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Sample records for glasses potential immobilization

  1. Barium borosilicate glass - a potential matrix for immobilization of sulfate bearing high-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Sengupta, P.; Kumar, Amar; Das, D.; Kale, G.B.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-01-01

    Borosilicate glass formulations adopted worldwide for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is not suitable for sulphate bearing HLW, because of its low solubility in such glass. A suitable glass matrix based on barium borosilicate has been developed for immobilization of sulphate bearing HLW. Various compositions based on different glass formulations were made to examine compatibility with waste oxide with around 10 wt% sulfate content. The vitrified waste product obtained from barium borosilicate glass matrix was extensively evaluated for its characteristic properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, glass transition temperature, thermal conductivity, impact strength, etc. using appropriate techniques. Process parameters like melt viscosity and pour temperature were also determined. It is found that SB-44 glass composition (SiO 2 : 30.5 wt%, B 2 O 3 : 20.0 wt%, Na 2 O: 9.5 wt% and BaO: 19.0 wt%) can be safely loaded with 21 wt% waste oxide without any phase separation. The other product qualities of SB-44 waste glass are also found to be on a par with internationally adopted waste glass matrices. This formulation has been successfully implemented in plant scale

  2. Immobilization of hazardous and radioactive waste into glass structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of more than three decades of international research, glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization of a wide range of potentially hazardous radioactive and non-radioactive materials. The ability of glass structures to incorporate and then immobilize many different elements into durable, high integrity, waste glass products is a direct function of the unique random network structure of the glassy state. Every major country involved with long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has either selected or is considering glass as the matrix of choice for immobilizing and ultimately, disposing of the potentially hazardous, high-level radioactive material. There are many reasons why glass is preferred. Among the most important considerations are the ability of glass structures to accommodate and immobilize the many different types of radionuclides present in HLW, and to produce a product that not only has excellent technical properties, but also possesses good processing features. Good processability allows the glass to be fabricated with relative ease even under difficult remote-handling conditions necessary for vitrification of highly radioactive material. The single most important property of the waste glass produced is its ability to retain hazardous species within the glass structure and this is reflected by its excellent chemical durability and corrosion resistance to a wide range of environmental conditions. In addition to immobilization of HLW glass matrices are also being considered for isolation of many other types of hazardous materials, both radioactive as well as nonradioactive. This includes vitrification of various actinides resulting from clean-up operations and the legacy of the cold war, as well as possible immobilization of weapons grade plutonium resulting from disarmament activities. Other types of wastes being considered for immobilization into glasses include transuranic wastes, mixed wastes, contaminated

  3. Immobilization of radioactive waste in glass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A promising process for long-term management of high-level radioactive waste is to immobilize the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix. Among the most important criteria characterizing the integrity of the large-scale glass-waste forms are that they possess good chemical stability (including low leachability), thermal stability, mechanical integrity, and high radiation stability. Fulfillment of these criteria ensures the maximum margin of safety of glass-waste products, following solidification, handling, transportation, and long-term storage

  4. Immobilization of Uranium Silicides in Sintered Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, P.; Russo, D.O.; Heredia, A.D.; Sanfilippo, M.

    2003-01-01

    High activity nuclear spent fuels vitrification by fusion is a well known technology which has industrial scale in France, England, Japan, EEUU. Borosilicates glasses are used in this process.Sintered glasses are an alternative to the immobilization task in which there is also a wide experience around the world.The available technics are: cold pressing and sintering , hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing.This work compares Borosilicates and Iron silicates sintered glasses behaviour when different ammounts of nuclear simulated waste is added

  5. Nuclear waste immobilization in iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.A.; Rodriguez, Diego A.; Menghini, Jorge E.; Bevilacqua, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Iron-phosphate glasses have become important in the nuclear waste immobilization area because they have some advantages over silicate-based glasses, such as a lower processing temperature and a higher nuclear waste load without losing chemical and mechanical properties. Structure and chemical properties of iron-phosphate glasses are determined in terms of the main components, in this case, phosphate oxide along with the other oxides that are added to improve some of the characteristics of the glasses. For example, Iron oxide improves chemical durability, lead oxide lowers fusion temperature and sodium oxide reduces viscosity at high temperature. In this work a study based on the composition-property relations was made. We used different techniques to characterize a series of iron-lead-phosphate glasses with uranium and aluminium oxide as simulated nuclear waste. We used the Arquimedes method to determine the bulk density, differential temperature analysis (DTA) to determine both glass transition temperature and crystallization temperature, dilatometric analysis to calculate the linear thermal expansion coefficient, chemical durability (MCC-1 test) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We also applied some theoretic models to calculate activation energies associated with the glass transition temperature and crystallization processes. (author)

  6. Chemical durability and resistance to irradiation of LnYSiAlO (Ln=La or Ce) glasses, potential immobilization matrix of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavarini, St.

    2002-11-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate glasses are known for their interesting mechanical and optical properties. Recent studies have shown that their chemical durability was very good too, such they have the potential to be used in the nuclear industry for the specific immobilization of trivalent actinides. Initial dissolution rates of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO were determined using a Soxhlet device (dynamic leaching). The differences linked to the nature of the rare earth element were studied by synthesizing analogous glasses that only differed in their rare earth element composition (%at.): Y-5%, La-5 %, Si-15%, Al-10% O-65%. The influence of pH on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics was also studied by static leaching tests performed in dilute solutions of NaOH or HNO 3 . Electronic defects and collision cascades, induced by a-disintegration of radioelements confined in storage matrix, can cause important modifications in the glass structure and, thus, influence its chemical durability. To simulate these effects, glass samples were irradiated with β particles and heavy ions accelerated to 2,5 MeV and 200 keV, respectively. Monoliths were then leached in static bi-distilled water (pH≥≥ 5.5) for one month in an autoclave heated to 90 degrees C. Initially, the structural changes caused by irradiation were determined using Raman, NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Ion μ-beams, SEM-EDS and XPS analysis were also performed to evaluate the potential modifications of the superficial composition. Finally, the leaching behavior was studied, for both irradiated and unirradiated samples, through solution and solid elementary characterization. (author)

  7. Hierarchically Nanoporous Bioactive Glasses for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, W.; Min, D.D.; Zhang, X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glasses with hierarchical nanoporosity and structures have been heavily involved in immobilization of enzymes. Because of meticulous design and ingenious hierarchical nanostructuration of porosities from yeast cell biotemplates, hierarchically nanostructured porous bioactive glasses can...... and products of catalytic reactions can freely diffuse through open mesopores (2–40 nm). The formation mechanism of hierarchically structured porous bioactive glasses, the immobilization mechanism of enzyme and the catalysis mechanism of immobilized enzyme are then discussed. The novel nanostructure...

  8. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Tang, Yuanyuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Lee, Po-Heng [Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Liu, Chengshuai, E-mail: csliu@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Li, Fangbai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2017-01-05

    immobilization of Cr. The overall results suggest that the use of affordable additives has potential in more reliably immobilizing COPR with a spinel-based glass-ceramic for safer disposal of this hazardous waste.

  9. Conversion of radioactive ferrocyanide compounds to immobile glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Dressen, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    Complex radioactive ferrocyanide compounds result from the scavenging of cesium from waste products produced in the chemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel. These ferrocyanides, in accordance with this process, are converted to an immobile glass, resistant to leaching by water, by fusion together with sodium carbonate and a mixture of (a) basalt and boron trioxide (B 2 O 3 ) or (b) silica (SiO 2 ) and lime (CaO). 7 claims

  10. Research on vitrification technology to immobilize radioactive sludge generated from Fukushima Daiichi power plant. Enhanced glass medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Kobayashi, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Naoto; Takebe, Hiromichi; Mitamura, Naoki; Tsuzuki, Tatsuya; Fukayama, Daigen; Nagano, Yuichi; Jantzen, Tatjana; Hack, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The search for an enhanced glass medium to immobilize the sludge at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is our main purpose. The iron phosphate glass (IPG) is a potential candidate as we set about assessing it by means of theoretical and experimental investigation. Based on the results of this study, the IPG showed favorable characteristics as a vitrification medium for the sludge. (author)

  11. Immobilization of radioactive iodine in silver aluminophosphate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, Thomas; Méar, François O; Campayo, Lionel; Pinet, Olivier; Revel, Bertrand; Montagne, Lionel

    2014-01-15

    Silver aluminophosphate glasses have been investigated as matrices for the immobilization of radioactive iodine. In this study, up to 28mol% AgI have been incorporated without volatilization thanks to a low temperature synthesis protocol. Alumina was added in the composition in order to increase the glass transition temperature for a better thermal stability in a repository conditions. Two series of glasses have been investigated, based on AgPO3 and Ag5P3O10 compositions, and with 0-5mol% Al2O3. We report (31)P, (27)Al and (109)Ag NMR study of these glasses, including advanced measurement of the connectivities through {(27)Al}-(31)P cross-polarization and (31)P-(31)P double-quantum correlation. We confirm that AgI is inserted in the aluminophosphate glasses and does not form clusters. AgI does not induce any modification of the glass polymerization but only an expansion of the network. Despite no evidence for crystallization could be obtained from XRD, NMR revealed that the introduction of AgI induces an exclusion of alumina from the network, leading to the crystallization of aluminophosphate phases such as Al(PO3)3 or AlPO4. As a consequence, despite NMR gives evidence for the presence of aluminophosphate bonds, only a limited effect of alumina addition on thermal properties is observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Selection of a glass-ceramic formulation to immobilize fluorinel- sodium calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, B.A.; Wood, H.C.

    1994-12-01

    One option for immobilizing calcined high level wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is conversion to a glass-ceramic form through hot isostatic pressing. Calcines exist in several different chemical compositions, and thus candidate formulations have been developed for converting each to glass-ceramic forms which are potentially resistant to aqueous corrosion and stable enough to qualify for repository storage. Fluorinel/Na, a chemically complex calcine type, is one of the types being stored at ICPP, and development efforts have identified three formulations with potential for immobilizing it. These are a glass forming additive that uses aluminum metal to enhance reactivity, a second glass forming additive that uses titanium metal to enhance reactivity and a third that uses not only a combination of silicon and titanium metals but enough phosphorous pentoxide to form a calcium phosphate host phase in the glass-ceramic product. Glass-ceramics of each formulation performed well in restricted characterization tests. However, none of the three was subjected to rigorous testing that would provide information on whether each was processable, that is able to retain favorable characteristics over a practical range of processing conditions.

  13. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129 I, 85 Kr and 14 C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  14. The state and art of the study on glass-ceramics for immobilization of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhentao; Wang Lei; Xing Haiqing; Gan Xueying

    2008-01-01

    There exist two problems for glass as the matrix to immobilize the nuclear wastes. One is the waste loading restricted by the solubility of minor actinides in glass, the other is the long-term stability limited by the devitrification of the glass. Glass ceramic could be an alternative matrix due to its good chemical stability and high loading capacity of the crystals for actinides as well as the good compatibility of glass for the fission and activation products. Literatures show that the high level liquid waste (HLLW) and the actinides could be immobilized in glass ceramic. Glass-zirconolite has been studied for the immobilization of Pu 2 O in the laboratory. The glass-zirconolite is fabricated by the crystallization of a homogeneous parent glass melt though the nuclearization and the growth of the crystal grains. Glass ceramic is easy to be fabricated in the industrial facility for immobilization of HLLW. People have proved the feasibility of fabrication of glass ceramic by the full industrial scale cold crucible with the simulated HLLW. The glass ceramic is formed by the natural cooling of the parent glass in the canister. It is proved that glass ceramic has a higher waste loading capacity and a lower nuclide leaching rate than the glass. Cold crucible plus glass ceramic is the optimized technique for HLLW treatment. The glass-zirconolite is studied more than other glass ceramics. (authors)

  15. Loading and leakage of krypton immobilized in zeolites and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, A.B.; Del Debbio, J.A.; Knecht, D.A.; Tanner, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Krypton-85 is formed in nuclear power reactors and remains trapped until the fuel is reprocessed. Federal regulations limit the release of 85 Kr to the environment, requiring recovery and storage of 85% of the 85 Kr produced in commercial light-water reactors after January 1, 1983. One of the long-term storage options involves encapsulating 85 Kr in zeolites or glasses at high pressure and temperature. This paper presents experimental results for krypton encapsulation and leakage in sodalite, zeolite 5A, and Vycor Thristy glass. The results show that all three materials are feasible for 85 Kr immobilization and long-term storage, although zeolite 5A and Thirsty Vycor are preferable due to lower leakage rates

  16. Immobilization of radioactive wastes in glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotto, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive liquid wastes arises from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to recover uranium and plutonium. Immobilization of such wastes in solid form and disposal of the solidified wastes in safe places, to prevent contamination of the human environment, are topics of considerable interest for both the scientific community and the public in general. The great majority of materials candidate for the encapsulation of radioactive wastes are inorganic non-metalic, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, special cements, calcined ceramics and few more. Among these materials, certain glasses have received special attention, and are being studied for over twenty years. It is estimated that about US$2 billion have already been spent in these studies. The disposal (long term storage) of these solid wastes may be possible in deep geological formations, salt mines, the ocean bed, by evacuation to the outer space, etc. A brief review on the several options avaiable for encapsulation and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes is presented, along with the relative merits and disadvantages of the candidate materials for encapsulation. A few suggestions for the solution of the Brazilian problem are advanced. (Author) [pt

  17. Plutonium disposition via immobilization in ceramic or glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, A.

    1997-01-01

    The management of surplus weapons plutonium is an important and urgent task with profound environmental, national, and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Policy Directive 13, and various analyses by renown scientific, technical, and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths for the long term disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The central goal of this effort is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in spent fuel from civilian reactors. One disposition option being considered for surplus plutonium is immobilization, in which the plutonium would be incorporated into a glass or ceramic material that would ultimately be entombed permanently in a geologic repository for high-level waste

  18. Immobilization of high-level wastes into sintered glass: 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, D.O.; Messi de Bernasconi, N.; Audero, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to immobilize the high-level radioactive wastes from fuel elements reprocessing, borosilicate glass was adopted. Sintering experiments are described with the variety VG 98/12 (SiO 2 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 , MgO, CaO and Na 2 O) (which does not present devitrification problems) mixed with simulated calcinated wastes. The hot pressing line (sintering under pressure) was explored in two variants 1: In can; 2: In graphite matrix with sintered pellet extraction. With scanning electron microscopy it is observed that the simulated wastes do not disolve in the vitreous matrix, but they remain dispersed in the same. The results obtained point out that the leaching velocities are independent from the density and from the matrix type employed, as well as from the fact that the wastes do no dissolve in the matrix. (M.E.L.) [es

  19. Preliminary assessment of modified borosilicate glasses for chromium and ruthenium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Osama M. [Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt); Centre of Nuclear Engineering (CNE), Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Abdel Rahman, R.O., E-mail: alaarehab@yahoo.com [Hot Laboratory Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The feasibility of using modified alkali borosilicate glasses for ruthenium and chromium immobilization is preliminary assessed by investigating the immobilization system structure under normal conditions. Within this context, reference alkali borosilicate, and simulated Magnox-modified glasses were prepared and studied. The results indicate that ruthenium is immobilized in the vitreous structure as encapsulated RuO{sub 2} crystallites that act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of other crystalline phases. The presence of Zn, as modifier, has contributed to chromium immobilization in zincochromite spinel structure, whereas Ca is accommodated in the vitreous structure. Immobilization performance was evaluated by conducting conservative static leach test and studying the leached glass. Leached glass morphology was altered, where near surface reference glass is leached over 400 nm and simulated Magnox-modified sample is altered over 300 nm. Normalized release rates are within normal range for borosilicate material. For simulated Magnox-modified sample, Ca and alkali structural element, i.e. Na and Li, are leached via ion-exchange reaction. The ion-exchanged fraction equals 1.06 × 10{sup −8} mol/m{sup 2} s and chromium has slightly lower normalized release rate value than ruthenium. - Highlights: • The presence of modifiers and waste oxides led to localized de-vitrification. • Ruthenium is encapsulated within the vitreous glass network as RuO{sub 2} crystals. • Chromium is immobilized within the zincochromite spinel structure. • Pitting and cracks induced by leaching did not affect the immobilization performance.

  20. Immobilization of high-level wastes into sintered glass: 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, A.M.; Russo, D.O.; Messi de Bernasconi, N.; Audero, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    High level radioactive wastes are immobilized into borosilicate glasses. Experiences with the variety VG 98/12 (SiO 2 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 , MgO, CaO, Na 2 O) are described. The pressing was performed in a matrix of 12.7 mm diameter, the walls of which were lubricated with sterotex dissolved in Cl 4 C. The sintering was made in an horizontal electric furnace in air atmosphere at temperatures between 500 and 600 deg C. It was observed that the maximum density occurs at 605 deg C. Comparing both the hot and the cold pressing process, it is concluded that: 1) In spite of requiring more complex equipment the hot pressing process has the advantage that lower pressures are applied, with the consequent obtainment of waste blocks with larger diameters, and 2) it is advisable that pressing process should be performed in the definitive can. (M.E.L.) [es

  1. Comparative analysis of the water resistance of glass composites and homogeneous glass matrices for immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlina, O.K.; Ozhovan, M.I.; Popov, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    The reliability of immobilizing radioactive wastes in glass composites as compared to homogeneous glasses containing the same amount of radioactive components is evaluated. The resistance criterion of the glass composites is defined as the condition where their water resistance is no worse than that of a homogeneous glass of the same composition without unexpected sample decompositions. The water resistance of the glass composites and the homogeneous matrices in addition to its change after induced sample fragmentation are experimentally studied. The limit is found for the maximal particle size of the dispersed radioactive phase in the glass composites. The maximal achievable size of the radioactive inclusions depends on the properties of the glass matrix used and the distribution coefficient of the radionuclides between the additive and the matrix

  2. Borosilicate glass as a matrix for immobilization of SRP high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 22 million gallons of high-level radioactive defense waste are currently being stored in large underground tanks located on the Savannah River Plant (SRP) site in Aiken, South Carolina. One option now being considered for long-term management of this waste involves removing the waste from the tanks, chemically processing the waste, and immobilizing the potentially harmful radionuclides in the waste into a borosilicate glass matrix. The technology for producing waste glass forms is well developed and has been demonstrated on various scales using simulated as well as radioactive SRP waste. Recently, full-scale prototypical equipment has been made operational at SRP. This includes both a joule-heated ceramic melter and an in-can melter. These melters are a part of an integrated vitrification system which is under evaluation and includes a spray calciner, direct liquid feed apparatus, and various elements of an off-gas system. Two of the most important properties of the waste glass are mechanical integrity and leachability. Programs are in progress at SRL aimed at minimizing thermally induced cracking by carefully controlling cooling cycles and using ceramic liners or coatings. The leachability of SRP waste glass has been studied under many different conditions and consistently found to be low. For example, the leachability of actual SRP waste glass was found to be 10 -6 to 10 -5 g/(cm 2 )(day) initially and decreasing to 10 -9 to 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(day) after 100 days. Waste glass is also being studied under anticipated storage conditions. In brine at 90 0 C, the leachability is about 5 x 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(day) after 60 days. The effects of other geological media including granite, basalt, shale, and tuff are also being studied as part of the multibarrier isolation system

  3. UK program: glasses and ceramics for immobilization of radioactive wastes for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The UK Research Program on Radioactive Waste Management includes the development of processes for the conversion of high-level-liquid-reprocessing wastes from thermal and fast reactors to borosilicate glasses. The properties of these glasses and their behavior under storage and disposal conditions have been examined. Methods for immobilizing activity from other wastes by conversion to glass or ceramic forms are described. The UK philosophy of final solutions to waste management and disposal is presented

  4. Immobilization of radwastes in glass containers and products formed thereby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, P.B.; Litovitz, T.A.; Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Lagakos, N.; Tran, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    A mixture of glass packing and radioactive or other toxic material is placed in a solid glass container, and the container is heated to drive off volatile components and collapse and seal the container

  5. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marra, James C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Crawford, Charles L.; Vienna, John D.

    2014-05-22

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphate and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.

  6. Development and characterization of basalt-glass ceramics for the immobilization of transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.; Chick, L.A.; Thomas, L.E.

    1982-09-01

    Basalt-based waste forms were developed for the immobilization of transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes. The specific waste studied is a 3:1 blend of process sludge and incinerator ash. Various amounts of TRU blended waste were melted with Pomona basalt powder. The vitreous products were subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to form glass ceramics. The total crystallinity of the glass ceramic, ranging from 20 to 45 wt %, was moderately dependent on composition and heat treatment conditions. Three parent glasses and four glass ceramics with varied composition and heat treatment were produced for detailed phase characterization and leaching. Both parent glasses and glass ceramics were mainly composed of a continuous, glassy matrix phase. This glass matrix entered into solution during leaching in both types of materials. The Fe-Ti rich dispersed glass phase was not significantly degraded by leaching. The glass ceramics, however, exhibited four to ten times less elemental releases during leaching than the parent glasses. The glass ceramic matrix probably contains higher Fe and Na and lower Ca and Mg relative to the parent glass matrix. The crystallization of augite in the glass ceramics is believed to contribute to the improved leach rates. Leach rates of the basalt glass ceramic are compared to those of other TRU nuclear waste forms containing 239 Pu

  7. Modeling a novel glass immobilization waste treatment process using flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Welch, T.D.; Giardina, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    One option for control and disposal of surplus fissile materials is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), a process developed at ORNL for directly converting Pu-bearing material into a durable high-quality glass waste form. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of the GMODS process flowsheet using FLOW, a chemical process simulator. The simulation showed that the glass chemistry postulated ion the models has acceptable levels of risks

  8. Production and characterization of red mud based on glasses for the immobilization of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Heveline

    2015-01-01

    Glasses based on red mud, a residual material from bauxite processing, were developed and characterized in this work. In order to promote its use, a minimum 60 wt% of red mud was used in the production of the glasses. According to XRD results, materials containing considerable amorphous phases were produced when using red mud as raw material. These amorphous phases were observed even though crystalline phases associated to Fe coming from the red mud itself were present. The material denominated 60L40S, which has a nominal composition of 60 wt% red mud showed the best properties comparing with the others compositions studied. However, these materials presented a high melting temperature. Changes in the composition of this material were made with the objective of lowering this temperature. Results indicated that the changes made to the material were successful in the reduction of the melting temperature. However, a reduction in the chemical properties of the resulting material was observed. Elements usually found in the chemical composition of nuclear wastes were added to the glasses produced. It was done with the objective of determining the effect of these elements on the chemical and physical properties of the red mud based glasses obtained. It was found that it was possible to add up to 15 wt% of these elements to the materials produced. The addition of these simulant materials promoted a reduction in the melting temperature of the resulting material. Above 15 wt%, the added elements precipitate in the structure of the resulting material. Even though the reduction in the chemical durability of the 60L40S material when simulant elements were added, it was observed that this material contained the simulant elements confined in its structure when in contact with water. This is a promising result, since it indicates that the 60L40S has the potential to immobilize elements from nuclear wastes . (author)

  9. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study

  10. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study.

  11. Low leach rate glasses for immobilization of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1980-10-01

    Improved defense and commercial waste glass have about one order of magnitude lower leach rates at 90 0 C in static deionized water than reference glasses. This durability difference diminishes as the leaching temperature is raised, but at repository temperature less than 150 0 C, the improved compositions would have considerable advantages over reference glases. At the melting temperatures necessary for most of the high-durability glasses, volatility was found to be higher than that experienced in processing current reference glases. Higher volatilities might be compensated for by specific design of the off-gas system for improved off-gas treatment and volatile materials recovery. 6 figures, 2 tables

  12. Properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase immobilized on porous glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, J.; Hanson, C. L.; Lyding, J. M.; Reilly, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from spinach has been bound to arylamine porous glass with a diazo linkage and to alklamine porous glass with glutaraldehyde. Stability at elevated temperatures and responses to changes of pH and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, Mg(2+), and dithiothreitol concentrations were not significantly different from the soluble enzyme, though stability at 4 C was somewhat improved.

  13. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  14. Specialty glass development for radiation shielding windows and nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, S.; Ghorui, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.; Sen, R.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Sen, S.; Maiti, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    The technology of two important varieties of specialty glasses, namely high density Radiation Shielding Window (RSW) glass and specialty glass beads of borosilicate composition have been successfully developed in CGCRI with an aim to meet the countries requirement. Radiation Shielding Windows used in nuclear installations, are viewing devices, which allow direct viewing into radioactive areas while still providing adequate protection to the operating personnel. The glass blocks are stabilized against damage from radiation by introducing cerium in definite proportions. Considering the essentially of developing an indigenous technology to make the country self-sufficient for this critical item, CGCRI has taken up a major programme to develop high lead containing glasses required for RSWs under a MoD with BARC. On the other hand, the specialty glass bead of specific composition and properties is a critical material required for management of radioactive waste in a closed nuclear fuel cycle that is followed by India. During reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel, high level radio-active liquid waste (HLW) is produced containing unwanted radio isotopes some of which remain radioactive for thousands of years. The need is to immobilize them within a molecular structure so that they will not come out and be released to the ambience and thereby needs to be resolved if nuclear power is to make a significant contribution to the country's power requirement. Borosilicate glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization due to its unique random network structure

  15. Utilization of borosilicate glass for transuranic waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledford, J.A.; Williams, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Incinerated transuranic waste and other low-level residues have been successfully vitrified by mixing with boric acid and sodium carbonate and heating to 1050 0 C in a bench-scale continuous melter. The resulting borosilicate glass demonstrates excellent mechanical durability and chemical stability

  16. Stable and Simple Immobilization of Proteinase K Inside Glass Tubes and Microfluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, Andreas; Bleich, Julian N; Sebastian, Bernhard; Dittrich, Petra S; Walde, Peter

    2015-11-25

    Engyodontium album proteinase K (proK) is widely used for degrading proteinaceous impurities during the isolation of nucleic acids from biological samples, or in proteomics and prion research. Toward applications of proK in flow reactors, a simple method for the stable immobilization of proK inside glass micropipette tubes was developed. The immobilization of the enzyme was achieved by adsorption of a dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugate from aqueous solution. This conjugate was first synthesized from a polycationic dendronized polymer (denpol) and proK and consisted, on average, of 2000 denpol repeating units and 140 proK molecules, which were attached along the denpol chain via stable bis-aryl hydrazone bonds. Although the immobilization of proK inside the tube was based on nonspecific, noncovalent interactions only, the immobilized proK did not leak from the tube and remained active during prolonged storage at 4 °C and during continuous operation at 25 °C and pH = 7.0. The procedure developed was successfully applied for the immobilization of proK on a glass/PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchip, which is a requirement for applications in the field of proK-based protein analysis with such type of microfluidic devices.

  17. Durabilities and Microstructures of Radioactive Glasses to Immobilize Excess Actinides and Reprocessing Wastes at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the microstructures and durabilities of glasses for immobilization of excess Pu, Am, and Cm, and of the reprocessing wastes at Savannah River Site (SRS). The reprocessing wastes will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. Another facility at SRS will be used for the Pu, Am, and Cm glasses. In this paper results are presented for a DWPF radioactive glass containing the actual fission product-actinide waste from one the million gallon storage tanks at SRS. This waste is the first radioactive sludge that will be processed in DWPF. The actinide glasses investigated had compositions based on a commercial borosilicate glass composition. All the glasses were so radioactive that they had to be prepared remotely in shielded cells and the analyses had to be performed in gloveboxes or radiobenches. Durabilities were measured using the ASTM C-1285 standard leach test. Results for four glasses are presented. The glasses are a DWPF type glass containing Tank 51 radioactive waste, two glasses containing 15 and 13 wt.percent Pu, respectively, and a glass containing Am and Cm. The radioactive DWPF glass contained 28 wtpercent waste from SRS Tank 51 and was homogeneous. The 15 wt percent Pu contained dissolved PuO2 and as well PuO2 crystals that were not dissolved but were trapped in the glass. The 13 wt percent Pu glass was homogenous. The Am/Cm glass contained <1 wt percent actinides and was homogenous. The PCT test indicated that B, Li, and Na were leaching congruently from the glass. Release rates for Tc-99 and Np-237 were also congruent while Cs-133, Th-232, U-238, and Pu-239 were slower. The two Pu glasses were 25 to 50 times more durable than the DWPF glass. B and Ba were leached congruently while Sm and Pu were lower. Release rates for B and Ba from the Am-Cm glass were equal and 27X lower than the DWPF glass

  18. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani; Hrma, Pavel; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-10-01

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  19. Immobilized TiO2on glass spheres applied to heterogeneous photocatalysis: photoactivity, leaching and regeneration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Deivisson Lopes; Kuznetsov, Alexei; Achete, Carlos Alberto; Machado, Antonio Eduardo da Hora; Marques, Marcia

    2018-01-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis using titanium dioxide as catalyst is an attractive advanced oxidation process due to its high chemical stability, good performance and low cost. When immobilized in a supporting material, additional benefits are achieved in the treatment. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple protocol for impregnation of TiO 2 -P25 on borosilicate glass spheres and evaluate its efficiency in the photocatalytic degradation using an oxidizable substrate (methylene blue), in a Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) reactor. The assays were conducted at lab-scale using radiation, which simulated the solar spectrum. TiO 2 leaching from the glass and the catalyst regeneration were both demonstrated. A very low leaching ratio (0.03%) was observed after 24 h of treatment, suggesting that deposition of TiO 2 resulted in good adhesion and stability of the photocatalyst on the surface of borosilicate. This deposition was successfully achieved after calcination of the photocatalyst at 400 °C (TiO 2 -400 °C). The TiO 2 film was immobilized on glass spheres and the powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and BET. This characterization suggested that thermal treatment did not introduce substantial changes in the measured microstructural characteristics of the photocatalyst. The immobilized photocatalyst degraded more than 96% of the MB in up to 90 min of reaction. The photocatalytic activity decreased after four photocatalytic cycles, but it was recovered by the removal of contaminants adsorbed on the active sites after washing in water under UV-Vis irradiation. Based on these results, the TiO 2 -400 °C coated on glass spheres is potentially a very attractive option for removal of persistent contaminants present in the environment.

  20. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  1. 1-butanethiol vapor sensing based on gold nanoparticle immobilized on glass slide by digital color analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokoufi, Nader; Adeleh, Sara

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate that gold nanoparticles (GNPs) immobilized on silanized glass act as an optical sensor that is able to quantify 1-butanethiol vapor. GNPs optical properties in the visible region are dominated by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The high affinity between 1-butanethiol and GNPs through Au-s bond leads to change in plasmon feature of GNPs that immobilized on silanized glass and causes absorption decrease at 542 nm in SPR spectrum of GNPs. It can be used as an optical sensor for quantitative detection. In this research, the glass slide surface activated by aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Spherical GNPs immobilized on silanized glass by silanization agent. The sensor is based on the spectrophotometry and digital color analysis (DCA) through RGB. We monitored R value and linear range 50–700 µM (R 2  =  0.97) with 2.05% relative standard deviation and 26.5 µM value was achieved, for the limit of detection. This method represents advantages of metal gold nanoparticles and solid substrate stability in one package, being inexpensive and low time consuming is another advantage of our method that can be conducted in petrochemical, pharmaceutical industries, and for detection of rotten food in food industries.

  2. Chemical durability and resistance to irradiation of LnYSiAlO (Ln=La or Ce) glasses, potential immobilization matrix of minor actinides; Durabilite chimique et comportement a l'irradiation des verres quaternaires LnYSiAlO (Ln = La ou Ce), matrice potentielle d'immobilisation d'actinides mineurs trivalents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavarini, St

    2002-11-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate glasses are known for their interesting mechanical and optical properties. Recent studies have shown that their chemical durability was very good too, such they have the potential to be used in the nuclear industry for the specific immobilization of trivalent actinides. Initial dissolution rates of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO were determined using a Soxhlet device (dynamic leaching). The differences linked to the nature of the rare earth element were studied by synthesizing analogous glasses that only differed in their rare earth element composition (%at.): Y-5%, La-5 %, Si-15%, Al-10% O-65%. The influence of pH on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics was also studied by static leaching tests performed in dilute solutions of NaOH or HNO{sub 3}. Electronic defects and collision cascades, induced by a-disintegration of radioelements confined in storage matrix, can cause important modifications in the glass structure and, thus, influence its chemical durability. To simulate these effects, glass samples were irradiated with {beta} particles and heavy ions accelerated to 2,5 MeV and 200 keV, respectively. Monoliths were then leached in static bi-distilled water (pH{>=}{>=} 5.5) for one month in an autoclave heated to 90 degrees C. Initially, the structural changes caused by irradiation were determined using Raman, NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Ion {mu}-beams, SEM-EDS and XPS analysis were also performed to evaluate the potential modifications of the superficial composition. Finally, the leaching behavior was studied, for both irradiated and unirradiated samples, through solution and solid elementary characterization. (author)

  3. Immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glasses. Devitrification evaluation produced with different thermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messi de Bernasconi, N.B.; Russo, D.O.; Bevilacqua, M.E.; Sterba, M.E.; Heredia, A.D.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glass, as alternative way to melting glass. Different chemical compositions of borosilicate glass with simulate waste were utilized and satisfactory results were obtained at laboratory scale. As another contribution to the materials studies by X ray powder diffraction analysis, the devitrification produced with different thermal treatments, was evaluated. The effect of the thermal history on the behaviour of fission products containing glasses has been studied by several working groups in the field of high level waste fixation. When the glass is cooled through the temperature range from 800 deg C down to less than 400 deg C (these temperatures are approximates) nucleation and crystal growth can take place. The rate of crystallization will be maximum near the transformation point but through this rate may be low at lower temperatures, devitrification can still occur over long periods of time, depending on the glass composition. It was verified that there can be an appreciable increase in leaching in some waste glass compositions owing to the presence of crystalline phases. On the other hand, other compositions show very little change in leachability and the devitrified product is often preferable as there is less tendency to cracking, particularly in massive blocks of glass. A borosilicate glass, named SG7, which was developed specially in the KfK for the hot pressing of HLW with glass frit was studied. It presents a much enhanced chemical durability than borosolicate glass developed for the melting process. The crystallization behaviour of SG7 glass products was investigated in our own experiments by annealing sintered samples up to 3000 h at temperatures between 675 and 825 deg C. The samples had contained simulated waste with noble metals, since these might act as foreign nuclei for crystallization. Results on the extent of devitrification and time- temperature- transformation curves are

  4. Structural characterizations of rare earth-rich glasses for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardez, I.; Caurant, D.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Loiseau, P.; Gervais, C.; Ribot, F.; Neuville, D.R.; Baffier, N.; Fillet, C.

    2004-01-01

    New nuclear glass compositions, able to immobilize highly active liquid wastes arising from high burn-up UO 2 fuel reprocessing, are being studied. Investigations are being performed on rare earth rich glasses, known as durable matrices. After a preliminary study, a basic glass composition was selected (Glass A, wt. %): 51.0 SiO 2 - 8.5 B 2 O 3 - 12.2 Na 2 O - 4.3 Al 2 O 3 - 4.8 CaO - 3.2 ZrO 2 - 16.0 Nd 2 O 3 . The aim of this study is to determine the local environment of the rare earth in this glass and its evolution according to neodymium. To achieve this objective, glasses were prepared from the baseline Glass A with variable neodymium oxide amounts (from 0 to 30 wt. % Nd 2 O 3 ). By coupling characterization methods such as EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy at the neodymium LIII-edge, optical absorption spectroscopy, 11 B, 27 Al MAS-NMR and Raman spectroscopy, pieces of information the rare earth surroundings in the glass were obtained. (authors)

  5. Assessment of lead tellurite glass for immobilizing electrochemical salt wastes from used nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Brian J.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Pierce, David A.; Ebert, William L.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Frank, Steven M.; George, Jaime L.; Kruska, Karen

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of research evaluating the use of lead tellurite glass as a waste form for salt wastes from electrochemical reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. The efficacy of using lead tellurite glass to immobilize three different salt compositions was evaluated: a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt containing fission products from oxide fuel, a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt containing fission products from metallic fuel, and SrCl2. Physical and chemical properties of glasses made with these salts were characterized with X-ray diffraction, bulk density measurements, differential thermal analysis, chemical durability tests, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These glasses were found to accommodate high salt concentrations and have high densities, but further development is needed to improve chemical durability.

  6. Assessment of lead tellurite glass for immobilizing electrochemical salt wastes from used nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Pierce, David A.; Ebert, William L.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Frank, Steven M.; George, Jaime L.; Kruska, Karen

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of research evaluating the use of lead tellurite glass as a waste form for salt wastes from electrochemical reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. The efficacy of using lead tellurite glass to immobilize three different salt compositions was evaluated: a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt containing fission products from oxide fuel, a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt containing fission products from metallic fuel, and SrCl2. Physical and chemical properties of glasses made with these salts were characterized with X-ray diffraction, bulk density measurements, differential thermal analysis, chemical durability tests, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These glasses were found to accommodate high salt concentrations and have high densities, but further development is needed to improve chemical durability. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Technetium Incorporation in Glass for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    A priority of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) is to dispose of nuclear wastes accumulated in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. These nuclear wastes date from the Manhattan Project of World War II and from plutonium production during the Cold War. The DOE plans to separate high-level radioactive wastes from low activity wastes and to treat each of the waste streams by vitrification (immobilization of the nuclides in glass) for disposal. The immobilized low-activity waste will be disposed of here at Hanford and the immobilized high-level waste at the national geologic repository. Included in the inventory of highly radioactive wastes is large volumes of 99Tc (~9 × 10E2 TBq or ~2.5 × 104 Ci or ~1500 kg). A problem facing safe disposal of Tc-bearing wastes is the processing of waste feed into in a chemically durable waste form. Technetium incorporates poorly into silicate glass in traditional glass melting. It readily evaporates during melting of glass feeds and out of the molten glass, leading to a spectrum of high-to-low retention (ca. 20 to 80%) in the cooled glass product. DOE-ORP currently has a program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Rutgers University and in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University that seeks to understand aspects of Tc retention by means of studying Tc partitioning, molten salt formation, volatilization pathways, and cold cap chemistry. Another problem involves the stability of Tc in glass in both the national geologic repository and on-site disposal after it has been immobilized. The major environmental concern with 99Tc is its high mobility in addition to a long half-life (2.1×105 yrs). The pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) is highly soluble in water and does not adsorb well onto the surface of minerals and so migrates nearly at the same velocity as groundwater

  8. Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass: implications for the processing and immobilization of technetium-99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloy, John S; Riley, Brian J; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Hrma, Pavel; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W; Kruger, Albert A

    2012-11-20

    The immobilization of technetium-99 ((99)Tc) in a suitable host matrix has proven to be a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. In this context, the present work reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for (99)Tc, in a sodium borosilicate glass. Glasses containing target Re concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm [by mass, added as KReO(4) (Re(7+))] were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampules to minimize the loss of Re from volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found as Re(7+) in all of the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure. The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. At higher rhenium concentrations, additional rhenium was retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of alkali perrhenates detected with X-ray diffraction. Since (99)Tc concentrations in a glass waste form are predicted to be wastes, assuming Tc as Tc(7+) and similarities between Re(7+) and Tc(7+) behavior in this glass system.

  9. Comparison of excitation energy transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I in solution and immobilized on conducting glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Sebastian; Giera, Wojciech; D'Haene, Sandrine; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Excitation energy transfer in monomeric and trimeric forms of photosystem I (PSI) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in solution or immobilized on FTO conducting glass was compared using time-resolved fluorescence. Deposition of PSI on glass preserves bi-exponential excitation decay of ~4-7 and ~21-25 ps lifetimes characteristic of PSI in solution. The faster phase was assigned in part to photochemical quenching (charge separation) of excited bulk chlorophylls and in part to energy transfer from bulk to low-energy (red) chlorophylls. The slower phase was assigned to photochemical quenching of the excitation equilibrated over bulk and red chlorophylls. The main differences between dissolved and immobilized PSI (iPSI) are: (1) the average excitation decay in iPSI is about 11 ps, which is faster by a few ps than for PSI in solution due to significantly faster excitation quenching of bulk chlorophylls by charge separation (~10 ps instead of ~15 ps) accompanied by slightly weaker coupling of bulk and red chlorophylls; (2) the number of red chlorophylls in monomeric PSI increases twice-from 3 in solution to 6 after immobilization-as a result of interaction with neighboring monomers and conducting glass; despite the increased number of red chlorophylls, the excitation decay accelerates in iPSI; (3) the number of red chlorophylls in trimeric PSI is 4 (per monomer) and remains unchanged after immobilization; (4) in all the samples under study, the free energy gap between mean red (emission at ~710 nm) and mean bulk (emission at ~686 nm) emitting states of chlorophylls was estimated at a similar level of 17-27 meV. All these observations indicate that despite slight modifications, dried PSI complexes adsorbed on the FTO surface remain fully functional in terms of excitation energy transfer and primary charge separation that is particularly important in the view of photovoltaic applications of this photosystem.

  10. Assessment of lead tellurite glass for immobilizing electrochemical salt wastes from used nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Pierce, David A.; Ebert, William L.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Frank, Steven M.; George, Jaime L.; Kruska, Karen

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of research evaluating the use of tellurite glass as a waste form for salt wastes from electrochemical processing. The capacities to immobilize different salts were evaluated including: a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt (for oxide fuel) containing fission products, a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt (for metallic fuel) containing fission products, and SrCl2. Physical and chemical properties of the glasses were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, bulk density measurements, chemical durability tests, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy. These glasses were found to accommodate high concentrations of halide salts and have high densities. However, improvements are needed to meet chemical durability requirements.

  11. Study of powellite-rich glass-ceramics for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taurines, T.

    2012-01-01

    MoO 3 is poorly soluble in borosilicate glasses which can lead to the crystallization of undesired phases when its concentration or the charge load (minor actinides and fission products concentration) is too high. Crystallization control is needed to guarantee good immobilization properties. We studied powellite-rich glass-ceramics obtained from a simplified nuclear glass in the system SiO 2 - B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O - CaO - Al 2 O 3 - MoO 3 - RE 2 O 3 (RE = Gd, Eu, Nd) by various heat treatments. Rare earth elements (REE) were added as minor actinides surrogates and as spectroscopic probes. The influence of MoO 3 and RE 2 O 3 content on powellite (CaMoO 4 ) crystallization was investigated. Various glass-ceramics (similar residual glass + powellite) were obtained with large crystal size distributions. Phase separation due to molybdenum occurs during quenching when [MoO 3 ] ≥ 2.5 mol%. We showed that increasing the rare earth content can suppress the phase separation due to molybdenum but it leads to spinodal decomposition of the residual glass. Furthermore, we studied the effects of parent glass complexifying and the insertion of Gd 3+ ions into the powellite structure. In order to understand the influence of microstructure on evolutions under β-irradiation, we studied point defects creation and structural changes. We showed that the damage induced by electronic excitations in the glass-ceramics is driven by the damage in the residual glass. (author) [fr

  12. Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

  13. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate of a monomeric system on the porosity and activity of an immobilized enzyme prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperatures has been studied. Slow cooling gave the same effect on porosity of the polymer as decreasing the monomer concentration. A glass-forming solvent such as diethylene glycol was added to water to study the effect of the supercooling tendency of the solvent. Addition of diethylene glycol decreased porosity and also enzymic activity. Water was replaced by the miscible solvent p-dioxane and the immiscible solvent n-decane in order to clarify the effect of solvent. p-Dioxane had a similar effect to water on the relation between the monomer concentration, porosity and activity. On the other hand, polymer prepared from the system containing n-decane showed different immobilization properties owing to the presence of independent pores in the matrix. (author)

  14. Iron specificity of a biosensor based on fluorescent pyoverdin immobilized in sol-gel glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Two current technologies used in biosensor development are very promising: 1. The sol-gel process of making microporous glass at room temperature, and 2. Using a fluorescent compound that undergoes fluorescence quenching in response to a specific analyte. These technologies have been combined to produce an iron biosensor. To optimize the iron (II or III) specificity of an iron biosensor, pyoverdin (a fluorescent siderophore produced by Pseudomonas spp.) was immobilized in 3 formulations of porous sol-gel glass. The formulations, A, B, and C, varied in the amount of water added, resulting in respective R values (molar ratio of water:silicon) of 5.6, 8.2, and 10.8. Pyoverdin-doped sol-gel pellets were placed in a flow cell in a fluorometer and the fluorescence quenching was measured as pellets were exposed to 0.28 - 0.56 mM iron (II or III). After 10 minutes of exposure to iron, ferrous ion caused a small fluorescence quenching (89 - 97% of the initial fluorescence, over the range of iron tested) while ferric ion caused much greater quenching (65 - 88%). The most specific and linear response was observed for pyoverdin immobilized in sol-gel C. In contrast, a solution of pyoverdin (3.0 μM) exposed to iron (II or III) for 10 minutes showed an increase in fluorescence (101 - 114%) at low ferrous concentrations (0.45 - 2.18 μM) while exposure to all ferric ion concentrations (0.45 - 3.03 μM) caused quenching. In summary, the iron specificity of pyoverdin was improved by immobilizing it in sol-gel glass C. PMID:21554740

  15. Potential and challenges of interdisciplinary research on historical window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Kessler, Cordula; Goll, Jürg

    The interdisciplinary study of ancient materials has become an increasingly common strategy, mainly because it has proved to be a highly rewarding approach to studying the age, provenance and production of archaeological objects. The results of such an approach sometimes also provide answers to questions relating not only to socio-cultural, economic or technological developments in a particular region or period (trade, innovation, production etc.), but also the conservation of the materials or artefacts in question. A number of analytical methods, ranging from microscopic to elementary analyses, have been successfully applied to determine the nature of materials and technologies used in the production, as well as to identify the provenance of ancient glass. As far as window glass and stained glass is concerned, the study of architectural context and art history - as well as the technological characteristics of materials - has proved to be most helpful in determining history, production and artistic importance of the objects under study. This paper discusses some of the multidisciplinary studies that the Vitrocentre Romont has conducted on early medieval window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings and illustrates the potential of a holistic approach in solving questions about materials, techniques, window design and conservation. It also addresses the limitations of the approach, which are often related to finding appropriate (i.e. non-destructive and possibly portable) methods for the analysis of sometimes extremely fragile stained glass windows.

  16. Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

  17. Advances in the Glass Formulations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    The Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site in Washington. The WTP that is being designed and constructed by a team led by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) will separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fractions with the majority of the mass (~90%) directed to LAW and most of the activity (>95%) directed to HLW. The pretreatment process, envisioned in the baseline, involves the dissolution of aluminum-bearing solids so as to allow the aluminum salts to be processed through the cesium ion exchange and report to the LAW Facility. There is an oxidative leaching process to affect a similar outcome for chromium-bearing wastes. Both of these unit operations were advanced to accommodate shortcomings in glass formulation for HLW inventories. A by-product of this are a series of technical challenges placed upon materials selected for the processing vessels. The advances in glass formulation play a role in revisiting the flow sheet for the WTP and hence, the unit operations that were being imposed by minimal waste loading requirements set forth in the contract for the design and construction of the plant. Another significant consideration to the most recent revision of the glass models are the impacts on resolution of technical questions associated with current efforts for design completion.

  18. Potential applications of carbohydrases immobilization in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Fabiano Jares; de Alencar Figueira, Joelise; Kawaguti, Haroldo Yukio; de Barros Fernandes, Pedro Carlos; de Oliveira Carvalho, Patrícia; da Graça Nascimento, Maria; Sato, Hélia Harumi

    2013-01-11

    Carbohydrases find a wide application in industrial processes and products, mainly in the food industry. With these enzymes, it is possible to obtain different types of sugar syrups (viz. glucose, fructose and inverted sugar syrups), prebiotics (viz. galactooligossacharides and fructooligossacharides) and isomaltulose, which is an interesting sweetener substitute for sucrose to improve the sensory properties of juices and wines and to reduce lactose in milk. The most important carbohydrases to accomplish these goals are of microbial origin and include amylases (α-amylases and glucoamylases), invertases, inulinases, galactosidases, glucosidases, fructosyltransferases, pectinases and glucosyltransferases. Yet, for all these processes to be cost-effective for industrial application, a very efficient, simple and cheap immobilization technique is required. Immobilization techniques can involve adsorption, entrapment or covalent bonding of the enzyme into an insoluble support, or carrier-free methods, usually based on the formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). They include a broad variety of supports, such as magnetic materials, gums, gels, synthetic polymers and ionic resins. All these techniques present advantages and disadvantages and several parameters must be considered. In this work, the most recent and important studies on the immobilization of carbohydrases with potential application in the food industry are reviewed.

  19. Potential Applications of Carbohydrases Immobilization in the Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Fabiano Jares; de Alencar Figueira, Joelise; Kawaguti, Haroldo Yukio; de Barros Fernandes, Pedro Carlos; de Oliveira Carvalho, Patrícia; Nascimento, Maria da Graça; Sato, Hélia Harumi

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrases find a wide application in industrial processes and products, mainly in the food industry. With these enzymes, it is possible to obtain different types of sugar syrups (viz. glucose, fructose and inverted sugar syrups), prebiotics (viz. galactooligossacharides and fructooligossacharides) and isomaltulose, which is an interesting sweetener substitute for sucrose to improve the sensory properties of juices and wines and to reduce lactose in milk. The most important carbohydrases to accomplish these goals are of microbial origin and include amylases (α-amylases and glucoamylases), invertases, inulinases, galactosidases, glucosidases, fructosyltransferases, pectinases and glucosyltransferases. Yet, for all these processes to be cost-effective for industrial application, a very efficient, simple and cheap immobilization technique is required. Immobilization techniques can involve adsorption, entrapment or covalent bonding of the enzyme into an insoluble support, or carrier-free methods, usually based on the formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). They include a broad variety of supports, such as magnetic materials, gums, gels, synthetic polymers and ionic resins. All these techniques present advantages and disadvantages and several parameters must be considered. In this work, the most recent and important studies on the immobilization of carbohydrases with potential application in the food industry are reviewed. PMID:23344046

  20. Potential Applications of Carbohydrases Immobilization in the Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélia Harumi Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrases find a wide application in industrial processes and products, mainly in the food industry. With these enzymes, it is possible to obtain different types of sugar syrups (viz. glucose, fructose and inverted sugar syrups, prebiotics (viz. galactooligossacharides and fructooligossacharides and isomaltulose, which is an interesting sweetener substitute for sucrose to improve the sensory properties of juices and wines and to reduce lactose in milk. The most important carbohydrases to accomplish these goals are of microbial origin and include amylases (α-amylases and glucoamylases, invertases, inulinases, galactosidases, glucosidases, fructosyltransferases, pectinases and glucosyltransferases. Yet, for all these processes to be cost-effective for industrial application, a very efficient, simple and cheap immobilization technique is required. Immobilization techniques can involve adsorption, entrapment or covalent bonding of the enzyme into an insoluble support, or carrier-free methods, usually based on the formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs. They include a broad variety of supports, such as magnetic materials, gums, gels, synthetic polymers and ionic resins. All these techniques present advantages and disadvantages and several parameters must be considered. In this work, the most recent and important studies on the immobilization of carbohydrases with potential application in the food industry are reviewed.

  1. Apatite and sodalite based glass-bonded waste forms for immobilization of 129I and mixed halide radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Ashutosh [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McCloy, John S. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-30

    The goal of the project was to utilize the knowledge accumulated by the team, in working with minerals for chloride wastes and biological apatites, toward the development of advanced waste forms for immobilizing 129I and mixed-halide wastes. Based on our knowledge, experience, and thorough literature review, we had selected two minerals with different crystal structures and potential for high chemical durability, sodalite and CaP/PbV-apatite, to form the basis of this project. The focus of the proposed effort was towards: (i) low temperature synthesis of proposed minerals (iodine containing sodalite and apatite) leading to the development of monolithic waste forms, (ii) development of a fundamental understanding of the atomic-scale to meso-scale mechanisms of radionuclide incorporation in them, and (iii) understanding of the mechanism of their chemical corrosion, alteration mechanism, and rates. The proposed work was divided into four broad sections. deliverables. 1. Synthesis of materials 2. Materials structural and thermal characterization 3. Design of glass compositions and synthesis glass-bonded minerals, and 4. Chemical durability testing of materials.

  2. Glucoamylase biosynthesis by cells of Aspergillus niger C sub 58-III immobilized in sintered glass and pumice stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedurek, J.; Lobarzewski, J. (Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland). Inst. Mikrobiologii i Biochemii)

    1990-09-01

    A simple method of A. niger C{sub 58-III} cell immobilization is described. This strain produces extracellular glucoamylase. According to the proposed method A. niger spores were first immobilized by adsorption in sintered glass Rasching rings (RR) or pumice stones (PS). Growing out from spores, A. niger cells produced extracellular glucoamylase. This technique facilitates the culture growth in a filamentous spongy structure of the supports with a continuous accumulation of biomass. After every 24 h it was possible to obtain culture liquid rich in glucoamylase. This procedure can be repeated 30 times using the same sample of immobilized A. niger culture without any loss of glucoamylase activity in the liquid medium. In a 96 h period immobilized A. niger cells produced 300 units . ml{sup -1} whereas a shake culture of this fungus produced only 186 units . ml{sup -1}. (orig.).

  3. Fundamental chemistry and materials science of americium in selected immobilization glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, R.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stump, N.A. [Winston-Salem State Univ., NC (United States). Dept. of Physical Sciences

    1996-12-01

    We have pursued some of the fundamental chemistry and materials science of Am in 3 glass matrices, two being high-temperature (850 and 1400 C mp) silicate-based glasses and the third a sol-gel glass. Optical spectroscopy was the principal tool. One aspect of this work was to determine the oxidation state exhibited by Am in these matrices, as well as factors that control or may alter this state. A correlation was noted between the oxidation state of the f-elements in the two high-temperature glasses with their high-temperature oxide chemistries. One exception was Am: although AmO{sub 2} is the stable oxide encountered in air, when this dioxide was incorporated into the high-temperature glasses, only trivalent Am was found in the products. When Am(III) was used to prepare the sol-gel glasses at ambient temperature, and after these products were heated in air to 800 C, only Am(III) was observed. Potential explanations for the unexpected Am behavior is offered in the context of its basic chemistry. Experimental spectra, spectroscopic assignments, etc. are discussed.

  4. Fundamental chemistry and materials science of americium in selected immobilization glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, R.G.; Stump, N.A.

    1996-01-01

    We have pursued some of the fundamental chemistry and materials science of Am in 3 glass matrices, two being high-temperature (850 and 1400 C mp) silicate-based glasses and the third a sol-gel glass. Optical spectroscopy was the principal tool. One aspect of this work was to determine the oxidation state exhibited by Am in these matrices, as well as factors that control or may alter this state. A correlation was noted between the oxidation state of the f-elements in the two high-temperature glasses with their high-temperature oxide chemistries. One exception was Am: although AmO 2 is the stable oxide encountered in air, when this dioxide was incorporated into the high-temperature glasses, only trivalent Am was found in the products. When Am(III) was used to prepare the sol-gel glasses at ambient temperature, and after these products were heated in air to 800 C, only Am(III) was observed. Potential explanations for the unexpected Am behavior is offered in the context of its basic chemistry. Experimental spectra, spectroscopic assignments, etc. are discussed

  5. Study of the surface crystallization and resistance to dissolution of niobium phosphate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Heveline

    2008-01-01

    The surface crystallization and the dissolution rate of three phosphate glass compositions containing different amounts of niobium oxide were studied. The glasses were named Nb30, Nb37, and Nb44 according to the nominal content of niobium oxide in the glass composition. The three compositions were evaluated keeping the P 2 O 5 /K 2 O ratio constant and varying the amount of Nb 2 O 5 . These glasses were produced by melting appropriate chemical compounds at 1500 deg C for 0.5 hour. The crystalline phases which were nucleated on the glass surface after heat treatment were determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystalline structures depend on the amount of niobium oxide in the glass composition. The crystal morphologies were observed by using an optical microscope, and their characteristics are specific for each kind of crystalline phase. The crystal growth rate and the surface nuclei density were determined for each glass composition, and they depend on each crystalline phase nucleated on the surface. From the differential thermal analysis curves it was determined that the Nb44 glass containing 46.5 mol por cent of niobium oxide is the most thermally stable against crystallization when compared to the Nb30 and Nb37 glasses. According to the activation energies determined for crystal growth on the surface of each glass type, the Nb44 glass can also be considered the most resistant one against crystallization. The dissolution rate for the Nb44 glass after 14 days immersed in an aqueous solution with pH equals to 7 at 90 deg C is the lowest (9.0 x 10 -7 g. cm -2 . day -1 ) when compared to the other two glass compositions. The dissolution rates in acidic and neutral solutions of all studied glasses meet the international standards for materials which can be used in the immobilization of nuclear wastes. (author)

  6. Glass-bonded iodosodalite waste form for immobilization of 129 I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Saehwa; Peterson, Jacob A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tabada, Diana; Wall, Donald; Corkhill, Claire L.; McCloy, John S.

    2018-06-01

    Immobilization of radioiodine (e.g., 129I, 131I) is an important need for current and future nuclear fuel cycles. For the current work, iodosodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6I2] was synthesized hydrothermally from metakaolin, NaI, and NaOH. Following hydrothermal treatment, dried unwashed powders were used to make glass-bonded iodosodalite waste forms by heating pressed pellets at 650, 750, or 850 °C with two different types of sodium borosilicate glass binders, i.e., NBS-4 and SA-800. These heat-treated specimens were characterized with X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, thermal analysis, porosity and density measurements, neutron activation analysis, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The pellets mixed with 10 mass% of NBS-4 or SA-800 and heat-treated at 750 °C contained relatively high percentage iodine retention (~44-47 % of the maximum iodine loading) with relatively low porosities, while other pellets with higher percentages iodine retention either contained higher porosity or were not completely sintered. ASTM C1308 chemical durability tests of monolithic specimens showed a large initial release of Na, Al, Si, and I on the first day, possibly from water-soluble salt crystals or non-durable amorphous phases. Release rates of Na and Si were higher than for Al and I, probably due to a poorly durable Na-Si-O phase from the glass bonding matrix. The cumulative normalized release of iodine was 12.5 g m-2 for the first 10 1-d exchanges, suggestive of coherent dissolution. The average release rate from 10-24 days during the 7-d exchange intervals was 0.2336 g m-2 d-1.

  7. Detachable glass microelectrodes for recording action potentials in active moving organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, Mladen; Moreno, Angel; Harris, Tim D; Kay, Matthew W

    2017-06-01

    Here, we describe new detachable floating glass micropipette electrode devices that provide targeted action potential recordings in active moving organs without requiring constant mechanical constraint or pharmacological inhibition of tissue motion. The technology is based on the concept of a glass micropipette electrode that is held firmly during cell targeting and intracellular insertion, after which a 100-µg glass microelectrode, a "microdevice," is gently released to remain within the moving organ. The microdevices provide long-term recordings of action potentials, even during millimeter-scale movement of tissue in which the device is embedded. We demonstrate two different glass micropipette electrode holding and detachment designs appropriate for the heart (sharp glass microdevices for cardiac myocytes in rats, guinea pigs, and humans) and the brain (patch glass microdevices for neurons in rats). We explain how microdevices enable measurements of multiple cells within a moving organ that are typically difficult with other technologies. Using sharp microdevices, action potential duration was monitored continuously for 15 min in unconstrained perfused hearts during global ischemia-reperfusion, providing beat-to-beat measurements of changes in action potential duration. Action potentials from neurons in the hippocampus of anesthetized rats were measured with patch microdevices, which provided stable base potentials during long-term recordings. Our results demonstrate that detachable microdevices are an elegant and robust tool to record electrical activity with high temporal resolution and cellular level localization without disturbing the physiological working conditions of the organ. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Cellular action potential measurements within tissue using glass micropipette electrodes usually require tissue immobilization, potentially influencing the physiological relevance of the measurement. Here, we addressed this limitation with novel 100-µg detachable

  8. High activity wastes immobilization in sintered glasses: simulated wastes of the HWR (heavy water reactors) type in a new formulation glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, A.M.; Messi de Bernasconi, N.B.; Audero, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The new formulation of boron silicate glass, of German origin, SG7, was specifically developed for high activity wastes immobilization by a sintering process. Using the pressing technique at room temperature and subsequent sintering, the sintering conditions of the pure glass and the incorporation of the 10% in weight of simulated wastes of the HWR type recently developed, have been studied. Besides, three ways of incorporation of wastes are presented: a) incorporation of a coincidental compound obtained from chemical and thermal denitration; b) incorporation of a calcination only obtained from thermal denitration; c) incorporation of the nitric solution, mixing this one with the glass, and subsequent calcination. The results from the sintering studies and from the leaching assays of the MCC-1 are presented, and the microstructures observed are described. These results are compared with those previously obtained from boron silicate glasses of the VG type. Finally, results from long duration leaching assays, performed in samples obtained years before, are presented. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness factor along immobilized enzyme fixed-bed reactors: design of a reactor with naringinase covalently immobilized into glycophase-coated porous glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjon, A.; Iborra, J.L.; Gomez, J.L.; Gomez, E.; Bastida, J.; Bodalo, A.

    1987-09-01

    A design equation is presented for packed-bed reactors containing immobilized enzymes in spherical porous particles with internal diffusion effects and obeying reversible one-intermediate Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The equation is also able to explain irreversible and competitive product inhibition kinetics. It allows the axial substrate profiles to be calculated and the dependence of the effectiveness factor along the reactor length to be continuously evaluated. The design equation was applied to explain the behavior of naringinase immobilized in Glycophase-coated porous glass operating in a packed-bed reactor and hydrolyzing both p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-rhamnoside and naringin. The theoretically predicted results were found to fit well with experimentally measured values. (Refs. 28).

  10. Immobilized lipase from potential lipolytic microbes for catalyzing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodiesel has been regarded as a biodegradable and non-polluting fuel. ... The catalysis of transesterification between methanol and palm oil by the C. rugosa immobilized lipases revealed that immobilized lipase from C. rugosa on Sepabeads EC-OD was the most promising for further development as a biocatalyst for the ...

  11. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4

  12. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Miae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jong, E-mail: jheo@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Adama Science and Technology University (ASTU), PO Box 1888, Adama (Ethiopia)

    2015-12-15

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca–silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ion and 2.19·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing. - Highlights: • Glass-ceramic wasteforms containing Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} crystals were synthesized to immobilize lanthanide wastes. • Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. • Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–Nd–silicate crystals compared to glass matrix. • Amounts of Ce and Nd ions released in the material characterization center-type 1 were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb). • Normalized release values performed by a PCT were 2.64• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ions and 2.19• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ions.

  13. Enhancement stability and catalytic activity of immobilized α-amylase using bioactive phospho-silicate glass as a novel inorganic support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Samia A; Mostafa, Faten A; Ouis, Mona A

    2018-01-31

    α-Amylase enzyme was immobilized on bioactive phospho-silicate glass (PS-glass) as a novel inorganic support by physical adsorption and covalent binding methods using glutaraldehyde and poly glutaraldehyde as a spacer. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies confirmed the glass-enzyme linkage. Dissolution of PS-glass in acidic and neutral pH is higher than that of alkaline pH. Some immobilization variables were optimized using statistical factorial design (Central Composite Design). Optimized immobilization variables enhanced the immobilization yield (IY) from 27.9 to 79.9% (2.9-fold). It was found that the immobilized enzyme had higher optimum temperature, higher half-life time (t 1/2 ), lower activation energy (E a ), lower deactivation constant rate (k d ) and higher decimal reduction time (D-values) within the temperature range of 40-60°C. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC) confirmed the thermalstability of the immobilized enzyme. The immobilized enzyme was stable at a wide pH range (5.0-8.0). Kinetic studies of starch hydrolysis demonstrated that immobilized enzyme had lower Michaelis constant (K m ), maximum velocity (V max ) and catalytic efficiency (V max /K m ) values. The storage stability and reusability of the immobilized enzyme were found to be about 74.7 and 62.5% of its initial activity after 28days and 11cycles, respectively. Enhanced α-amylase stabilities upon immobilization make it suitable for industrial application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Strategy for Maintenance of the Long-Term Performance Assessment of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Approximately 50 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as a result of the past production of nuclear materials, primarily for defense uses. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proceeding with plans to permanently dispose of this waste. Plans call for separating the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which will be vitrified at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Principal radionuclides of concern in LAW are 99Tc, 129I, and U, while non-radioactive contaminants of concern are Cr and nitrate/nitrite. HLW glass will be sent off-site to an undetermined federal site for deep geological disposal while the much larger volume of immobilized low-activity waste will be placed in the on-site, near-surface Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

  15. Synthesis and characterization of niobium and iron phosphate glasses for U3O8 immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghussn, Luciana

    2005-01-01

    Niobium and iron phosphate glasses were produced by melting inorganic compound mixtures in electric furnaces and microwave ovens. The chemical durability was compared among niobium phosphate glasses produced by both processes, and equivalent results were obtained. Leaching tests were also performed to compare the chemical durability among monolithic glass blocks and sintered glasses. The glass transition, crystallization and melting temperatures as well the Hruby parameter (K H ) and the activation energy for crystallization were determined from differential thermal analysis of niobium phosphate glasses produced in electric furnaces. Niobium phosphate glasses are thermally more stable (K H =0.82 +- 0.04) than iron phosphate glasses (K H = 0.42 +- 0.03). Sintered glasses were produced from particles with different particle size distributions and sintering temperatures in the range of 720 - 800 deg C for niobium phosphate and 530 - 680 deg C for iron phosphate glasses. The sintering process was suitable because a glass with composition 37P 2 O 5 -23K 2 O-40Nb 2 O 5 showing leaching rate of 10 -6 g.cm -2 .d -1 , 99 % of the monolithic density and none crystalline phases was obtained. This glass only crystallizes itself after re heating at temperatures above 800 deg C , showing two crystalline phases identified as KNb 3 O 8 e K 3 NbP 2 O 9 . The activation energies for crystallization are 496 +- 7 kJ/mol and 513 +- 14 kJ/mol. Niobium phosphate sintered glasses are better densified than sintered iron phosphate glasses. The leaching rate of sintered glasses that show open porosity is higher than monolithic glass blocks. This effect is related to an increase of the surface area associated to open porous and, a correction of the value of the surface area used to calculate the leaching rate is required. A model was proposed based on the surface area of spherical porous to take in account that effect. Even after correcting the surface area, the leaching rates of sintered

  16. Bioactive glasses potential biomaterials for future therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Gurbinder

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the history, origin and basic characteristics of bioactive materials. It includes a chapter dedicated to hydroxyapatite mineral, its formation and its bioactive properties. The authors address how cytotoxicity is a determining step for bioactivity. Applications of bioactive materials in the contexts of tissue regeneration, bone regeneration and cancer therapy are also covered. Silicate, metallic and mesoporous glasses are described, as well as the challenges and future prospects of research in this field.

  17. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of myoglobin-antibody protein immobilized self-assembled gold nanoparticles on ITO-glass plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh_csir@yahoo.com [Polymer and Soft Material Section, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sharma, Vikash; Mishra, Sujeet K.; Biradar, Ashok M. [Polymer and Soft Material Section, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2012-01-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Mb-Ab was covalently bonded to carboxyl groups of the mixed MUA and MPA over self-assembled GNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assembly on ITO-glass plate was used as an impedimetric immunosensor for myoglobin detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High loading of Mb-Ab, on the GNPs results in a wide range of Mb-Ag detection from 0.01 {mu}g to 1.65 {mu}g mL{sup -1} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simple method and wide range of Mb-Ag detection makes this advantageous over other methods. - Abstract: We report a protein immobilized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plate. The protein-antibody, Mb-Ab, was covalently immobilized over the self-assembly of GNPs through a mixed SAM of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA) and 3-mercapto propionic acid (MPA) via carbodiimide coupling reaction using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N Prime -ethyl carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS). The whole assembly was constructed on 0.25 cm{sup 2} area of ITO-glass plate (Mb-Ab/MUA-MPA/GNPs/APTES/ITO-glass) and an impedimetric study was carried out for its application in myoglobin detection. This prototype assembly was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode showed an increased electron-transfer resistance on coupling with protein antigen, Mb-Ag, in the presence of a redox probe [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-}. Its exhibits an electrochemical impedance response to protein myoglobin-antigen, Mb-Ag, concentration in a linear range from 0.01 {mu}g to 1.65 {mu}g mL{sup -1} with a lowest detection limit of 1.4 ng mL{sup -1}.

  18. Diffusion of sodium cations and water stability of glasses for immobilization of middle-active wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, I.A.; Gulin, A.N.; Stefanovskij, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    Sodium cations diffusion coefficients in three model alumoborosilicate silicate and five alumophosfate glasses, including sulfate containing ones, are determined by method of integral residual activity. It is astablished that sodium cation mobilities within the investigated temperature range in glasses of the first group are by 1-3 orders lower than in the second one. Data on rates of sodium leaching from glasses by distilled water are obtained. It is shown that there exist some deviations from symbate character of changing diffusion coefficients and sodium leaching rates. It is found that it is possible to include much more sulfate containing wastes in alumophosphate glasses than in alumoborosilicate ones

  19. Facile method to immobilize ZnO particles on glass spheres for the photocatalytic treatment of tannery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiano, Vincenzo; Iervolino, Giuseppina

    2018-05-15

    In order to apply the photocatalytic processes on a real scale for the treatment of industrial wastewaters, the use of slurry reactors employing suspended photocatalysts is not suitable due to the need for an uncomfortable and expensive separation phase of photocatalyst. To overcome this disadvantage, the photocatalyst particles must be immobilized on a transparent support: our work proposes, for this reason, a simple and cost effective method for the deposition of ZnO photocatalyst on glass spheres in order to formulate a structured photocatalyst effective in the treatment of aqueous solutions containing various organic dyes, commonly used in the tannery industries and in the treatment of a real wastewater at high COD content (11 g/L) coming from the refining unit of the tanning process. In particular, ZnO was immobilized on glass spheres (ZnO/GS) with a simple dip coating method, starting from zinc acetate aqueous solution, without using complexing agent and strong basic compounds. The optimization of ZnO amount on glass spheres was evaluated employing Acid Blue 7 dye, as model pollutant. In particular, it was found that best performances in terms of discoloration and mineralization of the target dye were obtained using the photocatalyst with a ZnO loading equal to 0.19 wt% (ZnO_ac1), prepared through only one dip-coating step. Moreover, the ZnO_ac1 photocatalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture, maintaining excellent photocatalytic activity and durability even after several reuse cycles. Finally, ZnO_ac1 showed a high photocatalytic activity in the treatment of the real wastewater, obtaining a COD removal equal to 70% after 180 min of UV light irradiation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Leaching and mechanical properties of cabal glasses developed as matrices for immobilization high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezz-Eldin, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the leaching behavior of simulated high-level-waste cabal glass (CaO-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) as a bulk specimen. During leach tests, the glass is immersed in either deionized water or in groundwater for up to 57 days at 70 deg. C. Based on the results, mechanisms observed with the leaching of the glass in deionized water or groundwater are discussed. Three factors, i.e., time of immersion, type of leaching solution and irradiation effect, are extensively studied. The corrosion was found to be linear with time in the limit of investigation (1-57 days) but with different rates depending on the type of solution and glass composition. Effects of γ-irradiation on the glass together with groundwater were found to decrease the glass durability. The evolution of the damage on mechanical and physical properties of the glass before and after leaching or irradiation was also discussed. The addition of waste oxide changes the properties of the glass matrix, so the influence of the guest oxides on the properties of host materials is also discussed

  1. Fe++/Fe+++ concentration relationship and mechanical properties of phosphate glasses useful for wastes immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.A.; Prado, Miguel O.

    2007-01-01

    Under different melting conditions, glasses with different Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration relationship were prepared within each type of glass 43Fe 2 O 3 -57P 2 O 5 and 33,33Fe 2 O 3 - 66,67P 2 O 5 . Using Moessbauer spectroscopy Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration values were determined. Vickers and Knoop indentations were used for determining their hardness, toughness, Young modulus and brittleness. The same measurements were carried on some silicate and aluminosilicate glasses. Also Weibull statistics was done to determine the characteristics (Weibull modulus and and fracture probability) of glass fracture. We found that silicate glasses (SG) are harder than phosphate glasses (PG). Toughness values for PG, are in the same range than for SG, although for the same density exhibit larger values or smaller brittleness than silicate glasses. For one of the glasses it was found that the mechanical load P 0 needed for a fracture probability of 63% increases with the Fe(II) content. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the borosilicate glass matrix for the immobilization of actinide waste concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffler, K.; Krause, H.

    1978-01-01

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected due to the hydrolysis esp. of plutonium and other mechanisms. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentration can take place. Both effects will account for increased actinide concentrations in the glasses. The phenomena of these actinide enrichment processes are studied. Following the investigations on actinide compatibility with HLW glass a research program has been started aiming at the vitrification of special actinide waste concentrates. A hazards evaluation is established on the basis of experimental results for simulated disposal periods of millenia with respect to leaching of actinides and alpha irradiation damage. The chemical compatibility of borosilicate glass with actinides has been determined and basic considerations are drawn for the solidification of different types of alpha-bearing wastes in borosilicate glasses

  3. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete

  4. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete.

  5. A review of phase separation in borosilicate glasses, with reference to nuclear fuel waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1990-08-01

    This report reviews information on miscibility limits in borosilicate glass-forming systems. It includes both a literature survey and an account of experimental work performed within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Emphasis is placed on the measurement and depiction of miscibility limits in multicomponent (mainly quaternary) systems, and the effects of individual components on the occurrence of phase separation. The behaviour of the multicomponent system is related to that of simpler (binary and ternary) glass systems. The possible occurrence of phase separation, as well as its avoidance, during processing of nuclear waste glasses is discussed

  6. High production of D-tagatose, a potential sugar substitute, using immobilized L-arabinose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P; Yoon, S H; Roh, H J; Choi, J H

    2001-01-01

    An L-arabinose isomerase of Escherichia coli was immobilized using covalent binding to agarose to produce D-tagatose, a bulking sweetener that can be economically used as a sugar substitute. The immobilized L-arabinose isomerase stably produced an average of 7.5 g-tagatose/L.day for 7 days with a productivity exceeding that of the free enzyme (0.47 vs 0.30 mg/U.day). Using a scaled-up immobilized enzyme system, 99.9 g-tagatose/L was produced from galactose with 20% equilibrium in 48 h. The process was repeated two more times with production of 104.1 and 103.5 g-tagatose/L. D-Tagatose production using an immobilized L-arabinose isomerase has a high potential for commercial application.

  7. Immobilization and bonding scheme of radioactive iodine-129 in silver tellurite glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheong Won; Pyo, Jae-Young; Park, Hwan-Seo; Yang, Jae Hwan; Heo, Jong

    2017-08-01

    Silver tellurite glasses with melting temperatures disposal site. Iodine waste loading in glasses was as high as 12.64 wt% of all metallic elements and 11.21 wt% including oxygen. Normalized elemental releases obtained from the product consistency test were well below US regulation of 2 g/m2. Iodines are surrounded by four Ag+ ions forming [Ag4I]3+ units that are further connected to tellurite network through bonds with non-bridging oxygens.

  8. Role of sodium ions in the vitrification process: glass matrix modification, slag structure depolymerization, and influence of metal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Ming

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the role of Na ions, a common flux, in the vitrification process. Artificial glass systems composed of Al2O3, CaO, and SiO2 with various Na concentrations were melted at 1450 degrees C. The specimens were cooled by air cooling and water quenching and the metal mobility was evaluated using a sequential extraction procedure. The X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations showed that Na ions governed the air-cooled slag's structure. Na ions initially depolymerized CaSiO3-linked chains into CaSiO3 chains, and further cut them into shorter and nonuniform ones, making the slag structure amorphous. With even more Na ions, CaSiO3 chains were divided into single SiO4 tetrahedrons and formed Na-related crystals (Na2Ca3Si2O8 and NaAlSiO4). The phase distributions of Al, Cr, Cu Mn, and Ni showed that Na has a positive effect on the immobilization of heavy metals at suitable concentrations, but a negative effect when in excess amounts. Implications: Vitrification has been widely used to treat hazardous materials. The Na-bearing additives were often used as a flux to improve the melting process. This study described the role of Na played in the vitrification process. The Na ions acted as glass modifier and depolymerize the chain structure of slag. With adequate addition amount of Na ions, the immobilization of heavy metals was improved. The results provided much information about the crystalline phase variation, metal mobility, and surface characteristics while Na serves as a flux.

  9. Beneficial rhizobacteria immobilized in nanofibers for potential application as soybean seed bioinoculants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Romina De Gregorio

    Full Text Available Seed inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR is an ideal tool to supply the soil with a high density of beneficial microorganisms. However, maintaining viable microorganisms is a major problem during seed treatment and storage. In this work, an evaluation was made of the effect of bacterial immobilization in nanofibers on the stability (viability and maintenance of beneficial properties of two potential PGPR, Pantoea agglomerans ISIB55 and Burkholderia caribensis ISIB40. Moreover, the impact of soybean seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria on bacterial survival during seed storage and on germination and plant growth parameters was determined. Bacterial nanoimmobilization and subsequent seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria were carried out by electrospinning. The results demonstrate that this technique successfully immobilized P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 because it did not affect the viability or beneficial properties of either rhizobacteria. Seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria improved P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 survival on seeds stored for 30 days and contributed to the successful colonization of both bacteria on the plant root. Moreover, seed coating with P. agglomerans ISIB55 increased germination, length and dry weight of the root. Furthermore, seed coating with B. caribensis ISIB40 increased leaf number and dry weight of the shoot. Therefore, the technique applied in the present work to coat seeds with nanofiber-immobilized PGPR could be considered a promising eco-friendly approach to improve soybean production using a microbial inoculant.

  10. Beneficial rhizobacteria immobilized in nanofibers for potential application as soybean seed bioinoculants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi Muller, Lenise; de Souza Borges, Clarissa; Pomares, María Fernanda; Saccol de Sá, Enilson Luiz; Pereira, Claudio; Vincent, Paula Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Seed inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) is an ideal tool to supply the soil with a high density of beneficial microorganisms. However, maintaining viable microorganisms is a major problem during seed treatment and storage. In this work, an evaluation was made of the effect of bacterial immobilization in nanofibers on the stability (viability and maintenance of beneficial properties) of two potential PGPR, Pantoea agglomerans ISIB55 and Burkholderia caribensis ISIB40. Moreover, the impact of soybean seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria on bacterial survival during seed storage and on germination and plant growth parameters was determined. Bacterial nanoimmobilization and subsequent seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria were carried out by electrospinning. The results demonstrate that this technique successfully immobilized P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 because it did not affect the viability or beneficial properties of either rhizobacteria. Seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria improved P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 survival on seeds stored for 30 days and contributed to the successful colonization of both bacteria on the plant root. Moreover, seed coating with P. agglomerans ISIB55 increased germination, length and dry weight of the root. Furthermore, seed coating with B. caribensis ISIB40 increased leaf number and dry weight of the shoot. Therefore, the technique applied in the present work to coat seeds with nanofiber-immobilized PGPR could be considered a promising eco-friendly approach to improve soybean production using a microbial inoculant. PMID:28472087

  11. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material; Imobilizacao de metais pesados oriundos de lodo galvanico em material vitreo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisberto, R., E-mail: regina.felisberto@poa.ifrs.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PPGEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  12. RHENIUM SOLUBILITY IN BOROSILICATE NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROCESSING AND IMMOBILIZATION OF TECHNETIUM-99 (AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION WITH GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AA KRUGER; A GOEL; CP RODRIGUEZ; JS MCCLOY; MJ SCHWEIGER; WW LUKENS; JR, BJ RILEY; D KIM; M LIEZERS; P HRMA

    2012-08-13

    The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is {approx} 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be {approx}3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

  13. Protein Immobilization Capabilities of Sucrose and Trehalose Glasses: The Effect of Protein/Sugar Concentration Unraveled by High-Field EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, Marco; Savitsky, Anton; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Möbius, Klaus; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Disaccharide glasses are increasingly used to immobilize proteins at room temperature for structural/functional studies and long-term preservation. To unravel the molecular basis of protein immobilization, we studied the effect of sugar/protein concentration ratios in trehalose or sucrose matrixes, in which the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) was embedded as a model protein. The structural, dynamical, and H-bonding characteristics of the sugar-protein systems were probed by high-field W-band EPR of a matrix-dissolved nitroxide radical. We discovered that RC immobilization and thermal stabilization, being independent of the protein concentration in trehalose, occur in sucrose only at sufficiently low sugar/protein ratios. EPR reveals that only under such conditions does sucrose form a microscopically homogeneous matrix that immobilizes, via H-bonds, the nitroxide probe. We conclude that the protein immobilization capability depends critically on the propensity of the glass-forming sugar to create intermolecular H-bond networks, thus establishing long-range, homogeneous connectivity within the matrix.

  14. Dye decolorization and detoxification potential of Ca-alginate beads immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2015-12-10

    In view of compliance with increasingly stringent environmental legislation, an eco-friendly treatment technology of industrial dyes and effluents is a major environmental challenge in the color industry. In present study, a promising and eco-friendly entrapment approach was adopted to immobilize purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced from an indigenous strain of Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 on Ca-alginate beads. The immobilized MnP was subsequently used for enhanced decolorization and detoxification of textile reactive dyes). MnP isolated from solid-state culture of G. lucidum IBL-05, presented highest immobilization yield (83.9 %) using alginate beads prepared at optimized conditions of 4 % (w/v) sodium alginate, 2 % (w/v) Calcium chloride (CaCl2) and 0.5 mg/ml enzyme concentration. Immobilization of MnP enhanced optimum temperature but caused acidic shift in optimum pH of the enzyme. The immobilized MnP showed optimum activity at pH 4.0 and 60 °C as compared to pH 5.0 and 35 °C for free enzyme. The kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) of MnP were significantly improved by immobilization. The enhanced catalytic potential of immobilized MnP led to 87.5 %, 82.1 %, 89.4 %, 95.7 % and 83 % decolorization of Sandal-fix Red C4BLN, Sandal-fix Turq Blue GWF, Sandal-fix Foron Blue E2BLN, Sandal-fix Black CKF and Sandal-fix Golden Yellow CRL dyes, respectively. The insolubilized MnP was reusable for 7 repeated cycles in dye color removal. Furthermore, immobilized MnP also caused a significant reduction in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (94.61-95.47 %), chemical oxygen demand (COD) (91.18-94.85 %), and total organic carbon (TOC) (89.58-95 %) of aqueous dye solutions. G. lucidum MnP was immobilized in Ca-alginate beads by entrapment method to improve its practical effectiveness. Ca-alginate bound MnP was catalytically more vigorous, thermo-stable, reusable and worked over wider ranges of pH and temperature as compared to its free counterpart. Results of cytotoxicity like

  15. Microbial lipase obtained from the fermentation of pumpkin seeds: immobilization potential of hydrophobic matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Cristiane Andrade Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization potential of lipase from Aspergillus niger on sol-gel matrix was evaluated by physical adsorption and covalent binding and the biochemical characterization of free and immobilized enzyme was performed. Lipase was produced by solid state fermentation of pumpkin seed flour with 30% moisture, at 30°C for 120h. The enzyme was pre-purified with ammonium sulfate and immobilized in the sol-gel matrix by covalent attachment and physical adsorption. A higher yield of immobilization (81.88% was obtained in the latter. The free enzyme presented higher hydrolytic activity with pH 4.0, at 37°C; moreover, it was more stable with pH between 6.0 and 7.0, at 35°C. The immobilized lipase showed maximum hydrolytic activity with pH 11.0, at 50°C; it was more stable with pH 11.0, at 37°C. Parameters Km and Vmax were best determined by Hanes-Woolf linearization.

  16. Design of biocompatible immobilized Candida rugosa lipase with potential application in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbojević Ivić, Jovana; Veličković, Dušan; Dimitrijević, Aleksandra; Bezbradica, Dejan; Dragačević, Vladimir; Gavrović Jankulović, Marija; Milosavić, Nenad

    2016-09-01

    Biocatalysts are a promising alternative for the production of natural flavor compounds. Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) is a particularly important biocatalyst owing to its remarkable efficiency in both hydrolysis and synthesis. However, additional stabilization is necessary for successful industrial implementation. This study presents an easy and time-saving method for immobilizing this valuable enzyme on hydroxyapatite (HAP), a biomaterial with high protein-binding capacity. Targeted immobilized CRL was obtained in high yield of ≥98%. Significant lipase stabilization was observed upon immobilization: at 60 °C, immobilized lipase (HAP-CRL) retained almost unchanged activity after 3 h, while free CRL lost 50% of its initial activity after only 30 min. The same trend was observed with tested organic solvents. Methanol and hexane had the most pronounced effect: after 3 h, only HAP-CRL was stable and active, while CRL was completely inactivated. The practical value of the prepared catalyst was tested in the synthesis of the aroma ester methyl acetate in hexane. Reaction yields were 2.6 and 52.5% for CRL and HAP-CRL respectively. This research has successfully combined an industrially prominent biocatalyst, CRL, and a biocompatible, environmentally suitable carrier, HAP, into an immobilized preparation with improved catalytic properties. The obtained CRL preparation has excellent potential for the food and flavor industries, major consumers in the global enzyme market. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Glass pipette-carbon fiber microelectrodes for evoked potential recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes M.F.D.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for recording field potentials with tungsten electrodes make it virtually impossible to use the same recording electrode also as a lesioning electrode, for example for histological confirmation of the recorded site, because the lesioning procedure usually wears off the tungsten tip. Therefore, the electrode would have to be replaced after each lesioning procedure, which is a very high cost solution to the problem. We present here a low cost, easy to make, high quality glass pipette-carbon fiber microelectrode that shows resistive, signal/noise and electrochemical coupling advantages over tungsten electrodes. Also, currently used carbon fiber microelectrodes often show problems with electrical continuity, especially regarding electrochemical applications using a carbon-powder/resin mixture, with consequent low performance, besides the inconvenience of handling such a mixture. We propose here a new method for manufacturing glass pipette-carbon fiber microelectrodes with several advantages when recording intracerebral field potentials

  18. An inexpensive and simple method for thermally stable immobilization of DNA on an unmodified glass surface: UV linking of poly(T)10-poly(C)10-tagged DNA probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðnason, Haukur; Dufva, Hans Martin; Bang, Dang Duong

    2008-01-01

    the hybridization performance of the immobilized probes on the amino-silane surface, indicating a general benefit of adding a TC tag to DNA probes. In conclusion, our results show that using TC-tagged DNA probes immobilized on an unmodified glass surface is a robust, heat-stable, very simple, and inexpensive method...

  19. Glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the fluorinel-sodium, alumina, and zirconia calcines stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinjamuri, K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Glass-ceramics appear to be very good candidate waste forms for immobilization of the calcined high level solid wastes, fluorinel-sodium (Fl/Na), alumina and zirconia that are stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Candidate experimental glass-ceramics were synthesized at ICPP by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a mixture of precompacted pilot plant calcine and additives. The glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the Fl/Na, alumina, and zirconia calcines consist of 70 wt% Fl/Na calcine, 23.9 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 5 wt% Ti, 1.1 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}; 70 wt% alumina calcine, 30 wt% SiO{sub 2}; and 70 wt% zirconia calcine, 20.25 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 5 wt% Ti, 2.25 wt% Na{sub 2}O, 1.75 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.75 wt% Li{sub 2}O, respectively. The characteristics of the waste forms including density, chemical durability, glass and crystalline phases, and the microstructure are investigated. The 14-day MCC-1 total mass loss rates and the normalized elemental leach rates for aluminum, boron, calcium, cadmium, chromium, cesium, potassium, silicon, sodium, strontium, titanium, and zirconium are all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day. The crystalline phases for the Fl/Na and zirconia waste forms include zirconia, zircon, calcium fluoride, and titanates. In addition, cadmium sulphide in Fl/Na, and cadmium metal in zirconia waste form were also identified. The crystalline phases for the alumina waste form are alpha, gamma, and delta alumina, cristobalite, albite, and mullite. Glass phase separation was not observed in alumina and zirconia waste forms. The observed glass phase separation in Fl/Na waste form appears to be chemically durable.

  20. Testing and evaluation of the properties of various potential materials for immobilizing high activity waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malow, G.; Beran, V.; Lutze, W.

    1980-01-01

    Second joint annual report of the work performed on the testing and evaluation of materials for immobilizing high activity waste under Community contracts. At Marcoule, active block samples containing HAW from the Marcoule reprocessing plant were cast to the specification of five of the six original reference samples and leach tested at ambient temperature. Phosphate glass -bead samples produced by the Gelsenberg/DWK PAMELA process- were included in the test programme at HMI-Berlin and UKAEA Harwell. Leaching tests of inactive samples with leachants of various pH-values, with ionized water and with natural water compositions representative of certain repository conditions (salt, clay and granite) were added to the Harwell programme. The studies of radiation and thermal effects and the investigation of devitrification phenomena, started in 1977, continued, as samples reached annealing times of 2400 h and doses 4 x 10 17 dpg. The results achieved have so far confirmed most of the favourable preliminary assessments of glass based solidification products. At this stage the programme aims primarily at the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena rather that at verification under realistic waste storage and disposal conditions

  1. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  2. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Sarita, E-mail: saritaiitr2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Rani, Pooja [D.A.V. College, Sec-10, Chandigarh-160010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO{sub 2} (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO{sub 2} has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=−21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  3. Development of Cellulose Nano fibre (CNF) Derived From Kenaf Bast Fibre and Its Potential in Enzyme Immobilization Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwan Sulaiman; Mohd Noriznan Mokhtar; Mohd Nazli Naim; Azhari Samsu Baharuddin

    2016-01-01

    This research mainly focuses on developing a natural cellulose nano fibre (CNF) from kenaf bast fibre and its potential for enzyme immobilization support. CNF was isolated by using a combination between chemical and mechanical treatments such as alkaline process and high-intensity ultrasonication process to increase the efficiency of hemicelluloses and lignin removal, and to reduce its size into nano-order. The morphological study was carried out by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), indicating most of CNF diameter in range of 50-90 nm was obtained. The result of chemical analysis shows that cellulose content of raw bast fibre, bleached pulp fibre and CNF are 66.4 %, 83.7 % and 90.0 %, respectively. By decreasing the size of cellulose fibre, it increases the number of (O-H) group on the surface that plays as important role in enzyme immobilization. Covalent immobilization of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) onto CNF support resulted in about 95.0 % of protein loading with 69.48 % of enzyme activity, indicating high immobilization yield of enzyme. The enzymatic reaction of immobilized CGTase was able to produce more than 40 % yield of α-CD. Reusability profile of immobilized CGTase resulted in more than 60 % of retained activity up to 7 cycles. Therefore, the CNF is highly potential to be applied as enzyme immobilization support. (author)

  4. Potential of Bioactive Glasses for Cardiac and Pulmonary Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Kargozar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Repair and regeneration of disorders affecting cardiac and pulmonary tissues through tissue-engineering-based approaches is currently of particular interest. On this matter, different families of bioactive glasses (BGs have recently been given much consideration with respect to treating refractory diseases of these tissues, such as myocardial infarction. The inherent properties of BGs, including their ability to bond to hard and soft tissues, to stimulate angiogenesis, and to elicit antimicrobial effects, along with their excellent biocompatibility, support these newly proposed strategies. Moreover, BGs can also act as a bioactive reinforcing phase to finely tune the mechanical properties of polymer-based constructs used to repair the damaged cardiac and pulmonary tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of different forms of BGs, alone or in combination with other materials (e.g., polymers, in regards to repair and regenerate injured tissues of cardiac and pulmonary systems.

  5. Immobilization of LiCl-Li 2 O pyroprocessing salt wastes in chlorosodalite using glass-bonded hydrothermal and salt-occlusion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Kroll, Jared O.; Frank, Steven M.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, salt occlusion and hydrothermal processes were used to make chlorosodalite through reaction with a high-LiCl salt simulating a waste stream following pyrochemical treatment of oxide-based used nuclear fuel. Some products were reacted with glass binders to increase chlorosodalite yield through alkali ion exchange and aide in densification. Hydrothermal processes included reaction of the salt simulant in an acid digestion vessel with either zeolite 4A or sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. Chlorosodalite yields in the crystalline products were nearly complete in the glass-bonded materials at values of 100 mass% for the salt-occlusion method, up to 99.0 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with zeolite 4A, and up to 96 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. These results show promise for using chemically stable chlorosodalite to immobilize oxide reduction salt wastes.

  6. Immobilization of LiCl-Li2O pyroprocessing salt wastes in chlorosodalite using glass-bonded hydrothermal and salt-occlusion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Brian J.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Kroll, Jared O.; Frank, Steven M.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, hydrothermal and salt-occlusion processes were used to make chlorosodalite through reactions with a high-LiCl salt simulating a waste stream generated from pyrochemical treatment of oxide-based used nuclear fuel. Some products were reacted with glass binders to increase chlorosodalite yield through alkali ion exchange and to aid in densification. Hydrothermal processes included reaction of the salt simulant in an autoclave with either zeolite 4A or sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. Chlorosodalite yields in the crystalline products were nearly complete in the glass-bonded materials at values of 100 mass% for the salt-occlusion method, up to 99.0 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with zeolite 4A, and up to 96 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. These results show promise for using chemically stable chlorosodalite to immobilize oxide reduction salt wastes.

  7. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, H. B.; Zhao, X. L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, K. B.; Li, L. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Lam, W. M.; Lu, W. W.; Wang, D. P.; Huang, W. H.; Lin, K. L.; Chang, J.

    2009-01-01

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid relea...

  8. Immobilization of Trypsin in Lignocellulosic Waste Material to Produce Peptides with Bioactive Potential from Whey Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Bassan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, trypsin (Enzyme Comission 3.4.21.4 was immobilized in a low cost, lignocellulosic support (corn cob powder—CCP with the goal of obtaining peptides with bioactive potential from cheese whey. The pretreated support was activated with glyoxyl groups, glutaraldehyde and IDA-glyoxyl. The immobilization yields of the derivatives were higher than 83%, and the retention of catalytic activity was higher than 74%. The trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP derivative was thermally stable at 65 °C, a value that was 1090-fold higher than that obtained with the free enzyme. The trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP and trypsin-glutaraldehyde-CCP derivatives had thermal stabilities that were 883- and five-fold higher, respectively, then those obtained with the free enzyme. In the batch experiments, trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP retained 91% of its activity and had a degree of hydrolysis of 12.49%, while the values for trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP were 87% and 15.46%, respectively. The stabilized derivative trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP was also tested in an upflow packed-bed reactor. The hydrodynamic characterization of this reactor was a plug flow pattern, and the kinetics of this system provided a relative activity of 3.04 ± 0.01 U·g−1 and an average degree of hydrolysis of 23%, which were suitable for the production of potentially bioactive peptides.

  9. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  10. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    composed of VO5 pyramids. The vanadates-based glasses show semiconducting ..... the composition 1 mol% of CeO2. The AC conductivity obeys a power law. The glass samples exhibit typical inor- ganic semiconducting behaviour. The activation energy and conductivity at room temperature were found to be 0.09 eV ...

  11. Leaching potential of pervious concrete and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn using pervious concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solpuker, U; Sheets, J; Kim, Y; Schwartz, F W

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the leaching potential of pervious concrete and its capacity for immobilizing Cu, Pb and Zn, which are common contaminants in urban runoff. Batch experiments showed that the leachability of Cu, Pb and Zn increased when pHPHREEQC equilibrium modeling, the leaching of major ions and trace metals was mainly controlled by the dissolution/precipitation and surface complexation reactions, respectively. A 1-D reactive transport experiment was undertaken to better understand how pervious concrete might function to attenuate contaminant migration. A porous concrete block was sprayed with low pH water (pH=4.3±0.1) for 190 h. The effluent was highly alkaline (pH~10 to 12). In the first 50 h, specific conductance and trace-metal were high but declined towards steady state values. PHREEQC modeling showed that mixing of interstitial alkaline matrix waters with capillary pore water was required in order to produce the observed water chemistry. The interstitial pore solutions seem responsible for the high pH values and relatively high concentrations of trace metals and major cations in the early stages of the experiment. Finally, pervious concrete was sprayed with a synthetic contaminated urban runoff (10 ppb Cu, Pb and Zn) with a pH of 4.3±0.1 for 135 h. It was found that Pb immobilization was greater than either Cu or Zn. Zn is the most mobile among three and also has the highest variation in the observed degree of immobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  13. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials and electrochemical batteries.8 Rare earth metal ions when added to borate act as network modifiers and change the properties of glasses. In rare earth ... room temperature to 600◦C. For electrical measurements, samples were polished and conducting silver paste was deposited on both sides. The sample area ...

  14. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H B; Zhao, X L; Zhang, X; Zhang, K B; Li, L C; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Lu, W W; Wang, D P; Huang, W H; Lin, K L; Chang, J

    2010-07-06

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid release of boron, but also induce the adhesion of osteoblast-like cells, SaOS-2, thus significantly increasing the cyto-compatibility of borate glass. The formation of multilayers of apatite with porous structure indicates that complete degradation is optimistic, and the spread of SaOS-2 covered by apatite to form a sandwich structure may induce bone-like tissue formation at earlier stages. Therefore, such novel strontium-incorporated borosilicate may act as a new generation of biomaterial for bone regeneration, which not only renders boron as a nutritious element for bone health, but also delivers strontium to stimulate formation of new bones.

  15. An interatomic potential for studying CuZr bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paduraru, A.; Kenoufi, A.; Bailey, N.P.; Schioetz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Glass forming ability has been found in only a small number of binary alloys, one being CuZr. In order to simulate this glass, we fitted an interatomic potential within Effective Medium Theory (EMT). For this purpose we use basic properties of the B2 crystal structure as calculated from Density Functional Theory (DFT) or obtained from experiments. We then performed Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the cooling process and studied the thermodynamics and structure of CuZr glass. We find that the potential gives a good description of the CuZr glass, with a glass transition temperature and elastic constants close to the experimental values. The local atomic order, as witnessed by the radial distribution function, is also consistent with similar experimental data. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Study of the surface crystallization and resistance to dissolution of niobium phosphate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization; Estudo da cristalizacao superficial e da resistencia a dissolucao de vidros niobofosfatos visando a imobilizacao de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Heveline

    2008-07-01

    The surface crystallization and the dissolution rate of three phosphate glass compositions containing different amounts of niobium oxide were studied. The glasses were named Nb30, Nb37, and Nb44 according to the nominal content of niobium oxide in the glass composition. The three compositions were evaluated keeping the P{sub 2}O{sub 5}/K{sub 2}O ratio constant and varying the amount of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. These glasses were produced by melting appropriate chemical compounds at 1500 deg C for 0.5 hour. The crystalline phases which were nucleated on the glass surface after heat treatment were determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystalline structures depend on the amount of niobium oxide in the glass composition. The crystal morphologies were observed by using an optical microscope, and their characteristics are specific for each kind of crystalline phase. The crystal growth rate and the surface nuclei density were determined for each glass composition, and they depend on each crystalline phase nucleated on the surface. From the differential thermal analysis curves it was determined that the Nb44 glass containing 46.5 mol por cent of niobium oxide is the most thermally stable against crystallization when compared to the Nb30 and Nb37 glasses. According to the activation energies determined for crystal growth on the surface of each glass type, the Nb44 glass can also be considered the most resistant one against crystallization. The dissolution rate for the Nb44 glass after 14 days immersed in an aqueous solution with pH equals to 7 at 90 deg C is the lowest (9.0 x 10{sup -7} g. cm{sup -2} . day{sup -1}) when compared to the other two glass compositions. The dissolution rates in acidic and neutral solutions of all studied glasses meet the international standards for materials which can be used in the immobilization of nuclear wastes. (author)

  17. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and process parameters on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the effects of aluminum and silicon reactants, process soak time and the initial calcine particle size on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of the high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are investigated. The waste form characteristics include density, total and normalized elemental leach rates, and microstructure. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050 degrees C, 20,000 psi for 4 hours. One of the formulations with 2 wt % Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. The calcine particle size range include as calcined particle size smaller than 600 μm (finer than -30 mesh, or 215 μm Mass Median Diameter, MMD) and 180 μm (finer than 80 mesh, or 49 μm MMD)

  18. Charge density glass dynamics – Soft potentials and soft modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljaković, K.; Starešinić, D.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Remenyi, G.; Mélin, R.; Monceau, P.; Sahling, S.

    2012-01-01

    An universal fingerprint of glasses has been found in low-temperature thermodynamic properties of charge/spin density wave (C/SDW) systems. Deviations from the well-known Debye, elastic continuum prediction for specific heat (flat C p /T 3 plot) appear as two anomalies; the upturn below 1 K and a broad bump at T∼10 K (named Boson peak in glasses). The first one, inherent of localized two level systems within the shalow corrugated phase space, exhibits slow relaxation with the complex dynamics. The second one, “Boson peak-like peak” was attributed to the pinned mode and incomplete softening of CDW superstructural mode. We discuss similar C p (T) features found also in incommensurate dielectrics with well documented soft-mode anomalies.

  19. Charge density glass dynamics - Soft potentials and soft modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biljakovic, K., E-mail: katica@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, HR-10001, Zagreb, P.O. Box 304 (Croatia); Staresinic, D., E-mail: damirs@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, HR-10001, Zagreb, P.O. Box 304 (Croatia); Lasjaunias, J.C., E-mail: jean-claude.lasjaunias@pop3.grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Remenyi, G., E-mail: Gyorgy.Remenyi@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Melin, R., E-mail: Regis.Melin@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Monceau, P., E-mail: pierre.monceau@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Sahling, S., E-mail: sven.olaf@gmail.com [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Dresden, D-01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    An universal fingerprint of glasses has been found in low-temperature thermodynamic properties of charge/spin density wave (C/SDW) systems. Deviations from the well-known Debye, elastic continuum prediction for specific heat (flat C{sub p}/T{sup 3} plot) appear as two anomalies; the upturn below 1 K and a broad bump at T{approx}10 K (named Boson peak in glasses). The first one, inherent of localized two level systems within the shalow corrugated phase space, exhibits slow relaxation with the complex dynamics. The second one, 'Boson peak-like peak' was attributed to the pinned mode and incomplete softening of CDW superstructural mode. We discuss similar C{sub p}(T) features found also in incommensurate dielectrics with well documented soft-mode anomalies.

  20. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: the potential role of glass flow in the sand-dissolution process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Cincibusová, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2009), s. 145-155 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : sand dissolution * temperature gradients * glass flow patterns * space utilisation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  1. Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, K

    2010-01-01

    Audio recording of the sea from the breakwater in Plymouth Sound, by Stuart Moore. Presentations and exhibitions of the film Glass include: Finding Place exhibition, Plymouth (3 > 26 February 2010); University of the West of England's Radical British Screens symposium (3 September 2010); Plymouth University Festival of Research: Materiality and Technology film programme presented by the Centre for Media Art and Design Research (MADr), Jill Craigie Cinema, Plymouth University (14 March 2011); ...

  2. Utilization of Cs137 to generate a radiation barrier for weapons grade plutonium immobilized in borosilicate glass canisters. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.J.; Armantrout, G.A.; Collins, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    One of the ways recommended by a recent National Academy of Sciences study to dispose of excess weapons-grade plutonium is to encapsulate the plutonium in a glass in combination with high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) to generate an intense radiation dose rate field. The objective is to render the plutonium as difficult to access as the plutonium contained in existing US commercial spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel until it can be disposed of in a permanent geological repository. A radiation dose rate from a sealed canister of 1,000 rem/h (10 Sv/h) at 1 meter for at least 30 years after fabrication was assumed in this paper to be a radiation dose comparable to spent LWR fuel. This can be achieved by encapsulating the plutonium in a borosilicate glass with an adequate amount of a single fission product in the HLWS, namely radioactive Cs 137 . One hundred thousand curies of Cs 137 will generate a dose rate of 1,000 rem/h (10 Sv/h) at 1 meter for at least 30 years when imbedded into canisters of the size proposed for the Savannah River Site's vitrified high-level wastes. The United States has a current inventory of 54 MCi of CS 137 that has been separated from defense HLWs and is in sealed capsules. This single curie inventory is sufficient to spike 50 metric tons of excess weapons-grade plutonium if plutonium can be loaded at 5.5 wt% in glass, or 540 canisters. Additional CS 137 inventories exist in the United States' HLWs from past reprocessing operations, should additional curies be required. Using only one fission product, CS 137 , rather than the multiple chemical elements and compounds in HLWs to generate a high radiation dose rate from a glass canister greatly simplifies the processing engineering retirement for encapsulating plutonium in a borosilicate glass

  3. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF CHITOSAN NANOPARTICLES AS NOVEL SUPPORT IN ENZYME IMMOBILIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Hoda Jafarizadeh Malmiri; Mohammad Ali Ghaz Jahanian; Aydin Berenjian

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Due to the good biocompatibility of chitosan, it can be used in magnetic-field assisted drug delivery, enzyme or cell immobilization and many other industrial applications. In the past decade, nanotechnology has been a considerable research interest in the area of preparation of immobilized enzyme carriers. This study looks at characteristi...

  4. Meta-analysis of biochar potential for pollutant immobilization and stabilization in contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Gerhard; Marsz, Aleksandra; Fristak, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    -reviewed literature about the immobilizing potential of biochar for pollutants, we could use about 1300 comparisons of biochar application versus no application for a range of organic and inorganic pollutants in a soil environment. Our assessments have shown that in the average of all studies biochar decreased the availability of cationic heavy metals and organic pollutants significantly by 40-50 %. We could confirm that an increasing biochar application rate also increases contaminant sorption. The only exception was found for anionic heavy metals like As or Mo that are clearly mobilized by biochar applications. Differences in sorption efficiency depend on the type of biochar, on different pollutants and on the compartment where the reduction of bioavailability has been studied.

  5. Improving the catalytic potential and substrate tolerance of Gibberella intermedia nitrilase by whole-cell immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Yang, Tao; Gong, Jin-Song; Xiong, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Li, Hui; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Comparative studies of immobilized and free cells of Gibberella intermedia CA3-1 in bioconversion of 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinic acid were performed. Entrapping method was chosen based on the advantages in enzymatic activity recovery, mechanical strength and preparation procedure. Four entrapment matrices were investigated and sodium alginate was screened to be the most suitable material. Maximal nitrilase activity of alginate immobilized cells was obtained under conditions of 2 % alginate, 0.6 % CaCl2, 0.4 g cell/g alginate, 1.8 mm bead size. The immobilized cells showed excellent substrate tolerance even when the 3-cyanopyridine concentration was 700 mM. The half-lives of immobilized cells at 30, 40 and 50 °C were 315, 117.5 and 10.9 h, respectively, correspondingly 1.4, 1.6 and 1.7-fold compared with that of the free cells. Efficient reusability of immobilized cells up to 28 batches was achieved and 205.7 g/(g dcw) nicotinic acid was obtained with 80.55 % enzyme activity preserved.

  6. Effect of the nature of alkali and alkaline-earth oxides on the structure and crystallization of an alumino-borosilicate glass developed to immobilize highly concentrated nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintas, A.; Caurant, D.; Majerus, O.; Charpentier, T.; Dussossoy, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    A complex rare-earth rich alumino-borosilicate glass has been proved to be a good candidate for the immobilization of new high level radioactive wastes. A simplified seven-oxides composition of this glass was selected for this study. In this system, sodium and calcium cations were supposed in other works to simulate respectively all the other alkali (R + = Li + , Rb + , Cs + ) and alkaline-earth (R 2+ = Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations present in the complex glass composition. Moreover, neodymium or lanthanum are used here to simulate all the rare-earths and actinides occurring in waste solutions. In order to study the impact of the nature of R + and R 2+ cations on both glass structure and melt crystallization tendency during cooling, two glass series were prepared by replacing either Na + or Ca 2+ cations in the simplified glass by respectively (Li + , K + , Rb + , Cs + ) or (Mg 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations. From these substitutions, it was established that alkali ions are preferentially involved in the charge compensation of (AlO 4 ) - entities in the glass network comparatively to alkaline-earth ions. The glass compositions containing calcium give way to the crystallization of an apatite silicate phase bearing calcium and rare-earth ions. The melt crystallization tendency during cooling strongly varies with the nature of the alkaline-earth. (authors)

  7. Assessing the Validity of the Simplified Potential Energy Clock Model for Modeling Glass-Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grillet, Anne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Glass-ceramic seals may be the future of hermetic connectors at Sandia National Laboratories. They have been shown capable of surviving higher temperatures and pressures than amorphous glass seals. More advanced finite-element material models are required to enable model-based design and provide evidence that the hermetic connectors can meet design requirements. Glass-ceramics are composite materials with both crystalline and amorphous phases. The latter gives rise to (non-linearly) viscoelastic behavior. Given their complex microstructures, glass-ceramics may be thermorheologically complex, a behavior outside the scope of currently implemented constitutive models at Sandia. However, it was desired to assess if the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model is capable of capturing the material response. Available data for SL 16.8 glass-ceramic was used to calibrate the SPEC model. Model accuracy was assessed by comparing model predictions with shear moduli temperature dependence and high temperature 3-point bend creep data. It is shown that the model can predict the temperature dependence of the shear moduli and 3- point bend creep data. Analysis of the results is presented. Suggestions for future experiments and model development are presented. Though further calibration is likely necessary, SPEC has been shown capable of modeling glass-ceramic behavior in the glass transition region but requires further analysis below the transition region.

  8. Single glass nanopore-based regenerable sensing platforms with a non-immobilized polyglutamic acid probe for selective detection of cupric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lizhen; He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-08-19

    A single glass capillary nanopore-based sensing platform for rapid and selective detection of cupric ions is demonstrated by utilizing polyglutamic acid (PGA) as a non-immobilized probe. The detection is based on the significant decrease of ionic current through nanopore and the reversal of ion current rectification responses induced by the chelated cupric ions on the probes when in the presence of cupric ions. PGA shows high selectivity for detecting cupric ions rather than other metal ions. The sensitivity of the sensing platform can be improved about 1-2 orders of magnitude by employing asymmetric salt gradients during the measurements. And the PGA-based nanopore sensing platform shows excellent regenerability for Cu(2+) sensing applications. In addition, the method is found effective and reliable for the detection of cupric ions in real samples with small volume down to 20 μL. This nanopore-based sensing platform will find promising practical applications for the detection of cupric ions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential antioxidant peptides produced from whey hydrolysis with an immobilized aspartic protease from Salpichroa origanifolia fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Gabriela Fernanda; Kise, Francisco; Rosso, Adriana Mabel; Parisi, Mónica Graciela

    2017-12-15

    An aspartic protease from Salpichroa origanifolia fruits was successfully immobilized onto an activated support of glutaraldehyde agarose. The immobilized enzyme presented higher thermal stability than the free enzyme from 40°C to 50°C and high reusability, retaining 54% of the initial activity after ten cycles of the process. Whey protein concentrates (WPC) were hydrolyzed with both free and immobilized enzyme, reaching a similar degree of hydrolysis of approximately 6-8% after 20h. In addition, the immobilized derivate hydrolyzed α-lactalbumin protein with a higher affinity than β-lactoglobulin. The hydrolysate was ultra-filtrated, and the fractions were evaluated for antioxidant activities with the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity method. The fraction containing peptides with a molecular mass below 3kDa demonstrated a strong radical quenching effect (IC 50: 0.48mg/ml). These results suggest that hydrolyzed WPC could be considered as a promising source of natural food antioxidants for the development of functional food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear Waste Glasses - Suitability, Surface Studies, and Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    Every major country involved with long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has either selected or is considering glass as the matrix of choice for immobilizing and ultimately, disposing of the potentially hazardous, high-level radioactive material. There are many reasons why glass is preferred. Among the most important considerations are the ability of glass structures to accommodate and immobilize the many different types of radionuclides present in HLW, and to produce a product that not only has excellent technical properties, but also possesses good processing features. Good processability allows the glass to be fabricated with relative ease even under difficult remote-handling conditions necessary for vitrification of highly radioactive material. The single most important property of the waste glass produced is its ability to retain hazardous species within the glass structure and this is reflected by its excellent chemical durability and corrosion resistance to a wide range of environmental conditions

  11. Formation of zeolites in metakaolin-based geopolymers and their potential application for Cs immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel Haddad, M.; Ofer-Rozovsky, E.; Bar-Nes, G.; Borojovich, E. J. C.; Nikolski, A.; Mogiliansky, D.; Katz, A.

    2017-09-01

    Alkali-activated aluminisilicate materials, also known as geopolymers, have been considered as attractive candidates for nuclear waste immobilization, due to their ability to incorporate cations, combined with high chemical resistance and suitable mechanical and thermal properties. The goal of the present research was to study the incorporation and immobilization of Cs in low-Si geopolymers (SiO2:Al2O3 molar ratio ≤ 2) which are known to have a relatively high crystalline phase content. A series of low-Si geopolymers was prepared from metakaolin using activating solutions containing CsOH and NaOH at different proportions. The structural evolution of the resulting products was followed using X-ray diffraction, the incorporation of Cs in the geopolymer was followed by pore water analysis, and its immobilization efficiency was determined from leaching tests following the ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard procedure. Like low-Si NaOH-based geopolymers, the mixed CsOH-NaOH geopolymers contain a significant amount of crystalline material which is imbedded within an amorphous matrix. Formulations with 1%Cs yielded the crystalline phases zeolite A and zeolite X. At 50%Cs the Cs-bearing zeolite F was formed. All three phases were observed at an intermediate Cs content (7%Cs). Pore water analysis indicated a preference for Cs uptake from the activating solution, while leaching experiments indicated selectivity for Cs immobilization in the mixed CsOH-NaOH geopolymers. Correlation of the apparent diffusion constants for both Na and Cs, as obtained from the leaching experiments, with the structural data lead to the conclusion that Cs is more efficiently bound by zeolite F, whereas Na binding is preferred by zeolites A and X. Nevertheless, the leachability indices for both Cs and Na were well above 6, indicating that such matrices may be considered as waste forms for 137Cs.

  12. Potential application of immobilized streptokinase extracted from Streptococcus equinus VIT_VB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnavi, B; Subathra Devi, C

    2017-11-26

    Streptokinase purified from Streptococcus equinus VIT_VB2 isolated from bovine milk sample was immobilized in various solid supports namely entrapment in agarose gel, calcium alginate beads and gelatin gel by cross-linking with formaldehyde. Immobilization of streptokinase in calcium alginate beads showed maximum efficiency (81.8 ± 1.06%) when compared with entrapment with agarose gel (55.6 ± 2.17%) and cross-linked gelatin formaldehyde gel (71.0 ± 1.54%). The purified SK activity was expressed maximum in calcium alginate (1%) and gelatin gel (0.25%) with 1292.68 ± 1.33 and 1121.9 ± 1.2 U mL -1 , respectively. Similarly, SK entrapped in gelatin gel and calcium alginate showed maximum in vitro blood clot lysis activity with 77.67 ± 2.64% and 76.16 ± 2.72%, respectively. The immobilized SK in gelatin gel showed complete clot lysis within 15 min; hence, this application of the study could be used in the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis, phlebitis, and venous thrombosis. These beads were used for three repeated cycles to check the conversion of substrates into their products, and we concluded that SK can be immobilized in the suitable matrices. Therefore, this helps in the drug-delivery strategies in highly efficient way, moreover, economically competent process in the pharmaceutics.

  13. Immobilization of Organic Solvent-Tolerant Lipase from Pseudomonas mendocina M-37 with Potential Synthetic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Dahiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermostable solvent-tolerant lipase was isolated from Pseudomonas mendocina M-37. The lipase production medium was optimized for cost-effective production. Olive oil as a carbon source, and glycine as a nitrogen source were selected as the best for maximum lipase production. Medium optimization led to 3.75-fold increase in the lipase production. The extracellular lipase was purified 42.2-fold to homogeneity by precipitation using polyethyleneglycol, ultrafiltration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Its molecular mass, determined with sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was 32 kDa. The enzyme was further immobilized on microcrystalline cellulose. The lipase showed an optimal water activity of 0.53 for both, acidolysis and interesterification reactions. Six- to sevenfold increase in synthetic activity of immobilized lipase was observed when interesterification activity of 0.139 IU/mg and transesterification activity of 0.181 IU/mg, respectively, were obtained. This is the first report on Pseudomonas mendocina lipase with synthetic activity immobilized on microcrystalline cellulose.

  14. Potential adverse effects of applying phosphate amendments to immobilize soil contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majs, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    Seven-day batch equilibrium experiments were conducted to measure the efficacy of four phosphate amendments (trisodium trimetaphosphate [TP3], dodecasodium phytate [Na-IP6], precipitated calcium phytate [Ca-IP6], and hydroxyapatite [HA]) for immobilizing Ni and U in organic-rich sediment. Using the eight-step modified Miller's sequential extraction procedure and the USEPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, the effect of these amendments on the distribution of Ni and U was assessed. Relative to unamended controls, equilibrium aqueous-phase U concentrations were lower following HA and Ca-IP6 additions but higher following TP3 and Na-IP6 amendments, whereas aqueous Ni concentrations were not decreased only in the Na-IP6 amended treatment relative to the control. The poor rates of contaminant immobilization following TP3 and Na-IP6 amendments correlate with the dispersion of organic matter and organo-mineral colloids, which probably contain sorbed U and Ni. While all amendments shifted the U distribution toward more recalcitrant soil fractions, Ni was redistributed to more labile soil fractions. This study cautions that the addition of orthophosphates and organophosphates as contaminant immobilizing amendments may in fact have adverse effects, especially in high-organic soils. Particular attention is warranted at sites with mixed contaminants with varying geochemical behaviors. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Identification and immobilization of a novel cold-adapted esterase, and its potential for bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinjiong; Liang, Weiqu; Li, Yanfang; Li, He; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-09-11

    Pyrethroids are potentially harmful to living organisms and ecosystems. Thus, concerns have been raised about pyrethroid residues and their persistence in agricultural products. To date, although several pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzymes have been cloned, very few reports are available on pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzymes with cold adaptation, high hydrolytic activity and good reusability, indispensable properties in practical bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated vegetables. Here, a novel gene (est684) encoding pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase was isolated from the Mao-tofu metagenome for the first time. Est684 encoded a protein of 227 amino acids and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in soluble form. The optimum temperature was 18 °C. It maintained 46.1% of activity at 0 °C and over 50% of its maximal activity at 4-35 °C. With the goal of enhancing stability and recycling biocatalysts, we used mesoporous silica SBA-15 as a nanometer carrier for the efficient immobilization of Est684 by the absorption method. The best conditions were an esterase-to-silica ratio of 0.96 mg/g (w/w) and an adsorption time of 30 min at 10 °C. Under these conditions, the recovery of enzyme activity was 81.3%. A large improvement in the thermostability of Est684 was achieved. The half-life (T 1/2 ) of the immobilized enzyme at 35 °C was 6 h, 4 times longer than the soluble enzyme. Interestingly, the immobilized Est684 had less loss in enzyme activity up to 12 consecutive cycles, and it retained nearly 54% of its activity after 28 cycles, indicating excellent operational stability. Another noteworthy characteristic was its high catalytic activity. It efficiently hydrolyzed cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, and fenvalreate in pyrethroid-contaminated cucumber within 5 min, reaching over 85% degradation efficiency after four cycles. A novel cold-adapted pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase was screened from the Mao-tofu metagenome. This report is the first on immobilizing

  16. On the potential energy landscape of supercooled liquids and glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodney, D.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The activation-relaxation technique (ART), a saddle-point search method, is applied to determine the potential energy landscape around supercooled and glassy configurations of a three-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones system. We show a strong relation between the distribution of activation energies...... of transitions undergone by the same supercooled liquid during a time trajectory simulated by molecular dynamics. We find that ART is biased towards more heterogeneous transitions with higher activation energies and more broken bonds than the MD simulation....

  17. Potential energy landscape signatures of slow dynamics in glass forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sastry, S.; Debenedetti, P. G.; Stillinger, F. H.

    1999-01-01

    We study the properties of local potential energy minima (‘inherent structures’) sampled by liquids at low temperatures as an approach to elucidating the mechanisms of the observed dynamical slowing down observed as the glass transition temperature is approached. This onset of slow dynamics...... inherent structure basins from that due to inter-basin transitions becomes valid at temperatures T...

  18. An interatomic potential for studying CuZr bulk metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paduraru, Anca; Kenoufi, Abdel; Bailey, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical properties of BMGs are remarkably different from the ones of ordinary metallic alloys due to the atomic level disorder in the glassy state. Unlike crystalline materials plastic deformation in metallic glasses cannot be caused by lattice defects but takes place through atomic......-scale deformation events and may furthermore involve localization through formation of shear bands. In this paper, an Effective Medium Theory (EMT) potential optimized for modeling the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of CuZr bulk metallic glass is studied. The late transition metals crystallizing in close......-packed structures, and their alloys, while still allowing simulations with millions of atoms is discussed....

  19. Structural characterization and anti-cancerous potential of gallium bioactive glass/hydrogel composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, T J; Placek, L M; Coughlan, A; Bowers, G M; Hall, M M; Wren, A W

    2016-11-20

    A bioactive glass series (0.42SiO2-0.10Na2O-0.08CaO-(0.40-X)ZnO-(X)Ga2O3) was incorporated into carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/dextran (Dex) hydrogels in three different amounts (0.05, 0.10, and 0.25m(2)), and the resulting composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP MAS-NMR). Composite extracts were also evaluated in vitro against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. TEM confirmed glass distribution throughout the composites, although some particle agglomeration was observed. DSC revealed that glass composition and content did have small effects on both Tg and Tm. MAS-NMR revealed that both CMC and Dex were successfully functionalized, that cross-linking occurred, and that glass addition did slightly alter bonding environments. Cell viability analysis suggested that extracts of the glass and composites with the largest Ga-content significantly decreased MG-63 osteosarcoma viability after 30days. This study successfully characterized this composite series, and demonstrated their potential for anti-cancerous applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of the nature of alkali and alkaline-earth oxides on the structure and crystallization of an alumino-borosilicate glass developed to immobilize highly concentrated nuclear waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintas, A.; Caurant, D.; Majerus, O. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris (UMR 7574), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris - ENSCP, ParisTech, Paris, 75005 (France); Charpentier, T. [CEA Saclay, Laboratoire de Structure et Dynamique par Resonance Magnetique, DSM/DRECAM/SCM - CEA CNRS URA 331, Gif-sur-Yvette, 91191 (France); Dussossoy, J.L. [Laboratoire d' Etude de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, DEN/DTCD/SCDV/LEBV, Bagnols-sur-Ceze, 30207 (France)

    2008-07-01

    A complex rare-earth rich alumino-borosilicate glass has been proved to be a good candidate for the immobilization of new high level radioactive wastes. A simplified seven-oxides composition of this glass was selected for this study. In this system, sodium and calcium cations were supposed in other works to simulate respectively all the other alkali (R{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and alkaline-earth (R{sup 2+} = Sr{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}) cations present in the complex glass composition. Moreover, neodymium or lanthanum are used here to simulate all the rare-earths and actinides occurring in waste solutions. In order to study the impact of the nature of R{sup +} and R{sup 2+} cations on both glass structure and melt crystallization tendency during cooling, two glass series were prepared by replacing either Na{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+} cations in the simplified glass by respectively (Li{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) or (Mg{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}) cations. From these substitutions, it was established that alkali ions are preferentially involved in the charge compensation of (AlO{sub 4}){sup -} entities in the glass network comparatively to alkaline-earth ions. The glass compositions containing calcium give way to the crystallization of an apatite silicate phase bearing calcium and rare-earth ions. The melt crystallization tendency during cooling strongly varies with the nature of the alkaline-earth. (authors)

  1. Supramolecular protein immobilization on lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, R.P.G.; Hendriksen, W.E.; Verheijden, Mark Lloyd; Eelkema, R.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, J.H.; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and

  2. Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A.; Mitchell, M.

    2000-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D and T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D and T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D and T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency

  3. Characterization of the glass transition of water predicted by molecular dynamics simulations using nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreck, Cara A; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2014-02-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations allow detailed study of the experimentally inaccessible liquid state of supercooled water below its homogeneous nucleation temperature and the characterization of the glass transition. Simple, nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials are commonly used in classical molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous systems due to their lower computational cost and their ability to reproduce a wide range of properties. Because the quality of these predictions varies between the potentials, the predicted glass transition of water is likely to be influenced by the choice of potential. We have thus conducted an extensive comparative investigation of various three-, four-, five-, and six-point water potentials in both the NPT and NVT ensembles. The T(g) predicted from NPT simulations is strongly correlated with the temperature of minimum density, whereas the maximum in the heat capacity plot corresponds to the minimum in the thermal expansion coefficient. In the NVT ensemble, these points are instead related to the maximum in the internal pressure and the minimum of its derivative, respectively. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen-bonding properties at the glass transition reveals that the extent of hydrogen-bonds lost upon the melting of the glassy state is related to the height of the heat capacity peak and varies between water potentials.

  4. Ogilvie syndrome: a potentially life-threatening phenotype of immobilization hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Chi; Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Chen, Mei-Chen; Chen, Jui-Chang; Tsao, Yu-Tzu

    2014-07-01

    Ogilvie syndrome, also known as acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, is characterized by the clinical presentation and imaging evidence of acute colonic obstruction in the absence of a mechanical cause. Several comorbidities and serious associated medical or surgical conditions have been described to be relevant to this syndrome. In general, a preferred initial management with favorable treatment outcomes is virtually to correct underlying disorders. Although disrupted electrolyte homeostasis may induce impaired colonic motility, hypercalcemia secondary to immobilization as a major culprit in this syndrome has rarely been studied. In this report, we profiled radiographic features, therapeutic strategies, and pathogenetic hypothesis of this clinical entity and highlighted the need for clinicians to maintain awareness of this distinct manifestation.

  5. Immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a potential aflatoxin decontaminating agent in pistachio nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rahaie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the binding ability of Saccharomayces cerevisiae to aflatoxin in pistachio nuts. The obtained results indicate that S. cerevisiae has an aflatoxin surface binding ability of 40% and 70% (with initial aflatoxin concentrations of 10 and 20 ppb in the exponential phase. Acid treatments increase this ability to approximately 60% and 73% for the two concentrations of aflatoxin, respectively. Heat treatments also enhance surface binding to 55% and 75%, respectively. Binding appears to be a physical phenomenon that saturates within the first 2-3 hours of the process. The obtained results indicate that yeast immobilization for toxin reduction on aflatoxin-contaminated pistachios had no effect on qualitative characteristics, such as color, texture, and peroxide value. Yeast cells, viable or nonviable, are effective for aflatoxin binding, and this property could lead to a promising solution to aflatoxin contamination in high-risk foods.

  6. Hydrophobicity, surface tension, and zeta potential measurements of glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M A; Monteiro, F J; Santos, J D; Serro, A P; Saramago, B

    1999-06-15

    Wettability and zeta potential studies were performed to characterize the hydrophobicity, surface tension, and surface charge of P2O5-glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites. Quantitative phase analysis was performed by the Rietveld method using GSAS software applied to X-ray diffractograms. Surface charge was assessed by zeta potential measurements. Protein adsorption studies were performed using vitronectin. Contact angles and surface tensions variation with time were determined by the sessile and pendent drop techniques, respectively, using ADSA-P software. The highest (-18.1 mV) and lowest (-28.7 mV) values of zeta potential were found for hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), respectively, with composite materials presenting values in between. All studied bioceramic materials showed similar solid surface tension. For HA and beta-TCP, solid surface tensions of 46.7 and 45.3 mJ/m2, respectively, were obtained, while composites presented intermediate surface tension values. The dispersive component of surface tension was the predominant one for all materials studied. Adhesion work values between the vitronectin solution and HA and beta-TCP were found to be 79.8 and 88.0 mJ/m2, respectively, while the 4.0 wt % glass composites showed slightly lower values than the 2.5 wt % ones. The presence of beta-TCP influenced surface charge, hydrophobicity, and protein adsorption of the glass-reinforced HA composites, and therefore indirectly affected cell-biomaterial interactions.

  7. Evaluation of potential for reuse of industrial wastewater using metal-immobilized catalysts and reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongyun; Chung, Jinwook

    2015-04-01

    This report describes a novel technology of reusing the wastewater discharged from the display manufacturing industry through an advanced oxidation process (AOP) with a metal-immobilized catalyst and reverse osmosis (RO) in the pilot scale. The reclaimed water generated from the etching and cleaning processes in display manufacturing facilities was low-strength organic wastewater and was required to be recycled to secure a water source. For the reuse of reclaimed water to ultrapure water (UPW), a combination of solid-phase AOP and RO was implemented. The removal efficiency of TOC by solid-phase AOP and RO was 92%. Specifically, the optimal acid, pH, and H2O2 concentrations in the solid-phase AOP were determined. With regard to water quality and operating costs, the combination of solid-phase AOP and RO was superior to activated carbon/RO and ultraviolet AOP/anion polisher/coal carbon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro studies on the potential for pulpal cytotoxicity of glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, W R; Mount, G J

    1988-06-01

    Elution samples of glass-ionomer cement were prepared in sterile tissue culture medium either by direct contact between the fluid and standard cement samples or through a layer of human dentin, and then tested for toxicity to cultured mouse fibroblasts (L929). The directly-prepared eluates of the cements were highly cytotoxic, but those prepared through dentin were of either limited or no cytotoxicity. The degree of toxicity of some directly-prepared eluates was reduced by adjustment of the pH to neutrality. It was apparent that dentin reduced the potential for cytotoxicity of glass-ionomer cements to a large degree. Proposed mechanisms for the reduction were limited availability of water at the dentin-cement interface and thus limited dissolution of components, buffering of acid components of the cements by dentin, or other chemical interactions with dentin.

  9. The Heroes' Problems: Exploring the Potentials of Google Glass for Biohazard Handling Professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jack Shen-Kuen; Henry, Michael J.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Love, Oriana J.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2015-06-23

    In “white powder incidents” or other suspicious and risky situations relating to deadly diseases or chemicals (e.g., Ebola investigation), those who handle the potentially hazardous materials are the heroes who spearhead the first responder’s operations. Although well trained, these heroes need to manage complex problems and make life-or-death decisions while handling the unknown and dangerous. We are motivated to explore how Google Glass can facilitate those heroes’ missions. To this end, we conducted contextual inquiry on six biohazard-handling, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)-wearing professionals. With an inductive thematic analysis, we summarized the heroes’ workflow and four groups of “Heroes’ Problems”. A unique “A3 Model” (Awareness, Analysis, Action) was generated to encapsulate our qualitative findings and proposed Glass features. The findings serve as the groundwork for our future development.

  10. Anti-fish bacterial pathogen effect of visible light responsive Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles immobilized on glass using TiO{sub 2} sol–gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, N. [Center of General Education, MingDao University, Taiwan (China); Lee, Y.C. [Graduate Institute of Materials Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chang, C.Y. [Center of General Education, National Taitung Junior College, Taiwan (China); Cheng, T.C., E-mail: cheng.tachih@gmail.com [Department of Tropical Agriculture and International Cooperation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-31

    This paper demonstrates a fish pathogen reduction procedure that uses TiO{sub 2} sol–gel coating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@TiO{sub 2} powder on glass substrate. Such procedure can effectively relieve two constraints that haunt TiO{sub 2} sterilization applications: 1) the need for UV for overcoming the wide band gap of pure TiO{sub 2} and 2) the difficulty of its recovering from water for reuse. In the process, visible light responsive Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are synthesized and immobilized on glass using TiO{sub 2} sol–gel as the binder for fish bacterial pathogen disinfection test. After 3 h of visible light irradiation, the immobilized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@TiO{sub 2}'s inhibition efficiencies for fish bacterial pathogen are, respectively, 50% for Edwardsiella tarda (BCRC 10670) and 23% for Aeromonas hydrophila (BCRC 13018)

  11. [Immobilization remediation of Cd and Pb contaminated soil: remediation potential and soil environmental quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue-Bing; Wang, Peng-Chao; Xu, Ying-Ming; Sun, Yang; Qin, Xu; Zhao, Li-Jie; Wang, Lin; Liang, Xue-Feng

    2014-12-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the immobilization remediation effects of sepiolite on soils artificially combined contamination by Cd and Pb using a set of various pH and speciation of Cd and Pb in soil, heavy metal concentration in Oryza sativa L., and soil enzyme activity and microbial quantity. Results showed that the addition of sepiolite increased the soil pH, and the exchangeable fraction of heavy metals was converted into Fe-Mn oxide, organic and residual forms, the concentration of exchangeable form of Cd and Pb reduced by 1.4% - 72.9% and 11.8% - 51.4%, respectively, when compared with the control. The contents of heavy metals decreased with increasing sepiolite, with the maximal Cd reduction of 39.8%, 36.4%, 55.2% and 32.4%, respectively, and 22.1%, 54.6%, 43.5% and 17.8% for Pb, respectively, in the stems, leaves, brown rice and husk in contrast to CK. The addition of sepiolite could improve the soil environmental quality, the catalase and urease activities and the amount of bacteria and actinomycete were increased to some extents. Although the fungi number and invertase activity were inhibited compared with the control group, it was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The significant correlation between pH, available heavy metal content, urease and invertase activities and heavy metal concentration in the plants indicated that these parameters could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of stabilization remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil.

  12. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    An investigation was made of the high-level radioactive waste immobilization technology programs in the U.S. and Europe, and of the associated regulatory programs and waste management perspectives in the countries studied. Purpose was to assess the ability of those programs to satisfy DOE waste management needs and U.S. regulatory requirements. This volume includes: introduction, immobilization strategies in the context of waste isolation program needs, high-level waste management as an integrated system, regulatory goals, engineered-barrier characteristics, barrier technology, high-level waste disposal programs, analysis of HLW immobilization technology in the context of policy and regulatory requirements, and waste immobilization program option

  13. Phyto-crystallization of silver and gold by Erigeron annuus (L. Pers flower extract and catalytic potential of synthesized and commercial nano silver immobilized on sodium alginate hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanivel Velmurugan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A green, eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles (AgNPs and AuNPs using Erigeron annuus (L. pers flower extract as both the reducing and capping agent is reported for the first time. Optimal nanoparticle production was achieved by adjusting various parameters including pH, extract concentration, metal ion concentration, and time. Initial verification of AgNP and AuNP production was done by visual observation and measuring surface plasmon spectra at 434 and 537 nm, respectively. The synthesized AgNPs and AuNPs were characterized by high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and zeta potential. The catalytic potential of E. annuus flower extract, silver ions, synthesized AgNPs, commercial grade AgNPs, and a mixture of flower extract and AgNPs immobilized on sodium alginate hydrogel beads (Na/Al HB was analyzed. The ability of these immobilized materials to degrade methylene blue was investigated. Commercial grade AgNPs immobilized with Na/Al HB 1.5 g/20 mL were observed to have good catalytic activity followed by a mixture of synthesized AgNPs immobilized with Na/Al HB and E. annuus flower extract immobilized with Na/Al HB at 1.5 g/20 mL.

  14. Sodium aluminum-iron phosphate glass-ceramics for immobilization of lanthanide oxide wastes from pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Stefanovsky, O. I.; Kadyko, M. I.; Nikonov, B. S.

    2018-03-01

    Sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glass ceramics containing of up to 20 wt.% rare earth (RE) oxides simulating pyroprocessing waste were produced by melting at 1250 °C followed by either quenching or slow cooling to room temperature. The iron-free glass-ceramics were composed of major glass and minor phosphotridymite and monazite. The iron-bearing glass-ceramics were composed of major glass and minor monazite and Na-Al-Fe orthophosphate at low waste loadings (5-10 wt.%) and major orthophosphate and minor monazite as well as interstitial glass at high waste loadings (15-20 wt.%). Slowly cooled samples contained higher amount of crystalline phases than quenched ones. Monazite is major phase for REs. Leach rates from the materials of major elements (Na, Al, Fe, P) are 10-5-10-7 g cm-2 d-1, RE elements - lower than 10-5 g cm-2 d-1.

  15. Evaluation of the potential of waste fondant glass in formulations of ceramic pasta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares Filho, J.E.; Santos, L.L. dos; Nascimento, R.M. do; Feitosa, A.O.; Dutra, R.P.S.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing amount of waste generated and deposited on the environment, many unspecified decomposition with time, as is the case of the glass. Thinking about it, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the power of the flux residue on glass formulations porcelains, as a flux to feldspar replacement. This study was performed in comparison with a standard formulation. The raw materials were characterized in the diffraction X-ray fluorescence and X-ray thermal differential analysis, and determination of the technological properties of water absorption, linear contraction, ignition loss, apparent porosity and apparent specific gravity in the formulation standard and replacement of feldspar in different percentages of waste and processing conditions. Specimens of the formulations were subjected to assay of three points. Results indicate that the residue glass has the potential of being used as a flux material in the composition of the ceramic body reduces the apparent porosity and according to the technology of water absorption property. The ceramic mass standard was classified as semi-stoneware, the BIIa group, and after the addition of the residue in any of the three percentages evaluated was classified as sandstone, belonging to the group BIb.(author)

  16. Potential of hybrid functionalized meso-porous materials for the separation and immobilization of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, V. [Programa Nacional de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. General, Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    Functionalized meso-porous materials are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic material in which a meso-porous metal oxide framework is functionalized with multifunctional organic molecules. These molecules may contain one or more anchor groups that form strong bonds to the pore surfaces of the metal oxide framework and free functional groups that can impart and or modify the functionality of the material such as for binding metal ions in solution. Such materials have been extensively studied over the past decade and are of particular interest in absorption applications because of the tremendous versatility in choosing the composition and architecture of the metal oxide framework and the nature of the functional organic molecule as well as the efficient mass transfer that can occur through a well-designed hierarchically porous network. A sorbent for nuclear applications would have to be highly selective for particular radio nuclides, it would need to be hydrolytically and radiolytically stable, and it would have to possess reasonable capacity and fast kinetics. The sorbent would also have to be available in a form suitable for use in a column. Finally, it would also be desirable if once saturated with radio nuclides, the sorbent could be recycled or converted directly into a ceramic or glass waste form suitable for direct repository disposal or even converted directly into a material that could be used as a transmutation target. Such a cradle-to- grave strategy could have many benefits in so far as process efficiency and the generation of secondary wastes are concerned.This paper will provide an overview of work done on all of the above mentioned aspects of the development of functionalized meso-porous adsorbent materials for the selective separation of lanthanides and actinides and discuss the prospects for future implementation of a cradle-to-grave strategy with such materials. (author)

  17. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Second stage immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Automated equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the conceptual design stage and the facility will begin operation in 2008. This paper discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Project phase 2 automation equipment conceptual design, equipment design, and work completed

  18. Glass melting and its innovation potentials : the role of glass flow in the bubble-removal process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Cincibusová, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2008), s. 240-249 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : bubble removal * temperature gradients * glass-flow patterns, Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.644, year: 2008

  19. Evaluation of ceramic materials to immobilize ICPP calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Cole, H.S.; Mittl, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Various ceramic materials as well as Formula 127 glass have been developed to immobilize Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) zirconia calcine. Tailored, titanate and matrix encapsulated ceramics were prepared by cold pressing and sintering reactants, while glass-ceramics were prepared by melting in a manner similar to that of preparing the glass. X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the presence of radionuclide and calcine matrix element host phases in each ceramic material. The aqueous leachability, practical loading capacity and the incorporation of waste elements into host phases was investigated and compared to those of Formula 127 glass through application of the Soxhlet and MCC-1 static leach tests. Potential process requirements for each material were evaluated based on the number of steps needed for laboratory-scale preparation. 5 figures, 4 tables

  20. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: selected immobilization processes, directory of selected European organizations involved in HLW management, U.S. high-level waste inventories, and selected European HLW program

  1. Engineered/designer biochar for contaminant removal/immobilization from soil and water: Potential and implication of biochar modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhang, Ming; Vithanage, Meththika; Mandal, Sanchita; Gao, Bin; Bolan, Nanthi S; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar has been suggested as a means of remediating contaminated soil and water. The practical applications of conventional biochar for contaminant immobilization and removal however need further improvements. Hence, recent attention has focused on modification of biochar with novel structures and surface properties in order to improve its remediation efficacy and environmental benefits. Engineered/designer biochars are commonly used terms to indicate application-oriented, outcome-based biochar modification or synthesis. In recent years, biochar modifications involving various methods such as, acid treatment, base treatment, amination, surfactant modification, impregnation of mineral sorbents, steam activation and magnetic modification have been widely studied. This review summarizes and evaluates biochar modification methods, corresponding mechanisms, and their benefits for contaminant management in soil and water. Applicability and performance of modification methods depend on the type of contaminants (i.e., inorganic/organic, anionic/cationic, hydrophilic/hydrophobic, polar/non-polar), environmental conditions, remediation goals, and land use purpose. In general, modification to produce engineered/designer biochar is likely to enhance the sorption capacity of biochar and its potential applications for environmental remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Utilization of ionizing radiation to obtention of polymeric supports for the enzyme immobilization with clinical potential use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodas, Andrea Cecilia Dorion

    1997-01-01

    In the development of polymers with biological activity, it was studied the grafting of acrylic acid monomer onto polyethylene and polypropylene pellets by mutual radiation grafting technique. The effect of dose rate, irradiation total dose, and monomer concentration were studied. With the Pp pellets the best grafting yield occurred at dose rate of 0.25 kGy/h and with the PE pellets the dose rate was lower. The irradiation dose from 8 to 10 kGy was sufficient to obtain the highest grafting degree, and the AA concentration of 40% v/v was suitable. The graft of poly (acrylic acid) was chemically modified for the immobilization of two enzymes, the glucose oxidase and the urease. For both enzymes the increasing of grafting degree onto the pellets, increased the enzyme immobilization yield. The immobilized glucose oxidase showed the best activity when immobilized onto Pp-A A supports with grafting degree around 2%. The optimum p H and temperature profiles, and the Km and Vmax for free and immobilized enzyme were determined. The supports grafted with A A were not suitable for the chemical immobilization of urease. (author)

  3. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification.

  4. Investigation of U3O8 immobilization in the GP-91 borosilicate glass by induction melter with a cold crucible (CCIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyunin, Y.I.; Demin, A.V.; Smelova, T.V.; Yudintsev, S.V.; Lapina, M.I.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most promising and intensively developed methods for the solidification of high-level wastes is their vitrification with the use of a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), which offers a number of advantages over ceramic melter. This work is concerned with comparison studies on the behavior of uranium in vitreous borosilicate materials synthesized by the traditional technique (melting in muffle furnaces) and CCIM method. The incorporation of uranium oxide U 3 O 8 into the GP-91 borosilicate glass with the use of CCIM technology is investigated. The limiting solubility of uranium in the GP-91 borosilicate glass is evaluated. The phase composition of precipitated dispersed particles based on uranium is determined. Some physicochemical properties of synthesized materials are explored. Investigations into the behavior of uranium in borosilicate glass prepared in the CCIM show a feasibility to synthesize the X-ray amorphous homogeneous borosilicate glasses incorporating as much as 25 - 28 wt% uranium, which is 4 - 5 times larger than that in glasses obtained by the traditional method. (author)

  5. Testing and evaluation of the properties of various potential materials for immobilizing high activity waste. First annual report (1977)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malow, G.; Beran, V.; Lutze, W.; Marples, J.A.C.; Dalton, J.T.; Hall, A.R.; Hough, A.; Boult, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    Four borosilicate glasses and one Celsian glass ceramic were tested under strictly identical conditions. This report presents the results of the following test: (a) Leach testing of samples, in the as cast state, annealed at 800 0 C for up to 100 days; (b) Grain titration test of hydrolytic resistance (DIN 12111); (c) Examination of the glass structure and its changes due to thermal effects, differential thermal analysis, x ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, microprobe analysis

  6. Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, B; Bolan, N S; Choppala, G; Kunhikrishnan, A; Sanderson, P; Wang, H; Currie, L D; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Y S; Kim, G

    2017-10-01

    Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56-76.2%, 3.21-83.56%, and 2.31-74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13-23.4% and 14.3-54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. α-Amylase immobilization onto functionalized graphene nanosheets as scaffolds: Its characterization, kinetics and potential applications in starch based industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kritika; Srivastava, Garima; Talat, Mahe; Srivastava, Onkar Nath; Kayastha, Arvind Mohan

    2015-09-01

    α-Amylase is imperative for starch and its deriviatized industries. Functionalized graphene sheets were tailored and optimized as scaffold for α-amylase immobilization using Response Surface Methodology based on Box-Behnken design, with an overall immobilization efficiency of 85.16%. Analysis of variance provided adequacy to the mathematical model for further studies. Native and immobilized functionalized graphene were characterized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, followed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Wheat α-amylase conjugated with functionalized graphene sheets were visually evident on transmission and scanning micrographs while the FTIR spectra showed interplay of various chemical interactions and bonding, during and after immobilization. Optimum pH and optimum temperature for immobilized enzyme though remained unchanged but showed broader range whereas K m showed a slight decrease (1.32 mg/mL). It also showed enhanced thermal and storage stability and retained 73% residual activity after 10 uses. These ensemble of properties and non-toxic nature of functionalized graphene, makes it viable to be absorbed commercially in starch processing industries.

  8. Carbohydrate base co-polymers as an efficient immobilization matrix to enhance lipase activity for potential biocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, Kirtikumar Chandulal; Bhanage, Bhalchandra Mahadeo

    2015-12-10

    In the present study, we have synthesized biocompatible hybrid blend of cellulosic polymers of hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose (HPMC) and chitosan (CHY) for the immobilization of Candida rugosa lipase (CRL). The immobilized biocatalyst HPMC:CHY:CRL was subjected for characterization such as SEM, TGA, water content analysis, lipase activity, specific activity and protein content analysis. The kinetic parameter study (Rmax/Km) demonstrated improved biocatalytic activity of lipase after immobilization on carbohydrate co-polymers of HPMC:CHY. This biocatalyst was then employed to study practical biocatalytic applications for kinetic resolution which provided 50% conversion and >94% enantiomeric excess of substrate/product (ees/eep). The protocol demonstrated excellent recyclability upto five cycles. Finally, we studied influence of immobilization on cellulosic polymers for substrate, structure and reactivity for kinetic resolution. Hence, we investigated R0 (initial reaction rate), E-value (enantioselectivity) and Ea (activation energy). This study confirms that, lipase immobilized on carbohydrate polymers had 3-4 folds higher biocatalytic activity as compared to crude CRL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermogelling chitosan–collagen–bioactive glass nanoparticle hybrids as potential injectable systems for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Cheisy D.F.; Carvalho, Sandhra M.; Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br; Pereira, Marivalda M., E-mail: mpereira@demet.ufmg.br

    2016-01-01

    Recently, stimuli-responsive nanocomposite-derived hydrogels have gained prominence in tissue engineering because they can be applied as injectable scaffolds in bone and cartilage repair. Due to the great potential of these systems, this study aimed to synthesize and characterize novel thermosensitive chitosan-based composites, chemically modified with collagen and reinforced by bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG) on the development of injectable nanohybrids for regenerative medicine applications. Thus, the composite hydrogels were extensively characterized by structural, morphological, rheological, and biological testing. The composites showed thermosensitive response with the gelation temperature at approximately 37 °C, which is compatible with the human body temperature. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that the chitosan hydrogels exhibited 3D-porous structures, and the incorporation of collagen in the system caused increase on the average pore size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicated the main functional groups of each component of the composite system and their chemical interactions forming the scaffold. Moreover, rheological measurements were employed to assess the viscoelastic behavior of the hydrogels as a function of the temperature. The results demonstrated that the addition of collagen and bioactive glass increases the mechanical properties after the gelation process. The addition of 2 wt.% of BG nanoparticles caused an increase of approximately 39% on stiffness compared to pure chitosan and the addition of 30 wt.% collagen caused a further increase on the stiffness by 95%. The cytotoxicity and cell viability of the hydrogels were assessed by MTT and LIVE/DEAD® assays, where the results demonstrated no toxic effect of the composites on the human osteosarcoma cell culture (SAOS) and kidney cells line of human embryo (HEK 293T). Hence, it can be stated that innovative composites were

  10. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  11. Development of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses as potential biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shidan; Wei, Qin; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Bingliang; Chen, You; Sun, Yanfei

    2015-01-01

    A new series of Fe80-x-yCrxMoyP13C7 (x = 10, y = 10; x = 20, y = 5; x = 2 0, y = 10, all in at.%) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with the maximum diameter of 6mm have been developed for biomedical implant application by the combination method of fluxing treatment and J-quenching technique. The corrosion performance of the present Fe-based BMGs is investigated in both Hank's solution (pH = 7.4) and artificial saliva solution (pH = 6.3) at 37 °C by electrochemical measurements. The result indicates that the corrosion resistance of the present Fe-based BMGs in the above two simulated body solutions is much better than that of biomedical 316 L stainless steel (316 L SS), and approaching that of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy (TC4). The concentrations of Fe, Ni and Cr ions released into the Hank's solution and artificial saliva solution from the present Fe-based BMGs after potentiodynamic polarization are significant lower than that released from 316 L SS. The biocompatibility of the present Fe-based BMGs is evaluated through the in vitro test of NIH3T3 cells culture in the present Fe-based BMG extraction media for 1, 3 and 5 days. The result indicates that the present Fe-based BMGs exhibit no cytotoxicity to NIH3T3 cells. And the test result of the cell adhesion and growth on the surface of the samples indicates that the present Fe-based BMGs exhibit the better cell viability compared with 316 L SS and TC4 biomedical alloys. The present Fe-based BMGs, especially Fe55Cr20Mo5P13C7 BMG, exhibit good glass formation ability, the high corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility, suggesting their promising potential as biomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microorganism immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  13. Interatomic potential to predict the favored and optimized compositions for ternary Cu-Zr-Hf metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, S. Y.; Cui, Y. Y.; Dai, Y.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2012-01-01

    Under the framework of smoothed and long range second-moment approximation of tight-binding, a realistic interatomic potential was first constructed for the Cu-Zr-Hf ternary metal system. Applying the constructed potential, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to compare the relative stability of crystalline solid solution versus its disordered counterpart over the entire composition triangle of the system (as a function of alloy composition). Simulations not only reveal that the origin of metallic glass formation but also determine, in the composition triangle, a quadrilateral region, within which metallic glass formation is energetically favored. It is proposed to define the energy differences between the crystalline solid solutions and disordered states as the driving force for amorphization and the corresponding calculations pinpoint an optimized composition locating at an composition of Cu 55 Zr 10 Hf 35 , around which the driving force for metallic glass formation reaches its maximum, suggesting that the ternary Cu-Zr-Hf metallic glasses designed to have the compositions around Cu 55 Zr 10 Hf 35 could be more stable than other alloys in the system. Moreover, for the Cu 55 Zr 10 Hf 35 metallic glass, the Voronoi tessellation calculations reveal some interesting features of its atomic configurations and coordination polyhedra distribution.

  14. Immobilization of high activity nuclear wastes in sintered glass. Fabrication of blocks at semi-industrial scale by hot pressing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, D.O.; Messi, N.B.; Riquelme, R.; Sterba, M.E.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sintering process under glass pressure has been studied as an alternative of melting with the aim of obtaining a monolytic material apt to preserve the high activity nuclear wastes. Different properties of the products obtained have been evaluated where the material is selected on the basis of the results attained. The purpose of this work is the equipment development and the process adjusting for the blocks obtainment. (Author) [es

  15. Biosorption potential of synthetic dyes by heat-inactivated and live Lentinus edodes CCB-42 immobilized in loofa sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Gabriela Gregolin; Ruiz, Suelen Pereira; Caetano, Wilker; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Matioli, Graciette

    2014-12-01

    Lentinus edodes CCB-42 was immobilized in loofa sponges and applied to the biosorption of the synthetic dyes congo red, bordeaux red and methyl violet. Live immobilized microorganisms achieved average decolorations of congo red, bordeaux red and methyl violet of 97.8, 99.7 and 90.6 %, respectively. The loofa sponge was the support and the coadjuvant promoting dye adsorption. The biosorption conditions were optimized for each dye, yielding 30 °C, pH 5.0 and a 12 h reaction time for congo red; 25 °C, pH 3.0 and 36 h for bordeaux red; and 25 °C, pH 8.0 and 24 h for methyl violet. Operational stability was evaluated over five consecutive cycles, with both bordeaux red and congo red exhibiting decolorations above 90 %, while the decoloration of methyl violet decreased after the third cycle. In the sixth month of storage, congo red, bordeaux red and methyl violet had decolorations of 93.1, 79.4 and 73.8 %, respectively. Biosorption process best fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic and Freundlich isotherm models. Maximum biosorption capacity of heat-treated L. edodes immobilized in loofa sponge was determined as 143.678, 500.00 and 381.679 mg/g for congo red, bordeaux red and methyl violet, respectively. Treatment with immobilized L. edodes reduced the phytotoxicity of the medium containing dyes. FT-Raman experiments suggested the occurrence of interactions between loofa sponge fibers, L. edodes and dye. L. edodes CCB-42 immobilized in loofa sponges represents a promising new mode of treatment of industrial effluents.

  16. Crystalline phase, microstructure, and aqueous stability of zirconolite-barium borosilicate glass-ceramics for immobilization of simulated sulfate bearing high-level liquid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lang; Xiao, Jizong; Wang, Xin; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang; Liao, Qilong

    2018-01-01

    The crystalline phase, microstructure, and aqueous stability of zirconolite-barium borosilicate glass-ceramics with different content (0-30 wt %) of simulated sulfate bearing high-level liquid waste (HLLW) were evaluated. The sulfate phase segregation in vitrification process was also investigated. The results show that the glass-ceramics with 0-20 wt% of HLLW possess mainly zirconolite phase along with a small amount baddeleyite phase. The amount of perovskite crystals increases while the amount of zirconolite crystals decreases when the HLLW content increases from 20 to 30 wt%. For the samples with 20-30 wt% HLLW, yellow phase was observed during the vitrification process and it disappeared after melting at 1150 °C for 2 h. The viscosity of the sample with 16 wt% HLLW (HLLW-16) is about 27 dPa·s at 1150 °C. The addition of a certain amount (≤20 wt %) of HLLW has no significant change on the aqueous stability of glass-ceramic waste forms. After 28 days, the 90 °C PCT-type normalized leaching rates of Na, B, Si, and La of the sample HLLW-16 are 7.23 × 10-3, 1.57 × 10-3, 8.06 × 10-4, and 1.23 × 10-4 g·m-2·d-1, respectively.

  17. Effects of photovoltaic module soiling on glass surface resistance and potential-induced degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60°C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 orders of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when ...

  18. Glass corrosion in the presence of iron-bearing materials and potential corrosion suppressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Neill, Lindsay; Weaver, Jamie L.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Musa, Christopher; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Gin, Stephane; Wall, Nathalie

    2015-07-16

    A complete understanding of radioactive waste glass interactions with near-field materials is essential for appropriate nuclear waste repository performance assessment. In many geologic repository designs, Fe is present in both the natural environment and in the containers that will hold the waste glasses. In this paper we discuss investigations into the alteration of International Simple Glass (ISG) in the presence of Fe0 foil and hematite (Fe2O3). ISG alteration is more pronounced in the presence of Fe0 than with hematite. Additionally, minimal glass corrosion is observed for distances equal to 5 mm between Fe materials and ISG, but substantial glass corrosion is observed for systems exhibiting full contact between Fe0 material and ISG. Diatomaceous earth appears to be a better corrosion suppressant than silica when present with iron and ISG.

  19. Uptake and accumulation of 137Cs by upland grassland soil fungi: a potential pool of Cs immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dighton, J.; Clint, G.M.; Poskitt, J.

    1991-01-01

    Reports of high concentrations of fallout radiocaesium in basidiomycete fruit bodies after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and speculation that fungi could be long-term 137 Cs accumulators led us to ask if fungi could be long-term 137 Cs accumulators. We used six common upland grassland species to try to estimate their importance in the immobilization of 137 Cs. Uptake of Cs by these species ranged from 44 to 235 nmol Cs g − 1d.w. h − 1. Efflux studies indicate that more than 40% of the Cs taken up is bound within the hyphae. We estimate that the fungal component of the soil could immobilize the total radiocaesium fallout received in upland grasslands following the Chernobyl accident

  20. Molecular boxes on a molecular printboard: encapsulation of anionic dyes in immobilized dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onclin, S.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ravoo, B.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2005-01-01

    Fifth-generation poly(propylene imine) dendrimers, modified with 64 apolar adamantyl groups, have been immobilized on cyclodextrin host monolayers (molecular printboards) on glass by supramolecular microcontact printing. The immobilized dendrimers retain their guest-binding properties and function

  1. Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1978-12-01

    A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal

  2. Industrial opportunities of controlled melt flow during glass melting, part 2: Potential applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbek, Lukáš; Dyrčíková, Petra; Němec, Lubomír; Jebavá, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2014), s. 202-209 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * controlled flow * space utilization * homogenization processess Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2014 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2014/pdf/2014_03_202.pdf

  3. Review - bioactive glass implants for potential application in structural bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahaman Mohamed N.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass particles andweak scaffolds have been used to heal small contained bone defects but an unmet challenge is the development of bioactive glass implants with the requisite mechanical reliability and in vivo performance to heal structural bone defects. Inadequate mechanical strength and a brittle mechanical response have been key concerns in the use of bioactive glass scaffolds in structural bone repair. Recent research has shown the capacity to create strong porous bioactive glass scaffolds and the ability of these scaffolds to heal segmental bone defects in small and large rodents at a rate comparable to autogenous bone grafts. Loading these strong porous scaffolds with bone morphogenetic protein-2 can significantly enhance their ability to regenerate bone. Recentwork has also shown that coating the external surface of strong porous scaffolds with an adherent biodegradable polymer can dramatically improve their load-bearing capacity in flexural loading and their work of fracture (a measure of toughness. These tough and strong bioactive glass-polymer composites with an internal architecture conducive to bone infiltration could provide optimal synthetic implants for structural bone repair.

  4. Production of a potential liquid plant bio-stimulant by immobilized Piriformospora indica in repeated-batch fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Nikolay; Eichler-Löbermann, Bettina; Flor-Peregrin, Elena; Martos, Vanessa; Reyes, Antonia; Vassileva, Maria

    2017-12-01

    Piriformospora indica, a mycorrhizal-like fungus able to establish associations with roots of a wide range of plants, supporting plant nutrition and increasing plant resistance and tolerance to stress, was shown to solubilise phosphate applied in the form of animal bone char (HABO) in fermentation systems. The process of P solubilisation was caused most likely by proton extrusion and medium pH lowering. The fungal mycelium was successfully immobilized/retained in a polyurethane foam carrier. Further employment of the immobilized mycelium in repeated-batch fermentation process resulted in at least 5 cycles of P solubilization. The concentration of soluble P increased during the experiment with 1.0 and 3.0 g HABO l -1 and at the end of the 5th batch cycle reached 40.8 and 120 mg l -1 , respectively. The resulting final liquid product, without or with solubilized phosphate, was found to significantly increase plant growth and P plant uptake. It can be used as a biostimulant containing microbial plant growth-promoting substances and soluble P derived from renewable sources (HABO) thus supporting the development of sustainable agro-ecosystems.

  5. Immobilization of TiO2 nanopowder on glass beads for the photocatalytic decolorization of an azo dye C.I. Direct Red 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, N; Salari, D; Niaei, A; Rasoulifard, M H; Khataee, A R

    2005-01-01

    TiO2 supported on glass beads was prepared and its photocatalytic activity was determined by photooxidation of the commercial textile dye, C.I. Direct Red 23, in aqueous solution illuminated by a UV-C lamp (30 W). The progress of photocatalytic decolorization of the C.I. Direct Red 23 was studied by measuring the absorbance at lambda(max) = 507 nm by UV Vis spectrophotometer. The experiments indicated that both UV light and TiO2 were needed for the effective destruction of the dye. The effect of pH on the rate of decolorization efficiency was followed in the pH range 2-12. Acidic pH range was found to favor the decolorization rate. The addition of a proper amount of hydrogen peroxide improved the decolorization, whereas the excess hydrogen peroxide quenched the formation of hydroxyl radicals (*OH). The electrical energy consumption per order of magnitude for photocatalytic decolorization of the dye was lower in the UV/TiO2/H2O2 process than that in the UV/TiO2 process. In the real wastewater sample the efficiency of the method was determined by measuring the changes in the absorption spectra of the dye solution during photodegradation. Our results indicated that during the photooxidation process, the decolorization efficiency was more than 80% at irradiation time of 3 h.

  6. Potential of Hollow Glass Microsphere as Cement Replacement for Lightweight Foam Concrete on Thermal Insulation Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidan Shahiron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming can be defined as a gradual increase in the overall temperature of the earth’s atmosphere. A lot of research work has been carried out to reduce that heat inside the residence such as the used of low density products which can reduce the self-weight, foundation size and construction costs. Foamed concrete it possesses high flow ability, low self-weight, minimal consumption of aggregate, controlled low strength and excellent thermal insulation properties. This study investigate the characteristics of lightweight foamed concrete where Portland cement (OPC was replaced by hollow glass microsphere (HGMs at 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% by weight. The density of wet concrete is 1000 kg/m3 were tested with a ratio of 0.55 for all water binder mixture. Lightweight foamed concrete hollow glass microsphere (HGMs produced were cured by air curing and water curing in tank for 7, 14 and 28 days. A total of 52 concrete cubes of size 100mm × 100mm × 100mm and 215mm × 102.5mm × 65mm were produced. Furthermore, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and X-ray fluorescence (XRF were carried out to study the chemical composition and physical properties of crystalline materials in hollow glass microspheres. The experiments involved in this study are compression strength, water absorption test, density and thermal insulation test. The results show that the compressive strength of foamed concrete has reached the highest in 3% of hollow glass microsphere with less water absorption and less of thermal insulation. As a conclusion, the quantity of hollow glass microsphere plays an important role in determining the strength and water absorption and also thermal insulation in foamed concrete and 3% hollow glass microspheres as a replacement for Portland cement (OPC showed an optimum value in this study as it presents a significant effect than other percentage.

  7. Inclusion bodies of recombinant Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen p18 as potential immobilized antigens in enzyme immunoassays for detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Kariapper, Leena; Krishnan, Gopala; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Ng, Ching Ching

    2015-08-25

    Development of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) often utilizes synthetic peptides or recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli as immobilized antigens. Because inclusion bodies (IBs) formed during recombinant protein expression in E. coli are commonly thought as misfolded aggregates, only refolded proteins from IBs are used to develop new or in-house diagnostic assays. However, the promising utilities of IBs as nanomaterials and immobilized enzymes as shown in recent studies have led us to explore the potential use of IBs of recombinant Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen p18 (VCA p18) as immobilized antigens in ELISAs for serologic detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thioredoxin fusion VCA p18 (VCA-Trx) and IBs of VCA p18 without fusion tags (VCA-IBs) were purified from E. coli. The diagnostic performances of IgG/VCA-IBs, IgG/VCA-Denat-IBs (using VCA-IBs coated in 8mol/l urea), IgG/VCA-Trx, and IgG/VCA-Peptide assays were compared by screening 100 NPC case-control pairs. The IgG/VCA-Denat-IBs assay showed the best area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC: 0.802; p<0.05), while the AUCs for the IgG/VCA-IBs, IgG/VCA-Trx, and IgG/VCA-Peptide assays were comparable (AUC: 0.740, 0.727, and 0.741, respectively). We improved the diagnostic performance of the ELISA significantly using IBs of recombinant VCA p18. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Composition and redox control of waste glasses: Recommendation for process control limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrochemical series of redox couples, originally developed for Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 131 (SRL-131) as a reference composition, has been extended to two other alkali borosilicate compositions that are candidate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization. Since no dramatic differences were ascertained in the redox chemistry of selected multivalent elements in SRL-131 versus that in Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 165 (SRL-165) and in West Valley glass number-sign 205 (WV-205), the comprehensive electrochemical series can readily be applied to a range of nuclear waste glass compositions. In order to alleviate potential problems with foaming and precipitation of insolubles during the processing of the nuclear waste in these glass melts, the [Fe 2+ ]/[Fe 3+ ] ratio of the melt should be between 0.1 and 0.5. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: bubble removal under the effect of the centrifugal force

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Tonarová, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2008), s. 225-239 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : glass melt * bubble removal * centrifugal force Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.644, year: 2008

  10. Metallic Glasses as Potential Reinforcements in Al and Mg Matrices: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jayalakshmi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of metal matrix composites (MMCs with metallic glass/amorphous alloy reinforcements is an emerging research field. As reinforcements, metallic glasses with their high strength (up to ~2 GPa and high elastic strain limit (~2% can provide superior mechanical properties. Being metallic in nature, the glassy alloys can ensure better interfacial properties when compared to conventional ceramic reinforcements. Given the metastable nature of metallic glasses, lightweight materials such as aluminum (Al and magnesium (Mg with relatively lower melting points are suitable matrix materials. Synthesis of these advanced composites is a challenge as selection of processing method and appropriate reinforcement type (which does not allow devitrification of the metallic glass during processing is important. Non-conventional techniques such as high frequency induction sintering, bidirectional microwave sintering, friction stir processing, accumulative roll-bonding, and spark plasma sintering are being explored to produce these novel materials. In this paper, an overview on the synthesis and properties of aluminum and magnesium based composites with glassy reinforcement produced by various unconventional methods is presented. Evaluation of properties of the produced composites indicate: (i retention of amorphous state of the reinforcement after processing; (ii significant improvement in hardness and strength; (iii improvement/retention of ductility; and (iv high wear resistance and low coefficient of friction. Further, a comparative understanding of the properties highlights that the selection of the processing method is important in producing high performance composites.

  11. Diffusion of Ag ions under random potential barriers in silver-containing chalcogenide glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stehlík, Štěpán; Shimakawa, K.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 20 (2012), s. 1-5 ISSN 0022-3727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Ag ion diffusion * chalcogenide glass * Nyquist plots Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/45/20/205304/

  12. Development of Co-based bulk metallic glasses as potential biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zeyan; Wei, Qin; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Bingliang; Chen, You; Sun, Yanfei

    2016-12-01

    A new series of Co80-x-yCrxMoyP14B6 (x=5 y=5; x=5 y=10; x=10 y=10, all values in at.%) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with a maximum diameter of 1.5mm has been developed for using them as potential bio-implant materials by a combination of fluxing treatment and J-quenching technique. The performance of the present Co-based BMGs in biomedical implant applications was investigated as compared to the CoCrMo biomedical alloy (ASTM F75) and 316L stainless steel (316L SS). The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated in both Hank's solution (pH=7.4) and artificial saliva solution (pH=6.3) at 37°C employing electrochemical measurements. The results indicate that the Co-based BMGs exhibit much higher corrosion resistance in the simulated body solutions than that of 316L SS. Compared with the corrosion resistance of ASTM F75, that of Co70Cr5Mo5P14B6 and Co65Cr5Mo10P14B6 BMGs is found to be lower and that of Co60Cr10Mo10P14B6 BMG is higher. The concentrations of Co, Cr, and Mo ions released into the simulated body solutions from our Co-based BMGs after potentiodynamic polarization are significantly lower than that released from ASTM F75. The biocompatibility of the specimens was evaluated using an in vitro test of NIH3T3 cell culture in the specimen extraction media for 1, 3, 5, and 7days, revealing the non-cytotoxicity of the Co-based BMGs towards NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, examinations on the cell adhesion and growth on the surface of the specimens indicate that the Co-based BMGs exhibit better cell viability compared to ASTM F75 and 316L SS biomedical alloys. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biodegradation characterization and immobilized strains' potential for quinoline degradation by Brevundimonas sp. K4 isolated from activated sludge of coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunrong; Zhang, Mengru; Cheng, Fanglin; Geng, Qi

    2015-01-01

    A novel quinoline-degrading strain, named K4, was isolated from activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant and identified as Brevundimonas sp. on the basis of its 16s rDNA gene sequence analysis. Its optimum temperature and pH for quinoline degradation were 30 °C and pH 9.0, respectively, and during the biodegradation process, at 100 mg/L initial quinoline concentration, an inoculation amount of 8% (OD600 of 0.23) was the optimal strain concentration. In addition, the kinetics of free K4 strains for quinoline degradation showed that it followed a zero-order equation. Furthermore, compared with free K4 strains, immobilized K4 strains' potential for quinoline degradation was investigated by adding both of them into SBR reactors for actual coking wastewater treatment on operation over 15 days. The results showed that bioaugmentation by both free and immobilized K4 strains enhanced quinoline removal efficiency, and especially, the latter could reach its stable removal after a shorter accommodation period, with 94.8% of mean quinoline removal efficiency.

  14. Photodegradation of diethyl phthalate with PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} immobilized on glass plate irradiated with visible light and simulated sunlight—effect of synthesized method and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chung-Hsuang, E-mail: jeremyh@ccms.nkfust.edu.tw [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, No. 1, University Rd., Yenchau Dist., Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Ching, E-mail: caroline@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, No. 700, Kaohsiung University Rd., Nan-Tzu Dist., Kaohsiung City 811, Taiwan (China); Li, Huei-Wen, E-mail: soillab@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, No. 700, Kaohsiung University Rd., Nan-Tzu Dist., Kaohsiung City 811, Taiwan (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Photocatalysts doped with polyaniline and functionalized CNTs onto TiO{sub 2} were developed. • The PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts possessed both advantages of PANi and CNTs. • The fabricated PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts exhibited high photocatalytic activity under sunlight. • The hydrothermal synthesized PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} presented a good photocatalytic activity and the sol–gel ones presented a good photocatalytic stability. - Abstract: Diethyl phthalate (DEP) is one of the most common phthalates for industrial use and has widely spread in environment. A series of PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} potocatalysts immobilized on glass plate irradiated with visible light were presented to degrade DEP in this study. The PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} potocatalysts were fabricated by co-doping with polyaniline (PANi) and two functionalized CNT (CNT-COCl and CNT-COOH) onto TiO{sub 2} followed by a hydrothermal synthesis and a sol–gel hydrolysis. Doping of PANi resulted in the absorption edge of the fabricated potocatalysts shifting to 421–437 nm and the most distinguished red-shift effect was found in hydrothermal synthesized photocatalysts. The best DEP degradation of 41.5–59.0% and 44.5–67.4% was found in the simulated sunlight system irradiated for 120 min for sol–gel hydrolysis PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts and hydrothermal synthesized ones, respectively. The optimum pH was determined at 5.0 and 7.0 for the two PANi/CNT/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts mentioned above, respectively. The reusability of the sol–gel hydrolyzed photocatalysts up to 5 times was observed no decline in the photodegradation efficiency but less photocatalytic stability of the hydrothermal synthesized ones was found. Meanwhile, the active species of OH radicals generated in the DEP degradation system was identified by free radical scavenging experiments.

  15. Potential for bias in epidemiologic studies that rely on glass-based retrospective assessment of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective assessment of exposure to radon remains the greatest challenge in epidemiologic efforts to assess lung cancer risk associated with residential exposure. An innovative technique based on measurement of α-emitting, long-lived daughters embedded by recoil into household glass may one day provide improved radon dosimetry. Particulate air pollution is known, however, to retard the plate-out of radon daughters. This would be expected to result in a differential effect on dosimetry, where the calibration curve relating the actual historical radon exposure to the remaining α-activity in the glass would be different in historically smoky and nonsmoky environments. The resulting open-quotes measurement confoundingclose quotes can distort inferences about the effect of radon and can also produce spurious evidence for synergism between radon exposure and cigarette smoking. 18 refs., 4 figs

  16. Sewage sludge ash characteristics and potential for use in bricks, tiles and glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Ciarán J; Dhir, Ravindra K; Ghataora, Gurmel S

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of sewage sludge ash (SSA) and its use in ceramic applications pertaining to bricks, tiles and glass ceramics have been assessed using the globally published literature in the English medium. It is shown that SSA possesses similar chemical characteristics to established ceramic materials and under heat treatment achieves the targeted densification, strength increases and absorption reductions. In brick and tile applications, technical requirements relating to strength, absorption and durability are achievable, with merely manageable performance reductions with SSA as a partial clay replacement. Fluxing properties of SSA facilitate lower firing temperatures during ceramics production, although reductions in mix plasticity leads to higher forming water requirements. SSA glass ceramics attained strengths in excess of natural materials such as granite and marble and displayed strong durability properties. The thermal treatment and nature of ceramic products also effectively restricted heavy metal leaching to low levels. Case studies, predominantly in bricks applications, reinforce confidence in the material with suitable technical performances achieved in practical conditions.

  17. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  18. Improved immobilization of laccase on a glassy carbon electrode by oriented covalent attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A laccase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 was reported to be potentially useful in the design of a temperature controlled biofuel cell. For enhancing its application in different thermal conditions, we engineered a laccase-oriented immobilized electrode. A site-directed mutant N323C of the laccase was constructed. A photometric assay was employed in order to compare the catalytic properties of wild-type laccase and mutant. The mutant was attached to a glass carbon electrode by covalent cross-linking. The electrochemical properties of the immobilized laccase were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. This immobilization allowed the active electrode to function at temperatures up to 95°C. The thermal and pH dependence profiles were similar to those of the soluble enzyme investigated by spectrophotometry.

  19. Potentiality of a frit waste from ceramic sector as raw material to glass-ceramic material production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachina Albert, E.; Llop Pla, J.; Notari Abad, M. D.; Carda Castello, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    This work consists of studying the devitrification capacity of a residue from sodium-calcium frit, using the vitreous powder sintering method, which follows the traditional ceramic processing route, including a specific heat treatment to generate the appearance of crystals from the original glass phase. Initially the frit residue has been characterized by instrumental techniques such as XRF, XRD and DTA/TG. Furthermore, the chemical analysis (XRF) has allowed the prediction of devitrification potentiality of this residue by theoretical approaches represented by Gingsberg, Raschin-Tschetverikov and Lebedeva ternary diagrams. Then, this residue was subjected to traditional ceramic method, by changing the grinding time, the pressing pressure and prepared samples were obtained at different temperatures. In this part, the techniques for measuring particle size by laser diffraction and XRD and SEM to evaluate the generated crystalline phases, were applied. Finally, it has been found that this frit residue works as glass-ceramic precursor, devitrifying in wollastonite crystals as majority phase and without being subjected to the melting step of the glass-ceramic typical method. (Author)

  20. Potential for Lead Release from Lead-Immobilized Animal Manure Compost in Rhizosphere Soil of Shooting Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Katoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify the magnitude of lead release from lead-sorbed animal manure compost (AMC in rhizosphere soil compared with nonplanted soil of shooting range. The presence of buckwheat caused reduction in rhizosphere soil pH and enhancement in the level of water-soluble organic carbon compared with those of nonplanted soil. In addition, the presence of buckwheat altered the lead phases and increased the relative amount of the soluble exchangeable fraction, resulting in increase in the CaCl2-soluble lead level. In contrast, the presence of Guinea grass did not change the lead bioavailability or phases compared with nonplanted soil. Lead release tests in solution showed that between solution pH 5 and solution pH 7 the amount of lead released from the compost was higher in the rhizosphere soil of buckwheat than in nonplanted soil, whereas there was no significant difference between the rhizosphere soil of Guinea grass and nonplanted soil. These results suggest that the increase in the quantity of exchangeable lead resulting from the rhizosphere effect induces lead immobilized by the AMC to be remobilized. Therefore, AMC should be applied to soils that contain plants that are unable to alter the lead phases in the shooting range soil. Efforts should be particularly made to ensure that lead cannot be transformed to the exchangeable phase.

  1. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  3. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  4. Application of radiopolymerization for immobilization of enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, O.Z.; Mastro, N.L. del; Castagnet, A.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrophilic glass-forming monomers were used in an application of irradiation technology for the immobilization of cellulase and cellobiase. Experiments to observe the effect of additives such as silicates and polyethylene glycol in the enzyme entrapment are reported on. In all cases, enzymatic activity was maintained for more than fifteen batch enzyme reactions. (Author) [pt

  5. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jfreire@invi.uned.es

    2008-07-16

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, two distinct values of B have been considered for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, mixed models with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of ordering or crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of the abrupt change in the curves associated with a thermodynamic transition. It is concluded that ordering is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves, which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches.

  6. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, J.; Debois, M.M.; Raben, A.; Mageras, G.S.; Lutz, W.R.; Mychalczak, B.; Schwartz, L.H.; Gloeggler, P.J.; Leibel, S.A.; Fuks, Z.; Kutcher, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lung tumors are subject to movement due to respiratory motion. Conventionally, a margin is applied to the clinical target volume (CTV) to account for this and other treatment uncertainties. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefits of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique which has two distinct features - deep inspiration which reduces lung density and breath-hold which immobilizes lung tumors. Both properties can potentially reduce the mass of normal lung tissue in the high dose region, thus improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: To study the efficacy of the DIBH technique, CT scans are acquired for each patient under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing; DIBH; shallow inspiration breath-hold; shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans are used to generate treatment plans for comparison of standard and DIBH techniques, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans provide information on the maximum extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry and slow vital capacity maneuvers. For the treatment plan comparison free-breathing and DIBH planning target volumes (PTVs) are constructed consisting of the CTV plus a margin for setup error and lung tumor motion. For both plans the margin for setup error is the same while the margin for lung tumor motion differs. The margin for organ motion in free-breathing is determined by the maximum tumor excursions in the shallow inspiration and expiration CT scans. For the DIBH, tumor motion is reduced to the extent to which DIBH can be maintained and the margin for any residual tumor motion is determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies, acquired with the patient monitored using spirometry. Three-dimensional treatment plans, generated using apertures based on the free-breathing and DIBH PTVs, are

  7. Study of the validity of a combined potential model using the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo method in Fluoride glass system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kotbi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of appropriate interaction models is among the major disadvantages of conventional methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD and Monte Carlo (MC simulations. On the other hand, the so-called Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC method, based on experimental data, can be applied without any interatomic and/or intermolecular interactions. The RMC results are accompanied by artificial satellite peaks. To remedy this problem, we use an extension of the RMC algorithm, which introduces an energy penalty term into the acceptance criteria. This method is referred to as the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC method. The idea of this paper is to test the validity of a combined potential model of coulomb and Lennard-Jones in a Fluoride glass system BaMnMF7 (M = Fe,V using HRMC method. The results show a good agreement between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as a meaningful improvement in partial pair distribution functions (PDFs. We suggest that this model should be used in calculating the structural properties and in describing the average correlations between components of fluoride glass or a similar system. We also suggest that HRMC could be useful as a tool for testing the interaction potential models, as well as for conventional applications.

  8. The characterization and testing of candidate immobilization forms for the disposal of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakel, A. J.; Buck, E. C.; Chamberlain, D. B.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Fortner, J. A.; Marra, J. C.; Mcgrail, B. P.; Mertz, C. J.; Peeler, D. K.; Shaw, H. F.; Strachan, D. M.; Van Konynenburg, R. A.; Vienna, J. D.; Wolf, S. F.

    1997-01-01

    Candidate immobilization forms for the disposal of surplus weapons-useable are being tested and characterized. The goal of the testing program was to provide sufficient data that, by August 1997, an informed selection of a single immobilization form could be made so that the form development and production R and D could be more narrowly focused. Two forms have been under consideration for the past two years: glass and ceramic. In August, 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected ceramic for plutonium disposition, halting further work on the glass material. In this paper, we will briefly describe these two waste forms, then describe our characterization techniques and testing methods. The analytical methods used to characterize altered and unaltered samples are the same. A full suite of microscopic techniques is used. Techniques used include optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopies. For both candidate immobilization forms, the analyses are used to characterize the material for the presence of crystalline phases and amorphous material. Crystalline materials, either in the untested immobilization form or in the alteration products from testing, are characterized with respect to morphology, crystal structure, and composition. The goal of these analyses is to provide data on critical issues such as Pu and neutron absorber volubility in the immobilization form, thermal stability, potential separation of absorber and Pu, and the long-term behavior of the materials. Results from these analyses will be discussed in the presentation. Testing methods include MCC-1 tests, product consistency tests (methods A and B), unsaturated ''drip'' tests, vapor hydration tests, single-pass flow-through tests, and pressurized unsaturated flow tests. Both candidate immobilization forms have very low dissolution rates; examples of typical test results will be reported

  9. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-15

    DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Both low-activity and high-level wastes will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass. One area of work is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated low-activity waste glass, LAWA44, provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 97.9 to 102.6 wt %, indicating acceptable recovery of the glass components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. It was noted that the measured B2O3 concentrations are somewhat above the targeted values for the study glasses. No obvious trends were observed with regard to the multiple melting steps used to prepare the study glasses, indicating that any potential effects of volatility were below measurable thresholds.

  10. Tannin-immobilized cellulose hydrogel fabricated by a homogeneous reaction as a potential adsorbent for removing cationic organic dye from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ying; Chu, Shan; Chen, Yue; Li, Zhidong; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Shuqi; Wu, Xingjun; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Xuejing; Tang, Keyong

    2017-10-01

    Tannin-immobilized cellulose (CT) hydrogels were successfully fabricated by homogeneous immobilization and crosslinking reaction via a simple method. The structures and properties of hydrogels were characterized by SEM and mechanical test. Methlyene Blue (MB) was selected as a cationic dye model, and the adsorption ability of CT hydrogel was evaluated. Tannins immobilized acted as adsorbent sites which combined MB by electrostatic attraction, resulting in the attractive adsorption ability of CT hydrogel. Adsorption kinetics could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model, and the absorption behaviors were in agreement with a Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption-desorption cycle of CT hydrogel was repeated six times without significant loss of adsorption capacity. In this work, both tannin immobilization and hydrogel formation were achieved simultaneously by a facile homogeneous reaction, providing a new pathway to fabricate tannin-immobilized materials for water treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of the dynamics of glass-forming liquids from the properties of the potential energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sumilan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2012-02-01

    We develop a framework for understanding the difference between strong and fragile behavior in the dynamics of glass-forming liquids from the properties of the potential energy landscape. Our approach is based on a master equation description of the activated jump dynamics among the local minima of the potential energy (the so-called inherent structures) that characterize the potential energy landscape of the system. We study the dynamics of a small atomic cluster using this description as well as molecular dynamics simulations and demonstrate the usefulness of our approach for this system. Many of the remarkable features of the complex dynamics of glassy systems emerge from the activated dynamics in the potential energy landscape of the atomic cluster. The dynamics of the system exhibits typical characteristics of a strong supercooled liquid when the system is allowed to explore the full configuration space. This behavior arises because the dynamics is dominated by a few lowest-lying minima of the potential energy and the potential energy barriers between these minima. When the system is constrained to explore only a limited region of the potential energy landscape that excludes the basins of attraction of a few lowest-lying minima, the dynamics is found to exhibit the characteristics of a fragile liquid. © 2012 American Physical Society

  12. Economics of transuranic waste immobilization and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Seven proposed transuranic (TRU) waste immobilization systems are assessed and evaluated on the basis of costs. Specific cost components that are estimated include processing costs, transportation costs, and repository or disposal costs. Economics are examined to determine the effects that each component has on the system costs. The evaluation led to two recommended systems based on these cost component evaluations. A cast-cement system is recommended for immobilized TRU wastes disposed in a defense-related waste repository because of lower processing costs and a reduced incentive for waste volume reduction. The joule-heated glass system is recommended for the immobilized TRU wastes placed in a commercial waste repository since the increased disposal cost places a greater emphasis and value upon an immobilization system which provides a large volume reduction

  13. Fabrication and Crystallization of ZnO-SLS Glass Derived Willemite Glass-Ceramics as a Potential Material for Optics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Mohd Zaid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Willemite glass-ceramics were successfully derived from conventional melt-quench ZnO-SLS precursor glass by an isothermal heat treatment process. The effect of heat treatment temperatures on the physical properties was investigated by Archimedes principle and linear shrinkage. The generation of willemite crystal phase and morphology with increase in heat treatment temperature was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM techniques. X-ray diffraction revealed that the metastable β-Zn2SiO4 and thermodynamically stable zinc orthosilicate α-Zn2SiO4 phases can be observed at temperatures above 700°C. The experimental results indicated that the density and shrinkage of the glass-ceramic vary with increasing the sintering temperature. FTIR studies showed that the structure of glass-ceramic consists of SiO2 and ZnO4 units and exhibits the structural evolution of willemite glass-ceramics. The characteristic of strong vibrational bands can be related to the SiO44- tetrahedron corresponding to reference spectra of willemite.

  14. Radioactive wastes immobilization in glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotto, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    A review on the several options available for encapsulation and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes is presented, along with the relative merits and disadvantages of each material to be encapsulated. Some of the main fields requiring further advancements in both scientific and technological research are discussed and a few suggestions for the solution of the brazilian problem are given. (Author) [pt

  15. Enhanced stability and catalytic activity of immobilized α-amylase on modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles for potential application in food industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinipour, Seyyedeh Leila [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Biotechnology Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khiabani, Mahmoud Sowti [Tabriz University, Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Science (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamishehkar, Hamed, E-mail: hamishehkar.hamed@gmail.com [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Drug Applied Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, Roya, E-mail: salehiro@tbzmed.ac.ir [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and School of Advanced Medical Science (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes play an essential role in catalyzing various reactions. However, their instability upon repetitive/prolonged use, elevated temperature, acidic or alkaline pH remains an area of concern. α-Amylase, a widely used enzyme in food industries for starch hydrolysis, was covalently immobilized on the surface of two developed matrices, amino-functionalized silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (AFSMNPs) alone and covered with chitosan. The synthesis steps and characterizations of NPs were examined by FT-IR, VSM, and SEM. Modified nanoparticles with average diameters of 20–80 nm were obtained. Enzyme immobilization efficiencies of 89 and 74 were obtained for AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. The optimum pH obtained was 6.5 and 8.0 for the enzyme immobilized on AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. Optimum temperature for the immobilized enzyme shifted toward higher temperatures. Considerable enhancements in thermal stabilities were observed for the immobilized enzyme at elevated temperatures up to 80 °C. A frequent use experiment demonstrated that the immobilized enzyme retained 74 and 85 % of its original activity even after 20 times of repeated use in AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. Storage stability demonstrated that free enzyme lost its activity completely within 30 days. But, immobilized enzyme on AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs preserved 65.73 and 78.63 % of its initial activity, respectively, after 80 days of incubation. In conclusion, a substantial improvement in the performance of the immobilized enzyme with reference to the free enzyme was obtained. Furthermore, the relative activities of immobilized enzyme are superior than free enzyme over the broader pH and temperature ranges.

  16. Enhanced stability and catalytic activity of immobilized α-amylase on modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles for potential application in food industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinipour, Seyyedeh Leila; Khiabani, Mahmoud Sowti; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Salehi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play an essential role in catalyzing various reactions. However, their instability upon repetitive/prolonged use, elevated temperature, acidic or alkaline pH remains an area of concern. α-Amylase, a widely used enzyme in food industries for starch hydrolysis, was covalently immobilized on the surface of two developed matrices, amino-functionalized silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (AFSMNPs) alone and covered with chitosan. The synthesis steps and characterizations of NPs were examined by FT-IR, VSM, and SEM. Modified nanoparticles with average diameters of 20–80 nm were obtained. Enzyme immobilization efficiencies of 89 and 74 were obtained for AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. The optimum pH obtained was 6.5 and 8.0 for the enzyme immobilized on AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. Optimum temperature for the immobilized enzyme shifted toward higher temperatures. Considerable enhancements in thermal stabilities were observed for the immobilized enzyme at elevated temperatures up to 80 °C. A frequent use experiment demonstrated that the immobilized enzyme retained 74 and 85 % of its original activity even after 20 times of repeated use in AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. Storage stability demonstrated that free enzyme lost its activity completely within 30 days. But, immobilized enzyme on AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs preserved 65.73 and 78.63 % of its initial activity, respectively, after 80 days of incubation. In conclusion, a substantial improvement in the performance of the immobilized enzyme with reference to the free enzyme was obtained. Furthermore, the relative activities of immobilized enzyme are superior than free enzyme over the broader pH and temperature ranges.

  17. Enhanced stability and catalytic activity of immobilized α-amylase on modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles for potential application in food industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinipour, Seyyedeh Leila; Khiabani, Mahmoud Sowti; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Salehi, Roya

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes play an essential role in catalyzing various reactions. However, their instability upon repetitive/prolonged use, elevated temperature, acidic or alkaline pH remains an area of concern. α-Amylase, a widely used enzyme in food industries for starch hydrolysis, was covalently immobilized on the surface of two developed matrices, amino-functionalized silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (AFSMNPs) alone and covered with chitosan. The synthesis steps and characterizations of NPs were examined by FT-IR, VSM, and SEM. Modified nanoparticles with average diameters of 20-80 nm were obtained. Enzyme immobilization efficiencies of 89 and 74 were obtained for AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. The optimum pH obtained was 6.5 and 8.0 for the enzyme immobilized on AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. Optimum temperature for the immobilized enzyme shifted toward higher temperatures. Considerable enhancements in thermal stabilities were observed for the immobilized enzyme at elevated temperatures up to 80 °C. A frequent use experiment demonstrated that the immobilized enzyme retained 74 and 85 % of its original activity even after 20 times of repeated use in AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs, respectively. Storage stability demonstrated that free enzyme lost its activity completely within 30 days. But, immobilized enzyme on AFSMNPs and chitosan-coated AFSMNPs preserved 65.73 and 78.63 % of its initial activity, respectively, after 80 days of incubation. In conclusion, a substantial improvement in the performance of the immobilized enzyme with reference to the free enzyme was obtained. Furthermore, the relative activities of immobilized enzyme are superior than free enzyme over the broader pH and temperature ranges.

  18. Biological effect of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on some potentially toxic elements during alteration of SON 68 nuclear glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, M.; Crovisier, J. L.; Stille, P.; Vuilleumier, S.; Geoffroy, V.

    2009-04-01

    Although underground nuclear waste repositories are not expected to be favourable places for microbial activity, one should not exclude localized action of extremophilic bacteria on some materials involved in the storage concept. Among endogenous or accidentally introduced acidophiles, some are susceptible to lead to a locally drastic decreased in pH, with potential consequences on materials corrosion. Experiments were performed with Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on 100-125 m french reference nuclear glass SON68 grains in a mineral medium under static conditions during 60 days at 25degC. Growth medium was periodically renewed and analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS spectrometry for both major, trace and ultra-trace elements. Biofilm formation was evidenced by confocal laser microscopy, staining DNA with ethidium bromide and exopolysaccharides with calcofluor white. Biofilm thickness around material grains exceeded 20 m under the chosen experimental conditions. It can be noticed that while numerous studies on biofilm formation upon interaction between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and materials are found in the literature, evidence for biofilm formation is still scarce for the case of the acidophilic bacterium A. thiooxidans. Presence of biofilm is a key parameter for material alteration at the solid/solution interface in biotic systems. Indeed, various constitutive elements of materials trapped in the polyanionic polymer of biofilm may also influence the alteration process. In particular, biofilm may reduce the alteration rate of materials by forming a protective barrier at their surface (Aouad et al., 2008). In this study, glass alteration rates, determined using strontium as tracer, showed that the progressive formation of a biofilm on the surface of glass has a protective effect against its alteration. Uranium and rare earth elements (REE) are efficiently trapped in the biogenic compartment of the system (exopolysaccharides + bacterial cells). Besides, the ratio

  19. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  20. Risk element sorption/desorption characteristics of dry olive residue: a technique for the potential immobilization of risk elements in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovorka, Miloš; Száková, Jiřina; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Acebal, Mercedes Blanc; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Olive oil production is one of the most relevant agroindustrial activities in the Mediterranean region and generates a huge amount of both solid and semi-solid wastes, the uncontrolled disposal of which might lead to serious environmental problems. Due to its organic matter and mineral nutrient content, the waste material can be applied to agricultural soil as a fertilizer. However, due to its high organic matter content, dry olive residue (DOR), commonly called "alperujo," has the potential to immobilize risk elements in contaminated soils. The main objective of this study was to assess the possible effect of DOR on sorption of risk elements such as cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the soil. A set of batch sorption experiments were carried out to assess the ability of DOR to adsorb Cd, Pb, and Zn where the effect of the preceding biotransformation of DOR by four species of fungi: Penicillium chrysogenum, Coriolopsis floccosa, Bjerkhandera adusta, and Chondrostereum purpureum was compared. The Freundlich and Langmuir sorption isotherms were calculated to assess the sorption characteristics of both transformed and non-transformed DOR. The results showed good potential sorption capacity of DOR, especially for Pb and to a lesser extent for Cd and Zn. Better sorption characteristics were reported for the biotransformed DOR samples, which are expected to show higher humification of the organic matter. However, the desorption experiments showed weakness and instability of the DOR-bound elements, especially in the case of Zn. Thus, future research should aim to verify the DOR sorption pattern in contaminated soil as well as the potential stabilization of the DOR element bounds where the increase of the pH levels of the DOR samples needs to be taken into account.

  1. Production and Characterization of Glass-Ceramic Materials for Potential Use in Dental Applications: Thermal and Mechanical Properties, Microstructure, and In Vitro Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Baino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multicomponent silicate glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives were prepared and tested for potential applications in dentistry. The glasses were produced via a melting-quenching process, ground and sieved to obtain fine-grained powders that were pressed in the form of small cylinders and thermally treated to obtain sintered glass-ceramic samples. X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out on the materials before and after sintering to detect the presence of crystalline phases. Thermal analyses, mechanical characterizations (assessment of bending strength, Young’s modulus, Vickers hardness, fracture toughness, and in vitro bioactivity tests in simulated body fluid were performed. On the basis of the acquired results, different potential applications in the dental field were discussed for the proposed glass-ceramics. The use of such materials can be suggested for either restorative dentistry or dental implantology, mainly depending on their peculiar bioactive and mechanical properties. At the end of the work, the feasibility of a novel full-ceramic bilayered implant was explored and discussed. This implant, comprising a highly bioactive layer expected to promote osteointegration and another one mimicking the features of tooth enamel, can have an interesting potential for whole tooth substitution.

  2. Effect of chemical composition on hydrophobicity and zeta potential of plasma sprayed HA/CaO-P2O5 glass coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, M P; Monteiro, F J; Serro, A P; Saramago, B; Gibson, I R; Santos, J D

    2001-12-01

    Multilayered plasma sprayed coatings on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloys have been prepared, which were composed of an underlayer of HA and a surface layer of a CaO-P2O5 glass-HA composite, with 2 or 4wt% of glass. Contact angle and surface tension variation with time, for both water and a protein solution, were determined by the sessile and pendent drop methods respectively using the ADSA-P software. Wettability studies showed that hydrophobicity of the coatings increase with the glass addition. The work of adhesion of albumin was also altered in a controlled manner by the addition of the CaO-P2O5 glass, being lower on the composite coatings than on HA. Zeta potential (ZP) results showed that composite coatings presented a higher net negative charge than HA coatings and that ZP values were also influenced by the content of the glass. This study demonstrated that the surface properties of those coatings may be modified by the addition of CaO-P2O5 glass.

  3. A disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This report describes a conceptual design of a disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste. The surface facilities consist of plants for the preparation of steel cylinders containing nuclear waste immobilized in glass, shaft headframe buildings and all necessary support facilities. The underground disposal vault is located on one level at a depth of 1000 m. The waste cylinders are emplaced into boreholes in the tunnel floors. All surface and subsurface facilities are described, operations and schedules are summarized, and cost estimates and manpower requirements are given. (auth)

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-01

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  5. Manipulation and Immobilization of a Single Fluorescence Nanosensor for Selective Injection into Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairulazwan; Maruyama, Hisataka; Masuda, Taisuke; Arai, Fumihito

    2016-12-01

    Manipulation and injection of single nanosensors with high cell viability is an emerging field in cell analysis. We propose a new method using fluorescence nanosensors with a glass nanoprobe and optical control of the zeta potential. The nanosensor is fabricated by encapsulating a fluorescence polystyrene nanobead into a lipid layer with 1,3,3-trimethylindolino-6'-nitrobenzopyrylospiran (SP), which is a photochromic material. The nanobead contains iron oxide nanoparticles and a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B. The zeta potential of the nanosensor switches between negative and positive by photo-isomerization of SP with ultraviolet irradiation. The positively-charged nanosensor easily adheres to a negatively-charged glass nanoprobe, is transported to a target cell, and then adheres to the negatively-charged cell membrane. The nanosensor is then injected into the cytoplasm by heating with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. As a demonstration, a single 750 nm nanosensor was picked-up using a glass nanoprobe with optical control of the zeta potential. Then, the nanosensor was transported and immobilized onto a target cell membrane. Finally, it was injected into the cytoplasm using a NIR laser. The success rates of pick-up and cell immobilization of the nanosensor were 75% and 64%, respectively. Cell injection and cell survival rates were 80% and 100%, respectively.

  6. Manipulation and Immobilization of a Single Fluorescence Nanosensor for Selective Injection into Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairulazwan; Maruyama, Hisataka; Masuda, Taisuke; Arai, Fumihito

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation and injection of single nanosensors with high cell viability is an emerging field in cell analysis. We propose a new method using fluorescence nanosensors with a glass nanoprobe and optical control of the zeta potential. The nanosensor is fabricated by encapsulating a fluorescence polystyrene nanobead into a lipid layer with 1,3,3-trimethylindolino-6′-nitrobenzopyrylospiran (SP), which is a photochromic material. The nanobead contains iron oxide nanoparticles and a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B. The zeta potential of the nanosensor switches between negative and positive by photo-isomerization of SP with ultraviolet irradiation. The positively-charged nanosensor easily adheres to a negatively-charged glass nanoprobe, is transported to a target cell, and then adheres to the negatively-charged cell membrane. The nanosensor is then injected into the cytoplasm by heating with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. As a demonstration, a single 750 nm nanosensor was picked-up using a glass nanoprobe with optical control of the zeta potential. Then, the nanosensor was transported and immobilized onto a target cell membrane. Finally, it was injected into the cytoplasm using a NIR laser. The success rates of pick-up and cell immobilization of the nanosensor were 75% and 64%, respectively. Cell injection and cell survival rates were 80% and 100%, respectively. PMID:27916931

  7. Manipulation and Immobilization of a Single Fluorescence Nanosensor for Selective Injection into Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairulazwan Hashim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation and injection of single nanosensors with high cell viability is an emerging field in cell analysis. We propose a new method using fluorescence nanosensors with a glass nanoprobe and optical control of the zeta potential. The nanosensor is fabricated by encapsulating a fluorescence polystyrene nanobead into a lipid layer with 1,3,3-trimethylindolino-6′-nitrobenzopyrylospiran (SP, which is a photochromic material. The nanobead contains iron oxide nanoparticles and a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B. The zeta potential of the nanosensor switches between negative and positive by photo-isomerization of SP with ultraviolet irradiation. The positively-charged nanosensor easily adheres to a negatively-charged glass nanoprobe, is transported to a target cell, and then adheres to the negatively-charged cell membrane. The nanosensor is then injected into the cytoplasm by heating with a near-infrared (NIR laser. As a demonstration, a single 750 nm nanosensor was picked-up using a glass nanoprobe with optical control of the zeta potential. Then, the nanosensor was transported and immobilized onto a target cell membrane. Finally, it was injected into the cytoplasm using a NIR laser. The success rates of pick-up and cell immobilization of the nanosensor were 75% and 64%, respectively. Cell injection and cell survival rates were 80% and 100%, respectively.

  8. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  9. Immobilized silver nanoparticles enhance contact killing and show highest efficacy: elucidation of the mechanism of bactericidal action of silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shekhar; Mukherji, Soumyo; Mukherji, Suparna

    2013-07-01

    NPs, as well as a higher concentration of silver ions in solution. In addition, the AgNP immobilized substrate was used multiple times with good efficacy, indicating this immobilization protocol is effective for retaining AgNPs while maintaining their disinfection potential. The antibacterial surface was found to be extremely stable in aqueous medium and no significant leaching (~1.15% of total silver deposited) of the AgNPs was observed. Thus, immobilization of AgNPs on a surface may promote reuse, reduce environmental risks associated with leaching of AgNPs and enhance cost effectiveness. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Photographic image of silanization chamber; FEG-TEM image to show particle distribution of as-synthesized silver nanoparticles; photographic image of pristine amino-silanized glass and AgNPs immobilized glass; batch reactor fabrication for disinfection and silver release studies; surface coverage of silver nanoparticle immobilized glass substrate; and EDX analysis of the treated bacterial (E. coli) cells. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00024a

  10. Energy saving potential of heat insulation solar glass: Key results from laboratory and in-situ testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuce, Erdem; Cuce, Pinar Mert; Young, Chin-Huai

    2016-01-01

    HISG (heat insulation solar glass) is a recently developed multi-functional glazing technology to mitigate energy consumption of buildings. HISG can generate electricity similar to conventional PV (photovoltaic) glazing products when exposed to sunlight, however it differs from them by having some extraordinary characteristic features such as thermal insulation, which is competitive with Argon filled triple glazed windows, acoustic comfort, remarkable energy saving potential and self-cleaning ability owing to TiO 2 nano coating. Within the scope of this research, latest results from laboratory and in-situ testing of HISG are presented in terms of its key role in mitigating heating and cooling demand of buildings as well as clean energy generation. Lighting and thermal comfort related parameters such as shading coefficient, UV, IR and visible light intensity are also investigated through the tests conducted in real operating conditions. It is achieved from the results that instant electricity generation of HISG is 16% higher than that of standard PV glazing owing to its nano layer reflective film. Shading coefficient of HISG is only 0.136, which provides almost 80% reduction in solar heat gain compared to ordinary glazing. Indoor air temperature measured from HISG test house in summer time is very close to the ambient temperature, whereas it is found to be 14.7 °C higher in ordinary glass test house due to greenhouse effect. Annual heating and cooling demand tests indicate that HISG provides 38 and 48% energy saving in heating and cooling season, respectively. - Highlights: • Nano layer reflective film of HISG enables 16% more power generation. • 80% of undesired outdoor thermal radiation is prevented by HISG. • HISG has a 100% UV blocking rate. • The shading coefficient of HISG is 0.136. • HISG provides 38 and 48% energy saving in heating and cooling season.

  11. Risk element immobilization/stabilization potential of fungal-transformed dry olive residue and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi application in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Stejskalová, Tereza; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Száková, Jiřina; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    The use of biotransformed dry olive residue (DOR) as organic soil amendment has recently been proposed due to its high contents of stabilized organic matter and nutrients. The potential of biotransformed DOR to immobilize risk elements in contaminated soils might qualify DOR as a potential risk element stabilization agent for in situ soil reclamation practices. In this experiment, the mobility of risk elements in response to Penicillium chrysogenum-10-transformed DOR, Funalia floccosa-transformed DOR, Bjerkandera adusta-transformed DOR, and Chondrostereum purpureum-transformed DOR as well as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), Funneliformis mosseae, inoculation was investigated. We evaluated the effect of these treatments on risk element uptake by wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants in a pot experiment with Cd, Pb, and Zn contaminated soil. The results showed a significant impact of the combined treatment (biotransformed DOR and AMF inoculation) on wheat plant growth and element mobility. The mobile proportions of elements in the treated soils were related to soil pH; with increasing pH levels, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, P, Pb, and Zn mobility decreased significantly (r values between -0.36 and -0.46), while Ca and Mg mobility increased (r = 0.63, and r = 0.51, respectively). The application of biotransformed DOR decreased risk element levels (Cd, Zn), and nutrient concentrations (Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn) in the aboveground biomass, where the elements were retained in the roots. Thus, biotransformed DOR in combination with AMF resulted in a higher capacity of wheat plants to grow under detrimental conditions, being able to accumulate high amounts of risk elements in the roots. However, risk element reduction was insufficient for safe crop production in the extremely contaminated soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Ba in the glass characteristics of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive 137 Cs extracted from high level nuclear waste, when immobilized in a suitable matrix can be used as a γsource in medical industry. Iron phosphate glass (IPG) is one of a suitable matrix for the immobilization of 137 Cs prior to the immobilization of 137 Cs in IPG, it is essential to optimize the immobilization conditions using natural (inactive) cesium. Glass characteristics of inactive Cs loaded iron phosphate glasses were already explored in our earlier studies. However, the change in glass characteristics of 137 Cs loaded iron phosphate glass to 137 Ba loaded iron phosphate glass need to be studied before the immobilization of 137 Cs in iron phosphate glass as 137 Cs transforms to 137 Ba due to nuclear transmutation ( 137 Cs(β,γ) 137 Ba). This paper reports the studies on such a behaviour by incorporating inactive Ba in cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses. Cs and Ba loaded iron phosphate glasses were prepared by melt quench technique in air using appropriate amounts of Fe 2 O 3 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 , Ba(OH) 2.8 H 2 O and Cs 2 CO 3 . The chemicals were added such that the glass formed possesses the batch composition of (a) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -45 wt. % Cs 2 O-5 wt % BaO-P 2 O 5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs45Ba5); (b) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -25 wt. % Cs 2 O-25 wt % BaO-P 2 O5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs25Ba25). The thermal expansion measurements were also carried out using a home-built quartz push-rod dilatometer. The data related to change in thermal expansion behaviour, glass forming ability, glass stability and structural changes in phosphate network due to the partial replacement of Cs with Ba will also be discussed. (author)

  13. δD values of hydrated volcanic glass : a potential record of ancient meteoric water and climate in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shane, P.; Ingraham, N.

    2002-01-01

    Tephra beds that are well drained and have been buried by thin paleosols become hydrated within 2-3000 yr on reaction with meteoric waters. Hence, the absorbed water within silicic volcanic glass shards provides a potential record of δD values of ancient meteoric water. Such isotopic records have previously received little investigation. We demonstrate that 1.5-2 m thick tephra beds in central North Island, New Zealand, display uniform δD values vertically through their profiles and laterally up to 250 m in outcrop. Reproducibility is not influenced by grain size or age of the tephra. We obtained an average δD value of -48 ± 3 permille for water within the 1.8 ka Taupo Tephra. This is similar to the composition of present-day surface waters. δD values of -73 ± 2 and -60 ± 2 permille for the 25 ka Kawakawa and 30 ka Mangaone Tephra beds are significantly lower than present waters, indicating that they have been hydrated under different surficial conditions. This is consistent with other proxy paleoclimatic indicators that suggest a cooler, drier, and windier climate at the time of their eruption. Tephra beds are a potential source of paleoclimatic data in terrestrial environments that otherwise may lack proxy records. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Comparison of invitro cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of glass ionomer cement type IX on human lymphocytes before and after electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Mithra N.; Brijesh; Shetty, Shilpa S.; Hegde, Nidarsh D.; Suchetha Kumari; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements are widely used in dentistry as an adhesive restorative materials. However, the results of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies using these materials are inconclusive in literature. The aim of this study was to examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of glass ionomer cement type IX available commercially before and after irradiation. Glass ionomer cement type IX was obtained commercially. Samples were prepared as per the ISO standard size of 25x2x2 mm using polytetrafluoroethylene teflon mould and divided into two groups - non irradiated and irradiated groups. The samples in radiated category were exposed to 10 KGy of electron beam irradiation at Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, Mangalore, India. For hemolysis assay, the samples were immersed in phosphate buffer saline and incubated at 370℃ for 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days. 200 μL of 24 hr material extract was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA comet assay and apoptosis by DNA diffusion assay. Hemolytic activity of non irradiated Glass ionomer cement type IX after 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days was 78.18±10.13, 32.57±12.28, 38.56±4.68 respectively whereas hemolytic activity of irradiated Glass ionomer cement type IX after 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days was 58.90±2.28, 35.04±1.09 and 34.26±7.71 respectively. The irradiation of Glass ionomer cement type IX with 10 KGy dose of electron beam irradiation did not show significant increase in the frequency of DNA damage when compared to that of the nonirradiated group. Apoptotic index did not show much difference between non-irradiated and irradiated groups. Taken together, we conclude that some components of glass ionomer cements show both genotoxic and cytotoxic effects. (author)

  15. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Joseph; Debois, Marc M.; Mah, Dennis; Mageras, Gikas S.; Raben, Adam; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Mychalczak, Borys; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Gloeggler, Paul J.; Lutz, Wendell; Ling, C. Clifton; Leibel, Steven A.; Fuks, Zvi; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This study evaluates the dosimetric benefits and feasibility of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in the treatment of lung tumors. The technique has two distinct features--deep inspiration, which reduces lung density, and breath-hold, which immobilizes lung tumors, thereby allowing for reduced margins. Both of these properties can potentially reduce the amount of normal lung tissue in the high-dose region, thus reducing morbidity and improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Five patients treated for non-small cell lung carcinoma (Stage IIA-IIIB) received computed tomography (CT) scans under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing, DIBH, shallow inspiration breath-hold, and shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans were used to generate 3-dimensional conformal treatment plans for comparison, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans determined the extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry, and for DIBH, modified slow vital capacity maneuvers. Planning target volumes (PTVs) for free-breathing plans included a margin for setup error (0.75 cm) plus a margin equal to the extent of tumor motion due to respiration (1-2 cm). Planning target volumes for DIBH plans included the same margin for setup error, with a reduced margin for residual uncertainty in tumor position (0.2-0.5 cm) as determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies. To simulate the effects of respiration-gated treatments and estimate the role of target immobilization alone (i.e., without the benefit of reduced lung density), a third plan is generated from the free-breathing scan using a PTV with the same margins as for DIBH plans. Results: The treatment plan comparison suggests that, on average, the DIBH technique can reduce the volume of lung receiving more than 25 Gy by 30% compared to free

  16. Ensuring Longevity: Ancient Glasses Help Predict Durability of Vitrified Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Jamie L.; McCloy, John S.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-01

    How does glass alter with time? For the last hundred years this has been an important question to the fields of object conservation and archeology to ensure the preservation of glass artifacts. This same question is part of the development and assessment of durable glass waste forms for the immobilization of nuclear wastes. Researchers have developed experiments ranging from simple to highly sophisticated to answer this question, and, as a result, have gained significant insight into the mechanisms that drive glass alteration. However, the gathered data have been predominately applicable to only short-term alteration times, i.e. over the course of decades. What has remained elusive is the long-term mechanisms of glass alteration[1]. These mechanisms are of particular interest to the international nuclear waste glass community as they strive to ensure that vitrified products will be durable for thousands to tens of thousands of years. For the last thirty years this community has been working to fill this research gap by partnering with archeologists, museum curators, and geologists to identify hundred to million-year old glass analogues that have altered in environments representative of those expected at potential nuclear waste disposal sites. The process of identifying a waste glass relevant analogue is challenging as it requires scientists to relate data collected from short-term laboratory experiments to observations made from long-term analogues and extensive geochemical modeling.

  17. Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations

  18. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item

  19. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  20. Electrospun Polyhydroxybutyrate/Poly(ε-caprolactone)/58S Sol-Gel Bioactive Glass Hybrid Scaffolds with Highly Improved Osteogenic Potential for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaping; Li, Wei; Müller, Teresa; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Yao, Qingqing; Roether, Judith A

    2016-07-13

    Electrospinning of biopolymer and inorganic substances is one of the efficient ways to combine various advantageous properties in one single fibrous structure with potential for tissue engineering applications. In the present study, to integrate the high stiffness of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), the flexibility of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and the bioactivity of 58S bioactive glass, PHB/PCL/58S sol-gel bioactive glass hybrid scaffolds were fabricated using combined electrospinning and sol-gel method. Physical features such as fiber diameter distribution, mechanical strength and Young's modulus were characterized thoroughly. FTIR analysis demonstrated the successful incorporation of 58S bioactive glass into the blend polymers, which greatly improved the hydrophilicity of PHB/PCL fibermats. The primary biological response of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells on the prepared fibrous scaffolds was evaluated, proving that the 58S glass sol containing hybrid scaffold were not only favorable to MG-63 cell adhesion but also slightly enhanced cell viability and significantly increased alkaline phosphate activity .

  1. Performance Enhancements to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low-Activity Waste Vitrification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W. F.; Gerdes, K.; Holton, L. K.; Pegg, I.L.; Bowan, B.W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the treatment and vitrification of underground tank wastes stored at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The WTP comprises four major facilities: a pretreatment facility to separate the tank waste into high level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) process streams, a HLW vitrification facility to immobilize the HLW fraction; a LAW vitrification facility to immobilize the LAW fraction, and an analytical laboratory to support the operations of all four treatment facilities. DOE has established strategic objectives to optimize the performance of the WTP facilities and the LAW and HLW waste forms to reduce the overall schedule and cost for treatment and vitrification of the Hanford tank wastes. This strategy has been implemented by establishing performance expectations in the WTP contract for the facilities and waste forms. In addition, DOE, as owner-operator of the WTP facilities, continues to evaluate 1) the design, to determine the potential for performance above the requirements specified in the WTP contract; and 2) improvements in production of the LAW and HLW waste forms. This paper reports recent progress directed at improving production of the LAW waste form. DOE's initial assessment, which is based on the work reported in this paper, is that the treatment rate of the WTP LAW vitrification facility can be increased by a factor of 2 to 4 with a combination of revised glass formulations, modest increases in melter glass operating temperatures, and a second-generation LAW melter with a larger surface area. Implementing these improvements in the LAW waste immobilization capability can benefit the LAW treatment mission by reducing the cost of waste treatment. (authors)

  2. Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSabatino, A.; Loftus, D.

    1999-01-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant

  3. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  4. Immobilization Technologies in Probiotic Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregoria Mitropoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed.

  5. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Messing, E. [University of Rochester, Departments of Urology and Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States); Rubens, D. [University of Rochester, Departments of Imaging Science and Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States); Sarkar, N. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Ng, W. [Nangyang Technical University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  6. Screening of supports for immobilization of commercial porcine pancreatic lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robison Scherer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to report the performance of different supports for the immobilization of commercial porcine pancreatic lipase. The immobilization tests were carried out in several types of Accurel, activated alumina, kaolin, montmorillonite, ion exchange resins and zeolites. The characterization of the supports showed differences in terms of specific area and morphology. The characteristics of the supports influenced the amount of enzyme adsorbed, yield of immobilization and esterification activity of the resulting immobilized catalyst. The clays KSF and natural and pillared montmorillonites presented potential for use as support for lipase immobilization in terms of yield and esterification activity. Yields of immobilization of 76.32 and 52.01% were achieved for clays KSF and natural montmorillonite, respectively. Esterification activities of 754.03, 595.51, 591.88 and 515.71 U.g-1 were obtained for lipases immobilized in Accurel MP-100, Amberlite XAD-2, mordenite and pillared montmorillonite, respectively.

  7. Natural and Synthetic Barriers to Immobilize Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, W.

    2011-01-01

    The experiments of weathering of glass waste form and the reacted sediments with simulated glass leachates show that radionuclide sequestration can be significantly enhanced by promoting the formation of secondary precipitates. In addition, synthetic phosphate-bearing nanoporous material exhibits high stability at temperature and has a very high K d value for U(VI) removal. Both natural and synthetic barrier materials can be used as additional efficient adsorbents for retarding transport of radionuclides for various contaminated waste streams and waste forms present at U. S. Department of Energy clean-up sites and the proposed geologic radioactive waste disposal facility. In the radioactive waste repository facility, natural or synthetic materials are planned to be used as a barrier material to immobilize and retard radionuclide release. The getter material can be used to selectively scavenge the radionuclide of interest from a liquid waste stream and subsequently incorporate the loaded getters in a cementitious or various monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides form monolithic waste forms by being emplaced as a backfill barrier material around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential hazard of leached radioactive wastes. The barrier material should be highly efficient to sequester radionuclides and possess physical and chemical stability for long-term exposure to severe weathering conditions. Because potential leaching of radionuclides depends on various environmental and weathering conditions of the near-field repository, the barrier materials must be durable and not disintegrate under a range of moisture, temperature, pressure, radiation, Eh, ph. and

  8. Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed

  9. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author) [pt

  10. Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) and Its Impact on Durability: Selecting Glasses for a Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D

    2005-01-01

    The likelihood for the formation of nepheline in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glass systems and the potential impact of nepheline on the durability of these systems is part of the frit development efforts for SB4. The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO 4 (nepheline) and LiAlSi 2 O 6 , and crystalline SiO 2 . Although it is well known that the addition of Al 2 O 3 to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na + -[AlO 4/2 ] - pairs), the combination of high Al 2 O 3 and Na 2 O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO 4 ). Given the projected high concentration of Al 2 O 3 in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na 2 O based frit to improve melt rate and a high Na 2 O sludge due to settling problems, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems continues to be assessed. The most recent compositional projections from the Closure Business Unit (CBU) for SB4 may be framed around three decision areas: the sodium molarity of the sludge (at values of 1M Na and 1.6M Na), the SB3 heel that will be included in the batch (expressed in inches of SB3 sludge with values of 0, 40, and 127''), and the introduction of an ARP stream into the sludge (which is represented by six options: no ARP, ARPa, ARPe, ARPk, ARPm, and ARPv). Candidate frits are being identified for these options via a paper study approach with the intent of downselecting to a set of key

  11. New glass coatings for high insulating greenhouses without light losses - energy saving, crop production and economic potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming, S.

    2009-01-01

    More than 90% of Dutch greenhouse area is covered with single glass. Energy losses through the covering are high during heating period (winter) but energy requirements are also high during cooling period (summer) in the case of semiclosed greenhouses. Until now, light losses of insulating coverings

  12. Ceramic process and plant design for high-level nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKisson, R.L.; De Wames, R.E.; Guon, J.; Flintoff, J.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    In the last 3 years, significant advances in ceramic technology for high-level nuclear waste solidification have been made. Product quality in terms of leach-resistance, compositional uniformity, structural integrity, and thermal stability promises to be superior to borosilicate glass. This paper addresses the process effectiveness and preliminary designs for glass and ceramic immobilization plants. The reference two-step ceramic process utilizes fluid-bed calcination (FBC) and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidation. Full-scale demonstration of these well-developed processing steps has been established at DOE and/or commercial facilities for processing radioactive materials. Based on Savannah River-type waste, our model predicts that the capital and operating cost for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste is about the same for the ceramic and glass options. However, when repository costs are included, the ceramic option potentially offers significantly better economics due to its high waste loading and volume reduction. Volume reduction impacts several figures of merit in addition to cost such as system logistics, storage, transportation, and risk. The study concludes that the ceramic product/process has many potential advantages, and rapid deployment of the technology could be realized due to full-scale demonstrations of FBC and HIP technology in radioactive environments. Based on our finding and those of others, the ceramic innovation not only offers a viable backup to the glass reference process but promises to be a viable future option for new high-level nuclear waste management opportunities

  13. Phase 1 Testing Results of Immobilization of WTP Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottoms Core Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, Alex D.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate, along with entrained, volatile, and semi-volatile metals, such as Hg, As, and Se. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate that get recycled to the melter, and is a key objective of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of earlier tasks was to formulate and prepare a

  14. Phase 1 Testing Results of Immobilization of WTP Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottoms Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, Alex D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-05

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate, along with entrained, volatile, and semi-volatile metals, such as Hg, As, and Se. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate that get recycled to the melter, and is a key objective of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of earlier tasks was to formulate and prepare a

  15. Comparison of covalent and noncovalent immobilization of Malatya apricot pectinesterase (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuş, Emine; Pekyardımcı, Sule

    2012-02-01

    Pectinesterase isolated from Malatya apricot pulp was noncovalently and covalently immobilized onto bentonite and glutaraldehyde-containing amino group functionalized porous glass beads surface at pH 8.0 and pH 9.0, respectively. The effect of various parameters such as pH, temperature, activation energy, heat and storage stability on immobilized enzyme were investigated. The optimum temperature of covalently and noncovalently immobilized PE was 50°C. This value was 60°C for free PE. Although optimum pH of covalently-immobilized PE was 8.0, this parameter was 9.0 for free and covalently-immobilized PE. The noncovalently immobilized enzyme exhibited better thermostability than the free and covalently immobilized PE.

  16. Site-selective protein immobilization through 2-cyanobenzothiazole-cysteine condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Chan; Yu, Ching-Ching; Liang, Chien-Fu; Huang, Li-De; Hwu, Jih-Ru; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2014-04-14

    We described a rapid site-selective protein immobilization strategy on glass slides and magnetic nanoparticles, at either the N or C terminus, by a 2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT)-cysteine (Cys) condensation reaction. A terminal cysteine was generated at either terminus of a target protein by a combination of expressed protein ligation (EPL) and tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) digestion, and was reacted with the CBT-solid support to immobilize the protein. According to microarray analysis, we found that glutathione S-transferase immobilized at the N terminus allowed higher substrate binding than for immobilization at the C terminus, whereas there were no differences in the activities of N- and C-terminally immobilized maltose-binding proteins. Moreover, immobilization of TEVp at the N terminus preserved higher activity than immobilization at the C terminus. The success of utilizing CBT-Cys condensation and the ease of constructing a terminal cysteine using EPL and TEVp digestion demonstrate that this method is feasible for site-selective protein immobilization on glass slides and nanoparticles. The orientation of a protein is crucial for its activity after immobilization, and this strategy provides a simple means to evaluate the preferred protein immobilization orientation on solid supports in the absence of clear structural information. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Immobilization of chloride-rich radioactive wastes produced by pyrochemical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Terry, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    A a result of its former role as a producer of nuclear weapons components, the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Golden, Colorado accumulated a variety of plutonium-contaminated materials. When the level of contamination exceeded a predetermined level (the economic discard limit), the materials were classified as residues rather than waste and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. Although large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, remain in storage at the site. It is planned for the residues with lower concentrations of plutonium to be disposed of as wastes at an appropriate disposal facility, probably the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Because the plutonium concentration is too high or because the physical or chemical form would be difficult to get into a form acceptable to WIPP, it may not be possible to dispose of a portion of the residues at WIPP. The pyrochemical salts are among the residues that are difficult to dispose of. For a large percentage of the pyrochemical salts, safeguards controls are required, but WIPP was not designed to accommodate safeguards controls. A potential solution would be to immobilize the salts. These immobilized salts would contain substantially higher plutonium concentrations than is currently permissible but would be suitable for disposal at WIPP. This document presents the results of a review of three immobilization technologies to determine if mature technologies exist that would be suitable to immobilize pyrochemical salts: cement-based stabilization, low-temperature vitrification, and polymer encapsulation. The authors recommend that flow sheets and life-cycle costs be developed for cement-based and low-temperature glass immobilization

  18. On the Potential of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Dental Implantology: Case Study on Ti40Zr10Cu36Pd14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alethea Liens

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ti40Zr10Cu36Pd14 Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG appears very attractive for future biomedical applications thanks to its high glass forming ability, the absence of toxic elements such as Ni, Al or Be and its good mechanical properties. For the first time, a complete and exhaustive characterization of a unique batch of this glassy alloy was performed, together with ISO standard mechanical tests on machined implant-abutment assemblies. The results were compared to the benchmark Ti-6Al-4V ELI (Extra-Low-Interstitial to assess its potential in dental implantology. The thermal stability, corrosion and sterilization resistance, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties were measured on samples with a simple geometry, but also on implant-abutment assemblies’ prototypes. Results show that the glassy alloy exhibits a quite high thermal stability, with a temperature range of 38 °C between the glass transition and crystallization, a compressive strength of 2 GPa, a certain plastic deformation (0.7%, a hardness of 5.5 GPa and a toughness of 56 MPa.√m. Moreover, the alloy shows a relatively lower Young’s modulus (96 GPa than the Ti-6Al-4V alloy (110–115 GPa, which is beneficial to limit bone stress shielding. The BMG shows a satisfactory cytocompatibility, a high resistance to sterilization and a good corrosion resistance (corrosion potential of −0.07 V/SCE and corrosion current density of 6.0 nA/cm2, which may ensure its use as a biomaterial. Tests on dental implants reveal a load to failure 1.5-times higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V and a comparable fatigue limit. Moreover, implants could be machined and sandblasted by methods usually conducted for titanium implants, without significant degradation of their amorphous nature. All these properties place this metallic glass among a promising class of materials for mechanically-challenging applications such as dental implants.

  19. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: The combination of transversal and longitudinal circulations and its influence on space utilisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, M.; Němec, Lubomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 357, 16-17 (2011), s. 3108-3116 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : space utilisation * sand dissolution * bubble removal * flow patterns * model furnace Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.537, year: 2011

  20. Single Phase Melt Processed Powellite (Ba,Ca) MoO{sub 4} For The Immobilization Of Mo-Rich Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, Kyle [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, James [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fox, Kevin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Reppert, Jason [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Crum, Jarrod [Paci fic Northwest National Laboratory , Richland, WA (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2012-09-17

    Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO{sub 4} crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO{sub 4} and CaMoO{sub 4} were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In-situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO{sub 4} and BaMoO{sub 4} powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 X 10{sup 13} Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m{sup 2}).

  1. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  2. Description of processes for the immobilization of selected transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1980-12-01

    Processed sludge and incinerator-ash wastes contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements may require immobilization to prevent the release of these elements to the environment. As part of the TRU Waste Immobilization Program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing applicable waste-form and processing technology that may meet this need. This report defines and describes processes that are capable of immobilizing a selected TRU waste-stream consisting of a blend of three parts process sludge and one part incinerator ash. These selected waste streams are based on the compositions and generation rates of the waste processing and incineration facility at the Rocky Flats Plant. The specific waste forms that could be produced by the described processes include: in-can melted borosilicate-glass monolith; joule-heated melter borosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter aluminosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter basaltic-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter glass-ceramic monolith; cast-cement monolith; pressed-cement pellet; and cold-pressed sintered-ceramic pellet

  3. Preliminary evaluation of alternative forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Beary, M.M.; Gallagher, S.A.; Higley, B.A.; Johnston, R.G.; Kupfer, M.J.; Palmer, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Borosilicate Glass Marbles and/or monoliths were rated among the top three waste forms for immobilization of all types of Hanford high-level waste. Supergrout Concrete and Bitumen, low temperature processes, are judged to be particularly suitable for immobilization and bulk disposal of high sodium blended wastes and/or residual liquid. This preliminary assessment indicates that certain ceramic waste forms (e.g., Tailored Ceramics, Supercalcine Ceramic, and SYNROC Ceramic) are equal to or superior to Borosilicate Glass waste forms for immobilization of Hanford sludges and radionuclides removed from salt cake and residual liquid. These ceramic waste forms can be made by the Sol Gel process. Some multibarrier waste forms (e.g., Coated Ceramics, Ceramic Pellets in Metal Matrix, and Glass in Metal Matrix) are judged to be superior waste forms for immobilization of Hanford sludges and/or radionuclide concentrate

  4. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-16

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  5. Evaluation of matrices for immobilizing ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Speranzini, R.A.

    1980-07-01

    Ion exchange resins make up a significant fraction of the volume of radioactive wastes generated during the operation of CANDU-PHW nuclear power stations. Since permanent disposal will eventually be required for these contaminated ion-exchange resins, some way to reduce their volume and to immobilize their radionuclides is required. An evaluation of the processes for immobilizing contaminated ion exchange resins directly into glasses, plastics, bitumens and cements is reported here. Releases of Cs-137, Co-60 and C-14 in leach testss were found to be lowest for bitumen followed by glasses, plastics and cements. Approximately 8% of the C-14 inventory on the ion-exchange resins is released into the off-gas system during glass formation and could limit use of this option. A pyrolysis method for a three-fold reduction in the volume of used ion-exchange resins is described. (auth)

  6. Epsilon metal waste form for immobilization of noble metals from used nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis; Rohatgi, Aashish; Zumhoff, Mac

    2013-10-01

    Epsilon metal (ɛ-metal), an alloy of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, is being developed as a waste form to treat and immobilize the undissolved solids and dissolved noble metals from aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel. Epsilon metal is an attractive waste form for several reasons: increased durability relative to borosilicate glass, it can be fabricated without additives (100% waste loading), and in addition it also benefits borosilicate glass waste loading by eliminating noble metals from the glass, thus the processing problems related to their insolubility in glass. This work focused on the processing aspects of the epsilon metal waste form development. Epsilon metal is comprised of refractory metals resulting in high alloying temperatures, expected to be 1500-2000 °C, making it a non-trivial phase to fabricate by traditional methods. Three commercially available advanced technologies were identified: spark-plasma sintering, microwave sintering, and hot isostatic pressing, and investigated as potential methods to fabricate this waste form. Results of these investigations are reported and compared in terms of bulk density, phase assemblage (X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy).

  7. Screening of Potential Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors in Gnaphalium hypoleucum DC. by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography and Ultrafiltration-Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jian Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new method based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC combined with ultrafiltration-ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UF-UPLC-MS was developed for discovering ligands for xanthine oxidase (XO in Gnaphalium hypoleucum DC., a folk medicine used in China for the treatment of gout. By IMAC, the high flavonoid content of G. hypoleucum could be determined rapidly and efficiently. UF-UPLC-MS was used to select the bound xanthine oxidase ligands in the mixture and identify them. Finally, two flavonoids, luteolin-4′-O-glucoside and luteolin, were successfully screened and identified as the candidate XO inhibitors of G. hypoleucum. They were evaluated in vitro for XO inhibitory activity and their interaction mechanism was studied coupled with molecular simulations. The results were in favor of the hypothesis that the flavonoids of G. hypoleucum might be the active content for gout treatment by inhibiting XO.

  8. Screening of Potential Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors in Gnaphalium hypoleucum DC. by Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography and Ultrafiltration-Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Jian; Hu, Yi-Juan; Xu, Pan; Liang, Wei-Qing; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Pei-Gang; Cheng, Lin; Pu, Jin-Bao

    2016-09-17

    In this study, a new method based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) combined with ultrafiltration-ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UF-UPLC-MS) was developed for discovering ligands for xanthine oxidase (XO) in Gnaphalium hypoleucum DC., a folk medicine used in China for the treatment of gout. By IMAC, the high flavonoid content of G. hypoleucum could be determined rapidly and efficiently. UF-UPLC-MS was used to select the bound xanthine oxidase ligands in the mixture and identify them. Finally, two flavonoids, luteolin-4'-O-glucoside and luteolin, were successfully screened and identified as the candidate XO inhibitors of G. hypoleucum. They were evaluated in vitro for XO inhibitory activity and their interaction mechanism was studied coupled with molecular simulations. The results were in favor of the hypothesis that the flavonoids of G. hypoleucum might be the active content for gout treatment by inhibiting XO.

  9. Biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2017-02-10

    Vanillin is an important and popular plant flavor, but the amount of this compound available from plant sources is very limited. Biotechnological methods have high potential for vanillin production as an alternative to extraction from plant sources. Here, we report a new approach using immobilized enzymes for the production of vanillin. The recently discovered oxygenase Cso2 has coenzyme-independent catalytic activity for the conversion of isoeugenol and 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. Immobilization of Cso2 on Sepabeads EC-EA anion-exchange carrier conferred enhanced operational stability enabling repetitive use. This immobilized Cso2 catalyst allowed 6.8mg yield of vanillin from isoeugenol through ten reaction cycles at a 1mL scale. The coenzyme-independent decarboxylase Fdc, which has catalytic activity for the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, was also immobilized on Sepabeads EC-EA. We demonstrated that the immobilized Fdc and Cso2 enabled the cascade synthesis of vanillin from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol with repetitive use of the catalysts. This study is the first example of biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes, a process that provides new possibilities for vanillin production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

  11. Radiation technology for immobilization of bioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Within the framework of the Agency's coordinated research programme on ''Application of Radiation Technology in Immobilization of Bioactive Materials'', the third and final research coordination meeting was held at Beijing University, Beijing, People's Republic of China, 15-18 June 1987. The present publication compiles all presentations made at the meeting. Fundamental processes for the immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, cells and drugs were developed and established using gamma radiation, electron beams and plasma discharge. Applications of various biofunctional components, immobilized by radiation techniques in different processes, were studied. A range of backbone polymers has been examined together with various monomers. Coupling procedures have been developed which are relevant to our particular requirements. Enzymes of various types and characteristics have been immobilized with considerable efficiency. The immobilized biocatalysts have been shown to possess significant activity and retention of activity on storage. There appears to be a high degree of specificity associated with the properties of the immobilised biocatalysts, their activity and the ease of their preparation. Novel additives which lower the total radiation dose in grafting have been discovered and their value in immobilization processes assessed. Potential applications include: medical (diagnostic, therapeutic), and industrial processes (fermentation, bioseparation, etc.). Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Increase in stability of cellulase immobilized on functionalized magnetic nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Jianhui; Feng, Huixia; Zang, Limin; Sakai, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanospheres were prepared by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with three different amino-silanes: 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-triethoxysilane (AEAPTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMES) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Then three functionalized magnetic nanospheres were used as supports for immobilization of cellulase. The three functionalized magnetic nanospheres with core–shell morphologies exhibited higher capacity for cellulase immobilization than unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres. The increasing of surface charge of functionalized magnetic nanospheres leads to an enhancement of the capacity of cellulase immobilization. Particularly, AEAPTMES with methoxy groups was favored to be hydrolyzed and grafted on unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres than the others. AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres with the highest zeta potential (29 mV) exhibited 87% activity recovery and the maximum amount of immobilized cellulase was 112 mg/g support at concentration of initial cellulase of 8 mg/mL. Immobilized cellulase on AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than other immobilized cellulases and free cellulase. In particular, it can be used in about 40 °C, demonstrating the potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase. - Highlights: • Three Amino-silane modified magnetic nanospheres were prepared. • Cellulase immobilized AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than free cellulase. • The potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase

  13. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  14. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY: DEVELOPMENT OF US AND KRI TEST MATRICIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2007-02-06

    High-level radioactive wastes are stored as liquids in underground storage tanks at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Reservation. These wastes are to be prepared for permanent disposition in a geologic repository by vitrification with glass forming additives (e.g., frit), creating a waste form with long-term durability. Wastes at SRS are being vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Vitrification of the wastes stored at Hanford is planned for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) when completed. Some of the wastes at SRS, and particularly those at Hanford, contain high concentrations of aluminum, chromium and sulfate. These elements make it more difficult to produce a waste glass with a high waste loading (WL) without crystallization occurring in the glass (either within the melter or upon cooling of the glass), potentially exceeding the solubility limit of critical components, having negative impacts on durability, and/or resulting in the formation of a sulfate salt layer on the molten glass surface. Although the overall scope of the task is focused on all three critical, chemical components, the current work will primarily address the potential for crystallization (e.g., nepheline and/or spinel) in high level waste (HLW) glasses. Recent work at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and by other groups has shown that nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}), which is likely to crystallize in high-alumina glasses, has a detrimental effect on the durability of the glass. The objective of this task is to develop glass formulations for specific SRS and Hanford waste streams to avoid nepheline formation while meeting waste loading and waste throughput expectations, as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Secondary objectives of this task are to assess the sulfate solubility limit for the DWPF composition and spinel settling for the WTP composition. SRNL has

  16. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter

  17. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, T.

    1998-01-01

    plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be completed within 10 years

  18. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  19. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  20. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and HIP soak time on characteristics of glass-ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-04-01

    The high level liquid waste (HLLW) from nuclear fuel reprocessing is being calcined into solid granules and being stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) since 1963. Final disposal of the calcined waste in a geologic repository requires further consolidation of the calcine in to a solid waste form. One of the solid waste forms being considered for immobilization of the ICPP calcines is the glass-ceramic. The glass-ceramic waste form is a promising option because it can potentially reduce the calcined high level waste (HLW) volume significantly compared to glass waste forms while maintaining similar leach rates. Based on technical evaluations, and laboratory and pilot plant mockup tests, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that the glass-ceramic process is more efficient than the glass process for ICPP calcine waste forms. The EPA has determined that the glass-ceramic waste form technology is an acceptable technology to meet the Best Demonstrated Acceptable Technology (BDAT) for ICPP HLW calcine. In this progress report, the impact of aluminum and silicon reactants and HIP soak time on leach rates, microstructure and phase composition of glass-ceramic waste forms are discussed

  1. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  2. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne.......The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  3. [The immobilization syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénes, Z

    1996-08-11

    Prolonged inactivity, bed rest causes pathological changes in most organs and systems of the body generally known as immobilization syndrome. These changes became known in the past 50 years in addition to scientific experiences. The author reviews pathological changes that occur with inactivity, discusses the predisposition of the elderly to the complication of bed rest and makes recommendations for treatment and prevention. While the effects of immobilization are mostly reversible in young subjects, older persons have considerably more difficulty recovering, it can even lead to the loss of independence. Minimizing duration of bed rest, early ambulation, good nursing care and physiotherapy can prevent many of the complications of inactivity and bed rest.

  4. Immobilization of microorganisms. Part 1. Preparation of immobilized Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The immobilization of Lactobacillus bulgaricus on polyacrylamide and on alginate beads was investigated. The most active immobilized cells were obtained by entrapment in Ca alginate beads. These immobilized microbial cells, when introduced into 4.5% lactose solution and whey solution showed maximum relative activity of 28% for lactose and 18% for whey compared to free cells.

  5. Conceptual process for immobilizing defense high level wastes in SYNROC-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    It is believed that the immobilization of defense wastes in SYNROC-D possesses important advantages over an alternative process which involves immobilizing the sludges in borosilicate glass. (1) It is possible to immobilize about 3 times the weight of sludge in a given volume of SYNROC-D as compared to borosilicate glass. The costs of fabrications, transport and ultimate geologic storage are correspondingly reduced; (2) the mineral assemblage of SYNROC-D is vastly more stable in the presence of groundwaters than are borosilicate glasses. The long-lived actinide elements, in particular, are immobilized much more securely in SYNROC-D than in glass; and (3) SYNROC-D is composed of thermodynamically compatible phases which possess crystal structures identical to those of natural minerals which are known to have survived in geological environments at elevated pressures and temperatures for periods of 500 to 2000 million years and to have retained radioactive elements quantitatively for these periods despite strong radiation damage. It is this evidence, provided by nature herself, which can demonstrate to the community that the shorter times required for radwaste immobilization under the much less extreme pressure, temperature conditions present in a suitable geological repository can be successfully achieved. Glass, as a waste-form, is intrinsically incapable of providing this assurance

  6. 57Fe Moessbauer effect in borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was carried out to elucidate the valence state of iron and its co-ordination in borosilicate glasses, which are being investigated as possible solidification matrices for the immobilization of a simulated nuclear waste. 57 Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy was used as the experimental technique. The chemical compositions of glass samples and the experimental conditions for the preparation of these samples are given. Iron in the form of haematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was used as doping material. Details of the experimental procedure have previously been described. Isomer shifts are calculated relative to α-iron. The results indicate a strong dependence of the valency of the iron and its coordination on the chemical composition of the glass and the Fe 2 O 3 content. The method of preparing the glasses also influences the state of the iron in oxide glasses. (Author)

  7. Oligonucleotide microarrays: immobilization of phosphorylated oligonucleotides on epoxylated surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, S; Kumar, P; Gupta, K C

    2006-01-01

    A facile and efficient method for direct immobilization of phosphorylated oligonucleotides on an epoxy-activated glass surface is described. The new immobilization strategy has been analyzed for its performance in DNA microarray under both microwave and thermal conditions. It reflects high immobilization efficiency ( approximately 23%), and signal-to-noise ratio ( approximately 98) and resulted in high hybridization efficiency ( approximately 36%) in comparison to those obtained with standard methods, viz., NTMTA ( approximately 9.76%) and epoxide-amine ( approximately 9.82%). The probes immobilized through the new strategy were found to be heat-stable, since the performance of microarray decreased by only approximately 7% after subjecting it to 20 PCR-like heat cycles, suggesting that the chemistry could be used in integrated PCR/microarray devices. The immobilization of probes following the proposed chemistry resulted in spots of superior quality in terms of spot morphology, spot homogeneity, and signal reproducibility. The constructed microarrays have been successfully used for the discrimination of nucleotide mismatches. In conclusion, these features make the new immobilization strategy ideal for facile, efficient, and cost-effective manufacturing of DNA microarrays.

  8. Remote material handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brault, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    With the downsizing of the US and Russian nuclear stockpiles, large quantities of weapons-usable plutonium in the US are being declared excess and will be disposed of by the Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program. To implement this program, DOE has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the construction and operation of three new facilities: pit disassembly and conversion; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and plutonium immobilization. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize a portion of the excess plutonium in a hybrid ceramic and glass form containing high level waste for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The PIP is divided into three distinct operating areas: Plutonium Conversion, First Stage Immobilization, and Second Stage Immobilization. Processing technology for the PIP is being developed jointly by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper will discuss development of the automated unpacking and sorting operations in the conversion area, and the automated puck and tray handling operations in the first stage immobilization area. Due to the high radiation levels and toxicity of the materials to be disposed of, the PIP will utilize automated equipment in a contained (glovebox) facility. Most operations involving plutonium-bearing materials will be performed remotely, separating personnel from the radiation source. Source term materials will be removed from the operations during maintenance. Maintenance will then be performed hands on within the containment using glove ports

  9. Microbial Cellulases Immobilized in/on Porous Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Dragomirescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of cellulose by enzymatic hydrolysis using cellulases has an important value in biotechnology and the immobilization of enzyme on inorganic materials is very useful in practical applications. Enzymatic preparations with cellulase and cellobiase activities from Trichoderma viride were liophylized from the culture medium and immobilized in/on porous matrices. The methods used for immobilization were physical adsorption on ceramics and entrapment in glass sol-gel matrices using as alkoxysilane precursors tetraethoxysilane (TEOS and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS. The immobilization efficiency of the solid enzymatic preparations was about 60%. The immobilized enzymatic preparations were used for hydrolysis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC and cellobiose at different temperature and pH values. The resulted immobilized enzymes had the same optimum pH of 4.0 in the case of cellobiase substrate and a shifted optimum pH towards the less acid side (pH 5.0 in the hydrolysis of CMC. The optimum temperature of entrapped enzyme against CMC was shifted to a lower temperature (40°C in comparison with the native one (60°C.

  10. Limb immobilization and corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Drubach, Daniel A; Knopman, David S; Ahlskog, J Eric; Golden, Erin C; Drubach, Dina I; Petersen, Ronald C; Josephs, Keith A

    2012-12-01

    Recently, we evaluated two patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) who reported symptom onset after limb immobilization. Our objective was to investigate the association between trauma, immobilization and CBS. The charts of forty-four consecutive CBS patients seen in the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer Disease Research Center were reviewed with attention to trauma and limb immobilization. 10 CBS patients (23%) had immobilization or trauma on the most affected limb preceding the onset or acceleration of symptoms. The median age at onset was 61. Six patients manifested their first symptoms after immobilization from surgery or fracture with one after leg trauma. Four patients had pre-existing symptoms of limb dysfunction but significantly worsened after immobilization or surgery. 23 percent of patients had immobilization or trauma of the affected limb. This might have implications for management of CBS, for avoiding injury, limiting immobilization and increasing movement in the affected limb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development Of Glass Matrices For HLW Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc 99 , Cs 137 , and I 129 . Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  13. Immobilization of yeast cells with various porous carriers by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Takashi; Kaetsu, Isao

    1982-06-01

    Yeast cells were immobilized by radiation-induced polymerization in twice. Various kinds of porous polymer carriers were prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers at a low temperature. Precultured yeast cells were incubated aerobically at 30 0 C with these porous carriers for 24 h. Porous carriers with yeast cells were immersed in low concentration monomer solution. Yeast cells were immobilized by radiation-induced polymerization. The maximum ethanol productivity in immobilized yeast system was around 10 times as much as that in free yeast cell system. High activity of immobilized yeast cells was maintained more than 480 h. The growth of yeast cells in immobilized yeast cells during aerobical incubation was indicated. Immobilized yeast cells thus grown were incubated for fermentation reaction. In this immobilized system, 100% of glucose was converted to ethanol, that is 100% ethanol yield was obtained, within 180 min. In free cell system, only 15% ethanol yield was obtained within 180 min. These results indicates clearly the superiority of immobilized growing cell. Yeast cells were also immobilized with non woven material as carrier by radiation-induced polymerization. The relationship between pore size of non woven material and activity in immobilized yeast cells was made clear. (author)

  14. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  15. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of

  16. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  17. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  18. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  19. Biological and bactericidal properties of Ag-doped bioactive glass in a natural extracellular matrix hydrogel with potential application in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-Y; Chatzistavrou, X; Faulk, D; Badylak, S; Zheng, L; Papagerakis, S; Ge, L; Liu, H; Papagerakis, P

    2015-06-20

    The aim of this study was the fabrication and evaluation of a novel bioactive and bactericidal material, which could have applications in dentistry by supporting tissue regeneration and killing oral bacteria. Our hypothesis was that a new scaffold for pulp-dentin tissue engineering with enhanced antibacterial activity could be obtained by associating extracellular matrix derived from porcine bladder with an antibacterial bioactive glass. Our study combines in vitro approaches and ectopic implantation in scid mice. The novel material was fabricated by incorporating a sol-gel derived silver (Ag)-doped bioactive glass (BG) in a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel in ratio 1:1 in weight % (Ag-BG/ECM). The biological properties of the Ag-BG/ECM were evaluated in culture with dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). In particular, cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, stem cells markers profile, and cell differentiation potential were studied. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei was measured. Moreover, the capability of the material to enhance pulp/dentin regeneration in vivo was also evaluated. Our data show that Ag-BG/ECM significantly enhances DPSCs' proliferation, it does not affect cell morphology and stem cells markers profile, protects cells from apoptosis, and enhances in vitro cell differentiation and mineralisation potential as well as in vivo dentin formation. Furthermore, Ag-BG/ECM strongly inhibits S. mutans and L. casei growth suggesting that the new material has also anti-bacterial properties. This study provides foundation for future clinical applications in dentistry. It could potentially advance the currently available options of dental regenerative materials.

  20. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  1. Metal immobilization in soils using synthetic zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osté, L.A.; Lexmond, T.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils is a technique to improve soil quality. Synthetic zeolites are potentially useful additives to bind heavy metals. This study selected the most effective zeolite in cadmium and zinc binding out of six synthetic zeolites (mordenite-type,

  2. Biocatalysts Immobilized in Ultrathin Ordered Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Cabaj

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of enzymes and other proteins into ordered thin materials has attracted considerable attention over the past few years. This research has demonstrated that biomolecules immobilized in different [Langmuir-Blodgett (LB/Langmuir-Schaefer (LS] matrixes retain their functional characteristics to a large extent. These new materials are of interest for applications as biosensors and biocatalysts. We review the growing field of oxidases immobilized onto ordered Langmiur-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaefer films. Strategies for the preparation of solid supports and the essential properties of the resulting materials with respect to the envisaged applications are presented. Basic effects of the nature of the adsorption and various aspects of the application of these materials as biosensors, biocatalysts are discussed. Outlook of potential applications and further challenges are also provided.

  3. Structural analysis of xSrO–(50 − x)CaO–50P2O5 glasses with x = 0, 5, or 10 mol% for potential use in a local delivery system for osteomyelitis treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comeau, P.A.; Filiaggi, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of ions into a local delivery matrix is one method of managing degradation and subsequent release of the incorporated therapeutic agents. Of interest in this study was whether we could modify the structural nature of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) glass and the subsequent therapeutic potential of this local delivery matrix with inclusion of strontium (Sr). We found that adding 10 mol% Sr significantly increased the density and chain length of the glass. There was no significant impact of Sr doping on the subsequent loading of vancomycin into the matrix, or the matrix porosity. The noted differences in structural stability, ion release, and vancomycin release between the un-doped CPP matrices and 10 mol% Sr-doped CPP matrices in vitro are likely a result of a decrease in glass disorder upon Sr addition to the glass and preferential retention of Sr over Ca during matrix degradation. This study has provided further evidence that Sr incorporation may serve to both manipulate antibiotic release from the amorphous CPP matrix and provide a potential source of therapeutic ions for enhanced bone regeneration. - Highlights: • A strontium-doped CPP glass was fabricated with a novel calcine-melt protocol. • The density and chain length of CPP glass increased upon 10 mol% Sr addition to CPP. • The phosphorous ion released in vitro was not dependent on 10 mol% Sr addition. • Doping CPP with 10 mol% Sr improved matrix short-term structural stability in vitro.

  4. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  5. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule. The purpose of this advanced LAW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-term, mid-term, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced LAW glasses, property-composition models and their uncertainties, and an advanced glass algorithm to support WTP facility operations, including both Direct Feed LAW and full pretreatment flowsheets. Data are needed to develop, validate, and implement 1) new glass property-composition models and 2) a new glass formulation algorithm. Hence, this plan integrates specific studies associated with increasing the Na2O and SO3/halide concentrations in glass, because these components will ultimately dictate waste loadings for LAW vitrification. Of equal importance is the development of an efficient and economic strategy for 99Tc management. Specific and detailed studies are being implemented to understand the fate of Tc throughout

  6. Plutonium immobilization program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results

  7. Plutonium Immobilization Program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results

  8. Bioreporter pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 immobilized in a silica matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trogl J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, the whole cell bacterial biosensor that responds to naphthalene and its metabolites via the production of visible light, was immobilized into a silica matrix by the sol-gel technique. The bioluminescence intensities were measured in the maximum of the bioluminescence band at X = 500 nm. The immobilized cells (>105 cells per g silica matrix produced light after induction by salicylate (cone. > 10 g/l, naphthalene and aminobenzoic acid. The bioluminescence intensities induced by 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid were comparable to a negative control. The cells in the silica layers on glass slides produced light in response to the presence of an inductor at least 8 months after immobilization, and >50 induction cycles. The results showed that these test slides could be used as assays for the multiple determination of water pollution.

  9. Safe immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.; Kesson, S.; Ware, N.; Hibberson, W.; Major, A.

    1979-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of methods of immobilizing high-level radioactive wastes are discussed. Problems include the devitrification of glasses and the occurrence of radiation damage. An alternative method of radioctive waste immobilization is described in which the waste is incorporated in the constituent minerals of a synthetic rock, Synroc. Synroc is immune from devitrification and is composed of phases which possess crystal structures identical to those of minerals which are known to have retained radioactive elements in geological environments at elevated pressures and tempertures for long periods. The composition and mineralogy of Synroc is given and the process of immobilizing wastes in Synroc is described. Accelerated leaching tests at elevated pressures and temperatures are also described

  10. Glass Furnace Project, October 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, K.M.; Klingler, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the Glass Furnace Project currently under way at Mound, a treatment technology for low-level radioactive waste is being evaluated that will combine volume reduction and immobilization in one step. Initial work focused on demonstrating the ability of the furnace to efficiently incinerate nonradioactive, simulated power-plant waste and on determining the adequacy of immobilization in a soda-lime silica matrix. Further evaluation of the system will involve a demonstration of the combustion and containment of radioactive waste. In preparation for this next phase of the program, preliminary investigation and design work were conducted during the past six months. 5 figures, 1 table

  11. Assessment of Savannah River borosilicate glass in the repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-04-01

    Since 1973, borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In 1977, efforts began to develop and test the large-scale equipment necessary to convert the alkaline waste slurries at SRP into a durable borosilicate glass. A process has now been developed for the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which will annually produce approximately 500 canisters of SRP waste glass which will be stored on an interim basis on the Savannah River site. Current national policy calls for the permanent disposal of high-level waste in deep geologic repositories. In the repository environment, SRP waste glass will eventually be exposed to such stresses as lithostatic or hydrostatic pressures, radiation fields, and self-heating due to radioactive decay. In addition, producing and handling each canister of glass will also expose the glass to thermal and mechanical stresses. An important objective of the extensive glass characterization and testing programs of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has been to determine how these stresses affect the performance of SRP waste glass. The results of these programs indicate that: these stresses will not significantly affect the performance of borosilicate glass containing SRP waste; and SRP waste glass will effectively immobilize hazardous radionuclides in the repository environment

  12. High-level waste immobilization program: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.R.

    1979-09-01

    The High-Level Waste Immobilization Program is providing technology to allow safe, affordable immobilization and disposal of nuclear waste. Waste forms and processes are being developed on a schedule consistent with national needs for immobilization of high-level wastes stored at Savannah River, Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and West Valley, New York. This technology is directly applicable to high-level wastes from potential reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The program is removing one more obstacle previously seen as a potential restriction on the use and further development of nuclear power, and is thus meeting a critical technological need within the national objective of energy independence

  13. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams

  14. Preparation of Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore glass-ceramics as potential waste forms for actinides: The effects of processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linggen; Zhang, Yingjie; Karatchevtseva, Inna

    2017-10-01

    Glass-Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore was fabricated by sintering the mixture of glass precursor powder and (YTi)-composite which was prepared by a soft chemistry route. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the phase pure pyrochlore was crystallized in-situ in amorphous glass matrix at 1200 °C with dwelling time over 1 h. Pyrochlore was formed in glass matrix with cooling rate ∼0.1-40 °C/min, and independent of addition of alkali/alkaline earth fluorides. Glass matrix was able to accommodate/dissolve small amounts of impurities and the mean pyrochlore particle size was between 1 and 2 μm in glass observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.

  16. Ancient Glass: A Literature Search and its Role in Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    When developing a performance assessment model for the long-term disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, it is desirable to determine the durability of glass forms over very long periods of time. However, testing is limited to short time spans, so experiments are performed under conditions that accelerate the key geochemical processes that control weathering. Verification that models currently being used can reliably calculate the long term behavior ILAW glass is a key component of the overall PA strategy. Therefore, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to evaluate alternative strategies that can be used for PA source term model validation. One viable alternative strategy is the use of independent experimental data from archaeological studies of ancient or natural glass contained in the literature. These results represent a potential independent experiment that date back to approximately 3600 years ago or 1600 before the current era (bce) in the case of ancient glass and 106 years or older in the case of natural glass. The results of this literature review suggest that additional experimental data may be needed before the result from archaeological studies can be used as a tool for model validation of glass weathering and more specifically disposal facility performance. This is largely because none of the existing data set contains all of the information required to conduct PA source term calculations. For example, in many cases the sediments surrounding the glass was not collected and analyzed; therefore having the data required to compare computer simulations of concentration flux is not possible. This type of information is important to understanding the element release profile from the glass to the surrounding environment and provides a metric that can be used to calibrate source term models. Although useful, the available literature sources do not contain the required information

  17. Ancient Glass: A Literature Search and its Role in Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-07-01

    When developing a performance assessment model for the long-term disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, it is desirable to determine the durability of glass forms over very long periods of time. However, testing is limited to short time spans, so experiments are performed under conditions that accelerate the key geochemical processes that control weathering. Verification that models currently being used can reliably calculate the long term behavior ILAW glass is a key component of the overall PA strategy. Therefore, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to evaluate alternative strategies that can be used for PA source term model validation. One viable alternative strategy is the use of independent experimental data from archaeological studies of ancient or natural glass contained in the literature. These results represent a potential independent experiment that date back to approximately 3600 years ago or 1600 before the current era (bce) in the case of ancient glass and 106 years or older in the case of natural glass. The results of this literature review suggest that additional experimental data may be needed before the result from archaeological studies can be used as a tool for model validation of glass weathering and more specifically disposal facility performance. This is largely because none of the existing data set contains all of the information required to conduct PA source term calculations. For example, in many cases the sediments surrounding the glass was not collected and analyzed; therefore having the data required to compare computer simulations of concentration flux is not possible. This type of information is important to understanding the element release profile from the glass to the surrounding environment and provides a metric that can be used to calibrate source term models. Although useful, the available literature sources do not contain the required information

  18. Immobilization of nanoparticles by occlusion into microbial calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skuce, Rebecca L.; Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; MacLaren, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Binding of nanoparticles (NPs) to mineral surfaces influences their transport through the environment. The potential, however, for growing minerals to immobilize NPs via occlusion (the process of trapping particles inside the growing mineral) has yet to be explored in environmentally relevant...... not influence calcite precipitation at the concentrations used here. Overall, these findings demonstrate that microbially driven mineral precipitation has potential to immobilize nanoparticles in the environment via occlusion....

  19. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    of research that investigates the role of personality in predicting media usage by analyzing smart glasses, particularly Google Glass. First, we integrate AR devices into the current evolution of media and technologies. Then, we draw on the Big Five Model of human personality and present the results from two...... studies that investigate the direct and moderating effects of human personality on the awareness and innovation adoption of smart glasses. Our results show that open and emotionally stable consumers tend to be more aware of Google Glass. Consumers who perceive the potential for high functional benefits...

  20. Laboratory work in support of West Valley glass development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1988-05-01

    Over the past six years, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted several studies in support of waste glass composition development and testing of glass compositions suitable for immobilizing the nuclear wastes stored at West Valley, New York. As a result of pilot-scale testing conducted by PNL, the glass composition was changed from that originally recommended in response to changes in the waste stream, and several processing-related problems were discovered. These problems were solved, or sufficiently addressed to determine their likely effect on the glass melting operations to be conducted at West Valley. This report describes the development of the waste glass composition, WV-205, and discusses solutions to processing problems such as foaming and insoluble sludges, as well as other issues such as effects of feed variations on processing of the resulting glass. An evaluation of the WV-205 glass from a repository perspective is included in the appendix to this report

  1. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fulchiron, Ren?; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legar?, V?ronique

    2015-01-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg ) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of ap...

  2. Scanning electron microscopy study of protein immobilized on SIO2 Sol-gel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform attachment of enzymes to solid surfaces is essential in the development of bio and optical sensor devices. Immobilization by adsorption according to hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature is dependent on the charges and defects of the support surfaces. Sol-gel SiO2 densified glass surfaces, frequently used as supports for protein immobilization, are evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. The model protein is globular enzyme lysozyme, deposited by adsorption on functionalized surfaces. Formation of a protein layer is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, and the SEM images suggest discontinuous adsorption in areas where cracks predominate on the glass surface.

  3. Options for the Separation and Immobilization of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Among radioactive constituents present in the Hanford tank waste, technetium-99 (Tc) presents a unique challenge in that it is significantly radiotoxic, exists predominantly in the liquid low-activity waste (LAW), and has proven difficult to effectively stabilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, the LAW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility, but a significant fraction of Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment system. This necessitates recycle of the off-gas condensate solution to the LAW glass melter feed. The recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the immobilized LAW (ILAW), but it also disproportionately increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed, which have limited solubility in the LAW glass and thus significantly reduce the amount of LAW (glass waste loading) that can be vitrified and still maintain good waste form properties. This increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or requires the need for supplemental LAW treatment capacity. Several options are being considered to address this issue. Two approaches attempt to minimize the off-gas recycle by removing Tc at one of several possible points within the tank waste processing flowsheet. The separated Tc from these two approaches must then be dispositioned in a manner such that the Tc can be safely disposed. Alternative waste forms that do not have the Tc volatility issues associated with the vitrification process are being sought for immobilization of Tc for subsequent storage and disposal. The first objective of this report is to provide insights into the compositions and volumes of the Tc-bearing waste streams including the ion exchange eluate from processing LAW and the off-gas condensate from the melter. The first step to be assessed will be the

  4. Element mobilization and immobilization from carbonate rocks between CO 2 storage reservoirs and the overlying aquifers during a potential CO 2 leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawter, Amanda R.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Asmussen, R. Matthew; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Qafoku, Odeta; Bacon, Diana H.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2018-04-01

    Despite the numerous studies on changes within the reservoir following CO2 injection and the effects of CO2 release into overlying aquifers, little or no literature is available on the effect of CO2 release on rock between the storage reservoirs and subsurface. To address this knowledge gap, relevant rock materials, temperatures and pressures were used to study mineralogical and elemental changes in this intermediate zone. After rocks reacted with CO2, liquid analysis showed an increase of major elements (e.g., Ca, and Mg) and variable concentrations of potential contaminants (e.g., Sr and Ba); lower concentrations were observed in N2 controls. In experiments with As/Cd and/or organic spikes, representing potential contaminants in the CO2 plume originating in the storage reservoir, most or all of these contaminants were removed from the aqueous phase. SEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed the formation of new minerals and Fe oxides in some CO2-reacted samples, indicating potential for contaminant removal through mineral incorporation or adsorption onto Fe oxides. These experiments show the interactions between the CO2-laden plume and the rock between storage reservoirs and overlying aquifers have the potential to affect the level of risk to overlying groundwater, and should be considered during site selection and risk evaluation.

  5. Immobilization and controlled release of drug using plasma polymerized thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Sung-Woon [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, MRC Center, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sang-Chul [Department of Environmental Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon 540-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, MRC Center, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    In this study, plasma polymerization of acrylic acid was employed to immobilize drug and control its release. Doxorubicin (DOX) was immobilized covalently on the glass surface deposited with plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAAc) thin film containing the carboxylic group. At first, the PPAAc thin film was coated on a glass surface at a pressure of 1.33 Pa and radio frequency (RF) discharge power of 20 W for 10 min. DOX was immobilized on the PPAAc deposition in a two environment of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. The DOX immobilized surface was characterized by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The DOX molecules were more immobilized in PBS than DMSO solution. The different immobilization and release profiles of DOX result from the solubility of hydrophobic DOX in aqueous and organic solutions. Second, in order to control the release of the drug, PPAAc thin film was covered over DOX dispersed layer. Different thicknesses and cross-linked PPAAc thin films by adjusting deposition time and RF discharge power were covered on the DOX layer dispersed. PPAAc thin film coated DOX layer reduced the release rate of DOX. The thickness control of plasma deposition allows controlling the release rate of drug. - Highlights: • Doxorubicin was immobilized on the surface of plasma polymerized acrylic acid thin film. • Release profile of doxorubicin was affected by aqueous and organic solutions. • Plasma polymerized acrylic acid thin film can be used to achieve controlled release.

  6. Immobilization and controlled release of drug using plasma polymerized thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, Sung-Woon; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, plasma polymerization of acrylic acid was employed to immobilize drug and control its release. Doxorubicin (DOX) was immobilized covalently on the glass surface deposited with plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAAc) thin film containing the carboxylic group. At first, the PPAAc thin film was coated on a glass surface at a pressure of 1.33 Pa and radio frequency (RF) discharge power of 20 W for 10 min. DOX was immobilized on the PPAAc deposition in a two environment of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. The DOX immobilized surface was characterized by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The DOX molecules were more immobilized in PBS than DMSO solution. The different immobilization and release profiles of DOX result from the solubility of hydrophobic DOX in aqueous and organic solutions. Second, in order to control the release of the drug, PPAAc thin film was covered over DOX dispersed layer. Different thicknesses and cross-linked PPAAc thin films by adjusting deposition time and RF discharge power were covered on the DOX layer dispersed. PPAAc thin film coated DOX layer reduced the release rate of DOX. The thickness control of plasma deposition allows controlling the release rate of drug. - Highlights: • Doxorubicin was immobilized on the surface of plasma polymerized acrylic acid thin film. • Release profile of doxorubicin was affected by aqueous and organic solutions. • Plasma polymerized acrylic acid thin film can be used to achieve controlled release

  7. [Immobilization of heavy metal Pb2+ with geopolymer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Man-tong; Jin, Zan-fang; Huang, Cai-ju

    2011-05-01

    A series of geopolymers were synthesized by mixing metakaolinite, water glass, sodium hydroxide and water, and the lead ion solidification experiments were performed with the geopolymer. Then, the immobilization efficiency was characterized by monitoring the leaching concentration and compressive strength of solidified products. Additionally, the structure and properties of the solidified products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, based on the analysis of immobilization efficiency, microstructure and mineral structure, the difference between geopolymer and cement on the performance of immobilizing heavy metals was discussed. The results of lead ion immobilization experiments showed that over 99.7% of heavy metal was captured by the geopolymer as the doping concentration of lead ion was less than 3%. Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the solidified product ranged from 40 MPa to 50 MPa. Furthermore, by using the same Pb2+ concentration, the geopolymer showed higher compressive strength and lower leaching concentration compared to the cement. Because lead ion participated in constitution of structure of geopolymer, or Pb2+ was adsorbed by the aluminium ions on the geopolymeric skeleton and held in geopolymer. However, cement mainly solidified lead ion by physical encapsulation and adsorption mechanism. Therefore, both from the compressive strength and leaching concentration and from the microstructure characterization as well as the mechanism of the geopolymerization reaction, the geopolymer has more advantages in immobilizing Pb2+ than the cement.

  8. Assessment of methods for immobilizing reprocessed radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, M. K.; Baranyi, A. D.

    1980-05-01

    Nuclear waste forms presently used for the disposal of high level wastes and other potential waste forms under development were studied. The following waste forms were considered: Borosilicate glass, high silica glass, glassceramics, supercalcine ceramics, synroc ceramics, borosilicate glass beads in a metal matrix, supercalcine and synroc ceramics in a metal matrix and coated ceramics. The best developed wasteform, both in terms of overall product quality and process development, is monolithic borosilicate glass. However, hydrothermal instability is a major concern. Borosilicate glass in metal matrix waste form has better properties than monolithic borosilicate glass waste form. The process was proven on a pilot scale. Hence, it is considered very close to monolithic glass in terms of overall development. The product qualities of the other waste forms are better than borosilicate glass. However, process development for these alternative waste forms is still in a conceptual stage.

  9. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1982-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently being designed to convert Savannah River Plant liquid, high-level radioactive waste into a solid form, such as borosilicate glass. To prevent the spread of radioactivity, the outside of the canisters of waste glass must have very low levels of smearable radioactive contamination before they are removed from the DWPF. Several techniques were considered for canister decontamination: high-pressure water spray, electropolishing, chemical dissolution, and abrasive blasting. An abrasive blasting technique using a glass frit slurry has been selected for use in the DWPF. No additional equipment is needed to process waste generated from decontamination. Frit used as the abrasive will be mixed with the waste and fed to the glass melter. In contrast, chemical and electrochemical techniques require more space in the DWPF, and produce large amounts of contaminated by-products, which are difficult to immobilize by vitrification

  10. Aluminophosphate glasses with high sulfate content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovsky, S.V.; Ivanov, I.A.; Gulin, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    To immobilize a high sulfate radioactive wastes a system Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 -SO 3 has been chosen as one where glasses have a relatively low melting points and good chemical durability. Glasses within partial system 44 Na 2 O, 20 Al 2 O 3 , (36-x)P 2 O 5 , x SO 3 have been prepared at 1,000 C. A possibility of assimilation up to 12 mole % of SO 3 has been established. The basic properties of sulfate-containing glasses as density, microhardness, thermal expansion coefficient, transformation and deformation temperatures, viscosity, electric resistivity, leach rate of ions and diffusion coefficients of 22 Na, 35 S, 90 Sr and 137 Cs have been measured. Glass structure by infrared and EPR spectroscopies has been investigated

  11. Element mobilization and immobilization from carbonate rocks between CO2storage reservoirs and the overlying aquifers during a potential CO2leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawter, Amanda R; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Asmussen, R Matthew; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Qafoku, Odeta; Bacon, Diana H; Brown, Christopher F

    2018-04-01

    Despite the numerous studies on changes within the reservoir following CO 2 injection and the effects of CO 2 release into overlying aquifers, little or no literature is available on the effect of CO 2 release on rock between the storage reservoirs and subsurface. This is important, because the interactions that occur in this zone between the CO 2 storage reservoir and the subsurface may have a significant impact on risk analysis for CO 2 storage projects. To address this knowledge gap, relevant rock materials, temperatures and pressures were used to study mineralogical and elemental changes in this intermediate zone. After rocks reacted with CO 2 -acidified 0.01 M NaCl, liquid analysis showed an increase of major elements (e.g., Ca and Mg) and variable concentrations of potential contaminants (e.g., Sr and Ba); lower aqueous concentrations of these elements were observed in N 2 control experiments, likely due to differences in pH between the CO 2 and N 2 experiments. In experiments with As/Cd and/or organic spikes, representing potential contaminants in the CO 2 plume originating in the storage reservoir, most or all of these contaminants were removed from the aqueous phase. SEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed the formation of new minerals and Fe oxides in some CO 2 -reacted samples, indicating potential for contaminant removal through mineral incorporation or adsorption onto Fe oxides. These experiments show the interactions between the CO 2 -laden plume and the rock between storage reservoirs and overlying aquifers have the potential to affect the level of risk to overlying groundwater, and should be considered during site selection and risk evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3-month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents

  13. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

  14. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    . The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m 2 and depth of ∼1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in wasteloading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

  15. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    . The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in wasteloading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

  16. Improvement of the homogeneity of protein-imprinted polymer films by orientated immobilization of the template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lijian; Zheng Jingjing; Fang Guijie; Xie Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MPH was genetically modified at its C-terminal with (Gly-Ser) 5 –Cys. ► MPH-L was immobilized with fixed orientation via disulfide chemistry. ► The immobilized MPH-L retained the activity of MPH. ► MPH-L formed a homogeneous template. ► Homogeneous MIP film was obtained with orientated immobilization of the template. - Abstract: A method for preparing homogeneous protein-imprinted polymer films with orientated immobilization of template is described. The template methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) was modified with a peptide linker (Gly-Ser) 5 –Cys and was immobilized on a cover glass with a fixed orientation via the linker. The activity of the fusion enzyme (MPH-L) was evaluated by determining the product's absorbance at 405 nm (A 405 ). Both the free and the immobilized MPH-L showed higher retention of the bioactivity than the wide type enzyme (MPH-W) as revealed by the A 405 values for MPH-L free /MPH-W free (1.159/1.111) and for MPH-L immobilized /MPH-W immobilized (0.348/0.118). The immobilized MPH-L also formed a more homogeneous template stamp compared to the immobilized MPH-W. The molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared with the immobilized MPH-L exhibited high homogeneity with low Std. Deviations of 80 and 200 from the CL intensity mean volumes which were observed for batch-prepared films and an individual film, respectively. MPH-L-imprinted polymer film also had a larger template binding capacity indicated by higher CL intensity mean volume of 3900 INT over 2500 INT for MPH-W-imprinted films. The imprinted film prepared with the orientated immobilization of template showed an imprinting factor of 1.7, while the controls did not show an imprinting effect.

  17. Characterization of a frozen shoulder model using immobilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Du Hwan; Lee, Kil-Ho; Lho, Yun-Mee; Ha, Eunyoung; Hwang, Ilseon; Song, Kwang-Soon; Cho, Chul-Hyun

    2016-12-08

    The objective of this study was to investigate serial changes for histology of joint capsule and range of motion of the glenohumeral joint after immobilization in rats. We hypothesized that a rat shoulder contracture model using immobilization would be capable of producing effects on the glenohumeral joint similar to those seen in patients with frozen shoulder. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into one control group (n = 8) and seven immobilization groups (n = 8 per group) that were immobilized with molding plaster for 3 days, or for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks. At each time point, eight rats were euthanized for histologic evaluation of the axillary recess and for measurement of the abduction angle. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was found in the synovial tissue until 2 weeks after immobilization. However, inflammatory cells were diminished and fibrosis was dominantly observed in the synovium and subsynovial tissue 3 weeks after immobilization. From 1 week after immobilization, the abduction angle of all immobilization groups at each time point was significantly lower than that of the control group. Our study demonstrated that a rat frozen shoulder model using immobilization generates the pathophysiologic process of inflammation leading to fibrosis on the glenohumeral joint similar to that seen in patients with frozen shoulder. This model was attained within 3 weeks after immobilization. It may serve as a useful tool to investigate pathogenesis at the molecular level and identify potential target genes that are involved in the development of frozen shoulder.

  18. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  19. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  20. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.; Hertz, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spin glasses, simply defined by the authors as a collection of spins (i.e., magnetic moments) whose low-temperature state is a frozen disordered one, represent one of the fascinating new fields of study in condensed matter physics, and this book is the first to offer a comprehensive account of the subject. Included are discussions of the most important developments in theory, experimental work, and computer modeling of spin glasses, all of which have taken place essentially within the last two decades. The first part of the book gives a general introduction to the basic concepts and a discussion of mean field theory, while the second half concentrates on experimental results, scaling theory, and computer simulation of the structure of spin glasses

  1. Glass markets information system: Application records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The Glass Markets Information System synthesizes technical and economic information on existing and potential uses for recovered glass for the purpose of making this information readily available in a structured form. Access to reliable information regarding the technical characteristics and market conditions for recovered glass facilitates decisions on its use and marketing.

  2. Microscopic and spectroscopic characterization of humic substances from a compost amended copper contaminated soil: main features and their potential effects on Cu immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jorge; Monreal, Carlos; Chabot, Denise; Meier, Sebastián; González, María Eugenia; Morales, Esteban; Parillo, Rita; Borie, Fernando; Cornejo, Pablo

    2017-06-01

    We characterized humic substances (HS) extracted from a Cu-contaminated soil without compost addition (C) or amended with a wheat straw-based compost (WSC) (H1), co-composted with Fe 2 O 3 (H2), or co-composted with an allophane-rich soil (H3). Extracted HS were characterized under electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (X-EDS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In addition, HS extracted from WSC (H4) were characterized at pH 4.0 and 8.0 with descriptive purposes. At pH 4.0, globular structures of H4 were observed, some of them aggregating within a large network. Contrariwise, at pH 8.0, long tubular and disaggregated structures prevailed. TEM microscopy suggests organo-mineral interactions at scales of 1 to 200 nm with iron oxide nanoparticles. HS extracted from soil-compost incubations showed interactions at nanoscale with minerals and crystal compounds into the organic matrix of HS. Bands associated to acidic functional groups of HS may suggest potential sorption interactions with transition metals. We conclude that metal ions and pH have an important role controlling the morphology and configuration of HS from WSC. Characterization of H4 extracted from WSC showed that physicochemical protection of HS could be present in composting systems treated with inorganic materials. Finally, the humified fractions obtained from compost-amended soils may have an important effect on metal-retention, supporting their potential use in metal-contaminated soils.

  3. US DOE Initiated Performance Enhancements to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low-activity Waste Vitrification (LAW) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, William F.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Holton, Langdon K.; Pegg, Ian L.; Bowen, Brad W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the treatment and vitrification of underground tank wastes stored at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The WTP comprises four major facilities: a pretreatment facility to separate the tank waste into high level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) process streams, a HLW vitrification facility to immobilize the HLW fraction; a LAW vitrification facility to immobilize the LAW fraction, and an analytical laboratory to support the operations of all four treatment facilities. DOE has established strategic objectives to optimize the performance of the WTP facilities and the LAW and HLW waste forms to reduce the overall schedule and cost for treatment and vitrification of the Hanford tank wastes. This strategy has been implemented by establishing performance expectations in the WTP contract for the facilities and waste forms. In addition, DOE, as owner-operator of the WTP facilities, continues to evaluate (1) the design, to determine the potential for performance above the requirements specified in the WTP contract; and (2) improvements in production of the LAW and HLW waste forms. This paper reports recent progress directed at improving production of the LAW waste form. DOE's initial assessment, which is based on the work reported in this paper, is that the capacity of the WTP LAW vitrification facility can be increased by a factor of 2 to 4 with a combination of revised glass formulations, modest increases in melter glass operating temperatures, and a second-generation LAW melter with a larger surface area. Implementing these improvements in the LAW waste immobilization capability can benefit the LAW treatment mission by reducing both processing time and cost

  4. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  5. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models: Results for the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-03

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  6. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field

  7. Engineered Hybrid Scaffolds of Poly(vinyl alcohol/Bioactive Glass for Potential Bone Engineering Applications: Synthesis, Characterization, Cytocompatibility, and Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermes S. Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis, characterization, preliminary cytocompatibility, and degradation behavior of the hybrids based on 70% Poly(vinyl alcohol and 30% bioactive glass (58SiO2–33CaO–9P2O5, BaG with macroporous tridimensional structure is reported for the first time. The effect of glutaraldehyde covalent crosslinker in the organic-inorganic nanostructures produced and, as a consequence, tailoring the hybrids properties was investigated. The PVA/BaG hybrids scaffolds are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and X-ray Microcomputed tomography analysis (μCT. Cytotoxicity assessment is performed by the MTT method with VERO cell culture. Additionally, the hybrid in vitro degradation assay is conducted by measuring the mass loss by soaking in deionized water at 37°C for up to 21 days. The results have clearly shown that it is possible to modify the PVA/BaG hybrids properties and degradation behavior by engineering the structure using different concentrations of the chemical crosslinker. Moreover, these hybrid crosslinked nanostructures have presented 3D hierarchical pore size architecture varying within 10–450 μm and a suitable cytocompatibility for potential use in bone tissue engineering applications.

  8. Iodine immobilization in apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audubert, F.; Lartigue, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In the context of a scientific program on long-lived radionuclide conditioning, a matrix for iodine 129 immobilization has been studied. A lead vanado-phosphate apatite was prepared from the melt of lead vanado-phosphate Pb 3 (VO 4 ) 1.6 (PO 4 ) 0.4 and lead iodide PbI 2 in stoichiometric proportions by calcination at 700 deg. C during 3 hours. Natural sintering of this apatite is not possible because the product decomposition occurs at 400 deg. C. Reactive sintering is the solution. The principle depends on the coating of lead iodide with lead vanado-phosphate. Lead vanado-phosphate coating is used as iodo-apatite reactant and as dense covering to confine iodine during synthesis. So the best condition to immobilize iodine during iodo-apatite synthesis is a reactive sintering at 700 deg. C under 25 MPa. We obtained an iodo-apatite surrounded with dense lead vanadate. Leaching behaviour of the matrix synthesized by solid-solid reaction is under progress in order to determine chemical durability, basic mechanisms of the iodo-apatite alteration and kinetic rate law. Iodo-apatite dissolution rates were pH and temperature dependent. We obtained a rate of 2.5 10 -3 g.m -2 .d -1 at 90 deg. C in initially de-ionised water. (authors)

  9. Double-Barrier mechanism for chromium immobilization: A quantitative study of crystallization and leachability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Changzhong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); Tang, Yuanyuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Liu, Chengshuai, E-mail: csliu@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Shih, Kaimin [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Fangbai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of chromium incorporating in the glass-ceramic matrix. Most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • The glass-ceramic samples were proven to be excellent in immobilizing Cr. • Glass-ceramic was successfully synthesized in CaO-MgO-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} -Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. • Both crystalline and glass phases were quantified by Rietveld quantitative XRD. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 90%. - Abstract: Glass-ceramics are well known for the excellent combination properties provided by their components, a glassy matrix and crystalline phases, and have promising applications in the immobilization and detoxification of solid waste containing toxic metals. Glass-ceramic products were successfully synthesized in CaO-MgO-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} -Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. Two key measures – partitioning ratio of Cr in the spinel and Cr leaching ratio – were used to investigate the mechanism of Cr immobilization in the glass-ceramic products. The results of powder X-ray diffraction revealed that both spinel and diopside were major crystalline phases in the products. The value of x in the MgCr{sub x}Al{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel was highly related to the amount of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} added to the glass-ceramic system. As Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} content increased, the proportion of spinel phase increased, while that of glass phase decreased. The partitioning ratio of Cr in spinel phase was about 70% for 2 wt.% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and increased to 90% when loaded with 10 wt.% of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. According to the results of the prolonged toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, the Cr leaching ratio decreased with the increase of Cr partitioning ratio into the spinel phase. The findings of this study clearly indicate that glass-ceramic formed by spinel structure and residual

  10. Properties of Formula 127 glass prepared with radioactive zirconia calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Pavlica, D.A.; Cole, H.S.

    1982-09-01

    Formula 127 glass has been developed to immobilize ICPP zirconia calcine. This glass has been prepared remotely on a laboratory scale basis with actual radioactive zirconia calcine retrieved after ten years of storage from Bin Set 2. The aqueous leachability of the glass produced was investigated and compared through application of the MCC-1, MCC-2 and Soxhlet leach tests with that of Formula 127 glass prepared with simulated calcine. The solid state properties of the glasses prepared with actual and simulated calcines were also measured by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX). Based on the application of these leaching tests and analysis techniques the properties measured in this study are similar for 127 glass prepared with either simulated or radioactive calcine. 13 figures, 16 tables

  11. Carbohydrate Microarray on Glass: a Tool for Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Giesbers, M.; Visser, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Beek, van T.A.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method to immobilize carbohydrates on a glass surface to obtain a carbohydrate microarray is described. The array was used to study carbohydrate-lectin interactions. The glass surface was modified with aldehyde terminated linker groups of various chain lengths. Coupling of carbohydrates

  12. Enhanced LAW Glass Correlation - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Joseph, Innocent [Atkins Energy Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    2016-12-01

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at the United States Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE’s Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product is designed for acceptance into a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. Acceptable glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford low activity waste (LAW) must meet a variety of product quality, processability, and waste loading requirements. To this end, The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at The Catholic University of America (CUA) developed and tested a number of glass formulations during Part A, Part B1 and Part B2 of the WTP development program. The testing resulted in the selection of target glass compositions for the processing of eight of the Phase I LAW tanks. The selected glass compositions were tested at the crucible scale to confirm their compliance with ILAW performance requirements. Duramelter 100 (DM100) and LAW Pilot Melter tests were then conducted to demonstrate the viability of these glass compositions for LAW vitrification at high processing rates.

  13. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural analysis of xSrO-(50 - x)CaO-50P2O5 glasses with x=0, 5, or 10 mol% for potential use in a local delivery system for osteomyelitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, P A; Filiaggi, M J

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of ions into a local delivery matrix is one method of managing degradation and subsequent release of the incorporated therapeutic agents. Of interest in this study was whether we could modify the structural nature of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) glass and the subsequent therapeutic potential of this local delivery matrix with inclusion of strontium (Sr). We found that adding 10 mol% Sr significantly increased the density and chain length of the glass. There was no significant impact of Sr doping on the subsequent loading of vancomycin into the matrix, or the matrix porosity. The noted differences in structural stability, ion release, and vancomycin release between the un-doped CPP matrices and 10 mol% Sr-doped CPP matrices in vitro are likely a result of a decrease in glass disorder upon Sr addition to the glass and preferential retention of Sr over Ca during matrix degradation. This study has provided further evidence that Sr incorporation may serve to both manipulate antibiotic release from the amorphous CPP matrix and provide a potential source of therapeutic ions for enhanced bone regeneration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Addressed immobilization of biofunctionalized diatoms on electrodes by gold electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, S; Garibo, D; Fernández-Tejedor, M; O'Sullivan, C K; Campàs, M

    2017-03-23

    Diatoms are single cell microalgae with a silica shell (frustule), which possess a micro/nanoporous pattern of unparalleled diversity far beyond the possibilities of current micro- and nanofabrication techniques. To explore diatoms as natural three-dimensional nanostructured supports in sensing and biosensing devices, a simple, rapid and stable method to immobilize diatoms via gold electrodeposition is described. In this process, gold microstructures are formed, immobilizing diatoms by entrapment or crossing their nanopores. Varying the applied potential, time and HAuCl 4 concentration, gold deposits of different morphologies and roughness are obtained, thereby determining the diatom immobilization process. Optical and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize diatom immobilization yields, the morphology of the gold microstructures, and the morphological integrity of diatoms. Cyclic voltammetry has been performed to characterize the gold deposits and to demonstrate the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the gold-diatom electrodes. Electro-addressed immobilization of different diatoms on specific bands of interdigitated electrode arrays has been achieved, highlighting the potential application of diatoms for site-specific immobilization on microarrays. The feasibility to combine tailored immobilization with diatom biofunctionalization has also been demonstrated. Antibody-functionalized diatoms were immobilized on electrodes retaining their ability to detect its cognate antigen. The reported method exploits the natural three-dimensional nanostructures of diatoms together with their easy modification with biomolecules and the simplicity of gold electrodeposition to produce micro/nanostructured and highly electrocatalytic electrodes, providing low-cost and eco-friendly platforms and arrays with potential application in biosensing devices.

  16. A simple gold nanoparticle-mediated immobilization method to fabricate highly homogeneous DNA microarrays having higher capacities than those prepared by using conventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Cheulhee; Mun, Hyo Young; Li, Taihua; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2009-01-01

    A simple, highly efficient immobilization method to fabricate DNA microarrays, that utilizes gold nanoparticles as the mediator, has been developed. The fabrication method begins with electrostatic attachment of amine-modified DNA to gold nanoparticles. The resulting gold-DNA complexes are immobilized on conventional amine or aldehyde functionalized glass slides. By employing gold nanoparticles as the immobilization mediator, implementation of this procedure yields highly homogeneous microarrays that have higher binding capacities than those produced by conventional methods. This outcome is due to the increased three-dimensional immobilization surface provided by the gold nanoparticles as well as the intrinsic effects of gold on emission properties. This novel immobilization strategy gives microarrays that produce more intense hybridization signals for the complementary DNA. Furthermore, the silver enhancement technique, made possible only in the case of immobilized gold nanoparticles on the microarrays, enables simple monitoring of the integrity of the immobilized DNA probe.

  17. Mineralogical controls on uranium immobilization at Tono Uranium Deposit, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, M. A.; McKibben, M. A.; Arthur, R. C.; Ota, K.; Iwatsuki, T.

    2002-12-01

    The Tono uranium deposit, located in central Japan, is thought to have formed when oxidizing groundwater leached uranium from the underlying Toki Granite and transported it to the overlying host sedimentary formations where it precipitated under reducing conditions. Fission-track dating shows that this uranium mineralization took place ~10 million years ago and has remained immobilized despite episodes of sedimentation, uplift, subsidence, major faulting, and erosion. In order to understand the mineralogical controls on uranium immobilization, this study is gathering data on the mode of precipitation and adsorption of uranium within the various host lithologies. Optical petrography done on samples has shown a predominance of volcaniclastic deposits, containing glass shards within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. Tephra that were formerly glass lack axiolitic devitrification textures and are altered to similar fine-grained mineralogy as in the matrix. X-ray diffraction data indicates that the majority of this fine-grained mineralogy is chlorite and the Mg, Ca smectite, saponite. Electron dispersive spectroscopy and back scattered electron data will create a map of the uranium concentrations and show any mineralogical affinities. Scanning and transmission electron microscope data will resolve the nature, crystallinity, and host sites of the uranium mineralization and help resolve the paragenesis in these tuffaceous rocks. This paper will address data gathered on samples across the host sedimentary formations and with depth to establish what mineralogical controls, if any, have influenced uranium precipitation and immobilization.

  18. Physical and chemical characterization of borosilicate glasses containing Hanford high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.; Palmer, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    Scouting studies are being performed to develop and evaluate silicate glass forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level wastes. Detailed knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of these glasses is required to assess their suitability for long-term storage or disposal. Some key properties to be considered in selecting a glass waste form include leach resistance, resistance to radiation, microstructure (includes devitrification behavior or crystallinity), homogeneity, viscosity, electrical resistivity, mechanical ruggedness, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, density, softening point, annealing point, strain point, glass transformation temperature, and refractive index. Other properties that are important during processing of the glass include volatilization of glass and waste components, and corrosivity of the glass on melter components. Experimental procedures used to characterize silicate waste glass forms and typical properties of selected glass compositions containing simulated Hanford sludge and residual liquid wastes are presented. A discussion of the significance and use of each measured property is also presented

  19. Toward a solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay within microfluidic channels using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Algar, W Russ; Tavares, Anthony J; Krull, Ulrich J

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties and surface area of quantum dots (QDs) have made them an attractive platform for the development of nucleic acid biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Solid-phase assays based on FRET using mixtures of immobilized QD-oligonucleotide conjugates (QD biosensors) have been developed. The typical challenges associated with solid-phase detection strategies include non-specific adsorption, slow kinetics of hybridization, and sample manipulation. The new work herein has considered the immobilization of QD biosensors onto the surfaces of microfluidic channels in order to address these challenges. Microfluidic flow can be used to dynamically control stringency by adjustment of the potential in an electrokinetic-based microfluidics environment. The shearing force, Joule heating, and the competition between electroosmotic and electrophoretic mobilities allow the optimization of hybridization conditions, convective delivery of target to the channel surface to speed hybridization, amelioration of adsorption, and regeneration of the sensing surface. Microfluidic flow can also be used to deliver (for immobilization) and remove QD biosensors. QDs that were conjugated with two different oligonucleotide sequences were used to demonstrate feasibility. One oligonucleotide sequence on the QD was available as a linker for immobilization via hybridization with complementary oligonucleotides located on a glass surface within a microfluidic channel. A second oligonucleotide sequence on the QD served as a probe to transduce hybridization with target nucleic acid in a sample solution. A Cy3 label on the target was excited by FRET using green-emitting CdSe/ZnS QD donors and provided an analytical signal to explore this detection strategy. The immobilized QDs could be removed under denaturing conditions by disrupting the duplex that was used as the surface linker and thus allowed a new layer of QD biosensors to be re-coated within the channel

  20. Glass Formulation Development for the Vitrification of Oak Ridge Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Workman, P.J.; Harbour, J.R.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-07-01

    Radioactive waste from four different Oak Ridge tank farms will be immobilized. The sludges in these tanks contain transuranic radionuclides and RCRA metals at levels which will make the final waste from both TRU and mixed. The final waste form in the immobilization of these sludges may be glass because of its ability to accept a wide variety of components into its network structure. The results of these tests indicate that sufficient waste loadings can be obtained in the glass to significantly reduce the waste volume. This paper will present the results of the glass formulation efforts.

  1. Cellulase immobilization on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Janaina S; Araújo, Pedro H H; Sayer, Claudia; Souza, Antonio A U; Viegas, Alexandre C; de Oliveira, Débora

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of cellulases on magnetic nanoparticles, especially magnetite nanoparticles, has been the main approach studied to make this enzyme, economically and industrially, more attractive. However, magnetite nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, are very reactive and easily oxidized in air, which has strong impact on their useful life. Thus, it is very important to provide proper surface coating to avoid the mentioned problems. This study aimed to investigate the immobilization of cellulase on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymeric nanospheres. The support was characterized in terms of morphology, average diameter, magnetic behavior and thermal decomposition analyses. The polymer nanospheres containing encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior and intensity average diameter about 150 nm. Immobilized cellulase exhibited broader temperature stability than in the free form and great reusability capacity, 69% of the initial enzyme activity was maintained after eight cycles of use. The magnetic support showed potential for cellulase immobilization and allowed fast and easy biocatalyst recovery through a single magnet.

  2. Alteration of basaltic glasses from the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.

    chemical changes are the loss of Si, Mg and Ca and a gain of Na and K whilst, Fe and Ti remained immobile. It reflects that the basaltic glasses have undergone initial to intermediate stages of palagonitisation under low temperature oxidative alterations...

  3. Process Technology for Immobilized Lipasecatalyzed Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yuan

    (e.g. a hydrophobic carrier for the immobilized lipase and the capabilities to provide sufficient mixing as well as stepwise/continuous feeding of ethanol to the reactor). An STR is efficient for batch operation while a PBR is efficient for a continuous production. An STR can more easily provide...... sufficient external mass transfer for a reaction, but will lead to more mechanical damage of the biocatalyst particles, than a PBR. A reactor combination of CSTR with PBR can couple the advantages of both, delivering an efficient continuous process. The second case study (esterification) shares some similar......-catalyzed transesterification is that it is multi-phasic system. The by-product glycerol can potentially impose inhibitory effects on immobilized lipases and likewise the un-dissolved ethanol can inhibit the lipase. The options for addressing these issues can be used as the basis for selecting the biocatalyst and the reactor...

  4. Nitrate salt immobilization process development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, R.D.; Johnson, A.J.; Peter, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The waste nitrate salts generated at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) were determined to be unacceptable in their present form for shipment to and storage at the Nevada Test Site, according to the recently implemented Waste Acceptance Criteria. A reduction in the dispersibility and oxidizing potential of the salt was necessary. Various methods of immobilization were investigated to determine the waste form with the highest possible waste loading and the most cost effective processing. Portland cement was selected as the most effective binder (in terms of cost and performance), with a 55 wt % waste loading and a 1.5 water-to-cement ratio. A nitrate salt immobilization process has been installed in the liquid waste processing building. The process uses dry nitrate salts from the existing spray dryer, spray dryer feed solution, and Portland cement. The resulting waste grout is packaged in a plastic lined, corrugated fiberboard tri-wall box, and shipped to the Nevada Test Site for burial

  5. Preliminary evaluation of alternative forms for immobilization of Savannah River Plant high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.; Goforth, S.T. Jr.; Smith, P.K.

    1979-12-01

    An evaluation of available information on eleven alternative solid forms for immobilization of SRP high-level waste has been completed. Based on the assessment of both product and process characteristics, four forms were selected for more detailed evaluation: (1) borosilicate glass made in the reference process, (2) a high-silica glass made from a porous glass matrix, (3) crystalline ceramics such as supercalcine or SYNROC, and (4) ceramics coated with an impervious barrier. The assessment includes a discussion of product and process characteristics for each of the eleven forms, a cross comparison of these characteristics for the forms, and the bases for selecting the most promising forms for further study

  6. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, F.R.R.; Fonseca, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms

  7. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal properties and chemical durability of glasses of iron and uranium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboleda Zuluaga, P.A; Rodriguez, D.S; Gonzalez Oliver, C; Rincon Lopez, J.M; Soldera, F

    2012-01-01

    A series of glass compositions including (54,6-73,5P 2 O 5 .14-22Fe 2 O 3.x Na 2 O.2,8-4,25 UO 2 ) %mol. x=0-28,4 were studied in function of sodium oxide content for the thermal properties and chemical durability. By means differential dilatometer measurements was possible establish the variation of Tg, and α Tsoft and analysis of the kinetics of sintering by means of High Temperature Microscopy (MAT) and dilatometric data of pressed pellets. The presence of modifier oxides in the structure of iron phosphate glasses causes slightly onset sintering anticipation in almost 25 o C The chemical durability was estimated performing the named Product Consistency Test (PCT-B) focused on determining the resistance of glasses for nuclear wastes. These glasses exhibit good chemical durability but it is significant impaired by the addition of x≥6wt%Na 2 O. It is aimed to achieve more stable compositions and get glass matrixes able to contain more uranium oxides allowing evaluating the potential application of these iron phosphate glasses for special, industrial and nuclear waste immobilization

  8. External Criticality Risk of Immobilized Plutonium Waste Form in a Geologic Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. McClure

    2001-03-12

    This purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive summary of the waste package (WP) external criticality-related risk of the Plutonium Disposition ceramic waste form, which is being developed and evaluated by the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Potential accumulation of the fissile materials, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U, in rock formations having a favorable chemical environment for such actions, requires analysis because autocatalytic configurations, while unlikely to form, never-the-less have consequences which are undesirable and require evaluation. Secondly, the WP design has evolved necessitating a re-evaluation of the internal WP degradation scenarios that contribute to the external source terms. The scope of this study includes a summary of the revised WP degradation calculations, a summary of the accumulation mechanisms in fractures and lithophysae in the tuff beneath the WP footprint, and a summary of the criticality risk calculations from any accumulated fissile material. Accumulations of fissile material external to the WP sufficient to pose a potential criticality risk require a deposition mechanism operating over sufficient time to reach required levels. The transporting solution concentrations themselves are well below critical levels (CRWMS 2001e). The ceramic waste form consists of Pu immobilized in ceramic disks, which would be embedded in High-Level Waste (HLW) glass in the standard HLW glass disposal canister. The ceramic disks would occupy approximately 12% of the HLW canister volume, while most of the remaining 88% of the volume would be occupied by HLW glass.

  9. Developing an Efficient and General Strategy for Immobilization of Small Molecules onto Microarrays Using Isocyanate Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenggang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Cui, Zhaomeng; Li, Quanfu; Dang, Yongjun; Mi, Lan; Zheng, Fengyun; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-03-16

    Small-molecule microarray (SMM) is an effective platform for identifying lead compounds from large collections of small molecules in drug discovery, and efficient immobilization of molecular compounds is a pre-requisite for the success of such a platform. On an isocyanate functionalized surface, we studied the dependence of immobilization efficiency on chemical residues on molecular compounds, terminal residues on isocyanate functionalized surface, lengths of spacer molecules, and post-printing treatment conditions, and we identified a set of optimized conditions that enable us to immobilize small molecules with significantly improved efficiencies, particularly for those molecules with carboxylic acid residues that are known to have low isocyanate reactivity. We fabricated microarrays of 3375 bioactive compounds on isocyanate functionalized glass slides under these optimized conditions and confirmed that immobilization percentage is over 73%.

  10. Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, Eric M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chung, Chul-Woo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

  11. Impact of Redox on Glass Durability: The Glass Selection Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEELER, DAVID

    2004-01-01

    Recent glass formulation activities have focused on developing alternative frit compositions for use with specific sludge batches to maximize melt rate and/or waste throughput. The general trend has been to increase the total alkali content in the glass through the use of a high alkali based frit, a less washed sludge, or a combination of the two. As a result, predictions of durability have become a limiting factor in defining the projected operating windows for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for certain systems. An additional issue for these high alkali glasses has been the effect of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on the durability of the glass. Recent analyses have indicated that the application of the durability model's value without consideration of the overall glass composition may lead to a more significant shift (larger magnitude) than needed. Therefore, activation of the REDOX term in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) may have a significant impact on the predicted operational windows based on model predictions, but may not represent the realistic impact on the measured durability. In this report, two specific issues are addressed. First, a review of the data used to develop PCCS (in particular the durability model) showed the potential for a REDOX interaction that is not accounted for. More specifically, three terms were added to the current model and were found to be statistically significant at a confidence level of 95 per cent. These results suggest a possible interaction between REDOX and glass composition that is not accurately captured leading to potentially conservative decisions regarding the durability of reduced glasses. The second issue addressed in this report is the development of a 45 glass test matrix to assess the effect of REDOX on durability as well as to provide insight into specific interactive compositional effects on durability. The glasses were selected to support the assessment of the following specific

  12. Hanford immobilized LAW product acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area testing data package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JD Vienna; A Jiricka; BP McGrail; BM Jorgensen; DE Smith; BR Allen; JC Marra; DK Peeler; KG Brown; IA Reamer; WL Ebert

    2000-03-08

    The Hanford Site's mission has been to produce nuclear materials for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during plutonium production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The total volume of LAW requiring immobilization will include the LAW separated from the tank waste, as well as new wastes generated by the retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes. Per the Tri-Party Agreement (1994), both the LAW and HLW will be vitrified. It has been estimated that vitrification of the LAW waste will result in over 500,000 metric tons or 200,000 m{sup 3} of immobilized LAW (ILAW) glass. The ILAW glass is to be disposed of onsite in a near-surface burial facility. It must be demonstrated that the disposal system will adequately retain the radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. This report describes a study of the impacts of systematic glass-composition variation on the responses from accelerated laboratory corrosion tests of representative LAW glasses. A combination of two tests, the product consistency test and vapor-hydration test, is being used to give indictations of the relative rate at which a glass could be expected to corrode in the burial scenario.

  13. The Savannah River Site Accelerated Cleanup Mission: Sludge Retrieval and Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 130 million liters of sludge/supernate high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is currently stored in underground carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began immobilizing these wastes in borosilicate glass in 1996. Currently, the radioactive glass is being produced as a sludge-only composition by combining washed high-level sludge with glass frit and melting. The glass is poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a permanent geological repository. Recent directives from the U.S. Department of Energy have been focused on accelerated clean-up missions for the various sites around the DOE complex. The Savannah River Site has developed a program to meet this new directive. With respect to the DWPF, a vision case has been developed which reduces the overall immobilization campaign by several years. This reduction is based on several parameters; two of which are increase s in melt rate and waste loading. To support this incentive, the Savannah River Technology Center is focusing on increasing waste loading and/or improving melt rates via strategic glass formulation, changes in acid addition strategies, and reassessing process control models to challenge their extreme conservatism. Glass formulation activities have recently shifted from the strategy of using generic frits developed to process a number of different sludge batches, to the concept of developing a specific frit for each sludge batch in order to obtain higher waste loadings and/or improved melt rates. Increases in waste loading have also been realized by the development of a new liquidus temperature model - a parameter which has typically limited waste loadings in previous processing. Coupling the new liquidus model with strategic glass formulations will result in an increase in overall waste throughput. Assessments are also being made on the potential to minimize the number of sludge w ashing

  14. An orientation analysis method for protein immobilized on quantum dot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Satoka, E-mail: aoyagi@life.shimane-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Shimane University, 1060 Matsue-shi, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Inoue, Masae [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    The evaluation of orientation of biomolecules immobilized on nanodevices is crucial for the development of high performance devices. Such analysis requires ultra high sensitivity so as to be able to detect less than one molecular layer on a device. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has sufficient sensitivity to evaluate the uppermost surface structure of a single molecular layer. The objective of this study is to develop an orientation analysis method for proteins immobilized on nanomaterials such as quantum dot particles, and to evaluate the orientation of streptavidin immobilized on quantum dot particles by means of TOF-SIMS. In order to detect fragment ions specific to the protein surface, a monoatomic primary ion source (Ga{sup +}) and a cluster ion source (Au{sub 3}{sup +}) were employed. Streptavidin-immobilized quantum dot particles were immobilized on aminosilanized ITO glass plates at amino groups by covalent bonding. The reference samples streptavidin directly immobilized on ITO plates were also prepared. All samples were dried with a freeze dryer before TOF-SIMS measurement. The positive secondary ion spectra of each sample were obtained using TOF-SIMS with Ga{sup +} and Au{sub 3}{sup +}, respectively, and then they were compared so as to characterize each sample and detect the surface structure of the streptavidin immobilized with the biotin-immobilized quantum dots. The chemical structures of the upper surface of the streptavidin molecules immobilized on the quantum dot particles were evaluated with TOF-SIMS spectra analysis. The indicated surface side of the streptavidin molecules immobilized on the quantum dots includes the biotin binding site.

  15. An orientation analysis method for protein immobilized on quantum dot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Inoue, Masae

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of orientation of biomolecules immobilized on nanodevices is crucial for the development of high performance devices. Such analysis requires ultra high sensitivity so as to be able to detect less than one molecular layer on a device. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has sufficient sensitivity to evaluate the uppermost surface structure of a single molecular layer. The objective of this study is to develop an orientation analysis method for proteins immobilized on nanomaterials such as quantum dot particles, and to evaluate the orientation of streptavidin immobilized on quantum dot particles by means of TOF-SIMS. In order to detect fragment ions specific to the protein surface, a monoatomic primary ion source (Ga + ) and a cluster ion source (Au 3 + ) were employed. Streptavidin-immobilized quantum dot particles were immobilized on aminosilanized ITO glass plates at amino groups by covalent bonding. The reference samples streptavidin directly immobilized on ITO plates were also prepared. All samples were dried with a freeze dryer before TOF-SIMS measurement. The positive secondary ion spectra of each sample were obtained using TOF-SIMS with Ga + and Au 3 + , respectively, and then they were compared so as to characterize each sample and detect the surface structure of the streptavidin immobilized with the biotin-immobilized quantum dots. The chemical structures of the upper surface of the streptavidin molecules immobilized on the quantum dot particles were evaluated with TOF-SIMS spectra analysis. The indicated surface side of the streptavidin molecules immobilized on the quantum dots includes the biotin binding site.

  16. Dental pulp stem cells immobilized in alginate microspheres for applications in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanafi, M M; Ramesh, A; Gupta, P K; Bhonde, R R

    2014-07-01

    To immobilize dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in alginate microspheres and to determine cell viability, proliferation, stem cell characteristics and osteogenic potential of the immobilized DPSCs. Human DPSCs isolated from the dental pulp were immobilized in 1% w/v alginate microspheres. Viability and proliferation of immobilized DPSCs were determined by trypan blue and MTT assay, respectively. Stem cell characteristics of DPSCs post immobilization were verified by labelling the cells with CD73 and CD90. Osteogenic potential of immobilized DPSCs was assessed by the presence of osteocalcin. Alizarin red staining and O-cresolphthalein complexone method confirmed and quantified calcium deposition. A final reverse transcriptase PCR evaluated the expression of osteogenic markers - ALP, Runx-2 and OCN. More than 80% of immobilized DPSCs were viable throughout the 3-week study. Proliferation appeared controlled and consistent unlike DPSCs in the control group. Presence of CD73 and CD90 markers confirmed the stem cell nature of immobilized DPSCs. The presence of osteocalcin, an osteoblastic marker, was confirmed in the microspheres on day 21. Mineralization assays showed high calcium deposition indicating elevated osteogenic potential of immobilized DPSCs. Osteogenic genes- ALP, Runx-2 and OCN were also upregulated in immobilized DPSCs. Surprisingly, immobilized DPSCs in the control group cultured in conventional stem cell media showed upregulation of osteogenic genes and expressed osteocalcin. Dental pulp stem cells immobilized in alginate hydrogels exhibit enhanced osteogenic potential while maintaining high cell viability both of which are fundamental for bone tissue regeneration. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in a Patient with Paraplegia and Immobilization Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Masala, Salvatore; Calabria, Eros; Nezzo, Marco; De Vivo, Dominique; Neroni, Luca; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We will discuss a potential role of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in the management of a patient with immobilization syndrome due to paraplegia and vertebral osteoporotic fractures. While PVP is commonly used for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral compression fractures, its role in vertebral stabilization in patient with immobilization syndrome has not been reported in the literature. A 73-year-old woman affected by immobilization syndrome due to paraplegia and vertebra...

  18. Exploration of the potential of complex fluids and liquid mineral crystals as templates for obtaining meso-porous monoliths for actinides immobilization; Exploration du potentiel de fluides complexes et cristaux liquides mineraux comme templates pour l'obtention de monolithes mesoporeux pour l'immobilisation d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiot, C. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France)]|[CEA Valrho, Lab. de Chimie des Actinides (LCA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of generation IV reactors, the implementation of a closed cycle involves a grouped management of actinides, as well as their united insertion in a new fuel material. The researches carried out for the main variant of fuel cycle are then centred on the synthesis of a material allowing to immobilize these radioelements in an ordered way inside a solid phase of known composition and structure, and in which they have to be dispersed in an homogeneous way. In this work, is considered the study of the synthesis of innovating materials by a molecular engineering approach. The aim is to explore the properties of matrices based on complex mineral fluids for actinides immobilization, to study the confinement potential of these new mineral liquid crystal phases and to understand their interaction with the actinides. (O.M.)

  19. High-level-waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form

  20. Ethanol fermentation by immobilized cells of Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, W.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that immobilized yeast cell cultures have commercial potential for fuel ethanol production. In this study the suitability of strains of Z. mobilis for whole cell immobilization was investigated. Experiments revealed that immobilization in Ca-alginate or K-carrageenan gel or use of flocculating strains was effective for ethanol production at relatively high productivities. Two laboratory size reactors were designed and constructed. These were a compartmented multiple discshaft column and a tower fermentor. Results of this work supported other studies that established that growth and fermentation could be uncoupled. The data indicated that specific metabolic rates were dependent on the nature of the fermentation media. The addition of lactobacilli to Z. mobilis continuous fermentations had only a transient effect, and was unlikely to affect an immobilized Z. mobilis process. With 150 gl/sup -1/ glucose media and a Z. mobilis ZM4 immobilized cell reactor, a maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of 55 gl/sup -1/h/sup -1/ was obtained. The fermentation of sucrose media or sucrose-based raw materials (molasses, cane juice, synthetic mill liquor) by immobilized Z. mobilis ZM4 revealed a pattern of rapid sucrose hydrolysis, preferential glucose utilization and the conversion of fructose to the undesirable by-products levan and sorbitol.

  1. Investigation of Enzyme Immobilization Effects on its Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mehrasbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enzymes are well known as sensitive catalysts in the laboratory and industrial scale. To improve their properties and for using their significant potential in various reactions as a useful catalyst the stability of enzymes can often require improvement. Enzymes Immobilization on solid supports such as epoxy- functionalized ferric silica nanocomposite can be effective way to improve their characteristics. Methods: In this study silica coated magnetite nanoparticles were Functionalized with GPTSM as a linker, then immobilization reaction performed by using various amounts of lipase B from Candida Antarctica (CALB, for the next step immobilization effects on thermal stability and optimum pH were investigated in comparison with free CALB. Results: Results illustrated enzyme was successfully immobilized on nano particles and immobilized derivative retains 100% of its activity by 55°C while free CALB loss its activity at the same condition. Conclusion: Immobilization of CALB on Fe3O4@SiO2 particles resulted in significant improvements in its characteristics such as thermal stability and methanol tolerance compared to the free CALB.

  2. Fabrication of CaO-ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} glasses and glass-ceramics. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jing-Shi; Shen, Pouyan [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-01

    The CaO-ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} glass, a potential glaze, solder and immobilizer of high-level radioactive wastes, was prepared from the powder batches of CaO-ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} (C{sub 5}ZT, subscripts are molar ratios) with the additives of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and at a firing temperature of 1200C. Upon heating (10C/min) for differential thermal analysis, all the glasses went through a glass transition event at 640C (peak temperature) and then two devitrification events at 800 and 900C, which caused the formation of m-ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-derived phases (predominantly zirconolite, CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), respectively. Glass-ceramics were further fabricated from the glass slabs by one-stage heating at 900C, which caused first the cellular layer and then spherulitic clusters of ZrO{sub 2} derivatives. When the glass-ceramics were subjected to prolonged annealing, the ZrO{sub 2}-derived phases always survived while borate, silicate and other phases appeared. The selection of zirconia-related phases during devitrification are discussed.

  3. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: the impact of the input and output geometries on the utilization of the melting space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, M.; Němec, Lubomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2010), s. 212-218 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : space utilization, * sand dissolution * bubble removal * space geometry Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.297, year: 2010

  4. Arginine-assisted immobilization of silver nanoparticles on ZnO nanorods: an enhanced and reusable antibacterial substrate without human cell cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shekhar; Bajaj, Geetika; Mukherji, Suparna; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2015-04-01

    Silver-based hybrid nanomaterials are gaining interest as potential alternatives for conventional antimicrobial agents. Herein, we present a simple, facile and eco-friendly approach for the deposition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on ZnO nanorods, which act as a nanoreactor for in situ synthesis and as an immobilizing template in the presence of arginine. The presence of arginine enhanced the stability of ZnO deposition on the glass substrate by hindering the dissolution of zinc under alkaline conditions. Various Ag/ZnO hybrid nanorod (HNR) samples were screened to obtain a high amount of silver immobilization on the ZnO substrate. Ag/ZnO HNRs displayed potent antibacterial ability and could achieve 100% kill for both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains under various test conditions. The hybrid material mediated its dual mode of antibacterial action through direct contact-killing and release of silver ions/nanoparticles and showed superior bactericidal performance compared to pure ZnO nanorods and colloidal AgNPs. No significant decline in antibacterial efficacy was observed even after the same substrate was repeatedly reused multiple times. Interestingly, the amount of Ag and Zn release was much below their maximal limit in drinking water, thus preventing potential health hazards. Immobilized AgNPs showed no cytotoxic effects on the human hepatocarcinoma cell line (HepG2). Moreover, treating cells with the antibacterial substrate for 24 hours did not lead to significant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The good biocompatibility and bactericidal efficacy would thus make it feasible to utilize this immobilization strategy for preparing new-generation antibacterial coatings.Silver-based hybrid nanomaterials are gaining interest as potential alternatives for conventional antimicrobial agents. Herein, we present a simple, facile and eco-friendly approach for the deposition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on ZnO nanorods, which act as a

  5. Plutonium Immobilization Project Phase 1 Cold Pour Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping tests and results. The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium containing ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was planned to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping tests and results

  6. Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed.

  7. Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed

  8. Development and Validation of an On-Line Water Toxicity Sensor with Immobilized Luminescent Bacteria for On-Line Surface Water Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolijn Woutersen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface water used for drinking water production is frequently monitored in The Netherlands using whole organism biomonitors, with for example Daphnia magna or Dreissena mussels, which respond to changes in the water quality. However, not all human-relevant toxic compounds can be detected by these biomonitors. Therefore, a new on-line biosensor has been developed, containing immobilized genetically modified bacteria, which respond to genotoxicity in the water by emitting luminescence. The performance of this sensor was tested under laboratory conditions, as well as under field conditions at a monitoring station along the river Meuse in The Netherlands. The sensor was robust and easy to clean, with inert materials, temperature control and nutrient feed for the reporter organisms. The bacteria were immobilized in sol-gel on either an optical fiber or a glass slide and then continuously exposed to water. Since the glass slide was more sensitive and robust, only this setup was used in the field. The sensor responded to spikes of genotoxic compounds in the water with a minimal detectable concentration of 0.01 mg/L mitomycin C in the laboratory and 0.1 mg/L mitomycin C in the field. With further optimization, which should include a reduction in daily maintenance, the sensor has the potential to become a useful addition to the currently available biomonitors.

  9. Zr61Ti2Cu25Al12 metallic glass for potential use in dental implants: Biocompatibility assessment by in vitro cellular responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Shi, Ling-ling; Zhu, Zhen-dong; He, Qiang; Ai, Hong-jun; Xu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    In comparison with titanium and its alloys, Zr 61 Ti 2 Cu 25 Al 12 (ZT1) bulk metallic glass (BMG) manifests a good combination of high strength, high fracture toughness and lower Young's modulus. To examine its biocompatibility required for potential use in dental implants, this BMG was used as a cell growth subtract for three types of cell lines, L929 fibroblasts, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and osteoblast-like MG63 cells. For a comparison, these cell lines were in parallel cultured and grown also on commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti6–Al4–V alloy (Ti64). Cellular responses on the three metals, including adhesion, morphology and viability, were characterized using the SEM visualization and CCK-8 assay. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR was used to measure the activity of integrin β, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and type I collagen (COL I) in adherent MG63 cells. As indicated, in all cases of three cell lines, no significant differences in the initial attachment and viability/proliferation were found between ZT1, CP-Ti, and Ti64 until 5 d of incubation period. It means that the biocompatibility in cellular response for ZT1 BMG is comparable to Ti and its alloys. For gene expression of integrin β, ALP and COL I, mRNA level from osteoblast cells grown on ZT1 substrates is significantly higher than that on the CP-Ti and Ti64. It suggests that the adhesion and differentiation of osteoblasts grown on ZT1 are even superior to those on the CP-Ti and Ti64 alloy, then promoting bone formation. The good biocompatibility of ZT1 BMG is associated with the formation of zirconium oxide layer on the surface and good corrosion-resistance in physiological environment. Quantitative analysis of Real-time PCR for MG63 cells cultured on Zr 61 Ti 2 Cu 25 Al 12 BMG, CP-Ti, and Ti64 as well as plastic as a control at several incubation periods. Relative amounts of (a) integrin β, (b) ALP, and (c) COL I (*p < 0.05). Highlights: ► Cellular response to Zr

  10. Immobilization of cellulases on magnetic particles to enable enzyme recycling during hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alftrén, Johan

    approach to decrease the costs of the cellulases could be to immobilize the enzymes on particles and thereby enable enzyme re-use. However, recycling of immobilized cellulases using common separation unit operations such as centrifugation or filtration may be difficult when dealing with lignocellulosic...... feedstocks containing insolubles. This could potentially be overcome by immobilizing the cellulases on magnetically susceptible particles. Consequently, the immobilized cellulases could be magnetically recovered and recycled for a new cycle of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The main objective...... of this thesis was to examine the possibility of immobilizing cellulases on magnetic particles in order to enable enzyme re-use. Studies at lab and pilot scale (20 L) were conducted using model and real substrates. In paper I and III beta-glucosidase or a whole cellulase mixture was covalently immobilized...

  11. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-01-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R ampersand D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl 2 Ti 6 O 16 ) and rutile (TiO 2 ). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and monazite (CePO 4 ), to name a few of the most promising. R ampersand D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO 2 powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues

  12. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  13. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  14. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  15. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  16. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  17. Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-01

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  18. Integrated process for the purification and immobilization of the envelope protein domain III of dengue virus type 2 expressed in Rachiplusia nu larvae and its potential application in a diagnostic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, María Emilia; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Cerezo, Julieta; Morales, María Alejandra; Miranda, María Victoria; Talou, Julián Rodríguez

    2017-03-01

    Dengue incidence has grown dramatically in the last years, with about 40% of the world population at risk of infection. Recently, a vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been registered, but only in a few countries. Moreover, specific antiviral drugs are not available. Thus, an efficient and accurate diagnosis is important for disease management. To develop a low-cost immunoassay for dengue diagnosis, in the present study we expressed the envelope protein domain III of dengue virus type 2 in Rachiplusia nu larvae by infection with a recombinant baculovirus. The antigen was expressed as a fusion to hydrophobin I (DomIIIHFBI) to easily purify it by an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) and to efficiently immobilize it in immunoassay plates. A high level of recombinant DomIIIHFBI was obtained in R. nu, where yields reached 4.5 mg per g of larva. Also, we were able to purify DomIIIHFBI by an ATPS with 2% of Triton X-114, reaching a yield of 73% and purity higher than 80% in a single purification step. The recombinant DomIIIHFBI was efficiently immobilized in hydrophobic surface plates. The immunoassay we developed with the immobilized antigen was able to detect IgG specific for dengue virus type 2 in serum samples and not for other serotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on the synthesis and characterization of cesium-containing iron phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Chandramohan, P.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2009-02-01

    Isotopes of cesium and strontium can be utilized as radiation source for various industrial and medical applications after their separation from high level nuclear waste. However, these elements need to be immobilized in a suitable matrix. In the present work, a systematic approach has been made to immobilize inactive cesium into iron phosphate glass. Up to 36 mol% of Cs 2O has been loaded successfully without crystallization. The glass transition temperature of the cesium loaded glass was found to increase initially and then decrease as a function of Cs 2O content. Mössbauer studies show that the concentration of Fe 3+ ions in the cesium loaded glasses is >95%. Volatilization experiments at 1263 K show that the weight loss is >0.5% for a period of 4 h. The 36 mol% of Cs 2O loaded iron phosphate glass with high Fe 3+ content described in this paper is reported for the first time.

  20. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  1. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to grout and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT ampersand E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT ampersand E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the

  2. Hanford Immobilized LAW Product Acceptance: Tanks Focus Area Testing Data Package II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Rebecca L.; Lorier, Troy H.; Peeler, David K.; Brown, Kevin G.; Reamer, Irene A.; Vienna, John D.; Jiricka, Antonin; Jorgensen, Benaiah M.; Smith, Donald E.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a continuation of the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Waste (LAW) Product Acceptance (HLP): Initial Tanks Focus Area Testing Data Package (Vienna (and others) 2000). In addition to new 5000-h product consistency test (PCT), vapor hydration test (VHT), and alteration products data, some previously reported data together with relevant background information are included for an easily accessible source of reference when comparing the response of the various glasses to different test conditions. A matrix of 55 glasses was developed and tested to identify the impact of glass composition on long-term corrosion behavior and to develop an acceptable composition region for Hanford LAW glasses. Of the 55 glasses, 45 were designed to systematically vary the glass composition, and 10 were selected because large and growing databases on their corrosion characteristics had accumulated. The targeted and measured compositions of these glasses are found in the Appendix A. All glasses were fabricated according to standard procedures and heat treated to simulate the slow cooling that will occur in a portion of the waste glass after vitrification in the planned treatment facility at Hanford

  3. Study on immobilizations of ovine anti-human IgG and MCAb against EHF on radiation-modified silicone films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jinhui; Ha Hongfei; Zhang Yuhua

    1990-01-01

    Films of silicone (silastic) were grafted by monomer acrylamide vis γ-radiation technology and then the ovine anti-human IgG, Epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF)-MCAb were immobilized on the silastic-AAM films with different grafting yields passthrough associate reactions. Measruements of relationships between grafting yields. Contents of immobilized antibodies and immunoactivities for immobilized silastic-AAM films were performed by using 125 I method ELISA method was used to measure the immunoactivities for the immobilized monoantibody. The results showed that the antibodies used can be immobilized on radiation-grafted silicone films and this immobilization method has its potential significance in clinical practice

  4. Immobilization needs and technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.; Armantrout, G.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium in keeping with US policy that plutonium must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, we first reviewed published information on high-level waste immobilization technologies and identified 72 possible plutonium immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were further screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine the most promising technology families. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long- term disposition of plutonium. From this evaluation, a detailed research and development plan has been developed to provide answers to these remaining questions

  5. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  6. Efficient Immobilization of Porcine Pancreatic α-Amylase on Amino-Functionalized Magnetite Nanoparticles: Characterization and Stability Evaluation of the Immobilized Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhond, M; Pashangeh, Kh; Karbalaei-Heidari, H R; Absalan, G

    2016-11-01

    The potential of the modified magnetic nanoparticles for covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic α-amylase has been investigated. The synthesis and immobilization processes were simple and fast. The co-precipitation method was used for synthesis of magnetic iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles (NPs) which were subsequently coated with silica through sol-gel reaction. The amino-functionalized NPs were prepared by treating silica-coated NPs with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane followed by covalent immobilization of α-amylase by glutaraldehyde. The optimum enzyme concentration and incubation time for immobilization reaction were 150 mg and 4 h, respectively. Upon this immobilization, the α-amylase retained more than 50 % of its initial specific activity. The optimum pH for maximal catalytic activity of the immobilized enzyme was 6.5 at 45 °C. The kinetic studies on the immobilized enzyme and its free counterpart revealed an acceptable change of K m and V max . The Km values were found as 4 and 2.5 mM for free and immobilized enzymes, respectively. The V max values for the free and immobilized enzymes were calculated as 1.75 and 1.03 μmol mg -1  min -1 , in order, when starch was used as the substrate. A quick separation of immobilized amylase from reaction mixture was achieved when a magnetically active support was applied. In comparison to the free enzyme, the immobilized enzyme was thermally stable and was reusable for 9 cycles while retaining 68 % of its initial activity.

  7. Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Murphy, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m 2 d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90 degrees C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young's modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt

  8. Process Technology for Immobilized LipaseProcess Technology for Immobilized Lipase-catalyzed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yuan

    (e.g. a hydrophobic carrier for the immobilized lipase and the capabilities to provide sufficient mixing as well as stepwise/continuous feeding of ethanol to the reactor). An STR is efficient for batch operation while a PBR is efficient for a continuous production. An STR can more easily provide...... sufficient external mass transfer for a reaction, but will lead to more mechanical damage of the biocatalyst particles, than a PBR. A reactor combination of CSTR with PBR can couple the advantages of both, delivering an efficient continuous process.The second case study (esterification) shares some similar......-catalyzed transesterification is that it is multi-phasic system. The by-product glycerol can potentially impose inhibitory effects on immobilized lipases and likewise the un-dissolved ethanol can inhibit the lipase. The options for addressing these issues can be used as the basis for selecting the biocatalyst and the reactor...

  9. Studies on reaction parameters influence on ethanolic production of coconut oil biodiesel using immobilized lipase as a catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Livia M.O.; Santos, Bruno C. da S.; Almeida, Renata M.R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel production by enzymatic catalysis has been the subject of much research for developing processes that can potentially compete with other types of catalysis. The objective of this paper was to study the variables that affect the transesterification of coconut oil in biodiesel production using immobilized enzymes as catalysts and ethanol. The transesterification reactions were carried out in closed glass reactors kept under agitation at 200 rpm and catalyzed by the commercial immobilized lipase Novozym 435. An experimental design with the variables: temperature (40–60 °C), enzyme concentration (3–7%) and oil:ethanol ratio (1:6–1:10) was carried out. The best result – 80.5% conversion – was achieved with the highest temperature, molar ratio and enzyme concentration. -- Highlights: ► Coconut oil was used to produce biodiesel by enzymatic catalysis. ► Variables that interfere in the ethanolic transesterification were studied. ► An experimental design studied: temperature; lipase concentration; oil:ethanol ratio. ► The best result was 80.5% of biodiesel under 60 °C, 7% enzyme and 1:10 of oil:ethanol.

  10. Immobile Complex Verbs in Germanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2005-01-01

    Certain complex verbs in Dutch, German, and Swiss German do not undergo verb movement. The suggestion to be made in this article is that these ‘‘immobile'' verbs have to fulfill both the requirements imposed on complex verbs of the V° type (=verbs with non-separable prefixes) and the requirements...... imposed on complex verbs of the V* type (=verbs with separable prefixes). This results in such verbs being morphologically unexceptional, i.e., having a full set of forms but syntactically peculiar (‘‘immobile''), i.e., they can only occur in their base position. Any movement is incompatible with either...... frequent type with only one prefix-like part (e.g., German bauchreden/Dutch buikspreken ‘to ventriloquize'). This analysis will try to account not only for the data discussed in Haider (1993) and Koopman (1995) but also for the following: - why immobile verbs include verbs with only one prefix-like part...

  11. Potentiality of a frit waste from ceramic sector as raw material to glass-ceramic material production; Potencialidad de un residuo de frita procedente del sector ceramico como materia prima para la produccion de material vitroceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina Albert, E.; Llop Pla, J.; Notari Abad, M. D.; Carda Castello, J. B.

    2015-10-01

    This work consists of studying the devitrification capacity of a residue from sodium-calcium frit, using the vitreous powder sintering method, which follows the traditional ceramic processing route, including a specific heat treatment to generate the appearance of crystals from the original glass phase. Initially the frit residue has been characterized by instrumental techniques such as XRF, XRD and DTA/TG. Furthermore, the chemical analysis (XRF) has allowed the prediction of devitrification potentiality of this residue by theoretical approaches represented by Gingsberg, Raschin-Tschetverikov and Lebedeva ternary diagrams. Then, this residue was subjected to traditional ceramic method, by changing the grinding time, the pressing pressure and prepared samples were obtained at different temperatures. In this part, the techniques for measuring particle size by laser diffraction and XRD and SEM to evaluate the generated crystalline phases, were applied. Finally, it has been found that this frit residue works as glass-ceramic precursor, devitrifying in wollastonite crystals as majority phase and without being subjected to the melting step of the glass-ceramic typical method. (Author)

  12. Enzyme immobilization and biocatalysis of polysiloxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, Yadagiri

    Lipases have been proven to be versatile and efficient biocatalysts which can be used in a broad variety of esterification, transesterification, and ester hydrolysis reactions. Due to the high chemo-, regio-, and stereo-selectivity and the mild conditions of lipase-catalyzed reactions, the vast potential of these biocatalysts for use in industrial applications has been increasingly recognized. Polysiloxanes (silicones) are well known for their unique physico-chemical properties and can be prepared in the form of fluids, elastomers, gels and resins for a wide variety of applications. However, the enzymatic synthesis of silicone polyesters and copolymers is largely unexplored. In the present investigations, an immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) on macroporous acrylic resin beads (Novozym-435 RTM) has been successfully employed as a catalyst to synthesize silicone polyesters and copolymers under mild reaction conditions. The silicone aliphatic polyesters and the poly(dimethylsiloxane)--poly(ethylene glycol) (PDMS-PEG) copolymers were synthesized in the bulk (without using a solvent), while the silicone aromatic polyesters, the silicone aromatic polyamides and the poly(epsilon-caprolactone)--poly(dimethylsiloxane)--poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL-PDMS-PCL) triblock copolymers were synthesized in toluene. The synthesized silicone polyesters and copolymers were characterized by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD). This dissertation also describes a methodology for physical immobilization of the enzyme pepsin from Porcine stomach mucosa in silicone elastomers utilizing condensation-cure room temperature vulcanization (RTV) of silanol-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The activity and the stability of free pepsin and pepsin immobilized in silicone elastomers were studied with respect to p

  13. Combinational Effect of Cell Adhesion Biomolecules and Their Immobilized Polymer Property to Enhance Cell-Selective Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Kurimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surface immobilization of medical devices with bioactive molecules is one of the most widely used strategies to improve biocompatibility, the physicochemical properties of the biomaterials significantly impact the activity of the immobilized molecules. Herein we investigate the combinational effects of cell-selective biomolecules and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the polymeric substrate on selective adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs, fibroblasts (FBs, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. To control the polymeric substrate, biomolecules are immobilized on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm-grafted glass surfaces. By switching the molecular conformation of the biomolecule-immobilized polymers, the cell-selective adhesion performances are evaluated. In case of RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide-immobilized surfaces, all cell types adhere well regardless of the surface hydrophobicity. On the other hand, a tri-Arg-immobilized surface exhibits FB-selectivity when the surface is hydrophilic. Additionally, a tri-Ile-immobilized surface exhibits EC-selective cell adhesion when the surface is hydrophobic. We believe that the proposed concept, which is used to investigate the biomolecule-immobilized surface combination, is important to produce new biomaterials, which are highly demanded for medical implants and tissue engineering.

  14. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  15. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input

  16. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  17. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling

  18. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fabíola; Carvalho, Isabel F; Montelaro, Ronald C; Gomes, P; Martins, M Cristina L

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to overcome biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activity, high efficacy at very low concentrations, target specificity, anti-endotoxin activity, synergistic action with classical antibiotics, and low propensity for developing resistance. Therefore, the development of an antimicrobial coating with such properties would be worthwhile. The immobilization of AMPs onto a biomaterial surface has further advantages as it also helps to circumvent AMPs' potential limitations, such as short half-life and cytotoxicity associated with higher concentrations of soluble peptides. The studies discussed in the current review report on the impact of covalent immobilization of AMPs onto surfaces through different chemical coupling strategies, length of spacers, and peptide orientation and concentration. The overall results suggest that immobilized AMPs may be effective in the prevention of biofilm formation by reduction of microorganism survival post-contact with the coated biomaterial. Minimal cytotoxicity and long-term stability profiles were obtained by optimizing immobilization parameters, indicating a promising potential for the use of immobilized AMPs in clinical applications. On the other hand, the effects of tethering on mechanisms of action of AMPs have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, further studies are recommended to explore the real potential of immobilized AMPs in health applications as antimicrobial coatings of medical devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An assessment of methods for immobilizing reprocessed radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.K.; Baranyi, A.D.

    1980-05-01

    Nuclear waste forms presently used for the disposal of high-level wastes and other potential waste forms under development were studied using information available in the literature and by visits to the laboratories. The following waste forms were considered: Borosilicate glass, high-silica glass, glassceramics, supercalcine ceramics, synroc ceramics, borosilicate glass beads in a metal matrix, supercalcine and synroc ceramics in a metal matrix and coated ceramics. The following conclusions have been reached: To date the best developed wasteform, both in terms of overall product quality and process development, is monolithic borosilicate glass. However, hydrothermal instability is a major concern. Borosilicate glass in metal matrix waste form has better properties than monolithic borosilicate glass waste form. The process has been proven on a pilot scale. Hence, it is considered very close to monolithic glass in terms of overall development. The product qualities of the other waste forms are better than borosilicate glass. However, process development for these alternative waste forms is still in a conceptual stage. The technological basis for processing ceramic waste forms exists in a well developed state. Nevertheless, adaptation of the technology to continuous hot-cell operation, although feasible, has not been demonstrated. In view of the product potential of ceramic waste forms it is felt that their development should be given emphasis at this time. (auth)

  20. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghui; Ha Hongfei; Wang Xia; Wu Jilan

    1988-01-01

    Catalase was immobilized by a chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles produced by radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78 0 C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical arm to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2 O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed. (author)

  1. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... is ensured using a structural adhesive. At first, the elastic and viscoelastic material properties of the adhesive are identified where the influence of load-rate and failure properties are also examined. Through an inverse analysis using the finite element method, the experimental observations...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  2. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  3. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skorski, Daniel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  4. Immobilization and characterization of inulinase from Ulocladium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ulocladium atrum inulinase was immobilized on different composite membranes composed of chitosan/nonwoven fabrics. Km values of free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on different composite membranes were calculated. The enzyme had optimum pH at 5.6 for free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on polyester ...

  5. Bone bonding ability of some borate bio-glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma H. Margha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary borate glasses from the system Na2O·CaO·B2O3 together with soda-lime-borate samples containing 5 wt.% of MgO, Al2O3, SiO2 or P2O5 were prepared. The obtained glasses were converted to their glass-ceramic derivatives by controlled heat treatment. X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the separated crystalline phases in glass-ceramics after heat treatment of the glassy samples. The glasses and corresponding glass-ceramics after immersion in water or diluted phosphate solution for extended times were characterized by the grain method (adopted by several authors and recommended by ASTM and Fourier-transform infrared spectra to justify the formation of hydroxyapatite as an indication of the bone bonding ability. The influence of glass composition on bioactivity potential was discussed too.

  6. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  7. Fabrication of silver nanosheets on quartz glass substrates through electroless plating approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zao; Xu, Xibin; Fang, Qi; Wang, Yuying; Li, Xibo; Tan, Xiulan; Luo, Jiangshan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Yi, Yougen; Tang, Yongjian

    2014-02-01

    Silver nanosheets (NSs) have been synthesized by an electroless plating approach using a complexation mechanism of triethanolamine (TEA) and Ag+ to reduce the oxidation-reduction potential difference and slow down the deposition speed of Ag on quartz glass substrates. The synthesized Ag NSs with 500 nm in edge length and 30 nm in thickness stand on the substrates and are dispersed uniformly. The formation mechanism of Ag NSs is proposed. The formation of Ag NSs is attributed to the molar ratio of AgNO3 to TEA, the concentration of AgNO3 and the influence of reaction temperature. This study is important in vertical immobilization Ag NSs on solid substrates, which could provide substrates for catalysis or surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  8. Permitting plan for the immobilized low-activity waste project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage and disposal of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) and (2) interim storage of TWRS immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms. Low-activity waste (LAW), low-level waste (LLW), and high-level waste (HLW) are defined by the TWRS, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) DOE/EIS-0189, August 1996 (TWRS, Final EIS). By definition, HLW requires permanent isolation in a deep geologic repository. Also by definition, LAW is ''the waste that remains after separating from high-level waste as much of the radioactivity as is practicable that when solidified may be disposed of as LLW in a near-surface facility according to the NRC regulations.'' It is planned to store/dispose of (ILAW) inside four empty vaults of the five that were originally constructed for the Group Program. Additional disposal facilities will be constructed to accommodate immobilized LLW packages produced after the Grout Vaults are filled. The specifications for performance of the low-activity vitrified waste form have been established with strong consideration of risk to the public. The specifications for glass waste form performance are being closely coordinated with analysis of risk. RL has pursued discussions with the NRC for a determination of the classification of the Hanford Site's low-activity tank waste fraction. There is no known RL action to change law with respect to onsite disposal of waste

  9. Integrated Disposal Facility FY 2012 Glass Testing Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kerisit, Sebastien N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krogstad, Eirik J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burton, Sarah D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bjornstad, Bruce N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-29

    PNNL is conducting work to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility for Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program, PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. Key activities in FY12 include upgrading the STOMP/eSTOMP codes to do near-field modeling, geochemical modeling of PCT tests to determine the reaction network to be used in the STOMP codes, conducting PUF tests on selected glasses to simulate and accelerate glass weathering, developing a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the characteristics of the weathered glass reaction layer as a function of glass composition, and characterizing glasses and soil samples exhumed from an 8-year lysimeter test. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and the first quarter of FY 2013 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of LAW glasses.

  10. Foaming of CRT panel glass powder with Na2CO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    melt, while Na2O becomes incorporated into the glass structure. We have quantified the melt expansion through density measurements and the Na2O incorporation is indicated by the decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the final foam glass. The glass foaming quality depends on the foaming......Recycling of cathode ray tube (CRT) glass remains a challenging task. The CRT glass consists of four glass types fused together: Funnel-, neck-, frit- and panel glass. The three former glasses contain toxic lead oxide, and therefore have a low recycling potential. The latter on the other hand...... is lead-free, but since barium and strontium oxide are present, panel glass is incompatible with most common recycling methods. However, foam glass production is a promising approach for the recycling of panel glass waste, since the process parameters can be changed according to the glass waste...

  11. Immobilization of enzymatic extracts of Portulaca oleracea cv. roots for oxidizing aqueous bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuki; Kaneda, Hirokazu; Harada, Kazuo; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2015-05-01

    Water pollution from the release of industrial wastewater is a serious problem for almost every industry. Enzymes from portulaca, Portulaca oleracea cv., have been investigated for their ability to degrade bisphenol A (BPA), one of the well-known estrogenic pollutants. Enzymatic crude extracts from P. oleracea cv. roots were immobilized on aminopropyl-modified glass beads. They maintained BPA metabolic activity over a broad range of pH values and temperatures. The immobilized enzyme was reusable with more than 50 % of its initial activity retained after 12 batch reactions and no loss of activity after storage for 1 month at -30 °C. Thus, the immobilization of extracts from P. oleracea cv. roots is a useful method for removing BPA from industrial wastewater.

  12. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lindberg, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heasler, Patrick G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mercier, Theresa M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, William E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eibling, Russell E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  13. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  14. Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass standard reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCT). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Envirorunental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability, analytic, and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers

  15. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  16. Effect of PEG-mediated pore forming on Ca-alginate immobilization of nitrilase-producing bacteria Pseudomonas putida XY4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongmei; Ma, Li; Deng, Chao; Xu, Zhenghong; Chen, Jinghua

    2014-08-01

    Effect of PEG-mediated pore forming on Ca-alginate immobilization of nitrilase-producing bacteria Pseudomonas putida XY4 was studied. Through using PEG as porogen, the environmental tolerance as well as the biocatalytic reaction efficiency of immobilized cells was greatly improved, i.e., Ca-alginate-PEG immobilized cells got better temperature and substrate concentration tolerance than Ca-alginate immobilized cells and showed similar efficiency with free cells, suggesting that the intrinsic mass transfer resistance of immobilization obviously decreased. It was also observed that the pore diameter and porosity of immobilization beads were related with the molecular weight of PEG. PEG400 was found to be a relatively suitable porogen for Ca-alginate-PEG immobilized cells catalyzed hydrolysis of glycinonitrile. It was noteworthy that the Ca-alginate-PEG immobilized cells could be reused more than 18 times with little loss of enzyme activity which had shown good operation ability and great application potential.

  17. Wood mimetic hydrogel beads for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Saerom; Kim, Sung Hee; Won, Keehoon; Choi, Joon Weon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-22

    Wood component-based composite hydrogels have potential applications in biomedical fields owing to their low cost, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. The controllable properties of wood mimetic composites containing three major wood components are useful for enzyme immobilization. Here, lipase from Candida rugosa was entrapped in wood mimetic beads containing cellulose, xylan, and lignin by dissolving wood components with lipase in [Emim][Ac], followed by reconstitution. Lipase entrapped in cellulose/xylan/lignin beads in a 5:3:2 ratio showed the highest activity; this ratio is very similar to that in natural wood. The lipase entrapped in various wood mimetic beads showed increased thermal and pH stability. The half-life times of lipase entrapped in cellulose/alkali lignin hydrogel were 31- and 82-times higher than those of free lipase during incubation under denaturing conditions of high temperature and low pH, respectively. Owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and controllable properties, wood mimetic hydrogel beads can be used to immobilize various enzymes for applications in the biomedical, bioelectronic, and biocatalytic fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  19. Physical immobilization of biofunctional substance by the use of radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization at low temperatures of glass-forming monomers in a supercooled state can be applied, for example, in casting of organic glass and the immobilization of biofunctional substance. The immobilization of various biofunctional materials such as enzymes, microbial cells, tissue cells etc. will be a promising application in the near future in biotechnology and bioengineering. The authors studied the immobilization technique which can be applied to general biocomponents, by using low-temperature radiation polymerization in a supercooled phase. According to this method, biocomponents are composed mainly on the surface of the carrier polymer, and therefore the product has the bioactivity at the surface of the composite. This method can be called the adhesion method. Biocomponents can be composed simply by mixing with monomer, shaping into a desirable form, then cooling to low temperature and irradiating into a product. On the cooling of the monomer-buffer (including biocomponent) mixture, water in the buffer changes to ice and then the biocomponents in the buffer are isolated from the ice, and concentrated on a surface of supercooled monomer phase. These biocomponents are fixed immediately on the polymer surface by irradiation. Anti-cancers immobilized by low-temperature radiation-induced polymerization have been applied to local chemotherapy by implantation, and the result of such a slow release system has been proved to be successful by animal experiments. The application of the radiation immobilized antibody to immunoassay has also been proved successful. The authors started research on the utilization of radiation techniques for the conversion of cellulosic wastes such as chaff, rice straw, sawdust, bagasse and wastepaper. It includes pretreatment by irradiation of cellulose wastes and saccharification and fermentation by using radiation immobilized enzymes and yeasts. (author)

  20. Characterization study of industrial waste glass as starting material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study, an industrial waste glass was characterized and the potential to assess as starting material in development of bioactive materials was investigated. A waste glass collected from the two different glass industry was grounded to fine powder. The samples were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ...

  1. Stabilization of α-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Batal, A.I.; Atia, K.S.; Eid, M.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the entrapment of α-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using γ irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized α-amylase were studied. Covering of α-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized α-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized α-amylase showed a higher k cat /K m and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of α-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems

  2. Immobilization of Streptomyces thermotolerans 11432 on polyurethane foam to improve production of acetylisovaleryltylosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongji; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Jiaheng; Caiyin, Qinggele; Qiao, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, polyurethane foam (PUF) was chemically treated to immobilize Streptomyces thermotolerans 11432 for semi-continuous production of acetylisovaleryltylosin (AIV). Based on experimental results, positive cross-linked PUF (PCPUF) was selected as the most effective carrier according to immobilized cell mass. The effect of adsorption time on immobilized mass was investigated. AIV concentration (33.54 mg/l) in batch fermentations with immobilized cells was higher than with free cells (20.34 mg/l). In repeated batch fermentations with immobilized S. thermotolerans 11432 using PCPUF cubes, high AIV concentrations and conversion rates were attained, ranging from 25.56 to 34.37 mg/l and 79.93 to 86.31 %, respectively. Significantly, this method provides a feasible strategy for efficient AIV production and offers the potential for large-scale production.

  3. Stabilization of α-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Batal, A. I.; Atia, K. S.; Eid, M.

    2005-10-01

    This work describes the entrapment of α-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using γ irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized α-amylase were studied. Covering of α-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized α-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10 mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized α-amylase showed a higher k/K and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of α-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems.

  4. New TiO2/DSAT Immobilization System for Photodegradation of Anionic and Cationic Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Izhan Nawawi Wan Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new immobilized TiO2 technique was prepared by coating TiO2 solution onto double-sided adhesive tape (DSAT as a thin layer binder without adding any organic additives. Glass plate was used as support material to immobilized TiO2/DSAT. Two different charges of dyes were applied, namely, anionic reactive red 4 (RR4 and cationic methylene blue (MB dyes. Photocatalytic degradation of RR4 and MB dyes was observed under immobilized TiO2/DSAT with the degradation rate slightly lower and higher, respectively, compared with TiO2 in suspension mode. It was observed that DSAT is able to provide a very strong intact between glass and TiO2 layers thus making the reusability of immobilized TiO2/DSAT be up to 30 cycles. In fact, a better photodegradation activity was observed by number of cycles due to increasing formation of pores on TiO2 surface observed by SEM analysis.

  5. Aluminophosphate glasses with high sulfate content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S.V. [State Corp. Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I.A.; Gulin, A.N. [Inst. of Tech., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    To immobilize a high sulfate radioactive wastes a system Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SO{sub 3} has been chosen as one where glasses have a relatively low melting points and good chemical durability. Glasses within partial system 44 Na{sub 2}O, 20 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (36-x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, x SO{sub 3} have been prepared at 1,000 C. A possibility of assimilation up to 12 mole % of SO{sub 3} has been established. The basic properties of sulfate-containing glasses as density, microhardness, thermal expansion coefficient, transformation and deformation temperatures, viscosity, electric resistivity, leach rate of ions and diffusion coefficients of {sup 22}Na, {sup 35}S, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs have been measured. Glass structure by infrared and EPR spectroscopies has been investigated.

  6. Exposure Scenarios and Unit Dose Factors for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-12-29

    Exposure scenarios are defined to identify potential pathways and combinations of pathways that could lead to radiation exposure from immobilized tank waste. Appropriate data and models are selected to permit calculation of dose factors for each exposure

  7. Immobilization of 2,4- and 2,6-Dinitrotoluenes in Soils and Compost

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pennington, Judith

    2003-01-01

    .... The broad objectives of this study were to demonstrate the potential for immobilization reactions of DNTs in soils and to determine the mechanisms of bonding of amino transformation products of DNTs...

  8. Complexability of o-bisguanidinobenzenes with arsenic and phosphoric acids in solution and solid states, and the potential use of their immobilized derivatives as solid base ligands for metal salts and arsenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomoya; Suda, Koji; Kumamoto, Takuya; Nakanishi, Waka; Watanabe, Toshiko; Ishikawa, Tsutomu; Seki, Hiroko; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Ogura, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2010-02-01

    The role of o-bisguanidinobenzenes (BGBs) as new Brønsted base ligands for arsenic and phosphoric acids was examined. In solution state, complexation was evaluated by Job's plot in (1)H NMR experiment, indicating a 1:1 complex formation, whereas in solid state crystalline structures of complexes obtained were addressed by X-ray crystallographic analysis and/or solid state (13)C NMR experiment, in which 1:2 complexes between the BGB and the acid components were normally formed. Based on these results, Merrifield and Hypogel resin-anchored BGBs were designed and prepared as the corresponding polymer-supported host ligands. Evaluation of their coordination ability with metal salts (ZnCl(2) and CoCl(2)) and arsenic acid in aqueous media by ICP-MS showed that the latter Hypogel resin-anchored BGBs acted as effective immobilized base ligands.

  9. Yield point of metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Shear bands form in most bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) within a narrow range of uniaxial strain ε y ≅ 2%. We propose this critical condition corresponds to embryonic shear band (ESB) propagation, not its nucleation. To propagate an ESB, the far-field shear stress τ ∞ ∼ Eε y /2 must exceed the quasi-steady-state glue traction τ glue of shear-alienated glass until the glass transition temperature is approached internally due to frictional heating, at which point ESB matures as a runaway shear crack. The incubation length scale l inc necessary for this maturation is estimated to be ∼10 2 nm for Zr-based BMGs, below which sample size-scale shear localization does not happen. In shear-alienated glass, the last resistance against localized shearing comes from extremely fast downhill dissipative dynamics of timescale comparable to atomic vibrations, allowing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture this recovery process which governs τ glue . We model four metallic glasses: a binary Lennard-Jones system, two binary embedded atom potential systems and a quinternary embedded atom system. Despite vast differences in the structure and interatomic interactions, the four MD calculations give ε y predictions of 2.4%, 2.1%, 2.6% and 2.9%, respectively

  10. The mechanisms of heavy metal immobilization by cementitious material treatments and thermal treatments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bin; Liu, Bo; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Shengen

    2017-05-15

    Safe disposal of solid wastes containing heavy metals is a significant task for environment protection. Immobilization treatment is an effective technology to achieve this task. Cementitious material treatments and thermal treatments are two types of attractive immobilization treatments due to that the heavy metals could be encapsulated in their dense and durable wasteforms. This paper discusses the heavy metal immobilization mechanisms of these methods in detail. Physical encapsulation and chemical stabilization are two fundamental mechanisms that occur simultaneously during the immobilization processes. After immobilization treatments, the wasteforms build up a low permeable barrier for the contaminations. This reduces the exposed surface of wastes. Chemical stabilization occurs when the heavy metals transform into more stable and less soluble metal bearing phases. The heavy metal bearing phases in the wasteforms are also reviewed in this paper. If the heavy metals are incorporated into more stable and less soluble metal bearing phases, the potential hazards of heavy metals will be lower. Thus, converting heavy metals into more stable phases during immobilization processes should be a common way to enhance the immobilization effect of these immobilization methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  12. Nuclear waste immobilization. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwood, A.E.; Sinclair, W.; McLaughlin, G.M.

    1979-11-20

    United States defense nuclear wastes are presently in tank storage, largely as sludges comprising Fe, Mn, Ni, U and Na oxides and hydroxides, together with 0.5 to 5 percent of fission products and actinides (exclusive of uranium). The relative proportions of Al, Fe, Mn, Ni, U and Na in the sludges from different tanks vary considerably, except that (Fe + Al + Mn) are by far the major components and Fe is more abundant than Mn. Typical compositions of some calcined sludges from Savannah River are given. This paper briefly describes how the SYNROC process, utilizing straightforward technology, can be readily adapted to the problem of defense waste immobilization, yielding a dense, inert, ceramic waste-form, SYNROC-D. Two classes of processes are discussed - one designed to immobilize sludges containing normal amounts of sodium and the other designed for otherwise similar sludges which are, however, strongly depleted in sodium as a result of more efficient washing procedures.

  13. Hydrophilic PCU scaffolds prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilizing gelatin to enhance cell adhesion and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Changcan; Yuan, Wenjie; Khan, Musammir; Li, Qian [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Feng, Yakai, E-mail: yakaifeng@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Chemical Engineering (Tianjin) Tianjin 300072 (China); Yao, Fanglian [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Wencheng, E-mail: wenchengzhang@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Logistics University of Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Tianjin 300162 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin contains many functional motifs which can modulate cell specific adhesion, so we modified polycarbonate urethane (PCU) scaffold surface by immobilization of gelatin. PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatins onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds. To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted onto PCU scaffolds by surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Then, following amination and immobilization, PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were obtained. Both modified scaffolds were characterized by chemical and biological methods. After immobilization of gelatin, the microfiber surface became rough, but the original morphology of scaffolds was maintained successfully. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were more hydrophilic than PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds. Because hydrophilic PEGMA and gelatin were grafted and immobilized onto the surface, the PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds showed low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity and excellent cell growth and proliferation capacity. It could be envisioned that PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds might have potential applications in tissue engineering artificial scaffolds. - Graphical abstract: PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatin onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds (method a). To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, PEGMAs were grafted onto the scaffold surface by SI-ATRP. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by method b. The gelatin modified scaffolds exhibited high hydrophilicity, low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity, and excellent cell adhesion and proliferation capacity. They might have potential applications as tissue engineering scaffolds for artificial blood vessels. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic scaffolds were prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilization of gelatins. • Grafting PEGMA enhanced the immobilization amount of gelatin

  14. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  15. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  16. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.

    2001-01-01

    provide models and parameter values that can be used to calculate the dissolution rates for the different modes of water contact. The analyses were conducted to identify key aspects of the mechanistic model for glass dissolution to be included in the abstracted models used for PA calculations, evaluate how the models can be used to calculate bounding values of the glass dissolution rates under anticipated water contact modes in the disposal. system, and determine model parameter values for the range of potential waste glass compositions and anticipated environmental conditions. The analysis of a bounding rate also considered the effects of the buildup of glass corrosion products in the solution contacting the glass and potential effects of alteration phase formation. Note that application of the models and model parameter values is constrained to the anticipated range of HLW glass compositions and environmental conditions. The effects of processes inherent to exposure to humid air and dripping water were not modeled explicitly. Instead, the impacts of these processes on the degradation rate were taken into account by using empirically measured parameter values. These include the rates at which water sorbs onto the glass, drips onto the glass, and drips off of the glass. The dissolution rates of glasses that were exposed to humid air and dripping water measured in laboratory tests are used to estimate model parameter values for contact by humid air and dripping water in the disposal system

  17. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.E.; Thompson, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3 to 20 wt percent iodine as Ba(IO 3 ) 2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO 3 ) 2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. 10 claims, 2 figures

  18. Immobilization of Mitochondria on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    poly- acryloylaminopropanol (AAP) and poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) reduces the adsorption of mitochondria on the surface (Whiting, C.E., and A. Edgar...poly-L-lysine has also been reported for immobilization of yeast mitochondria. Coating was performed by repetitive washing of cover slips with 0.02...of Poly-L-lysine Applications of PLL PLL is a production of bacterial fermentation and is used as a food preservative. In biology, PLL is used in

  19. Contaminant immobilization via microbial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to search the literature to identify biological techniques that could be applied to the restoration of contaminated groundwaters near uranium milling sites. Through bioremediation it was hypothesized that the hazardous heavy metals could be immobilized in a stable, low-solubility form, thereby halting their progress in the migrating groundwater. Three basic mechanisms were examined: reduction of heavy metals by microbially produced hydrogen sulfide; direct microbial mediated reduction; and biosorption

  20. Application of the adhesive bacterionanofiber AtaA to a novel microbial immobilization method for the production of indigo as a model chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masahito; Shigemori, Kazuki; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The toluene-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 shows high adhesiveness mediated by the bacterionanofiber protein AtaA, which is a new member of the trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) family. In contrast to other reported TAAs, AtaA mediates the adhesion of Tol 5 to various abiotic surfaces ranging from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. The expression of ataA in industrially relevant bacteria improves their adhesiveness and enables immobilization directly onto support materials. This represents a new method that can be alternated with conventional immobilization via gel entrapment and chemical bonding. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of this immobilizing method by utilizing AtaA. As a model case for this method, the indigo producer Acinetobacter sp. ST-550 was transformed with ataA and immobilized on a polyurethane support. The immobilized ST-550 cells were transferred directly to a reaction solution containing indole as the substrate. The immobilized ST-550 cells showed a faster indigo production rate at high concentrations of indole compared with planktonic ST-550 not expressing the ataA gene, implying that immobilization enhanced the tolerance of ST-550 to the substrate indole. As a result, the immobilized ST-550 produced fivefold higher levels of indigo than planktonic ST-550. These results proved that AtaA is useful for bacterial immobilization. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  2. Technique for Machining Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Process for machining glass with conventional carbide tools requires a small quantity of a lubricant for aluminum applied to area of glass to be machined. A carbide tool is then placed against workpiece with light pressure. Tool is raised periodically to clear work of glass dust and particles. Additional lubricant is applied as it is displaced.

  3. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract no. 13460

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling

  4. Comment on 'Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An analytically solvable model with a glass-to-glass transition'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakoviack, V.

    2007-01-01

    Guided by old results on simple mode-coupling models displaying glass-glass transitions, we demonstrate, through a crude analysis of the solution with one step of replica symmetry breaking (1RSB) derived by Crisanti and Leuzzi for the spherical s+p mean-field spin glass [Phys. Rev. B 73, 014412 (2006)], that the phase behavior of these systems is not yet fully understood when s and p are well separated. First, there seems to be a possibility of glass-glass transition scenarios in these systems. Second, we find clear indications that the 1RSB solution cannot be correct in the full glassy phase. Therefore, while the proposed analysis is clearly naive and probably inexact, it definitely calls for a reassessment of the physics of these systems, with the promise of potentially interesting developments in the theory of disordered and complex systems

  5. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  6. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently.

  7. Universal biomimetic preparation and immobilization of layered double hydroxide films and adsorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wenpeng; Chen, Zilin

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • An in situ method is developed for immobilization of nanoscale LDHs. • The universal method can be applied on multiple substrates. • The homogeneous LDHs film can be synthesis and immobilized in one step. • The LDHs film showed good adsorption performance towards anionic compounds. - Abstract: Preparation and immobilization of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) film onto multiple substrates is important and challenging in functional materials fields by date. In this work, a simple and universal polydopamine (PD)-based layer-by-layer assembly strategy was developed for the immobilization of LDHs film onto surfaces such as polypropylene chip, glass slides and metal coins. The surface of substrates was firstly modified by polydopamine functionalization, and then LDHs film was synthesized via urea method and directly immobilized on the PD layer by in situ growing strategy in one step. The PD layer as well as the final LDHs film was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern and X-ray photoelectron spectra. It has been demonstrated the formation of the dense and homogeneous nanoscaled LDHs film with 400 nm thickness. Adsorption behavior of the fabricated NiAl-LDHs film toward anionic dyes and pharmaceuticals was further assessed. To demonstrate their extensive application, fast and high efficient adsorption of anionic dyes and pharmaceuticals was achieved by NiAl-LDHs-modified polypropylene centrifugal tube.

  8. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D. (Alfred Univ., NY (United States)); Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses.

  9. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D. [Alfred Univ., NY (United States); Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses.

  10. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D.; Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses

  11. A new route to the stable capture and final immobilization of radioactive cesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Han, Ahreum; Yoon, Joo Young; Park, Hwan-Seo; Cho, Yung-Zun

    2017-10-05

    Radioactive Cs released from damaged fuel materials in the event of nuclear accidents must be controlled to prevent the spreading of hazardous Cs into the environment. This study describes a simple and novel process to safely manage Cs gas by capturing it within ceramic filters and converting it into monolithic waste forms. The results of Cs trapping tests showed that CsAlSiO 4 was a reaction product of gas-solid reactions between Cs gas and our ceramic filters. Monolithic waste forms were readily prepared from the Cs-trapping filters by the addition of a glass frit followed by thermal treatment at 1000°C for 3h. Major findings revealed that the Cs-trapping filters could be added up to 50wt% to form durable monoliths. In 30-50wt% of waste fraction, CsAlSiO 4 was completely converted to pollucite (CsAlSi 2 O 6 ), which is a potential phase for radioactive Cs due to its excellent thermal and chemical stability. A static leaching test for 28 d confirmed the excellent chemical resistance of the pollucite structure, with a Cs leaching rate as low as 7.21×10 -5 gm -2 /d. This simple scheme of waste processing promises a new route for radioactive Cs immobilization by synthesizing pollucite-based monoliths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  13. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  14. Structural analysis of xSrO–(50 − x)CaO–50P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glasses with x = 0, 5, or 10 mol% for potential use in a local delivery system for osteomyelitis treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comeau, P.A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada); Filiaggi, M.J., E-mail: mark.filiaggi@dal.ca [School of Biomedical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada); Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Dalhousie University, 5981 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of ions into a local delivery matrix is one method of managing degradation and subsequent release of the incorporated therapeutic agents. Of interest in this study was whether we could modify the structural nature of calcium polyphosphate (CPP) glass and the subsequent therapeutic potential of this local delivery matrix with inclusion of strontium (Sr). We found that adding 10 mol% Sr significantly increased the density and chain length of the glass. There was no significant impact of Sr doping on the subsequent loading of vancomycin into the matrix, or the matrix porosity. The noted differences in structural stability, ion release, and vancomycin release between the un-doped CPP matrices and 10 mol% Sr-doped CPP matrices in vitro are likely a result of a decrease in glass disorder upon Sr addition to the glass and preferential retention of Sr over Ca during matrix degradation. This study has provided further evidence that Sr incorporation may serve to both manipulate antibiotic release from the amorphous CPP matrix and provide a potential source of therapeutic ions for enhanced bone regeneration. - Highlights: • A strontium-doped CPP glass was fabricated with a novel calcine-melt protocol. • The density and chain length of CPP glass increased upon 10 mol% Sr addition to CPP. • The phosphorous ion released in vitro was not dependent on 10 mol% Sr addition. • Doping CPP with 10 mol% Sr improved matrix short-term structural stability in vitro.

  15. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → A recycling/treatment process to remove lead on funnel glass surface is described. → Utilizing recycled funnel glass in mortar can reduce hazardous CRT glass wastes. → Effects of CRT glass content on the properties of cement mortar are studied. → Fly ash can effectively mitigate ASR expansion of mortar even at 100% glass content. → Alkaline medium in cement matrix successfully prevented the leaching of lead. - Abstract: Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production.

  16. Short-term immobilization influences use-dependent cortical plasticity and fine motor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, George M; Evans, Alexandra; Ridding, Michael C; Semmler, John G

    2016-08-25

    Short-term immobilization that reduces muscle use for 8-10h is known to influence cortical excitability and motor performance. However, the mechanisms through which this is achieved, and whether these changes can be used to modify cortical plasticity and motor skill learning, are not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of short-term immobilization on use-dependent cortical plasticity, motor learning and retention. Twenty-one adults were divided into control and immobilized groups, both of which underwent two experimental sessions on consecutive days. Within each session, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes, short- (SICI) and long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF) before and after a grooved pegboard task. Prior to the second training session, the immobilized group underwent 8h of left hand immobilization targeting the index finger, while control subjects were allowed normal limb use. Immobilization produced a reduction in MEP amplitudes, but no change in SICI, LICI or ICF. While motor performance improved for both groups in each session, the level of performance was greater 24-h later in control, but not immobilized subjects. Furthermore, training-related MEP facilitation was greater after, compared with before, immobilization. These results indicate that immobilization can modulate use-dependent plasticity and the retention of motor skills. They also suggest that changes in intracortical excitability are unlikely to contribute to the immobilization-induced modification of cortical excitability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Performance of the ACWA Pilot Immobilized Cell Bioreactor in Degradation of HD and Tetrytol Payloads of the M60 Chemical Round

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guelta, Mark A; Chester, Nancy A; Kurnas, Carl W; Haley, Mark V; Lupton, F. S; Koch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    .... Neutralization followed by biodegradation was one technology identified as having potential. Guelta and DeFrank conducted preliminary laboratory studies using 1-liter Immobilized Cell Bioreactors (ICB...

  18. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: electronics recycling industry communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia R; Boehm, Michael W; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustics of glass harmonicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    2004-05-01

    Glass musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine glasses, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of glasses played in this manner is called a glass harp. Another type of glass harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs glass bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of glass harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.

  20. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  1. Prehospital Cervical Spine Motion: Immobilization Versus Spine Motion Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Erik E; Tucker, W Steven; Nowak, Matthew; Roberto, Jason; Hollingworth, Amy; Decoster, Laura C; Trimarco, Thomas W; Mihalik, Jason P

    2018-02-16

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of two different spinal immobilization techniques on cervical spine movement in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. A counterbalanced crossover design was used to evaluate two different spinal immobilization techniques in a standardized environment. Twenty healthy male volunteers (age = 20.9 ± 2.2 yr) underwent ambulance transport from a simulated scene to a simulated emergency department setting in two separate conditions: utilizing traditional spinal immobilization (TSI) and spinal motion restriction (SMR). During both transport scenarios, participants underwent the same simulated scenario. The main outcome measures were cervical spine motion (cumulative integrated motion and peak range of motion), vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation), and self-reported pain. Vital signs and pain were collected at six consistent points throughout each scenario. Participants experienced greater transverse plane cumulative integrated motion during TSI compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 4.05; P = 0.049), and greater transverse peak range of motion during participant loading/unloading in TSI condition compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 17.32; P TSI compared to 25% of participants during SMR (χ 2 = 1.29; P = 0.453). Spinal motion restriction controlled cervical motion at least as well as traditional spinal immobilization in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. Given these results, along with well-documented potential complications of TSI in the literature, SMR is supported as an alternative to TSI. Future research should involve a true patient population.

  2. Pellet formation of zygomycetes and immobilization of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Jonas; Lacintra, Michael G; Westman, Johan O; Berglin, Mattias; Lundin, Magnus; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2013-06-25

    Pelleted growth provides many advantages for filamentous fungi, including decreased broth viscosity, improved aeration, stirring, and heat transfer. Thus, the factors influencing the probability of pellet formation of Rhizopus sp. in a defined medium was investigated using a multifactorial experimental design. Temperature, agitation intensity, Ca(2+)-concentration, pH, and solid cellulose particles, each had a significant effect on pelletization. Tween 80, spore concentration, and liquid volume were not found to have a significant effect. All of the effects were additive; no interactions were significant. The results were used to create a simple defined medium inducing pelletization, which was used for immobilization of a flocculating strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the zygomycetes pellets. A flor-forming S. cerevisiae strain was also immobilized, while a non-flocculating strain colonized the pellets but was not immobilized. No adverse effects were detected as a result of the close proximity between the filamentous fungus and the yeast, which potentially allows for co-fermentation with S. cerevisiae immobilized in pellets of zygomycetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Immobilization of laccase of Pycnoporus sanguineus CS43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Coronel, Luis A; Cobas, Marta; Rostro-Alanis, Magdalena de J; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto; Hernandez-Luna, Carlos; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Ángeles

    2017-10-25

    Laccase from Pycnoporus sanguineus CS43 was successfully immobilized onto Immobead-150 and Eupergit-C by covalent binding and by entrapment in LentiKats. The highest immobilization was onto Immobead-150 (97.1±1.2%) compared to the other supports, LentiKats (89±1.1%) and Eupergit-C (83.2±1.4%). All three immobilized enzyme systems showed increased thermostability and better mechanical properties than free laccase. Moreover, after 5 cycles of reuse of these systems, 90% of initial laccase activity was retained. Immobead-150 and LentiKats systems exhibited the highest efficiencies in removal of m-cresol under the combined actions of biodegradation and adsorption, while laccase entrapped in LentiKats showed a high ability for degradation of m-cresol within 24h. In addition, the typical Michaelis-Menten enzymatic model effectively described the kinetic profile of m-cresol degradation by the enzyme entrapped in LentiKats. Based on the results obtained in the present study, it can be established that the immobilized biocatalysts developed here possess significant potential for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Julia R.; Boehm, Michael W.; Drummond, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Given a large flow rate of CRT glass ∼10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. ► The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. ► Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. ► Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. ► Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  6. Preliminary flowsheet for the conversion of Hanford high-level waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beary, M.M.; Chick, L.A.; Ely, P.C.; Gott, S.A.

    1977-06-01

    The flowsheets describe a process for converting waste removed from the Hanford underground waste tanks to more immobile form. The process involves a chemical separation of the radionuclides from industrial chemicals, and then making glass from the resulting small volume of highly radioactive waste. Removal of Sr, actinides, cesium, and technetium is discussed