of less than 1500g should systematically have a dilated fundus examination. The time of screening and schedule for follow-up are guided by the various risk factors. This disease results from immaturity of the peripheral retinal vessels at the time of premature birth. The classification of ROP depends on the anteroposterior extent of involvement (from center to periphery: zone I, II and III), its extension in 30° sectors (clock hours) and its stage (stage 1 to 5). "Plus" disease is defined as dilation and tortuosity of the retinal blood vessels in the posterior pole of the eye and represents a major risk factor for rapid unfavorable progression. A majority of patients will spontaneously recover, but patients with a high risk of progression will require treatment to prevent retinal detachment and blindness. The indications for treatment are threshold disease and type 1 pre-threshold disease. The current treatment of choice is peripheral retinal ablation with transpupillary laser, but ab externo cryotherapy may be used instead. Intravitreal injection of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors may be an attractive therapeutic option and is currently under investigation. After laser treatment, unfavorable outcomes occur in only 9 to 14 % of eyes, but at the price of peripheral retinal destruction. For all patients, whether treated or not, a regular fundus examination should be insured until complete retinal vascularization has occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Central corneal thickness among glaucoma patients attending ...

    AAU_CHS

    ocular pressure measurement and is different among different ethnic population and subtypes of glaucoma. The central corneal thickness of different subtypes of glaucoma at Menelik II Hospital ... Intraocular pressure is a key element in the.

  8. Optineurin, a multifunctional protein involved in glaucoma

    MADHU

    Glaucomas are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative eye diseases that ... with normal tension glaucoma (a sub-type of adult onset primary open angle .... identifies variants at CSF1, OPTN and TNFRSF11A as genetic risk factors for.

  9. Mayombian ethnic, vegetables low intake, insulin treatment, diabetic nephropathy and severe diabetic retinopathy are determinants of blindness in diabetic Africans

    Moise, Mvitu Muaka; Benjamin, Longo-Mbenza; Enoch, Cibanda Yokobo; Igor, Longo Phemba

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency and causes of blindness in diabetic Africans. METHODS The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out among known black diabetics consecutively admitted at the Teaching Hospital, University of Kinshasa, between 2005 and 2007. Examination methods included interviewer-administered structured questionnaire, eye examinations (visual acuity, tonometry, funduscopy), and fasting plasma glycaemia test. RESULTS Of the 227 patients examined, 15.9% had blindness. Univariate analyses showed significant association between female, severity of diabetic retinopathy, Mayombian ethnic group, use of insulin treatment, low intake of vegetables, diabetic nephropathy, open angle glaucoma and blindness in all diabetics. After logistic regression, only diabetic nephropathy, use of insulin treatment, macular oedema, Mayombian ethnic group and vegetables low intake were the independent risk factors of blindness in all diabetics. However, after logistic regression in the sub-group with diabetic retinopathy, only open angle glaucoma and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were the independent determinants of blindness. CONCLUSION The majority of the causes of blindness in these diabetic Africans are avoidable. It is recommended that appropriate diabetes care, nutrition education, periodic eye examination and laser photocoagulation facilities should be provided for treating diabetics in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24195057

  10. A case involving an Ahmed™ glaucoma valve transferred from the vitreous into the anterior chamber of the eye with a silicone oil tamponade for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma

    Miki M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Michiko Miki, Mari Ueki, Tetsuya Sugiyama, Shota Kojima, Tsunehiko IkedaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, JapanPurpose: To report the short-term efficacy and safety of the transfer of an Ahmed™ glaucoma valve (AGV™ tube from the vitreous into the anterior chamber, in a patient with neovascular glaucoma who had undergone pars plana AGV™ implantation and ultimately needed a silicone oil tamponade.Case: A 41-year-old male with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in both eyes was referred to us for treatment in December 2009. Although the patient previously underwent several surgeries, he ultimately lost vision in his right eye. His left eye suffered from neovascular glaucoma after undergoing a pars plana vitrectomy for tractional retinal detachment. After several vitreous and glaucoma surgeries, the patient underwent implantation of a pars plana AGV™. Postoperatively, although his intraocular pressure was stabilized at approximately 10 mmHg, he had repeated vitreous hemorrhage and hyphema without improvement. He ultimately underwent PPV with a silicone oil tamponade and at the same time, the AGV™ tube was pulled out from the vitreous and inserted into the anterior chamber in order to avoid complications caused by the silicone oil.Results: At 19 months postoperative, the patient’s intraocular pressure had stabilized at 10 mmHg with no recurrence of vitreous hemorrhage and hyphema. Eventually, he lost vision in his left eye because of cerebral hemorrhage.Conclusion: The findings show that insertion of a pars plana AGV™ tube into the anterior chamber in a patient undergoing a silicone oil tamponade is both effective and safe in the short-term.Keyword: tube implantation, glaucoma surgery, tube transfer, pars plana, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, intraocular pressure

  11. Rapid assessment of avoidable blindness and diabetic retinopathy in Republic of Moldova.

    Zatic, Tatiana; Bendelic, Eugen; Paduca, Ala; Rabiu, Mansour; Corduneanu, Angela; Garaba, Angela; Novac, Victoria; Curca, Cristina; Sorbala, Inga; Chiaburu, Andrei; Verega, Florentina; Andronic, Victoria; Guzun, Irina; Căpăţină, Olga; Zamă-Mardari, Iulea

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairment, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy among people aged ≥50 years in the Republic of Moldova using Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness plus Diabetic Retinopathy ('RAAB+DR') techniques. 111 communities of people aged ≥50 years were randomly selected. In addition to standard RAAB procedures in all people with diabetes (previous history of the disease or with a random blood glucose level >11.1 mm/L (200 mg/dL)), a dilated fundus examination was performed to assess the presence and the degree of diabetic retinopathy using the Scottish DR grading system. 3877 (98%) people out of the 3885 eligible people were examined. The prevalence of blindness was 1.4% (95% CI 1.0% to 1.8%). The major causes of blindness and severe visual impairment were untreated cataract (58.2%), glaucoma (10.9%), and other posterior segment causes (10.9%). The estimated prevalence of diabetes was 11.4%. Among all people with diabetes, 55.9% had some form of retinopathy, and sight threatening diabetic retinopathy affected 14.6%. The RAAB+DR survey in the Republic of Moldova established that untreated cataract is the major cause of avoidable blindness in rural areas. This needs to be tackled by expanding the geographical coverage of cataract surgical services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Normal-tension glaucoma (Low-tension glaucoma)

    Anderson, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is now considered an abnormal physiology in the optic nerve head that interacts with the level of intraocular pressure (IOP), with the degree and rate of damage depending on the IOP and presumably the degree of abnormal physiology. Diagnosis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), defined as glaucoma without a clearly abnormal IOP, depends on recognizing symptoms and signs associated with optic nerve vulnerability, in addition to absence of other explanations for disc abnormality and visual field loss. Among the findings are a halo or crescent of absence of retinal pigment epithelium around the disc, bilateral pre-chiasmal visual field defects, splinter hemorrhages at the disc margin, vascular dysregulation (low blood pressure, cold hands and feet, migraine headache with aura, and the like), or a family history of glaucoma. Possibly relevant, is a history of hemodynamic crisis, arterial obstructive disease, or sleep apnea. Neurological evaluation with imaging is needed only for atypical cases or ones that progress unexpectedly. Management follows the same principle of other chronic glaucomas, to lower the IOP by a substantial amount, enough to prevent disabling visual loss. However, many NTG cases are non-progressive. Therefore, it may often be wisein mild cases to determine whether the case is progressive and the rate of progression before deciding on how aggressivene to be with therapy. Efforts at neuroprotection and improvement in blood flow have not yet been shown effective. PMID:21150042

  13. Normal-tension glaucoma (Low-tension glaucoma

    Anderson Douglas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is now considered an abnormal physiology in the optic nerve head that interacts with the level of intraocular pressure (IOP, with the degree and rate of damage depending on the IOP and presumably the degree of abnormal physiology. Diagnosis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG, defined as glaucoma without a clearly abnormal IOP, depends on recognizing symptoms and signs associated with optic nerve vulnerability, in addition to absence of other explanations for disc abnormality and visual field loss. Among the findings are a halo or crescent of absence of retinal pigment epithelium around the disc, bilateral pre-chiasmal visual field defects, splinter hemorrhages at the disc margin, vascular dysregulation (low blood pressure, cold hands and feet, migraine headache with aura, and the like, or a family history of glaucoma. Possibly relevant, is a history of hemodynamic crisis, arterial obstructive disease, or sleep apnea. Neurological evaluation with imaging is needed only for atypical cases or ones that progress unexpectedly. Management follows the same principle of other chronic glaucomas, to lower the IOP by a substantial amount, enough to prevent disabling visual loss. However, many NTG cases are non-progressive. Therefore, it may often be wisein mild cases to determine whether the case is progressive and the rate of progression before deciding on how aggressivene to be with therapy. Efforts at neuroprotection and improvement in blood flow have not yet been shown effective.

  14. Novel surgical procedures in glaucoma: advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    Filippopoulos, Theodoros; Rhee, Douglas J

    2008-03-01

    Despite late modifications and enhancements, traditional penetrating glaucoma surgery is not without complications and is reserved for patients in whom pharmacologic treatment and/or laser trabeculoplasty do not suffice to control the intraocular pressure. This article critically reviews recent advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery with particular attention paid to two novel surgical approaches: ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome and implantation of the Ex-PRESS shunt. Ab interno trabeculectomy (Trabectome) achieves a sustained 30% reduction in intraocular pressure by focally ablating and cauterizing the trabecular meshwork/inner wall of Schlemm's canal. It has a remarkable safety profile with respect to early hypotonous or infectious complications as it does not generate a bleb, but it can be associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may necessitate additional glaucoma surgery. The Ex-PRESS shunt is more commonly implanted under a partial thickness scleral flap, and appears to have similar efficacy to standard trabeculectomy offering some advantages with respect to the rate of early complications related to hypotony. Penetrating glaucoma surgery will continue to evolve. As prospective randomized clinical trials become available, we will determine the exact role of these surgical techniques in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium.

  15. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  16. Angle closure glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea

    Grace M. Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Congenital ectropion uvea is a rare anomaly, which is associated with open, but dysplastic iridocorneal angles that cause childhood glaucoma. Herein, we present 3 cases of angle-closure glaucoma in children with congenital ectropion uvea. Observations: Three children were initially diagnosed with unilateral glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uvea at 7, 8 and 13 years of age. The three cases showed 360° of ectropion uvea and iris stromal atrophy in the affected eye. In one case, we have photographic documentation of progression to complete angle closure, which necessitated placement of a glaucoma drainage device 3 years after combined trabeculotomy and trabeculectomy. The 2 other cases, which presented as complete angle closure, also underwent glaucoma drainage device implantation. All three cases had early glaucoma drainage device encapsulation (within 4 months and required additional surgery (cycloablation or trabeculectomy. Conclusions and importance: Congenital ectropion uvea can be associated with angle-closure glaucoma, and placement of glaucoma drainage devices in all 3 of our cases showed early failure due to plate encapsulation. Glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea requires attention to angle configuration and often requires multiple surgeries to obtain intraocular pressure control. Keywords: Congenital ectropion uvea, Juvenile glaucoma, Angle-closure glaucoma, Glaucoma drainage device

  17. Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1, and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

  18. Relationship between retinopathy and cirrhosis

    Colakoglu Onder; Taskiran Bengur; Dayi Selcuk; Sozmen Bulent; Unsal Belkis; Maden Ahmet; Pasa Eser; Aslan S. Leyla

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ophthalmic disorders with special attention to retinopathy in cirrhotic patients. Vitamin A deficiency-related ophthalmopathy, xerophthalmia, and color blindness may be documented in cirrhosis due to various etiologies. Retinopathy is an obscure feature of cirrhosis. METHODS: Thirty-two cirrhotic patients, who were followed up by Clinics of Gastroenterology, Izmir Ataturk Teaching and Research Hospital, were enrolled to the study. Associated systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension were excluded. Thirty-two healthy volunteers took part as the control subjects. All participants had ophthalmologic examination in the same hospital. RESULTS: Five (15.6%) of the cirrhotic subjects had soft exudate in the retina. None of the control subjects had retinopathy (P<0.05). Intraocular pressure (IOP) measured for both eyes were also significantly lower in the cirrhotics (P<0.05 vs P = 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of other ophthalmic pathologies. The ophthalmic findings did not show up any differences according to the etiology of cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: Soft exudates may develop in cirrhotic patients probably due to loss of synthetic function of liver and hemodynamic effects of portal hypertension. Retinopathy must be sought in cirrhosis because of its severe morbidity.

  19. Propionibacterium acnes endophthalmitis in Ahmed glaucoma valve.

    Gutiérrez-Díaz, E; Montero-Rodríguez, M; Mencía-Gutiérrez, E; Fernández-González, M C; Pérez-Blázquez, E

    2001-01-01

    To report a case of Propionibacterium acnes endophthalmitis in a patient with an Ahmed glaucoma valve. A nine-year-old boy with bilateral congenital glaucoma, with an Ahmed glaucoma valve implanted in the left eye, had recurrent conjunctival dehiscence and endophthalmitis. Vitreous cultures demonstrated the presence of Propionibacterium acnes. This is the first reported case of Propionibacterium acnes endophthalmitis in an Ahmed glaucoma valve and the second one in a glaucoma drainage device. We strongly recommend using a patch graft to prevent and treat tube exposure. Conjunctival grafts may be useful to close the conjunctiva when there is marked scarring to prevent patch exposure and melting or extrusion.

  20. Altered aquaporin expression in glaucoma eyes

    Tran, Thuy Linh; Bek, Toke; Cour, Morten la

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQP) are channels in the cell membrane that mainly facilitate a passive transport of water. In the eye, AQPs are expressed in the ciliary body and retina and may contribute to the pathogenesis of glaucoma and optic neuropathy. We investigated the expression of AQP1, AQP3, AQP4, AQP5......, AQP7 and AQP9 in human glaucoma eyes compared with normal eyes. Nine glaucoma eyes were examined. Of these, three eyes were diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma; three eyes had neovascular glaucoma; and three eyes had chronic angle-closure glaucoma. Six eyes with normal intraocular pressure...... and without glaucoma were used as control. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against AQP1, AQP3, AQP4, AQP5, AQP7 and AQP9. For each specimen, optical densities of immunoprecipitates were measured using Photoshop and the staining intensities were calculated. Immunostaining showed labelling...

  1. Automated classifiers for early detection and diagnosis of retinopathy in diabetic eyes.

    Somfai, Gábor Márk; Tátrai, Erika; Laurik, Lenke; Varga, Boglárka; Ölvedy, Veronika; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Jianhua; Smiddy, William E; Somogyi, Anikó; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera

    2014-04-12

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used to classify eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma. DR is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in the developed world. The implementation of DR diagnostic routines could be feasibly improved by the integration of structural and optical property test measurements of the retinal structure that provide important and complementary information for reaching a diagnosis. In this study, we evaluate the capability of several structural and optical features (thickness, total reflectance and fractal dimension) of various intraretinal layers extracted from optical coherence tomography images to train a Bayesian ANN to discriminate between healthy and diabetic eyes with and with no mild retinopathy. When exploring the probability as to whether the subject's eye was healthy (diagnostic condition, Test 1), we found that the structural and optical property features of the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and the complex formed by the ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers (GCL + IPL) provided the highest probability (positive predictive value (PPV) of 91% and 89%, respectively) for the proportion of patients with positive test results (healthy condition) who were correctly diagnosed (Test 1). The true negative, TP and PPV values remained stable despite the different sizes of training data sets (Test 2). The sensitivity, specificity and PPV were greater or close to 0.70 for the retinal nerve fiber layer's features, photoreceptor outer segments and retinal pigment epithelium when 23 diabetic eyes with mild retinopathy were mixed with 38 diabetic eyes with no retinopathy (Test 3). A Bayesian ANN trained on structural and optical features from optical coherence tomography data can successfully discriminate between healthy and diabetic eyes with and with no retinopathy. The fractal dimension of the OPL and the GCL + IPL complex predicted by the Bayesian radial basis function network provides better

  2. Prevalence of glaucoma in a Nigerian hospital | Usifoh | Journal of ...

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) was the most common type of glaucoma (91.24%), followed by Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG) with a prevalence of 3.23%. No significant association was found between age or sex and types of glaucoma. PACG and Juvenile glaucoma remains relatively rare accounting for only ...

  3. Clinical findings following Ahmed Glaucoma Valve™ implantation in pediatric glaucoma

    Amir Pirouzian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Amir Pirouzian1, Joseph L Demer21Department of Ophthalmology, San Diego Children’s Hospital, San Diego, UCSD, San Diego, CA, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAPurpose: To describe clinical findings after Ahmed valve drainage implantation in children.Design: All records in one practice were reviewed to identify and describe clinical findings in all children who had undergone Ahmed Glaucoma ValveTM S2 model insertion for uncontrolled primary or secondary glaucoma.Results: A total of 6 patients were identified, ranging in age from 2–15 years. Mean follow-up time averaged from 2–5 years from the time of tube insertion. Three patients exhibited pupillary peaking towards the tube of the valve. All patients required additional surgery or additional medications to control intraocular pressure. Lenticular opacification near the tube site developed in one patient. Gradual tube extrusion was also noted in another two patients.Conclusion: Multiple clinical events follow the Ahmed valve insertion in children. Pupillary irregularity is the most commonly noted event in this series. To avoid or reduce the risk of this complication, additional or modification of surgical procedures could be considered. The mechanism of such occurrence will further be discussed.Keywords: Ahmed Glaucoma Valve, children, pediatric glaucoma

  4. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    Toyama, Shingo; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi; Tokumaru, Sunao; Mizota, Atsushi; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG

  5. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    Toyama, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Yoshitaka [Department of Ophthalmology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG.

  6. The Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Workflow

    Bolster, Nigel M.; Giardini, Mario E.; Bastawrous, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Complications of diabetes mellitus, namely diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy, are the leading cause of blindness in working aged people. Sufferers can avoid blindness if identified early via retinal imaging. Systematic screening of the diabetic population has been shown to greatly reduce the prevalence and incidence of blindness within the population. Many national screening programs have digital fundus photography as their basis. In the past 5 years several techniques and adapters have been developed that allow digital fundus photography to be performed using smartphones. We review recent progress in smartphone-based fundus imaging and discuss its potential for integration into national systematic diabetic retinopathy screening programs. Some systems have produced promising initial results with respect to their agreement with reference standards. However further multisite trialling of such systems’ use within implementable screening workflows is required if an evidence base strong enough to affect policy change is to be established. If this were to occur national diabetic retinopathy screening would, for the first time, become possible in low- and middle-income settings where cost and availability of trained eye care personnel are currently key barriers to implementation. As diabetes prevalence and incidence is increasing sharply in these settings, the impact on global blindness could be profound. PMID:26596630

  7. HYPERAUTOFLUORESCENT RING IN AUTOIMMUNE RETINOPATHY

    LIMA, LUIZ H.; GREENBERG, JONATHAN P.; GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; SALLUM, JULIANA M. F.; THIRKILL, CHARLES; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the presence of a hyperautofluorescent ring and corresponding spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) features seen in patients with autoimmune retinopathy. Methods All eyes were evaluated by funduscopic examination, full-fleld electroretinography, fundus autofluorescence, and SD-OCT. Further confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained with immunoblot and immunohistochemistry testing of the patient’s serum. Humphrey visual fields and microperimetry were also performed. Results Funduscopic examination showed atrophic retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) associated with retinal artery narrowing but without pigment deposits. The scotopic and photopic full-field electroretinograms were nondetectable in three patients and showed a cone–rod pattern of dysfunction in one patient. Fundus autofluorescence revealed a hyperautofluorescent ring in the parafoveal region, and the corresponding SD-OCT demonstrated loss of the photoreceptor inner segment–outer segment junction with thinning of the outer nuclear layer from the region of the hyperautofluorescent ring toward the retinal periphery. The retinal layers were generally intact within the hyperautofluorescent ring, although the inner segment–outer segment junction was disrupted, and the outer nuclear layer and photoreceptor outer segment layer were thinned. Conclusion This case series revealed the structure of the hyperautofluorescent ring in autoimmune retinopathy using SD-OCT. Fundus autofluorescence and SD-OCT may aid in the diagnosis of autoimmune retinopathy and may serve as a tool to monitor its progression. PMID:22218149

  8. Solar Retinopathy: A Multimodal Analysis

    Claudia Bruè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Solar retinopathy is a rare clinical disturbance, for which spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings are not always consistent. We report on two cases of solar retinopathy and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods. This is an observational case study. Results. A 12-year-old female was referred to ophthalmology for bilateral scotoma. Visual acuity was 20/50 in both eyes. Fundus examination was unremarkable, except for slight yellowish material in the central macula, bilaterally. SD-OCT revealed juxtafoveal microcystic cavities in the outer retina, interruption of the external limiting membrane and the inner and outer segment junctions, with disorganized material in the vitelliform space. Fundus autofluorescence showed hypoautofluorescence surrounded by a relatively hyperautofluorescent ring, bilaterally. Similar clinical and morphological findings were detected in a 27-year-old male. Conclusions. Solar retinopathy has a subtle presentation and patients often deny sun-gazing. SD-OCT and fundus autofluorescence are noninvasive and useful tools for its diagnosis.

  9. Educational paper: Retinopathy of prematurity.

    Casteels, Ingele; Cassiman, Catherine; Van Calster, Joachim; Allegaert, Karel

    2012-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a proliferative retinal vascular disease affecting the premature infant with an incompletely vascularized retina. The spectrum of ophthalmological findings in ROP exists from minimal sequelae, which do not affect vision, to bilateral retinal detachment and total blindness. With the increased survival of very small infants, retinopathy of prematurity has become one of the leading causes of childhood blindness. Over the past two decades, major advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis of ROP, to a large extent as a result of changes in clinical risk factors (oxygen and non-oxygen related) and characteristics observed in ROP cases. This article provides a literature review on the evolution in clinical characteristics, classification and treatment modalities and indications of ROP. Special attention is hereby paid to the neonatal factors influencing the development of ROP and to the necessity for everyone caring for premature babies to have a well-defined screening and treatment protocol for ROP. Such screening protocol needs to be based on a unit-specific ROP risk profile and, consequently, may vary between different European regions. Retinopathy of prematurity is an important cause of ocular morbidity and blindness in children. With better understanding of the pathogenesis, screening and treatment guidelines have changed over time and are unit specific.

  10. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma.

    Todd E Scheetz

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1, cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1 gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308 and matched controls (n = 157 using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05. These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG.

  11. Aqueous shunt implantation in glaucoma

    Jing Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous shunts or glaucoma drainage devices are increasingly utilized in the management of refractory glaucoma. The general design of the most commonly-used shunts is based on the principles of the Molteno implant: ie. a permanent sclerostomy (tube, a predetermined bleb area (plate and diversion of aqueous humour to the equatorial region and away from the limbal subconjunctival space. These three factors make aqueous shunts more resistant to scarring as compared to trabeculectomy. The two most commonly used shunts are the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve, which contains a flow-restrictor, and the non-valved Baervedlt Glaucoma Implant. While the valved implants have a lower tendency to hypotony and related complications, the non-valved implants with larger, more-biocompatible end plate design, achieve lower intraocular pressures with less encapsulation. Non-valved implants require additional suturing techniques to prevent early hypotony and a number of these methods will be described. Although serious shunt-related infection is rare, corneal decompensation and diplopia are small but significant risks.

  12. PSEUDOEXFOLIATION SYNDROME IN ETHIOPIAN GLAUCOMA ...

    1999-05-05

    May 5, 1999 ... of a systemic disorder involving an aberrant connective- tissue metabolism ... were included in this study, except those secondary glaucoma cases due to trauma, ... a1(17), found the five and 10 year cumulative probabilities of ...

  13. [Perimetric changes in advanced glaucoma].

    Feraru, Crenguta Ioana; Pantalon, Anca

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of various perimetric aspects in advanced glaucoma stages correlated to morpho-functional changes. MATHERIAL AND METHOD: Retrospective clinical trial over a 10 months time period that included patients with advanced glaucoma stages, for which there have been recorded several computerised visual field tests (central 24-2 strategy, 10-2 strategy with either III or V--Goldman stimulus spot size) along with other morpho-funtional ocular paramaters: VA, lOP optic disk analysis. We included in our study 56 eyes from 45 patients. In most cases 89% it was an open angle glaucoma (either primary or secondary) Mean visual acuity was 0.45 +/- 0.28. Regarding the perimetric deficit 83% had advanced deficit, 9% moderate and 8% early visual changes. As perimetric type of defect we found a majority with general reduction of sensitivity (33 eyes) + ring shape scotoma. In 6 eyes (10.7%) having left only a central isle of vision we performed the central 10-2 strategy with III or V Goldmann stimulus spot size. Statistic analysis showed scarce correlation between the visual acuity and the quantitative perimetric parameters (MD and PSD), and variance analysis found present a multiple correlation parameter p = 0.07 that proves there is no liniary correspondence between the morpho-functional parameters: VA-MD(PSD) and C/D ratio. In advanced glaucoma stages, the perimetric changes are mostly severe. Perimetric evaluation is essential in these stages and needs to be individualised.

  14. Role of macular xanthophylls in prevention of common neovascular retinopathies: retinopathy of prematurity and diabetic retinopathy.

    Gong, Xiaoming; Rubin, Lewis P

    2015-04-15

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are important causes of blindness among children and working-age adults, respectively. The development of both diseases involves retinal microvascular degeneration, vessel loss and consequent hypoxic and inflammatory pathologic retinal neovascularization. Mechanistic studies have shown that oxidative stress and subsequent derangement of cell signaling are important factors in disease progression. In eye and vision research, role of the dietary xanthophyll carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, has been more extensively studied in adult onset macular degeneration than these other retinopathies. These carotenoids also may decrease severity of ROP in preterm infants and of DR in working-age adults. A randomized controlled clinical trial of carotenoid supplementation in preterm infants indicated that lutein has functional effects in the neonatal eye and is anti-inflammatory. Three multicenter clinical trials all showed a trend of decreased ROP severity in the lutein supplemented group. Prospective studies on patients with non-proliferative DR indicate serum levels of lutein and zeaxanthin are significantly lower in these patients compared to normal subjects. The present review describes recent advances in lutein and zeaxanthin modulation of oxidative stress and inflammation related to ROP and DR and discusses potential roles of lutein/zeaxanthin in preventing or lessening the risks of disease initiation or progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening for diabetic retinopathy | Rice | Continuing Medical ...

    Good glucose control and the treatment of hypertension and hyperlipidaemia remain the key strategies in preventing diabetic retinopathy and its progression. Unfortunately, some degree of retinopathy will eventually develop in almost all type 1 diabetics and over 60% of type 2 diabetics over a 20-year period.

  16. Automated early detection of diabetic retinopathy

    Abràmoff, M.D.; Reinhardt, J.M.; Russell, S.R.; Folk, J.C.; Mahajan, V.B.; Niemeijer, M.; Quellec, G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of automated diabetic retinopathy (DR) detection, using the algorithm that won the 2009 Retinopathy Online Challenge Competition in 2009, the Challenge2009, against that of the one currently used in EyeCheck, a large computer-aided early DR detection project.

  17. Progress of inflammatory cytokines in glaucoma

    Ping Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucomais a group of diseases characterized by optic nerve damage and visual field defect, and pathological high intraocular pressure is a risk factor for glaucoma. Glaucoma is affected by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors, and inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A great deal of studies have confirmed that high expression of connective tissue growth factor(CTGF, tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α, interleukins(ILs, nuclear factor-kappa B(NF-κBand various cytokines in the aqueous humor of patients with glaucoma, which have a close correlation with pathogenesis of glaucoma.This article reviews the progress of inflammatory cytokines and their relationship with glaucoma.

  18. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes.......To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes....

  19. Low Vision Rehabilitation and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Khan, Sarfaraz A.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is emerging as a major cause of blindness. Diabetic retinopathy calls for a multidisciplinary to the patients. Management of the patient requires a team work by the internist, diabetologist, dietician, ophthalmologist and low vision therapist. Diabetic retinopathy very often results in vision loss. It is important for ophthalmologist to recognize the importance of low vision rehabilitation in formulating appropriate treatment strategies. People with low vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy usually experience difficulty in daily life. Most people with diabetic retinopathy (who have remaining useful vision) can be helped with low vision devices. However, often one low vision device may not be suitable for all purposes. A comprehensive low vision evaluation is required to assess the person's current visual status, identify the goals and the visual needs, and then design an individualized vision rehabilitation program to meet these needs. (author)

  20. Peripheral iridotomy for pigmentary glaucoma

    Michelessi, Manuele; Lindsley, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell death resulting in damage to the optic nerve head and the retinal nerve fiber layer. Pigment dispersion syndrome is characterized by a structural disturbance in the iris pigment epithelium (the densely pigmented posterior surface of the iris) that leads to dispersion of the pigment and its deposition on various structures within the eye. Pigmentary glaucoma is a specific form of open-angle glaucoma found in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Topcial medical therapy is usually the first-line treatment; however, peripheral laser iridotomy has been proposed as an alternate treatment. Peripheral laser iridotomy involves creating an opening in the iris tissue to allow drainage of fluid from the posterior chamber to the anterior chamber and vice versa. Equalizing the pressure within the eye may help to alleviate the friction that leads to pigment dispersion and prevent visual field deterioration. However, the effectiveness of peripheral laser iridotomy in reducing the development or progression of pigmentary glaucoma is unknown. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of peripheral laser iridotomy compared with other interventions, including medication, trabeculoplasty, and trabeculectomy, or no treatment, for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE and clinical trials websites such as (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 November 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that had compared peripheral laser iridotomy versus no treatment or other treatments for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures for systematic reviews. Two review authors independently screened articles for eligibility

  1. The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project

    Waisbourd, Michael; Pruzan, Noelle L.; Johnson, Deiana; Ugorets, Angela; Crews, John E.; Saaddine, Jinan B.; Henderer, Jeffery D.; Hark, Lisa A.; Katz, L. Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the detection rates of glaucoma-related diagnoses and the initial treatments received in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project, a community-based initiative aimed at improving the detection, treatment, and follow-up care of individuals at risk for glaucoma. Design Retrospective analysis. Participants A total of 1649 individuals at risk for glaucoma who were examined and treated in 43 community centers located in underserved communities of Philadelphia. Methods Individuals were enrolled if they were African American aged ≥50 years, were any other adult aged ≥60 years, or had a family history of glaucoma. After attending an informational glaucoma workshop, participants underwent a targeted glaucoma examination including an ocular, medical, and family history; visual acuity testing, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and corneal pachymetry; slit-lamp and optic nerve examination; automated visual field testing; and fundus color photography. If indicated, treatments included selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT), laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI), or IOP-lowering medications. Follow-up examinations were scheduled at the community sites after 4 to 6 weeks or 4 to 6 months, depending on the clinical scenario. Main Outcome Measures Detection rates of glaucoma-related diagnoses and types of treatments administered. Results Of the 1649 individuals enrolled, 645 (39.1%) received a glaucoma-related diagnosis; 20.0% (n = 330) were identified as open-angle glaucoma (OAG) suspects, 9.2% (n = 151) were identified as having narrow angles (or as a primary angle closure/suspect), and 10.0% (n = 164) were diagnosed with glaucoma, including 9.0% (n = 148) with OAG and 1.0% (n = 16) with angle-closure glaucoma. Overall, 39.0% (n = 64 of 164) of those diagnosed with glaucoma were unaware of their diagnosis. A total of 196 patients (11.9%) received glaucoma-related treatment, including 84 (5.1%) who underwent LPI, 13 (0.8%) who underwent SLT

  2. Angle closure glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea.

    Wang, Grace M; Thuente, Daniel; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2018-06-01

    Congenital ectropion uvea is a rare anomaly, which is associated with open, but dysplastic iridocorneal angles that cause childhood glaucoma. Herein, we present 3 cases of angle-closure glaucoma in children with congenital ectropion uvea. Three children were initially diagnosed with unilateral glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uvea at 7, 8 and 13 years of age. The three cases showed 360° of ectropion uvea and iris stromal atrophy in the affected eye. In one case, we have photographic documentation of progression to complete angle closure, which necessitated placement of a glaucoma drainage device 3 years after combined trabeculotomy and trabeculectomy. The 2 other cases, which presented as complete angle closure, also underwent glaucoma drainage device implantation. All three cases had early glaucoma drainage device encapsulation (within 4 months) and required additional surgery (cycloablation or trabeculectomy). Congenital ectropion uvea can be associated with angle-closure glaucoma, and placement of glaucoma drainage devices in all 3 of our cases showed early failure due to plate encapsulation. Glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea requires attention to angle configuration and often requires multiple surgeries to obtain intraocular pressure control.

  3. Malignant glaucoma after cataract surgery.

    Varma, Devesh K; Belovay, Graham W; Tam, Diamond Y; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2014-11-01

    To report a series of eyes that developed malignant glaucoma after cataract surgery. Private academic practice, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Retrospective case series. Eyes that developed malignant glaucoma after cataract surgery were treated with medical therapy. This was followed by laser iridozonulohyaloidotomy, anterior chamber reformation and intraocular lens (IOL) pushback, and finally with surgical iridozonulohyaloidovitrectomy if all other measures were unsuccessful. Refraction, intraocular pressure (IOP), gonioscopy, and anterior chamber depth (ACD) by anterior segment optical coherence tomography were analyzed before treatment and after treatment. The study evaluated 20 eyes of 18 female patients aged 44 to 86 years. Preoperatively, the mean refraction was +3.11 diopters (D) ± 2.89 (SD), the mean axial length was 21.30 ± 1.40 mm, and all eyes had narrow or closed angles. Malignant glaucoma was diagnosed a mean of 5.8 ± 7.1 weeks postoperatively. At diagnosis, the mean refraction was -2.15 ± 2.95 D; the mean ACD, 2.49 ± 0.72 mm; and the mean IOP, 28.3 ± 10.8 mm Hg on a mean of 1.3 ± 1.6 medications. Two eyes responded to cycloplegia, 7 to laser iridozonulohyaloidotomy, and 6 to anterior chamber reformation-IOL pushback; 5 eyes required vitrectomy. Posttreatment, the mean refraction was -0.56 ± 1.07 D; the mean ACD, 3.30 ± 0.50 mm; and the mean IOP, 14.4 ± 4.60 mm Hg on a mean of 1.2 ± 1.4 medications. Cycloplegia was discontinued in 17 eyes. Malignant glaucoma can occur after phacoemulsification and presents with myopic surprise, anterior chamber shallowing and, possibly, elevated IOP. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Ahmed valve in glaucoma surgery].

    Bikbov, M M; Khusnitdinov, I I

    This is a review on Ahmed valve application in glaucoma surgery. It contains, in particular, data on the Ahmed valve efficiency, results of experimental and histological studies of filtering bleb encapsulation, examines the use of antimetabolites and anti-VEGF agents, and discusses implantation techniques. The current appraisal of antimetabolites delivery systems integrated into the Ahmed valve is presented. Various complications encountered in practice and preventive measures are also covered.

  5. Update on normal tension glaucoma

    Jyotiranjan Mallick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases, systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG.

  6. Composite fibrous glaucoma drainage implant

    Klapstova, A.; Horakova, J.; Shynkarenko, A.; Lukas, D.

    2017-10-01

    Glaucoma is a frequent reason of loss vision. It is usually caused by increased intraocular pressure leading to damage of optic nerve head. This work deals with the development of fibrous structure suitable for glaucoma drainage implants (GDI). Commercially produced metallic glaucoma implants are very effective in lowering intraocular pressure. However, these implants may cause adverse events such as damage to adjacent tissue, fibrosis, hypotony or many others [1]. The aim of this study is to reduce undesirable properties of currently produced drains and improve their properties by creating of the composite fibrous drain for achieve a normal intraocular pressure. Two types of electrospinning technologies were used for the production of very small tubular implants. First type was focused for production of outer part of tubular drain and the second type of electrospinning method made the inner part of shape follows the connections of both parts. Complete implant had a special properties suitable for drainage of fluid. Morphological parameters, liquid transport tests and in-vitro cell adhesion tests were detected.

  7. Glaucoma and dry eye disease: the role of preservatives in glaucoma medications

    Ratna Sitompul

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a common cause of irreversible blindness with increasing prevalence. Some of glaucoma patients will also experience dry eye. Dry eye is the most frequent side effect related to benzalkonium chloride (BAC-containing eye drop  used for glaucoma patients. In addition, glaucoma and dry eyes have shared risk factors that are old age and female. Dry eye among glaucoma patients need to be treated promptly as it produces discomfort, reduces patients’ compliance and   decreases success rate of glaucoma therapy. Dry eye symptoms can be treated by applying preservative-free eye drop, giving combination of preservative containing and preservative-free eye drop to reduce BAC exposure, prescribing artificial tear and conducting surgery to minimize or eliminate the need of topical medication. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:302-5Keywords: benzalkonium chloride, dry eye, glaucoma

  8. Prevalence of open angle glaucoma in accompanying first degree relatives of patients with glaucoma

    Franciele Vegini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of open angle glaucoma in first-degree relatives accompanying POAG patients during routine examination in a reference hospital. METHOD: First-degree relatives of primary open angle glaucoma patients who accompanied their relatives to the glaucoma service of a reference hospital were screened for glaucoma. RESULTS: One-hundred and one first-degree relatives were examined, of which 56.4% had never had their intraocular pressure measured. 10.9% had previously been diagnosed with glaucoma, and 5.9% were newly diagnosed during this study. CONCLUSIONS: The eye examination of first-degree relatives identified a significant percentage of individuals with glaucoma. Despite being first-degree relatives of glaucoma patients, 56.4% of the companions had never had their eye pressure measured, demonstrating a lack of awareness about this disease.

  9. Glaucoma and clinical characteristics in Vietnamese Americans.

    Peng, Pai-Huei; Manivanh, Richard; Nguyen, Ngoc; Weinreb, Robert N; Lin, Shan C

    2011-08-01

    To assess the proportions of glaucoma types and clinical characteristics in Vietnamese Americans in a single-center, retrospective study. Medical charts of Vietnamese-American patients who visited a single private practice in Northern California from 1998-2007 were reviewed. The main outcome measures included the distribution and characteristics of glaucoma types, and clinical parameters associated with the presence of various glaucomas. Data from 2247 patients aged 18-98 years were reviewed. Glaucoma was determined for 305 patients (13.6%). Among this group, 54.8% had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), 26.9% had primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG), 13.4% had mixed mechanism glaucoma (MMG), and 4.9% had secondary glaucoma. In the MMG group (41 patients), 27 patients who initially had open angles developed narrow angles and underwent laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) with a mean follow up of 6.4 years from the time of iridotomy. The other 13 patients had glaucoma progression with open angles after LPI. One POAG patient had neovascular glaucoma due to retinal vein occlusion several years later. Compared to the PACG group, the MMG group had significantly lower baseline intraocular pressure (25.0 vs. 20.2 mmHg, p = 0.007) but with no difference in biometry. POAG is the major type of glaucoma in this clinic-based Vietnamese population. However, Vietnamese appear to have a relatively higher proportion of PACG than Caucasians and those of African descent. It is recommended that gonioscopy be part of the regular eye check-up for adult Vietnamese patients.

  10. Diabetic Retinopathy Grading by Digital Curvelet Transform

    Shirin Hajeb Mohammad Alipour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major complications of diabetes is diabetic retinopathy. As manual analysis and diagnosis of large amount of images are time consuming, automatic detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy are desired. In this paper, we use fundus fluorescein angiography and color fundus images simultaneously, extract 6 features employing curvelet transform, and feed them to support vector machine in order to determine diabetic retinopathy severity stages. These features are area of blood vessels, area, regularity of foveal avascular zone, and the number of micro-aneurisms therein, total number of micro-aneurisms, and area of exudates. In order to extract exudates and vessels, we respectively modify curvelet coefficients of color fundus images and angiograms. The end points of extracted vessels in predefined region of interest based on optic disk are connected together to segment foveal avascular zone region. To extract micro-aneurisms from angiogram, first extracted vessels are subtracted from original image, and after removing detected background by morphological operators and enhancing bright small pixels, micro-aneurisms are detected. 70 patients were involved in this study to classify diabetic retinopathy into 3 groups, that is, (1 no diabetic retinopathy, (2 mild/moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, (3 severe nonproliferative/proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and our simulations show that the proposed system has sensitivity and specificity of 100% for grading.

  11. Predicted impact of extending the screening interval for diabetic retinopathy: the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening programme.

    Looker, H C; Nyangoma, S O; Cromie, D T; Olson, J A; Leese, G P; Philip, S; Black, M W; Doig, J; Lee, N; Briggs, A; Hothersall, E J; Morris, A D; Lindsay, R S; McKnight, J A; Pearson, D W M; Sattar, N A; Wild, S H; McKeigue, P; Colhoun, H M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to identify subgroups of patients attending the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening (DRS) programme who might safely move from annual to two yearly retinopathy screening. This was a retrospective cohort study of screening data from the DRS programme collected between 2005 and 2011 for people aged ≥12 years with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Scotland. We used hidden Markov models to calculate the probabilities of transitions to referable diabetic retinopathy (referable background or proliferative retinopathy) or referable maculopathy. The study included 155,114 individuals with no referable diabetic retinopathy or maculopathy at their first DRS examination and with one or more further DRS examinations. There were 11,275 incident cases of referable diabetic eye disease (9,204 referable maculopathy, 2,071 referable background or proliferative retinopathy). The observed transitions to referable background or proliferative retinopathy were lower for people with no visible retinopathy vs mild background retinopathy at their prior examination (respectively, 1.2% vs 8.1% for type 1 diabetes and 0.6% vs 5.1% for type 2 diabetes). The lowest probability for transitioning to referable background or proliferative retinopathy was among people with two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy, where the probability was <0.3% for type 1 and <0.2% for type 2 diabetes at 2 years. Transition rates to referable diabetic eye disease were lowest among people with type 2 diabetes and two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy. If such people had been offered two yearly screening the DRS service would have needed to screen 40% fewer people in 2009.

  12. Determining diabetic retinopathy screening interval based on time from no retinopathy to laser therapy.

    Hughes, Daniel; Nair, Sunil; Harvey, John N

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To determine the necessary screening interval for retinopathy in diabetic patients with no retinopathy based on time to laser therapy and to assess long-term visual outcome following screening. Methods In a population-based community screening programme in North Wales, 2917 patients were followed until death or for approximately 12 years. At screening, 2493 had no retinopathy; 424 had mostly minor degrees of non-proliferative retinopathy. Data on timing of first laser therapy and visual outcome following screening were obtained from local hospitals and ophthalmology units. Results Survival analysis showed that very few of the no retinopathy at screening group required laser therapy in the early years compared with the non-proliferative retinopathy group ( p retinopathy at screening group required laser therapy, and at three years 0.2% (cumulative), lower rates of treatment than have been suggested by analyses of sight-threatening retinopathy determined photographically. At follow-up (mean 7.8 ± 4.6 years), mild to moderate visual impairment in one or both eyes due to diabetic retinopathy was more common in those with retinopathy at screening (26% vs. 5%, p diabetes occurred in only 1 in 1000. Conclusions Optimum screening intervals should be determined from time to active treatment. Based on requirement for laser therapy, the screening interval for diabetic patients with no retinopathy can be extended to two to three years. Patients who attend for retinal screening and treatment who have no or non-proliferative retinopathy now have a very low risk of eventual blindness from diabetes.

  13. Design of low cost glaucoma screening

    Niessen, A. G.; Langerhorst, C. T.; Geijssen, H. C.; Greve, E. L.

    1997-01-01

    In 1991 the Netherlands Glaucoma Patient Association organized a glaucoma screening survey. This survey was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a low cost screening setting. During a screening period of 8 days, 1259 subjects over the age of 49 years were examined by a team of

  14. GLAUCOMA IN PSEUDOEXFOLIATION- CLINICAL PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Balasubramanian M. Manickavelu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pseudoexfoliation is one of the common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide with a mean progression rate higher than primary open-angle glaucoma. In India, prevalence rate of pseudoexfoliation is around 2% (Hiller et al. In South India, the prevalence rate is 6% in >40 years of age as per Krishnadas et al in 2003. The aim of the study is to study the demographic aspects of pseudoexfoliation, the frequency of glaucoma in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome and to assess the treatment response in pseudoexfoliation syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted among 96 patients with pseudoexfoliation who attended OP Department of Ophthalmology, Government Tiruvannamalai Medical College and Hospital, Tiruvannamalai, from January 2017 to June 2017. Complete ocular examination with visual acuity, anterior segment examination, intraocular pressure, gonioscopy, fundus examination, central corneal thickness, visual field, ultrasound B scan and ultrasound biomicroscopy was done. RESULTS Incidence of glaucoma is more common in pseudoexfoliation and most of them have open angles. All patients with pseudoexfoliation should undergo complete glaucoma evaluation for early detection. Further ophthalmologist should focus on detection of pseudoexfoliation, since it is related to high risk of operative complication. CONCLUSION Incidence of glaucoma is more in pseudoexfoliation with most common bilateral presentation with open angles with recalcitrant intraocular pressure. Severity of optic nerve damage and with progression of field defects appeared to be more compared to primary open-angle glaucoma. Better response to combination drug therapy and surgical therapy than primary open-angle glaucoma.

  15. Determinants of glaucoma awareness in urban punjab

    Farooq, S.; Jaffar, S.; Kausar, A.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the awareness about glaucoma and the factors affecting it in urban Punjab population. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in March-April 2011 in Rawalpindi District Punjab, Pakistan. Material and Methods: Glaucoma awareness study was conducted on urban population of Rawalpindi, Islamabad, Lahore and Taxila. Individuals belonging to medical profession (doctors, nurses and paramedics etc) were not included. Demographic details and educational status of all participants were documented. A brief structured close-ended study questionnaire was used to collect information about their awareness of risk factors, treatment aspects and complication of glaucoma. Results: There were 729 participants in the study. Majority were females (60.1%) and adults (76.1%). Literacy level of 40.2% was up to matriculate level. The study indicated that the awareness level about glaucoma was low especially about the recognition of high-risk groups and symptoms. Only one-third of respondents i.e. 32.6% had an idea about the symptoms of the disease and 27.4% participants had awareness of glaucoma as a blinding eye disease. Determinants of glaucoma awareness amongst study participants were gender, age, education level and occupation. Conclusion: Awareness of glaucoma was quite low among the urban population in Punjab. There is need of increased public health education to reduce glaucoma associated blindness and its burden on society. (author)

  16. Normal tension glaucoma and Alzheimer disease

    Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kessing, Svend Vedel; Mogensen, Ulla Brasch

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is associated with increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: A total of 69 patients with NTG were identified in the case note files in the Glaucoma Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet...

  17. New pharmacotherapy for the treatment of glaucoma.

    Schehlein, Emily M; Novack, Gary; Robin, Alan L

    2017-12-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world and current pharmacotherapies for glaucoma have remained relatively unchanged (with the exception of fixed combinations of previously available medications) since the mid-1990s with the development of prostaglandin analogues. Now, with both new formulations and new classes of medications with novel mechanisms of action, the medical therapy of glaucoma may be heralding a new dawn in medical management. Areas covered: This review outlines new topical therapies for intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering treatment, in addition to new formulations, preservative-free options, and advances in glaucoma medical therapy delivery. We performed a comprehensive search for published studies for glaucoma medical therapy using the electronic database PubMed. A manual search for each therapy or delivery system was also performed. Expert commentary: These advances in glaucoma therapy have the potential to overcome many barriers to glaucoma's medical care, particularly in terms of adherence. However, both time and research are needed to prove the relative efficacy and safety of these new pharmacotherapies and products, helping us decide their role in the treatment of elevated intraocular pressure. We are hopeful that these new developments in therapy may bring more options for glaucoma medical therapy.

  18. Progress on study of the risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity

    Hong-Cheng Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity(ROPis an ocular disease caused by retinal ophthalmic dysplasia in premature infants, leads to strabismus, amblyopia, cataract, glaucoma, and even blindness, which seriously affects the quality of life of preterm infants. The infant blindness ratio has climbed to 6%-18%, according to figures released by the World Health Organisation. ROP is the primary cause of blindness in children of the world in recent years. But the pathogenesis of ROP is not yet clear. Gestational age, birth weight, oxygen intake, delivery mode, multiple newborns, neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, anemia, blood transfusion, sepsis, infection, hypercapnia, hyperbilirubinemia, maternal prenatal use of a drug are all the risk factors. We reviewed the risk factors and possible mechanism of ROP, in order to offer theoretical support for the study and prevention of ROP in premature infants.

  19. Glaucoma Drainage Device Erosion Following Ptosis Surgery.

    Bae, Steven S; Campbell, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    To highlight the potential risk of glaucoma drainage device erosion following ptosis surgery. Case report. A 71-year-old man underwent uncomplicated superotemporal Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in the left eye in 2008. Approximately 8 years later, the patient underwent bilateral ptosis repair, which successfully raised the upper eyelid position. Three months postoperatively, the patient's glaucoma drainage implant tube eroded through the corneal graft tissue and overlying conjunctiva to become exposed. A graft revision surgery was successfully performed with no further complications. Caution and conservative lid elevation may be warranted when performing ptosis repair in patients with a glaucoma drainage implant, and patients with a glaucoma implant undergoing ptosis surgery should be followed closely for signs of tube erosion.

  20. Driving patterns in older adults with glaucoma.

    van Landingham, Suzanne W; Hochberg, Chad; Massof, Robert W; Chan, Emilie; Friedman, David S; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2013-02-21

    The ability to drive is important for ensuring quality of life for many older adults. Glaucoma is prevalent in this age group and may affect driving. The purpose of this study is to determine if glaucoma and glaucomatous visual field (VF) loss are associated with driving cessation, limitations, and deference to another driver in older adults. Cross-sectional study. Eighty-one glaucoma subjects and 58 glaucoma suspect controls between age 60 and 80 reported if they had ceased driving, limited their driving in various ways, or preferred another to drive. Twenty-three percent of glaucoma subjects and 6.9% of suspects had ceased driving (p = 0.01). Glaucoma subjects also had more driving limitations than suspects (2.0 vs. 1.1, p = 0.007). In multivariable models, driving cessation was more likely for glaucoma subjects as compared to suspects (OR = 4.0; 95% CI = 1.1-14.7; p = 0.03). The odds of driving cessation doubled with each 5 decibel (dB) decrement in the better-eye VF mean deviation (MD) (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.4-2.9; p driving limitations (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-16.8; p = 0.02). The likelihood of reporting more limitations increased with the VF loss severity (OR = 1.6 per 5 dB decrement in the better-eye VF MD; 95% CI = 1.1-2.4; p = 0.02). Neither glaucoma nor VF MD was associated with other driver preference (p > 0.1 for both). Glaucoma and glaucomatous VF loss are associated with greater likelihood of driving cessation and greater limitation of driving in the elderly. Further prospective study is merited to assess when and why people with glaucoma change their driving habits, and to determine if their observed self-regulation of driving is adequate to ensure safety.

  1. Scanning the macula for detecting glaucoma

    Viquar U Begum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the advent of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT, there has been a renewed interest in macular region for detection of glaucoma. However, most macular SDOCT parameters currently are thickness parameters which evaluate thinning of the macular layers but do not quantify the extent of area over which the thinning has occurred. We therefore calculated a new macular parameter, "ganglion cell complex surface abnormality ratio (GCC SAR" that represented the surface area over which the macular thickness was decreased. Purpose: To evaluate the ability of SAR in detecting perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma. Design: Retrospective image analysis. Materials and Methods: 68 eyes with perimetric glaucoma, 62 eyes with preperimetric glaucoma and 165 control eyes underwent GCC imaging with SDOCT. SAR was calculated as the ratio of the abnormal to total area on the GCC significance map. Statistical Analysis: Diagnostic ability of SAR in glaucoma was compared against that of the standard parameters generated by the SDOCT software using area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC and sensitivities at fixed specificities. Results: AUC of SAR (0.91 was statistically significantly better than that of GCC average thickness (0.86, P = 0.001 and GCC global loss volume (GLV; 0.88, P = 0.01 in differentiating perimetric glaucoma from control eyes. In differentiating preperimetric glaucoma from control eyes, AUC of SAR (0.72 was comparable to that of GCC average thickness (0.70, P > 0.05 and GLV (0.72, P > 0.05. Sensitivities at specificities of 80% and 95% of SAR were comparable (P > 0.05 for all comparisons to that of GCC average thickness and GLV in diagnosing perimetric and preperimetric glaucoma. Conclusion: GCC SAR had a better ability to diagnose perimetric glaucoma compared to the SDOCT software provided global GCC parameters. However, in diagnosing preperimetric glaucoma, the ability of SAR was similar to that of

  2. The Ahmed Glaucoma Valve in Refractory Glaucoma: Experiences in Southwest Ethiopia.

    Gessesse, Girum W

    2015-07-01

    The management of refractory glaucoma is a challenging task for any glaucoma surgeon. This study is aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve implantation in refractory glaucomas in South-West Ethiopia. A retrospective review was conducted on the charts of consecutive patients treated with Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation at Jimma University Specialized Hospital between August 2012 and August 2014. Success was defined as Intraocular Pressure (IOP) less than 22 mm Hg and greater than 5mm Hg at 6 months, with at least 30% reduction from baseline, without medical therapy (complete success) or either with or without medication (qualified successes). A total of 12 eyes of 11 patients were included. The mean age of patients was 40.7 (SD= 19.0) years; 63.6% of them were males. The main types of glaucoma were pseudoexfoliative (3 eyes), uveitic (2 eyes), chronic angle closure (2 eyes) and Juvenile Open Angle (JOAG) (2 eyes). The mean IOP was reduced from preoperative level (32.75±7.14 mmHg) to (15.75 ±4.35 mmHg) at six postoperative months, (PAhmed glaucoma valve implant appears to be effective and relatively safe for treating complicated glaucomas with success rate comparable with those reported from other studies. Ahmed glaucoma valve, refractory glaucoma, complications, Ethiopia.

  3. Outcomes of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Revision in Pediatric Glaucoma.

    Al-Omairi, Ahmed Mansour; Al Ameri, Aliah H; Al-Shahwan, Sami; Khan, Arif O; Al-Jadaan, Ibrahim; Mousa, Ahmed; Edward, Deepak P

    2017-11-01

    Encapsulation of the Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) plate is a common cause for postoperative elevation of intraocular pressure, especially in children. Many reports have described the outcomes of AGV revision in adults. However, the outcomes of AGV revision in children are poorly documented. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of AGV revision in children. Retrospective cross-sectional study. A retrospective chart review of patients less than 15 years of age who underwent AGV revision with a minimum postoperative follow-up of 6 months was conducted. Outcome measures included reduction in intraocular pressure from baseline, survival analysis, and reduction in the number of antiglaucoma medications. Postoperative complications were also noted. Complete success was defined as an IOP of 21 mm Hg or less without medications, while qualified success was defined as having an IOP of 21 mm Hg or less with medications. A total of 44 eyes met the inclusion criteria. Primary congenital glaucoma was present in 39 eyes (88.6%), aphakic glaucoma in 4 eyes (9.1%), and Peters anomaly-associated glaucoma in 1 eye (2.3%). The mean number of previous surgeries was 1.4, and the mean age was 6.7 years (range, 1.9-13 years) with a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-24 months). The IOP was reduced from a preoperative mean of 30.4 (± 10.3) to 24.9 (± 10.6) mm Hg at 6 months postoperatively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the complete success rate at 1 month was 100% followed by a rapid decline at 6 months to 38.6%, 27.7% at 1 year, and 5.5% at 2 years. Qualified success rate was 100% at 1 month followed by a 6-month and 1-year survival rate of approximately 50% and a 2-year survival rate of approximately 16%. The median survival time was 14 months. No specific risk factors for failure were identified. Visual acuity remained unchanged following revision. The most common complication was recurrence of encapsulation with elevated IOP (15.9%). Other

  4. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber...... and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only...... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. The Department of Ophthalmology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, has a strong tradition of studying the retinal microvasculature in diabetic retinopathy. In the present paper, we demonstrate the importance of the retinal vasculature not only as predictors of long...

  5. DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AND THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY

    SYED ALWI SAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is associated with increased risk of development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR. Although pregnancy does not have any long term effect on DR, progression of retinopathy changes occur in 50%-70% of cases. The greatest risk of worsening occurs during the second trimester and persists as long as 12 months postpartum. The other factors found to be associated with its progression include duration of the diabetes, severity of retinopathy at conception, hyperglycaemic control, anaemia and progression of coexisting hypertension. Because of the increased risk of progression of the disease inpregnancy, conception should be delayed till the ocular disease is treated and stabilized and laser photocoagulation should be promptly instituted in all cases of severe non-proliferative retinopathy and should not be delayed till the patient develops early proliferative changes. Good diabetic control before and during pregnancy can help prevent this increase in the progression and serious vision loss.

  6. Efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab combined with Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma.

    Tang, Min; Fu, Yang; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Zhi; Fan, Ying; Sun, Xiaodong; Xu, Xun

    2016-01-09

    Neovascular glaucoma is a refractive glaucoma. Recently, anti-VEGF factors have been used alone or in combination for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma. However, the medium- and long-term efficacy of such drugs remains to be evaluated. This study was to determine the efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab combined with Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma. In this prospective non-randomized study, 43 neovascular glaucoma patients (43 eyes) were assigned to receive either 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab for three to 14 days before Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation (injection group, n = 21) or Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation alone (control group, n = 22). The patients were followed up for six to 12 months. Differences in surgical success rate, intraocular pressure, best corrected visual acuity, anti-glaucoma medications and postoperative complications were compared between the two groups. Surgical success was defined as IOP > = 6 mm Hg and glaucoma medications, and without severe complications or reoperation. Of the 43 patients, 40 completed the 6-month follow-up and 37 completed the 1-year follow-up. Success rate was 73.7% vs. 71.4% at six months and 72.2% vs. 68.4% at 12 months in the injection group and the control group respectively. No significant difference was noted between the two groups (six months: P = 0.87, 12 months: P = 1.00). There were no significant differences in the two groups with respect to intraocular pressure, best corrected visual acuity, anti-glaucoma medications or postoperative complications at six months or 12 months. Single intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg) before surgery has no significant effect on the medium- or long-term outcomes of neovascular glaucoma treated with Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ( ChiCTR-OOC-14005709, Trial registration date: 2014-12-01).

  7. xidative Stress and Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Ümeyye Taka Aydın; Hatip Aydın; Osman Çekiç

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of retinopathy of prematurity. Insufficient antioxidant system and increased oxidative stress in premature infants lead to the development of the disease. Understanding the mechanism of oxidative stress and antioxidant system and the related signaling pathways contribute to the development of novel options for diagnosis and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity. The current review aimed to evaluate the relationship between ox...

  8. Antiretinal antibody- proven autoimmune retinopathy

    Sharanya Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A young female presented with bilateral subacute onset of progressive decrease in night vision and reduced peripheral field of vision. The short duration and rapid progression of symptoms along with the lack of family history of night blindness prompted a diagnosis of autoimmune retinopathy (AIR. Fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, visual fields, and electroretinogram were suggestive of AIR. A differential diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP was also made. Antiretinal autoantibodies were detected in the blood sample. Treatment was with oral steroids and subsequently oral immunosuppressive agents. Visual acuity was maintained, fundus examination reverted to normal, and investigations repeated at every visit were stable with improvement in visual fields. Our case suggests that AIR, if diagnosed early and treated appropriately, may have a good outcome and should be considered in patients with an atypical presentation of RP.

  9. Diabetic retinopathy screening: global and local perspective.

    Gangwani, R A; Lian, J X; McGhee, S M; Wong, D; Li, K Kw

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a global epidemic. It causes significant macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and stroke; as well as microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Diabetic retinopathy is known to be the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population and may be asymptomatic until vision loss occurs. Screening for diabetic retinopathy has been shown to reduce blindness by timely detection and effective laser treatment. Diabetic retinopathy screening is being done worldwide either as a national screening programme or hospital-based project or as a community-based screening programme. In this article, we review different methods of screening including grading used to detect the severity of sight-threatening retinopathy and the newer screening methods. This review also includes the method of systematic screening being carried out in Hong Kong, a system that has helped to identify diabetic retinopathy among all attendees in public primary care clinics using a Hong Kong-wide public patients' database.

  10. Diabetic retinopathy screening using deep neural network.

    Ramachandran, Nishanthan; Hong, Sheng Chiong; Sime, Mary J; Wilson, Graham A

    2017-09-07

    There is a burgeoning interest in the use of deep neural network in diabetic retinal screening. To determine whether a deep neural network could satisfactorily detect diabetic retinopathy that requires referral to an ophthalmologist from a local diabetic retinal screening programme and an international database. Retrospective audit. Diabetic retinal photos from Otago database photographed during October 2016 (485 photos), and 1200 photos from Messidor international database. Receiver operating characteristic curve to illustrate the ability of a deep neural network to identify referable diabetic retinopathy (moderate or worse diabetic retinopathy or exudates within one disc diameter of the fovea). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity. For detecting referable diabetic retinopathy, the deep neural network had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.901 (95% confidence interval 0.807-0.995), with 84.6% sensitivity and 79.7% specificity for Otago and 0.980 (95% confidence interval 0.973-0.986), with 96.0% sensitivity and 90.0% specificity for Messidor. This study has shown that a deep neural network can detect referable diabetic retinopathy with sensitivities and specificities close to or better than 80% from both an international and a domestic (New Zealand) database. We believe that deep neural networks can be integrated into community screening once they can successfully detect both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  12. Graft failure: III. Glaucoma escalation after penetrating keratoplasty.

    Greenlee, Emily C; Kwon, Young H

    2008-06-01

    Glaucoma after penetrating keratoplasty is a frequently observed post-operative complication and is a risk factor for graft failure. Penetrating keratoplasty performed for aphakic and pseudophakic bullous keratopathy and inflammatory conditions are more likely to cause postoperative glaucoma compared with keratoconus and Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy. The intraocular pressure elevation may occur immediately after surgery or in the early to late postoperative period. Early postoperative causes of glaucoma include pre-existing glaucoma, retained viscoelastic, hyphema, inflammation, pupillary block, aqueous misdirection, or suprachoroidal hemorrhage. Late causes include pre-existing glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, ghost cell glaucoma, suprachoroidal hemorrhage, and steroid-induced glaucoma. Determining the cause of IOP elevation can help guide therapeutic intervention. Treatments for refractory glaucoma include topical anti-glaucoma medications such as beta-adrenergic blockers. Topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, miotic agents, adrenergic agonists, and prostaglandin analogs should be used with caution in the post-keratoplasty patient, because of the possibility of corneal decompensation, cystoid macular edema, or persistent inflammation. Various glaucoma surgical treatments have reported success in post-keratoplasty glaucoma. Trabeculectomy with mitomycin C can be successful in controlling IOP without the corneal toxicity noted with 5-fluorouracil. Glaucoma drainage devices have successfully controlled intraocular pressure in postkeratoplasty glaucoma; this is, however, associated with increased risk of graft failure. Placement of the tube through the pars plana may improve graft success compared with implantation within the anterior chamber. In addition, cyclophotocoagulation remains a useful procedure for eyes that have refractory glaucoma despite multiple surgical interventions.

  13. Relation between Glaucoma and Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    A Mollasadeghi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness throughout the world. Some studies have suggested a relationship between glaucoma and sensorineural hearing loss, while others have found no evidence of an association. We performed a study to determine whether there is a significant difference in hearing of patients with glaucoma and a match control population. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, from February, 2005 till April, 2006, 44 patients with glaucoma were studied. The age range was between 15 to 60 years. After taking a complete medical history, those suffering from presbycusis, history of exposure to ototoxic drugs and substances and history of ear surgery were excluded from the study. All of the patients were cases of open-angle glaucoma, and were surveyed separately for normal-pressure glaucoma. Then complete audiometric tests (PTA, SDS, SRT, Impedance were conducted for all of them, and the results compared with a control group. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the case group and control group in PTA, SDS, and SRT, except for Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG. There wasn't any statistically significant difference between two groups with respect to age, gender, and history of diseases. In the NTG group, significant difference was seen only in high frequencies. Conclusion: As mentioned, there was a statistically significant difference between NTG group and control group. It is therefore recommended to conduct complete audiometric tests and histopathologic examinations in this group for early detection of hearing loss and application of rehabilitative measures.

  14. Glaucoma as a Metabolic Optic Neuropathy: Making the Case for Nicotinamide Treatment in Glaucoma.

    Williams, Pete A; Harder, Jeffrey M; John, Simon W M

    2017-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important, if not essential, component of human glaucoma. Using transcriptomics followed by molecular and neurobiological techniques, we have recently demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction within retinal ganglion cells is an early feature in the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma. Guided by these findings, we discovered that the retinal level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, a key molecule for mitochondrial health) declines in an age-dependent manner. We hypothesized that this decline in NAD renders retinal ganglion cells susceptible to damage during periods of elevated intraocular pressure. To replete NAD levels in this glaucoma, we administered nicotinamide (the amide of vitamin B3). At the lowest dose tested, nicotinamide robustly protected from glaucoma (~70% of eyes had no detectable glaucomatous neurodegeneration). At this dose, nicotinamide had no influence on intraocular pressure and so its effect was neuroprotective. At the highest dose tested, 93% of eyes had no detectable glaucoma. This represents a ~10-fold decrease in the risk of developing glaucoma. At this dose, intraocular pressure still became elevated but there was a reduction in the degree of elevation showing an additional benefit. Thus, nicotinamide is unexpectedly potent at preventing this glaucoma and is an attractive option for glaucoma therapeutics. Our findings demonstrate the promise for both preventing and treating glaucoma by interventions that bolster metabolism during increasing age and during periods of elevated intraocular pressure. Nicotinamide prevents age-related declines in NAD (a decline that occurs in different genetic contexts and species). NAD precursors are reported to protect from a variety of neurodegenerative conditions. Thus, nicotinamide may provide a much needed neuroprotective treatment against human glaucoma. This manuscript summarizes human data implicating mitochondria in glaucoma, and argues for studies to

  15. Delay in diabetic retinopathy screening increases the rate of detection of referable diabetic retinopathy.

    Scanlon, P H; Aldington, S J; Stratton, I M

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether there is a relationship between delay in retinopathy screening after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and level of retinopathy detected. Patients were referred from 88 primary care practices to an English National Health Service diabetic eye screening programme. Data for screened patients were extracted from the primary care databases using semi-automated data collection algorithms supplemented by validation processes. The programme uses two-field mydriatic digital photographs graded by a quality assured team. Data were available for 8183 screened patients with diabetes newly diagnosed in 2005, 2006 or 2007. Only 163 with type 1 diabetes were identified and were insufficient for analysis. Data were available for 8020 with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Of these, 3569 were screened within 6 months, 2361 between 6 and 11 months, 1058 between 12 and 17 months, 366 between 18 and 23 months, 428 between 24 and 35 months, and 238 at 3 years or more after diagnosis. There were 5416 (67.5%) graded with no retinopathy, 1629 (20.3%) with background retinopathy in one eye, 753 (9.4%) with background retinopathy in both eyes and 222 (2.8%) had referable diabetic retinopathy. There was a significant trend (P = 0.0004) relating time from diagnosis to screening detecting worsening retinopathy. Of those screened within 6 months of diagnosis, 2.3% had referable retinopathy and, 3 years or more after diagnosis, 4.2% had referable retinopathy. The rate of detection of referable diabetic retinopathy is elevated in those who were not screened promptly after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  16. Importance of intraocular pressure in glaucoma

    Joos, Karen M.

    1999-06-01

    Glaucoma results in permanent vision loss and affects the peripheral vision initially. It is presented in 22.5 million people worldwide and is the 3rd cause of blindness. Present tonometers are not ideal for intraocular pressure measurements in all eyes. Of concern, PRK and LASIK may result in lower intraocular pressure readings. A challenges now exists for the development of a tonometer which can easily compensate for corneas with many parameters to avoid a future increase in normal-tension glaucoma or glaucoma which is advanced.

  17. Coincidence of retinitis pigmentosa and pseudoexfoliative glaucoma

    Božić Marija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This is an observational case report presenting retinitis pigmentosa associated with pseudoexfoliative glaucoma. Case outline. A 69-year-old man presented with retinitis pigmentosa. On examination, pseudoexfoliative material was detected on anterior segment structures, and intraocular pressure was 26 mmHg in the right and 24 mmHg in the left eye. The patient was commenced on topical antiglaucomatous therapy (timolol + dorzolamide twice daily, latanoprost once in the evening to both eyes. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of retinitis pigmentosa associated with pseudoexfoliative glaucoma. Although rare, retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma can occur in the same eye.

  18. High Prevalence of Narrow Angles among Chinese-American Glaucoma and Glaucoma Suspect Patients

    Seider, Michael I; Pekmezci, Melike; Han, Ying; Sandhu, Simi; Kwok, Shiu Y; Lee, Roland Y; Lin, Shan C

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence of gonioscopically narrow angles in a Chinese-American population with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion. Patients and Methods Charts from all Chinese-American patients seen in a comprehensive ophthalmology clinic in the Chinatown district of San Francisco in 2002 were reviewed. One eye from each patient with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion that met inclusion criteria was included (n=108). Data was collected for gender, age, race (self-declared), refraction (spherical equivalent), intraocular pressure (IOP), gonioscopy and vertical cup-to-disk ratio (CDR). Results Sixty percent (n=65) of Chinese-American eyes with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion had gonioscopically narrow angles (Shaffer grade ≤2 in three or more quadrants). Those with narrow angles were significantly older (P=0.004) than their open angle counterparts, but the two groups did not differ in terms of gender, refraction, IOP or CDR (all, P≥0.071). In a multivariate model including age, gender and refraction as predictors of angle grade (open or narrow), only age was a significant predictor of angle grade (P=0.004). Conclusions A large proportion of Chinese-Americans in our study population with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion had gonioscopically narrow angles. In multivariate analysis, patients with narrow angles were older than those with open angles but did not differ from them in terms of gender or refraction. Continued evaluation of angle closure glaucoma risk among Chinese-Americans is needed. PMID:19826385

  19. High prevalence of narrow angles among Chinese-American glaucoma and glaucoma suspect patients.

    Seider, Michael I; Pekmezci, Melike; Han, Ying; Sandhu, Simi; Kwok, Shiu Y; Lee, Roland Y; Lin, Shan C

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of gonioscopically narrow angles in a Chinese-American population with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion. Charts from all Chinese-American patients seen in a comprehensive ophthalmology clinic in the Chinatown district of San Francisco in 2002 were reviewed. One eye from each patient with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion that met inclusion criteria was included (n=108). Data were collected for sex, age, race (self-declared), refraction (spherical equivalent), intraocular pressure, gonioscopy, and vertical cup-to-disk ratio. Sixty percent (n=65) of Chinese-American eyes with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion had gonioscopically narrow angles (Shaffer grade or = 0.071). In a multivariate model including age, sex, and refraction as predictors of angle grade (open or narrow), only age was a significant predictor of angle grade (P=0.004). A large proportion of Chinese-Americans in our study population with glaucoma or glaucoma suspicion had gonioscopically narrow angles. In multivariate analysis, patients with narrow angles were older than those with open angles but did not differ from them in terms of sex or refraction. Continued evaluation of angle closure glaucoma risk among Chinese-Americans is needed.

  20. Safety and efficacy of a low-cost glaucoma drainage device for refractory childhood glaucoma.

    Kaushik, Sushmita; Kataria, Pankaj; Raj, Srishti; Pandav, Surinder Singh; Ram, Jagat

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a low-cost glaucoma drainage device (GDD), Aurolab aqueous drainage implant (AADI), similar in design to the Baerveldt glaucoma implant (BGI), in refractory childhood glaucoma. This prospective interventional study was conducted in a tertiary care postgraduate teaching institute. Children aged glaucoma valve implant in children. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma

    Angmo, Dewang; Sharma, Reetika; Temkar, Shreyas; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-01-01

    ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD) has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs) not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medicat...

  2. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    Krema, Hatem, E-mail: htmkrm19@yahoo.com [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weisbrod, Daniel [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J.; Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  3. barriers to an effective diabetic retinopathy service in ibadan, nigeria

    like UK and USA,6,7 barriers identified include fear of ... blindness as well as the cost of attending clinic. Diabetic retinopathy .... cost of treatment for diabetic retinopathy - laser treatment ..... harness compliance to diabetic care, treatment and.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  5. GENDER AND AGE FEATURES OF GLAUCOMA

    O. V. Makarenk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, the definition “glaucoma” combines a number of eye pathologies that lead to irreversible blindness, and therefore is difficult disabling disease. Glaucoma occurs in people of working age, so this problem is not only medical, but also social, because it causes disability in substantial economic costs not only for individual patients, but also for the whole country – patients become unable to work. Gender features of glaucoma are also contradictory. In European literature the basic idea is that men are more likely to suffer from glaucoma than women. Such studies have not been conducted in the Podillya region of Ukraine, that makes impossible to design a reliable global data to estimate the prevalence of glaucoma in different age groups for persons living in Vinnitsa region. Therefore, the aim of the study was a retrospective analysis of medical records of patients in Eye Microsurgery Department of Vinnitsa Regional Clinical Hospital for the period 2008-2012 years for determining the gender and age characteristics. Materials and methods 1418 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (841 men and 577 women aged 14 to 92 years (mean age 67,12 ± 7,64, which were treated in the Eye Microsurgery Department, took part in the study. For the purpose of the study they were divided into two groups: I – male patients with glaucoma, II – female patients with glaucoma. Each group was divided into 7 subgroups according to the ontogenesis scheme: A – teens, B – youth, C – I adulthood age, D – II adulthood age, E – elderly age, F – senily age and G – centenarians. Thus was allocated 12 research groups. Results The structure of the incidence of glaucoma is 59.31% in men and 40.69% in women. Incidence of glaucoma is highest in the IE group and is 34.98%. The group IIE incidence is lower – 35.32%. In the group D the incidence of glaucoma among men and women was very different (13.89% and 2.89%, respectively. It should also be noted

  6. Choroidal Thinning Associated With Hydroxychloroquine Retinopathy.

    Ahn, Seong Joon; Ryu, So Jung; Joung, Joo Young; Lee, Byung Ro

    2017-11-01

    To investigate choroidal thickness in patients using hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and compare choroidal thickness between eyes with and without HCQ retinopathy. Retrospective case series. Setting: Institutional. We included 124 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with HCQ. The patients were divided into an HCQ retinopathy group and a control group, according to the presence or absence of HCQ retinopathy. Total choroidal thickness and choriocapillaris-equivalent thickness were measured manually by 2 independent investigators using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT; DRI-OCT, Topcon Inc, Tokyo, Japan). These measurements were made at the fovea and at nasal and temporal locations 0.5, 1.5, and 3 mm from the fovea. Medium-to-large vessel layer thickness was calculated accordingly. The thicknesses were compared between the HCQ retinopathy and control groups. We performed correlation analyses between choroidal thicknesses and details regarding HCQ use. Total choroidal thickness and choriocapillaris-equivalent thickness. Choroidal thicknesses were significantly decreased (P < .05) in the HCQ retinopathy group compared to the control group, except at the temporal choroid 1.5 mm from the fovea. Choriocapillaris-equivalent thicknesses were significantly different in all choroidal locations between the groups. In contrast, the medium-to-large vessel layer thickness was only significantly different at a few locations. The cumulative dose/body weight was significantly correlated with subfoveal choroidal and choriocapillaris-equivalent thicknesses (both P = .001). The association between presence of HCQ retinopathy and choroidal thicknesses was also statistically significant after adjusting for age, diagnosis for HCQ use, refractive errors, and duration of HCQ use (P = .001 and P = .003 for subfoveal choroidal and choriocapillaris-equivalent thickness, respectively). These results all suggest that HCQ retinopathy is

  7. Fundus fluorescence Angiography in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy.

    Wang, Shuhui; Zuo, Yuqin; Wang, Ning; Tong, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the manifestation characteristics of fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and its values in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy through comparing direct ophthalmoscopy. Two hundred fifty patients (500 eyes) who were suspected as diabetic retinopathy and admitted to the hospital between February 2015 and December 2016 were selected. They underwent direct ophthalmoscopy and FFA. The manifestation characteristics of FFA in the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy were summarized. The two examination methods were compared. In the diagnosis with direct ophthalmoscopy, 375 eyes out of 500 eyes were diagnosed as diabetic retinopathy (75%); there were 74 eyes at stage I, 88 eyes at stage II, 92 eyes at stage III, 83 eyes of stage IV, 28 eyes of stage V and 10 eyes of stage VI. In the diagnosis with FFA, 465 eyes out of 500 eyes were diagnosed as diabetic retinopathy (93%); there were 94 eyes at stage I, 110 eyes at stage II, 112 at stage III, 92 eyes at stage IV, 41 eyes at stage V and 16 eyes at stage VI. The detection rate of diabetic retinopathy using FFA was significantly higher than that using direct ophthalmoscopy (Pretinopathy (67.96%), 75 eyes had pre-proliferative lesions (16.13%), 149 eyes had proliferative lesions (32.04%), 135 eyes had diabetic maculopathy (29.03%) and 31 eyes had diabetic optic disc lesions (6.67%). The detection rate of diabetic retinopathy using FFA is higher than that using direct ophthalmoscopy. FFA could accurately determine clinical stage. Therefore, it is an important approach in treatment efficacy evaluation and treatment guidance, suggesting a significant application value.

  8. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes ...

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness worldwide. The associated loss of productivity and quality of life of the patients with diabetic retinopathy will lead to additional socioeconomic burden. This study aims to determine the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients. Materials ...

  9. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Have Normoalbuminuria. R Karoli, J Fatima, V Shukla, P Garg, A Ali. Abstract. Background: Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor of retinopathy, so absence of microalbuminuria may tend clinician not to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  10. Danish nationwide data reveal a link between diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma

    Horwitz, Anna; Petrovski, Beáta Éva; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    study with data over a 16-year follow-up period. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for antiglaucomatous medication and DM drugs. ICD-10 classifications were furthermore used to identify comorbidities between antiglaucomatous...

  11. Danish Nationwide Data Reveal a Link between Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Retinopathy, and Glaucoma

    Horwitz, Anna; Petrovski, Beata Eva; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    study with data over a 16-year follow-up period. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for antiglaucomatous medication and DM drugs. ICD-10 classifications were furthermore used to identify comorbidities between antiglaucomatous...

  12. Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble email Send this article ... eye disease bothers the patient more. What Causes Dry Eye Syndrome? Dry eye can be caused by many ...

  13. Management of exfoliative glaucoma: challenges and solutions.

    Holló, Gábor; Katsanos, Andreas; Konstas, Anastasios Gp

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliative glaucoma is the most common type of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide. It is characterized by high intraocular pressure (IOP) and worse 24-hour IOP characteristics. In order to minimize progression, treatment of exfoliative glaucoma has to provide a low long-term mean IOP and good 24-hour IOP control. To achieve these goals, fixed-dose combination eye drops, argon and selective laser trabeculoplasty, and various forms of surgery (trabeculectomy, deep sclerectomy, viscocanalostomy, ab interno trabeculotomy, trabecular aspiration, and cataract surgery) all need to be considered during the long-term management of the disease. Since exfoliative glaucoma is a disease of the elderly, and is frequently associated with systemic vascular disease, interdisciplinary consultations are of great clinical importance. These management aspects and the current medical, laser, and surgical results are covered in this review, with a special focus on the needs of the general ophthalmologist.

  14. The interrelation between hypothyroidism and glaucoma

    Thvilum, Marianne; Hjelm Brandt Kristensen, Frans; Brix, Thomas Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    Data on the association between hypothyroidism and glaucoma are conflicting. We sought to shed light on this by conducting a critical review and meta-analyses. The meta-analyses were conducted in adherence with the widely accepted MOOSE guidelines. Using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms......: hypothyroidism, myxoedema and glaucoma or intraocular pressure, case-control studies, cohort studies and cross-sectional studies were identified (PubMed) and reviewed. Using meta-analysis, the relative risk (RR) of coexistence of glaucoma and hypothyroidism was calculated. Based on the literature search......, thirteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and could be categorized into two groups based on the exposure. The designs of the studies varied considerably, and there was heterogeneity related to lack of power, weak phenotype classifications and length of follow-up. Eight studies had glaucoma (5757...

  15. Glaucoma detection with damato multifixation campimetry online

    Olsen, Ane Sophie; Alberti, M.; Serup, L.

    2016-01-01

    to define abnormality, and these were evaluated using the Glaucoma Staging System as gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC (AUC) were calculated. Results AUCs from 15 algorithms ranged from 0.79 to 0.90. The most promising algorithm combined results from two...... successive DMCO STANDARD tests. The sensitivity was highly dependent on the severity of glaucoma. Hence, for eyes with mild, moderate, advanced, and severe glaucoma, the DMCO test demonstrated a sensitivity of 11.8, 71.4, 100, and 100%, respectively. The specificity was as high as 98.1%. Median duration per...... eye to complete the DMCO STANDARD test was 86 s for the control group and 125 s in participants with glaucoma. Conclusions DMCO shows promise as a free-of-charge online tool to identify glaucomatous visual field defects in a preselected population. Ongoing studies are evaluating the use of DMCO...

  16. Antihypertensive medication postpones the onset of glaucoma

    Horwitz, Anna; Klemp, Marc; Jeppesen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of antihypertensive medication on the onset of glaucoma. Data from the complete Danish population between 40 and 95 years of age were used in the period from 1996 to 2012, covering >2.6 million individuals. The National Danish Registry of Medicinal Products...... Statistics was used to identify all claimed prescriptions for glaucoma medication and antihypertensive drugs. We first investigated basic correlations in the data and found that patients treated with antihypertensive medication, at any time during the study period, had a significantly higher overall relative...... risk (RR) of glaucoma, even when controlling for age and sex (with a RR of 1.31 and Pglaucoma. To investigate the causal effect of antihypertensive treatment on the onset of treatment for glaucoma, we used...

  17. The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of glaucoma

    Vohra, Rupali; Tsai, James C; Kolko, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disorder characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons. There are various hypotheses concerning the cause of RGC death. Previously, glaucoma was defined by high intraocular pressure (IOP); during the past decade, however, glaucoma...... specialists have acknowledged that elevated IOP is the most important risk factor for glaucoma, but does not define the disease. Other factors such as genetics, blood flow, and excitotoxicity are suggested as potential causal factors for progressive RGC death observed in glaucoma. We review recent studies...... elucidating a possible role of low-grade inflammation as a causal factor in the pathogenesis of glaucoma....

  18. The use of Ahmed glaucoma valve in the management of pediatric glaucoma.

    Balekudaru, Shantha; Vadalkar, Juhie; George, Ronnie; Vijaya, Lingam

    2014-08-01

    To assess the intraocular pressure control (IOP), changes in visual acuity, complications, reoperation rates and risk factors for failure following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in pediatric eyes with glaucoma. The medical records of consecutive patients with glaucoma who underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation from January 2000 to December 2009) were retrospectively reviewed. Only one eye of each patient was included. Subgroup analysis was performed in three groups; group 1 included phakic eyes with primary congenital glaucoma, juvenile open-angle glaucoma, or glaucoma associated with ocular anomalies; group 2 included eyes with glaucoma in aphakia or pseudophakia; group 3 included eyes with other diagnoses. A successful outcome was defined as final IOP between 6 mm Hg and 18 mm Hg without loss of light perception or reoperation for glaucoma. A total of 71 eyes in 71 patients: 15 (21%) in group 1, 47 (66%) in group 2, and 9 (13%) in group 3 were included Successful IOP control was achieved in 44 eyes of 44 patients (62%). Cumulative probabilities of success by Kaplan-Meier analysis at 12 and 24 months was 97% and 80% for the entire group, 100% and 82% for group 1, 95% and 86% for group 2, and 90% and 42% for group 3. Reoperation was necessary for 18 patients (25%), either for tube-related complications or for IOP control. The only significant risk factor for failure was the category of diagnosis (P = 0.029). Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation is an option in the management of pediatric glaucoma; however, reoperations for tube related complications or for persistent elevated IOP is frequently needed. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Rübsam, Anne; Parikh, Sonia; Fort, Patrice E.

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:29565290

  20. New Therapeutic Approaches in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Relhan, Nidhi; Kishor, Krishna S.; Flynn Jr, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It affects a substantial proportion of US adults over age 40. The condition is a leading cause of visual loss. Much attention has been given to expanding the role of current treatments along with investigating various novel therapies and drug delivery methods. In the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), intravitreal pharmacotherapies, especially anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, have gained popularity. Currently, anti-VEGF agents are often used as first-line agents in center-involved DME, with recent data suggesting that among these agents, aflibercept leads to better visual outcomes in patients with worse baseline visual acuities. While photocoagulation remains the standard treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), recent FDA approvals of ranibizumab and aflibercept in the management of diabetic retinopathy associated with DME may suggest a potential for pharmacologic treatments of PDR as well. Novel therapies, including small interfering RNAs, chemokines, kallikrein-kinin inhibitors, and various anti-angiogenic agents, are currently being evaluated for the management of diabetic retinopathy and DME. In addition to these strategies, novel drug delivery methods such as sustained-release implants and refillable reservoir implants are either under active evaluation or have recently gained FDA approval. This review provides an update on the novel developments in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26676668

  1. Role of Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Anne Rübsam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and remains the leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. For decades, diabetic retinopathy was considered only a microvascular complication, but the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia, which are affected even prior to clinically detectable vascular lesions. While progress has been made to improve the vascular alterations, there is still no treatment to counteract the early neuro-glial perturbations in diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia along with dyslipidemia, hypoinsulinemia and hypertension. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as one key player in diabetes-associated retinal perturbations, however, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Interlinked molecular pathways, such as oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end-products and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor have received a lot of attention as they all contribute to the inflammatory response. In the current review, we focus on the involvement of inflammation in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy with special emphasis on the functional relationships between glial cells and neurons. Finally, we summarize recent advances using novel targets to inhibit inflammation in diabetic retinopathy.

  2. The optic nerve head in glaucoma

    Rupert RA Bourne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available ll types of glaucoma involve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The key to detection and management of glaucoma is understanding how to examine the optic nerve head (ONH. This pictorial glossary addresses the following issues: how to examine the ONH; normal characteristics of the ONH; characteristics of a glaucomatous ONH; how to tell if the glaucomatous optic neuropathy is getting worse;‘pitfalls and pearls’.

  3. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation in Vitrectomized Eyes

    Erçalık, Nimet Yeşim; İmamoğlu, Serhat

    2018-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in vitrectomized eyes. Materials and Methods. The medical records of 13 eyes that developed glaucoma due to emulsified silicon oil or neovascularization following pars plana vitrectomy and underwent AGV implantation were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcome measures were intraocular pressure (IOP), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), number of antiglaucoma medications, and postoperative complications. Surgical...

  4. Vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Chao Peng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical effect of vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS: The clinical data of 55 cases(65 eyes, underwent vitrectomy, membrane peeling, endolaser photocoagulation and silicone oil or C3F8 injection, were retrospectively studied. During 6 months to 1 year follow-up period, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, retinal conditions and complications were observed.RESULTS: All 65 eyes received vitrectomy, of which silicone oil was tamponaded in 32 eyes, C3F8 was injected in 8 eyes, BBS was filled in 25 eyes. Visual improvement achieved in 42 eyes. Two eyes were manually vision, form count fingers to 0.05 in 18 eyes, >0.05-0.1 in 28 eyes, >0.1-0.3 in 12 eyes and >0.3 in 5 eyes. Retinal hole was occurred in 7 eyes, limitations fibrosis membrane remained in 8 eyes, retinal detachment appeared in 5 eyes, IOP increased in 18 eyes, vitreous hemorrhage relapsed in 12 eyes, 36 eyes received supplemental photocoagulation treatment 1-3 times after operation.CONCLUSION:Vitrectomy combined endophotocoagulation is an effective treatment for PDR. Silicone oil tamponade can limit the hemorrhage.

  5. The role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma.

    Wallace, Deborah M

    2014-07-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy affecting approximately 60million people worldwide and is the second most common cause of irreversible blindness. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for developing glaucoma and is caused by impaired aqueous humor drainage through the trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm\\'s canal (SC). In primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), this elevation in IOP in turn leads to deformation at the optic nerve head (ONH) specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also a deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagen and fibronectin. Matricellular proteins are non-structural secreted glycoproteins that help cells communicate with their surrounding ECM. This family of proteins includes connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), also known as CCN2, thrombospondins (TSPs), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), periostin, osteonectin, and Tenascin-C and -X and other ECM proteins. All members appear to play a role in fibrosis and increased ECM deposition. Most are widely expressed in tissues particularly in the TM and ONH and deficiency of TSP1 and SPARC have been shown to lower IOP in mouse models of glaucoma through enhanced outflow facility. The role of these proteins in glaucoma is emerging as some have an association with the pathophysiology of the TM and LC regions and might therefore be potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glaucoma.

  6. Macular thickness after glaucoma filtration surgery.

    Sesar, Antonio; Cavar, Ivan; Sesar, Anita Pusić; Geber, Mia Zorić; Sesar, Irena; Laus, Katia Novak; Vatavuk, Zoran; Mandić, Zdravko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of present study was to analyze early postoperative changes in the macular area using optical coherence tomography (OCT) after uncomplicated glaucoma filtration surgery. This prospective study included 32 patients (34 eyes) with open-angle glaucoma, which underwent trabeculectomy with or without use of mitomycin C. Exclusion criteria were macular edema, uveitis, age-related macular degeneration, blurred optical media, secondary glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma. All standard clinical examinations were made before surgery, at the 2nd day, 1 week and 1 month after surgery. Tomography of the macula was performed during every examination using Cirrus HD OCT for the analysis of central subfield thickness. Results show that thickening of the macula was slightly higher 1 week and 1 month after operation in comparison with baseline end 2nd day postoperativelly. There was no significant difference in the change of macular thickness in patients who have used topical prostaglandins compared with those who have used other topical medications. Also, there was no difference in macular changes between patients treated with or without mitomycin C. In conclusion, we found a slight subclinical increase in macular thickness after uncomplicated trabeculectomy, for which we considered that was the result in reduction of intraocular pressure after glaucoma surgery. Macular thickening after glaucoma filtering surgery could be a physiological reaction to the stress of the retina caused by a sudden reduction of intraocular pressure and it is the consequence of altered relationship between capillary pressure and interstitial fluid pressure.

  7. Glaucoma screening during regular optician visits : can the population at risk of developing glaucoma be reached?

    Stoutenbeek, R.; Jansonius, N. M.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the percentage of the population at risk of developing glaucoma, which can potentially be reached by conducting glaucoma screening during regular optician visits. Methods: 1200 inhabitants aged > 40 years were randomly selected from Dutch community population databases. A

  8. The glaucoma research foundation patient survey: patient understanding of glaucoma and its treatment.

    Herndon, Leon W; Brunner, Thomas M; Rollins, Jane Neff

    2006-01-01

    Determine patients' understanding of glaucoma and its treatment, their sources of information about glaucoma, their preferences for treatment, their experience with medication side effects, and their reasons for changing eye doctors. Prospective, nonrandomized patient survey study. A questionnaire was developed and sent to the 22,000 subscribers of the Gleams newsletter who have glaucoma. Questionnaires were returned by 4310 glaucoma patients. Most respondents received glaucoma information from their eye doctor. Only 28% of respondents reported having changed eye doctors for reasons related to their glaucoma. Of those who had, 60% cited poor communication as the reason. When queried about specific side effects associated with their medication, over 85% of responding patients were never or rarely bothered by headaches and eyelid darkening. Most respondents (67% and 55%, respectively) were rarely or never disturbed by red eye or burning and stinging. Most respondents understood the importance of intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering in glaucoma, and of those patients who expressed a preference, 92% reported that they would prefer the medication that lowers IOP the most, even if it caused red eye for a few weeks, over a medication that caused no red eye but did not get IOP as low. Patients who subscribe to Gleams and responded to the survey rely most on their doctors for information about glaucoma and its treatment. Most understand the importance of maintaining low IOP to decrease the risk of vision loss, and most will tolerate temporary ocular side effects to achieve low IOP.

  9. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  10. The Adenosinergic System in Diabetic Retinopathy

    J. Vindeirinho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative and inflammatory environment that is prevalent in the diabetic eye is a key player in the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The adenosinergic system is widely regarded as a significant modulator of neurotransmission and the inflammatory response, through the actions of the four types of adenosine receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R, and thus could be revealed as a potential player in the events unfolding in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we review the studies that explore the impact of diabetic conditions on the retinal adenosinergic system, as well as the role of the said system in ameliorating or exacerbating those conditions. The experimental results described suggest that this system is heavily affected by diabetic conditions and that the modulation of its components could reveal potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, particularly in the early stages of the disease.

  11. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  12. Targeting Neovascularization in Ischemic Retinopathy: Recent Advances

    Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Elsherbiny, Mohamed; Nussbaum, Julian; Othman, Amira; Megyerdi, Sylvia; Tawfik, Amany

    2014-01-01

    Pathological retinal neovascularization (RNV) is a common micro-vascular complication in several retinal diseases including retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and central vein occlusion. The current therapeutic modalities of RNV are invasive and although they may slow or halt the progression of the disease they are unlikely to restore normal acuity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop treatment modalities, which are less invasive and therefore associated with fewer procedural complications and systemic side effects. This review article summarizes our understanding of the pathophysiology and current treatment of RNV in ischemic retinopathies; lists potential therapeutic targets; and provides a framework for the development of future treatment modalities. PMID:25598837

  13. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase's latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  14. Microvascular retinopathy in subjects without diabetes

    Munch, Inger Christine; Kessel, Line; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:  Retinal vascular lesions such as microaneurysms and haemorrhages, while typical of diabetic retinopathy, are also seen in subjects without diabetes where they are associated with elevated cardiovascular mortality. In theory, these lesions could be a consequence of past hyperglycaemia. We...... examined the prevalence and risk factors for retinopathy, including lens fluorescence, a biomarker of cumulative life-time glycaemia in adults without diabetes. Methods:  Cross-sectional population-based study of 711 subjects without diabetes (WHO 1999 criteria) aged 30-60 years, including oral glucose...... tolerance testing, clinical and laboratory examinations, non-invasive ocular lens fluorometry and seven-field fundus photography. Results:  Retinopathy was present in 8.3% (CI(95) 6.3-10.3%) of subjects. Higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p = 0.032), increasing body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.014) and wider...

  15. Multicolor Scanning Laser Imaging in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Ahmad, Mohammad S Z; Carrim, Zia Iqbal

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common cause of blindness in individuals younger than 60 years. Screening for retinopathy is undertaken using conventional color fundus photography and relies on the identification of hemorrhages, vascular abnormalities, exudates, and cotton-wool spots. These can sometimes be difficult to identify. Multicolor scanning laser imaging, a new imaging modality, may have a role in improving screening outcomes, as well as facilitating treatment decisions. Observational case series comprising two patients with known diabetes who were referred for further examination after color fundus photography revealed abnormal findings. Multicolor scanning laser imaging was undertaken. Features of retinal disease from each modality were compared. Multicolor scanning laser imaging provides superior visualization of retinal anatomy and pathology, thereby facilitating risk stratification and treatment decisions. Multicolor scanning laser imaging is a novel imaging technique offering the potential for improving the reliability of screening for diabetic retinopathy. Validation studies are warranted.

  16. Oculoplastic technique of connecting a glaucoma valve shunt to extraorbital locations in cases of severe glaucoma.

    Rubin, Peter A D; Chang, Eli; Bernardino, Carlo Roberto; Hatton, Mark P; Dohlman, Claes H

    2004-09-01

    To describe a technique for inserting glaucoma shunts to the sinuses or the lacrimal sac as a means of lowering intraocular pressure in patients with refractory glaucoma associated with severe ocular surface disease. Nineteen patients with severe ocular surface disease necessitating a keratoprosthesis and with intractable glaucoma underwent placement of a modified Ahmed shunt to direct aqueous in the maxillary or ethmoid sinus or lacrimal sac. Intraocular pressure is presently well controlled without glaucoma medications in two thirds of patients. None of the patients had endophthalmitis. Established oculoplastic surgery techniques may be used to redirect aqueous to extraorbital locations and effectively lower intraocular pressure in patients with severe ocular surface disease and refractory glaucoma. This procedure has not been associated with endophthalmitis.

  17. The effect of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant on corneal endothelial cell density in children with glaucoma secondary to uveitis.

    Kalinina Ayuso, Viera; Scheerlinck, Laura M; de Boer, Joke H

    2013-03-01

    To assess the effect of Ahmed glaucoma valve implants on corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) in children with uveitic glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. setting: Institutional. patientpopulation: Eighty eyes from 42 patients diagnosed with uveitis before the age of 16. Twenty-eight eyes had an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant because of secondary glaucoma. Fifty-two eyes without an implant served as controls. intervention orobservationprocedure(s): Corneal ECD was examined cross-sectionally using a noncontact specular microscope. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimating equations analyses with correction for paired eyes were performed. mainoutcomemeasure(s): Correlation of ECD with the presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant and with the time following implantation. ECD was significantly lower in the Ahmed glaucoma valve group than in controls (2359 and 3088 cells/mm(2), respectively; P Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant, previous intraocular surgery, age, duration of uveitis, and history of corneal touch by the implant tube were all significantly associated with decreased ECD. Following a multivariate analysis, presence of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant (B = -340; adjusted P Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation was highly correlated with decreased ECD (B = -558, P Ahmed glaucoma valve implants in children with uveitic glaucoma are independently associated with decreased ECD, and this effect is associated with the time interval following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  19. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    ... An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An ... group of conditions that can result in irreversible blindness. This vision loss can be reduced if glaucoma ...

  20. Ocular hemodynamics and glaucoma: the role of mathematical modeling.

    Harris, Alon; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Arciero, Julia C; Amireskandari, Annahita; Tobe, Leslie A; Siesky, Brent A

    2013-01-01

    To discuss the role of mathematical modeling in studying ocular hemodynamics, with a focus on glaucoma. We reviewed recent literature on glaucoma, ocular blood flow, autoregulation, the optic nerve head, and the use of mathematical modeling in ocular circulation. Many studies suggest that alterations in ocular hemodynamics play a significant role in the development, progression, and incidence of glaucoma. Although there is currently a limited number of studies involving mathematical modeling of ocular blood flow, regulation, and diseases (such as glaucoma), preliminary modeling work shows the potential of mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute most significantly to glaucoma progression. Mathematical modeling is a useful tool when used synergistically with clinical and laboratory data in the study of ocular blood flow and glaucoma. The development of models to investigate the relationship between ocular hemodynamic alterations and glaucoma progression will provide a unique and useful method for studying the pathophysiology of glaucoma.

  1. awareness and knowledge of glaucoma among adult patients

    PATIENTS AT THE EYE CLINIC OF A TEACHING HOSPITAL. G. NKUM1, S. LARTEY2, ... Background: Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is an irreversible .... If patients are aware of the risk factors and presentation of glaucoma, there will ...

  2. Potential applications of optical coherence tomography angiography in glaucoma.

    Dastiridou, Anna; Chopra, Vikas

    2018-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a novel, noninvasive imaging modality that allows assessment of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The scope of this review is to summarize recent studies using OCTA in glaucoma and highlight potential applications of this new technology in the field of glaucoma. OCTA studies have shown that retinal vascular changes may not develop solely as a result of advanced glaucoma damage. OCTA-derived measurements have provided evidence for lower retinal vascular densities at the optic nerve head, peripapillary and macula in preperimetric-glaucoma and early-glaucoma, as well as, in more advanced glaucoma, in comparison to with normal eyes. OCTA is a novel imaging modality that has already started to expand our knowledge base regarding the role of ocular blood flow in glaucoma. Future studies will better elucidate the role of OCTA-derived measurements in clinical practice, research, and clinical trials in glaucoma.

  3. Glaucoma: Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop Past ... nerves are pale and cupped—signs of advanced glaucoma. Yet the patient wasn't aware of any ...

  4. Prospects for angiotensin receptor blockers in diabetic retinopathy

    Sjølie, Anne Katrin

    2007-01-01

    Retinopathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, and is an important cause of blindness worldwide. Clinical trials have demonstrated that tight metabolic control inhibits the progression of retinopathy. Good blood pressure control has been shown to be protective...... in type 2 diabetes, and it may also reduce proliferative retinopathy in type 1 diabetes. However, such control is often difficult to achieve in clinical practice, and may be associated with problems such as hypoglycaemia. New therapies are therefore needed to reduce the risk of retinopathy....... There is growing evidence that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, and this has led to interest in RAS inhibitors as agents to prevent retinopathy. Several trials have suggested that ACE inhibitor therapy can inhibit progression of retinopathy...

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  20. Glaucoma

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  1. Retinopathy of Prematurity in Triplets

    Mehmet Ali Şekeroğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the incidence, severity and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP in triplets. Materials and Methods: The medical records of consecutive premature triplets who had been screened for ROP in a single maternity hospital were analyzed and presence and severity of ROP; birth weight, gender, gestational age of the infant; route of delivery and the mode of conception were recorded. Results: A total of 54 triplets (40 males, 14 females who were screened for ROP between March 2010 and February 2013 were recruited for the study. All triplets were delivered by Caesarean section and 36 (66.7% were born following an assisted conception. During follow-up, seven (13% of the infants developed ROP of any stage and two (3.7% required laser photocoagulation. The mean gestational age of triplets with ROP was 27.6±1.5 (27-31 weeks whereas it was 32.0±1.5 (30-34 weeks in those without ROP (p=0.002. The mean birth weights of triplets with and without ROP were 1290.0±295.2 (970-1600 g and 1667.5±222.2 (1130-1960 g, respectively (p<0.001. The presence of ROP was not associated with gender (p=0.358 or mode of conception (p=0.674. Conclusion: ROP in triplets seems to be mainly related to low gestational age and low birth weight. Further prospective randomized studies are necessary to demonstrate risk factors of ROP in triplets and to determine if and how gemelarity plays a role in the development of ROP.

  2. Determinants of glaucoma awareness and knowledge in urban Chennai

    Sathyamangalam Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the awareness and knowledge levels about glaucoma and its determinants in an urban population of Chennai in south India. Materials and Methods: Chennai glaucoma study (CGS was a population based prevalence study to estimate the prevalence of glaucoma in a rural and urban south Indian population. A total of 3850 subjects aged 40 years or above participated in the urban arm of CGS. A systematic random sample of 1926 (50.0% subjects completed a questionnaire that assesses their awareness and knowledge level of glaucoma. Respondents "having heard of glaucoma" even before they were contacted/recruited for the study were defined as "aware" and respondents having some understanding of the eye disease were defined as "knowledgeable". Results: Overall 13.5% were aware of glaucoma, the age-gender adjusted rate for awareness was 13.3% (95% CI: 11.57 to 15.03. Two clinicians graded knowledge on glaucoma, based on the subject′s knowledge of risk factors, definitions and treatment aspects of glaucoma. Overall 8.7% had some knowledge about glaucoma. Among those who had knowledge 0.5% had good knowledge about glaucoma, 4% had fair knowledge and 4.2% had poor knowledge. We observed a very good agreement between the clinicians in grading knowledge (k =0.92. Determinants of glaucoma awareness and knowledge were higher levels of education, females, age, religion and family history of glaucoma. Conclusion: Awareness and knowledge about glaucoma was very low among the urban population of Chennai. We have found that younger subjects and men were less aware of glaucoma. Subjects with lower levels of education were less aware and knew less about glaucoma than their counterparts. The study findings stress the need for health education for effective prevention of blindness due to glaucoma.

  3. Demographic features of subjects with congenital glaucoma

    Tamçelik, Nevbahar; Atalay, Eray; Bolukbasi, Selim; Çapar, Olgu; Ozkok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Context: Congenital glaucoma is a potentially blinding ocular disease of the childhood. Identification of the possible associated risk factors and may be helpful for prevention or early detection of this public health problem. Aims: To demonstrate the demographic features of congenital glaucoma subjects. Setting and Design: The charts of congenital glaucoma patients referred to Tamcelik Glaucoma Center were retrospectively reviewed through the dates of 2000 and 2013. Materials and Methods: Analyzed data included diagnosis, age at first presentation, symptoms at first presentation, laterality of the disease, sex, presence of consanguinity, family history of congenital glaucoma, maturity of the fetus at delivery, and maternal age at conception. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19.0 by IBM (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used to compare the mean of continuous variables with Student's t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and χ2 test was used to test differences in proportions of categorical variables. Results: The data of 600 eyes of 311 patients were analyzed. The distribution of primary and secondary congenital glaucoma among the patients were 63.3% (n = 197) and 36.7% (n = 114), respectively. Of the 311 patients, 57.2% (n = 178) were male and 42.8% (n = 133) were female. The overall frequency of bilateral disease was 92.3% (n = 287). Overall rate of consanguinity and positive family history was 45.3% (n = 141) and 21.2% (n = 66), respectively. Conclusions: Bilateral disease in this study was more common than previously reported studies. Positive family history was more frequent in primary congenital glaucoma although not statistically significant. PMID:24881602

  4. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GLAUCOMA AND BLOOD GROUPS

    F. Ghannadi R. Varmazyar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available There are reports from different countries that some types of glaucoma are associated with blood groups. This cross-sectional study was performed on 400 glaucomatous patients [100 patients in each group of Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, chronic angle closure glaucoma (CACG, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma (PEXG and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG] and 400 blood donors as control group to assess the association between blood groups and glaucoma. All patients underwent ABO and Rh blood group testing. The prevalence of blood group A was 30% in the control group, 27% in POAG, 33% in CACA, 38% in PEXG and 36% in PCG. The prevalence of blood group B was 24% in the control group, 19% in POAG, 20% in CACG, 15% in PEXG and 34% in PCG (P < 0.025. The prevalence of blood group AB was 8% in the control group, 9% in POAG, 5% in CACG, 12% in PEXG, and 8% in PCG. The prevalence of blood group O was 38% in the control group, 45% in POAC, 42% in CACG, 35% in PEXG and 22% in PCG (P < 0.001. The prevalence of Rh+ was 88% in the control group, 84% in POAG, 87% in CACG, 86% in PEXG and 87% in PCG. Compared to control group, blood group B was more prevalent and blood group O was less prevalent in PCG. There was no association between other types of blood groups (ABO and Rh and PCG. There was no association between blood groups (ABO and Rh and other types of glaucoma.

  5. The medical management of glaucoma | Marais | South African ...

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. The main characteristic features include optic disc cupping, visual field loss, and in most instances a raised intraocular pressure. Primary open angle glaucoma accounts for nearly two thirds of all cases, while angle closure glaucoma contributes the majority of ...

  6. Goniodysgenesis in familial primary open-angle glaucoma

    Verbraak, F. D.; vd Berg, W.; Delleman, J. W.; Greve, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a pilot study to evaluate goniodysgenesis as a cause of familial open-angle glaucoma are reported. Patients with a familial high tension open-angle glaucoma and a goniodysgenetic chamber angle (n = 11), a number of their relatives with glaucoma (n = 12), and their relatives without

  7. Visual disability in Newly Diagnosed Primary open Angle Glaucoma ...

    Background: Glaucoma remains the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and the highest cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. In Nigeria, Glaucoma accounts for 16% of blindness and primary open angle glaucoma is the most prevalent clinical type. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the visual disability ...

  8. Presentation of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) at Lions ...

    Objective Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common type of glaucoma in Africa. We carried out a study to determine the clinical presentation pattern of patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) at a tertiary hospital in Malawi. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Lions Sight First Eye Hospital—a ...

  9. Radiation

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  10. Level of agreement among Latin American glaucoma subspecialists on the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma: results of an online survey

    Daniel E. Grigera; Paulo Augusto Arruda Mello; Wilma Lelis Barbosa; Javier Fernando Casiraghi; Rodolfo Perez Grossmann; Alejo Peyret

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to assess the level of agreement among glaucoma experts in Latin America on key practices related to treatment and diagnosis of glaucoma. METHODS: An online questionnaire was sent to a multinational panel of glaucoma experts. The questionnaire contained 107 statements on the medical treatment (Part 1) and diagnosis (Part 2) of glaucoma, and was developed in Spanish and translated into English. Agreement was defined as >70% of respondents. RESULTS: Fifty p...

  11. Late-Onset Endophthalmitis Secondary to Exposed Glaucoma Tube Implant in a Rare Case of Paediatric Glaucoma

    Ranganath, Akshatha; Hashim, Adnan

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma drainage implants (GDIs) are used to treat paediatric glaucoma resistant to conventional medical and surgical treatment, achieving good intraocular pressure (IOP) control and long-term success. Late endophthalmitis is a rare complication that may develop following GDI surgery. A 17-year-old male presented with acute endophthalmitis 2 years after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation with pericardial patch graft for management of refractory glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uveae...

  12. Recessive Stargardt Disease Phenocopying Hydroxychloroquine Retinopathy

    Noupuu, Kalev; Lee, Winston; Zernant, Jana; Greenstein, Vivienne C.; Tsang, Stephen; Allikmets, Rando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a series of Stargardt disease (STGD1) patients exhibiting a phenotype usually associated with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) retinopathy on spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Observational case series from Columbia University Medical Center involving 8 patients with genetically-confirmed STGD1. Patients selected for the study presented no history of HCQ use. Horizontal macular SD-OCT scans and accompanying 488nm autofluorescence (AF) images, color fundus photographs, and full-field electroretinograms were analyzed. Results All study patients exhibited an abrupt thinning of the parafoveal region or disruption of the outer retinal layers on SD-OCT resembling the transient HCQ retinopathy phenotype. Funduscopy and AF imaging revealed variations of bull’s eye maculopathy (BEM). Five patients exhibited local fleck-like deposits around the lesion. Genetic screening confirmed two disease-causing ABCA4 mutations in 5 patients and one mutation in 3 patients. Conclusions A transient SD- OCT phenotype ascribed to patients with HCQ retinopathy is associated with an early subtype of STGD1. This finding may also present with HCQ retinopathy-like BEM lesions on AF imaging and funduscopy. A phenotypic overlap may not be surprising given certain shared mechanistic disease processes between the two conditions. A thorough work-up, including screening of genes that are causal in retinal dystrophies associated with foveal sparing, may prevent the misdiagnoses of more ambiguous cases. PMID:26311262

  13. Presumed Chloroquine Retinopathy in Ibadan | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    Objective: To review patients with clinical features of chloroquine retinopathy seen during the study period with the view of identifying the trend and creating public awareness for behavioural change. Methods: A retrospective review of case notes of patients seen between 1996 and 2002. Results: 19 patients with features of ...

  14. Oxidative stress in diabetic patients with retinopathy

    one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of acquired blindness. ... cataract. Chronic hyperglycemia and its associated ... microvascular disease. This may be ... as ulcers, neuropathy, and nephropathy which are ... 10 ml of venous blood was collected from the median.

  15. 24-h Efficacy of Glaucoma Treatment Options.

    Konstas, Anastasios G P; Quaranta, Luciano; Bozkurt, Banu; Katsanos, Andreas; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian; Rossetti, Luca; Shaarawy, Tarek; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Miglior, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Current management of glaucoma entails the medical, laser, or surgical reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) to a predetermined level of target IOP, which is commensurate with either stability or delayed progression of visual loss. In the published literature, the hypothesis is often made that IOP control implies a single IOP measurement over time. Although the follow-up of glaucoma patients with single IOP measurements is quick and convenient, such measurements often do not adequately reflect the untreated IOP characteristics, or indeed the quality of treated IOP control during the 24-h cycle. Since glaucoma is a 24-h disease and the damaging effect of elevated IOP is continuous, it is logical that we should aim to understand the efficacy of all treatment options throughout the 24-h period. This article first reviews the concept and value of diurnal and 24-h IOP monitoring. It then critically evaluates selected available evidence on the 24-h efficacy of medical, laser and surgical therapy options. During the past decade several controlled trials have significantly enhanced our understanding on the 24-h efficacy of all glaucoma therapy options. Nevertheless, more long-term evidence is needed to better evaluate the 24-h efficacy of glaucoma therapy and the precise impact of IOP characteristics on glaucomatous progression and visual prognosis.

  16. [Study of corvitin efficiency in primary glaucoma].

    Mykheĭtseva, I M; Kashyntseva, L T; Artemov, O V; Khramenko, N I

    2012-01-01

    There were concluded our results of animal experimental investigation and clinical observation of the quercetin-containing preparation corvitin (C) in primary glaucoma treatment. On the model of disease it is shown for rabbit, that introduction of 0.5 ml 2 % C as factious instillation into the eye a basely decreased eye blood flow was increased twice, mionectic at glaucoma eye hydrodynamics was normalized : the outflow of liquid increased on 58 %, inflow - on 52 %, intraocular pressure went down on 14%. Intravenous inflowing of C brought down expressed of oxidative stress - M[see text]A in blood is decreased on 40 %, level of endothelial dysfunction marker NO is increased on 70 %. On the model of glaucoma for rats C, entered protractedly, showed the neuroprotective actions on the neurons of retina, promoting survivability of ganglion cells, that it is shown on histological preparations. Application C in the clinic of glaucoma (intravenously a 0.5 g of preparation in 100 ml of solution) improved for patients a blood supply in the eye on 25 %, and also rendered a positive antioxidant and metabolic effect. Noted positive influences of C concurrently to important pathogeneses factors such as regional eye blood supply, eye hydrodynamics, oxidative stress, metabolic changes, survival of retina neurons grounds to talk about new strategy of pathogenesis therapy of glaucoma.

  17. Short term outcome of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in management of refractory glaucoma in a tertiary hospital in Oman

    Shah, Manali R.; Khandekar, Rajiv B.; Zutshi, Rajiv; Mahrooqi, Rahima

    2013-01-01

    Background: We present outcomes of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (AGV) implantation in treating refractory glaucoma in a tertiary hospital in Oman. Refractory glaucoma was defined as previously failed conventional glaucoma surgery and an uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) of more than 21 mm Hg despite treatment with three topical and/or oral therapy. Materials and Methods: This historical cohort study was conducted in 2010. Details of medical and surgical treatment were recorded. Ophthalmologists examined eyes and performed glaucoma surgeries using AGV. The best corrected distant vision, IOP, and glaucoma medications were prospectively reviewed on 1st day, 1st, 6th, 12th week postoperatively, and at the last follow up. Result: Glaucoma specialists examined and treated 40 eyes with refractory glaucoma of 39 patients (20 males + 19 females). Neo-vascular glaucoma was present in 23 eyes. Vision before surgery was glaucoma medications (2.38; SD 1.1) was reduced compared to the mean number of postoperative medications (1.92; SD 0.9) at 12 weeks. Conclusion: We succeeded in reducing visual disabilities and the number of anti-glaucoma medications used to treat refractory glaucoma by AGV surgery. PMID:23772122

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Vessel Density in Healthy, Glaucoma Suspect, and Glaucoma Eyes

    Yarmohammadi, Adeleh; Zangwill, Linda M.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Suh, Min Hee; Manalastas, Patricia Isabel; Fatehee, Naeem; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Saunders, Luke J.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Huang, David; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) retinal vasculature measurements in healthy, glaucoma suspect, and glaucoma patients. Methods Two hundred sixty-one eyes of 164 healthy, glaucoma suspect, and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) participants from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study with good quality OCT-A images were included. Retinal vasculature information was summarized as a vessel density map and as vessel density (%), which is the proportion of flowing vessel area over the total area evaluated. Two vessel density measurements extracted from the RNFL were analyzed: (1) circumpapillary vessel density (cpVD) measured in a 750-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc and (2) whole image vessel density (wiVD) measured over the entire image. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) were used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. Results Age-adjusted mean vessel density was significantly lower in OAG eyes compared with glaucoma suspects and healthy eyes. (cpVD: 55.1 ± 7%, 60.3 ± 5%, and 64.2 ± 3%, respectively; P glaucoma and healthy eyes, the age-adjusted AUROC was highest for wiVD (0.94), followed by RNFL thickness (0.92) and cpVD (0.83). The AUROCs for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma suspect eyes were highest for wiVD (0.70), followed by cpVD (0.65) and RNFL thickness (0.65). Conclusions Optical coherence tomography angiography vessel density had similar diagnostic accuracy to RNFL thickness measurements for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma eyes. These results suggest that OCT-A measurements reflect damage to tissues relevant to the pathophysiology of OAG. PMID:27409505

  19. [Long-term outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for treating refractory glaucoma].

    Xu, Yumei; Hong, Tao; Li, Wanming

    2015-02-10

    To explore the efficacies and complications of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for treating refractory glaucoma. A retrospective study of case series was conducted for 24 patients (26 eyes) with refractory glaucoma from February 2001 to July 2008 at our hospital. Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation was performed. Pre- and post-operative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), number of medications and complications were recorded and analyzed. The follow-up period was 58-159 months. The post-operative values of IOP were 13.02+/-6.79, 11.43+/-5.24 and 18.56+/-6.43 mmHg at 1 day, 1 month and the last follow-up respectively. There were significant difference when compared with pre-operative IOP (37.59+/-10.76 mmHg, P glaucoma drugs after glaucoma valve implantation and the average number of medication was 1.72+/-0.98. There was significant difference with the pre-operative medication number 2.7 ± 0.7 (P = 0.001). The surgical success rate was 73.1%. And the causes of failure were endophthalmitis, corneal endothelial decompensation, persistent conjunctival wound non-healing, glaucoma valve exposure and loss of light perception.Early postoperative complications were ocular hypotony, shallow anterior chamber, hyphema, transient high IOP and tube occlusion. And long-term complications included encapsulated cyst formation, tube exposure, corneal endothelial decompensation and endophthalmitis. Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation is efficacious for refractory glaucoma.However, clinicians should pay attention to the prevention and treatment of complications.

  20. A prospective comparative study on neovascular glaucoma and non-neovascular refractory glaucoma following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

    Li, Zheng; Zhou, Minwen; Wang, Wei; Huang, Wenbin; Chen, Shida; Li, Xingyi; Gao, Xinbo; Zhang, Xiulan

    2014-01-01

    Neovascular glaucoma is a refractory disease, and difficult to manage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation (AGVI) in neovascular glaucoma (NVG) and non-NVG patients. This prospective, non-randomized study included 55 eyes of 55 patients with refractory glaucoma; 27 had NVG (NVG group) and 28 had non-NVG (non-NVG group). All of the patients underwent AGVI. The NVG group was adjunctively injected with intravitreal ranibizumab/bevacizumab (IVR/IVB) before AGVI. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was the primary outcome measure in this study. Surgical success rate, number of antiglaucoma medications used, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and postoperative complications were analyzed between the groups. All of the patients completed the study (follow-up of 12 months). Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis indicated that the qualified success rates in the NVG and non-NVG groups at 12 months were 70.5% and 92.9%, respectively; this difference was significant (P = 0.036). The complete success rates in the NVG and non-NVG groups at 12 months were 66.7% and 89.3%, respectively (P = 0.049). Compared with preoperative examinations, the postoperative mean IOP and use of medications were significantly lower at all follow-up time points in both groups (all P glaucoma, but the success rate of surgery was related to the type of refractory glaucoma. The complete and qualified success rates of NVG patient adjunctive anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment are still lower than those of non-NVG patients.

  1. Evaluation of Ocular Surface Disease in Patients with Glaucoma

    Mathews, Priya M.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.; Friedman, David S.; Utine, Canan A.; Akpek, Esen K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the subjective and objective measures of ocular surface disease in patients with glaucoma. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Sixty-four glaucoma subjects with bilateral visual field (VF) loss and 59 glaucoma suspects with normal VFs. Methods Consecutive patients were recruited prospectively from the Wilmer Eye Institute Glaucoma Clinic. Main Outcome Measures Tear film breakup time (TBUT), corneal staining score (0–15), and Schirmer’s test results were included as objective metrics, whereas the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire was administered to assess symptoms. Total OSDI score, vision-related subscore (derived from questions about vision and task performance), and discomfort-related subscore (derived from questions about ocular surface discomfort) were calculated for each subject. Results Seventy-five percent (48/64) of glaucoma subjects and 41% (24/59) of glaucoma suspects were receiving topical medications. The corneal staining grade was greater in glaucoma subjects than in glaucoma suspects (6.4 vs. 4.1; P0.20 for both). Multivariate regression models showed that topical glaucoma therapy burden was associated with a significantly higher total corneal staining grade (β, +0.9 for each additional glaucoma drop; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5–1.3; P0.20 for both). Glaucoma subjects had significantly higher total OSDI scores than glaucoma suspects (16.7 vs. 7.9; Pglaucoma group (11.1 vs. 3.3; Pglaucoma therapy burden was not associated with higher total OSDI score or vision- or discomfort-related subscore (P>0.20 for all). Conclusions Glaucoma is associated with significant ocular surface disease, and topical glaucoma therapy burden seems predictive of corneal staining severity. However, OSDI is a poor metric for capturing ocular surface disease in glaucoma because symptoms seem to be related largely to VF loss. PMID:23714318

  2. Pericentral retinopathy and racial differences in hydroxychloroquine toxicity.

    Melles, Ronald B; Marmor, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    To describe patterns of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy distinct from the classic parafoveal (bull's eye) maculopathy. Retrospective case series. Patients from a large multi-provider group practice and a smaller university referral practice diagnosed with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. Patients with widespread or "end-stage" retinopathy were excluded. Review of ophthalmic studies (fundus photography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, multifocal electroretinography, visual fields) and classification of retinopathy into 1 of 3 patterns: parafoveal (retinal changes 2°-6° from the fovea), pericentral (retinal changes ≥ 8° from the fovea), or mixed (retinal changes in both parafoveal and pericentral areas). Relative frequency of different patterns of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy and comparison of risk factors. Of 201 total patients (18% Asian) with hydroxychloroquine retinopathy, 153 (76%) had typical parafoveal changes, 24 (12%) also had a zone of pericentral damage, and 24 (12%) had pericentral retinopathy without any parafoveal damage. Pericentral retinopathy alone was seen in 50% of Asian patients but only in 2% of white patients. Patients with the pericentral pattern were taking hydroxychloroquine for a somewhat longer duration (19.5 vs. 15.0 years, P Hydroxychloroquine retinopathy does not always develop in a parafoveal (bull's eye) pattern, and a pericentral pattern of damage is especially prevalent among Asian patients. Screening practices may need to be adjusted to recognize pericentral and parafoveal hydroxychloroquine retinopathy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Diabetic retinopathy: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications].

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) develops in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the major cause of vision loss and blindness in the working population. The main risk factor of DR is hyperglycemia accompanied by enhanced mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and hexosamines, increase in polyol metabolism of glucose. The severity of vascular injury depends on the individual genetic background and is modified by other epigenetic, metabolic and haemodynamic factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. In diabetes, damage to the retina occurs in the vasculature (endothelial cells and pericytes), neurons and glia, pigment epithelial cells and infiltrating immunocompetent cells: monocytes, granulocytes, lymfocytes. These activated cells change the production pattern of a number of mediators such as growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, vasoactive molecules, coagulation factors and adhesion molecules resulting in increased blood flow, increased capillary permeability, proliferation of extracellular matrix and thickening of basal membranes, altered cell turnover (apoptosis, proliferation, hypertrophy), procoagulant and proaggregant pattern, and finally in angiogenesis and tissue remodelling. Brain, liver, adipose tissue, GUT, skeletal muscle and other tissues could be another source of mediators. Therapeutic approaches used for patients with or at risk for diabetic retinopathy include drug therapy to reduce modifiable risk factors, laser photocoagulation, intravitreous administration of anti-VEGF agents/steroids and intraocular surgery. Screening plays an important role in early detection and intervention to prevent the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Described insights into pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for DR, could help in the development of more targeted approach for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy. anti

  4. Anti-glaucoma potential of Heliotropium indicum Linn in experimentally-induced glaucoma

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Ramkissoon, Paul; Owusu-Afriyie, Osei

    2015-01-01

    Background Heliotropium indicum is used as a traditional remedy for hypertension in Ghana. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-glaucoma potential of an aqueous whole plant extract of H. indicum to manage experimentally-induced glaucoma. Methods The percentage change in intraocular pressure (IOP), after inducing acute glaucoma (15 mLkg?1 of 5?% dextrose, i.v.), in New Zealand White rabbits pretreated with Heliotropium indicum aqueous extract (HIE) (30?300 mgkg?1), acetazolamide (5 mg...

  5. Ahmed glaucoma valve in post-penetrating-keratoplasty glaucoma: A critically evaluated prospective clinical study

    Panda, Anita; Prakash, Vadivelu Jaya; Dada, Tanuj; Gupta, Anoop Kishore; Khokhar, Sudarshan; Vanathi, Murugesan

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) in post-penetrating-keratoplasty glaucoma (PKPG). Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 20 eyes of 20 adult patients with post-PKPG with intraocular pressure (IOP) >21 mmHg, on two or more antiglaucoma medications, underwent AG (model FP7) implantation and were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. Absolute success was defined as 5 glaucoma managed by AGV implantation revealed a satisfactory outcome up to 6 months of follow-up. PMID:21586837

  6. Trabecular meshwork stiffness in glaucoma.

    Wang, Ke; Read, A Thomas; Sulchek, Todd; Ethier, C Ross

    2017-05-01

    Alterations in stiffness of the trabecular meshwork (TM) may play an important role in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the second leading cause of blindness. Specifically, certain data suggest an association between elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and increased TM stiffness; however, the underlying link between TM stiffness and IOP remains unclear and requires further study. We here first review the literature on TM stiffness measurements, encompassing various species and based on a number of measurement techniques, including direct approaches such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and uniaxial tension tests, and indirect methods based on a beam deflection model. We also briefly review the effects of several factors that affect TM stiffness, including lysophospholipids, rho-kinase inhibitors, cytoskeletal disrupting agents, dexamethasone (DEX), transforming growth factor-β 2 (TGF-β 2 ), nitric oxide (NO) and cellular senescence. We then describe a method we have developed for determining TM stiffness measurement in mice using a cryosection/AFM-based approach, and present preliminary data on TM stiffness in C57BL/6J and CBA/J mouse strains. Finally, we investigate the relationship between TM stiffness and outflow facility between these two strains. The method we have developed shows promise for further direct measurements of mouse TM stiffness, which may be of value in understanding mechanistic relations between outflow facility and TM biomechanical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ahmed glaucoma valve in children: A review☆

    Nassiri, Nariman; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Coleman, Anne L.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric glaucoma is potentially a blinding disease. Although goniotomy and trabeculotomy are associated with good early success rates, eventually 20% of these procedures fail and many children will require additional surgery to control the IOP in the long-term. In this review, we reported that adequate IOP control can be achieved with the placement of Ahmed glaucoma valve and can last 5 or more years. However, most patients will need one or more glaucoma medications at some point after surgery. In addition, the implants may be associated with pupillary irregularities, lenticular opacification as well as tube-related complications, particularly in the first year of life, as the globe is enlarging with age. PMID:23960945

  8. BILATERAL STEROID INDUCED GLAUCOMA IN VERNAL KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS

    Bangal Surekha V, Bankar Mahima S, Bhandari Akshay J, Kalkote Prasad R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vernal Keratoconjunctivits (VKC is a bilateral recurrent allergic interstitial conjunctival inflammation with a periodic seasonal incidence and of self limiting nature, mainly affecting the younger population. Patients of VKC on steroid therapy are at higher risk of developing steroid induced glaucoma. Raised intraocular pressure due to steroids typically occurs within few weeks of starting steroid therapy and comes back to normal on immediate stoppage of steroids. A case of steroid induced glaucoma in a 30 years old female with vernal keratoconjunctivitis. She was on topical steroids for 3-4 years. She was incompliant with the instructions to stop steroids. She eventually developed steroid induced glaucoma and glaucomatous optic neuropathy with tunnel vision.

  9. Unilateral glaucoma in Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism).

    Yen, M T; Gedde, S J; Flynn, J T

    2000-12-01

    To report a patient with unilateral glaucoma associated with Sotos syndrome. Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a disorder of growth and development with characteristic facial changes and normal endocrine function. Ocular manifestations may also include megalocornea, iris hypoplasia, cataracts, megalophthalmos, strabismus, nystagmus, and retinal dystrophy. Case report. A 50 year-old man with the clinical features of Sotos syndrome presented with complaints of decreased vision in the left eye. Ophthalmologic examination revealed bilateral megalocornea, megalophthalmos, iris hypoplasia and transillumination defects, cataracts, and unilateral glaucoma. Intraocular pressure was lowered, and visual field loss was stabilized with topical medications. Sotos syndrome patients should be examined routinely to allow for early detection and treatment of potential ocular problems, including glaucoma.

  10. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma

    Agarwal Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is characterized by changes in the optic disc and visual field defects. The elevated intraocular pressure was considered the prime factor responsible for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy involving death of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Extensive investigations into the pathophysiology of glaucoma now reveal the role of multiple factors in the development of retinal ganglion cell death. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy is crucial in the development of better therapeutic options. This review is an effort to summarize the current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma so that newer therapeutic targets can be recognized. The literature available in the National Medical Library and online Pubmed search engine was used for literature review.

  11. [Influence of Luxury Foodstuffs on Glaucoma].

    Huber-van der Velden, K K

    2017-02-01

    The term "luxury foodstuffs" refers to foods which are not consumed because of their nutritional value. Classic modern luxury foodstuffs are alcohol, caffeine-containing drinks, cocoa, sugar and tobacco. The following review article examines some of these modern luxury foodstuffs in detail, as well as their influence on glaucoma. Thus, small quantities of alcohol lower high intraocular pressure and have a positive influence on the blood circulation of the optic nerve. In addition, red wine polyphenols exert vasoprotective effects. In general, however, alcohol consumption appears to have no significant effect on the prevalence of glaucoma. The most important source of caffeine intake is coffee consumption. In some studies, coffee consumption caused no changes in intraocular pressure, while others reported a rise. A large study showed a connection between heavy coffee consumption and the risk of pseudoexfoliation glaucoma. Green and black teas are rich sources of flavonoids with antioxidant activity. In addition, a slight trend for lowering the intraocular pressure has been measured. As regards chocolate, flavonoid-rich dark chocolate should be favoured, due to its antioxidant activity. It lowers blood pressure and improves endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation. Excessive sugar consumption over many years can lead to increased body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes. Many studies show a positive relationship between BMI and intraocular pressure. Some studies have identified significant correlations between type 2 diabetes and the risk of glaucoma. Smoking is a very widespread stimulant; it narrows the blood vessels and thus reduces the blood circulation of the optic nerve. Otherwise, studies on the role of smoking as a risk factor for glaucoma have been very inconsistent. Luxury foodstuffs may effect glaucoma and should be included in the medical history. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Management of Blood Pressure in Patients with Glaucoma.

    Levine, Russell M; Yang, Alina; Brahma, Venkatesh; Martone, James F

    2017-09-19

    Ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) is defined as the difference between BP and intraocular pressure (IOP). With low BP comes low OPP and resultant ischemic damage to the optic nerve, leading to glaucoma progression. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on BP as it relates to glaucoma and to create a forum of discussion between ophthalmologists and internal medicine specialists. Both high and low BP has been linked glaucoma. Low BP is particularly associated with glaucoma progression in normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients. Patients who have low nighttime BP readings are at highest risk of progression of their glaucoma. Internal medicine specialists and ophthalmologists should consider the relationship between BP and glaucoma when treating patients with concomitant disease. Too-low nighttime BP should be avoided. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful tool to identify patients at greatest risk for progression.

  13. Definition, Classification, and Pathophysiology of Canine Glaucoma.

    Pizzirani, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Glaucoma is a common ocular condition in humans and dogs leading to optic nerve degeneration and irreversible blindness. Primary glaucoma is a group of spontaneous heterogeneous diseases. Multiple factors are involved in its pathogenesis and these factors vary across human ethnic groups and canine breeds, so the clinical phenotypes are numerous and their classification can be challenging and remain superficial. Aging and oxidative stress are major triggers for the manifestation of disease. Multiple, intertwined inflammatory and biochemical cascades eventually alter cellular and extracellular physiology in the optic nerve and trabecular meshwork and lead to vision loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical observation on Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for teenagers with refractory glaucoma

    Dong-Dao Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical effect of Ahmed glaucoma valve(AGVimplantation for teenagers with refractory glaucoma. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients(27 eyeswith refractory glaucoma were treated with AGV implantation in our hospital from October 2012 to October 2014. The patients were followed up for 12mo. The success rate of the operation, postoperative intraocular pressure, the best corrected visual acuity, as well as complications were recorded. RESULTS: The success rate of the operation was 85%. The intraocular pressure of the 27 patients decreased from 48.3±8.3mmHg before operations to 21.4±8.1mmHg(PPCONCLUSION: AGV implantation is characterized by a high success rate, simple operation, less complications and is an effective treatment for refractory glaucoma in adolescents.

  15. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation for Uveitic Glaucoma Secondary to Behçet Disease.

    Satana, Banu; Yalvac, Ilgaz S; Sungur, Gulten; Eksioglu, Umit; Basarir, Berna; Altan, Cigdem; Duman, Sunay

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes of patients with uveitic glaucoma secondary to Behçet disease (BD) who underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation. A retrospective chart review of 14 eyes of 10 patients with uveitic glaucoma associated with BD who underwent AGV implantation at a tertiary referral center. Treatment success was defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) between 6 and 21 mm Hg with or without antiglaucoma medication, without further additional glaucoma surgery or loss of light perception. The main outcome measures were IOP, best-corrected visual acuity measured with Snellen charts, and number of glaucoma medications. Mean duration of postoperative follow-up was 18.2±6.6 months (range, 6 to 31 mo). Of the 14 eyes, 10 (71.4%) were pseudophakic and 5 (35.7%) had primary AGV implantation without a history of previous glaucoma surgery. At the most recent follow-up visit, 13 of the 14 eyes had an IOP between 6 and 21 mm Hg. Mean IOP was significantly reduced during follow-up, as compared with preoperative values (P≤0.005). The cumulative probability of surgical success rate was 90.9% at 18 months based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The mean number of antiglaucoma medications required to achieve the desired IOP decreased from 3.4±0.5 preoperatively to 1.0±1.1 postoperatively (P≤0.05). Visual acuity loss of >2 lines occurred in 4 eyes (28.5%) due to optic atrophy associated with retinal vasculitis. Temporary hypotony developed during follow-up in 4 eyes (28.5%) at first postoperative week. For the management of uveitic glaucoma associated with BD, AGV implantation is a successful method for glaucoma control but requires additional surgical interventions for high early hypotony rates.

  16. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure

    Huang, Jingjing; Lin, Jialiu; Wu, Ziqiang; Xu, Hongzhi; Zuo, Chengguo; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Jingjing Huang,1 Jialiu Lin,1 Ziqiang Wu,2 Hongzhi Xu,3 Chengguo Zuo,1 Jian Ge1 1State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Department of Glaucoma, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Center for Advanced Eye Care, Carson City, NV, USA; 3Institute of Child Health Policy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve...

  17. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening programs: an evaluation of utility and cost-effectiveness

    Cuadros JA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jorge A Cuadros Optometry/Vision Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: Diabetes is the main cause of blindness among working age adults, although treatment is highly effective in preventing vision loss. Eye examinations are recommended on a yearly basis for most patients for timely detection of retinal disease. Telemedicine-based diabetic retinopathy screening (TMDRS programs have been developed to identify patients with sight-threatening diabetic eye disease because patients are often noncompliant with recommended live eye examinations. This article reviews the cost-effectiveness of the various forms of TMDRS. A review of relevant articles, mostly published since 2008, shows that societal benefits generally outweigh the costs of TMDRS. However, advances in technology to improve efficacy, lower costs, and broaden screening to other sight-threatening conditions, such as glaucoma and refractive error, are necessary to improve the sustainability of TMDRS within health care organizations. Patient satisfaction with these telemedicine programs is generally high. New models of shared care with primary care providers and staff are emerging to improve patient engagement and follow-up care when individuals are found to have sight-threatening eye disease. TMDRS programs are growing and provide valuable clinical benefit. The cost-utility is currently well proven in locations with limited access to regular eye care services, such as rural areas, poor communities, and prison systems; however, improvements over time are necessary for these programs to be cost-effective in mainstream medical settings in the future. Keywords: telemedicine, diabetes, retinopathy, retinal imaging

  18. The East London glaucoma prediction score: web-based validation of glaucoma risk screening tool

    Stephen, Cook; Benjamin, Longo-Mbenza

    2013-01-01

    AIM It is difficult for Optometrists and General Practitioners to know which patients are at risk. The East London glaucoma prediction score (ELGPS) is a web based risk calculator that has been developed to determine Glaucoma risk at the time of screening. Multiple risk factors that are available in a low tech environment are assessed to provide a risk assessment. This is extremely useful in settings where access to specialist care is difficult. Use of the calculator is educational. It is a free web based service. Data capture is user specific. METHOD The scoring system is a web based questionnaire that captures and subsequently calculates the relative risk for the presence of Glaucoma at the time of screening. Three categories of patient are described: Unlikely to have Glaucoma; Glaucoma Suspect and Glaucoma. A case review methodology of patients with known diagnosis is employed to validate the calculator risk assessment. RESULTS Data from the patient records of 400 patients with an established diagnosis has been captured and used to validate the screening tool. The website reports that the calculated diagnosis correlates with the actual diagnosis 82% of the time. Biostatistics analysis showed: Sensitivity = 88%; Positive predictive value = 97%; Specificity = 75%. CONCLUSION Analysis of the first 400 patients validates the web based screening tool as being a good method of screening for the at risk population. The validation is ongoing. The web based format will allow a more widespread recruitment for different geographic, population and personnel variables. PMID:23550097

  19. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma.

    Angmo, Dewang; Sharma, Reetika; Temkar, Shreyas; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-05-01

    ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD) has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs) not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medications) was achieved in eight cases (66.7%) and qualified success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with additional glaucoma medications) in two cases (16.7%) at 1-year after surgery. Early intervention was needed in 4 patients; two underwent anterior chamber reformation while the other two required needling. Two patients required resurgery. There was no significant change in the best corrected visual acuity postoperatively (P = 0.37). ExPress GFD does not seem to offer a benefit over standard trabeculectomy in patients with advanced glaucomatous disease in terms of IOP control or complication rate. However, due to the small sample size with a heterogeneous mixture of primary and secondary glaucoma's, we await further studies with a larger sample size and long-term follow-up, to see how the device performs.

  20. Efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab with panretinal photocoagulation followed by trabeculectomy compared with Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in neovascular glaucoma

    Jin-Tao Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR with panretinal photocoagulation (PRP followed by trabeculectomy compared with Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV implantation in neovascular glaucoma (NVG. METHODS: This was a retrospective comparative study. We reviewed the cases of a total of 45 eyes from 45 NVG patients among which 23 eyes underwent AGV implantation and the other 22 underwent trabeculectomy. The causes of neovascular glaucoma included: diabetic retinopathy (25 eyes, and retinal vein occlusion (20 eyes. All patients received preoperative IVR combined with postoperative PRP. The mean best-corrected visual acuities (BCVA were converted to the logarithms of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR for the statisitical analyses. Intraocular pressure (IOP, the logMAR BCVA and surgical complications were evaluated before and after surgery. The follow-up period was 12mo. RESULTS: A total of 39 cases showed complete regression of iris neovascularization at 7d after injection, and 6 cases showed a small amount of residual iris neovascularization. The success rates were 81.8% and 82.6% at 12mo after trabeculectomy and AGV implantation, respectively. In the trabeculectomy group, the logMAR BCVA improved at the last follow-up in 14 eyes, remained stable in 6 eyes and decreased in 2 eyes. In 4 cases, slight hyphemas developed after trabeculectomy. A shallow anterior chamber developed in 2 cases and 2 vitreous hemorrhages. In the AGV group, the logMAR BCVA improved in 14 eyes, remained stable in 5 eyes and decreased in 4 eyes. Slight hyphemas developed in 3 cases, and a shallow anterior chamber in 3 cases. The mean postoperative IOP was significantly lower in both groups after surgery (F=545.468, P<0.05, and the mean postoperative logMAR BCVA was also significantly improved (F=10.964, P<0.05 with no significant difference between two groups. CONCLUSION: It is safe and effective to treat NVG with this combined procedure, and we

  1. Physical activity and its correlation to diabetic retinopathy.

    Praidou, Anna; Harris, Martin; Niakas, Dimitrios; Labiris, Georgios

    2017-02-01

    The lack of physical activity, along with obesity, smoking, hypertension and hyperglycaemia are considered as risk factors for the occurrence of diseases such as diabetes. Primary objective of the study was to investigate potential correlation between physical activity and diabetic retinopathy. Three hundred and twenty patients were included in the study: 240 patients with diabetes type 2 (80 patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 80 patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 80 ones with proliferative diabetic retinopathy) were compared with 80 non-diabetic patients (control group). Physical activity of patients was assessed by the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ, 2002). HbA1c and BMI were also measured in diabetic patients. Group comparisons were attempted for levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Total physical activity was decreased in patients with severe to very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy as compared to patients with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and to the control group (pdiabetic retinopathy and physical activity has been demonstrated (pdiabetic retinopathy, independent of the effects of HbA1c and BMI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural neurodegeneration correlates with early diabetic retinopathy

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Hansen, Rasmus Søgaard; Peto, Tunde

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine differences in structural and functional neurodegenerative measurements between patients with no and early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we examined 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 7-field fundus photographs acquired...... with Topcon TRC-NW6S, a single, certified grader determined the presence of DR according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale. Retinal neurodegeneration was evaluated by Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and by a RETI-scan multifocal...... electroretinography (mf-ERG) system in rings 1-6. RESULTS: Median age and duration of diabetes were 63.6 and 10 years, respectively, and 46% were men. Median HbA1c was 50 mmol/mol (6.7%), and ETDRS levels were 10 (41.7%, n = 43), 20 (35.0%, n = 36), and 35 (23.3%, n = 24). The duration of diabetes increased...

  3. Comparison of the nerve fiber layer of type 2 diabetic patients without glaucoma with normal subjects of the same age and sex

    Takis A

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alexandros Takis,1 Dimitrios Alonistiotis,1 Dimitrios Panagiotidis,1 Nikolaos Ioannou,1 Dimitris Papaconstantinou,2 Panagiotis Theodossiadis1 1Ophthalmological University Clinic of Athens, Attikon Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Ophthalmological University Clinic of Athens, Geniko Kratiko Hospital, Athens, Greece Background: The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 was compared to normal subjects of similar age and sex, having first excluded any risk factors for glaucoma. The correlation between the RNFL thickness and the severity of diabetic retinopathy was investigated at its primary stages and with other ocular and diabetic parameters. Methods: A prospective, case series study was carried out. Twenty-seven diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, 24 diabetic patients with mild retinopathy, and 25 normal, age-matched subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological examination and imaging with scanning laser polarimetry for the evaluation of the RNFL. Multivariate analysis was applied in order to investigate the correlation between RNFL and diabetic parameters, such as age, duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin; and ocular parameters, such as cup to disc ratio, levels of normal intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness. Results: The mean inferior average of RNFL and the temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal standard deviation were statistically significantly lower in both diabetic groups, and the nerve fiber index was higher (P=0.04 compared to the normal group. There was no statistically significant difference between the diabetic groups. The factor analysis showed no significant correlation between the RNFL and the previously mentioned diabetic and ocular parameters. Conclusion: The existence of diabetes should be seriously considered in evaluating the results of scanning laser polarimetry. Multivariate analysis for RNFL was used for the first

  4. Glaucoma: a brief update for 2017

    Abstract. Glaucoma is a complex condition of the eye and the second leading cause of blindness around the globe. It is an ... to a disease, trauma or drugs, or as being congenital in nature ..... as dry eyes, blurred vision, blepharitis and others.

  5. THE PRACTICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF GLAUCOMA INVESTIGATIONS

    more reliable and the more practical ones in a short, concise manner ... pathological changes in the affected eye'" This definition makes it clear ... having glaucoma; clear-cut clinical cases are excluded. So often ... be remembered that the provocative tests are helpful, but ... Make sure your Schiotz tonometer is standardized.

  6. Methylphenidate (Ritalin-associated Cataract and Glaucoma

    Chao-Kung Lu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin is the drug of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, an association of Ritalin with glaucoma has been reported. We report a case of Ritalin-associated cataract and glaucoma. A 10-year-old boy was diagnosed with ADHD and had received methylphenidate hydrochloride, 60 mg/day for 2 years. He presented with blurred vision. Best-corrected visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes. Ocular examinations revealed intraocular pressure (IOP of 30 mmHg under medication, dense posterior subcapsular opacity of lens, pale disc with advanced cupping, and marked constriction of visual field. Despite maximal anti-glaucomatous medication, IOP still could not be controlled. The patient then received combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. Visual acuity improved and IOP was within normal limits in both eyes postoperatively. Large dose of methylphenidate may cause cataract and glaucoma. The mechanism remains unclear. Doctors should be aware of the possible ocular side effects of methylphenidate.

  7. Molteno3 Implantation as Primary Glaucoma Surgery

    Juha O. Välimäki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the outcome of Molteno3 implantation as primary glaucoma surgery and to analyze the factors influencing the surgical outcome. Methods. This is a retrospective clinical study of 106 consecutive eyes (97 patients with no previous glaucoma surgery. Surgical failure was defined as an IOP > 21 mmHg or less than a 20% reduction below baseline, or IOP ≤ 5 mmHg, on two consecutive visits after 3 months follow-up, or reoperation for glaucoma or loss of light perception. Results. At the end of the follow-up (mean, 35 months; range, 12–71 months, the mean postoperative IOP (14.2 ± 4.4 mmHg was statistically significantly lower than the preoperative IOP (35.2 ± 9.7 mmHg (P<0.001. Life-table success rates were 97%, 94%, and 91% after follow-up of 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. Success rate for an IOP ≤ 18 mmHg was 77% at the last visit. Success was not influenced by previous cataract surgery, sex, age, laser trabeculoplasty (LTP, preoperative IOP, or number of antiglaucoma medications. Forty-seven eyes had 66 postoperative complications. Conclusions. The primary Molteno3 implant provided significant IOP lowering with minimal and manageable complications in uncontrolled glaucoma. Neither previous cataract surgery nor LTP had any detrimental effect on surgical success.

  8. Glaucoma facomórfico y ultrabiomicroscopia

    María Cristina González González

    2015-01-01

    Conclusiones: La ultrabiomicroscopia es un herramienta útil ya que permite una valoración completa del segmento anterior, aun en presencia de medios opacos y ayuda a determinar la relación del cristalino con las estructuras adyacentes y el probable mecanismo del glaucoma.

  9. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Abdullah S. Alhomida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.

  10. Diabetic retinopathy - ocular complications of diabetesmellitus

    Martin M Nentwich; Michael W Ulbig

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized nations diabetic retinopathy is the mostfrequent microvascular complication of diabetes mellitusand the most common cause of blindness in the workingagepopulation. In the next 15 years, the number ofpatients suffering from diabetes mellitus is expected toincrease significantly. By the year 2030, about 440 millionpeople in the age-group 20-79 years are estimated to besuffering from diabetes mellitus worldwide (prevalence7.7%), while in 2010 there were 285 million people withdiabetes mellitus (prevalence 6.4%). This accounts foran increase in patients with diabetes in industrialized nations by 20% and in developing countries by 69% until the year 2030. Due to the expected rise in diabetic patients, the need for ophthalmic care of patients (i.e. , exams and treatments) will also increase and represents a challenge for eye-care providers. Development of optimized screening programs, which respect available resources of the ophthalmic infrastructure, will become even more important. Main reasons for loss of vision in patients with diabetes mellitus are diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Incidence or progression of these potentially blinding complications can be greatly reduced by adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Additionally, regular ophthalmic exams are mandatory for detecting ocular complications and initiating treatments such as laser photocoagulation in case of clinical significant diabetic macular edema or early proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this way, the risk of blindness can considerably be reduced. In advanced stages of diabetic retinopathy, pars-plana vitrectomy is performed to treat vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. In recent years, the advent of intravitreal medication has improved therapeutic options for patients with advanced diabetic macular edema.

  11. Childhood glaucoma surgery in the 21st Century

    Papadopoulos, M; Edmunds, B; Fenerty, C; Khaw, P T

    2014-01-01

    Most children with glaucoma will require surgery in their lifetime, often in their childhood years. The surgical management of childhood glaucoma is however challenging, largely because of its greater potential for failure and complications as compared with surgery in adults. The available surgical repertoire for childhood glaucoma has remained relatively unchanged for many years with most progress owing to modifications to existing surgery. Although the surgical approach to childhood glaucoma varies around the world, angle surgery remains the preferred initial surgery for primary congenital glaucoma and a major advance has been the concept of incising the whole of the angle (circumferential trabeculotomy). Simple modifications to the trabeculectomy technique have been shown to considerably minimise complications. Glaucoma drainage devices maintain a vital role for certain types of glaucoma including those refractory to other surgery. Cyclodestruction continues to have a role mainly for patients following failed drainage/filtering surgery. Although the prognosis for childhood glaucoma has improved significantly since the introduction of angle surgery, there is still considerable progress to be made to ensure a sighted lifetime for children with glaucoma all over the world. Collaborative approaches to researching and delivering this care are required, and this paper highlights the need for more high-quality prospective surgical trials in the management of the childhood glaucoma. PMID:24924446

  12. Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: surgical technique and complications

    Riva I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivano Riva,1 Gloria Roberti,1 Francesco Oddone,1 Anastasios GP Konstas,2 Luciano Quaranta3 1IRCCS “Fondazione GB Bietti per l’Oftalmologia”, Rome, Italy; 21st University Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Unit, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Section of Ophthalmology, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve is an effective surgical technique to reduce intraocular pressure in patients affected with glaucoma. While in the past, the use of this device was reserved to glaucoma refractory to multiple filtration surgical procedures, up-to-date mounting experience has encouraged its use also as a primary surgery for selected cases. Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve can be challenging for the surgeon, especially in patients who already underwent previous multiple surgeries. Several tips have to be acquired by the surgeon, and a long learning curve is always needed. Although the valve mechanism embedded in the Ahmed glaucoma valve decreases the risk of postoperative hypotony-related complications, it does not avoid the need of a careful follow-up. Complications related to this type of surgery include early and late postoperative hypotony, excessive capsule fibrosis around the plate, erosion of the tube or plate edge, and very rarely infection. The aim of this review is to describe surgical technique for Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and to report related complications. Keywords: glaucoma, surgical technique, glaucoma drainage devices, Ahmed glaucoma valve, complications

  13. Update on pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma.

    Okafor, Kingsley; Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2017-03-01

    The present article reviews the clinical features and pathogenesis of pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma and provides an update regarding their diagnosis and management. Newer imaging modalities including ultrasound biomicroscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography facilitate visualization of the iris concavity characteristic of eyes with pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Patients with pigmentary glaucoma may be distinguished from those with other glaucoma types by the presence of typical symptoms, personality type, and patterns of diurnal intraocular pressure fluctuation. Although laser iridotomy has been shown to alter iris anatomy in pigmentary glaucoma, it is not proven to slow visual field progression. Multiple trials have validated the safety and efficacy of filtering surgery in treating pigmentary glaucoma, with fewer studies published on the role of micro-invasive glaucoma surgery. Literature from the review period has further defined the unique clinical characteristics of pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Laser surgery has a limited role in the management of these entities, whereas trabeculectomy remains an acceptable first-line surgical treatment. Further studies are needed to define the potential application of the newer micro-invasive glaucoma procedures in pigmentary glaucoma.

  14. Avaliação dos tipos de glaucoma no serviço de oftalmologia da UNICAMP Evaluation of glaucoma types at the sector of ophthalmology - UNICAMP

    Andréia Peltier Urbano

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência dos tipos de glaucoma no Setor de Glaucoma do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal de 329 pacientes atendidos no Setor de Glaucoma da Universidade Estadual de Campinas entre 1 de outubro e 20 de dezembro de 2000, com avaliação dos tipos de glaucoma e conduta terapêutica. RESULTADOS: De 329 pacientes atendidos no Ambulatório de Glaucoma, 132 foram encaminhados ao ambulatório por suspeita de glaucoma (40,1% e 197 como glaucoma diagnosticado (59,9%. Dos 132 suspeitos de glaucoma, 90 (68,2% foram confirmados como tendo glaucoma e 42 (31,8% encontram-se em acompanhamento. Dos 329 pacientes avaliados, 283 (86% tinham glaucoma, 42 (12,8% suspeita de glaucoma, 2 (0,6% diagnóstico de glaucoma excluído e 2 (0,6% hipertensão ocular. Dos 530 olhos glaucomatosos, havia 298 (56,2% glaucomas primários de ângulo aberto, 108 (20,4% glaucomas primários de ângulo estreito, 21 (4% glaucomas pós-facectomia, 19 (3,6% glaucomas congênitos e 16 (3% glaucomas de pressão normal. A conduta terapêutica adotada foi inicialmente clínica em todos os casos. Após seguimento médio de 10,5 meses, 89 (16,8% olhos necessitaram tratamento com laser: 72 (13,6% iridotomias, 7 (1,3% trabeculoplastias e 10 (1,9% panfotocoagulações. Cento e setenta e cinco olhos (33% foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico. CONCLUSÃO: O tipo mais freqüente de glaucoma observado foi o glaucoma primário de ângulo aberto, seguido por glaucoma primário de ângulo estreito. Glaucomas como o de pressão normal e o pseudo-exfoliativo foram pouco freqüentes na população estudada.PURPOSE: To evaluate the frequency of different types of glaucoma at the Hospital das Clínicas of Campinas State University. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 329 patients followed at the Glaucoma Service of Campinas State University from October 1 to December 20, 2000. The frequency of each type of glaucoma and the

  15. Treatment of absolute painful glaucoma with dynamic arcs using novalis shaped beam radiosurgery

    Gonzalez-Olhovich, Irene; Celis, Miguel Angel; Larraga-Gutierrez, Jose; Lopez-Ayala, Temuchino; Suarez-Campos, Jose; Garcia-Garduno, Amanda; Herrera-Gomez, Leopoldo; Hernandez-Bojorquez, Mariana B.Sc.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the effect of shaped beam conformal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in 1 patient with chronic painful glaucoma in one eye refractory to medical treatment. Methods and Materials: Left eye ciliary body was targeted at 18 Gy (90% isodose curve) with a dedicated linear accelerator (Novalis, BrainLAB, Germany) SRS. Interval follow-up was performed weekly for the first month, and every 2 months until 1 year was completed with clinical examinations and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. Results: Ocular pain resolved at 6 weeks after SRS treatment. IOP decreased and normalized at 1 year. Conclusions: We present a case in which SRS appears to be an effective treatment of chronic refractory painful glaucoma. Further Phase I studies are needed to know the best parameters for radiation dose, tolerance of organs at risk, and pathophysiologic effects

  16. Glaucoma and cataract surgery: two roads merging into one.

    Shah, Manjool; Law, Geoffrey; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2016-01-01

    To discuss the increasing utilization of cataract extraction in the management of glaucoma and to highlight advances in surgical care that can promote synergistic treatment of these comorbid conditions. Recent years have demonstrated significant advances in the management of glaucoma through the use of novel microinvasive glaucoma devices. Furthermore, an increased understanding of the role of cataract surgery in the treatment of various glaucomas warrants review. Nevertheless, cataract surgery in the glaucoma patient warrants specific preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative planning to optimize visual function and quality of life while mitigating potential risk factors for adverse events. Although the challenges of performing cataract extraction on glaucoma patients exist, the potential benefit to these patients is substantial. With attention to pre- and perioperative surgical planning and intraoperative technique, as well as with awareness and potential utilization of novel devices and treatment strategies, cataract extraction offers a unique platform for anatomical and functional improvement in this increasingly common cohort of patients.

  17. Alternative therapy in glaucoma management: Is there any role?

    Parikh Rajul

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Various randomized controlled clinical trials have shown that lowering intraocular pressure (IOP does reduce progression of primary open-angle glaucoma. However, there is lots of interest in nonpharmacological options that includes lifestyle adjustment and alternative and complementary therapy (ACT. At least 5% glaucoma population uses ACT. Various lifestyle activities like exercise and alcohol can reduce IOP by 1 to 2 mm Hg but would have small effect on glaucoma. The psychological stress can increase IOP. Hypothetically and few studies do show neuroprotective effect (or effect on ocular blood flow of alcohol, Gingko biloba, bilberry, but the current evidence is weak for its routine use. We must also remember the side effects of ′medications′ (e.g., marijuana, alcohol before promoting as remedy for glaucoma. In current armamentarium of glaucoma management, ACT cannot substitute the conventional treatment available to lower IOP.

  18. SERUM MAGNESIUM, LIPID PROFILE AND GLYCATED HAEMOGLOBIN IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Sunanda Vusikala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus of long duration. Alterations in trace metals like magnesium and lipid profile was observed in diabetic retinopathy with hyperglycaemic status. AIM The study was taken up to assess the role of magnesium, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin in diabetic retinopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 subjects between 40-65 years were included in the study. Group 1 includes 20 age and sex matched healthy controls. Group 2 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus without retinopathy. Group 3 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus with retinopathy. RESULTS Magnesium was found to be significantly low in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Fasting and Postprandial plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels confirmed the glycaemic status of each of the groups. CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia was observed in diabetic retinopathy along with increased levels of glycated haemoglobin in our study.

  19. Outcomes of vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy at Groote ...

    Background. Present limitations in primary and secondary prevention of diabetic retinopathy mean that many patients with diabetes present with advanced retinal complications, often requiring surgery (vitrectomy). Objectives. To determine the outcomes of vitrectomy for advanced diabetic retinopathy and to examine ...

  20. Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria | Lawan | Annals of ...

    Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria. ... Background: The aim of the study is to determine the pattern of retinopathy seen in diabetic patients attending the outpatient clinic in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, ... A screening program needs to be developed to facilitate early detection and prompt treatment.

  1. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    J.W.Y. Yau (Joanne W.); S.L. Rogers (Sophie); Y. Kawasaki; E.L. Lamoureux (Ecosse); J.W. Kowalski (Jonathan); T. Bek (Toke); S.-J. Chen (Shih-Jen); J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline); A.E. Fletcher (Astrid E.); J. Grauslund (Jakob); R.C.G. Haffner; U. Hamman (Ute); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); T. Kayama (Takamasa); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S. Krishnaiah (Sannapaneni); K. Mayurasakorn (Korapat); J.P. O'Hare (Joseph); T. Orchard; M. Porta; M. Rema (Mohan); M.S. Roy (Monique); T. Sharma (Tarun); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); H. Taylor (Hugh); J.M. Tielsch (James); D. Varma (Dhiraj); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); N. Wang (Ningli); S. West (Sheila); L. Zu (Liang); M. Yasuda (Maya); X. Zhang (Xinzhi); P. Mitchell (Paul); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A pooled analysis using individual participant data from population-based studies

  2. Characteristics of patients with diabetic retinopathy in Gaborone ...

    (GLLAMMs) to account for the non-independence of the eye diabetic retinopathy outcome at the patient level (Rabe-Hesketh et al., 2000). This model allowed for analysis of a polytomous ordinal response on a set of predictors and computed the odds ratios (OR) of having a more severe diabetic retinopathy grade compared ...

  3. Bevacizumab treatment for retinopathy of prematurity in South Africa

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a growing problem in South. Africa (SA), as it is .... detected in the serum of both infants and adults after intraocular injection,[7] ... use of anti-VEGF agents to treat macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy ...

  4. Lipoprotein(a Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy

    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atherogenic lipoproteins, such as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, are associated with progression of retinopathy. Aim. To evaluate the relationship between lipoprotein(a and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 145 diabetic consecutive patients (82 females, 63 males; mean age 66.8±12 years, mean duration of diabetes 9.4±6.8 years. Presence and severity of retinopathy were evaluated. Serum lipid profile, including Lp(a level, was assessed. Results. High Lp(a levels have been observed in 54 (78.3% subjects and normal levels in 13 (18.85% subjects as regards diabetic patients with retinopathy. Lp(a levels were high in 15 subjects (21.75% and normal in 63 subjects (91.35% as regards patients without retinopathy. Conclusions. Lp(a levels are increased in a significant percentage of patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy. The impact of Lp(a levels on diabetic retinopathy needs to be further investigated.

  5. Cyclo-photocoagulation in the management of aphakic glaucoma

    Lee, P.-F.

    1984-01-01

    Transpupillary argon laser photocoagulation of the ciliary processes (TALC) through a widely dilated pupil, with or without cerebral depression, has been used in the management of glaucoma in aphakic eyes for a number of years. 58% of glaucoma in aphakics treated with TALC showed sustained and meaningful intraocular pressure reduction 2 months to 5 years after the procedure. Clinically, the TALC procedure is a relatively safe, effective, and an useful alternative approach in the management of selected cases of glaucoma in aphakics. (Auth.)

  6. Superior versus inferior Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

    Pakravan, Mohammad; Yazdani, Shahin; Shahabi, Camelia; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2009-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) (New World Medical Inc., Rancho Cucamonga, CA) implantation in the superior versus inferior quadrants. Prospective parallel cohort study. A total of 106 eyes of 106 patients with refractory glaucoma. Consecutive patients with refractory glaucoma underwent AGV implantation in the superior or inferior quadrants. Main outcome measures included intraocular pressure (IOP) and rate of complications. Other outcome measures included best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), number of glaucoma medications, and success rate (defined as at least 30% IOP reduction and 5glaucoma surgery, phthisis bulbi, or loss of light perception. Of a total of 106 eyes, 58 and 48 eyes underwent AGV implantation in the superior and inferior quadrants, respectively. Baseline characteristics were comparable in the study groups, except for preoperative IOP, which was higher in the superior group (P = 0.01). Patients were followed for a mean period of 10.6+/-8.49 months and 10.58+/-6.75 months in the superior and inferior groups, respectively (P = 0.477). BCVA was comparable between the groups at all postoperative visits (P>0.122). After 1 year, statistically significant but comparable IOP reduction from baseline (Pglaucoma medications was comparable after 1 year (1.3+/-1.2 vs. 1.9+/-0.8 for superior and inferior implants, respectively, P = 0.256). Success rates were also similar at 1 year: 27 eyes (81.8%) versus 20 eyes (95.2%) for superior and inferior implants, respectively (P = 0.227). However, the overall rate of complications, such as implant exposure necessitating removal, cosmetically unappealing appearance, and endophthalmitis, was higher in the inferior group: 12 eyes (25%) versus 3 eyes (5.2%) for superior and inferior groups, respectively, (P = 0.004). Superior and inferior AGV implants have similar intermediate efficacy in terms of IOP reduction, decrease in number of glaucoma medications, and preservation of vision. However

  7. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish

    Cao, Ziquan; Jensen, Lasse D.; Rouhi, Pegah

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced vascular responses, including angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and vascular leakage, significantly contribute to the onset, development and progression of retinopathy. However, until recently there were no appropriate animal disease models recapitulating adult retinopathy available....... In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the hypoxia......-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish. This model provides a unique opportunity to study kinetically the development of retinopathy in adult animals using noninvasive protocols and to assess therapeutic efficacy of orally active antiangiogenic drugs....

  8. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Javeria Amin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area.

  9. A Review on Recent Developments for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Amin, Javeria; Sharif, Muhammad; Yasmin, Mussarat

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the retinal micro vasculature which may be formed as a result of diabetes mellitus. Blindness may appear as a result of unchecked and severe cases of diabetic retinopathy. Manual inspection of fundus images to check morphological changes in microaneurysms, exudates, blood vessels, hemorrhages, and macula is a very time-consuming and tedious work. It can be made easily with the help of computer-aided system and intervariability for the observer. In this paper, several techniques for detecting microaneurysms, hemorrhages, and exudates are discussed for ultimate detection of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood vessels detection techniques are also discussed for the diagnosis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Furthermore, the paper elaborates a discussion on the experiments accessed by authors for the detection of diabetic retinopathy. This work will be helpful for the researchers and technical persons who want to utilize the ongoing research in this area.

  10. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma

    Dewang Angmo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medications was achieved in eight cases (66.7% and qualified success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with additional glaucoma medications in two cases (16.7% at 1-year after surgery. Early intervention was needed in 4 patients; two underwent anterior chamber reformation while the other two required needling. Two patients required resurgery. There was no significant change in the best corrected visual acuity postoperatively (P = 0.37. ExPress GFD does not seem to offer a benefit over standard trabeculectomy in patients with advanced glaucomatous disease in terms of IOP control or complication rate. However, due to the small sample size with a heterogeneous mixture of primary and secondary glaucoma′s, we await further studies with a larger sample size and long-term follow-up, to see how the device performs.

  11. Combined Phacoemulsification and Ahmed Glaucoma Drainage Implant Surgery for Patients With Refractory Glaucoma and Cataract.

    Valenzuela, Felipe; Browne, Andrew; Srur, Miguel; Nieme, Carlos; Zanolli, Mario; López-Solís, Remigio; Traipe, Leonidas

    2016-02-01

    To examine the indications, safety, efficacy, and complications of combined phacoemulsification and Ahmed glaucoma drainage implant surgery. A retrospective case review of 35 eyes (31 patients) subjected to combined phacoemulsification and Ahmed glaucoma drainage implant surgery. Demographic characteristics of the study population, indications for combined surgery, and operative and postoperative complications were recorded. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and number of glaucoma medications were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Complete success was defined as IOP ≤ 21 mm Hg without medication, qualified success if IOP ≤ 21 mm Hg with ≥ 1 medications, and failure if IOP>21 mm Hg or ≤ 5 mm Hg on ≥ 2 consecutive visits. Mean follow-up was 29.5 months (range, 6 to 87 mo). The most common indication for combined surgery was a history of prior failed trabeculectomy (60%). Postoperative visual acuity improved in 30 of 35 eyes (85%) (PAhmed glaucoma drainage implant surgery seems to be a safe and effective surgical option, providing good visual rehabilitation and control of IOP for patients with refractory glaucoma and cataract.

  12. Targeting VEGF in canine oxygen-induced retinopathy - a model for human retinopathy of prematurity

    McLeod DS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available D Scott McLeod, Gerard A Lutty Department of Ophthalmology, Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Development of the dog superficial retinal vasculature is similar to the mechanism of human retinal vasculature development; they both develop by vasculogenesis, differentiation, and assembly of vascular precursors called angioblasts. Canine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR was first developed by Arnall Patz in an effort to experimentally determine the effects of hyperoxia on the development of the retinal vasculature. The canine OIR model has many characteristics in common with human retinopathy of prematurity. Exposure of 1-day-old dogs to hyperoxia for 4 days causes a vaso-obliteration throughout the retina. Vasoproliferation, after the animals have returned to room air, is robust. The initial small preretinal neovascular formations anastomose to form large preretinal membranes that eventually cause tractional retinal folds. The end-stage pathology of the canine model is similar to stage IV human retinopathy of prematurity. Therefore, canine OIR is an excellent forum to evaluate the response to drugs targeting VEGF and its receptors. Evaluation of an antibody to VEGF-R2 and the VEGF-Trap demonstrated that doses should be titered down so that preretinal neovascularization is inhibited but retinal revascularization is able to proceed, vascularizing peripheral retina and preventing it from being a source of VEGF. Keywords: angioblasts, blood vessels, endothelial cells, oxygen, retinopathy, retina, vascular endothelial cell growth factor

  13. Childhood glaucoma profile in Dakahelia, Egypt: a retrospective study

    Tharwat H. Mokbel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze childhood glaucoma regarding its demographics, presentations, different causes and surgical modalities used among patients in Dakahelia and to apply the Childhood Glaucoma Research Network (CGRN classification retrospectively to evaluate its convenience. METHODS: A retrospective study in which the medical files of all glaucoma patients <16 years old presented to Mansoura Ophthalmic Center, Mansoura University from 2014 to 2017, were retrieved and analyzed. Collected data included: age, gender, laterality, visual acuity (VA, refraction, intraocular pressure (IOP, corneal diameter, cup-disc ratio, types and number of surgeries and antiglaucomatous drugs (AGD at the first and last visit. Prevalence of different subtypes was calculated and means of clinical features were compared. RESULTS: A total of 305 eyes of 207 patients were included classified into 6 groups: primary congenital glaucoma (PCG, juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG, glaucoma associated with systemic disease, glaucoma associated with ocular anomalies, acquired glaucoma and glaucoma following cataract surgery. PCG was the predominant type (55.1% followed by acquired glaucoma (29.5%. Males represented 63.8% of the whole studied patients. Glaucoma associated with ocular anomaly group showed the youngest age at diagnosis (21.9±30.0mo. The shortest corneal diameter was recorded in post cataract group (10.4±0.5 mm. Highest cup-disc ratio was found in the PCG group (P<0.0005. Glaucoma associated with systemic disease presented with the highest baseline IOP (34.5±5.0 mm Hg. All the cases with PCG were treated surgically with 21.8% required more than one surgery. The majority of the patients (74.2% in the acquired group were treated medically. Combined trabeculotomy-trabeculectomy was the most frequent operation done, accounting for 34.5% of all primary surgeries. Ahmed valve implantation comprised 87% of the secondary surgeries. Acquired glaucoma group had the highest

  14. Glaucoma Surgery in Pregnancy: A Case Series and Literature Review

    Mohammad Reza Razeghinejad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma management in pregnant patients is a real challenge, especially when the glaucoma is not controlled with medications. We report the results of 6 incisional glaucoma surgeries for the management of medically uncontrolled glaucoma patients during pregnancy. This retrospective, case series was conducted on the 6 eyes of 3pregnant patients with uncontrolled glaucoma using maximum tolerable medications. Details of the glaucoma surgical management of these patients as well as their postoperative care and pregnancy and clinical outcomes on longitudinal follow-up are discussed. All 3 patients had juvenile open-angle glaucoma and were on various anti-glaucoma medications, including oral acetazolamide. The first case described underwent trabeculectomy without antimetabolites in both eyes because of uncontrolled intraocular pressure with topical medications. The surgery was done with topical lidocaine jelly and subconjunctival lidocaine during the second and third trimesters. The second patient had an Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes during the second and third trimesters because of uncontrolled IOP with topical medications and no response to selective laser trabeculoplasty. Surgery was done with topical tetracaine and subconjunctival and sub-Tenon’s lidocaine. The third case had a Baerveldt valve implantation under general anesthesia in the second trimester. In selected pregnant glaucoma patients with medically uncontrolled intraocular pressure threatening vision, incisional surgery may lead to good outcomes for the patient with no risk for the fetus.

  15. Relationship between retinal lattice degeneration and open angle glaucoma.

    Rahimi, Mansour

    2005-01-01

    Patients with retinal disorders may develop glaucoma of both a primary and secondary type. Pigment may contribute to trabecular obstruction in some patients with open-angle glaucoma. Lattice degeneration of the retina in its typical form is a sharply demarcated, circumferentially oriented, degenerative process with significant alterations of retinal pigmentation. The association between myopia, open angle glaucoma and pigment dispersion is striking. Therefore, it could be postulated that there is significant prevalence of open angle glaucoma in patients with retinal lattice degeneration, especially in combination with myopia.

  16. Pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma--a major review.

    Niyadurupola, Nuwan; Broadway, David C

    2008-12-01

    Pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) is an interesting condition that can lead to secondary open angle glaucoma. Pigmentary glaucoma is primarily a disease of young people, myopes and men. PDS is characterized by the presence of Krukenberg spindles, iris trans-illumination defects, trabecular meshwork pigmentation and backward bowing of the iris. Posterior bowing of the iris causes rubbing of the pigmented iris epithelium against lens structures, liberation of pigment and trabecular meshwork changes that result in reduced aqueous outflow with the risk of glaucoma. Peripheral laser iridotomy can reverse backward bowing of the iris and may prevent progression of pigmentary glaucoma.

  17. Level of agreement among Latin American glaucoma subspecialists on the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma: results of an online survey

    Daniel E. Grigera

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to assess the level of agreement among glaucoma experts in Latin America on key practices related to treatment and diagnosis of glaucoma. METHODS: An online questionnaire was sent to a multinational panel of glaucoma experts. The questionnaire contained 107 statements on the medical treatment (Part 1 and diagnosis (Part 2 of glaucoma, and was developed in Spanish and translated into English. Agreement was defined as >70% of respondents. RESULTS: Fifty participants from 14 countries completed the questionnaire. For the medical treatment of glaucoma, nearly all respondents (98% or greater confirmed that medical treatment as first-line therapy is preferred to surgery, prostaglandin analogs are the medication of first choice for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, longitudinal monitoring of efficacy should include intraocular pressure, structural and functional status, as well as if patients' quality of life is impaired by the high cost of medication. For the diagnosis of glaucoma section, all respondents confirmed that, after initial examination, gonioscopy should be repeated over time, standard automated perimetry is the most important functional examination for diagnosis and monitoring of primary open-angle glaucoma, central corneal thickness is important in assessment of glaucoma, and computerized imaging tests help in clinical evaluation of optic disc. CONCLUSIONS: This survey shows a high level of agreement on most aspects of glaucoma diagnosis and treatment among Latin American glaucoma experts. Areas of disagreement highlight the need for further evidence or education. These findings will be useful for guiding future efforts to optimize glaucoma practice by clinicians in Latin America.

  18. Level of agreement among Latin American glaucoma subspecialists on the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma: results of an online survey.

    Grigera, Daniel E; Mello, Paulo Augusto Arruda; Barbosa, Wilma Lelis; Casiraghi, Javier Fernando; Grossmann, Rodolfo Perez; Peyret, Alejo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the level of agreement among glaucoma experts in Latin America on key practices related to treatment and diagnosis of glaucoma. An online questionnaire was sent to a multinational panel of glaucoma experts. The questionnaire contained 107 statements on the medical treatment (Part 1) and diagnosis (Part 2) of glaucoma, and was developed in Spanish and translated into English. Agreement was defined as >70% of respondents. Fifty participants from 14 countries completed the questionnaire. For the medical treatment of glaucoma, nearly all respondents (98% or greater) confirmed that medical treatment as first-line therapy is preferred to surgery, prostaglandin analogs are the medication of first choice for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), longitudinal monitoring of efficacy should include intraocular pressure, structural and functional status, as well as if patients' quality of life is impaired by the high cost of medication. For the diagnosis of glaucoma section, all respondents confirmed that, after initial examination, gonioscopy should be repeated over time, standard automated perimetry is the most important functional examination for diagnosis and monitoring of primary open-angle glaucoma, central corneal thickness is important in assessment of glaucoma, and computerized imaging tests help in clinical evaluation of optic disc. This survey shows a high level of agreement on most aspects of glaucoma diagnosis and treatment among Latin American glaucoma experts. Areas of disagreement highlight the need for further evidence or education. These findings will be useful for guiding future efforts to optimize glaucoma practice by clinicians in Latin America.

  19. Pattern-reversal electroretinograms in unilateral glaucoma.

    Wanger, P; Persson, H E

    1983-06-01

    Pattern-reversal and flash electroretinograms (ERG) and oscillatory potentials (OP) were recorded from 11 patients with unilateral glaucoma. All glaucomatous eyes had reduced amplitudes both compared to the opposite eye in the same patient and to reference values. In 10 of the 11 cases this reduction was below the level of normal variation. The difference in pattern-reversal ERG amplitude means from glaucomatous and opposite eyes was statistically significant. No differences were observed in flash ERGs or OPs. The histopathologic correlate to the visual field defects in glaucoma is retinal ganglion cell degeneration. The present electrophysiologic findings support the view, based on results from animal experiments, that the pattern-reversal ERG reflects ganglion cell activity.

  20. Pigmentary glaucoma accompanied by Usher syndrome.

    Koucheki, Behrooz; Jalali, Kamran Hodjat

    2012-08-01

    To report a case of pigmentary glaucoma (PG) accompanied by Usher syndrome. Case report. The results were presented after standard ocular examination, visual field test, anterior segment and fundus photography, electroretinography, and otolaryngology consultation were conducted. Typical retinitis pigmentosa, flat electroretinography, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, high intraocular pressure, Krukenberg spindle, iris concavity, radial iris transillumination defect, severe pigment deposition on the trabecular meshwork, and glaucomatous optic nerve damage were indicative of PG accompanied by Usher syndrome. In some rare cases, PG may coexist with Usher syndrome. Common findings of Usher syndrome, including night blindness, impaired vision, visual field defects, and retinal changes may distract the clinician from considering the diagnosis of glaucoma. Such association should be borne in mind to make a timely diagnosis and treatment possible.

  1. Glaucoma progression detection with frequency doubling technology (FDT) compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP) in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study.

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Jansonius, Nomdo M

    2017-09-01

    To determine the usefulness of frequency doubling perimetry (FDT) for progression detection in glaucoma, compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP). Data were used from 150 eyes of 150 glaucoma patients from the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study. After baseline, SAP was performed approximately yearly; FDT every other year. First and last visit had to contain both tests. Using linear regression, progression velocities were calculated for SAP (Humphrey Field Analyzer) mean deviation (MD) and FDT MD and the number of test locations with a total deviation probability below p glaucoma progression in patients who cannot perform SAP reliably. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  2. Dynamic tube movement after reimplantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve in a child with glaucoma in aphakia

    Senthil, Sirisha; Badakare, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl underwent an Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation as a primary procedure for glaucoma in aphakia due to congenital cataract surgery. Following an unintended accidental excision of AGV tube during bleb revision for hypertensive phase, AGV was explanted and a second AGV was implanted in the same quadrant after 2 weeks. This resulted in a rare complication of dynamic tube movement in the anterior chamber with tube corneal touch and localised corneal oedema. Excision of the offending unstable tube and placement of a paediatric AGV in a different quadrant led to resolution of this complication, stable vision and well-controlled intraocular pressure. This case highlights the possible causes of dynamic tube, related complications and its management. This case also highlights the importance of understanding the various physiological phases after glaucoma drainage device implantation and their appropriate management. PMID:24695662

  3. Hypothyroidism and Glaucoma in The United States

    Kakigi, Caitlin; Kasuga, Toshimitsu; Wang, Sophia Y.; Singh, Kuldev; Hiratsuka, Yoshimune; Murakami, Akira; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between hypothyroidism and glaucomatous disease. Methods This cross-sectional study included all subjects above the age of 40 years from two nationwide surveys: the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) as well as the 2007 and 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The presence or absence of glaucoma, thyroid disease and other demographic and health-related information including comorbidities was ascertained via interview. Blood samples were collected from NHANES subjects and analyzed for thyrotropin (TSH). Results A total of 13,599 and 3,839 NHIS and NHANES participants respectively were analyzed to assess for a possible relationship between self-reported glaucoma, and self-reported hypothyroidism as well as self-reported thyroid disease. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for NHIS showed a significant association between self-reported glaucoma and self-reported hypothyroidism (OR 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.99). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, race, comorbidities, and health-related behavior, however, showed no association between self-reported glaucoma and hypothyroidism or thyroid disease in both surveys (OR 1.60, 95%CI 0.87-2.95 for NHIS; OR 1.05, 95%CI 0.59-1.88 for NHANES). Conclusion A previously reported association between hypothyroidism and glaucomatous disease was not confirmed in two large U.S. health survey populations. While such an association was noted in the univariate analysis for the NHIS survey, such a relationship was not found in the multivariate analysis after adjustment for potential confounding variables. PMID:26230664

  4. Anesthetic Preconditioning as Endogenous Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    Tsung-Han Chou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Blindness in glaucoma is the result of death of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs and their axons. RGC death is generally preceded by a stage of reversible dysfunction and structural remodeling. Current treatments aimed at reducing intraocular pressure (IOP are ineffective or incompletely effective in management of the disease. IOP-independent neuroprotection or neuroprotection as adjuvant to IOP lowering in glaucoma remains a challenge as effective agents without side effects have not been identified yet. We show in DBA/2J mice with spontaneous IOP elevation and glaucoma that the lifespan of functional RGCs can be extended by preconditioning RGCs with retrobulbar lidocaine in one eye at four months of age that temporary blocks RGC axonal transport. The contralateral, PBS-injected eye served as control. Lidocaine-induced impairment of axonal transport to superior colliculi was assessed by intravitreal injection of cholera toxin B. Long-term (nine months effect of lidocaine were assessed on RGC electrical responsiveness (PERG, IOP, expression of relevant protein (BDNF, TrkB, PSD95, GFAP, Synaptophysin, and GAPDH and RGC density. While lidocaine treatment did not alter the age-related increase of IOP, TrkB expression was elevated, GFAP expression was decreased, RGC survival was improved by 35%, and PERG function was preserved. Results suggest that the lifespan of functional RGCs in mouse glaucoma can be extended by preconditioning RGCs in early stages of the disease using a minimally invasive treatment with retrobulbar lidocaine, a common ophthalmologic procedure. Lidocaine is inexpensive, safe and is approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA to be administered intravenously.

  5. Anti-glaucoma potential of Heliotropium indicum Linn in experimentally-induced glaucoma.

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Ramkissoon, Paul; Owusu-Afriyie, Osei

    2015-01-01

    Heliotropium indicum is used as a traditional remedy for hypertension in Ghana. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-glaucoma potential of an aqueous whole plant extract of H. indicum to manage experimentally-induced glaucoma. The percentage change in intraocular pressure (IOP), after inducing acute glaucoma (15 mLkg(-1) of 5 % dextrose, i.v.), in New Zealand White rabbits pretreated with Heliotropium indicum aqueous extract (HIE) (30-300 mgkg(-1)), acetazolamide (5 mgkg(-1)), and normal saline (10 mLkg(-1)) per os were measured. IOPs were also monitored in chronic glaucoma in rabbits (induced by 1 % prednisolone acetate drops, 12 hourly for 21 days) after treatments with the same doses of HIE, acetazolamide, and normal saline for 2 weeks. The anti-oxidant property of the extract was assessed by assaying for glutathione levels in the aqueous humour. Glutamate concentration in the vitreous humour was also determined using ELISA technique. Histopathological assessment of the ciliary bodies was made. The extract significantly reduced intraocular pressure (p ≤ 0.05-0.001) in acute and chronic glaucoma, preserved glutathione levels and glutamate concentration (p ≤ 0.01-0.001). Histological assessment of the ciliary body showed a decrease in inflammatory infiltration in the extract and acetazolamide-treated group compared with the normal saline-treated group. The aqueous whole plant extract of Heliotropium indicum has ocular hypotensive, anti-oxidant and possible neuro-protective effects, which therefore underscore its plausible utility as an anti-glaucoma drug with further investigation.

  6. Effect of phacoemulsification on intraocular pressure in patients with primary open angle glaucoma and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma

    Jesus Jimenez-Roman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the effect of phacoemulsification on intraocular pressure (IOP in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PXG. METHODS: A retrospective comparative case series conducted at the Glaucoma Department at the Association to Prevent Blindness in Mexico. The study enrolled consecutive patients having phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL implantation and a diagnosis of POAG or PXG. Data about IOP values and number of glaucoma medications used was collected at baseline, 1, 3, 6 and 12mo postoperatively. RESULTS: The study enrolled 88 patients (88 eyes. After phacoemulsification, there was a statistically significant reduction in IOP values and glaucoma medications use compared to baseline in both POAG and PXG patients (P<0.001. In the POAG group, a 20% decrease in IOP values was evidenced, and a 56.5% reduction in the number of medications used at the one-year follow-up. The PXG group showed a 20.39%, and a 34.46% decrease in IOP and number of medications used, respectively. A significant difference in the mean ΔIOP (postoperative changes in IOP was evidenced between groups (P=0.005. The reduction of the postsurgical IOP mean values in both groups, the POAG group showed a greater reduction in IOP values compared to the PXG group. CONCLUSION: In both types of glaucoma, phacoemulsification cataract surgery can result in a significant IOP reduction (20% over a 12mo follow-up period. The number of medications used is also significantly reduced up to 12mo after surgery, especially in the PXG group.

  7. Surgical outcomes of trabeculectomy and glaucoma drainage implant for uveitic glaucoma and relationship with uveitis activity.

    Kwon, Hye Jin; Kong, Yu Xiang George; Tao, Lingwei William; Lim, Lyndell L; Martin, Keith R; Green, Catherine; Ruddle, Jonathan; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2017-07-01

    This study provides ophthalmologists who manage uveitic glaucoma with important information on factors that can affect the success of surgical management of this challenging disease. This study examines surgical outcomes of trabeculectomy and glaucoma device implant (GDI) surgery for uveitic glaucoma, in particular the effect of uveitis activity on surgical outcomes. Retrospective chart review at a tertiary institution. Eighty-two cases with uveitic glaucoma (54 trabeculectomies and 28 (GDI) surgeries) performed between 1 December 2006 and 30 November 2014. Associations of factors with surgical outcomes were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Surgical outcomes as defined in Guidelines from World Glaucoma Association. Average follow up was 26.4 ± 21.5 months. Overall qualified success rate of the trabeculectomies was not statistically different from GDI, being 67% and 75%, respectively (P = 0.60). Primary and secondary GDI operations showed similar success rates. The most common postoperative complication was hypotony (~30%). Active uveitis at the time of operation was higher in trabeculectomy compared with GDI group (35% vs. 14%). Active uveitis at the time of surgery did not significantly increase risk of failure for trabeculectomies. Recurrence of uveitis was significantly associated with surgical failure in trabeculectomy group (odds ratio 4.8, P = 0.02) but not in GDI group. Surgical success rate of GDI was not significantly different from trabeculectomy for uveitic glaucoma in this study. Regular monitoring, early and prolonged intensive treatment of ocular inflammation is important for surgical success particularly following trabeculectomy. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  8. Comparison between visual field defect in pigmentary glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Nilforushan, Naveed; Yadgari, Maryam; Jazayeri, Anisalsadat

    2016-10-01

    To compare visual field defect patterns between pigmentary glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma. Retrospective, comparative study. Patients with diagnosis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and pigmentary glaucoma (PG) in mild to moderate stages were enrolled in this study. Each of the 52 point locations in total and pattern deviation plot (excluding 2 points adjacent to blind spot) of 24-2 Humphrey visual field as well as six predetermined sectors were compared using SPSS software version 20. Comparisons between 2 groups were performed with the Student t test for continuous variables and the Chi-square test for categorical variables. Thirty-eight eyes of 24 patients with a mean age of 66.26 ± 11 years (range 48-81 years) in the POAG group and 36 eyes of 22 patients with a mean age of 50.52 ± 11 years (range 36-69 years) in the PG group were studied. (P = 0.00). More deviation was detected in points 1, 3, 4, and 32 in total deviation (P = 0.03, P = 0.015, P = 0.018, P = 0.023) and in points 3, 4, and 32 in pattern deviation (P = 0.015, P = 0.049, P = 0.030) in the POAG group, which are the temporal parts of the field. It seems that the temporal area of the visual field in primary open-angle glaucoma is more susceptible to damage in comparison with pigmentary glaucoma.

  9. Glaucoma in Costa Rica: Initial approaches

    Gabriela Chavarría-Soley

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the second most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Genetic factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. So far six loci (GLC1A-GLC1F and two genes (TIGR/MYOC and OPTN are involved in the development of juvenile (JOAG and adult onset or chronic primary open angle glaucoma (COAG, while two loci (GLC3A,GLC3B and one gene (CYP1B1 are known for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG. Here we summarize the results of the first genetic studies of glaucoma in Costa Rica. Nine families: 1 with JOAG, 1 with PCG and 7 with COAG were screened for mutations at the known genes. A10 bp duplication, 1546-1555dupTCATGCCACC, at the CYP1B1 gene, causes, in homozygous state, glaucoma in the consanguineous PCG family. This mutation has been found in different countries and generates an early stop codon that termitates protein synthesis 140 amino acids earlier than the normal allele. In exon 1 of the TIGR/MYOC the innocuous Arg76Lys variant was found in two of the COAG families. In the OPTN gene two variants in the coding region (Thr34Thr, Met 98Lys and 7 intronic changes were found in other Costa Rican glaucoma patients. One of the COAG families was chosen for a genome scan with 379 microsatellite markers and linkage analysis. LOD scores "suggestive" of linkage were obtained for several chromosomal regions. Evidence indicates that hereditary glaucoma in Costa Rica is highly heterogeneous and that further studies in the country will probably disclose some up to now unknown genes responsible for the disease. Rev. Biol. Trop. 52(3: 507-520. Epub 2004 Dic 15.El glaucoma es la segunda causa de ceguera irreversible en el mundo. El componente genético de algunos de los distintos tipos ha sido demostrado: seis loci (GLC1A-GLC1F y dos genes (TIGR/MYOC y OPTN se conocen, hasta ahora, como responsables de la aparición de glaucomas primarios de ángulo abierto tanto del tipo juvenil (JOAG como de l tipo de adultos (COAG. Además, dos

  10. Automatic CDR Estimation for Early Glaucoma Diagnosis

    Sarmiento, A.; Sanchez-Morillo, D.; Jiménez, S.; Alemany, P.

    2017-01-01

    Glaucoma is a degenerative disease that constitutes the second cause of blindness in developed countries. Although it cannot be cured, its progression can be prevented through early diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for automatic glaucoma diagnosis based on retinal colour images. We focus on capturing the inherent colour changes of optic disc (OD) and cup borders by computing several colour derivatives in CIE L∗a∗b∗ colour space with CIE94 colour distance. In addition, we consider spatial information retaining these colour derivatives and the original CIE L∗a∗b∗ values of the pixel and adding other characteristics such as its distance to the OD centre. The proposed strategy is robust due to a simple structure that does not need neither initial segmentation nor removal of the vascular tree or detection of vessel bends. The method has been extensively validated with two datasets (one public and one private), each one comprising 60 images of high variability of appearances. Achieved class-wise-averaged accuracy of 95.02% and 81.19% demonstrates that this automated approach could support physicians in the diagnosis of glaucoma in its early stage, and therefore, it could be seen as an opportunity for developing low-cost solutions for mass screening programs. PMID:29279773

  11. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma.

    Mierlo, Camille Van; Pinto, Luis Abegão; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic pigment dispersion syndrome generally originates from a repetitive, mechanical trauma to the pigmented posterior epithelium of the iris. This trauma can arise after intraocular surgery, most commonly due to an abnormal contact between the intraocular lens (IOL) and the iris. Whether surgical removal of this primary insult can lead to a successful intraocular pressure (IOP) control remains unclear. Case-series. Patients with IOP elevation and clinical signs of pigment dispersion were screened for a diagnosis of iatrogenic IOL-related pigment dispersion. Three patients in which the IOL or the IOL-bag complex caused a pigment dispersion through a repetitive iris chafing were selected. In two cases, replacement of a sulcus-based single-piece IOL (patient 1) or a sub-luxated in-the-bag IOL (patient 2) by an anterior-chamber (AC) iris-fixed IOL led to a sustained decrease in IOP. In the third case, extensive iris atrophy and poor anatomical AC parameters for IOL implantation precluded further surgical intervention. IOL-exchange appears to be a useful tool in the management of iatrogenic pigment dispersion glaucoma due to inappropriate IOL implantation. This cause-oriented approach seems to be effective in controlling IOP, but should be offered only if safety criteria are met. How to cite this article: Van Mierlo C, Abegao Pinto L, Stalmans I. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):28-32.

  12. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure

    Huang J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jingjing Huang,1 Jialiu Lin,1 Ziqiang Wu,2 Hongzhi Xu,3 Chengguo Zuo,1 Jian Ge1 1State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Department of Glaucoma, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Center for Advanced Eye Care, Carson City, NV, USA; 3Institute of Child Health Policy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV implantation in patients less than 7 years of age, with advanced primary congenital glaucoma who have failed previous surgeries.Patients and methods: Consecutive patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma that failed previous operations and had undergone subsequent AGV implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Surgical success was defined as 1 intraocular pressure (IOP ≥6 and ≤21 mmHg; 2 IOP reduction of at least 30% relative to preoperative values; and 3 without the need for additional surgical intervention for IOP control, loss of light perception, or serious complications.Results: Fourteen eyes of eleven patients were studied. Preoperatively, the average axial length was 27.71±1.52 (25.56–30.80 mm, corneal diameter was 14.71±1.07 (13.0–16.0 mm, cup-to-disc ratio was 0.95±0.04 (0.9–1.0, and IOP was 39.5±5.7 (30–55 mmHg. The mean follow-up time was 18.29±10.96 (5–44, median 18 months. There were significant reductions in IOPs and the number of glaucoma medications (P<0.001 postoperatively. The IOPs after operation were 11.3±3.4, 13.6±5.1, 16.3±2.7, and 16.1±2.6 mmHg at 1 month, 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier estimates of the cumulative probability of valve success were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 71.4% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Severe surgical complications, including erosion of tube, endophthalmitis, retinal detachment, choroidal detachment, and delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage, occurred in 28

  13. Supra-Tenon Capsule Implantation of the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve in Refractory Pediatric Glaucoma.

    Elhefney, Eman M; Al-Sharkawy, Hossam T; Kishk, Hanem M

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of supra-Tenon capsule implantation of an Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) as a measure to decrease the fibrotic potential of the Tenon capsule on bleb formation and its subsequent effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) control in children with refractory glaucoma. Mansoura Ophthalmic Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Egypt. A prospective interventional study. Twenty-two eyes of 12 children with refractory glaucoma underwent supra-Tenon capsule implantation of AGV. Ophthalmic examinations under general anesthesia including measurement of the corneal diameter and the IOP with Perkin's tonometer were performed preoperatively, on the first postoperative day, the first postoperative week, weekly for the first month, 2-weekly for the following 3 months, and monthly for at least 18 months. Postoperative complications and the number of glaucoma medications used preoperatively and postoperatively were recorded. The paired Student t test was used to compare preoperative and postoperative data. There were 12 eyes (54.6%) with refractory congenital glaucoma, 7 eyes (31.8%) with refractory pseudophakic glaucoma, and 3 eyes (13.6%) with refractory aphakic glaucoma. Patients included 10 male (83.3%) and 2 female (16.7%) children with a mean age of 16.3±9.7 months. The mean follow-up duration was 24.1±4.3 months. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean preoperative IOP (30.7±2.88 mm Hg) and the mean postoperative IOP (16.1±3.60 mm Hg) (t=16.22 and P=0.000, with a mean decrease in the IOP by 47.6%). The difference between the mean number of antiglaucoma medications before surgery (1.86±0.4) and after surgery (1.0±0.9) was also statistically significant (t=4.31 and P=0.000). Total success was achieved in 18 eyes (81.9%). Postoperative complications included tube exposure and slippage (10%), hypotony (10%), and hyphema (5%). Supra-Tenon capsule implantation of the AGV was successful in controlling the IOP with few

  14. Association between human breast milk and retinopathy of prematurity.

    Fonseca, Luciana Teixeira; Senna, Denise C; Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Silveira, Rita de Cássia; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the possible protective effect of breast milk against retinopathy of prematurity by comparing the amount of breast milk received by patients who developed retinopathy of prematurity and those who did not and to determine both the required minimum amount of breast milk and the time of life during which neonates need to receive breast milk for this effect to be significant. Cohort study of newborns with a birth weight of prematurity of any degree was 31% (100 of 323 patients) and that of severe retinopathy of prematurity was of 9% (29 of 323 patients). The median amounts of breast milk received daily by patients with and without retinopathy of prematurity were 4.9 mL/kg (interquartile range, 0.3-15.4) and 10.2 mL/kg (1.5-25.5), respectively. The amount of breast milk received in the first 6 weeks of life was inversely associated with the incidence of both retinopathy of prematurity of any degree and severe retinopathy of prematurity in the univariate analyses. However, the statistical significance was maintained only during the sixth week of life in a per-period multivariate analysis controlling for confounding factors. Small amounts of breast milk are inadequate to prevent retinopathy of prematurity in premature newborns at risk for the disease.

  15. Caracterización del glaucoma juvenil

    Silvia Roche Caso

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El glaucoma no es frecuente en los niños, pero cuando ocurre sus síntomas son poco perceptibles y produce graves consecuencias para la salud visual. El objetivo de este estudio fue caracterizar, desde las aristas clínica y epidemiológica, a los pacientes con glaucoma juvenil atendidos en los servicios de oftalmología de los Hospitales Pediátricos del Cerro y «Pedro Borrás», en Ciudad de La Habana, en el período comprendido entre enero de 2008 y diciembre de 2009. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio epidemiológico longitudinal y prospectivo, cuyo universo estuvo constituido por 176 pacientes entre 5 y 18 años de edad, con presunto glaucoma. La muestra, después de aplicados los criterios de inclusión y exclusión, quedó conformada por 38 casos. Se analizaron las variables: edad al momento del diagnóstico, sexo, color de la piel, antecedentes familiares según grado de parentesco, agudeza visual máxima corregida, tipo de defecto refractivo, características del ángulo camerular, espesor corneal central, valor de la presión intraocular, alteraciones fundoscópicas y campimétricas. RESULTADOS. En la mayoría de los pacientes el diagnóstico de glaucoma juvenil constituyó un hallazgo. La mediana de edad al momento del diagnóstico fue de 12,5 años, con ligero predominio de varones y de la piel no blanca. Fue más frecuente el antecedente de glaucoma en familiares de segundo grado de consanguinidad. La mayoría de los casos tenía visión óptima, algún grado de miopía y ángulo abierto sin alteraciones evidentes del ángulo camerular, entre las cuales la más frecuente fue la presencia de procesos iridianos prominentes. CONCLUSIONES. Predominaron la disminución moderada del espesor corneal y valores medios de presión intraocular de 26,91 mm Hg. La alteración fundoscópica encontrada con mayor frecuencia fue la excavación papilar moderada (entre 0,4 y 0,5 y como lesión campimétrica, el aumento de la mancha

  16. Retrobulbar diameter of optic nerve in glaucoma

    Stefanović Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The ultrasound diagnostics of the optic nerve includes the analysis of the optic nerve disc (PNO and measuring of its retrobulbar diameter. With B-scan, by Schraeder's method, it is possible to measure very precisely the optic nerve, the pial diameter, the normal values for the pial diameter being 2.8-4.1 mm. In glaucoma, the disease that is most frequently associated with higher intraocular pressure, there comes the destruction of nerve fibres, which can be visualized as the excavation of the optic nerve disc. Objective. In this paper, we were interested in finding whether in glaucoma, and in what phase of the disease, the optic nerve starts growing thinner. Aware of many forms of this very complex disease, we were interested in knowing if the visualization of excavation on the optic nerve disc is related to diminishing of the pial diameter of the retrobulbar nerve part. Methods. There were treated the patients who had already had the diagnosis of glaucoma and the visualized excavation of the optic disc of various dimensions. Echographically, there was measured the thickness of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve and the finding compared in relation to the excavation of the optic disc. Results. In all eyes with glaucoma, a normal size of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve was measured, ranging from 3.01 to 3.91 mm with the median of 3.36 mm. Also, by testing the correlation between the thickness of the optic nerve and the excavation of the PNO, by Pearson test, we found that there was no correlation between these two parameters (r=0.109; p>0.05. Conclusion. In the patients with glaucoma, the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve is not thinner (it has normal values, even not in the cases with a totally excavated optic disc. There is no connection between the size of the PNO excavation and the thickness of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve.

  17. The impact of available anti-glaucoma therapy on the volume and age profile of patients undergoing glaucoma filtration surgery.

    Keane, P A

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether new classes of glaucoma medication have influenced glaucoma filtration surgery over a 20-year period in the southeast region of Ireland. METHODS: All patients undergoing glaucoma filtration surgery between January 1986 and December 2005 in Waterford Regional Hospital were identified. The following data were recorded for each patient: age; sex; and type of filtration procedure. RESULTS: Over the 20-year study period two consultant ophthalmic surgeons performed a total of 760 glaucoma filtration procedures on patients aged over 20 years. The annual average number of glaucoma surgeries declined steadily, defined by availability of different topical anti-glaucoma medications, from an average of 23.75 surgeries per surgeon per year in the subperiod 1986-1995, to 21 in 1996, 20 in 1997, and 12.69 surgeries per surgeon per year in 1998-2005, these differences being statistically significant (general linear model, P<0.001). The age profile of patients did not change significantly over the course of the study period. CONCLUSIONS: The volume of patients requiring glaucoma filtration surgery under the care of two consultant ophthalmic surgeons decreased over the 20-year study period, an era in which three classes of anti-glaucoma medications were made available. However, an increase in the age profile of patients undergoing glaucoma filtration surgery during the same period was not observed. Further study is required to resolve whether introduction of the new topical anti-glaucoma medications has led to a real reduction in the demand for glaucoma filtration surgery, or has just led to the deferral of such a demand.

  18. Costs of a community-based glaucoma detection programme: analysis of the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Pizzi, Laura T; Waisbourd, Michael; Hark, Lisa; Sembhi, Harjeet; Lee, Paul; Crews, John E; Saaddine, Jinan B; Steele, Deon; Katz, L Jay

    2018-02-01

    Glaucoma is the foremost cause of irreversible blindness, and more than 50% of cases remain undiagnosed. Our objective was to report the costs of a glaucoma detection programme operationalised through Philadelphia community centres. The analysis was performed using a healthcare system perspective in 2013 US dollars. Costs of examination and educational workshops were captured. Measures were total programme costs, cost/case of glaucoma detected and cost/case of any ocular disease detected (including glaucoma). Diagnoses are reported at the individual level (therefore representing a diagnosis made in one or both eyes). Staff time was captured during site visits to 15 of 43 sites and included time to deliver examinations and workshops, supervision, training and travel. Staff time was converted to costs by applying wage and fringe benefit costs from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Non-staff costs (equipment and mileage) were collected using study logs. Participants with previously diagnosed glaucoma were excluded. 1649 participants were examined. Mean total per-participant examination time was 56 min (SD 4). Mean total examination cost/participant was $139. The cost/case of glaucoma newly identified (open-angle glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, or primary angle closure) was $420 and cost/case for any ocular disease identified was $273. Glaucoma examinations delivered through this programme provided significant health benefit to hard-to-reach communities. On a per-person basis, examinations were fairly low cost, though opportunities exist to improve efficiency. Findings serve as an important benchmark for planning future community-based glaucoma examination programmes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Association of Neovascular Glaucoma with Risk of Stroke: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Cheng-Wen Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neovascular glaucoma (NVG, caused by ocular ischemia, is a serious ocular disease complicated by intractably increased intraocular pressure. Cerebrovascular accidents are classified into ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Based on the similar pathogenic mechanisms of NVG and ischemic stroke, we investigated the relationship between NVG and stroke by using a nationally representative sample. This study included 416 NVG patients and 4160 controls. Medical comorbidities were also evaluated. The cumulative incidence of ischemic stroke was 15.6% higher in the NVG cohort than in the control cohort (p<0.001; the incidence density rates of stroke were 3.80 and 1.19 per 10,000 person-years in the NVG and control cohorts, respectively. According to the multivariable Cox regression results, the estimated adjusted hazard ratio (aHR of stroke was 2.07 (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.41–3.02 for the NVG cohort. Furthermore, the NVG cohort was 2.24-fold more likely to develop ischemic stroke (95% CI = 1.51–3.32. The risk of ischemic stroke was higher in patients with hypertension (aHR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.55–2.82 and in patients with diabetic retinopathy (aHR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.05–2.72. Notably, patients with NVG have a higher risk of ischemic stroke, but not hemorrhagic stroke.

  20. Thickness of the retinal photoreceptor outer segment layer in healthy volunteers and in patients with diabetes mellitus without retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic macular edema

    Abdullah Ozkaya

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The PROS layer at the foveal center was thinner in patients who had diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema than both the healthy volunteers and diabetic patients without retinopathy.

  1. The worldwide epidemic of diabetic retinopathy

    Yingfeng Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR, a major microvascular complication of diabetes, has a significant impact on the world′s health systems. Globally, the number of people with DR will grow from 126.6 million in 2010 to 191.0 million by 2030, and we estimate that the number with vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR will increase from 37.3 million to 56.3 million, if prompt action is not taken. Despite growing evidence documenting the effectiveness of routine DR screening and early treatment, DR frequently leads to poor visual functioning and represents the leading cause of blindness in working-age populations. DR has been neglected in health-care research and planning in many low-income countries, where access to trained eye-care professionals and tertiary eye-care services may be inadequate. Demand for, as well as, supply of services may be a problem. Rates of compliance with diabetes medications and annual eye examinations may be low, the reasons for which are multifactorial. Innovative and comprehensive approaches are needed to reduce the risk of vision loss by prompt diagnosis and early treatment of VTDR.

  2. Latanoprost systemic exposure in pediatric and adult patients with glaucoma

    Raber, Susan; Courtney, Rachel; Maeda-Chubachi, Tomoko

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate short-term safety and steady-state systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of latanoprost acid in pediatric subjects with glaucoma or ocular hypertension who received the adult latanoprost dose.......To evaluate short-term safety and steady-state systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of latanoprost acid in pediatric subjects with glaucoma or ocular hypertension who received the adult latanoprost dose....

  3. Some diagnostic and therapeutic controversies in glaucoma addressed

    Müskens, Rogier Peter Hendrik Maria

    2008-01-01

    In the five studies contained in this thesis, several controversies on the diagnosis of and therapy for glaucoma have been addressed. The first part of this thesis consisted of three studies that aimed tot improve existing technologies for diagnosing glaucoma. The latter part consisted of two

  4. Traumatic glaucoma with features of unilateral pigment dispersion.

    Bowler, Gordon; Ellul, Antony; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with traumatic glaucoma with features of unilateral pigment dispersion. This rare form of secondary glaucoma has only been reported twice previously, with both patients demonstrating angle recession, indicating associated damage to the trabecular meshwork. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in which angle recession was absent.

  5. Clinical Features of Primary Glaucoma in South East Nigeria ...

    Background: The clinical course of glaucoma depends on the type, onset, severity and response to treatment. The intraocular pressure and heredity also play a role in its presentation as members of the same family tend to have the same type of glaucoma. This paper seeks to address the problem of primary open angle ...

  6. Shared Care in Monitoring Stable Glaucoma Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Holtzer-Goor, Kim M.; van Vliet, Ellen J.; van Sprundel, Esther; Plochg, Thomas; Koopmanschap, Marc A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Lemij, Hans G.

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the quality of care provided by a hospital-based shared care glaucoma follow-up unit with care as usual. This randomized controlled trial included stable glaucoma patients and patients at risk for developing glaucoma. Patients in the Usual Care group (n=410) were seen by glaucoma

  7. Prevalence and determinants of glaucoma : an epidemiologic approach (The Rotterdam Study)

    I. Dielemans (Ida)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractGlaucoma is an eye disease characterized by damage to the optic nerve head and related visual field defects, often accompanied by elevated intraocular pressure. Glaucoma is an important cause of blindness, particularly in the elderly. One may divide glaucoma in primary glaucoma without

  8. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography characteristics in diabetic retinopathy

    Laxmi Gella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the appearance of diabetic retinopathy lesions using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Materials and Methods: A total of 287 eyes of 199 subjects were included. All the subjects underwent complete ophthalmic examination including SD-OCT. Results: The appearance of various lesions of diabetic retinopathy and the retinal layers involved were reported. In subjects with macular edema the prevalence of incomplete PVD was 55.6%. Conclusion: SD-OCT brings new insights into the morphological changes of the retina in diabetic retinopathy.

  9. Diabetic retinopathy in a remote Indigenous primary healthcare population: a Central Australian diabetic retinopathy screening study in the Telehealth Eye and Associated Medical Services Network project.

    Brazionis, L; Jenkins, A; Keech, A; Ryan, C; Brown, A; Boffa, J; Bursell, S

    2018-05-01

    To determine diabetic retinopathy prevalence and severity among remote Indigenous Australians. A cross-sectional diabetic retinopathy screening study of Indigenous adults with Type 2 diabetes was conducted by locally trained non-ophthalmic retinal imagers in a remote Aboriginal community-controlled primary healthcare clinic in Central Australia and certified non-ophthalmic graders in a retinal grading centre in Melbourne, Australia. The main outcome measure was prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Among 301 participants (33% male), gradable image rates were 78.7% (n = 237) for diabetic retinopathy and 83.1% (n = 250) for diabetic macular oedema, and 77.7% (n = 234) were gradable for both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. For the gradable subset, the median (range) age was 48 (19-86) years and known diabetes duration 9.0 (0-24) years. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 47% (n = 110) and for diabetic macular oedema it was 14.4% (n = 36). In the fully gradable imaging studies, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 16.2% (n = 38): 14.1% (n = 33) for clinically significant macular oedema, 1.3% (n = 3) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.9% (n = 2) for both. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy had been treated in 78% of detected cases. A novel telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening service detected a higher prevalence of 'any' diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in a remote primary care setting than reported in earlier surveys among Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Whether the observed high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was attributable to greater detection, increasing diabetic retinopathy prevalence, local factors, or a combination of these requires further investigation and, potentially, specific primary care guidelines for diabetic retinopathy management in remote Australia. Clinical Trials registration number: Australia and

  10. Marijuana for Glaucoma: A Recipe for Disaster or Treatment?

    Sun, Xiaoshen; Xu, Chaoying S; Chadha, Nisha; Chen, Allshine; Liu, Ji

    2015-09-01

    Marijuana has been shown to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) but with limited duration of action and numerous adverse effects. Use of marijuana to lower IOP as a means of glaucoma treatment would require frequent use throughout the day, leading to significant adverse effects, possible progression toward Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD), and/or withdrawal symptoms. The treatment of glaucoma based on the cannabis plant or drugs based on the cannabinoid molecule should be considered carefully before being prescribed. Considerations should include the adverse physical and psychological adverse effects, including substance abuse. Currently, the deleterious effects of marijuana outweigh the benefits of its IOP-lowering capacity in most glaucoma patients. Under extremely rare circumstances, a few categories of glaucoma patients may be potential candidates for treatment with medical marijuana. Further studies on alternate routes and more focused means of cannabinoid molecule delivery to the eye for glaucoma treatment are needed.

  11. No evidence of a causal relationship between hypothyroidism and glaucoma

    Thvilum, Marianne; Brandt, Frans; Brix, Thomas Heiberg

    2018-01-01

    Background An interrelationship between hypothyroidism and glaucoma, due to a shared autoimmune background or based on deposition of mucopolysaccharides in the trabecular meshwork in the eye, has been suggested but is at present unsubstantiated. Therefore, our objective was to investigate......-hypothyroid controls according to age and sex. Prevalence of glaucoma was recorded and cases and controls were followed over a mean of 7.1 years (range 0±17). Logistic and Cox regression models were used to assess the risk of glaucoma before and after the diagnosis of hypothyroidism, respectively. Results Overall, we...... found a higher prevalence of glaucoma in subjects with hypothyroidism as compared to controls (4.6% vs. 4.3%, p glaucoma [1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.13]. Based on the Cox regression...

  12. Retinal oxygen saturation before and after glaucoma surgery.

    Nitta, Eri; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Sato, Shino; Ukegawa, Kaori; Nakano, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2017-08-01

    This study compared retinal vessel oxygen saturation before and after glaucoma surgery. Retinal oxygen saturation in glaucoma patients was measured using a non-invasive spectrophotometric retinal oximeter. Adequate image quality was found in 49 of the 108 consecutive glaucoma patients recruited, with 30 undergoing trabeculectomy, 11 EX-PRESS and eight trabeculotomy. Retinal oxygen saturation measurements in the retinal arterioles and venules were performed at 1 day prior to and at approximately 10 days after surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test. After glaucoma surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased from 19.8 ± 7.7 mmHg to 9.0 ± 5.7 mmHg (p glaucoma surgery had an effect on the retinal venous oxygen saturation. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Visual disability and quality of life in glaucoma patients.

    Cesareo, Massimo; Ciuffoletti, Elena; Ricci, Federico; Missiroli, Filippo; Giuliano, Mario Alberto; Mancino, Raffaele; Nucci, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy that can result in progressive and irreversible vision loss, thereby affecting quality of life (QoL) of patients. Several studies have shown a strong correlation between visual field damage and visual disability in patients with glaucoma, even in the early stages of the disease. Visual impairment due to glaucoma affects normal daily activities required for independent living, such as driving, walking, and reading. There is no generally accepted instrument for assessing quality of life in glaucoma patients; different factors involved in visual disability from the disease are difficult to quantify and not easily standardized. This chapter summarizes recent works from clinical and epidemiological studies, which describe how glaucoma affects the performance of important vision-related activities and QoL. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Review of the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implant and Comparison with Other Surgical Operations.

    Riva, Ivano; Roberti, Gloria; Katsanos, Andreas; Oddone, Francesco; Quaranta, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) is a popular glaucoma drainage implant used for the control of intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma. While in the past AGV implantation was reserved for glaucoma patients poorly controlled after one or more filtration procedures, mounting evidence has recently encouraged its use as a primary surgery in selected cases. AGV has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in reducing intraocular pressure in patients with primary or secondary refractory glaucoma. Compared to other glaucoma surgeries, AGV implantation has shown favorable efficacy and safety. The aim of this article is to review the results of studies directly comparing AGV with other surgical procedures in patients with glaucoma.

  15. Clinical observation of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for refractory glaucoma by directly puncturing the sclerotic tunnel

    Zhi-Ke Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinic effects and complication of Ahmed glaucoma valve(AGVimplantation in refractory glaucoma by using the 23G syringe needle direct puncture the sclerotic tunnel.METHODS: Forty-four cases(44 eyesof refractory glaucoma underwent AGV implantation by useing the 23G syringe needle direct puncture the sclerotic tunnel. The intraocular pressure(IOP, visual acuity, and complication of post-operation were contrasted with those of pre-operation. RESULTS:The success rate was 84.1%, the mean preoperative IOP in research group was 52.1±10.1mmHg, and the last follow up mean IOP was 15.6±6.9mmHg. Compared with the preoperative visual acuity, 11 eyes increased, 27 eyes had no changes and 6 eyes decreased. The main post-operative complications included shallow anterior chamber(4 eyes, choroidal detachment(3 eyes, drainage tube shift(1 eye, hyphema(6 eyes, drainage tube blockage(1 eye, expulsive choroidal hemorrhage(1 eye, and fiber wrap of drainage tray(5 eyes.CONCLUSION: AGV implantation by direct puncture the sclerotic tunnel is feasible and easy. It avoids of making sclerotic petal and the xenogenic sclera transplanting, simplified the operation technique, prevent the leakage of around tube. The shallow anterior chamber rate is lower. It is an effective procedure for refractory glaucoma.

  16. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure

    Huang, Jingjing; Lin, Jialiu; Wu, Ziqiang; Xu, Hongzhi; Zuo, Chengguo; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in patients less than 7 years of age, with advanced primary congenital glaucoma who have failed previous surgeries. Patients and methods Consecutive patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma that failed previous operations and had undergone subsequent AGV implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Surgical success was defined as 1) intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥6 and ≤21 mmHg; 2) IOP reduction of at least 30% relative to preoperative values; and 3) without the need for additional surgical intervention for IOP control, loss of light perception, or serious complications. Results Fourteen eyes of eleven patients were studied. Preoperatively, the average axial length was 27.71±1.52 (25.56–30.80) mm, corneal diameter was 14.71±1.07 (13.0–16.0) mm, cup-to-disc ratio was 0.95±0.04 (0.9–1.0), and IOP was 39.5±5.7 (30–55) mmHg. The mean follow-up time was 18.29±10.96 (5–44, median 18) months. There were significant reductions in IOPs and the number of glaucoma medications (Pglaucoma unresponsive to previous surgical intervention, despite a relatively high incidence of severe surgical complications. PMID:26082610

  17. Nanotechnology and glaucoma: a review of the potential implications of glaucoma nanomedicine.

    Kim, Nathaniel J; Harris, Alon; Gerber, Austin; Tobe, Leslie Abrams; Amireskandari, Annahita; Huck, Andrew; Siesky, Brent

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the evolution of nanotechnology and its potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the field of ophthalmology, particularly as it pertains to glaucoma. We reviewed literature using MEDLINE and PubMed databases with the following search terms: glaucoma, nanotechnology, nanomedicine, nanoparticles, ophthalmology and liposomes. We also reviewed pertinent references from articles found in this search. A brief history of nanotechnology and nanomedicine will be covered, followed by a discussion of the advantages and concerns of using this technology in the field of glaucoma. We will look at various studies concerning the development of nanomedicine, its potential applications in ocular drug delivery, diagnostic and imaging modalities and, surgical techniques. In particular, the challenges of assuring safety and efficacy of nanomedicine will be examined. We conclude that nanotechnology offers a novel approach to expanding diagnostic, imaging and surgical modalities in glaucoma and may contribute to the knowledge of disease pathogenesis at a molecular level. However, more research is needed to better elucidate the mechanism of cellular entry, the potential for nanoparticle cytotoxicity and the assurance of clinical efficacy.

  18. Comparison of axial lengths in occludable angle and angle-closure glaucoma-The Bhaktapur Glaucoma Study

    Thapa, S.S.; Paudyal, I.; Khanal, S.; Paudel, N.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and axial length of eyes in a population-based sample among normal, occludable angle, and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) groups. Methods. Totally, 3979 subjects from a population-based glaucoma prevalence study underwent complete ocular

  19. The Ex-PRESS glaucoma shunt versus trabeculectomy in open-angle glaucoma: a prospective randomized study

    de Jong, Leo A. M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the efficacy and safety of the Ex-PRESS (Optonol Ltd., Neve Ilan, Israel) mini glaucoma shunt in open-angle glaucoma. This was a prospective, randomized trial. Eyes from enrolled patients were randomly assigned to either Ex-PRESS implantation under a

  20. Understanding practice patterns of glaucoma sub-specialists in India

    Nikhil S. Choudhari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To obtain information on the prevailing practice patterns of glaucoma specialists in India. METHODS: Glaucoma specialists attending the Annual Conference of the Glaucoma Society of India (GSI were surveyed. This survey, conducted in 2013, was based on an interactive audience response system. RESULTS: The information was obtained from 146 glaucoma specialists. Approximately half (n=83; 57% had ≥10y of experience in managing glaucoma and were in institutional practice (n=74, 51%. Goldmann applanation tonometry was preferred by 103 (72% specialists whilst n=25 (17.4% used non-contact tonometer. Indentation gonioscopy was favoured by two-thirds (n=90, 66% whereas stereoscopic optic disc examination and visual fields using Humphrey perimeter was performed by a majority of the specialists surveyed (n=115, 86% and n=114; 83% respectively. Nearly three quarter specialists (n=96; 72% preferred optical coherence tomography for imaging. The primary choice for treatment of angle closure disease and primary open angle glaucoma was laser (iridotomy, n=117; 93% and medical management (prostaglandin analogue, n=104; 78%, respectively. Approximately only a third of the specialists surveyed (n=37; 28% were performing both trabeculectomy and implantation of a glaucoma drainage device and about half (n=64; 47% were not operating on congenital glaucoma at all. CONCLUSION: This survey has found conformance with preferred practice patterns in several areas of diagnosis and management of glaucoma, but there was diversity in a few areas. The information is a significant step towards improvement of glaucoma care in India, including planning for future strategies.

  1. Targeting VEGF in canine oxygen-induced retinopathy - a model for human retinopathy of prematurity.

    McLeod, D Scott; Lutty, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the dog superficial retinal vasculature is similar to the mechanism of human retinal vasculature development; they both develop by vasculogenesis, differentiation, and assembly of vascular precursors called angioblasts. Canine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) was first developed by Arnall Patz in an effort to experimentally determine the effects of hyperoxia on the development of the retinal vasculature. The canine OIR model has many characteristics in common with human retinopathy of prematurity. Exposure of 1-day-old dogs to hyperoxia for 4 days causes a vaso-obliteration throughout the retina. Vasoproliferation, after the animals have returned to room air, is robust. The initial small preretinal neovascular formations anastomose to form large preretinal membranes that eventually cause tractional retinal folds. The end-stage pathology of the canine model is similar to stage IV human retinopathy of prematurity. Therefore, canine OIR is an excellent forum to evaluate the response to drugs targeting VEGF and its receptors. Evaluation of an antibody to VEGF-R2 and the VEGF-Trap demonstrated that doses should be titered down so that preretinal neovascularization is inhibited but retinal revascularization is able to proceed, vascularizing peripheral retina and preventing it from being a source of VEGF.

  2. Late-onset endophthalmitis secondary to exposed glaucoma tube implant in a rare case of paediatric glaucoma.

    Ranganath, Akshatha; Hashim, Adnan

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma drainage implants (GDIs) are used to treat paediatric glaucoma resistant to conventional medical and surgical treatment, achieving good intraocular pressure (IOP) control and long-term success. Late endophthalmitis is a rare complication that may develop following GDI surgery. A 17-year-old male presented with acute endophthalmitis 2 years after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation with pericardial patch graft for management of refractory glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uveae. The glaucoma tube was exposed due to erosion of the overlying conjunctiva with no visible pericardial graft. After control of active infection, he underwent tube revision surgery whereby the exposed tube was retained and repatched with a double-thickness pericardial patch graft. He did well following surgery with good control of IOP and restoration of vision. Conjunctival dehiscence with graft melting over the GDI tube presented a major risk factor for endophthalmitis. Prompt surgical revision of an exposed tube is highly recommended to avoid ocular morbidity.

  3. Late-Onset Endophthalmitis Secondary to Exposed Glaucoma Tube Implant in a Rare Case of Paediatric Glaucoma

    Akshatha Ranganath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma drainage implants (GDIs are used to treat paediatric glaucoma resistant to conventional medical and surgical treatment, achieving good intraocular pressure (IOP control and long-term success. Late endophthalmitis is a rare complication that may develop following GDI surgery. A 17-year-old male presented with acute endophthalmitis 2 years after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation with pericardial patch graft for management of refractory glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uveae. The glaucoma tube was exposed due to erosion of the overlying conjunctiva with no visible pericardial graft. After control of active infection, he underwent tube revision surgery whereby the exposed tube was retained and repatched with a double-thickness pericardial patch graft. He did well following surgery with good control of IOP and restoration of vision. Conjunctival dehiscence with graft melting over the GDI tube presented a major risk factor for endophthalmitis. Prompt surgical revision of an exposed tube is highly recommended to avoid ocular morbidity.

  4. Resource Planning in Glaucoma: A Tool to Evaluate Glaucoma Service Capacity.

    Batra, Ruchika; Sharma, Hannah E; Elaraoud, Ibrahim; Mohamed, Shabbir

    2017-12-28

    The National Patient Safety Agency (2009) publication advising timely follow-up of patients with established glaucoma followed several reported instances of visual loss due to postponed appointments and patients lost to follow-up. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists Quality Standards Development Group stated that all hospital appointments should occur within 15% of the intended follow-up period. To determine whether: 1. Glaucoma follow-up appointments at a teaching hospital occur within the requested time 2. Appointments are requested at appropriate intervals based on the NICE Guidelines 3. The capacity of the glaucoma service is adequate Methods: A two-part audit was undertaken of 98 and 99 consecutive patients respectively attending specialist glaucoma clinics. In the first part, the reasons for delayed appointments were recorded. In the second part the requested follow-up was compared with NICE guidelines where applicable. Based on the findings, changes were implemented and a re-audit of 100 patients was carried out. The initial audit found that although clinical decisions regarding follow-up intervals were 100% compliant with NICE guidelines where applicable, 24% of appointments were delayed beyond 15% of the requested period, due to administrative errors and inadequate capacity, leading to significant clinical deterioration in two patients. Following the introduction of an electronic appointment tracker and increased clinical capacity created by extra clinics and clinicians, the re-audit found a marked decrease in the percentage of appointments being delayed (9%). This audit is a useful tool to evaluate glaucoma service provision, assist in resource planning for the service and bring about change in a non-confrontational way. It can be widely applied and adapted for use in other medical specialities.

  5. Trabecular Meshwork Height in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Versus Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma.

    Masis, Marisse; Chen, Rebecca; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C

    2017-11-01

    To determine if trabecular meshwork (TM) height differs between primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) eyes. Prospective, cross-sectional clinical study. Adult patients were consecutively recruited from glaucoma clinics at the University of California, San Francisco, from January 2012 to July 2015. Images were obtained from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Cirrus OCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc, Dublin, California, USA). Univariate and multivariate linear mixed models comparing TM height and glaucoma type were performed to assess the relationship between TM height and glaucoma subtype. Mixed-effects regression was used to adjust for the use of both eyes in some subjects. The study included 260 eyes from 161 subjects, composed of 61 men and 100 women. Mean age was 70 years (SD 11.77). There were 199 eyes (123 patients) in the POAG group and 61 eyes (38 patients) in the PACG group. Mean TM heights in the POAG and PACG groups were 812 ± 13 μm and 732 ± 27 μm, respectively, and the difference was significant in univariate analysis (P = .004) and in multivariate analysis (β = -88.7 [24.05-153.5]; P = .008). In this clinic-based population, trabecular meshwork height is shorter in PACG patients compared to POAG patients. This finding may provide insight into the pathophysiology of angle closure and provide assistance in future diagnosis, prevention, and management of the angle-closure spectrum of disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for refractory glaucoma after sequential failed trabeculectomy

    Zhi-Qin Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for refractory glaucoma after sequential failed trabeculectomy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients(36 eyeswith prior failed sequential trabeculectomy who underwent Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation were included. The intraocular pressure(IOP, best corrected visual acuity(BCVAand complications were ovserved and all the patients were followed up at least for 12mo. RESULTS: Mean preoperative IOP was 35.20±7.28mmHg and reduced to 10.15±3.34, 11.23±3.56, 15.63±5.72, 17.17±5.47, 17.73±6.23,19.76±5.43mmHg at 1, 2wk, 1, 3, 6 and 12mo after surgery, which was significant different from the preoperative level(t=12.643, 11.837, 10.324, 8.839, 8.462, 8.046, all PZ=-0.420, P>0.05. At 12mo after operation, the complete success rate reached 78% and the conditional success rate reached 92%. There were 5 eyes complicated with shallow anterior chamber, 3 eye complicated with anterior chamber hemorrhage, which all recovered after additional treatments. Late complications included valve exposure and encapsulated cystic blebs around the plate. Severe corneal endothelium loss occurred in 1 patient. CONCLUSION: Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation is effective in reducing IOP at 1-year follow-up in refractory glaucoma patients with prior sequential failed trabeculectomy, but we should fully understand and attach great importance to all kinds of complications that may occur.

  7. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure.

    Huang, Jingjing; Lin, Jialiu; Wu, Ziqiang; Xu, Hongzhi; Zuo, Chengguo; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in patients less than 7 years of age, with advanced primary congenital glaucoma who have failed previous surgeries. Consecutive patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma that failed previous operations and had undergone subsequent AGV implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Surgical success was defined as 1) intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥6 and ≤21 mmHg; 2) IOP reduction of at least 30% relative to preoperative values; and 3) without the need for additional surgical intervention for IOP control, loss of light perception, or serious complications. Fourteen eyes of eleven patients were studied. Preoperatively, the average axial length was 27.71±1.52 (25.56-30.80) mm, corneal diameter was 14.71±1.07 (13.0-16.0) mm, cup-to-disc ratio was 0.95±0.04 (0.9-1.0), and IOP was 39.5±5.7 (30-55) mmHg. The mean follow-up time was 18.29±10.96 (5-44, median 18) months. There were significant reductions in IOPs and the number of glaucoma medications (Pvalve success were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 71.4% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Severe surgical complications, including erosion of tube, endophthalmitis, retinal detachment, choroidal detachment, and delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage, occurred in 28.6% cases. AGV implantation remains a viable option for patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma unresponsive to previous surgical intervention, despite a relatively high incidence of severe surgical complications.

  8. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the ... control, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age of the patient, duration of diabetes .... thus, the presence of one is believed to predict the development of the other.

  9. Argon laser in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (Preliminary communication)

    Saprykin, P.I.; Simonova, K.K.; Belyaeva, M.I.

    1974-01-01

    The complications observed in the photocoagulation treatment of diabetic angiopathy and retinopathy include the following conditions: tractional retinal detachment, accelerated development of proliferating retinitis and massive hemmorrhaging into the vitreous body. (V.A.P.)

  10. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04)

  11. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS). Population characteristics

    Knudsen, L.L.; Lervang, H.H.; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    Abstract Purpose: Several population based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of proliferativ retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy. Despite their importance, these studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore...... reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous era. Studies of the present diabetic population are therefore in demand. Methods: The present cross–section study included 656 type 1 and 328 type 2 diabetic subjects undergoing diabetic retinopathy screening. Crude prevalence rates...... for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, maculopathy, several specific lesions and non–ophthalmic findings were assessed together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The crude prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 5.6 % and 0.9 % for type 1...

  12. Ultra-wide-field imaging in diabetic retinopathy.

    Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Tsui, Irena; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    Since 1991, 7-field images captured with 30-50 degree cameras in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were the gold standard for fundus imaging to study diabetic retinopathy. Ultra-wide-field images cover significantly more area (up to 82%) of the fundus and with ocular steering can in many cases image 100% of the fundus ("panretinal"). Recent advances in image analysis of ultra-wide-field imaging allow for precise measurements of the peripheral retinal lesions. There is a growing consensus in the literature that ultra-wide-field imaging improves detection of peripheral lesions in diabetic retinopathy and leads to more accurate classification of the disease. There is discordance among studies, however, on the correlation between peripheral diabetic lesions and diabetic macular edema and optimal management strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods: Three patients with a normal ophthalmoscopic fundus appearance, a history of photopsia, and visual field loss compatible with AZOOR were examined using optical coherence tomography, automated perimetry...

  14. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  15. Secondary glaucoma in CAPN5-associated neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy

    Cham A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdourahman Cham,1,2 Mayank Bansal,3 Himanshu K Banda,4 Young Kwon,1 Paul S Tlucek,1 Alexander G Bassuk,5 Stephen H Tsang,6,7 Warren M Sobol,8 James C Folk,1 Steven Yeh,4 Vinit B Mahajan1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 3Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 5Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 6Barbara and Donald Jonas Laboratory of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine and Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Laboratory, Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Institute of Human Nutrition, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 7Edward S Harkness Eye Institute, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, 8Retina Physicians & Surgeons, Inc., Dayton, OH, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to review the treatment outcomes of patients with secondary glaucoma in cases of autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, a hereditary autoimmune uveitis due to mutations in CAPN5. Patients and methods: A retrospective, observational case series was assembled from ADNIV patients with secondary glaucoma. The main outcome measures were intraocular pressure (IOP, visual acuity, use of antiglaucoma medications, ocular surgeries, and adverse outcomes. Perimetry and optic disk optical coherence tomography (OCT were also analyzed. Results: Nine eyes of five ADNIV patients with secondary glaucoma were reviewed. Each received a fluocinolone acetonide (FA implant for the management of posterior uveitis. Following implantation, no eyes developed neovascular glaucoma. Five eyes (in patients 1, 2, and 5 required Ahmed glaucoma valve surgery for the management of steroid-responsive glaucoma. Patient 2 also developed angle closure with iris bombe and underwent laser

  16. Radiations

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  17. Radiation

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  18. A novel implantable glaucoma valve using ferrofluid.

    Eleftherios I Paschalis

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present a novel design of an implantable glaucoma valve based on ferrofluidic nanoparticles and to compare it with a well-established FDA approved valve. SETTING: Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Boston, USA. METHODS: A glaucoma valve was designed using soft lithography techniques utilizing a water-immiscible magnetic fluid (ferrofluid as a pressure-sensitive barrier to aqueous flow. Two rare earth micro magnets were used to calibrate the opening and closing pressure. In-vitro flow measurements were performed to characterize the valve and to compare it to Ahmed™ glaucoma valve. The reliability and predictability of the new valve was verified by pressure/flow measurements over a period of three months and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis over a period of eight weeks. In vivo assessment was performed in three rabbits. RESULTS: In the in vitro experiments, the opening and closing pressures of the valve were 10 and 7 mmHg, respectively. The measured flow/pressure response was linearly proportional and reproducible over a period of three months (1.8 µl/min at 12 mmHg; 4.3 µl/min at 16 mmHg; 7.6 µl/min at 21 mmHg. X-ray diffraction analysis did not show oxidization of the ferrofluid when exposed to water or air. Preliminary in vivo results suggest that the valve is biocompatible and can control the intraocular pressure in rabbits. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed valve utilizes ferrofluid as passive, tunable constriction element to provide highly predictable opening and closing pressures while maintaining ocular tone. The ferrofluid maintained its magnetic properties in the aqueous environment and provided linear flow to pressure response. Our in-vitro tests showed reliable and reproducible results over a study period of three months. Preliminary in-vivo results were very promising and currently more thorough investigation of this device is underway.

  19. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  20. Efficacy of Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Stage 3+ Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Mintz-Hittner, Helen A.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Chuang, Alice Z.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Retinopathy of prematurity is a leading cause of childhood blindness worldwide. Peripheral retinal ablation with conventional (confluent) laser therapy is destructive, causes complications, and does not prevent all vision loss, especially in cases of retinopathy of prematurity affecting zone I of the eye. Case series in which patients were treated with vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors suggest that these agents may be useful in treating retinopathy of prematurity. METHODS We conducted a prospective, controlled, randomized, stratified, multicenter trial to assess intravitreal bevacizumab monotherapy for zone I or zone II posterior stage 3+ (i.e., stage 3 with plus disease) retinopathy of prematurity. Infants were randomly assigned to receive intravitreal bevacizumab (0.625 mg in 0.025 ml of solution) or conventional laser therapy, bilaterally. The primary ocular outcome was recurrence of retinopathy of prematurity in one or both eyes requiring retreatment before 54 weeks’ postmenstrual age. RESULTS We enrolled 150 infants (total sample of 300 eyes); 143 infants survived to 54 weeks’ postmenstrual age, and the 7 infants who died were not included in the primary-outcome analyses. Retinopathy of prematurity recurred in 4 infants in the bevacizumab group (6 of 140 eyes [4%]) and 19 infants in the laser-therapy group (32 of 146 eyes [22%], P = 0.002). A significant treatment effect was found for zone I retinopathy of prematurity (P = 0.003) but not for zone II disease (P = 0.27). CONCLUSIONS Intravitreal bevacizumab monotherapy, as compared with conventional laser therapy, in infants with stage 3+ retinopathy of prematurity showed a significant benefit for zone I but not zone II disease. Development of peripheral retinal vessels continued after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab, but conventional laser therapy led to permanent destruction of the peripheral retina. This trial was too small to assess safety. PMID:21323540