WorldWideScience

Sample records for glass transition induced

  1. Melting and glass transition of radiation-induced graft polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Tokuda, T.

    1977-01-01

    Melting and glass transition data are reported employing DSC for styrene-grafted high-density polyethylene obtained by γ radiation. Judging from the data of the melting point and the heat of fusion, the grafted polystyrene had no effect on the polyethylene crystallites, but the half-width of the thermogram was observed to increase slightly, showing an effect on the crystallite size distribution. As no effect was observed on the glass transition temperature by grafting, the amorphous region of the polyethylene apparently was not affected. It is suggested, therefore, that the free volume or segmental mobility will not be decreased by radiation-induced grafting. Very few but long grafted chains had negligible effect on the average polyethylene chain length available for segmental motion, and grafted polystyrene should be expected to differ from the styrene homopolymer in thermal motions

  2. Polymer relaxations in thin films in the vicinity of a penetrant or a temperature induced glass transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wessling, Matthias; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2014-01-01

    The transient properties of thin glassy polymer films in the vicinity of the glass transition are investigated. We compare the differences and similarities between sorption and temperature induced glass transitions, referred to as Pg and Tg, respectively. The experimental technique used is in situ

  3. Direct investigations of deformation and yield induced structure transitions in polyamide 6 below glass transition temperature with WAXS and SAXS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Huilong; Wang, Jiayi; Zhou, Chengbo

    2015-01-01

    Deformation and yield induced structure transitions of polyamide 6 (PA6) were detected with the combination of the wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS) at 30 degrees C below glass transition temperature (T-g) of PA6. During deformation, gamma-alpha phase transition was found...... at elastic stage. The concentrated stress in crystals at elastic stage provided adequate energy for the direct gamma-alpha phase transition under T-g. The force to promote the gamma-phase into a phase directly is insufficient at the yield stage and a transient phase as a compromise was formed. The transient...... phase was confirmed by DSC measurements and assisted the gamma-alpha phase transition indirectly. The gamma-phase slips into incomplete fragments at yield point, and the parts along tensile direction are responsible for the formation of transient phase. The gamma-fragments after yield is oriented...

  4. Gauge theory of glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5∼ t correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data

  5. Observations of shear-induced clusters seen near the colloidal glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dandan; Semwogerere, Denis; Weeks, Eric R.

    2007-03-01

    Many studies of the glass transition focus on structural relaxation arising from thermally induced dynamics. Several of these studies observed isolated clusters of fast-moving particles. We present experimental work that finds similar heterogeneities from mechanically-induced motion applied to a dense colloidal suspension. We study micron-sized PMMA spheres with a volume fraction of approximately 50%. The sample is subjected to shear while simultaneously the dynamics are recorded using fast confocal microscopy. From the resulting 3D movie the trajectories of the individual particles are tracked and the macroscopically imposed shear is subtracted to study the mechanically-induced non-affine particle motion. We find fast-moving cooperative clusters with pronounced motion in the shear direction.

  6. Radiation-Induced Fluidity and Glass-Liquid Transition in Irradiated Amorphous Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fluidity behaviour of continuously irradiated glasses using the Congruent Bond Lattice model in which broken bonds 'configurons' facilitate the flow. Irradiation breaks the bonds creating configurons which at high concentrations provide the transition of material from the glassy to liquid state. An explicit equation of viscosity has been derived which gives results in agreement with experimental data. This equation provides correct viscosity data for non-irradiated materials and shows a significant increase of fluidity in radiation fields. It demonstrates a decrease of activation energy of flow for irradiated glasses. A simple equation for glass-transition temperature was also obtained which shows that irradiated glasses have lower glass transition temperatures and are readily transformed from glassy to liquid state e.g. fluidized in strong radiation fields. (authors)

  7. in glass transition region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    compositions of arsenic. An effort has also been made to develop an empirical model for the composition dependence of ∆H. A good agreement has been observed between the experimental values and the results of model calculation. Keywords. Glass transition temperature; activation energy; heat absorbed; composition ...

  8. Pressure Induced Liquid-to-Liquid Transition in Zr-based Supercooled Melts and Pressure Quenched Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmowski, W.; Gierlotka, S.; Wang, Z.; Yokoyama, Y.; Palosz, B.; Egami, T.

    2017-07-26

    Through high-energy x-ray diffraction and atomic pair density function analysis we find that Zr-based metallic alloy, heated to the supercooled liquid state under hydrostatic pressure and then quenched to room temperature, exhibits a distinct glassy structure. The PDF indicates that the Zr-Zr distances in this glass are significantly reduced compared to those quenched without pressure. Annealing at the glass transition temperature at ambient pressure reverses structural changes and the initial glassy state is recovered. This result suggests that pressure causes a liquid-to-liquid phase transition in this metallic alloy supercooled melt. Such a pressure induced transition is known for covalent liquids, but has not been observed for metallic liquids. The High Pressure Quenched glasses are stable in ambient conditions after decompression.

  9. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, . Here we report a universal water-content, , dependence of for aqueous solutions. Solutions with vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with totally vitrify at under conventional cooling/heating process though, of the samples annealed at temperatures   to effectively evoke ice recrystallization is stabilized at . Experiments on aqueous glycerol and 1,2,4-butanetriol solutions in literature were repeated, and the same samples subject to other annealing treatments equally reproduce the result. The upshift of by annealing is attributable to freeze-concentrated phase of solutions instead of ‘liquid II phase of water’. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution. PMID:26503911

  10. Ultrasound-induced crystallization around the glass transition temperature for Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Kai, Satoshi; Hirao, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    We have found that crystallization of a Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 bulk metallic glass is accelerated in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature T g when it is subjected to sub/low-MHz frequency ultrasonic vibration. Resonance frequencies and internal frictions have been measured with the electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) technique. In the initial heating process of an as-cast glassy sample, the resonance frequencies jump up just above T g under ultrasonic excitation, which is attributed to nano-crystallization that is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction profile. However, such a notable change is not observed without ultrasonic vibration. The irregular Λ-shaped internal-friction peaks are also observed prior to the abrupt crystallization. This rapid crystallization is considered to be caused by a stochastic resonance, in which the jump frequency of atoms matches the frequency of the interatomic-potential change by the ultrasonic vibration

  11. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We review the recent results of molecular dynamics simulations on metallic glasses. → They show the equivalence of mechanical failure and glass transition. → We discuss the microscopic mechanism behind this equivalence. → We show that the density of defects in metallic glasses is as high as a quarter. → Our concepts about the defect state in glasses need to be changed. - Abstract: The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  12. Molecular simulation and mathematical modelling of glass transition temperature depression induced by CO2 plasticization in Polysulfone membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, S. S. M.; Lau, K. K.; Lock Sow Mei, Irene; Shariff, A. M.; Yeong, Y. F.; Bustam, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    A sequence of molecular modelling procedure has been proposed to simulate experimentally validated membrane structure characterizing the effect of CO2 plasticization, whereby it can be subsequently employed to elucidate the depression in glass transition temperature (Tg ). Based on the above motivation, unswollen and swollen Polysulfone membrane structures with different CO2 loadings have been constructed, whereby the accuracy has been validated through good compliance with experimentally measured physical properties. It is found that the presence of CO2 constitutes to enhancement in polymeric chain relaxation, which consequently promotes the enlargement of molecular spacing and causes dilation in the membrane matrix. A series of glass transition temperature treatment has been conducted on the verified molecular structure to elucidate the effect of CO2 loadings to the depression in Tg induced by plasticization. Subsequently, a modified Michealis-Menten (M-M) function has been implemented to quantify the effect of CO2 loading attributed to plasticization towards Tg .

  13. CO2 Induced Foaming Behavior of Polystyrene near the Glass Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Al-Enezi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of high-pressure carbon dioxide on the foaming process in polystyrene near the glass transition temperature and the foaming was studied using cylindrical high-pressure view cell with two optical windows. This technique has potential applications in the shape foaming of polymers at lower temperatures, dye impregnation, and the foaming of polystyrene. Three sets of experiments were carried out at operating temperatures of 50, 70, and 100°C, each over a range of pressures from 24 to 120 bar. Foaming was not observed when the polymer was initially at conditions below Tg but was observed above Tg. The nucleation appeared to occur randomly leading to subsequent bubble growth from these sites, with maximum radius of 0.02–0.83 mm. Three models were applied on the foaming experimental data. Variable diffusivity and viscosity model (Model C was applied to assess the experimental data with the WLF equation. The model shows very good agreement by using realistic parameter values. The expansion occurs by diffusion of a dissolved gas from the supersaturated polymer envelope into the bubble.

  14. in glass transition region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    wave-guides e.g. in welding and surgery (Nishi et al. 1992). Especially amorphous chalcogenide alloys exhibit the property of reversible transformation. This property makes these systems very useful in optical memory. Glasses are amorphous (Elliot 1990) in nature, i.e. they form a disordered and metastable structure.

  15. Strong-Superstrong Transition in Glass Transition of Metallic Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Wang; Hong-Yan, Peng; Xiao-Yu, Xu; Bao-Ling, Chen; Chun-Lei, Wu; Min-Hua, Sun

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fragility of bulk metallic glass (BMG) of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 alloy is studied by three-point beam bending methods. The fragility parameter mfor Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG is calculated to be 24.5 at high temperature, which means that the liquid is a 'strong' liquid, while to be 13.4 at low temperature which means that the liquid is a 'super-strong' liquid. The dynamical behavior of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG in the supercooled region undergoes a strong to super-strong transition. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a strong-to-superstrong transition is found in the metallic glass. Using small angle x-ray scattering experiments, we find that this transition is assumed to be related to a phase separation process in supercooled liquid. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  16. Ideal glass transitions by random pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Biroli, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of freezing the positions of a fraction c of particles from an equilibrium configuration of a supercooled liquid at a temperature T. We show that within the random first-order transition theory pinning particles leads to an ideal glass transition for a critical fraction c = cK(T) even for moderate supercooling; e.g., close to the Mode-Coupling transition temperature. First we derive the phase diagram in the T - c plane by mean field approximations. Then, by applying a real-space renormalization group method, we obtain the critical properties for |c - cK(T)| → 0, in particular the divergence of length and time scales, which are dominated by two zero-temperature fixed points. We also show that for c = cK(T) the typical distance between frozen particles is related to the static point-to-set length scale of the unconstrained liquid. We discuss what are the main differences when particles are frozen in other geometries and not from an equilibrium configuration. Finally, we explain why the glass transition induced by freezing particles provides a new and very promising avenue of research to probe the glassy state and ascertain, or disprove, the validity of the theories of the glass transition. PMID:22623524

  17. Glass-like dynamics of the strain-induced coil/helix transition on a permanent polymer network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsin, O; Caroli, C; Baumberger, T

    2016-02-14

    We study the stress response to a step strain of covalently bonded gelatin gels in the temperature range where triple helix reversible crosslink formation is prohibited. We observe slow stress relaxation towards a T-dependent finite asymptotic level. We show that this is assignable to the strain-induced coil → helix transition, previously evidenced by Courty et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 13457 (2005)], of a fraction of the polymer strands. Relaxation proceeds, in a first stage, according to a stretched exponential dynamics, then crosses over to a terminal simple exponential decay. The respective characteristic times τK and τf exhibit an Arrhenius-like T-dependence with an associated energy E incompatibly larger than the activation barrier height for the isomerisation process which sets the clock for an elementary coil → helix transformation event. We tentatively assign this glass-like slowing down of the dynamics to the long-range couplings due to the mechanical noise generated by the local elementary events in this random elastic medium.

  18. Kinetics of a bioactive compound (caffeine) mobility at the vicinity of the mechanical glass transition temperature induced by gelling polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Kasapis, Stefan

    2011-11-09

    An investigation of the diffusional mobility of a bioactive compound (caffeine) within the high-solid (80.0% w/w) matrices of glucose syrup and κ-carrageenan plus glucose syrup exhibiting distinct mechanical glass transition properties is reported. The experimental temperature range was from 20 to -60 °C, and the techniques of modulated differential scanning calorimetry, small deformation dynamic oscillation in shear, and UV spectrometry were employed. Calorimetric and mechanical measurements were complementary in recording the relaxation dynamics of high-solid matrices upon controlled heating. Predictions of the reaction rate theory and the combined WLF/free volume framework were further utilized to pinpoint the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the two matrices in the softening dispersion. Independent of composition, calorimetry yielded similar T(g) predictions for both matrices at this level of solids. Mechanical experimentation, however, was able to detect the effect of adding gelling polysaccharide to glucose syrup as an accelerated pattern of vitrification leading to a higher value of T(g). Kinetic rates of caffeine diffusion within the experimental temperature range were taken with UV spectroscopy. These demonstrated the pronounced effect of the gelling κ-carrageenan/glucose syrup mixture to retard diffusion of the bioactive compound near the mechanical T(g). Modeling of the diffusional mobility of caffeine produced activation energy and fractional free-volume estimates, which were distinct from those of the carbohydrate matrix within the glass transition region. This result emphasizes the importance of molecular interactions between macromolecular matrix and small bioactive compound in glass-related relaxation phenomena.

  19. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  20. Glass transition of soft colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Galvan-Myoshi, Julian; Dieudonné-George, Philippe; Trappe, Véronique; Berthier, Ludovic; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-04-01

    We explore the glassy dynamics of soft colloids using microgels and charged particles interacting by steric and screened Coulomb interactions, respectively. In the supercooled regime, the structural relaxation time τα of both systems grows steeply with volume fraction, reminiscent of the behavior of colloidal hard spheres. Computer simulations confirm that the growth of τα on approaching the glass transition is independent of particle softness. By contrast, softness becomes relevant at very large packing fractions when the system falls out of equilibrium. In this nonequilibrium regime, τα depends surprisingly weakly on packing fraction, and time correlation functions exhibit a compressed exponential decay consistent with stress-driven relaxation. The transition to this novel regime coincides with the onset of an anomalous decrease in local order with increasing density typical of ultrasoft systems. We propose that these peculiar dynamics results from the combination of the nonequilibrium aging dynamics expected in the glassy state and the tendency of colloids interacting through soft potentials to refluidize at high packing fractions.

  1. Effect of particle size on the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ryan J; Zukoski, Charles F

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature of a broad class of molecules is shown to depend on molecular size. This dependency results from the size dependence of the pair potential. A generalized equation of state is used to estimate how the volume fraction at the glass transition depends on the size of the molecule, for rigid molecule glass-formers. The model shows that at a given pressure and temperature there is a size-induced glass transition: For molecules larger than a critical size, the volume fraction required to support the effective pressure due to particle attractions is above that which characterizes the glassy state. This observation establishes the boundary between nanoparticles, which exist in liquid form only as dispersions in low molecular weight solvents and large molecules which form liquids that have viscosities below those characterized by the glassy state.

  2. Paramagnetic and glass transitions in sudoku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-09-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a model glassy system based on sudoku, a familiar and popular mathematical puzzle. Sudoku puzzles provide a very rare example of a class of frustrated systems with a unique ground state without symmetry. Here, the puzzle is recast as a thermodynamic system where the number of violated rules defines the energy. We use Monte Carlo simulation to show that the “sudoku Hamiltonian” exhibits two transitions as a function of temperature, a paramagnetic, and a glass transition. Of these, the intermediate condensed phase is the only one that visits the ground state (i.e., it solves the puzzle, though this is not the purpose of the study). Both transitions are associated with an entropy change, paramagnetism measured from the dynamics of the Monte Carlo run, showing a peak in specific heat, while the residual glass entropy is determined by finding multiple instances of the glass by repeated annealing. There are relatively few such simple models for frustrated or glassy systems that exhibit both ordering and glass transitions; sudoku puzzles are unique for the ease with which they can be obtained, with the proof of the existence of a unique ground state via the satisfiability of all constraints. Simulations suggest that in the glass phase there is an increase in information entropy with lowering temperature. In fact, we have shown that sudoku puzzles have the type of rugged energy landscape with multiple minima that typifies glasses in many physical systems. This puzzling result is a manifestation of the paradox of the residual glass entropy. These readily available puzzles can now be used as solvable model Hamiltonian systems for studying the glass transition.

  3. Piezoelectricity of a ferroelectric liquid crystal with a glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jákli, A; Tóth-Katona, T; Scharf, T; Schadt, M; Saupe, A

    2002-07-01

    Pressure-electric (hydrostatic piezoelectric) measurements are reported on bookshelf textures of a ferroelectric smectic-C (Sm C*) liquid crystal with a glass transition. The continuous variation of a partially fluid state to the solid glass enables one to trace how the piezoelectric effect depends on the consistency of the material. It was observed that in the Sm C* samples with poled glass the piezoelectric constants are comparable to conventional piezoelectric crystals and poled piezoelectric polymers. This implies their application possibilities. The magnitude of the piezoelectric constant in the glassy state depends very much on the poling conditions. The studies indicate that there are two counteracting effects, which cancel each other out in the Sm C* phase near the glass transition. Our analysis indicates that the pressure-induced director tilt change has a dominating effect both in the fluid and the glassy Sm C* states.

  4. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  5. The physics of the colloidal glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary L; Weeks, Eric R

    2012-06-01

    As one increases the concentration of a colloidal suspension, the system exhibits a dramatic increase in viscosity. Beyond a certain concentration, the system is said to be a colloidal glass; structurally, the system resembles a liquid, yet motions within the suspension are slow enough that it can be considered essentially frozen. For several decades, colloids have served as a valuable model system for understanding the glass transition in molecular systems. The spatial and temporal scales involved allow these systems to be studied by a wide variety of experimental techniques. The focus of this review is the current state of understanding of the colloidal glass transition, with an emphasis on experimental observations. A brief introduction is given to important experimental techniques used to study the glass transition in colloids. We describe features of colloidal systems near and in glassy states, including increases in viscosity and relaxation times, dynamical heterogeneity and ageing, among others. We also compare and contrast the glass transition in colloids to that in molecular liquids. Other glassy systems are briefly discussed, as well as recently developed synthesis techniques that will keep these systems rich with interesting physics for years to come.

  6. The physics of the colloidal glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Gary L; Weeks, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    As one increases the concentration of a colloidal suspension, the system exhibits a dramatic increase in viscosity. Beyond a certain concentration, the system is said to be a colloidal glass; structurally, the system resembles a liquid, yet motions within the suspension are slow enough that it can be considered essentially frozen. For several decades, colloids have served as a valuable model system for understanding the glass transition in molecular systems. The spatial and temporal scales involved allow these systems to be studied by a wide variety of experimental techniques. The focus of this review is the current state of understanding of the colloidal glass transition, with an emphasis on experimental observations. A brief introduction is given to important experimental techniques used to study the glass transition in colloids. We describe features of colloidal systems near and in glassy states, including increases in viscosity and relaxation times, dynamical heterogeneity and ageing, among others. We also compare and contrast the glass transition in colloids to that in molecular liquids. Other glassy systems are briefly discussed, as well as recently developed synthesis techniques that will keep these systems rich with interesting physics for years to come. (review article)

  7. Humidity-dependent compression-induced glass transition of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Jung, Hyunjung; Choi, Yun Hwa; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Bang, Joona; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-07-28

    Constant rate compression isotherms of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA) show a distinct feature of an exponential increase in surface pressure in the high surface polymer concentration regime. We have previously demonstrated that this abrupt increase in surface pressure is linked to the glass transition of the polymer film, but the detailed mechanism of this process is not fully understood. In order to obtain a molecular-level understanding of this behavior, we performed extensive characterizations of the surface mechanical, structural and rheological properties of Langmuir PLGA films at the air-water interface, using combined experimental techniques including the Langmuir film balance, X-ray reflectivity and double-wall-ring interfacial rheometry methods. We observed that the mechanical and structural responses of the Langmuir PLGA films are significantly dependent on the rate of film compression; the glass transition was induced in the PLGA film only at fast compression rates. Surprisingly, we found that this deformation rate dependence is also dependent on the humidity of the environment. With water acting as a plasticizer for the PLGA material, the diffusion of water molecules through the PLGA film seems to be the key factor in the determination of the glass transformation properties and thus the mechanical response of the PLGA film against lateral compression. Based on our combined results, we hypothesize the following mechanism for the compression-induced glass transformation of the Langmuir PLGA film; (1) initially, a humidified/non-glassy PLGA film is formed in the full surface-coverage region (where the surface pressure shows a plateau) during compression; (2) further compression leads to the collapse of the PLGA chains and the formation of new surfaces on the air side of the film, and this newly formed top layer of the PLGA film is transiently glassy in character because the water evaporation rate

  8. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  9. Water’s second glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Gainaru, Catalin; Handle, Philip H.; Seidl, Markus; Nelson, Helge; Böhmer, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The glassy states of water are of common interest as the majority of H2O in space is in the glassy state and especially because a proper description of this phenomenon is considered to be the key to our understanding why liquid water shows exceptional properties, different from all other liquids. The occurrence of water’s calorimetric glass transition of low-density amorphous ice at 136 K has been discussed controversially for many years because its calorimetric signature is very feeble. Here, we report that high-density amorphous ice at ambient pressure shows a distinct calorimetric glass transitions at 116 K and present evidence that this second glass transition involves liquid-like translational mobility of water molecules. This “double Tg scenario” is related to the coexistence of two liquid phases. The calorimetric signature of the second glass transition is much less feeble, with a heat capacity increase at Tg,2 about five times as large as at Tg,1. By using broadband-dielectric spectroscopy we resolve loss peaks yielding relaxation times near 100 s at 126 K for low-density amorphous ice and at 110 K for high-density amorphous ice as signatures of these two distinct glass transitions. Temperature-dependent dielectric data and heating-rate–dependent calorimetric data allow us to construct the relaxation map for the two distinct phases of water and to extract fragility indices m = 14 for the low-density and m = 20–25 for the high-density liquid. Thus, low-density liquid is classified as the strongest of all liquids known (“superstrong”), and also high-density liquid is classified as a strong liquid. PMID:24101518

  10. Thermal expansion accompanying the glass-liquid transition and crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the linear thermal expansion behaviors of a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1 bulk metallic glass in its as-cast, annealed and crystallized states. Accompanying the glass-liquid transition, the as-cast Vitreloy 1 shows a continuous decrease in the thermal expansivity, whereas the annealed glass shows a sudden increase. The crystallized Vitreloy 1 exhibits an almost unchanged thermal expansivity prior to its melting. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the nucleation of crystalline phases can induce a significant thermal shrinkage of the supercooled liquid, but with the growth of these nuclei, the thermal expansion again dominates. These results are explained in the framework of the potential energy landscape, advocating that the configurational and vibrational contributions to the thermal expansion of the glass depend on both, structure and temperature.

  11. Theories of glass formation and the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, J S

    2014-04-01

    This key-issues review is a plea for a new focus on simpler and more realistic models of glass-forming fluids. It seems to me that we have too often been led astray by sophisticated mathematical models that beautifully capture some of the most intriguing features of glassy behavior, but are too unrealistic to provide bases for predictive theories. As illustrations of what I mean, the first part of this article is devoted to brief summaries of imaginative, sensible, but disparate and often contradictory ideas for solving glass problems. Almost all of these ideas remain alive today, with their own enthusiastic advocates. I then describe numerical simulations, mostly by H Tanaka and coworkers, in which it appears that very simple, polydisperse systems of hard disks and spheres develop long range, Ising-like, bond-orientational order as they approach glass transitions. Finally, I summarize my recent proposal that topologically ordered clusters of particles, in disordered environments, tend to become aligned with each other as if they were two-state systems, and thus produce the observed Ising-like behavior. Neither Tanaka's results nor my proposed interpretation of them fit comfortably within any of the currently popular glass theories.

  12. Chiral-glass transition and replica symmetry breaking of a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass

    OpenAIRE

    Hukushima, K.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations are performed for a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass with the nearest-neighbor Gaussian coupling to investigate its spin-glass and chiral-glass orderings. The occurrence of a finite-temperature chiral-glass transition without the conventional spin-glass order is established. Critical exponents characterizing the transition are different from those of the standard Ising spin glass. The calculated overlap distribution suggests the appearance ...

  13. Vortex-glass transition in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reger, J.D.; Tokuyasu, T.A.; Young, A.P.; Fisher, M.P.A.

    1991-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of a vortex-glass transition in a disordered type-II superconductor in a magnetic field in three dimensions by numerical studies of a simplified model. Monte Carlo simulations at finite temperature and domain-wall renormalization-group calculations at T=0 indicate that d=3 is just above the lower critical dimension d l , though the possibility that d l =3 cannot be definitely ruled out. A comparison is made with XY and Ising spin glasses. The (effective) correlation-length exponent ν and dynamical exponent z are in fairly good agreement with experiment

  14. Dielectric determination of the glass transition temperature (T sub g)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Heidi R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to determine the glass transition temperature of a polymer using a dielectric dissipation technique. A peak in the dissipation factor versus temperature curve is expected near the glass transition temperature T sub g. It should be noted that the glass transition is gradual rather than abrupt, so that the glass transition temperature T sub g is not clearly identifiable. In this case, the glass transition temperature is defined to be the temperature at the intersection point of the tangent lines to the dissipation factor versus temperature curve above and below the transition region, as illustrated.

  15. Microscopic model of the glass transition and the glassy state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.

    1982-07-01

    A microscopic model of the glass transition and the glassy state is presented. It is exactly solvable, and offers a unified view of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium aspects of the glass transition. It also provides a statistical-mechanical justification of the irreversible thermodynamic models of the glass transition proposed earlier. (author)

  16. Glass transition in soft-sphere dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RamIrez-Gonzalez, P E; Medina-Noyola, M

    2009-01-01

    The concept of dynamic equivalence among mono-disperse soft-sphere fluids is employed in the framework of the self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of colloid dynamics to calculate the ideal glass transition phase diagram of model soft-sphere colloidal dispersions in the softness-concentration state space. The slow dynamics predicted by this theory near the glass transition is compared with available experimental data for the decay of the intermediate scattering function of colloidal dispersions of soft-microgel particles. Increasing deviations from this simple scheme occur for increasingly softer potentials, and this is studied here using the Rogers-Young static structure factor of the soft-sphere systems as the input of the SCGLE theory, without assuming a priori the validity of the equivalence principle above.

  17. Microstructure and Rheology near an Attractive Colloidal Glass Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, T.; Sztucki, M.; Belina, G.; Pignon, F.

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure and rheological properties of a thermally reversible short-ranged attractive colloidal system are studied in the vicinity of the attractive glass transition line. At high volume fractions, the static structure factor changes very little but the low frequency shear moduli varies over several orders of magnitude across the transition. From the frequency dependence of shear moduli, fluid-attractive glass and repulsive glass-attractive glass transitions are identified

  18. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  19. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  20. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fulchiron, Ren?; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legar?, V?ronique

    2015-01-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg ) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of ap...

  1. Glass transition of anhydrous starch by fast scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Xavier; Maigret, Jean-Eudes; Lourdin, Denis; Saiter, Allisson

    2017-10-01

    By means of fast scanning calorimetry, the glass transition of anhydrous amorphous starch has been measured. With a scanning rate of 2000Ks -1 , thermal degradation of starch prior to the glass transition has been inhibited. To certify the glass transition measurement, structural relaxation of the glassy state has been investigated through physical aging as well as the concept of limiting fictive temperature. In both cases, characteristic enthalpy recovery peaks related to the structural relaxation of the glass have been observed. Thermal lag corrections based on the comparison of glass transition temperatures measured by means of differential and fast scanning calorimetry have been proposed. The complementary investigations give an anhydrous amorphous starch glass transition temperature of 312±7°C. This estimation correlates with previous extrapolation performed on hydrated starches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glass transitions in lubricants - Its relation to elastohydrodynamic lubrication /EHD/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, M.; Bair, S.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the possible role of glass transition and glassy state behavior of lubricants in EHD contacts is reported. Measurements of the glass transition of lubricants as a function of pressure by two methods are presented along with a discussion indicating possible implications of the results to EHD lubrication.

  3. Modern aspects of the kinetic theory of glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropin, T V; Aksenov, V L; Schmelzer, J W

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews glass transition kinetics models that are developed to describe the formation of structural (for example, covalent and metallic) glasses, as well as to account for the transition of a polymer to a solid glassy state. As the two approaches most frequently used over the last decade to model the glass transition, the Tool–Narayanaswamy–Moynihan model and the Adam–Gibbs theory of glass transition are described together with examples of their applications. Also discussed are entropy-based approaches that rely on irreversible thermodynamics methods originated in the work of De Donder, Mandelstam, and Leontovich. The actual problems that arise in applying these methods and the prospects of their development are discussed. A brief overview of statistical glass transition models is given, including the mode-coupling and energy-landscape theories. (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Echoes of the Glass Transition in Athermal Soft Spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Peter K; Corwin, Eric I

    2017-09-15

    Recent theoretical advances have led to the creation of a unified phase diagram for the thermal glass and athermal jamming transitions. This diagram makes clear that, while related, the mode-coupling-or dynamic-glass transition is distinct from the jamming transition, occurring at a finite temperature and significantly lower density than the jamming transition. Nonetheless, we demonstrate a prejamming transition in athermal frictionless spheres which occurs at the same density as the mode-coupling transition and is marked by percolating clusters of locally rigid particles. At this density in both the thermal and athermal systems, individual motions of an extensive number of particles become constrained, such that only collective motion is possible. This transition, which is well below jamming, exactly matches the definition of collective behavior at the dynamical transition of glasses. Thus, we reveal that the genesis of rigidity in both thermal and athermal systems is governed by the same underlying topological transition in their shared configuration space.

  5. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does Brillouin light scattering probe the primary glass transition process at temperatures well above glass transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, P; Gomopoulos, N; Le Grand, A; Hadjichristidis, N; Floudas, G; Ediger, M D; Fytas, G

    2010-02-21

    The primary alpha-relaxation time (tau(alpha)) for molecular and polymeric glass formers probed by dielectric spectroscopy and two light scattering techniques (depolarized light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy) relates to the decay of the torsional autocorrelation function computed by molecular dynamics simulation. It is well known that Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy (BLS) operating in gigahertz frequencies probes a fast (10-100 ps) relaxation of the longitudinal modulus M*. The characteristic relaxation time, irrespective of the fitting procedure, is faster than the alpha-relaxation which obeys the non-Arrhenius Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation. Albeit, this has been noticed, it remains a puzzling finding in glass forming systems. The available knowledge is based only on temperature dependent BLS experiments performed, however, at a single wave vector (frequency). Using a new BLS spectrometer, we studied the phonon dispersion at gigahertz frequencies in molecular [o-terphenyl (OTP)] and polymeric [polyisoprene (PI) and polypropylene (PP)] glass formers. We found that the hypersonic dispersion does relate to the glass transition dynamics but the disparity between the BLS-relaxation times and tau(alpha) is system dependent. In PI and PP, the former is more than one order of magnitude faster than tau(alpha), whereas the two relaxation times become comparable in the case of OTP. The difference between the two relaxation times appears to relate to the "breadth" of the relaxation time distribution function. In OTP the alpha-relaxation process assumes a virtually single exponential decay at high temperatures well above the glass transition temperature, in clear contrast with the case of the amorphous bulk polymers.

  7. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  8. Oxidation feature and diffusion mechanism of Zr-based metallic glasses near the glass transition point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Kun

    2018-03-01

    The oxidation behaviors of as-cast, pre-deformed, and crystallized Zr47.9Ti0.3Ni3.1Cu39.3Al9.4 metallic glasses (MGs) were studied near the glass transition point. The oxidation kinetics of the crystallized MGs followed a parabolic-rate law, and the as-cast and pre-deformed MGs exerted a typical two-stage behavior above the glass transition temperature (T g). Most interesting, pre-deformed treatment can significantly improve the oxidation rate of MGs, as the initial oxidation appeared earlier than for the as-cast MGs, and was accompanied by much thicker oxide scale. The EDS and XPS results showed that the metal Al acted as the preferred scavenger that absorbed intrinsic oxygen in the near-surface region of as-cast MGs. However, a homogeneous mixed layer without Al was observed in the pre-deformed MGs. We speculated the accelerated diffusion of other elements in the MGs was due to the local increase in the free volume and significant shear-induced dilation of the local structure. The results from this study demonstrate that MGs exhibit controllable atomic diffusion during the oxidation process, which can facilitate use in super-cooled liquid region applications.

  9. Isotope effect in glass-transition temperature and ionic conductivity of lithium-borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Takanori; Morishima, Ryuta; Matsui, Tsuneo

    2002-01-01

    The glass-transition temperature and the electrical conductivity of lithium borate (0.33Li 2 O-0.67B 2 O 3 ) glasses with various isotopic compositions were determined by differential thermal analysis and by impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained glass-transition temperature as well as the vibrational frequency of B-O network structure was independent of lithium isotopic composition. This result indicates that lithium ions, which exist as network modifier, only weakly interact with B-O network structure. In addition, the glass-transition temperature increased with 10 B content although the reason has not been understood. The electrical conductivity, on the other hand, increased with 6 Li content. The ratio of the conductivity of 6 Li glass to that of 7 Li glass was found to be 2, being larger than the value (7/6) 1/2 calculated with the simple classical diffusion theory. This strong mass dependence could be explained by the dynamic structure model, which assumes local structural relaxation even far below the glass-transition temperature. Besides, the conductivity appeared to increase with the glass-transition temperature. Possible correlations between the glass-transition temperature and the electrical conductivity were discussed. (author)

  10. Polymer brushes: a controllable system with adjustable glass transition temperature of fragile glass formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shi-Jie; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2014-01-28

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations for coarse-grained polymer brushes in a wide temperature range to investigate the factors that affect the glass transition in these systems. We focus on the influences of free surface, polymer-substrate interaction strength, grafting density, and chain length not only on the change of glass transition temperature Tg, but also the fragility D of the glass former. It is found that the confinement can enhance the dependence of the Tg on the cooling rate as compared to the bulk melt. Our layer-resolved analysis demonstrates that it is possible to control the glass transition temperature Tg of polymer brushes by tuning the polymer-substrate interaction strength, the grafting density, and the chain length. Moreover, we find quantitative differences in the influence range of the substrate and the free surface on the density and dynamics. This stresses the importance of long range cooperative motion in glass formers near the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the string-like cooperative motion analysis demonstrates that there exists a close relation among glass transition temperature Tg, fragility D, and string length ⟨S⟩. The polymer brushes that possess larger string length ⟨S⟩ tend to have relatively higher Tg and smaller D. Our results suggest that confining a fragile glass former through forming polymer brushes changes not only the glass transition temperature Tg, but also the very nature of relaxation process.

  11. Transition and post-transition metal ions in borate glasses: Borate ligand speciation, cluster formation, and their effect on glass transition and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möncke, D; Kamitsos, E I; Palles, D; Limbach, R; Winterstein-Beckmann, A; Honma, T; Yao, Z; Rouxel, T; Wondraczek, L

    2016-09-28

    A series of transition and post-transition metal ion (Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Bi) binary borate glasses was studied with special consideration of the cations impact on the borate structure, the cations cross-linking capacity, and more generally, structure-property correlations. Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies were used for the structural characterization. These complementary techniques are sensitive to the short-range order as in the differentiation of tetrahedral and trigonal borate units or regarding the number of non-bridging oxygen ions per unit. Moreover, vibrational spectroscopy is also sensitive to the intermediate-range order and to the presence of superstructural units, such as rings and chains, or the combination of rings. In order to clarify band assignments for the various borate entities, examples are given from pure vitreous B 2 O 3 to meta-, pyro-, ortho-, and even overmodified borate glass compositions. For binary metaborate glasses, the impact of the modifier cation on the borate speciation is shown. High field strength cations such as Zn 2+ enhance the disproportionation of metaborate to polyborate and pyroborate units. Pb 2+ and Bi 3+ induce cluster formation, resulting in PbO n - and BiO n -pseudophases. Both lead and bismuth borate glasses show also a tendency to stabilize very large superstructural units in the form of diborate polyanions. Far-IR spectra reflect on the bonding states of modifier cations in glasses. The frequency of the measured cation-site vibration band was used to obtain the average force constant for the metal-oxygen bonding, F M-O . A linear correlation between glass transition temperature (T g ) and F M-O was shown for the metaborate glass series. The mechanical properties of the glasses also correlate with the force constant F M-O , though for cations of similar force constant the fraction of tetrahedral borate units (N 4 ) strongly affects the thermal and mechanical properties. For paramagnetic Cu- and Mn-borate glasses

  12. The glass transition in high-density amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerting, Thomas; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Handle, Philip H; Seidl, Markus; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Gainaru, Catalin; Böhmer, Roland

    2015-01-01

    There has been a long controversy regarding the glass transition in low-density amorphous ice (LDA). The central question is whether or not it transforms to an ultraviscous liquid state above 136 K at ambient pressure prior to crystallization. Currently, the most widespread interpretation of the experimental findings is in terms of a transformation to a superstrong liquid above 136 K. In the last decade some work has also been devoted to the study of the glass transition in high-density amorphous ice (HDA) which is in the focus of the present review. At ambient pressure HDA is metastable against both ice I and LDA, whereas at > 0.2 GPa HDA is no longer metastable against LDA, but merely against high-pressure forms of crystalline ice. The first experimental observation interpreted as the glass transition of HDA was made using in situ methods by Mishima, who reported a glass transition temperature T g of 160 K at 0.40 GPa. Soon thereafter Andersson and Inaba reported a much lower glass transition temperature of 122 K at 1.0 GPa. Based on the pressure dependence of HDA's T g measured in Innsbruck, we suggest that they were in fact probing the distinct glass transition of very high-density amorphous ice (VHDA). Very recently the glass transition in HDA was also observed at ambient pressure at 116 K. That is, LDA and HDA show two distinct glass transitions, clearly separated by about 20 K at ambient pressure. In summary, this suggests that three glass transition lines can be defined in the p-T plane for LDA, HDA, and VHDA.

  13. Light-scattering study of the glass transition in lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, M. A.; Winer, W. O.; Medina, F. D.; Oshea, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    The sound velocity of four lubricants has been measured as a function of temperature and pressure using Brillouin scattering. A change in slope of the velocity as a function of temperature or pressure allowed the determination of the glass transition temperature and pressure. The glass transition data were used to construct a phase diagram for each lubricant. The data indicate that the glass transition temperature increased with pressure at a rate which ranged from 120 to 200 C/GPa. The maximum pressure attained was 0.69 GPa and the temperature range was from 25 to 100 C.

  14. Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An exactly solvable model for glass to spin-glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisanti, A.; Leuzzi, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the full phase diagram of the spherical 2+p spin-glass model with p≥4. The main outcome is the presence of a phase with both properties of full replica symmetry breaking phases of discrete models, e.g., the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and those of one replica symmetry breaking. This phase has a finite complexity which leads to different dynamic and static properties. The phase diagram is rich enough to allow the study of different kinds of glass to spin glass and spin glass to spin glass phase transitions

  15. Liquid-liquid phase transition and glass transition in a monoatomic model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses.

  16. Theoretical approaches to the glass transition in simple liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - ature. A connection with the glass transition ..... for which the density is the control parameter). The density functional theory .... approach to studies of such spin glass models is provided by the replica formal- ism [75]. It is, therefore, interesting ...

  17. Citrate increases glass transition temperature of vitrified sucrose preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.; Lipelaar, P.J.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Vromans, H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium citrate on the properties of dried amorphous sucrose glasses. Addition of sodium citrate to a sucrose solution followed by freeze-drying or convective drying resulted in a glass transition temperature (T-g) that was higher than the

  18. Thermodynamic consequences of the kinetic nature of the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperwas, Kajetan; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Tripathy, Satya N.; Masiewicz, Elzbieta; Paluch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the glass transition as a kinetic process and establish one universal equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp, which is a thermodynamic characteristic of this process. Our findings challenge the common previous expectations concerning key characteristics of the transformation from the liquid to the glassy state, because it suggests that without employing an additional condition, met in the glass transition, derivation of the two independent equations for dTg/dp is not possible. Hence, the relation among the thermodynamic coefficients, which could be equivalent to the well-known Prigogine-Defay ratio for the process under consideration, cannot be obtained. Besides, by comparing the predictions of our universal equation for dTg/dp and Ehrenfest equations, we find the aforementioned supplementary restriction, which must be met to use the Prigogine-Defay ratio for the glass transition. PMID:26657017

  19. An Overview of the Glass Transition Temperature of Synthetic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Keith R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents an overview of the glass-to-rubber transition, what it is, why it is important, and the major factors that influence it. Indicates that this information should be incorporated into chemistry curricula. (JN)

  20. Glass transition and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, R.; Kanaya, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Nishida, K.; Tsukushi, I.; Shibata, K.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied glass transition temperature and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films supported on silicon substrate using X-ray reflectivity and inelastic neutron scattering techniques. In annealing experiments, we have found that the reported apparent negative expansivity of polymer thin films is caused by unrelaxed structure due to insufficient annealing. Using well-annealed films, we have evaluated glass transition temperature T g and thermal expansivity as a function of film thickness. The glass transition temperature decreases with film thickness and is constant below about 10 nm, suggesting the surface glass transition temperature of 355 K, which is lower than that in bulk. We have also found that the thermal expansivity in the glassy state decreases with film thickness even after annealing. The decrease has been attributed to hardening of harmonic force constant arising from chain confinement in a thin film. This idea has been confirmed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements

  1. Glass transition and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, R. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Kanaya, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan)]. E-mail: kanaya@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miyazaki, T. [Nitto Denko Corporation, 1-1-2 Shimohozumi, Ibaraki, Osaka-fu 567-8680 (Japan); Nishida, K. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Tsukushi, I. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba-ken 275-0023 (Japan); Shibata, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    We have studied glass transition temperature and thermal expansivity of polystyrene thin films supported on silicon substrate using X-ray reflectivity and inelastic neutron scattering techniques. In annealing experiments, we have found that the reported apparent negative expansivity of polymer thin films is caused by unrelaxed structure due to insufficient annealing. Using well-annealed films, we have evaluated glass transition temperature T {sub g} and thermal expansivity as a function of film thickness. The glass transition temperature decreases with film thickness and is constant below about 10 nm, suggesting the surface glass transition temperature of 355 K, which is lower than that in bulk. We have also found that the thermal expansivity in the glassy state decreases with film thickness even after annealing. The decrease has been attributed to hardening of harmonic force constant arising from chain confinement in a thin film. This idea has been confirmed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

  2. Investigation of low glass transition temperature on COTS PEMs reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, M.; Agarwal, S.

    2002-01-01

    Many factors influence PEM component reliability.One of the factors that can affect PEM performance and reliability is the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the encapsulant or underfill. JPL/NASA is investigating how the Tg and CTE for PEMs affect device reliability under different temperature and aging conditions. Other issues with Tg are also being investigated. Some preliminary data will be presented on glass transition temperature test results conducted at JPL.

  3. Glass heat capacity and its abrupt change in glass transition region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    cover a large range of glass formers from metallic to non-metallic glasses. To conduct this study we convert the units of all the Cp data from J/mol K and J/g K to J/g-atom K. This study will provide insight into the correlations among chemical bonding, microstructure structure, liquid fragility, glass......Glass transition (GT) has been a fascinating, but challenging subject in the condensed matter science over decades. Despite progress in understanding GT, many crucial problems still need to be clarified. One of the problems deals with the microscopic origin of abrupt change of heat capacity (Cp......) around glass transition. Here we study this problem through two approaches. First, we analyze the Cp change with temperature on homologous series of glass formers (i.e., with regular compositional substitution). Second, we do the same on non-homologous systems (e.g. without regular compositional...

  4. [Glass transition of Chinese medicine extract powder and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Hui; Liang, Hong-Bo; Xiong, Lei; Rao, Xiao-Yong; Xie, Yin; He, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Glass transition theory is an important theory in polymer science, which is used to characterize the physical properties. It refers to the transition of amorphous polymer from the glassy state to the rubber state due to heating or the transition from rubber state to glassy state due to cooling. In this paper, the glassy state and glass transition of food and the similar relationship between the composition of Chinese medicine extract powder and food ingredients were described; the determination method for glass transition temperature (Tg) of Chinese medicine extract powder was established and its main influencing factors were analyzed. Meanwhile, the problems in drying process, granulation process and Chinese medicine extract powder and solid preparation storage were analyzed and investigated based on Tg, and then the control strategy was put forward to provide guidance for the research and production of Chinese medicine solid preparation. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Polyamorphism in Yb-based metallic glass induced by pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangliang; Luo, Qiang; Li, Renfeng; Zhao, Haiyan; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Wang, Luhong; Liu, Haozhe

    2017-04-01

    The Yb62.5Zn15Mg17.5Cu5 metallic glass is investigated using synchrotron x-ray total scattering method up to 38.4 GPa. The polyamorphic transformation from low density to high density with a transition region between 14.1 and 25.2 GPa is observed, accompanying with a volume collapse reflected by a discontinuousness of isothermal bulk modulus. This collapse is caused by that distortional icosahedron short range order precedes to perfect icosahedron, which might link to Yb 4f electron delocalization upon compression, and match the result of in situ electrical resistance measurement under high pressure conditions. This discovery in Yb-based metallic glass, combined with the previous reports on other metallic glass systems, demonstrates that pressure induced polyamorphism is the general behavior for typical lanthanide based metallic glasses.

  6. Size and pressure effects on glass transition temperature of poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, X.Y.; Zhang, G.H.; Lian, J.S.; Jiang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A simple and unified model, without any adjustable parameter, is developed for size and pressure effects on glass transition temperatures of nanopolymers. The model is based on a model for size dependent glass transition temperature of nanopolymer glasses under ambient pressure, and a pressure-dependent function of the root of mean-square displacement of atom vibration. It is found that the size- and pressure-dependent glass transition temperatures of free-standing films or supported films having weak interaction with substrates decreases with decreasing of pressure and size. However, the glass transition temperature of supported films having strong interaction with substrates increases with the increase of pressure and the decrease of size. The predicted results correspond with available experimental evidences for atactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under hydrostatic pressure or under the pressure induced by supercritical fluid CO 2 . In addition, the predicted glass transition temperature of isotactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under ambient pressure is consistent with available experimental evidences

  7. Size and pressure effects on glass transition temperature of poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, X.Y. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Zhang, G.H. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Lian, J.S. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Jiang, Q. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China)]. E-mail: jiangq@jlu.edu.cn

    2006-02-21

    A simple and unified model, without any adjustable parameter, is developed for size and pressure effects on glass transition temperatures of nanopolymers. The model is based on a model for size dependent glass transition temperature of nanopolymer glasses under ambient pressure, and a pressure-dependent function of the root of mean-square displacement of atom vibration. It is found that the size- and pressure-dependent glass transition temperatures of free-standing films or supported films having weak interaction with substrates decreases with decreasing of pressure and size. However, the glass transition temperature of supported films having strong interaction with substrates increases with the increase of pressure and the decrease of size. The predicted results correspond with available experimental evidences for atactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under hydrostatic pressure or under the pressure induced by supercritical fluid CO{sub 2}. In addition, the predicted glass transition temperature of isotactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under ambient pressure is consistent with available experimental evidences.

  8. Comment on 'Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An analytically solvable model with a glass-to-glass transition'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakoviack, V.

    2007-01-01

    Guided by old results on simple mode-coupling models displaying glass-glass transitions, we demonstrate, through a crude analysis of the solution with one step of replica symmetry breaking (1RSB) derived by Crisanti and Leuzzi for the spherical s+p mean-field spin glass [Phys. Rev. B 73, 014412 (2006)], that the phase behavior of these systems is not yet fully understood when s and p are well separated. First, there seems to be a possibility of glass-glass transition scenarios in these systems. Second, we find clear indications that the 1RSB solution cannot be correct in the full glassy phase. Therefore, while the proposed analysis is clearly naive and probably inexact, it definitely calls for a reassessment of the physics of these systems, with the promise of potentially interesting developments in the theory of disordered and complex systems

  9. Glass-like and Verwey transitions in magnetite in details

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janů, Zdeněk; Hadač, J.; Švindrych, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 310, - (2007), e203-e205 ISSN 0304-8853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : metal-insulator transition s and other electronic transition s * spin glass es and other random magnets * dynamic properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.704, year: 2007

  10. Photoacoustic investigation of glass transition in AsxTe1-x glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusoodanan, K.N.; Nandakumar, K.; Philip, J.; Titus, S.S.K.; Asokan, S.; Gopal, E.S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Photoacoustic (Pa) technique is used to study glass transition and temperature dependence of thermal diffusivity in As x Te 1-x glasses with 0.25 ≤ x ≤ 0.60. PA amplitude goes through a minimum and the phase shows a maximum at glass transition temperature T g . The variation of thermal diffusivity with temperature shows sharp decrease near T g . The variation of thermal diffusivity with composition shows maximum at x = 0.40 for all temperatures T ≤ T g . (author)

  11. Pressure-induced elastic anomaly in a polyamorphous metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zeng, Zhidan; Lou, Hongbo; Kono, Yoshio; Zhang, Bo; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Mao, Wendy L.

    2017-05-01

    The pressure-induced transitions discovered in metallic glasses (MGs) have attracted considerable research interest offering an exciting opportunity to study polyamorphism in densely packed systems. Despite the large body of work on these systems, the elastic properties of the MGs during polyamorphic transitions remain unclear. Here, using an in situ high-pressure ultrasonic sound velocity technique integrated with x-ray radiography and x-ray diffraction in a Paris-Edinburgh cell, we accurately determined both the compressional and shear wave velocities of a polyamorphous Ce68Al10Cu20Co2 MG up to 5.8 GPa. We observed elastic anomalies of a MG with minima (at ˜1.5 GPa) in the sound velocities, bulk modulus, and Poisson's ratio during its polyamorphic transition. This behavior was discussed in comparison to the elastic anomalies of silica glass and crystalline Ce.

  12. Models of agglomeration and glass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This book is for any physicist interested in new vistas in the domain of non-crystalline condensed matter, aperiodic and quasi-crystalline networks and especially glass physics and chemistry. Students with an elementary background in thermodynamics and statistical physics will find the book accessible. The physics of glasses is extensively covered, focusing on their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as various models leading to the formation of the glassy states of matter from overcooled liquids. The models of agglomeration and growth are also applied to describe the formation of quasicrystals, fullerenes and, in biology, to describe virus assembly pathways.

  13. The liquid-glass-jamming transition in disordered ionic nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braibanti, Marco; Kim, Ha Seong; Şenbil, Nesrin; Pagenkopp, Matthew J; Mason, Thomas G; Scheffold, Frank

    2017-11-08

    In quenched disordered out-of-equilibrium many-body colloidal systems, there are important distinctions between the glass transition, which is related to the onset of nonergodicity and loss of low-frequency relaxations caused by crowding, and the jamming transition, which is related to the dramatic increase in elasticity of the system caused by the deformation of constituent objects. For softer repulsive interaction potentials, these two transitions become increasingly smeared together, so measuring a clear distinction between where the glass ends and where jamming begins becomes very difficult or even impossible. Here, we investigate droplet dynamics in concentrated silicone oil-in-water nanoemulsions using light scattering. For zero or low NaCl electrolyte concentrations, interfacial repulsions are soft and longer in range, this transition sets in at lower concentrations, and the glass and the jamming regimes are smeared. However, at higher electrolyte concentrations the interactions are stiffer, and the characteristics of the glass-jamming transition resemble more closely the situation of disordered elastic spheres having sharp interfaces, so the glass and jamming regimes can be distinguished more clearly.

  14. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently.

  15. On relaxation nature of glass transition in amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanditov, Damba S.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-10-01

    A short review on relaxation theories of glass transition is presented. The main attention is paid to modern aspects of the glass transition equation qτg = C, suggested by Bartenev in 1951 (q - cooling rate of the melt, τg - structural relaxation time at the glass transition temperature Tg). This equation represents a criterion of structural relaxation at transition from liquid to glass at T = Tg (analogous to the condition of mechanical relaxation ωτ = 1, where the maximum of mechanical loss is observed). The empirical parameter С = δTg has the meaning of temperature range δTg that characterizes the liquid-glass transition. Different approaches of δTg calculation are reviewed. In the framework of the model of delocalized atoms a modified kinetic criterion of glass transition is proposed (q/Tg)τg = Cg, where Cg ≅ 7·10-3 is a practically universal dimensionless constant. It depends on fraction of fluctuation volume fg, which is frozen at the glass transition temperature Cg = fg/ln(1/fg). The value of fg is approximately constant fg ≅ 0.025. At Tg the process of atom delocalization, i.e. its displacement from the equilibrium position, is frozen. In silicate glasses atom delocalization is reduced to critical displacement of bridge oxygen atom in Si-O-Si bridge necessary to switch a valence bond according to Muller and Nemilov. An equation is derived for the temperature dependence of viscosity of glass-forming liquids in the wide temperature range, including the liquid-glass transition and the region of higher temperatures. Notion of (bridge) atom delocalization is developed, which is related to necessity of local low activation deformation of structural network for realization of elementary act of viscous flow - activated switch of a valence (bridge) bond. Without atom delocalization (;trigger mechanism;) a switch of the valence bond is impossible and, consequently, the viscous flow. Thus the freezing of atom delocalization process at low temperatures

  16. Glass transition of repulsive charged rods (fd-viruses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyongok

    2014-05-14

    It has recently been shown that suspensions of long and thin charged fibrous viruses (fd) form a glass at low ionic strengths. The corresponding thick electric double layers give rise to long-ranged repulsive electrostatic interactions, which lead to caging and structural arrest at concentrations far above the isotropic-nematic coexistence region. Structural arrest and freezing of the orientational texture are found to occur at the same concentration. In addition, various types of orientational textures are equilibrated below the glass transition concentration, ranging from a chiral-nematic texture with a large pitch (of about 100 μm), an X-pattern, and a tightly packed domain texture, consisting of helical domains with a relatively small pitch (of about 10 μm) and twisted boundaries. The dynamics of both particles as well as the texture are discussed, below and above the glass transition. Dynamic light scattering correlation functions exhibit two dynamical modes, where the slow mode is attributed to the elasticity of helical domains. On approach of the glass-transition concentration, the slow mode increases in amplitude, while as the amplitudes of the fast and slow mode become equal at the glass transition. Finally, interesting features of the "transient" behaviors of charged fd-rod glass are shown as the initial caging due to structural arrest, the propagation of flow originating from stress release, and the transition to the final metastable glass state. In addition to the intensity correlation function, power spectra are presented as a function of the waiting time, at the zero-frequency limit that may access to the thermal anomalities in a charged system.

  17. Glass transition of poly (methyl methacrylate) filled with nanosilica and core-shell structured silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yihu; Bu, Jing; Zuo, Min

    2017-01-01

    Core-shell (CS) nanocomposite particles with 53.4 wt% cross-linked poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell of 11.6 nm in thickness were fabricated via miniemulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate in the presence of modified nanosilica. The influence of nanosilica and CS nanoparticles on glass...... transition and segmental dynamics of PMMA in the nanocomposites prepared via solution casting was compared. The remarkable depression (≥10 °C) of glass transition temperature (Tg) induced by the incorporation of SiO2 and CS was both observed at low loadings. Here, different mechanisms were responsible...

  18. A universal reduced glass transition temperature for liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Data on the dependence of the glass transition temperature on the molecular structure for low-molecular-weight liquids are analyzed in order to determine whether Boyer's reduced glass transition temperature (1952) is a universal constant as proposed. It is shown that the Boyer ratio varies widely depending on the chemical nature of the molecule. It is pointed out that a characteristic temperature ratio, defined by the ratio of the sum of the melting temperature and the boiling temperature to the sum of the glass transition temperature and the boiling temperature, is a universal constant independent of the molecular structure of the liquid. The average value of the ratio obtained from data for 65 liquids is 1.15.

  19. Predictions of glass transition temperature for hydrogen bonding biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sman, R G M

    2013-12-19

    We show that the glass transition of a multitude of mixtures containing hydrogen bonding materials correlates strongly with the effective number of hydroxyl groups per molecule, which are available for intermolecular hydrogen bonding. This correlation is in compliance with the topological constraint theory, wherein the intermolecular hydrogen bonds constrain the mobility of the hydrogen bonded network. The finding that the glass transition relates to hydrogen bonding rather than free volume agrees with our recent finding that there is little difference in free volume among carbohydrates and polysaccharides. For binary and ternary mixtures of sugars, polyols, or biopolymers with water, our correlation states that the glass transition temperature is linear with the inverse of the number of effective hydroxyl groups per molecule. Only for dry biopolymer/sugar or sugar/polyol mixtures do we find deviations due to nonideal mixing, imposed by microheterogeneity.

  20. Unique properties associated with normal martensitic transition and strain glass transition – A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dong; Ni, Yan; Gao, Jinghui; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model the unique properties of strain glass which is different from that of normal martensite. ► We describe the importance of point defects in the formation of strain glass and related properties. ► The role of point defect can be attributed to global transition temperature effect (GTTE) and local field effect (LFE). -- Abstract: The transition behavior and unique properties associated with normal martensitic transition and strain glass transition are investigated by computer simulations using the phase field method. The simulations are based on a physical model that assumes that point defects alter the thermodynamic stability of martensite and create local lattice distortion. The simulation results show that strain glass transition exhibits different properties from those found in normal martensitic transformations. These unique properties include diffuse scattering pattern, “smear” elastic modulus peak, disappearance of heat flow peak and non-ergodicity. These simulation predictions agree well with the experimental observations

  1. Glass transition, crystallization kinetics and pressure effect on crystallization of ZrNbCuNiBe bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, P.F.; Zhuang, Yanxin; Wang, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Zr48Nb8Cu14Ni12Be18 bulk metallic glass have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The activation energies of both glass transition and crystallization events have been obtained usin...

  2. Inward Cationic Diffusion and Percolation Transition in Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsklaer, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng; Mørup, Steen

    2010-01-01

    We show the quantitative correlation between the degree of crystallization and the cationic diffusion extent in iron-containing diopside glass–ceramics at the glass transition temperature. We find a critical degree of crystallization, above which the diffusion extent sharply drops with the degree...... of crystallization. Below the critical value, the diffusion extent decreases only slightly with the degree of crystallization. No cationic diffusion is observed in the fully crystalline materials. The critical value might be associated with a percolation transition from an interconnected to a disconnected glass...

  3. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  4. 'Vanishing' structural effects of temperature in polymer glasses close to the glass-transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Yu, R.S.; Kondo, K.; Yampolskii, Yu. P.; Alentiev, A.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were used for observation of structural effects of temperature in polystyrene (PS), super-cross-linked polystyrene networks (CPS), and in polyimides (PI) below and in the vicinity of glass-transition temperature T g . 'Vanishing' of these structural effects in the repeating cycles of the temperature controlled PAL experiments due to the slow relaxation processes in different conditions and details of chemical structure is demonstrated. Obtained results illustrate complex, dependent on thermal history, inhomogeneous character of the glass structure. In fact, structure of some polymer glasses is changing continuously. Calculations of the number density of free volume holes in these conditions are discussed

  5. Glass transition temperature and conductivity in Li2O and Na2O doped borophosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwajeet, J. S.; Sankarappa, T.; Ramanna, R.; Sujatha, T.; Awasthi, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Two alkali doped Borophosphate glasses in the composition, (B2O3)0.2. (P2O5)0.3. (Na2O)(0.5-x). (Li2O)x, where x = 0.05 to 0.50 were prepared by standard melt quenching method at 1200K. Non-crystalline nature was confirmed by XRD studies. Room temperature density was measured by Archimedes principle. DC conductivity in the temperature range from 300K to 575K has been measured. Samples were DSC studied in the temperature range from 423K to 673K and glass transition temperature was determined. Glass transition temperature passed through minima for Li2O con.2centration between 0.25 and 0.30 mole fractions. Activation energy of conduction has been determined by analyzing temperature variation of conductivity determining Arrhenius law. Conductivity passed through minimum and activation passed through maximum for Li2O content from 0.25 to 0.30 mole fractions. Glass transition temperature passed through minimum for the same range of Li2O content. These results revealed mixed alkali effect taking place in these glasses. It is for the first time borophosphate glasses doped with Li2O and Na2O have been studied for density and dc conductivity and, the mixed alkali effect (MAE) has been observed.

  6. Configurational entropy of polar glass formers and the effect of electric field on glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-21

    A model of low-temperature polar liquids is constructed that accounts for the configurational heat capacity, entropy, and the effect of a strong electric field on the glass transition. The model is based on the Padé-truncated perturbation expansions of the liquid state theory. Depending on parameters, it accommodates an ideal glass transition of vanishing configurational entropy and its avoidance, with a square-root divergent enumeration function at the point of its termination. A composite density-temperature parameter ρ(γ)/T, often used to represent combined pressure and temperature data, follows from the model. The theory is in good agreement with the experimental data for excess (over the crystal state) thermodynamics of molecular glass formers. We suggest that the Kauzmann entropy crisis might be a signature of vanishing configurational entropy of a subset of degrees of freedom, multipolar rotations in our model. This scenario has observable consequences: (i) a dynamical crossover of the relaxation time and (ii) the fragility index defined by the ratio of the excess heat capacity and excess entropy at the glass transition. The Kauzmann temperature of vanishing configurational entropy and the corresponding glass transition temperature shift upward when the electric field is applied. The temperature shift scales quadratically with the field strength.

  7. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Giovambattista

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses.

  8. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  9. Glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a barium borosilicate glass by a non-isothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Soares, Roque S.; Lima, Maria M. A.; Monteiro, Regina C. C.

    2014-01-01

    The glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a glass with a molar composition 60BaO-30B 2 O 3 -10SiO 2 were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under non-isothermal conditions. DSC curves exhibited an endothermic peak associated with the glass transition and two partially overlapped exothermic peaks associated with the crystallization of the glass. The dependence of the glass transition temperature (T g ) and of the maximum crystallization temperature (T p ) on the heating rate was used to determine the activation energy associated with the glass transition (E g ), the activation energy for crystallization (E c ), and the Avrami exponent (n). X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that barium borate (β-BaB 2 O 4 ) was the first crystalline phase to be formed followed by the formation of barium silicate (Ba 5 Si 8 O 21 ). The variations of activation energy for crystallization and of Avrami exponent with the fraction of crystallization (χ) were also examined. When the crystallization fraction (χ) increased from 0.1 to 0.9, the value of local activation energy (E c (χ)) decreased from 554 to 458 kJ/mol for the first exothermic peak and from 1104 to 831 kJ/mol for the second exothermic peak. The value determined for the Avrami exponent was near 2 indicating a similar one-dimensional crystallization mechanism for both crystalline phases. This was confirmed by the morphological studies performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on glass samples heat-treated at the first and at the second crystallization temperatures

  10. Application of Kissinger analysis to glass transition and study of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 35; Issue 4. Application of Kissinger analysis to glass transition and study of thermal degradation kinetics of phenolic–acrylic IPNs ... Author Affiliations. S Goswami1 K Kiran1. Department of Polymer Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology, Ranchi 835 215, India ...

  11. Depression of Glass Transition Temperatures of Polymer Networks by Diluents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Karasz, Frank E.; Ellis, Thomas S.

    1983-01-01

    A classical thermodynamic theory is used to derive expressions for the depression of the glass transition temperature Tg of a polymer network by a diluent. The enhanced sensitivity of Tg in cross-linked systems to small amounts of diluent is explained. Predictions of the theory are in satisfactory

  12. Note on the glass transition temperature of poly(vinylphenol)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Šturcová, Adriana; Sikora, Antonín; Dybal, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 6 (2009), s. 1851-1856 ISSN 0014-3057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : Poly(4-vinylphenol) * glass transition temperature * differential scanning calorimetry Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2009

  13. Beta relaxation of nonpolymeric liquids close to the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Christensen, Tage Emil; Dyre, Jeppe

    2000-01-01

    Dielectric beta relaxation in a pyridine-toluene solution is studied close to the glass transition. Loss peak frequency and maximum loss both exhibit thermal hysteresis. An annealing-state-independent parameter involving loss and loss peak frequency is identified. This parameter has a simple...

  14. Resolution of conflicting views on thermodynamics of glass transition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    liquid with certain degrees of freedom frozen-in, which no longer contribute to the specific heat. Glass transition was thought to be well understood till recently. According to the conventional view the configu- rational entropy of the supercooled liquid is frozen below. Tg all the way to absolute zero. Residual entropy at 0 K is.

  15. Resolution of conflicting views on thermodynamics of glass transition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Resolution of conflicting views on thermodynamics of glass transition: A unified model. K T JACOB*, SAGAR PRABHUDEV and R M MALLYA. Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. MS received 17 May 2010. Abstract. Classical description of thermodynamic properties ...

  16. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-μm length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  17. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-15

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-{mu}m length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  18. Glass transition and density fluctuations in the fragile glass former orthoterphenyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, G.; Fioretto, D.; Comez, L.; Ruocco, G.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin light scattering is used to measure the dynamic structure factor of the fragile glass former orthoterphenyl (OTP) in a wide temperature range around the glass transition region and up to the boiling point. The whole set of spectra is described in terms of a phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic model. In the supercooled phase, we show the contemporary existence of the structural process, whose main features come out to be consistent with the results obtained with other spectroscopies, and of a secondary, activated process, which occurs on the 10 -11 s time scale and has a low activation energy (E a f =0.28 kcal/mol). This latter process, which is also present in the glassy phase and seems to be insensitive to the glass transition, is attributed to the coupling between the density modes and intramolecular degrees of freedom. In the normal liquid phase, the two processes merge together, and the resulting characteristic time is no longer consistent with those derived with other spectroscopies. The analysis points to the conclusion that, for what concerns the long-wavelength density fluctuations in fragile glass formers such as OTP, the universal dynamical features related to the glass transition come out clearly only in the supercooled phase and at frequencies lower than ∼10 6 Hz

  19. The nature of the colloidal 'glass' transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kenneth A; Lawlor, A; DeGregorio, Paolo; McCullagh, Gavin D; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Foffi, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Piero

    2003-01-01

    The dynamically arrested state of matter is discussed in the context of athermal systems, such as the hard sphere colloidal arrest. We believe that the singular dynamical behaviour near arrest expressed, for example, in how the diffusion constant vanishes may be 'universal', in a sense to be discussed in the paper. Based on this we argue the merits of studying the problem with simple lattice models. This, by analogy with the the critical point of the Ising model, should lead us to clarify the questions, and begin the program of establishing the degree of universality to be expected. We deal only with 'ideal' athermal dynamical arrest transitions, such as those found for hard sphere systems. However, it is argued that dynamically available volume (DAV) is the relevant order parameter of the transition, and that universal mechanisms may be well expressed in terms of DAV. For simple lattice models we give examples of simple laws that emerge near the dynamical arrest, emphasising the idea of a near-ideal gas of 'holes', interacting to give the power law diffusion constant scaling near the arrest. We also seek to open the discussion of the possibility of an underlying weak coupling theory of the dynamical arrest transition, based on DAV.

  20. Investigation of low glass transition temperature on COTS PEM's reliability for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, M.; Agarwal, S.; Peters, D.; Cooper, M. S.

    2003-01-01

    Plastic Encapsulated Microelectronics (PEM) reliability is affected by many factors. Glass transition temperature (Tg) is one such factor. In this presentation issues relating to PEM reliability and the effect of low glass transition temperature epoxy mold compounds are presented.

  1. Spin-glass polyamorphism induced by a magnetic field in LaMnO3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremenko, V. V.; Sirenko, V. A.; Baran, A.; Čižmár, E.; Feher, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present experimental evidence of field-driven transition in spin-glass state, similar to pressure-induced transition between amorphous phases in structural and metallic glasses, attributed to the polyamorphism phenomena. Cusp in temperature dependences of ac magnetic susceptibility of weakly disordered LaMnO3 single crystal is registered below the temperature of magnetic ordering. Frequency dependence of the cusp temperature proves its spin-glass origin. The transition induced by a magnetic field in spin-glass state, is manifested by peculiarity in dependence of cusp temperature on applied magnetic field. Field dependent maximum of heat capacity is observed in the same magnetic field and temperature range.

  2. The electronic conduction of glass and glass ceramics containing various transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Matsuno, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Nb 2 O 5 -V 2 O 5 -P 2 O 5 glasses containing only Group Va oxides have been investigated to elucidate their electronic conduction and structure, as compared with other glasses obtained by the addition of various transition metal oxides to vanadium phosphate. The P 2 O 5 introduction for Nb 2 O 5 in this glass with the same amount of V 2 O 5 increased the conductivity about two times. Glass ceramics having high conductivity increased by two orders of magnitude and the activation energy for conduction decreased from about 0.5 to 0.2 eV. The crystals were confirmed to be (V,Nb) 2 O 5 and Nb phosphate, one of which was highly conductive and developed a pillar-like shape with a length of more than 20 μm. (orig.)

  3. Structural behavior of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass below and above the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattern, N.; Hermann, H.; Roth, S.

    2003-01-01

    The thermal behavior of the structure of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass has been investigated in situ through the glass transition by means of high-temperature x-ray synchrotron diffraction. The dependence of the x-ray structure factor S(q) of the Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 glass on temperature follows...... the Debye theory up to the glass transition with a Debye temperature theta=296 K. Above the glass transition temperature T-g, the temperature dependence of S(q) is altered, pointing to a continuous development of structural changes in the liquid with temperature. The atomic pair correlation functions g......(r) indicate changes in short-range-order parameters of the first and the second neighborhood with temperature. The temperature dependence of structural parameters is different in glass and in supercooled liquid, with a continuous behavior through the glass transition. The nearest-neighbor distance decreases...

  4. Unusual Crystallization Behavior Close to the Glass Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2018-03-01

    Using molecular simulations, we shed light on the mechanism underlying crystal nucleation in metal alloys and unravel the interplay between crystal nucleation and glass transition, as the conditions of crystallization lie close to this transition. While decreasing the temperature of crystallization usually results in a lower free energy barrier, we find an unexpected reversal of behavior for glass-forming alloys as the temperature of crystallization approaches the glass transition. For this purpose, we simulate the crystallization process in two glass-forming Copper alloys, Ag6 Cu4 , which has a positive heat of mixing, and CuZr, characterized by a large negative heat of mixing. Our results allow us to identify this unusual behavior as directly correlated with a nonmonotonic temperature dependence for the formation energy of connected icosahedral structures, which are incompatible with crystalline order and impede the development of the crystal nucleus, leading to an unexpectedly larger free energy barrier at low temperature. This, in turn, promotes the formation of a predominantly closed-packed critical nucleus, with fewer defects, thereby suggesting a new way to control the structure of the crystal nucleus, which is of key importance in catalysis.

  5. Magnetization relaxation in spin glasses above transition point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, I.A.; Minakov, A.A.; Galonzka, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetization relaxation of Cd 0.6 Zn 0.4 Cr 2 Se 4 and Cd 0.6 Mn 0.4 Te monocrystalline samples with T g =21 K and T g =12 K respectively and magnetic colloid is investigated. It is shown that magnetization inexponential relaxation detected experimentally in spin and dipole glasses is essentially higher than T g temperature transition. It is found that at temperatures higher than T g the essential difference is observed in behaviour of spin glasses with different Z and disorder types

  6. Dynamic thermal expansivity of liquids near the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Kristine; Gundermann, Ditte; Christensen, Tage Emil

    2012-01-01

    Based on previous works on polymers by Bauer et al. [ Phys. Rev. E 61 1755 (2000)], this paper describes a capacitative method for measuring the dynamical expansion coefficient of a viscous liquid. Data are presented for the glass-forming liquid tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane (DC704) in the ...... the liquid contracts when cooling from room temperature down to around the glass-transition temperature, which is relevant when measuring on a molecular liquid rather than a polymer.......Based on previous works on polymers by Bauer et al. [ Phys. Rev. E 61 1755 (2000)], this paper describes a capacitative method for measuring the dynamical expansion coefficient of a viscous liquid. Data are presented for the glass-forming liquid tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane (DC704...

  7. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  8. Noise as a Probe of Ising Spin Glass Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare

    2009-03-01

    Noise is ubiquitous and and is often viewed as a nuisance. However, we propose that noise can be used as a probe of the fluctuations of microscopic entities, especially in the vicinity of a phase transition. In recent work we have used simulations to show that the noise increases in the vicinity of phase transitions of ordered systems. We have recently turned our attention to noise near the phase transitions of disordered systems. In particular, we are studying the noise near Ising spin glass transitions using Monte Carlo simulations. We monitor the system as a function of temperature. At each temperature, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization. We look at different quantities, such as the noise power spectrum and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations.

  9. Motility-driven glass and jamming transitions in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dapeng; Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Manning, M. Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. To make quantitative predictions about glass transitions in tissues, we study a self-propelled Voronoi (SPV) model that simultaneously captures polarized cell motility and multi-body cell-cell interactions in a confluent tissue, where there are no gaps between cells. We demonstrate that the model exhibits a jamming transition from a solid-like state to a fluid-like state that is controlled by three parameters: the single-cell motile speed, the persistence time of single-cell tracks, and a target shape index that characterizes the competition between cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension. In contrast to traditional particulate glasses, we are able to identify an experimentally accessible structural order parameter that specifies the entire jamming surface as a function of model parameters. We demonstrate that a continuum Soft Glassy Rheology model precisely captures this transition in the limit of small persistence times, and explain how it fails in the limit of large persistence times. These results provide a framework for understanding the collective solid-to-liquid transitions that have been observed in embryonic development and cancer progression, which may be associated with Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal transition in these tissues. PMID:28966874

  10. Glass transition of dense fluids of hard and compressible spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Ludovic; Witten, Thomas A.

    2009-08-01

    We use computer simulations to study the glass transition of dense fluids made of polydisperse repulsive spheres. For hard particles, we vary the volume fraction, φ , and use compressible particles to explore finite temperatures, T>0 . In the hard sphere limit, our dynamic data show evidence of an avoided mode-coupling singularity near φMCT≈0.592 ; they are consistent with a divergence of equilibrium relaxation times occurring at φ0≈0.635 , but they leave open the existence of a finite temperature singularity for compressible spheres at volume fraction φ>φ0 . Using direct measurements and a scaling procedure, we estimate the equilibrium equation of state for the hard sphere metastable fluid up to φ0 , where pressure remains finite, suggesting that φ0 corresponds to an ideal glass transition. We use nonequilibrium protocols to explore glassy states above φ0 and establish the existence of multiple equations of state for the unequilibrated glass of hard spheres, all diverging at different densities in the range φɛ[0.642,0.664] . Glassiness thus results in the existence of a continuum of densities where jamming transitions can occur.

  11. Determination of the glass transition temperature of cyclodextrin polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabary, Nicolas; Garcia-Fernandez, Maria Jose; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc; Martel, Bernard; Willart, Jean-François

    2016-09-05

    The aim of this work was to determine the main physical characteristics of β-cyclodextrin polymers, well known for improving complexation capacities and providing enhanced and sustained release of a large panel of drugs. Two polymers were investigated: a polymer of β-cyclodextrin (polyβ-CD) and a polymer of partially methylated (DS=0.57) β-cyclodextrin (polyMe-β-CD). The physical characterizations were performed by powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate that these polymers are amorphous and that their glass transition is located above the thermal degradation point of the materials preventing their direct observation and thus their full characterization. We could however estimate the virtual glass transition temperatures by mixing the polymers with different plasticizers (trehalose and mannitol) which decreases Tg sufficiently to make the glass transition observable. Extrapolation to zero plasticizer concentration then yield the following Tg values: Tg (polyMe-β-CD)=317°C±5°C and Tg (polyβ-CD)=418°C±6°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simple solvable energy-landscape model that shows a thermodynamic phase transition and a glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo G

    2012-06-01

    When a liquid melt is cooled, a glass or phase transition can be obtained depending on the cooling rate. Yet, this behavior has not been clearly captured in energy-landscape models. Here, a model is provided in which two key ingredients are considered in the landscape, metastable states and their multiplicity. Metastable states are considered as in two level system models. However, their multiplicity and topology allows a phase transition in the thermodynamic limit for slow cooling, while a transition to the glass is obtained for fast cooling. By solving the corresponding master equation, the minimal speed of cooling required to produce the glass is obtained as a function of the distribution of metastable states.

  13. Shear viscosity of glass-forming melts in the liquid-glass transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanditov, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to interpreting the hole-activation model of a viscous flow of glass-forming liquids is proposed. This model underlies the development of the concept on the exponential temperature dependence of the free energy of activation of a flow within the range of the liquid-glass transition in complete agreement with available experimental data. The 'formation of a fluctuation hole' in high-heat glass-forming melts is considered as a small-scale low-activation local deformation of a structural network, i.e., the quasi-lattice necessary for the switching of the valence bond, which is the main elementary event of viscous flow of glasses and their melts. In this sense, the hole formation is a conditioned process. A drastic increase in the activation free energy of viscous flow in the liquid-glass transition region is explained by a structural transformation that is reduced to a limiting local elastic deformation of the structural network, which, in turn, originates from the excitation (critical displacement) of a bridging atom like the oxygen atom in the Si-O-Si bridge. At elevated temperatures, as a rule, a necessary amount of excited bridging atoms (locally deformed regions of the structural network) always exists, and the activation free energy of viscous flow is almost independent of temperature. The hole-activation model is closely connected with a number of well-known models describing the viscous flow of glass-forming liquids (the Avramov-Milchev, Nemilov, Ojovan, and other models).

  14. Phase transitions and glass transition in a hyperquenched silica–alumina glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, D.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    and a suppressed ΔCp. The formation of cristobalite at 1553 K indicates the dominance of silica in the remaining glass matrix. The cristobalite gradually re-melts as the isothermal heat-treatment temperature is raised from 1823 to 1853 K, which is well below the melting point of cristobalite, while the amount...

  15. The influence of gamma radiation on the molecular weight and glass transition of PLLA and HAp/PLLA nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milicevic, D.; Trifunovic, S.; Dojcilovic, J.; Ignjatovic, N.; Suljovrujic, E.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on the molecular weight and glass transition behaviour of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and hydroxyapatite/poly-L-lactide (HAp/PLLA) nanocomposite has been studied. Since PLLA exposed to high-energy radiation in the presence of air is prone to chain scission reactions and large degradation, changes in molecular weight were obtained by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Alterations in the glass transition behaviour were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The apparent activation energy (ΔH*) for glass transition was determined on the basis of the heating rate dependence of the glass transition temperature (T g ). Our findings support the fact that chain scission is the main reason for the decrease of T g and ΔH* with the absorbed dose. Furthermore, more intensive chain scission degradation of PLLA was observed in HAp/PLLA and can only be ascribed to the presence of HAp nanoparticles. Consequently, initial differences in the glass transition temperature and/or apparent activation energy of PLLA and HAp/PLLA became more pronounced with absorbed dose. This study reveals that radiation-induced changes in molecular weight and glass transition temperature occur in a predictable and fairly accurate manner. Therefore, gamma radiation can be used not only for sterilization but also for tailoring desirable end-use properties of these biomaterials.

  16. Predicting bioactive glass properties from the molecular chemical composition: glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew D

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of inorganic glasses is an important parameter than can be used to correlate with other glass properties, such as dissolution rate, which governs in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. Seven bioactive glass compositional series reported in the literature (77 in total) were analysed here with T(g) values obtained by a number of different methods: differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and dilatometry. An iterative least-squares fitting method was used to correlate T(g) from thermal analysis of these compositions with the levels of individual oxide and fluoride components in the glasses. When all seven series were fitted a reasonable correlation was found between calculated and experimental values (R(2)=0.89). When the two compositional series that were designed in weight percentages (the remaining five were designed in molar percentage) were removed from the model an improved fit was achieved (R(2)=0.97). This study shows that T(g) for a wide range in compositions (e.g. SiO(2) content of 37.3-68.4 mol.%) can be predicted to reasonable accuracy enabling processing parameters to be predicted such as annealing, fibre-drawing and sintering temperatures. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutron- and light-scattering studies of the liquid-to-glass and glass-to-glass transitions in dense copolymer micellar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weiren; Chen Sowhsin; Mallamace, Francesco; Glinka, Charles J.; Fratini, Emiliano

    2003-01-01

    Recent mode coupling theory (MCT) calculations show that if a short-range attractive interaction is added to the pure hard sphere system, one may observe a new type of glass originating from the clustering effect (the attractive glass) as a result of the attractive interaction. This is in addition to the known glass-forming mechanism due to the cage effect in the hard sphere system (the repulsive glass). The calculations also indicate that if the range of attraction is sufficiently short compared to the diameter of the particle, within a certain interval of volume fractions where the two glass-forming mechanisms nearly balance each other, varying the external control parameter, the effective temperature, makes the glass-to-liquid-to-glass reentrance and the glass-to-glass transitions possible. Here we present experimental evidence of both transitions, obtained from small-angle neutron-scattering and photon correlation measurements taken from dense L64 copolymer micellar solutions in heavy water. Varying the temperature in certain predicted volume fraction range triggers a sharp transition between these two different types of glass. In particular, according to MCT, there is an end point (called A 3 singularity) of this glass-to-glass transition line, beyond which the long-time dynamics of the two glasses become identical. Our findings confirm this theoretical prediction. Surprisingly, although the Debye-Waller factors, the long-time limit of the coherent intermediate scattering functions, of these two glasses obtained from photon correlation measurements indeed become identical at the predicted volume fraction, they exhibit distinctly different intermediate time relaxation. Furthermore, our experimental results obtained from volume fractions beyond the end point are characterized by the same features as the repulsive glass obtained before the end point. A complete phase diagram giving the boundaries of the structural arrest transitions for L64 micellar system is

  18. Raman scattering boson peak and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the glass transition in tellurium-zinc oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavrou, E; Tsiantos, C; Tsopouridou, R D; Kripotou, S; Kontos, A G; Raptis, C; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M; Turrell, S; Khatir, S

    2010-01-01

    Raman scattering and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements have been carried out on four mixed tellurium-zinc oxide (TeO 2 ) 1-x (ZnO) x (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) glasses under variable temperature, with particular attention being given to the respective glass transition region. From the DSC measurements, the glass transition temperature T g has been determined for each glass, showing a monotonous decrease of T g with increasing ZnO content. The Raman study is focused on the low-frequency band of the glasses, the so-called boson peak (BP), whose frequency undergoes an abrupt decrease at a temperature T d very close to the respective T g values obtained by DSC. These results show that the BP is highly sensitive to dynamical effects over the glass transition and provides a means for an equally reliable (to DSC) determination of T g in tellurite glasses and other network glasses. The discontinuous temperature dependence of the BP frequency at the glass transition, along with the absence of such a behaviour by the high-frequency Raman bands (due to local atomic vibrations), indicates that marked changes of the medium range order (MRO) occur at T g and confirms the correlation between the BP and the MRO of glasses.

  19. Raman scattering boson peak and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the glass transition in tellurium-zinc oxide glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, E; Tsiantos, C; Tsopouridou, R D; Kripotou, S; Kontos, A G; Raptis, C; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M; Turrell, S; Khatir, S

    2010-05-19

    Raman scattering and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements have been carried out on four mixed tellurium-zinc oxide (TeO(2))(1 - x)(ZnO)(x) (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) glasses under variable temperature, with particular attention being given to the respective glass transition region. From the DSC measurements, the glass transition temperature T(g) has been determined for each glass, showing a monotonous decrease of T(g) with increasing ZnO content. The Raman study is focused on the low-frequency band of the glasses, the so-called boson peak (BP), whose frequency undergoes an abrupt decrease at a temperature T(d) very close to the respective T(g) values obtained by DSC. These results show that the BP is highly sensitive to dynamical effects over the glass transition and provides a means for an equally reliable (to DSC) determination of T(g) in tellurite glasses and other network glasses. The discontinuous temperature dependence of the BP frequency at the glass transition, along with the absence of such a behaviour by the high-frequency Raman bands (due to local atomic vibrations), indicates that marked changes of the medium range order (MRO) occur at T(g) and confirms the correlation between the BP and the MRO of glasses.

  20. Chiral-glass transition in a diluted dipolar-interaction Heisenberg system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kaicheng; Liu Guibin; Zhu Yan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, numerical simulations reveal that a spin-glass transition can occur in the three-dimensional diluted dipolar system. By defining the chirality of triple spins in a diluted dipolar Heisenberg spin glass, we study the chiral ordering in the system using parallel tempering algorithm and heat bath method. The finite-size scaling analysis reveals that the system undergoes a chiral-glass transition at finite temperature. - Highlights: → We define the chirality in a diluted dipolar Heisenberg system. → The system undergoes a chiral-glass transition at finite temperature. → We extract the critical exponents of the chiral-glass transition.

  1. Viscous surface flow induced on Ti-based bulk metallic glass by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kun [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hu, Zheng [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Science and Technology on Vehicle Transmission Laboratory, China North Vehicle Research Institute, Beijing 100072 (China); Li, Fengjiang [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Bingchen, E-mail: weibc@imech.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Obvious smoothing and roughening phases on the Ti-based MG surface resulted, which correspond respectively to the normal and off-normal incidence angles. • Atomic force microscopy confirms two types of periodic ripples distributed evenly over the rough surface. • The irradiation-induced viscosity of MG is about 4×10{sup 12} Pa·s, which accords with the theoretical prediction for metallic glasses close to glass transition temperature. • Surface-confined viscous flow plays a dominant quantitative role, which is due to radiation-induced softening of the low-viscosity surface layer. - Abstract: Ti-based bulk metallic glass was irradiated by a 20 MeV Cl{sup 4+} ion beam under liquid-nitrogen cooling, which produced remarkable surface smoothing and roughening that respectively correspond to normal and off-normal incidence angles of irradiation. Atomic force microscopy confirms two types of periodic ripples distributed evenly over the rough glass surface. In terms of mechanism, irradiation-induced viscosity agrees with the theoretical prediction for metallic glasses near glass transition temperature. Here, a model is introduced, based on relaxation of confined viscous flow with a thin liquid-like layer, that explains both surface smoothing and ripple formation. This study demonstrates that bulk metallic glass has high morphological instability and low viscosity under ion irradiation, which assets can pave new paths for metallic glass applications.

  2. Colloidal glass transition in unentangled polymer nanocomposite melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Benjamin J; Zukoski, Charles F

    2009-01-01

    The linear and non-linear rheology of a high volume fraction particle filled unentangled polymer melt is measured. The particles in the polymer melt behave like hard spheres as the particle volume fraction is raised. At high volume fractions, the suspension develops a plateau elastic modulus. Over the frequency range of the elastic modulus plateau, the viscous modulus develops a minimum and a maximum. The frequencies of the two local extrema initially have critical power law scaling, suggesting the approach of a singular glass transition. At higher volume fractions in excess of the glass transition, the viscous modulus continues to show a well defined minimum and a well defined maximum. The non-linear moduli show a single perturbative yield point beyond which the suspension softens. The yielding behavior of the nanocomposite is shown to be sensitive to the strain frequency and the proximity of the strain frequency to the maximum frequency for the linear viscous modulus from linear rheology which characterizes thermal relaxation of glassy particle clusters in the zero strain limit. The linear and non-linear measurements are compared against a recently developed mechanical theory for colloidal glasses.

  3. Linking rigidity transitions with enthalpic changes at the glass transition and fragility: insight from a simple oscillator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2010-07-21

    A low temperature Monte Carlo dynamics of a Keating-like oscillator model is used to study the relationship between the nature of network glasses from the viewpoint of rigidity, the thermal reversibility during the glass transition and the strong-fragile behaviour of glass-forming liquids. The model shows that a Phillips optimal glass formation with minimal enthalpic changes is obtained under a cooling/annealing cycle when the system is optimally constrained by the harmonic interactions, i.e. when it is isostatically rigid. For these peculiar systems with a nearly reversible glass transition, the computed activation energy for relaxation time shows also a minimum, which demonstrates that isostatically rigid glasses are strong (Arrhenius-like) glass-forming liquids. Experiments on chalcogenide and oxide glass-forming liquids are discussed under this new perspective and confirm the theoretical prediction for chalcogenide network glasses whereas limitations of the approach appear for weakly interacting (non-covalent, ionic) systems.

  4. Dynamic thermal expansivity of liquids near the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niss, Kristine; Gundermann, Ditte; Christensen, Tage; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2012-04-01

    Based on previous works on polymers by Bauer et al. [Phys. Rev. E 61, 1755 (2000)], this paper describes a capacitative method for measuring the dynamical expansion coefficient of a viscous liquid. Data are presented for the glass-forming liquid tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane (DC704) in the ultraviscous regime. Compared to the method of Bauer et al., the dynamical range has been extended by making time-domain experiments and by making very small and fast temperature steps. The modeling of the experiment presented in this paper includes the situation in which the capacitor is not full because the liquid contracts when cooling from room temperature down to around the glass-transition temperature, which is relevant when measuring on a molecular liquid rather than a polymer.

  5. Calorimetric study of water's two glass transitions in the presence of LiCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Guadalupe N.; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Bove, Livia E.; Corti, Horacio R.

    2018-01-01

    A DSC study of dilute glassy LiCl aqueous solutions in the water-dominated regime provides direct evidence of a glass-to-liquid transition in expanded high density amorphous (eHDA)-type solutions. Similarly, low density amorphous ice (LDA) exhibits a glass transition prior to crystallization to ice Ic. Both glass transition temperatures are independent of the salt concentration, whereas the magnitude of the heat capacity increase differs. By contrast to pure water, the glass transition endpoint for LDA can be accessed in LiCl aqueous solutions above 0.01 mole fraction. Furthermore, we also reveal the endpoint for HDA's glass transition, solving the question on the width of both glass transitions. This suggests that both equilibrated HDL and LDL can be accessed in dilute LiCl solutions, supporting the liquid–liquid transition scenario to understand water's anomalies. PMID:29442107

  6. Cubic to tetragonal phase transition of Tm3+ doped nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yiming; Fu, Yuting; Shi, Yahui; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hua; Zhao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Tm 3+ ions doped β-PbF 2 nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics with different doping concentrations and thermal temperatures are prepared by a traditional melt-quenching and thermal treatment method to investigate the structure and the phase transition of Tm 3+ doped nanocrystals. The structures are characterized by X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis and confirmed with numerical simulation. The phase transitions are proved further by the emission spectra. Both of the doping concentration and thermal temperature can induce an O h to D 4h site symmetry distortion and a cubic to tetragonal phase transition. The luminescence of Tm 3+ doped nanocrystals at 800 nm was modulated by the phase transition of the surrounding crystal field

  7. Thermal conductivity of Glycerol's liquid, glass, and crystal states, glass-liquid-glass transition, and crystallization at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2016-02-14

    To investigate the effects of local density fluctuations on phonon propagation in a hydrogen bonded structure, we studied the thermal conductivity κ of the crystal, liquid, and glassy states of pure glycerol as a function of the temperature, T, and the pressure, p. We find that the following: (i) κcrystal is 3.6-times the κliquid value at 140 K at 0.1 MPa and 2.2-times at 290 K, and it varies with T according to 138 × T(-0.95); (ii) the ratio κliquid (p)/κliquid (0.1 MPa) is 1.45 GPa(-1) at 280 K, which, unexpectedly, is about the same as κcrystal (p)/κcrystal (0.1 MPa) of 1.42 GPa(-1) at 298 K; (iii) κglass is relatively insensitive to T but sensitive to the applied p (1.38 GPa(-1) at 150 K); (iv) κglass-T plots show an enhanced, pressure-dependent peak-like feature, which is due to the glass to liquid transition on heating; (v) continuous heating cold-crystallizes ultraviscous glycerol under pressure, at a higher T when p is high; and (vi) glycerol formed by cooling at a high p and then measured at a low p has a significantly higher κ than the glass formed by cooling at a low p. On heating at a fixed low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range at that p is reached. We attribute this effect to thermally assisted loss of the configurational and vibrational instabilities of a glass formed at high p and recovered at low p, which is different from the usual glass-aging effect. While the heat capacity, entropy, and volume of glycerol crystal are less than those for its glass and liquid, κcrystal of glycerol, like its elastic modulus and refractive index, is higher. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of fluctuations in local density and structure, and the relations between κ and the thermodynamic quantities.

  8. Continuous-wave laser-induced glass fiber generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Nobuyasu; Hidai, Hirofumi; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Morita, Noboru

    2017-09-01

    Pulsed-laser-induced glass fiber generation has been reported. We demonstrate a novel glass fiber generation technique by continuous-wave laser illumination and reveal the generation mechanism. In this technique, borosilicate glass, metal foil, and a heat insulator are stacked and clamped by a jig as the sample. Glass fibers are ejected from the side surface of the borosilicate glass by laser illumination of the sample from the borosilicate glass side. SEM observation shows that nanoparticles are attached on the glass fibers. High-speed imaging reveals that small bubbles are formed at the side surface of the borosilicate glass and the bursting of the bubble ejects the fibers. The temperature at the fiber ejection point is estimated to be 1220 K. The mechanism of the fiber ejection includes the following steps: the metal thin foil heated by the laser increases the temperature of the surrounding glass by heat conduction. Since the absorption coefficient of the glass is increased by increasing the temperature, the glass starts to absorb the laser irradiation. The heated glass softens and bubbles form. When the bubble bursts, molten glass and gas inside the bubble scatter into the air to generate the glass fibers.

  9. Computational Nanofluidics: Nonlocal Transport And The Glass Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puscasu, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    -confined geometries. We start with an overview on the nonlocal constitutive relation and the microscopic definitions of the key properties such as momentum density autocorrelation function, stress autocorrelation function and the wavevector dependent viscosity. Then we demonstrate how the nonlocal viscosity kernel can be computed via equilibrium molecular dynamics. Firstly, we showcase the spatially nonlocal viscosity kernel for simple monatomic and diatomic fluids over a wide range of wave vectors, state points and potential energy functions. Further we consider more complex fluids; in particular, we report results for alkanes and polymer melts. Secondly, we study glass-forming liquids and therefore extend the temperature range and report the nonlocal viscosities of polymer melts cooled towards their glassy state. The results reveal the nonlocal nature of the viscous transport and we give evidence that the slow dynamics in supercooled liquids is governed by a dynamic critical point at which time and length scales diverge and link it to the dynamic heterogeneity. It follows that the response of polymer melts to a velocity gradient near the glass transition temperature is highly nonlocal. In systems where the strain rate varies significantly over the width of the real space kernels, the generalized nonlocal viscosity must be used in order to correctly compute the velocity profile of molecular fluids via use of generalized hydrodynamics and thus the nonlocal behaviour of the transport must be integrated into methodologies developed to describe the multi-scale physics of nano flows.

  10. Characterization of the hidden glass transition of amorphous cyclomaltoheptaose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabary, Nicolas; Mahieu, Aurélien; Willart, Jean-François; Dudognon, Emeline; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc; Bacquet, Maryse; Martel, Bernard

    2011-10-18

    An amorphous solid of cyclomaltoheptaose (β-cyclodextrin, β-CD) was formed by milling its crystalline form using a high-energy planetary mill at room temperature. The glass transition of this amorphous solid was found to occur above the thermal degradation point of the material preventing its direct observation and thus its full characterization. The corresponding glass transition temperature (T(g)) and the ΔC(p) at T(g) have, however, been estimated by extrapolation of T(g) and ΔC(p) of closely related amorphous compounds. These compounds include methylated β-CD with different degrees of substitution and molecular alloys obtained by co-milling β-CD and methylated β-CD (DS 1.8) at different ratios. The physical characterization of the amorphous states have been performed by powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, while the chemical integrity of β-CD upon milling was checked by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pressure dependence of glass transition in As2Te3 glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K

    2014-07-24

    Amorphous solids prepared from their melt state exhibit glass transition phenomenon upon heating. Viscosity, specific heat, and thermal expansion coefficient of the amorphous solids show rapid changes at the glass transition temperature (Tg). Generally, application of high pressure increases the Tg and this increase (a positive dT(g)/dP) has been understood adequately with free volume and entropy models which are purely thermodynamic in origin. In this study, the electrical resistivity of semiconducting As(2)Te(3) glass at high pressures as a function of temperature has been measured in a Bridgman anvil apparatus. Electrical resistivity showed a pronounced change at Tg. The Tg estimated from the slope change in the resistivity-temperature plot shows a decreasing trend (negative dT(g)/dP). The dT(g)/dP was found to be -2.36 °C/kbar for a linear fit and -2.99 °C/kbar for a polynomial fit in the pressure range 1 bar to 9 kbar. Chalcogenide glasses like Se, As(2)Se(3), and As(30)Se(30)Te(40) show a positive dT(g)/dP which is very well understood in terms of the thermodynamic models. The negative dT(g)/dP (which is generally uncommon in liquids) observed for As(2)Te(3) glass is against the predictions of the thermodynamic models. The Adam-Gibbs model of viscosity suggests a direct relationship between the isothermal pressure derivative of viscosity and the relaxational expansion coefficient. When the sign of the thermal expansion coefficient is negative, dT(g)/dP = Δk/Δα will be less than zero, which can result in a negative dT(g)/dP. In general, chalcogenides rich in tellurium show a negative thermal expansion coefficient (NTE) in the supercooled and stable liquid states. Hence, the negative dT(g)/dP observed in this study can be understood on the basis of the Adams-Gibbs model. An electronic model proposed by deNeufville and Rockstad finds a linear relation between Tg and the optical band gap (Eg) for covalent semiconducting glasses when they are grouped

  12. Effect of molecular weight and glass transition on relaxation and release behaviour of poly(DL-lactic acid) tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steendam, R.; Van Steenbergen, M.J.; Hennink, W.E.; Frijlink, H.W.; Lerk, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Different molecular weight grades of poly(DL-lactic acid) were applied as release controlling excipients in tablets for oral drug administration. The role of molecular weight and glass transition in the mechanism of water-induced volume expansion and drug release of PDLA tablets was investigated.

  13. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg, making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this Perspective, we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  14. A Second Glass Transition in Pressure Collapsed Type II Clathrate Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2018-04-19

    Type II clathrate hydrates (CHs) M·17 H 2 O, with M = tetrahydrofuran (THF) or 1,3-dioxolane, are known to collapse, or amorphize, on pressurization to ∼1.3 GPa in the temperature range 77-140 K. On heating at 1 GPa, these pressure-amorphized CH states show a weak, stretched sigmoid-shaped, heat-capacity increase because of a glass transition. Here we use thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements to show that also type II CH with M = cyclobutanone (CB) collapses on isothermal pressurization and undergoes a similar, weak, glass transition upon heating at 1 GPa. Furthermore, we reveal for both THF CH and CB CH a second, much more pronounced, glass transition at temperatures above the thermally weak glass transition on heating in the 0.2-0.7 GPa range. This result suggests the general occurrence of two glass transitions in water-rich (94 mol %) pressure-collapsed CHs. Because of a large increase in dielectric permittivity concurrently as the weak heat capacity increase, the first glass transition must be due to kinetic unfreezing of water molecules. The thermal features of the second glass transition, measured on isobaric temperature cycling, are typical of a glass-liquid-glass transition, which suggests that pressure-amorphized CHs transform reversibly to liquids.

  15. Glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Cu0.3(SSe20)0.7 chalcogenide glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    The glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Cu 0.3 (SSe 20 ) 0.7 chalcogenide glass were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two crystalline phases (SSe 20 and Cu 2 Se) were identified after annealing the glass at 773 K for 24 h. The activation energy of the glass transition (E g ), the activation energy of crystallization (E c ), the Avrami exponent (n) and the dimensionality of growth (m) were determined. Results indicate that this glass crystallizes by a two-stage bulk crystallization process upon heating. The first transformation, in which SSe 20 precipitates from the amorphous matrix with a three-dimensional crystal growth. The second transformation, in which the residual amorphous phase transforms into Cu 2 Se compound with a two-dimensional crystal growth

  16. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas; Lukanov, Boris R.; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    Water has multiple glassy states, often called amorphous ices. Low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation connects to a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) above the glass transition temperature Tg. Direct experimental evidence of the LLPT is challenging to obtain, since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this work, we explore the implications of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA by performing computer simulations of two water models – one with a LLPT, and one without. In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. When there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario including a LLPT. PMID:22550566

  17. Quantum percolation phase transition and magnetoelectric dipole glass in hexagonal ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, S. E.; Vojta, T.; Jones, A. T.; Guo, W.; Oliveira, J.; Morrison, F. D.; Lindfield, N.; Baggio Saitovitch, E.; Watts, B. E.; Scott, J. F.

    2017-07-01

    Hexagonal ferrites not only have enormous commercial impact (£2 billion/year in sales) due to applications that include ultrahigh-density memories, credit-card stripes, magnetic bar codes, small motors, and low-loss microwave devices, they also have fascinating magnetic and ferroelectric quantum properties at low temperatures. Here we report the results of tuning the magnetic ordering temperature in PbF e12 -xG axO19 to zero by chemical substitution x . The phase transition boundary is found to vary as TN˜(1-x /xc ) 2 /3 with xc very close to the calculated spin percolation threshold, which we determine by Monte Carlo simulations, indicating that the zero-temperature phase transition is geometrically driven. We find that this produces a form of compositionally tuned, insulating, ferrimagnetic quantum criticality. Close to the zero-temperature phase transition, we observe the emergence of an electric dipole glass induced by magnetoelectric coupling. The strong frequency behavior of the glass freezing temperature Tm has a Vogel-Fulcher dependence with Tm finite, or suppressed below zero in the zero-frequency limit, depending on composition x . These quantum-mechanical properties, along with the multiplicity of low-lying modes near the zero-temperature phase transition, are likely to greatly extend applications of hexaferrites into the realm of quantum and cryogenic technologies.

  18. Simultaneous Determination of Glass Transition Temperatures of Several Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang; Liu, Wei; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    A simple and easy optical method is proposed for the determination of glass transition temperature (Tg) of polymers. Tg was determined using the technique of microsphere imaging to monitor the variation of the refractive index of polymer microsphere as a function of temperature. It was demonstrated that the method can eliminate most thermal lag and has sensitivity about six fold higher than the conventional method in Tg determination. So the determined Tg is more accurate and varies less with cooling/heating rate than that obtained by conventional methods. The most attractive character of the method is that it can simultaneously determine the Tg of several polymers in a single experiment, so it can greatly save experimental time and heating energy. The method is not only applicable for polymer microspheres, but also for the materials with arbitrary shapes. Therefore, it is expected to be broadly applied to different fundamental researches and practical applications of polymers.

  19. Relaxation and possible dynamical transition in electron glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Preeti; Malik, Vikas; Kumar, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    We have considered here the relaxation properties of three dimensional lattice model of an electron glass. We have modeled the kinetics of site-occupation numbers as Ising spins by Kawasaki Dynamics. The master equation governing the dynamics is approximated by making mean field approximation. We have calculated the eigenvalues and localization characteristics of the linear dynamical matrix. The behavior of the eigenvalues at different temperatures is used to detect the presence of a possible dynamical transition. We have also calculated eigenvalues of inverse susceptibility matrix and its behavior with temperature is used as additional input to analyze the slow dynamics and aging. Due to localized states having long lifetime the dynamics of the system slows down with decreasing temperature. We found the gap exponent of density of states of Hartree energy to be close to δ≈d-1 as predicted by Efros and Shklovskii.

  20. Glass Transition of Miscible Binary Polymer-Polymer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besancon, Brian M.; Soles, Christopher L.; Green, Peter F.

    2006-08-01

    The average glass transition temperatures, Tg, of thin homopolymer films exhibit a thickness dependence, Tg(h), associated with a confinement effect and with polymer-segment interface interactions. The Tg’s of completely miscible thin film blends of tetramethyl bisphenol-A polycarbonate (TMPC) and deuterated polystyrene (dPS), supported by SiOx/Si, decrease with decreasing h for PS weight fractions ϕ>0.1. This dependence is similar to that of PS and opposite to that of TMPC thin films. Based on an assessment of Tg(h,ϕ), we suggest that the Tg(h,ϕ) of miscible blends should be rationalized, additionally, in terms of the notion of a self-concentration and associated heterogeneous component dynamics.

  1. Influence of Network Structure on Glass Transition Temperature of Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bandzierz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that only intermolecular, elastically-effective crosslinks influence elastomer properties. The role of the intramolecular modifications of the polymer chains is marginalized. The aim of our study was the characterization of the structural parameters of cured elastomers, and determination of their influence on the behavior of the polymer network. For this purpose, styrene-butadiene rubbers (SBR, cured with various curatives, such as DCP, TMTD, TBzTD, Vulcuren®, DPG/S8, CBS/S8, MBTS/S8 and ZDT/S8, were investigated. In every series of samples a broad range of crosslink density was obtained, in addition to diverse crosslink structures, as determined by equilibrium swelling and thiol-amine analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA were used to study the glass transition process, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS to investigate the size of the free volumes. For all samples, the values of the glass transition temperature (Tg increased with a rise in crosslink density. At the same time, the free volume size proportionally decreased. The changes in Tg and free volume size show significant differences between the series crosslinked with various curatives. These variations are explained on the basis of the curatives’ structure effect. Furthermore, basic structure-property relationships are provided. They enable the prediction of the effect of curatives on the structural parameters of the network, and some of the resulting properties. It is proved that the applied techniques—DSC, DMA, and PALS—can serve to provide information about the modifications to the polymer chains. Moreover, on the basis of the obtained results and considering the diversified curatives available nowadays, the usability of “part per hundred rubber” (phr unit is questioned.

  2. Quantum spin-glass transition in the two-dimensional electron gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 2 ... Spin glasses; quantum phase transition; ferromagnetism; electron gas. ... We argue that a quantum transition involving the destruction of the spin-glass order in an applied in-plane magnetic field offers a natural explanation of some features of recent ...

  3. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-09-28

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a 'hidden' polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleation process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. Our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses.

  4. A thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal for monitoring glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liguo; Xie, Zhuoying; Xu, Hua; Xu, Ming; Han, Guozhi; Wang, Cheng; Bai, Xuduo; Gu, ZhongZe

    2012-03-01

    An optical method was developed to monitor the glass transition of the polymer by taking advantage of reflection spectrum change of the thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal. The thermally tunable photonic bands of the polymer inverse opal photonic crystal were traceable to the segmental motion of macromolecules, and the segmental motion was temperature dependent. By observing the reflection spectrum change of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal during thermal treatment, the glass transition temperature of polystyrene was gotten. Both changes of the position and intensity of the reflection peak were observed during the glass transition process of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal. The optical change of inverse opal photonic crystal was so large that the glass transition temperature could even be estimated by naked eyes. The glass transition temperature derived from this method was consistent with the values measured by differential scanning calorimeter.

  5. Spatial glass transition temperature variations in polymer glass: application to a maltodextrin-water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sleeuwen, Rutger M T; Zhang, Suying; Normand, Valéry

    2012-03-12

    A model was developed to predict spatial glass transition temperature (T(g)) distributions in glassy maltodextrin particles during transient moisture sorption. The simulation employed a numerical mass transfer model with a concentration dependent apparent diffusion coefficient (D(app)) measured using Dynamic Vapor Sorption. The mass average moisture content increase and the associated decrease in T(g) were successfully modeled over time. Large spatial T(g) variations were predicted in the particle, resulting in a temporary broadening of the T(g) region. Temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the variation in T(g) in nonequilibrated samples was larger than in equilibrated samples. This experimental broadening was characterized by an almost doubling of the T(g) breadth compared to the start of the experiment. Upon reaching equilibrium, both the experimental and predicted T(g) breadth contracted back to their initial value.

  6. Terahertz-induced Kerr effect in amorphous chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the terahertz-induced third-order (Kerr) nonlinear optical properties of the amorphous chalcogenide glasses As2S3 and As2Se3. Chalcogenide glasses are known for their high optical Kerr nonlinearities which can be several hundred times greater than those of fused silica. We us...

  7. Mobility restrictions and glass transition behaviour of an epoxy resin under confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemour, A; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J

    2015-04-07

    Confinement can have a big influence on the dynamics of glass formers in the vicinity of the glass transition. Already 40 to 50 K above the glass transition temperature, thermal equilibration of glass formers can be strongly influenced by the confining substrate. We investigate the linear thermal expansion and the specific heat capacity cp of an epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) in a temperature interval of 120 K around the glass transition temperature. The epoxy resin is filled into controlled pore glasses with pore diameters between 4 and 111 nm. Since DGEBA can form H-bonds with silica surfaces, we also investigate the influence of surface silanization of the porous substrates. In untreated substrates a core/shell structure of the epoxy resin can be identified. The glass transition behaviours of the bulk phase and that of the shell phase are different. In silanized substrates, the shell phase disappears. At a temperature well above the glass transition, a second transition is found for the bulk phase - both in the linear expansion data as well as in the specific heat capacity. The cp data do not allow excluding the glass transition of a third phase as being the cause for this transition, whereas the linear expansion data do so. The additional transition temperature is interpreted as a separation between two regimes: above this temperature, macroscopic flow of the bulk phase inside the porous structure is possible to balance the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between DGEBA and the substrate. Below the transition temperature, this degree of freedom is hindered by geometrical constraints of the porous substrates. Moreover, this second transition could also be found in the linear expansion data of the shell phase.

  8. Spectroscopic cell for fast pressure jumps across the glass transition line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R.; Scopigno, T.; Ruocco, G.; Buontempo, U.

    2004-08-01

    We present an experimental protocol for the spectroscopic study of the dynamics of glasses in the aging regime induced by sudden pressure jumps (crunches) across the glass transition line. The sample, initially in the liquid state, is suddenly brought in the glassy state, and therefore out of equilibrium, in a four-window optical crunch cell which is able to perform pressure jumps of 3 Kbar in a time interval of ≈10 ms. The main advantages of this setup with respect to previous pressure-jump systems is that the pressure jump is induced through a pressure transmitting fluid mechanically coupled to the sample stage through a deformable membrane, thus avoiding any flow of the sample itself in the pressure network and allowing us to deal with highly viscous materials. The dynamics of the sample during the aging regime is investigated by Brillouin light scattering. For this purpose the crunch cell is used in conjunction with a high resolution double monochromator equipped with a charge-coupled device detector. This system is able to record a full spectrum of a typical glass forming material in a single 1 s shot. As an example we present the study of the evolution toward equilibrium of the infinite frequency longitudinal elastic modulus (M∞) of low molecular weight polymer [Poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin), glycidyl end capped]. The observed time evolution of M∞, well represented by a single stretched exponential, is interpreted within the framework of the Tool-Narayanaswamy theory.

  9. Long-wavelength fluctuations and the glass transition in two dimensions and three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, Skanda; Kelleher, Colm P; Chaikin, Paul M; Weeks, Eric R

    2017-02-21

    Phase transitions significantly differ between 2D and 3D systems, but the influence of dimensionality on the glass transition is unresolved. We use microscopy to study colloidal systems as they approach their glass transitions at high concentrations and find differences between two dimensions and three dimensions. We find that, in two dimensions, particles can undergo large displacements without changing their position relative to their neighbors, in contrast with three dimensions. This is related to Mermin-Wagner long-wavelength fluctuations that influence phase transitions in two dimensions. However, when measuring particle motion only relative to their neighbors, two dimensions and three dimensions have similar behavior as the glass transition is approached, showing that the long-wavelength fluctuations do not cause a fundamental distinction between 2D and 3D glass transitions.

  10. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, Ziga, E-mail: ziga.smit@ijs.si [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, Timotej [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jezersek, David [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Istenic, Janka [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  11. Forensic comparative glass analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Candice M.; Powell, Joseph; Steele, Katie L.; Sigman, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Glass samples of four types commonly encountered in forensic examinations have been analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the purpose of discriminating between samples originating from different sources. Some of the glass sets were also examined by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Refractive index (RI) measurements were also made on all glass samples and the refractive index data was combined with the LIBS and with the LA-ICP-MS data to enhance discrimination. The glass types examined included float glass taken from front and side automobile windows (examined on the non-float side), automobile headlamp glass, automobile side-mirror glass and brown beverage container glass. The largest overall discrimination was obtained by employing RI data in combination with LA-ICP-MS (98.8% discrimination of 666 pairwise comparisons at 95% confidence), while LIBS in combination with RI provided a somewhat lower discrimination (87.2% discrimination of 1122 pairwise comparisons at 95% confidence). Samples of side-mirror glass were less discriminated by LIBS due to a larger variance in emission intensities, while discrimination of side-mirror glass by LA-ICP-MS remained high

  12. Pair distribution function and its relation to the glass transition in an amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, S.; Clarke, R.; Nagel, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Data for the pair distribution function g (r) are presented as a function of temperature for amorphous Nb/sub 0.4/Ni/sub 0.6/. We show, based on a simple model, that g (r) varies linearly with T over a wide temperature range in the glass as was found empirically by Wendt and Abraham. We also find that in our glass the behavior of g (r) near the glass transition is, within experimental error, similar to what they found in their Monte Carlo calculation. We interpret the deviation from linearity at the glass transition as due to the onset of diffusive motion of the atoms

  13. Using Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy to Characterize the Glass Transition Time of Polydextrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin G; Kindle, Michael L; Carter, Brady P

    2015-06-01

    Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy was used to characterize the glass transition time, tg , of polydextrose, where the glass transition temperature, Tg , and water activity, aw (relative humidity), were held constant during polydextrose relaxation. The tg was determined from a shift in the peak frequency of the imaginary capacitance spectrum with time. It was found that when the peak frequency reaches 30 mHz, polydextrose undergoes glass transition. Glass transition time, tg , is the time for polydextrose to undergo glass transition at a specific Tg and aw . Results lead to a modified state diagram, where Tg is depressed with increasing aw . This curve forms a boundary: (a) below the boundary, polydextrose does not undergo glass transition and (b) above the boundary, polydextrose rapidly undergoes glass transition. As the boundary curve is specified by a tg value, it can assist in the selection of storage conditions. An important point on the boundary curve is at aw = 0, where Tg0 = 115 °C. The methodology can also be used to calculate the stress-relaxation viscosity of polydextrose as a function of Tg and aw , which is important when characterizing the flow properties of polydextrose initially in powder form. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Investigation of the atypical glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous prazosin salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokesh; Popat, Dharmesh; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-08-25

    This manuscript studied the effect of counterion on the glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous salts of prazosin. Three amorphous salts of prazosin, namely, prazosin hydrochloride, prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate were prepared by spray drying, and characterized by optical-polarized microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the glass transition and recrystallization temperature of amorphous salts. Glass transition of amorphous salts followed the order: prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate ~ prazosin hydrochloride. Amorphous prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate showed glass transition, followed by recrystallization. In contrast, amorphous prazosin hydrochloride showed glass transition and recrystallization simultaneously. Density Functional Theory, however, suggested the expected order of glass transition as prazosin hydrochloride > prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate. The counterintuitive observation of amorphous prazosin hydrochloride having lower glass transition was explained in terms of its lower activation energy (206.1 kJ/mol) for molecular mobility at Tg, compared to that for amorphous prazosin mesylate (448.5 kJ/mol) and prazosin tosylate (490.7 kJ/mol), and was further correlated to a difference in hydrogen bonding strength of the amorphous and the corresponding recrystallized salts. This study has implications in selection of an optimal amorphous salt form for pharmaceutical development.

  15. Johari-Goldstein Relaxation Far Below Tg: Experimental Evidence for the Gardner Transition in Structural Glasses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirhos, K.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2018-02-01

    Experimental evidence for the Gardner transition, theoretically predicted to arise deep in the glassy state of matter, is scarce. At this transition, the energy landscape sensed by the particles forming the glass is expected to become more complex. In the present Letter, we report the dielectric response of two typical glass formers with well-pronounced Johari-Goldstein β relaxation, following this response down to unprecedented low temperatures, far below the glass transition. As the Johari-Goldstein process is believed to arise from the local structure of the energy landscape, its investigation seems an ideal tool to seek evidence for the Gardner transition. Indeed, we find an unusual broadening of the β relaxation below about 110 K for sorbitol and 100 K for xylitol, in excess of the expected broadening arising from a distribution of energy barriers. These results are well consistent with the presence of the Gardner transition in canonical structural glass formers.

  16. Experimental and computational prediction of glass transition temperature of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Ahmad; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Mahlin, Denny; Bergström, Christel A S

    2014-12-22

    Glass transition temperature (Tg) is an important inherent property of an amorphous solid material which is usually determined experimentally. In this study, the relation between Tg and melting temperature (Tm) was evaluated using a data set of 71 structurally diverse druglike compounds. Further, in silico models for prediction of Tg were developed based on calculated molecular descriptors and linear (multilinear regression, partial least-squares, principal component regression) and nonlinear (neural network, support vector regression) modeling techniques. The models based on Tm predicted Tg with an RMSE of 19.5 K for the test set. Among the five computational models developed herein the support vector regression gave the best result with RMSE of 18.7 K for the test set using only four chemical descriptors. Hence, two different models that predict Tg of drug-like molecules with high accuracy were developed. If Tm is available, a simple linear regression can be used to predict Tg. However, the results also suggest that support vector regression and calculated molecular descriptors can predict Tg with equal accuracy, already before compound synthesis.

  17. Magnetically ordered phase near transition to Bose-glass phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromyatnikov, A. V.; Sizanov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a magnetically ordered ("superfluid") phase near quantum transition to the Bose-glass phase in a simple modeling system, a Heisenberg antiferromagnet with spatial dimension d >2 in an external magnetic field with disorder in exchange coupling constants. Our analytical consideration is based on hydrodynamic description of long-wavelength excitations. Results obtained are valid in the entire critical region near the quantum critical point (QCP), allowing us to describe a possible crossover from one critical behavior to another. We demonstrate that the system behaves in full agreement with predictions by M. P. Fisher et al. [Phys. Rev. B 40, 546 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevB.40.546] in close vicinity to the QCP. We find as an extension to that analysis that the anomalous dimension η =2 -d and β =ν d /2 , where β and ν are critical exponents of the order parameter and the correlation length, respectively. The density of states per spin of low-energy localized excitations is found to be independent of d ("superuniversal"). We show that many recent experimental and numerical results obtained in various three-dimensional (3D) systems can be described by our formulas using percolation critical exponents. Then, it is a possibility that a percolation critical regime arises in the ordered phase in some 3D systems not very close to the QCP.

  18. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, W.H.; Guillen, D.P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, P.; Yano, T.; Lee, S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2017), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : borosilicate glass * computed tomography * glass melting * morphology * nuclear waste * X-ray Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  19. Alkaline glass as induced fission fragment detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, A.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The slide glass, registered trade marks INLAB, INVICT and PERFECTA were compared. For the three kinds of glasses the following studies were done: chemical composition; general dissolution rate for hydrofluoric acid solutions of concentrations between 1 and 10M, at 30 0 C and ultrasound shaking; relative efficiency for recording fission fragment tracks from 252 Cf. The INLAB glass was selected due to the better quality of its surface after chemical etching. The HF concentration 2.5M was determined for chemical etching of INLAB glass, and the optimum etching time was chosen between 8 and 10 minutes. The thermal attenuation of latent tracks in the environmental temperature was observed for intervals uo to 31 days between the detector exposure to the fission fragment source and etching of tracks. Several methods were used for determining the detector parameters, such as: critical angle, angle of the cone and efficiency of etching. The effects of gamma irradiation from 60 Co and reactor neutrons in material properties as track detector were studied. Attenuation of latent tracks and saturation of color centers were observed for doses over 100M Rad. Since this kind of material contains uranium as impurity, uniformely distributed, slide glass were calibrated to be applied as a monitor of thermal neutron flux in nuclear reactor. (Author) [pt

  20. Discontinuity in Fast Dynamics at the Glass Transition of ortho-Terphenyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-11-16

    The dynamics of the molecular glass former ortho-terphenyl through the glass transition were observed with two-dimensional infrared vibrational spectroscopy measurements of spectral diffusion using the small probe molecule phenylselenocyanate. Although the slow diffusive motions were not visible on the experimental time scale, a picosecond-scale exponential relaxation was observed at temperatures from above to well below the glass transition temperature. The characteristic time scale has a smooth temperature dependence from the liquid into the glass phase, but the range of vibrational frequencies the probe samples displayed a discontinuity at the glass transition temperature. Complementary pump-probe experiments associate the observed motion with density fluctuations. The key features of the dynamics are reproduced with a simple corrugated well potential energy surface model. In addition, the temperature dependence of the homogeneous vibrational dephasing was found to have a T 2 functional form, where T is the absolute temperature.

  1. Striking role of non-bridging oxygen on glass transition temperature of calcium aluminosilicate glass-formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhadja, M.; Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structural and dynamic properties of calcium aluminosilicate, (CaO-Al 2 O 3 ) 1−x (SiO 2 ) x , glass formers along three joins, namely, R = 1, 1.57, and 3, in which the silica content x can vary from 0 to 1. For all compositions, we determined the glass-transition temperature, the abundances of the non-bridging oxygen, triclusters, and AlO 5 structural units, as well as the fragility from the temperature evolution of the α-relaxation times. We clearly evidence the role played by the non-bridging oxygen linked either to Al atoms or Si atoms in the evolution of the glass-transition temperature as well as of the fragility as a function of silica content along the three joins

  2. Discontinuous nature of the repulsive-to-attractive colloidal glass transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laar, Van T.; Higler, R.; Schroën, K.; Sprakel, J.

    2016-01-01

    In purely repulsive colloidal systems a glass transition can be reached by increasing the particle volume fraction beyond a certain threshold. The resulting glassy state is governed by configurational cages which confine particles and restrict their motion. A colloidal glass may also be formed by

  3. Quantum spin-glass transition in the two-dimensional electron gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An average ferromagnetic moment may also be present, and the spin-glass order then resides in the plane orthogonal to the ferromagnetic moment. We argue that a quantum transition involving the destruction of the spin-glass order in an applied in-plane magnetic field offers a natural explanation of some features of recent ...

  4. Glass transition and aging in dense suspensions of thermosensitive microgel particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnomo, E.H; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Vanapalli Veera, V.S.A.R.; Vanapalli, Srinivas; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2008-01-01

    We report a thermosensitive microgel suspension that can be tuned reversibly between the glass state at low temperature and the liquid state at high temperature. Unlike hard spheres, we find that the glass transition for these suspensions is governed by both the volume fraction and the softness of

  5. Glass transition of PCBM, P3HT and their blends in quenched state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Trinh Tung; Nguyen, Duc Nghia; Nguyen, Van Tuyen

    2012-01-01

    In this work the thermal behavior with the glass transition of phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and their blends was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Both TGA and DSC measurements show that PCBM contains around 1% residual solvent in the crystalline structure. The glass transition of PCBM, P3HT and their blends was determined by quenching techniques. The quenched state of the materials has a strong effect on the glass transition of the materials, especially in the case of PCBM. In all blend compositions only one glass transition temperature was found. These results indicate that PCBM and P3HT are thermodynamically miscible in all blend compositions. (paper)

  6. Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yu; Jin Li

    2008-01-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (T f ) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials. (fast track communication)

  7. Glass transition temperature of PMMA/modified alumina nanocomposite: Molecular dynamic study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Maryam; Davoodi, Jamal; Javanbakht, Mahdi; Rezaei, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of alumina and modified alumina nanoparticles in a PMMA/alumina nanocomposite was investigated. To attain this goal, the glass transition behavior of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), PMMA/alumina and PMMA/hydroxylated alumina nanocomposites were investigated by molecular dynamic simulations (MD). All the MD simulations were performed using the Materials Studio 6.0 software package of Accelrys. To obtain the glass transition temperature, the variation of density vs. t...

  8. Discontinuous and heterogeneous glass transition behavior of carbohydrate polymer-plasticizer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kiyoshi; Hagura, Yoshio

    2012-07-01

    In order to understand the glass transition properties of carbohydrate polymer-plasticizer systems, glass transition temperatures of dextrin-glucose and dextrin-maltose systems were investigated systematically using differential scanning calorimetry. The onset (Tg(on)) and offset (Tg(off)) of the glass transition decreased with increasing plasticizer (glucose or maltose) content, and showed an abrupt depression at certain plasticizer content. The abrupt depression of Tg(off) occurred at higher plasticizer content than that of Tg(on). The glass transition was much broader for intermediate plasticizer content. From the enthalpy relaxation behavior of samples aged at various temperatures, it was found that two different glass transitions occurred contentiously in the broad glass transition. These results suggested that carbohydrate polymer-plasticizer systems can be classified into three regions: the entrapment of the plasticizer by the polymer, the formations of the polymer-plasticizer and plasticizer-rich domains, and the embedment of polymer into the plasticizer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of steaming treatment on crystallinity and glass transition temperature of Eucalyptuses grandis × E. urophylla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lulu; Zhao, Zijian; He, Zhengbin; Yi, Songlin

    To investigate the effects of steaming treatment on crystallinity and glass transition temperature, samples of Eucalyptuses grandis × E. urophylla with moisture content of 50%, 70%, and 90% were steamed in saturated steam at 100 °C for 2, 4, 6, and 8 h. The degree of crystallinity (CrI) and glass transition temperature (Tg) were measured via X-ray diffraction and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. Results revealed a crystallinity degree of Eucalyptus of 29.9%-34.2%, and a glass transition temperature of 80-94 °C with moisture contents of steamed samples of 20%. Furthermore, steaming was revealed to have an obvious effect on crystallization and glass transition. Values of CrI and Tg showed similar changing characteristics: increasing initially, followed by a decrease with increasing steaming time, reaching a maximum at 2 h. Water within the wood seemed to promote crystallization and glass transition during steaming. All steamed samples tested in this study reached glass transition temperature after 50 min of steaming, and the residual growth stress was released.

  10. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel layer...... first and then the growth of silica crystals on the glass surface. The type of alkaline earth cations has a strong impact on both the glass transition and the surface crystallization. In the Mg-containing glass, a quartz layer forms on the glass surface. This could be attributed to the fact that Mg2......+ ions have stronger bonds to oxygen and lower coordination number (4~5) than Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions. In contrast, a cristobalite layer forms in Ca-, Sr- and Ba-containing glasses....

  11. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    and their crystallization, e.g., for locating the glass transition and melting point(s), as well as for investigating the stability against crystallization and estimating the relative change in specific heat between the solid and liquid phases at the glass transition......We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat...

  12. Melting transition of an Ising glass driven by a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, L.; Dalidovich, D.; Dobrosavljević, V.; Rozenberg, M. J.

    2004-02-01

    The quantum critical behavior of the Ising glass in a magnetic field is investigated. We focus on the spin-glass-to-paramagnet transition of the transverse degrees of freedom in the presence of a finite longitudinal field. We use two complementary techniques, the Landau theory close to the T=0 transition and the exact diagonalization method for finite systems. This allows us to estimate the size of the critical region and characterize various crossover regimes. An unexpectedly small energy scale on the disordered side of the critical line is found, and its possible relevance to experiments on metallic glasses is briefly discussed.

  13. Numerical detection of the Gardner transition in a mean-field glass former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Jin, Yuliang; Parisi, Giorgio; Rainone, Corrado; Seoane, Beatriz; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Recent theoretical advances predict the existence, deep into the glass phase, of a novel phase transition, the so-called Gardner transition. This transition is associated with the emergence of a complex free energy landscape composed of many marginally stable sub-basins within a glass metabasin. In this study, we explore several methods to detect numerically the Gardner transition in a simple structural glass former, the infinite-range Mari-Kurchan model. The transition point is robustly located from three independent approaches: (i) the divergence of the characteristic relaxation time, (ii) the divergence of the caging susceptibility, and (iii) the abnormal tail in the probability distribution function of cage order parameters. We show that the numerical results are fully consistent with the theoretical expectation. The methods we propose may also be generalized to more realistic numerical models as well as to experimental systems.

  14. Effects of nanoparticles on chain dynamics and glass transition in athermal polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Joon; Green, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Chain relaxation dynamics and the glass transition of mixtures of polystyrene (PS) homopolymer with PS-grafted gold nanoparticles were examined using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and capacitive scanning dilatometry. Through changes in the nanoparticle core size, D, grafting density, σ, degree of polymerization of grafted chains, N, and the nanoparticle concentration, φ, both the chain relaxation time, τ, and the Tg could be induced to undergo significant changes, increases or decreases, in magnitude. These results will be discussed in light of dynamics in other polymer/nanoparticle systems. In addition, the role of particle size and the role of the melt/brush interfacial interactions on the dynamics will be discussed.

  15. On melting dynamics and the glass transition. II. Glassy dynamics as a melting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzakala, Florent; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2011-01-21

    There are deep analogies between the melting dynamics in systems with a first-order phase transition and the dynamics from equilibrium in super-cooled liquids. For a class of Ising spin models undergoing a first-order transition--namely p-spin models on the so-called Nishimori line--it can be shown that the melting dynamics can be exactly mapped to the equilibrium dynamics. In this mapping the dynamical--or mode-coupling--glass transition corresponds to the spinodal point, while the Kauzmann transition corresponds to the first-order phase transition itself. Both in mean field and finite dimensional models this mapping provides an exact realization of the random first-order theory scenario for the glass transition. The corresponding glassy phenomenology can then be understood in the framework of a standard first-order phase transition.

  16. Calorimetric glass transition in a mean-field theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Parisi, Giorgio; Rainone, Corrado

    2015-02-24

    The study of the properties of glass-forming liquids is difficult for many reasons. Analytic solutions of mean-field models are usually available only for systems embedded in a space with an unphysically high number of spatial dimensions; on the experimental and numerical side, the study of the properties of metastable glassy states requires thermalizing the system in the supercooled liquid phase, where the thermalization time may be extremely large. We consider here a hard-sphere mean-field model that is solvable in any number of spatial dimensions; moreover, we easily obtain thermalized configurations even in the glass phase. We study the 3D version of this model and we perform Monte Carlo simulations that mimic heating and cooling experiments performed on ultrastable glasses. The numerical findings are in good agreement with the analytical results and qualitatively capture the features of ultrastable glasses observed in experiments.

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Waste Glass Powder on ASR Expansion Induced by Waste Glass Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed research is carried out to ascertain the inhibitory effect of waste glass powder (WGP on alkali-silica reaction (ASR expansion induced by waste glass aggregate in this paper. The alkali reactivity of waste glass aggregate is examined by two methods in accordance with the China Test Code SL352-2006. The potential of WGP to control the ASR expansion is determined in terms of mean diameter, specific surface area, content of WGP and curing temperature. Two mathematical models are developed to estimate the inhibitory efficiency of WGP. These studies show that there is ASR risk with an ASR expansion rate over 0.2% when the sand contains more than 30% glass aggregate. However, WGP can effectively control the ASR expansion and inhibit the expansion rate induced by the glass aggregate to be under 0.1%. The two mathematical models have good simulation results, which can be used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of WGP on ASR risk.

  18. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  19. Hydrogen-induced high damping of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    There are two important topics concerned with the recent researches on the damping materials of hydrogenated metallic glasses (HMGs). One is the mechanism of the high hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs. The other is the materials processing of 'bulk' HMGs for engineering. This article describes the summary of our recent studies on these topics. The first one is closely related to the local structure of the metallic glasses. Therefore, our recent results on the intermediate-range local structure of the simple two Zr-based metallic glasses are described, which has been clarified by the Voronoi analysis using the experimental data of the neutron diffraction measurements. The hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs is also discussed on the basis of these recent results of the local structure of the metallic glasses. In terms of the second topic, the first successful preparation of heavily hydrogenated Zr-based bulk HMG rods without hydrogen-induced surface embrittlement is described. They are prepared by a powder-compact-melting and liquid-casting process using Zr-Al-Ni-Cu metallic glass and ZrH 2 powders as the starting materials. It has been found that they have high damping properties.

  20. Glass Transition Temperature of Saccharide Aqueous Solutions Estimated with the Free Volume/Percolation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Julian Gelman; Schneider, Matthias; Corti, Horacio R

    2016-06-09

    The glass transition temperature of trehalose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions has been predicted as a function of the water content by using the free volume/percolation model (FVPM). This model only requires the molar volume of water in the liquid and supercooled regimes, the molar volumes of the hypothetical pure liquid sugars at temperatures below their pure glass transition temperatures, and the molar volumes of the mixtures at the glass transition temperature. The model is simplified by assuming that the excess thermal expansion coefficient is negligible for saccharide-water mixtures, and this ideal FVPM becomes identical to the Gordon-Taylor model. It was found that the behavior of the water molar volume in trehalose-water mixtures at low temperatures can be obtained by assuming that the FVPM holds for this mixture. The temperature dependence of the water molar volume in the supercooled region of interest seems to be compatible with the recent hypothesis on the existence of two structure of liquid water, being the high density liquid water the state of water in the sugar solutions. The idealized FVPM describes the measured glass transition temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions, with much better accuracy than both the Gordon-Taylor model based on an empirical kGT constant dependent on the saccharide glass transition temperature and the Couchman-Karasz model using experimental heat capacity changes of the components at the glass transition temperature. Thus, FVPM seems to be an excellent tool to predict the glass transition temperature of other aqueous saccharides and polyols solutions by resorting to volumetric information easily available.

  1. Thermal analysis of ice and glass transitions in insects that do and do not survive freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsypal, Jan; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr; Koštál, Vladimír

    2018-03-01

    Some insects rely on the strategy of freeze tolerance for winter survival. During freezing, extracellular body water transitions from the liquid to solid phase and cells undergo freeze-induced dehydration. Here we present results of a thermal analysis (from differential scanning calorimetry) of ice fraction dynamics during gradual cooling after inoculative freezing in variously acclimated larvae of two drosophilid flies, Drosophila melanogaster and Chymomyza costata. Although the species and variants ranged broadly between 0 and close to 100% survival of freezing, there were relatively small differences in ice fraction dynamics. For instance, the maximum ice fraction (IF max ) ranged between 67.9 and 77.7% total body water (TBW). The C. costata larvae showed statistically significant phenotypic shifts in parameters of ice fraction dynamics (melting point and IF max ) upon entry into diapause, cold-acclimation, and feeding on a proline-augmented diet. These differences were mostly driven by colligative effects of accumulated proline (ranging between 6 and 487 mmol.kg -1 TBW) and other metabolites. Our data suggest that these colligative effects per se do not represent a sufficient mechanistic explanation for high freeze tolerance observed in diapausing, cold-acclimated C. costata larvae. Instead, we hypothesize that accumulated proline exerts its protective role via a combination of mechanisms. Specifically, we found a tight association between proline-induced stimulation of glass transition in partially-frozen body liquids (vitrification) and survival of cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Phase transitions between different spin-glass phases and between different chaoses in quenched random chiral systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćaǧlar, Tolga; Berker, A. Nihat

    2017-09-01

    The left-right chiral and ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic double-spin-glass clock model, with the crucially even number of states q =4 and in three dimensions d =3 , has been studied by renormalization-group theory. We find, for the first time to our knowledge, four spin-glass phases, including conventional, chiral, and quadrupolar spin-glass phases, and phase transitions between spin-glass phases. The chaoses, in the different spin-glass phases and in the phase transitions of the spin-glass phases with the other spin-glass phases, with the non-spin-glass ordered phases, and with the disordered phase, are determined and quantified by Lyapunov exponents. It is seen that the chiral spin-glass phase is the most chaotic spin-glass phase. The calculated phase diagram is also otherwise very rich, including regular and temperature-inverted devil's staircases and reentrances.

  3. The extent of the glass transition from molecular simulation revealing an overcrank effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, François; Fleury, Alexandre; Ghoufi, Aziz; Soldera, Armand

    2018-02-15

    A deep understanding of the transition between rubber and amorphous state characterized by a glass transition temperature, T g , is still a source of discussions. In this work, we highlight the role of molecular simulation in revealing explicitly this temperature dependent behavior. By reporting the specific volume, the thermal expansion coefficient and the heat capacity versus the temperature, we actually show that the glass transition domain extends to a greater range of temperature, compared with experiments. This significant enlargement width is due to the fast cooling rate, and actually explains the difficulty to locate T g . This result is the manifestation of an overcranking effect used by high-speed cameras to reveal slow-motion. Accordingly, atomistic simulation offers the significant opportunity to show that the transition from the rubber state to the glass phase should be detailed in terms of the degrees of freedom freeze. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of configurational changes on electrical resistivity during glass-liquid transition of two bulk metal-alloy glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, D. P. B.; Johari, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Consequences of increase in structural fluctuations on heating Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 and Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 through their glass to liquid transition range were investigated by measuring the electrical resistivity, ρ, an electron scattering property. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR = (1/ρ) dρ/dT) of the liquid and glassy states is negative. The plots of their ρ against T in the Tg (glass to liquid transition) range show a gradual change in the slope similar to the change observed generally for the plots of the density, elastic modulus, and refractive index. As fluctuations in the melt structure involve fewer configurations on cooling, ρ increases. In the energy landscape description, the melt's structure explores fewer minima with decrease in T, vibrational frequencies increase, and electron scattering and ρ increase. Plots of (-dρ/dT) against T resemble the plot of the specific heat of other glasses and show a sub-Tg feature and a rapid rise at T near Tg. Analysis shows that the magnitude of negative TCR is dominated by change in the phonon characteristics, and configurational fluctuations make it more negative. The TCR of the liquid and glassy states seems qualitatively consistent with the variation in the structure factor in Ziman's model for pure liquid metals as extended by Nagel to metal alloys and used to explain the negative TCR of a two-component metal glass.

  5. Dielectric relaxation at the glass transition of confined N-methyl-ɛ-caprolactam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoukaki, D.; Barut, G.; Pelster, R.; Nimtz, G.; Kyritsis, A.; Pissis, P.

    1998-09-01

    The effects of confinement on the glass transition of the nonassociating glass-forming liquid N-methyl-ɛ-caprolactam were studied in detail by means of broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, 5 Hz-2 GHz, and thermally stimulated depolarization current measurements, 77-300 K. The liquid was two dimensionally confined in the pores of controlled porous glasses with mean pore diameter d=2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 20.0 nm (Gelsil glasses) and d=4.0 nm (Vycor glass) and three dimensionally confined in butyl rubber with mean droplet diameter d=7.6 nm. The confined liquid is classified into two fractions: a relatively immobile interfacial layer close to the wall and the inner layer (volume liquid). For the volume liquid the α relaxation associated with the glass transition becomes faster and the glass transition temperature decreases compared to the bulk liquid. These effects increase with decreasing d and are stronger for three- than for two-dimensional confinement. They can be understood on the basis of the cooperativity concept and the configurational entropy model of Adam and Gibbs. The systematic variation of d allows the determination of the cooperativity length ξ at Tg to ξ <=10-12 nm.

  6. Glass Transition Kinetics of 2714A amorphous alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker Rao, T.; Lilly Shanker Rao, T.; Shaker, A. M.; Venkataraman, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present study is related to the kinetics of onset crystallization, Tx and peak crystallization Tp of cobalt based metallic glass 2714A (Co65Si15B14Fe4Ni2) using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Non-isothermal measurements were performed at different heating rates (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 K/min).The experimental results of the crystallization were studied by two most frequently used methods, i.e., Moynihan and Kissinger. The onset crystallization was also studied by VFT and Lasock’s approaches in addition to the above two methods. The activation energy of crystallization Ec was found to be 622.86 and 638.28 kJ/mol and Ex the activation energy of onset crystallization to be 676.34 and 688.93 kJ/mol respectively. Here Tx is used as a substitution of Tg to calculate the fragility index m of the cobalt based metallic glass in the absence of Tg. The fragility index, m which is a measure of glass forming ability (GFA) is also calculated and the value falls between 20 and 60. This indicates the studied metallic glass is an intermediate strong glass.

  7. Surface silver-doping of biocompatible glass to induce antibacterial properties. Part I: Massive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verné, E; Miola, M; Vitale Brovarone, C; Cannas, M; Gatti, S; Fucale, G; Maina, G; Massé, A; Di Nunzio, S

    2009-03-01

    A glass belonging to the system SiO(2)-Al(2)O(3)-CaO-Na(2)O has been subjected to a patented ion-exchange treatment to induce surface antibacterial activity by doping with silver ions. Doped samples have been characterized by means of X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) analysis, in vitro bioactivity test, Ag(+) leaching test by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) analyses, cytotoxicity tests by fibroblasts adhesion and proliferation, adsorption of IgA and IgG on to the material to evaluate its inflammatory property and antibacterial tests (cultures with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). In vitro tests results demonstrated that the modified glass maintains the same biocompatibility of the untreated one and, moreover, it acquires an antimicrobial action against tested bacteria. This method can be selected to realize glass or glass-ceramic bone substitutes as well as coatings on bio-inert devices, providing safety against bacterial colonization thus reducing the risks of infections nearby the implant site. The present work is the carrying on of a previous research activity, concerning the application of an ion-exchange treatment on glasses belonging to the ternary system SiO(2)-CaO-Na(2)O. On the basis of previous results the glass composition was refined and the ion-exchange process was adapted to it, in order to tune the final material properties. The addition of Al(2)O(3) to the original glass system and the optimization of the ion-exchange conditions allowed a better control of the treatment, leading to an antibacterial material, without affecting both bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  8. Dynamic anomalies at the glass transition of the van der Waals glass tri-α-naphthylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, E.; Debus, O.; Fujara, F.; Kiebel, M.; Sillescu, H.; Petry, W.; Magill, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Debye-Waller factor of the van der Waals glass tri-α-naphthylbenzene, measured by high resolution incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering, shows a cusp at Tc = 407 ± 5 K signaling the existence of a critical instability as has been predicted by mode coupling theory to occur in supercooled glass forming liquids. At temperatures above Tc structural relaxation is observed to obey the time-temperature superposition principle. (orig.)

  9. Glass transition in thin supported polystyrene films probed by temperature-modulated ellipsometry in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu; Kiyanova, Anna V; Last, Julie; Soofi, Shauheen S; Thode, Christopher; Nealey, Paul F

    2012-08-01

    Glass transition in thin (1-200 nm thick) spin-cast polystyrene films on silicon surfaces is probed by ellipsometry in a controlled vacuum environment. A temperature-modulated modification of the method is used alongside a traditional linear temperature scan. A clear glass transition is detected in films with thicknesses as low as 1-2 nm. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) shows no substantial dependence on thickness for coatings greater than 20 nm. Thinner films demonstrate moderate T(g) depression achieving 18 K for thicknesses 4-7 nm. Less than 4 nm thick samples are excluded from the T(g) comparison due to significant thickness nonuniformity (surface roughness). The transition in 10-20 nm thick films demonstrates excessive broadening. For some samples, the broadened transition is clearly resolved into two separate transitions. The thickness dependence of the glass transition can be well described by a simple 2-layer model. It is also shown that T(g) depression in 5 nm thick films is not sensitive to a wide range of experimental factors including molecular weight characteristics of the polymer, specifications of solvent used for spin casting, substrate composition, and pretreatment of the substrate surface.

  10. Kinetic glass transition in a micellar system with short-range attractive interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace; Gambadauro; Micali; Tartaglia; Liao; Chen

    2000-06-05

    We show that percolation and structural arrest transitions coexist in different regions of the phase diagram of a copolymer-micellar system and relate them to short-range intermicellar attraction. The intermediate scattering function shows a nonergodic transition along a temperature and concentration dependent line. Analyses show a logarithmic time dependence, attributed to a higher-order glass transition singularity predicted by mode-coupling theory, followed by a power law.

  11. Optical properties of 3d transition metal ion-doped sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Hongli; Tanner, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Photographs of undoped (SiO 2 ) 50 (Na 2 O) 25 (B 2 O 3 ) 25 (SiNaB) glass and transition metal ion-doped (TM) 0.5 (SiO 2 ) 49.5 (Na 2 O) 25 (B 2 O 3 ) 25 glass samples. - Highlights: • 3d transition metal ion (from Ti to Zn) doped SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses. • Optical properties of doped glasses investigated. • V(IV,V); Cr(III, VI); Mn(II,III); Fe(II,III); Co(II); Ni(II); Cu(II) by XANES, DRS. • Strong visible absorption but only vanadium ion gives strong emission in glass. - Abstract: SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses doped with 3d-transition metal species from Ti to Zn were prepared by the melting-quenching technique and their optical properties were investigated. The X-ray absorption near edge spectra of V, Cr, and Mn-doped glasses indicate that the oxidation states of V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI) and Mn(II, III) exist in the studied glasses. The oxidation states revealed from the diffuse reflectance spectra of the glasses are V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI), Mn(III), Fe(II, III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II). Most of the 3d transition element ions exhibit strong absorption in the visible spectral region in the glass. Under ultraviolet excitation, the undoped sodium borosilicate glass produces weak and broad emission, while doping of vanadium introduces strong and broad emission due to the V(V) charge transfer transition. Only weak emission is observed from Ti(IV), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II), partly resulting from the strong electron–phonon coupling of the 3d-electrons and the relatively high phonon energy of the studied glass host, with the former leading to dominant nonradiative relaxation based on multiphonon processes for most of the 3d excited states

  12. Polymeric nanoparticles - Influence of the glass transition temperature on drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Svenja; Mulac, Dennis; Langer, Klaus

    2017-01-30

    The physico-chemical characterisation of nanoparticles is often lacking the determination of the glass transition temperature, a well-known parameter for the pure polymer carrier. In the present study the influence of water on the glass transition temperature of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles was assessed. In addition, flurbiprofen and mTHPP as model drugs were incorporated in poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly (DL-lactic acid), and poly (L-lactic acid) nanoparticles. For flurbiprofen-loaded nanoparticles a decrease in the glass transition temperature was observed while mTHPP exerted no influence on this parameter. Based on this observation, the release behaviour of the drug-loaded nanoparticles was investigated at different temperatures. For all preparations an initial burst release was measured that could be attributed to the drug adsorbed to the large nanoparticle surface. At temperatures above the glass transition temperature an instant drug release of the nanoparticles was observed, while at lower temperatures less drug was released. It could be shown that the glass transition temperature of drug loaded nanoparticles in suspension more than the corresponding temperature of the pure polymer is the pivotal parameter when characterising a nanostructured drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pressure induced phase transitions studies using advanced synchrotron techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haozhe; Liu, Lisa; Zhao, Jinggeng; HIT Overseas Collaborative Base at Argonne Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    In this presentation, the joint effort on high pressure research through program of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) Overseas Collaborative Base at Argonne will be introduced. Selected research projects on pressure induced phase transitions at room temperature and high/low temperature conditions, such as A2B3 type topological insulators, iron arsenide superconductors, piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, ABO3 type single crystals and metallic glasses, will be presented. Recent development on imaging and diffraction tomography techniques in diamond anvil cell will be reviewed as well.

  14. Effect of 3d-transition metal doping on the shielding behavior of barium borate glasses: a spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatal, H A; Abdelghany, A M; Ghoneim, N A; ElBatal, F H

    2014-12-10

    UV-visible and FT infrared spectra were measured for prepared samples before and after gamma irradiation. Base undoped barium borate glass of the basic composition (BaO 40%-B2O3 60mol.%) reveals strong charge transfer UV absorption bands which are related to unavoidable trace iron impurities (Fe(3+)) within the chemical raw materials. 3d transition metal (TM)-doped glasses exhibit extra characteristic absorption bands due to each TM in its specific valence or coordinate state. The optical spectra show that TM ions favor generally the presence in the high valence or tetrahedral coordination state in barium borate host glass. Infrared absorption bands of all prepared glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular BO3 units and tetrahedral BO4 units within their characteristic vibrational modes and the TM-ions cause minor effects because of the low doping level introduced (0.2%). Gamma irradiation of the undoped barium borate glass increases the intensity of the UV absorption together with the generation of an induced broad visible band at about 580nm. These changes are correlated with suggested photochemical reactions of trace iron impurities together with the generation of positive hole center (BHC or OHC) within the visible region through generated electrons and positive holes during the irradiation process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Size-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Silica Glass Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhang; Wang, Jiangwei; Bitzek, Erik; Huang, Jian Yu; Zheng, He; Tong, Limin; Yang, Qing; Li, Ju; Mao, Scott X

    2016-01-13

    Silica (SiO2) glass, an essential material in human civilization, possesses excellent formability near its glass-transition temperature (Tg > 1100 °C). However, bulk SiO2 glass is very brittle at room temperature. Here we show a surprising brittle-to-ductile transition of SiO2 glass nanofibers at room temperature as its diameter reduces below 18 nm, accompanied by ultrahigh fracture strength. Large tensile plastic elongation up to 18% can be achieved at low strain rate. The unexpected ductility is due to a free surface affected zone in the nanofibers, with enhanced ionic mobility compared to the bulk that improves ductility by producing more bond-switching events per irreversible bond loss under tensile stress. Our discovery is fundamentally important for understanding the damage tolerance of small-scale amorphous structures.

  16. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration

  17. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  18. DWPF glass transition temperatures: What they are and why they are important

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site will immobilize high-level radioactive liquid waste in borosilicate glass. The glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the DWPF canistered waste form which must be met in order to assure compatibility with, and acceptance by, the repository. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to report glass transition temperatures for the projected range of compositions. This information will be used by the repository to establish waste package design limits

  19. On the Frequency Correction in Temperature-Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Glass Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, J.C.; Allan, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Simulations of TMDSC signals were performed for Corning EAGLE XG® glass over a wide range of modulation frequencies. Our results reveal that the frequen...... correction. The resulting glass transition temperature from the frequency corrected reversing heat flow is thereby shown to be independent of frequency.......Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Simulations of TMDSC signals were performed for Corning EAGLE XG® glass over a wide range of modulation frequencies. Our results reveal that the frequency...

  20. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x < x/sub c/ (metalloid poor glasses) vacancy-like defects form, which are characterized by the excess volume which they contribute to the glass. Another, as yet unspecified defect appears to form in glasses with x > x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration.

  1. Glass transition temperature of hard chairside reline materials after post-polymerisation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Vanessa M; Machado, Ana L; Alves, Marinês O; Maciel, Adeilton P; Vergani, Carlos E; Leite, Edson R

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of post-polymerisation treatments on the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of five hard chairside reline materials (Duraliner II-D, Kooliner-K, New Truliner-N, Ufi Gel hard-U and Tokuso Rebase Fast-T). Specimens (10 x 10 x 1 mm) were made following the manufacturers' instructions and divided into three groups (n = 5). Control group specimens were left untreated. Specimens from the microwave group were irradiated with pre-determined power/time combinations, and specimens from the water-bath group were immersed in hot water at 55 degrees C for 10 min. Glass transition ( degrees C) was performed by differential scanning calorimetry. Data were analysed using anova, followed by post hoc Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). Both post-polymerisation treatments promoted a significant (p glass transition of material Kooliner, with the effect being more pronounced for microwave irradiation.

  2. Acrylate oligomers in ultraviolet cured PSA's glass transition, molecular weight versus peel strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    Typically those not skilled in the art relate Glass Transition Temperature to Pressure Sensitive Adhesives. You need a low Tg material to prepare good pressure sensitive adhesives. This report deals with a wide range acrylate terminated oligomers in a standard formulation. Molecular weight, chemical structure variations are examined versus the Glass Transition of the oligomers and final peel strength. Each formulated adhesive will require unique oligomer properties to reach one hundred newtons per 100 millimeters (5.71 pounds per square inch) peel strength. Excellent peel strengths may be obtained with oligomer molecular weight ranging from six thousand to one thousand molecular weight and glass transition temperatures ranging from minus seventy four degrees centigrade up to thirteen degrees centigrade

  3. Effect of the glass transition temperature on alpha-amylase activity in a starch matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vinita; Panyoyai, Naksit; Small, Darryl M; Shanks, Robert A; Kasapis, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    This study optimises a protocol for the estimation of α-amylase activity in a condensed starch matrix in the vicinity of the glass transition region. Enzymatic activity on the vitrified starch system was compared with that of a reference substrate, maltodextrin. The activity was assayed as the rate of release of reducing sugar using a dinitrosalicylic acid procedure. The condensed carbohydrate matrices served the dual purpose of acting as a substrate as well as producing a pronounced effect on the ability to enzymatic hydrolysis. Activation energies were estimated throughout the glass transition region of condensed carbohydrate preparations based on the concept of the spectroscopic shift factor. Results were used to demonstrate a considerable moderation by the mechanical glass transition temperature, beyond the expected linear effect of the temperature dependence, on the reaction rate of starch hydrolysis by α-amylase in comparison with the low-molecular weight chain of maltodextrin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Resolving glass transition in Te-based phase-change materials by modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yimin; Mu, Sen; Wang, Guoxiang; Shen, Xiang; Wang, Junqiang; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua; Wang, Rongping

    2017-10-01

    Glass transitions of Te-based phase-change materials (PCMs) were studied by modulated differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that both Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe are marginal glass formers with ΔT (= T x - T g) less than 2.1 °C when the heating rate is below 3 °C min-1. The fragilities of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe can be estimated as 46.0 and 39.7, respectively, around the glass transition temperature, implying that a fragile-to-strong transition would be presented in such Te-based PCMs. The above results provide direct experimental evidence to support the investigation of crystallization kinetics in supercooled liquid PCMs.

  5. Thermodynamic aspects of the glass-rubber transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staverman, A.J.

    1966-01-01

    In 1933 Ehren/est defined transitions in which not only the thermodynamical potential but also the specific volume and entropy of the two states are equal. For these transitions he derived three relations, between the differences of the coefficients of dilatation and of compressibility and the

  6. Glass transitions in one-, two-, three-, and four-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Ralf; St-Onge, Denis A; Patterson, Steve [Physics Department, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB, E4L 1E6 (Canada); Kob, Walter [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II and CNRS, 34095 Montpellier Cedex (France)], E-mail: rbruening@mta.ca

    2009-01-21

    We investigate the calorimetric liquid-glass transition by performing simulations of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture in one through four dimensions. Starting at a high temperature, the systems are cooled to T = 0 and heated back to the ergodic liquid state at constant rates. Glass transitions are observed in two, three and four dimensions as a hysteresis between the cooling and heating curves. This hysteresis appears in the energy and pressure diagrams, and the scanning rate dependence of the area and height of the hysteresis can be described using power laws. The one-dimensional system does not experience a glass transition but its specific heat curve resembles the shape of the D{>=}2 results in the supercooled liquid regime above the glass transition. As D increases, the radial distribution functions reflect reduced geometric constraints. Nearest neighbor distances become smaller with increasing D due to interactions between nearest and next-nearest neighbors. Simulation data for the glasses are compared with crystal and melting data obtained with a Lennard-Jones system with only one type of particle and we find that with increasing D crystallization becomes increasingly more difficult.

  7. Water sorption and glass transition of pig gastric mucin studied by QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znamenskaya, Yana; Sotres, Javier; Gavryushov, Sergei; Engblom, Johan; Arnebrant, Thomas; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2013-02-28

    Hydration of films of pig gastric mucin was studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) equipped with a humidity module. As a prerequisite, the water adsorption isotherm of a clean silica surface was determined. Atomic force microscopy was used to characterize the changes occurring on the silica surface after repeated sorption/desorption and cleaning cycles. The water sorption isotherms of several hundreds of nanometers thick mucin films were obtained in QCM-D experiments using analysis of overtone behavior. The results show that the sorption isotherms are not dependent on the film thicknesses and are in good agreement with sorption calorimetric data on mucin in the bulk phase. Moreover, hydration-induced changes of rheological properties of mucin films were investigated using a model-free approach. The ratio of G'/G″ was evaluated as a function of relative humidity. The transition from solidlike behavior to liquidlike behavior was observed in the same humidity range as in sorption calorimetric experiments. Thus, ability of QCM-D to monitor glass transition in biopolymers was demonstrated.

  8. The superspin glass transition in zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaman, Ondřej; Kořínková, T.; Jirák, T.; Maryško, Miroslav; Veverka, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 17 (2015), "17C706-1"-"17C706-4" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0807; GA ČR GAP204/10/0035 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : superspin glass * zinc ferrite * doped magnetite * magnetic nanoparticles * thermal decomposition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.101, year: 2015

  9. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  10. Mathematical modeling of photoinitiated coating degradation: Effects of coating glass transition temperature and light stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; G.de With, R.A.T.M.Van Benthem

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model, describing coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature, was extended to simulate the behavior of a coating with a low glass transition temperature. The effects of adding light stabilizers (a UV......, and simulates the transient development of an oxidation zone. Simulations are in good agreement with experimental data for a fast degrading epoxy-amine coating with a glass transition temperature of −50°C. It was found that the degradation rate of the non-stabilized coating was influenced significantly...

  11. Two rigidity-percolation transitions on binary Bethe networks and the intermediate phase in glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukarzel, Cristian F

    2013-12-01

    Rigidity percolation is studied analytically on randomly bonded networks with two types of nodes, respectively, with coordination numbers z(1) and z(2), and with g(1) and g(2) degrees of freedom each. For certain cases that model chalcogenide glass networks, two transitions, both of first order, are found, with the first transition usually rather weak. The ensuing intermediate pase, although not isostatic in its entirety, has very low self-stress. Our results suggest a possible mechanism for the appearance of intermediate phases in glass that does not depend on a self-organization principle.

  12. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  13. Chaotic state to self-organized critical state transition of serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition in metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y., E-mail: hybai@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun, B. A. [Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-02-07

    We study serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition induced by tuning the sample aspect ratio in a Zr-based metallic glass. The statistical analysis reveals that the serrated flow dynamics transforms from a chaotic state characterized by Gaussian-distribution serrations corresponding to stick-slip motion of randomly generated and uncorrelated single shear band and brittle behavior, into a self-organized critical state featured by intermittent scale-free distribution of shear avalanches corresponding to a collective motion of multiple shear bands and ductile behavior. The correlation found between serrated flow dynamics and plastic deformation might shed light on the plastic deformation dynamic and mechanism in metallic glasses.

  14. Superfluid/Bose-glass transition in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristivojevic, Zoran; Petković, Aleksandra; Le Doussal, Pierre; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    We consider a one-dimensional system of interacting bosons in a random potential. At zero temperature, it can be either in the superfluid or in the insulating phase. We study the transition at weak disorder and moderate interaction. Using a systematic approach, we derive the renormalization group equations at two-loop order and discuss the phase diagram. We find the universal form of the correlation functions at the transitions and compute the logarithmic corrections to the main universal power-law behavior. In order to mimic large density fluctuations on a single site, we study a simplified model of disordered two-leg bosonic ladders with correlated disorder across the rung. Contrarily to the single-chain case, the latter system exhibits a transition between a superfluid and a localized phase where the exponents of the correlation functions at the transition do not take universal values.

  15. Anomalous Crystallization as a Signature of the Fragile-to-Strong Transition in Metallic Glass-Forming Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, X.N.; Zhou, C.; Sun, Q.J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the fragile-to-strong (F−S) transition of metallic glass-forming liquids (MGFLs) by measuring the thermal response during annealing and dynamic heating of La55Al25Ni5Cu15 glass ribbons fabricated at different cooling rates. We find that the glasses fabricated in the intermediate regime...

  16. Experimental studies of the liquid-glass transition in trimethylheptane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G. Q.; Toulouse, J.; Beaufils, S.; Bonello, B.; Hwang, Y. H.; Finkel, P.; Hernandez, J.; Bertault, M.; Maglione, M.; Ecolivet, C.; Cummins, H. Z.

    2000-07-01

    The molecular glass former trimethylheptane was studied by calorimetric, dielectric, ultrasonic, neutron scattering, Brillouin scattering, and depolarized light-scattering techniques. The molecular structure appears to be nearly spherical optically as indicated by the low depolarization ratio and dielectric susceptibility values. A preliminary mode-coupling theory (MCT) analysis of the light-scattering and neutron-scattering data indicates that TC>~150 K, at least 25 K above TG. The susceptibility minima were analyzed with the MCT interpolation equation, and disagreement between the light and neutron results was observed despite the apparent isotropy of the molecules.

  17. Analyses of kinetic glass transition in short-range attractive colloids based on time-convolutionless mode-coupling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Michio

    2017-03-01

    For short-range attractive colloids, the phase diagram of the kinetic glass transition is studied by time-convolutionless mode-coupling theory (TMCT). Using numerical calculations, TMCT is shown to recover all the remarkable features predicted by the mode-coupling theory for attractive colloids: the glass-liquid-glass reentrant, the glass-glass transition, and the higher-order singularities. It is also demonstrated through the comparisons with the results of molecular dynamics for the binary attractive colloids that TMCT improves the critical values of the volume fraction. In addition, a schematic model of three control parameters is investigated analytically. It is thus confirmed that TMCT can describe the glass-glass transition and higher-order singularities even in such a schematic model.

  18. Spin glass transition in canonical AuFe alloys: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Li, Yong-Feng; Liu, Gui-Bin; Zhu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Although spin glass transitions have long been observed in diluted magnetic alloys, e.g. AuFe and CuMn alloys, previous numerical studies are not completely consistent with the experiment results. The abnormal critical exponents of the alloys remain still puzzling. By employing parallel tempering algorithm with finite-size scaling analysis, we investigated the phase transitions in canonical AuFe alloys. Our results strongly support that spin glass transitions occur at finite temperatures in the alloys. The calculated critical exponents agree well with those obtained from experiments. -- Highlights: ► By simulation we investigated the abnormal critical exponents observed in canonical SG alloys. ► The critical exponents obtained from our simulations agree well with those measured from experiments. ► Our results strongly support that RKKY interactions lead to SG transitions at finite temperatures.

  19. Analyses of glass transition phenomena by solving differential equation with delay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Inoue, A.

    2007-01-01

    A linear differential equation for the analyses of glass transition phenomena has been proposed by taking into account the delay effect due to the change in transportation of atoms near the glass transition temperature (T g ). Under the condition maintaining the order of the differential equation as the second, the non-linear differential equation proposed by Van Den Beukel and Sietsma is modified to obtain the analytic solution for a linear equation by introducing the following points: the delay effect which is described with a term of Mackey-Glass model, a concept of effective free volume (x fe eff ) and its concentration expression (C fe eff ) which correspond to the equilibrium, and an additional term associated with C fe eff . In analyzing the linear equation, Doyle's p-function was used for the integral of reaction rate with respect to temperature (T). It is found that the linear equation proposed in the present study can describe the changes in free volume (x) with increasing temperature in the dx/dT-T chart, the sharp increase in free volume at T g , and over shooting phenomena of free volume slightly above the T g , as experimentally in thermal analyses for metallic glasses. The linear solution obtained in the present study is of great importance for the analyses of the glass transition because the change in free volume with increasing temperature on heating is described with fundamental functions

  20. Water sorption and glass transition temperatures in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M.; Sablani, Shyam S.; Tang, Juming; Powers, Joseph; Swanson, Barry G.

    2010-01-01

    Water sorption isotherms and glass transition temperatures of raspberries were determined to understand interactions between water and biopolymers. Water adsorption and desorption isotherms of raspberries were determined with an isopiestic method. Thermal transitions of raspberries equilibrated at selected water concentrations using adsorption and desorption were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The sorption isotherm data were modeled by BET and GAB equations, while the plasticizing influence of water on glass transition was modeled by the Gordon-Taylor equation. Equilibrium water concentrations varied at equivalent water activities during adsorption and desorption indicating occurrence of hysteresis and irreversibility of thermodynamic processes. The monolayer water concentrations of 0.099 and 0.108 kg water/kg dry raspberry solids obtained by BET and GAB models during desorption were larger than those during adsorption (0.059 and 0.074 kg water/kg dry raspberry solids). The glass transition temperature of raspberries decreased with increasing water concentrations. The Gordon-Taylor parameters T gs and k obtained for raspberries during adsorption were 42.6 o C and 4.73 and during desorption were 44.9 o C and 5.03, respectively. The characteristic glass transition temperature of the maximally freeze concentrated solution T ' g was -63.1 ± 5 o C and the onset of ice crystal melting temperature T ' m was -32.3 ± 0.4 o C. Although the water activity differed significantly at equivalent water concentrations obtained using absorption or desorption, the glass transition temperatures of raspberries were dependent on the concentration of water present not the method of equilibration.

  1. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jakobsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat conduction through an insulating material, i.e., is proportional to the temperature difference between sample and surroundings. The monitored signal reflects the sample’s specific heat and is sensitive to exo- and endothermic processes. The technique is useful for studying supercooled liquids and their crystallization, e.g., for locating the glass transition and melting point(s, as well as for investigating the stability against crystallization and estimating the relative change in specific heat between the solid and liquid phases at the glass transition.

  2. The glass transition, crystallization and melting in Au-Pb-Sb alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Allen, J. L.; Fecht, H. J.; Perepezko, J. H.; Ohsaka, K.

    1988-01-01

    The glass transition, crystallization and melting of Au(55)Pb(22.5)Sb(22.5) alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Crystallization on heating above the glass transition temperature Tg (45 C) begins at 64 C. Further crystallization events are observed at 172 C and 205 C. These events were found to correspond to the formation of the intermetallic compounds AuSb2, Au2Pb, and possibly AuPb2, respectively. Isothermal DSC scans of the glassy alloy above Tg were used to monitor the kinetics of crystallization. The solidification behavior and heat capacity in the glass-forming composition range were determined with droplet samples. An undercooling level of 0.3T(L) below the liquidus temperature T(L) was achieved, resulting in crystallization of different stable and metastable phases. The heat capacity C(P) of the undercooled liquid was measured over an undercooling range of 145 C.

  3. Local variation of fragility and glass transition temperature of ultra-thin supported polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakata, Paul Z; Douglas, Jack F; Starr, Francis W

    2012-12-28

    Despite extensive efforts, a definitive picture of the glass transition of ultra-thin polymer films has yet to emerge. The effect of film thickness h on the glass transition temperature T(g) has been widely examined, but this characterization does not account for the fragility of glass-formation, which quantifies how rapidly relaxation times vary with temperature T. Accordingly, we simulate supported polymer films of a bead-spring model and determine both T(g) and fragility, both as a function of h and film depth. We contrast changes in the relaxation dynamics with density ρ and demonstrate the limitations of the commonly invoked free-volume layer model. As opposed to bulk polymer materials, we find that the fragility and T(g) do not generally vary proportionately. Consequently, the determination of the fragility profile--both locally and for the film as a whole--is essential for the characterization of changes in film dynamics with confinement.

  4. Material properties and glass transition temperatures of different thermoplastic starches after extrusion processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Léon P.B.M.; Karman, Andre P.; Graaf, Robbert A. de

    Four different starch sources, namely waxy maize, wheat, potato and pea starch were extruded with the plasticizer glycerol, the latter in concentrations of 15, 20 and 25% (w/w). The glass transition temperatures of the resulting thermoplastic products were measured by Dynamic Mechanical Thermal

  5. Determination of the glass-transition temperature of proteins from a viscometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkos, Karol

    2015-03-01

    All fully hydrated proteins undergo a distinct change in their dynamical properties at glass-transition temperature Tg. To determine indirectly this temperature for dry albumins, the viscosity measurements of aqueous solutions of human, equine, ovine, porcine and rabbit serum albumin have been conducted at a wide range of concentrations and at temperatures ranging from 278 K to 318 K. Viscosity-temperature dependence of the solutions is discussed on the basis of the three parameters equation resulting from Avramov's model. One of the parameter in the Avramov's equation is the glass-transition temperature. For all studied albumins, Tg of a solution monotonically increases with increasing concentration. The glass-transition temperature of a solution depends both on Tg for a dissolved dry protein Tg,p and water Tg,w. To obtain Tg,p for each studied albumin the modified Gordon-Taylor equation was applied. This equation describes the dependence of Tg of a solution on concentration, and Tg,p and a parameter depending on the strength of the protein-solvent interaction are the fitting parameters. Thus determined the glass-transition temperature for the studied dry albumins is in the range (215.4-245.5)K. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Practical Considerations for Determination of Glass Transition Temperature of a Maximally Freeze Concentrated Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansare, Swapnil K; Patel, Sajal Manubhai

    2016-08-01

    Glass transition temperature is a unique thermal characteristic of amorphous systems and is associated with changes in physical properties such as heat capacity, viscosity, electrical resistance, and molecular mobility. Glass transition temperature for amorphous solids is referred as (T g), whereas for maximally freeze concentrated solution, the notation is (T g'). This article is focused on the factors affecting determination of T g' for application to lyophilization process design and frozen storage stability. Also, this review provides a perspective on use of various types of solutes in protein formulation and their effect on T g'. Although various analytical techniques are used for determination of T g' based on the changes in physical properties associated with glass transition, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is the most commonly used technique. In this article, an overview of DSC technique is provided along with brief discussion on the alternate analytical techniques for T g' determination. Additionally, challenges associated with T g' determination, using DSC for protein formulations, are discussed. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical industry perspective on determination of T g' for protein formulations as it relates to design and development of lyophilization process and/or for frozen storage; however, a comprehensive review of glass transition temperature (T g, T g'), in general, is outside the scope of this work.

  7. CORRELATION OF THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF PLASTICIZED PVC USING A LATTICE FLUID MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model has been developed to describe the composition dependence of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) + plasticizer mixtures. The model is based on Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state and the Gibbs-Di Marzio criterion, which states that th...

  8. Interactions in a blend of two polymers greatly differing in glass transition temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Šturcová, Adriana; Sikora, Antonín; Dybal, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 14 (2011), s. 1031-1040 ISSN 0887-6266 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) * fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) * glass transition temperature Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2011

  9. Studying the Adhesion Force and Glass Transition of Thin Polystyrene Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Hua; Qian, Xiaoqin; Guan, Li

    2018-01-01

    microscopy (AFM)-based forcedistance curve to study the relaxation dynamics and the film thickness dependence of glass transition temperature (T-g) for normal thin polystyrene (PS) films supported on silicon substrate. The adhesion force (F-ad) between AFM tip and normal thin PS film surfaces...

  10. Molecular Motion in Polymers: Mechanical Behavior of Polymers Near the Glass-Rubber Transition Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature at which the onset of coordinated segmental motion begins is called the glass-rubber transition temperature (Tg). Natural rubber at room temperature is a good example of a material above its Tg. Describes an experiment examining the response of a typical polymer to temperature variations above and below Tg. (Author/JN)

  11. Exploring the Origin of Fragile-to-Strong Transition in Some Glass-Forming Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Hu, L. N.

    2014-01-01

    The slow dynamics of glass-forming liquids is a complex subject of the condensed matter science. But the fragile-to-strong transition, which was observed not long ago [Ito, et al, Nature 1999], makes this subject even more complex since it is extremely challenging to directly probe the structural...

  12. Glass transition and relaxation processes of polymers studied by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science

    1996-10-01

    The glass transition and relaxation processes of polymers were studied by the positron annihilation technique. A positron implanted into polymers might annihilate from positronium (Ps) states in open spaces. Ps is a bound state between a positron and an electron, and its nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is practically identical to that of a hydrogen atom. The lifetime of Ps can be associated with the size of the open spaces, and the formation probability of Ps provides information of motions of molecules. Since the glass transition or relaxation processes affect behavior of open spaces, one can study these phenomena through the detection of the open spaces using the positron annihilation technique. In the present paper, we report studies of the glass transition and relaxation processes in polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene by measurements of lifetime spectra of positrons and those of Doppler broadening profiles of the annihilation radiation. For these specimens, by measurements of the lifetime of Ps, {tau}{sub 3}, as a function of temperature, the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, was determined as an onset temperature of the increase in the temperature coefficient of {tau}{sub 3}. Below T{sub g}, local motions of molecules were detected by measurements of the formation probability of Ps. The positron annihilation as a tool for the characterization of polymers was discussed. (author). 51 refs.

  13. Crystallization kinetics, glass transition kinetics, and thermal stability of Se70-xGa30Inx (x=5, 10, 15, and 20) semiconducting glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, Mousa M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Crystallization and glass transition kinetics of Se 70-x Ga 30 In x (x=5, 10, 15, and 20) semiconducting chalcogenide glasses were studied under non-isothermal condition using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). DSC thermograms of the samples were recorded at four different heating rates 5, 10, 15, and 20 K/min. The variation of the glass transition temperature (T g ) with the heating rate (β) was used to calculate the glass transition activation energy (E t ) using two different models. Meanwhile, the variation of the peak temperature of crystallization (T p ) with β was utilized to deduce the crystallization activation energy (E c ) using Kissinger, Augis-Bennet, and Takhor models. Results reveal that E t decreases with increasing In content, while both T g and E c exhibit the opposite behavior, and the crystal growth occurs in one dimension. The variation of these thermal parameters with the average coordination number was also discussed, and the results were interpreted in terms of the type of bonding that In makes with Se. Assessment of thermal stability and glass forming ability (GFA) was carried out on the basis of some quantitative criteria and the results indicate that thermal stability is enhanced while the crystallization rate is reduced with the addition of In to Se-Ga glass. -- Research highlights: → Addition of In to Se-Ga glass decreases the glass transition activation energy. → The crystallization rate in Se-Ga-In glass is reduced as In content increases. → The crystal growth in Se-Ga-In glass occurs in one dimension. → Thermal properties of Se-Ga-In glass indicate a shift in Phillips-Thorpe threshold.

  14. Thermally induced morphological transition of silver fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey; Kébaili, Nouari

    2014-01-01

    We present both experimental and theoretical study of thermally induced morphological transition of silver nanofractals. Experimentally, those nanofractals formed from deposition and diffusion of preformed silver clusters on cleaved graphite surfaces exhibit dendritic morphologies that are highly...... sensitive to any perturbation, particularly caused by temperature. We analyze and characterize the morphological transition both in time and temperature using the recently developed Monte Carlo simulation approach for the description of nanofractal dynamics and compare the obtained results...

  15. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10 4 s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses

  16. Physical stability of drugs after storage above and below the glass transition temperature: Relationship to glass-forming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Alzghoul, Ahmad; Mahlin, Denny; Bergström, Christel A S

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous materials are inherently unstable and tend to crystallize upon storage. In this study, we investigated the extent to which the physical stability and inherent crystallization tendency of drugs are related to their glass-forming ability (GFA), the glass transition temperature (Tg) and thermodynamic factors. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to produce the amorphous state of 52 drugs [18 compounds crystallized upon heating (Class II) and 34 remained in the amorphous state (Class III)] and to perform in situ storage for the amorphous material for 12h at temperatures 20°C above or below the Tg. A computational model based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was developed to predict the structure-property relationships. All drugs maintained their Class when stored at 20°C below the Tg. Fourteen of the Class II compounds crystallized when stored above the Tg whereas all except one of the Class III compounds remained amorphous. These results were only related to the glass-forming ability and no relationship to e.g. thermodynamic factors was found. The experimental data were used for computational modeling and a classification model was developed that correctly predicted the physical stability above the Tg. The use of a large dataset revealed that molecular features related to aromaticity and π-π interactions reduce the inherent physical stability of amorphous drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transport properties of glass-forming liquids suggest that dynamic crossover temperature is as important as the glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Branca, Caterina; Corsaro, Carmelo; Leone, Nancy; Spooren, Jeroen; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-12-28

    It is becoming common practice to partition glass-forming liquids into two classes based on the dependence of the shear viscosity η on temperature T. In an Arrhenius plot, ln η vs 1/T, a strong liquid shows linear behavior whereas a fragile liquid exhibits an upward curvature [super-Arrhenius (SA) behavior], a situation customarily described by using the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law. Here we analyze existing data of the transport coefficients of 84 glass-forming liquids. We show the data are consistent, on decreasing temperature, with the onset of a well-defined dynamical crossover η(×), where η(×) has the same value, η(×) ≈ 10(3) Poise, for all 84 liquids. The crossover temperature, T(×), located well above the calorimetric glass transition temperature T(g), marks significant variations in the system thermodynamics, evidenced by the change of the SA-like T dependence above T(×) to Arrhenius behavior below T(×). We also show that below T(×) the familiar Stokes-Einstein relation D/T ∼ η(-1) breaks down and is replaced by a fractional form D/T ∼ η(-ζ), with ζ ≈ 0.85.

  18. UV laser radiation-induced modifications and microstructuring of glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkenberg, Marc; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang; Horn, Alexander; Jacquorie, Michael; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2002-06-01

    Modifications and microstructures are generated on the surface and in the volume of silicate glasses using pulsed UV laser radiation of small pulse length. During the interaction of pulsed excimer laser radiation and frequency-trippled Nd:YAG laser radiation with intensities below the removal-threshold of the cerium- and silver-doped multi-component silicate glass absorption centers in the UV are induced. Subsequent thermal treatment and wet chemical etching results in crystallization of the laser-illuminated absorbing region and in the fabrication of microstructures on the surface. Processing of sodalime- and boro-silicate glass with pulsed ArF excimer laser radiation and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser radiation with intensities above the removal-threshold leads to microstructures including the generation of microcracks on the surface and in the bulk. The dynamics and the transmission of the expanding plasma and changes in the refractive index of the glass are investigated with speckle photography using the pump and probe method. The determination of plasma emission and crack generation is carried out using high speed and Nomarski photography. Morphological and chemical properties of the debris generated under defined processing gas atmospheres are investigated with REM, white light interferometry, XPS and EPMA. Induced absorption and changes of the crystalline- phase are probed using optical-spectroscopy and XRD as well REM. On the basis of these investigations the processes of the generation of induced absorption centers and crystallization on the one hand and the generation of cracks and debris on the other hand as well as the quality of the produced microstructures is discussed.

  19. Laser-induced multiphoton transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, S.

    1978-06-01

    Laser induced multiphoton processes are reviewed. The effects of strong fields on atoms are discussed. The perturbation treatment is presented and also its generalization to treat intermediate resonances. The influence of atomic coherence is discussed heuristically and the relation between quantal and classical descriptions of the field is elucidated by reference to the dressed atom description. Atomic ionization experiments are reviewed and the present understanding of multiphoton dissociation of molecules is explained. Finally some prospects for the future are discussed. (author)

  20. Spectroscopic and ultrasonic investigations on structural characterization of borate glass specimen doped with transition metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, K; Thirumaran, S

    2015-08-05

    The present work describes the glass samples of composition (x% V₂O₅-(80-x)% B₂O₃-20% Na₂CO₃) VBS glass system and (x%MnO₂-(80-x)% B₂O₃-20% Na₂CO₃) in MBS glass system with mol% ranging from x=3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 in steps of 3 mol% are prepared by melt quenching technique. For these prepared glass systems, sound velocity (longitudinal and shear velocities) and density have been measured. The sound velocity (longitudinal and shear) was measured by using pulse-echo technique at 5 MHz. The XRD study was carried to out to ascertain the amorphous nature of the glass specimen. Using these measured values, the elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, Debye temperature, acoustic impedance and thermal expansion coefficient of the two glass systems were evaluated. The elastic and mechanical properties of the prepared glass systems are analyzed from ultrasonic study and the structural characterization from spectroscopic study. The effects due to the doping of transition metal ions with borate have been discussed. In the V₂O₅ doped glass system,(VBS glass system) the sound velocity, density and elastic moduli, steeply increases after 12 mol% comparatively with MnO₂ doped glass system (VBS glass system). The present study critically observes the doping of V₂O₅ with borate enhances the strengthening of network linkage and hardening of the glassy network structure than MnO₂. The IR spectral analysis reveals depolymerization of the borate network and conversion of BO₃ or BO4 units with the formation of non-bridging oxygen. The FTIR spectral studies confirm the presence of various functional groups of the sample. FTIR spectrum of sample exhibits broad absorption bands indicating the wide distribution of borate structural units. The effect of Na₂CO₃, V₂O₅ and MnO₂ contents on the structures of borate glass is evaluated from the FTIR spectra. The topological aspects of the prepared glass samples are exhaustively reported from SEM micrographs

  1. Glass-to-cryogenic-liquid transitions in aqueous solutions suggested by crack healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Tate, Mark W; Gruner, Sol M

    2015-09-22

    Observation of theorized glass-to-liquid transitions between low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) water states had been stymied by rapid crystallization below the homogeneous water nucleation temperature (∼235 K at 0.1 MPa). We report optical and X-ray observations suggestive of glass-to-liquid transitions in these states. Crack healing, indicative of liquid, occurs when LDA ice transforms to cubic ice at 160 K, and when HDA ice transforms to the LDA state at temperatures as low as 120 K. X-ray diffraction study of the HDA to LDA transition clearly shows the characteristics of a first-order transition. Study of the glass-to-liquid transitions in nanoconfined aqueous solutions shows them to be independent of the solute concentrations, suggesting that they represent an intrinsic property of water. These findings support theories that LDA and HDA ice are thermodynamically distinct and that they are continuously connected to two different liquid states of water.

  2. Unusual glass-forming ability induced by changes in the local atomic structure in Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y C; Chang, H J; Kim, D H; Kim, W T; Cha, P R

    2007-01-01

    The effect of partial replacement of Cu by Be in Ti 50 Cu 32 Ni 15 Sn 3 alloy on the thermal properties, structure, and forming ability of an amorphous phase were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 alloy shows enhanced glass-forming ability, enabling one to fabricate a fully amorphous bulk metallic glass sample 2 mm in diameter by injection casting. With the replacement, the supercooled liquid region ΔT x (= T x -T g , where T x is the crystallization temperature and T g is the glass transition temperature) decreased from 73 to 45 K and the reduced glass transition temperature T rg (= T g /T 1 , where T 1 is the liquidus temperature) increased from 0.53 to 0.57. The amorphous Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 phase showed a formation of short-range-ordered clusters 1-2 nm in size, which is attributed to the strong interaction between Ti and Be. The results show that ΔT x can be used as a thermal parameter reflecting the glass-forming ability of the alloy only when the phase formed during crystallization is the same as the phase competing with the glass transition during solidification

  3. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, William H.; Guillen, Donna P.; Klouzek, Jaroslav; Pokorny, Richard; Yano, Tetsuji

    2017-01-01

    The feed composition of a high level nuclear waste (HLW) glass melter affects the overall melting rate by influencing the chemical, thermophysical, and morphological properties of a relatively insulating cold cap layer over the molten phase where the primary feed vitrification reactions occur. Data from X ray computed tomography imaging of melting pellets comprised of a simulated high-aluminum HLW feed heated at a rate of 10°C/min reveal the distribution and morphology of bubbles, collectively known as primary foam, within this layer for various SiO 2 /(Li 2 CO 3 +H 3 BO 3 +Na 2 CO 3 ) mass fractions at temperatures between 600°C and 1040°C. To track melting dynamics, cross-sections obtained through the central profile of the pellet were digitally segmented into primary foam and a condensed phase. Pellet dimensions were extracted using Photoshop CS6 tools while the DREAM.3D software package was used to calculate pellet profile area, average and maximum bubble areas, and two-dimensional void fraction. The measured linear increase in the pellet area expansion rates – and therefore the increase in batch gas evolution rates – with SiO 2 /(Li 2 CO 3 +H 3 BO 3 +Na 2 CO 3 ) mass fraction despite an exponential increase in viscosity of the final waste glass at 1050°C and a lower total amount of gas-evolving species suggest that the retention of primary foam with large average bubble size at higher temperatures results from faster reaction kinetics rather than increased viscosity. However, viscosity does affect the initial foam collapse temperature by supporting the growth of larger bubbles. Because the maximum bubble size is limited by the pellet dimensions, larger scale studies are needed to understand primary foam morphology at high temperatures. This temperature-dependent morphological data can be used in future investigations to synthetically generate cold cap structures for use in models of heat transfer within a HLW glass melter.

  4. Thermal history of Hawaiian pāhoehoe lava crusts at the glass transition: implications for flow rheology and emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Joachim; Harris, Andrew J. L.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2004-12-01

    We have investigated the thermal history of glassy pāhoehoe crusts across their glass transition. Ten different samples obtained between 1993 and 2003 from the active flow field of the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption on Hawaii (USA) have been analysed using relaxation geospeedometry. This method employs differential scanning calorimetry to quantify the enthalpic relaxation of the glass to monitor the natural time-temperature (t-T) path followed by the melt during cooling across its glass transition. Cooling rates across the glass transition interval (at 1000- 900 K) have been found to vary between 8 and 140 K/min. The associated glass transition temperatures are up to 400 K, lower than previously anticipated by others. Melt viscosities at the glass transition for these crusts range from 10 9.4 to 10 10.7 Pa s. We have compared the t-T paths quantified via relaxation geospeedometry with those obtained from direct measurements on the active flow field. The calorimetrically determined cooling rates are consistent with either simple cooling from eruption temperatures to temperatures below the glass transition or more complex cooling paths, including periods of reheating and short-term annealing within the glass transition interval. By quantifying the relaxation times associated with these contrasting cooling histories, we show that secondary vesiculation of pāhoehoe flow crusts may be favoured by complex, nonlinear t-T paths within the glass transition. These constraints also allow us to evaluate the time scales associated with the crystallisation and inflation of flow lobes at the glass transition for different pāhoehoe lava flow types. Our results provide important quantifications of rheological parameters at the lower temperature range of viscoelastic deformation in basaltic lava flows. As such, the results may be helpful in refining models for the generation of continental flood basalt flows, as well as models of basaltic lava flow propagation for hazard

  5. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the glass transition: A generic geometric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutzow, I.; Ilieva, D.; Babalievski, F.; Yamakov, V.

    2000-01-01

    A generic phenomenological theory of the glass transition is developed in the framework of a quasilinear formulation of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Starting from one of the basic principles of this science in its approximate form given by de Donder's equation, after a change of variables the temperature dependence of the structural parameter ξ(T), the thermodynamic potentials ΔG(tilde sign)(T), the thermodynamic functions and the time of molecular relaxation τ of vitrifying systems is constructed. In doing so, a new effect in the ΔG(tilde sign)(T) course is observed. The analysis of the higher derivatives of the thermodynamic potential, and especially the nullification of the second derivative of the configurational specific heats ΔC(tilde sign) p (T) of the vitrifying liquid defines glass transition temperature T(tilde sign) g and leads directly to the basic dependence of glass transition kinetics: the Frenkel-Kobeko-Reiner equation. The conditions guaranteeing the fulfillment of this equation specify the temperature dependence of the activation energy U(T,ξ(tilde sign)) for viscous flow and give a natural differentiation of glass formers into fragile and strong liquids. The effect of thermal prehistory on the temperature dependence of both thermodynamic functions and kinetic coefficients is established by an appropriate separation of de Donder's equation. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  6. Origin of photo-induced transmitting oscillations in chalcogenide glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, HaiZheng; Yang, ZhiYong; Lucas, Pierre

    2009-09-28

    Light-induced oscillatory behaviors of transmission in chalcogenide glasses are investigated using a continuous wave tunable Ti-sapphire laser. It is shown that phase change, thermal fluctuation, nonlinear index change and periodic self focusing are not at the origin of light-induced oscillatory transmittance in chalcogenide glasses. Instead, results indicate that the interference of transmitting and reflecting light is at the origin of the oscillatory behaviors of transmitted light. Just like the principle of Fabry-Pérot interferometer, these interferences result in a periodic change in transmission as the related interferential beams get in and out of phase. However, this transmitting oscillatory behavior can be registered by the detector only when the change of optical path length difference initiated by photo-induced effects is slower enough compared with the corresponding response time of the detector. Several photo-structural effects contribute to that phenomenon including photo-expansion, photo-darkening, and permanent self focusing. It appears that fluctuations of the light source intensity induce a wide distribution of the oscillatory periods.

  7. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then β irradiated at different doses up to 10 9 Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe 3+ reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe 3+ amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h 0 /e-) consuming equilibrium. He + and Kr 3+ ions and γ irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  8. Electronic and ionic conductivity studies on microwave synthesized glasses containing transition metal ions

    OpenAIRE

    Basareddy Sujatha; Ramarao Viswanatha; Hanumathappa Nagabushana; Chinnappa Narayana Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Glasses in the system xV2O5·20Li2O·(80 − x) [0.6B2O3:0.4ZnO] (where 10 ≤ x ≤ 50) have been prepared by a simple microwave method. Microwave synthesis of materials offers advantages of efficient transformation of energy throughout the volume in an effectively short time. Conductivity in these glasses was controlled by the concentration of transition metal ion (TMI). The dc conductivity follows Arrhenius law and the activation energies determined by regression analysis varies with the content o...

  9. Peculiar thermal points during B2O3 transition from liquid to glass-like state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Lomovskoj, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation transitions in glass-like B 2 O 3 were studied by dynamic methods in vacuum in the temperature range of 70-1070 K and frequency range of 10 -4 -1.2·10 6 Hz. The standard temperature of glass formation is T g =493 K and it corresponds to the standard frequency 5.3·10 -4 Hz. Above T g two special temperature points - T K and T F , position of which does not depend on the frequency, are observed

  10. Deuteron NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) in relation to the glass transition in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, E.; Sillescu, H.; Spiess, H. W.; Wallwitz, R.

    1983-01-01

    H-2NMR is introduced as a tool for investigating slow molecular motion in the glass transition region of amorphous polymers. In particular, we compare H-2 spin alignment echo spectra of chain deuterated polystyrene with model calculations for restricted rotational Brownian motion. Molecular motion in the polyztyrene-toluene system has been investigated by analyzing H-2NMR of partially deuterated polystyrene and toluene, respectively. The diluent mobility in the mixed glass has been decomposed into solid and liquid components where the respective average correlation times differ by more than 5 decades.

  11. Spin glass phase transitions in the random feedback vertex set problem

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Ying; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A feedback vertex set (FVS) of an undirected graph contains vertices from every cycle of this graph. Constructing a FVS of sufficiently small cardinality is very difficult in the worst cases, but for random graphs this problem can be efficiently solved after converting it into an appropriate spin glass model [H.-J. Zhou, Eur. Phys. J. B 86 (2013) 455]. In the present work we study the local stability and the phase transition properties of this spin glass model on random graphs. For both regul...

  12. Connection between slow and fast dynamics of molecular liquids around the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Kristine; Dalle-Ferrier, Cecile; Frick, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The mean-square displacement (MSD) was measured by neutron scattering at various temperatures and pressures for a number of molecular glass-forming liquids. The MSD is invariant along the glass-transition line at the pressure studied, thus establishing an “intrinsic” Lindemann criterion for any...... given liquid. A one-to-one connection between the MSD’s temperature dependence and the liquid’s fragility is found when the MSD is evaluated on a time scale of ∼4 ns, but does not hold when the MSD is evaluated at shorter times. The findings are discussed in terms of the elastic model and the role...

  13. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition

  14. Glass transition temperature of dried lens tissue pretreated with trehalose, maltose, or cyclic tetrasaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Tetsuhiro; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Glass transition temperature is a main indicator for amorphous polymers and biological macromolecules as materials, and would be a key for understanding the role of trehalose in protecting proteins and cells against desiccation. In this study, we measured the glass transition temperature by differential scanning calorimetry of dried lens tissues as a model of a whole biological tissue to know the effect of pretreatment by trehalose and other sugars. Isolated porcine lenses were incubated with saline, 100 or 1000 mM concentration of trehalose, maltose, or cyclic tetrasaccharide dissolved in saline at room temperature for 150 minutes. The solutions were removed and all samples were dried at room temperature in a desiccator until no weight change. The dried tissues were ground into powder and placed in a measuring pan for differential scanning calorimetry. The glass transition temperature of the dried lens tissues, as a mean and standard deviation, was 63.0 ± 6.4°C (n = 3) with saline pretreatment; 53.0 ± 0.8°C and 56.3 ± 2.7°C (n = 3), respectively, with 100 and 1000 mM trehalose pretreatment; 56.0 ± 1.6°C and 55.8 ± 1.1°C (n = 3), respectively, with 100 and 1000 mM maltose pretreatment; 60.0 ± 8.8°C and 59.2 ± 6.3°C (n = 3), respectively, with 100 and 1000 mM cyclic tetrasaccharide pretreatment. The glass transition temperature appeared lower, although not significantly, with trehalose and maltose pretreatments than with saline and cyclic tetrasaccharide pretreatments (P > 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test). The glass transition temperature of the dried lens tissues with trehalose pretreatment appeared more noticeable on the thermogram, compared with other pretreatments. The glass transition temperature was measured for the first time in the dried lens tissues as an example of a whole biological tissue and might provide a basis for tissue preservation in the dried condition.

  15. A FeNiMnC alloy with strain glass transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and theoretical investigations suggested that doping sufficient point defects into a normal ferroelastic/martensitic alloy systems could lead to a frozen disordered state of local lattice strains (nanomartensite domains, thereby suppressing the long-range strain-ordering martensitic transition. In this study, we attempt to explore the possibility of developing novel ferrous Elinvar alloys by replacing nickel with carbon and manganese as dopant species. A nominal Fe89Ni5Mn4.6C1.4 alloy was prepared by argon arc melting, and XRD, DSC, DMA and TEM techniques were employed to characterize the strain glass transition signatures, such as invariance in average structure, frequency dispersion in dynamic mechanical properties (storage modulus and internal friction and the formation of nanosized strain domains. It is indicated that doping of Ni, Mn and C suppresses γ→α long-range strain-ordering martensitic transformation in Fe89Ni5Mn4.6C1.4 alloy, generating randomly distributed nanosized domains by strain glass transition. Keywords: Strain glass transition, Elinvar alloys, Point defects, Nanosized domains

  16. Dimensional study of the caging order parameter at the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Ikeda, Atsushi; Parisi, Giorgio; Zamponi, Francesco

    2012-08-28

    The glass problem is notoriously hard and controversial. Even at the mean-field level, little is agreed upon regarding why a fluid becomes sluggish while exhibiting but unremarkable structural changes. It is clear, however, that the process involves self-caging, which provides an order parameter for the transition. It is also broadly assumed that this cage should have a gaussian shape in the mean-field limit. Here we show that this ansatz does not hold. By performing simulations as a function of spatial dimension d, we find the cage to keep a nontrivial form. Quantitative mean-field descriptions of the glass transition, such as mode-coupling theory, density functional theory, and replica theory, all miss this crucial element. Although the mean-field random first-order transition scenario of the glass transition is qualitatively supported here and non-mean-field corrections are found to remain small on decreasing d, reconsideration of its implementation is needed for it to result in a coherent description of experimental observations.

  17. Stress-induced birefringence control in femtosecond laser glass welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstalter, M.; Chabrol, G.; Bahouka, A.; Serreau, L.; Heitz, J.-L.; Taupier, G.; Dorkenoo, K.-D.; Rehspringer, J.-L.; Lecler, S.

    2017-11-01

    Glass welding by femtosecond laser pulses causes microscopic structural modifications, affecting the refractive index due to residual stress. Locally induced birefringence is studied by photoelasticimetry using a polarized light microscope. The study is performed on borosilicate thin glass plates using an industrial femtosecond laser generating 300 fs pulses at 500 kHz, with a 100 mm focusing length F-theta lens allowing fast welding. For low-energy deposition, the principal birefringence axes are determined to be homogenous along the seam and perpendicular and parallel to the laser scanning direction. Tensile stress is induced in the laser scanning direction by the welding seams. The induced birefringence is determined to be equivalent for in-volume irradiated track and welding seams. An inhomogeneity of the birefringence within the seam is observed for the first time at high-energy deposition. The distribution of the birefringence can be controlled with the laser scanning patterns. The amount of residual stress is measured by compensating the local birefringence. The birefringence Δ n is estimated at 2.4 × 10^{-4}, corresponding to a residual stress amount around 59 MPa. The influence of the welding geometry is also illustrated.

  18. Structural influence of mixed transition metal ions on lithium bismuth borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Arti; Dahiya, Manjeet S.; Hooda, A.; Chand, Prem; Khasa, S.

    2017-08-01

    Lithium bismuth borate glasses containing mixed transition metals having composition 7CoO·23Li2O·20Bi2O3·50B2O3 (CLBB), 7V2O5·23Li2O·20Bi2O3·50B2O3 (VLBB) and x(2CoO·V2O5)·(30 - x)Li2O·20Bi2O3·50B2O3 (x = 0.0 (LBB) and x = 2.0, 5.0, 7.0, 10.0 mol% (CVLBB1-4)) are synthesized via melt quench route. The synthesized compositions are investigated for their physical properties using density (D) and molar volume (Vm), thermal properties by analyzing DSC/TG thermo-graphs, structural properties using IR absorption spectra in the mid-IR range and optical properties using UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of vanadyl and cobalt ion have been analyzed to study compositional effects on spin-Hamiltonian parameters. The non linear variations in physical properties depict a strong structural influence of Co/V- oxides on the glassy matrix. The compositional variations in characteristic temperatures (glass transition temperature Tg, glass crystallization temperature Tp and glass melting temperature Tm) reveals that Tg for glass samples CLBB is relatively less than that of pure lithium bismuth borate (LBB) glass sample wherein Tg for sample VLBB is higher than that of LBB. The increase in Tg (as compared with LBB) with an enhanced substitution of mixed transition metal oxides (2CoO·V2O5) shows a progressive structure modification of bismuth borate matrix. These predictions are very well corroborated by corresponding compositional trends of Tp and Tm. FTIR studies reveal that Co2+& VO2+ ions lead to structural rearrangements through the conversion of three-coordinated boron into four coordinated boron and thereby reducing number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. Bismuth is found to exist in [BiO6] octahedral units only, whereas boroxol rings are not present in the glass network. The theoretical values of optical basicity (Λth) and corresponding oxide ion polarizability (αo2-) have also been calculated to investigate oxygen covalency of

  19. Pressure effect of glass transition temperature in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Roseker, W.; Sikorski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition...... was detected from the change of the slope of peak position as a function of temperature. It is found that the glass transition temperature increases with pressure by 4.4 K/GPa for the Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass, and the supercooled liquid range decreases with pressure by 2.9 K/GPa in a pressure...... range of 0-2.2 GPa. This method opens a possibility to study the pressure effect of glass transition process in glassy systems under high pressures (>1 GPa). (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  20. Formation of bulk metallic glasses in the Fe-M-Y-B (M = transition metal) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X.M. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chang, C.T. [Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Chang, Z.Y.; Wang, X.D.; Cao, Q.P. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Shen, B.L.; Inoue, A. [Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Jiang, J.Z. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    In this work, quaternary Fe{sub 72-x}M{sub x}Y{sub 6}B{sub 22} (M = Ni, Co and Mo) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been developed. It is found that a fully amorphous Fe{sub 68}Mo{sub 4}Y{sub 6}B{sub 22} cylindrical rod with 6.5 mm in diameter can be prepared by copper mold injection. These alloys have a high glass transition temperature of about 900 K with high fracture strengths up to about 3 GPa although they are still brittle. Magnetic measurements reveal that they are ferromagnetic at ambient temperature with low coercive force of about 2 A/m, saturation magnetization of about 0.7 T and effective permeability of about 7000 at 100 kHz. The newly developed Fe-based quaternary alloys exhibit excellent combination properties: superior glass forming ability (GFA), high glass transition temperature, and soft magnetic properties, which could have potential applications in electronic industries. Furthermore, the effect of Mo addition on GFA in the Fe-Y-B BMG system has been discussed compared with those of Ni and Co additions.

  1. Understanding ductile-to-brittle transition of metallic glasses from shear transformation zone dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Q. Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model that takes into account the free-volume aided cooperative shearing of shear transformation zones (STZs is developed to quantitatively understand the ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT of metallic glasses. The STZ dilatational strain is defined as the ratio of STZ-activated free volume to STZ volume itself. The model demonstrates that the STZ dilatational strain will increase drastically and exceed the characteristic shear strain of STZ as temperature decreases below a critical value. This critical temperature is in good agreement with the experimentally measured DBT temperature. Our results suggest that the DBT of metallic glasses is underpinned by the transition of atomic-cluster motions from STZ-type rearrangements to dilatational processes (termed tension transformation zones (TTZs.

  2. Glass transition in the spin-density wave phase of (TMTSF)2PF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasjaunias, J.C.; Biljakovic, K.; Nad, F.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of low frequency dielectric measurements and a detailed kinetic investigation of the specific heat anomaly in the spin-density wave phase of (TMTSF)(2)PF6 in the temperature range between 2 and 4 K. The dielectric relaxation shows a critical slowing down towards a ''static'......'' glass transition around 2 K. The jump in the specific heat in different controlled kinetic conditions shows all the characteristics of freezing in supercooled liquids. Both effects give direct evidence of a glass transition in the spin-density wave ground state.......We present the results of low frequency dielectric measurements and a detailed kinetic investigation of the specific heat anomaly in the spin-density wave phase of (TMTSF)(2)PF6 in the temperature range between 2 and 4 K. The dielectric relaxation shows a critical slowing down towards a ''static...

  3. Spin-glass-like transition in the majority-vote model with anticonformists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, Andrzej

    2018-03-01

    Majority-vote model on scale-free networks and random graphs is investigated in which a randomly chosen fraction p of agents (called anticonformists) follows an antiferromagnetic update rule, i.e., they assume, with probability governed by a parameter q (0 transition from a disordered (paramagnetic) state to a spin-glass-like state, characterized by a non-zero value of the spin-glass order parameter measuring the overlap of agents' opinions in two replicas of the system, and simultaneously by the magnetization close to zero. In the case of the model on scale-free networks the critical value of the parameter q weakly depends on the details of the degree distribution. As p is decreased, the critical value of q falls quickly to zero and only the disordered phase is observed. On the other hand, for p close to zero for decreasing q the usual ferromagnetic transition is observed.

  4. Isoviscosity lines and the liquid-glass transition in simple liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Brazhkin, V V; Ryzhov, V N

    2012-07-01

    This article presents the study of the generic behavior of viscosity of liquids based on some simple theoretical models, the soft-spheres and Lennard-Jones systems. The use of these simple models allows us to investigate in detail the viscosity behavior in a wide range of temperatures and pressures including the high-temperature-high-pressure limits. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the shape of isoviscosity lines and analyze the glass transition at high temperatures and high pressures. Despite the fact that the viscosity drastically increases in the limit of high temperatures and high pressures along the melting line, the relaxation time rapidly decreases in this region, and the system becomes further from the glass transition.

  5. Electronic and ionic conductivity studies on microwave synthesized glasses containing transition metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basareddy Sujatha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glasses in the system xV2O5·20Li2O·(80 − x [0.6B2O3:0.4ZnO] (where 10 ≤ x ≤ 50 have been prepared by a simple microwave method. Microwave synthesis of materials offers advantages of efficient transformation of energy throughout the volume in an effectively short time. Conductivity in these glasses was controlled by the concentration of transition metal ion (TMI. The dc conductivity follows Arrhenius law and the activation energies determined by regression analysis varies with the content of V2O5 in a non-linear passion. This non-linearity is due to different conduction mechanisms operating in the investigated glasses. Impedance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopic studies were performed to elucidate the nature of conduction mechanism. Cole–cole plots of the investigated glasses consist of (i single semicircle with a low frequency spur, (ii two depressed semicircles and (iii single semicircle without spur, which suggests the operation of two conduction mechanisms. EPR spectra reveal the existence of electronic conduction between aliovalent vanadium sites. Further, in highly modified (10V2O5 mol% glasses Li+ ion migration dominates.

  6. Effect of alkali content on AC conductivity of borate glasses containing two transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashif, I.; Rahman, Samy A.; Soliman, A.A.; Ibrahim, E.M.; Abdel-Khalek, E.K.; Mostafa, A.G.; Sanad, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium borate glasses containing iron and molybdenum ions with the total concentration of transition ions constant and gradual substitution of sodium oxide (network modifier) by borate oxide (network former) was prepared. Densities, molar volume, DC and AC conductivities are measured. The trends of these properties are attributed to changes in the glass network structure. Their DC and AC conductivity increased with increasing NaO concentration. The increase of AC conductivity of sodium borate glasses is attributed to the chemical composition and the hopping mechanism of conduction. Measurements of the dielectric constant (ε) and dielectric loss (tan δ) as a function of frequency (50 Hz-100 kHz) and temperature (RT-600 K) indicate that the increase in dielectric constant and loss (ε and tan δ) values with increasing sodium ion content could be attributed to the assumption that Fe and Mo ions tend to assume network-forming position in the glass compositions studied. The variation of the value of frequency exponent s for all glass samples as the function of temperature at a definite frequency indicates that the value of s decreases with increasing the temperature which agrees with the correlated barrier-hopping (CBH) model.

  7. Spin glass transition in a thin-film NiO/permalloy bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tianyu; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2018-02-01

    We experimentally study magnetization aging in a thin-film NiO/permalloy bilayer. Aging characteristics are nearly independent of temperature below the exchange bias blocking temperature TB, but rapidly vary above it. The dependence on the magnetic history qualitatively changes across TB. The observed behaviors are consistent with the spin glass transition at TB, with significant implications for magnetism and magnetoelectronic phenomena in antiferromagnet/ferromagnet bilayers.

  8. DWPF glass transition temperatures - What they are and why they are important

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, S.L.; Applewhite-Ramsey, A.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the DWPF canistered waste form which must be met in order to assure compatibility with, and acceptance by, the first geologic repository. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to report glass transition temperatures for the projected range of compositions. This information will be used by the repository to establish waste package design limits

  9. Self-bonding in an amorphous polymer below the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiko, Yuri M.; Bach, Anders; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    was found to develop with (th)1/2 at Th = Tg-bulk - 33 °C (where Tg-bulk is the glass-transition temperature of the bulk sample), and log G was found to develop with 1/Th at Tg-bulk - 43 °C Th Tg-bulk - 23 °C. The smallest measured value of G = 1.4 J/m2 was at least one order of magnitude larger than...

  10. Hard sphere-like glass transition in eye lens α-crystallin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, Giuseppe; Savin, Gabriela; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Thurston, George M; Stradner, Anna; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2014-11-25

    We study the equilibrium liquid structure and dynamics of dilute and concentrated bovine eye lens α-crystallin solutions, using small-angle X-ray scattering, static and dynamic light scattering, viscometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and mode-coupling theory. We find that a polydisperse Percus-Yevick hard-sphere liquid-structure model accurately reproduces both static light scattering data and small-angle X-ray scattering liquid structure data from α-crystallin solutions over an extended range of protein concentrations up to 290 mg/mL or 49% vol fraction and up to ca. 330 mg/mL for static light scattering. The measured dynamic light scattering and viscosity properties are also consistent with those of hard-sphere colloids and show power laws characteristic of an approach toward a glass transition at α-crystallin volume fractions near 58%. Dynamic light scattering at a volume fraction beyond the glass transition indicates formation of an arrested state. We further perform event-driven molecular dynamics simulations of polydisperse hard-sphere systems and use mode-coupling theory to compare the measured dynamic power laws with those of hard-sphere models. The static and dynamic data, simulations, and analysis show that aqueous eye lens α-crystallin solutions exhibit a glass transition at high concentrations that is similar to those found in hard-sphere colloidal systems. The α-crystallin glass transition could have implications for the molecular basis of presbyopia and the kinetics of molecular change during cataractogenesis.

  11. Dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics associated with the glass transition of amorphous trehalose-water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lindong; Elliott, Gloria D

    2014-06-21

    The glass transition temperature Tg of biopreservative formulations is important for predicting the long-term storage of biological specimens. As a complementary tool to thermal analysis techniques, which are the mainstay for determining Tg, molecular dynamics simulations have been successfully applied to predict the Tg of several protectants and their mixtures with water. These molecular analyses, however, rarely focused on the glass transition behavior of aqueous trehalose solutions, a subject that has attracted wide scientific attention via experimental approaches. Important behavior, such as hydrogen-bonding dynamics and self-aggregation has yet to be explored in detail, particularly below, or in the vicinity of, Tg. Using molecular dynamics simulations of several dynamic and thermodynamic properties, this study reproduced the supplemented phase diagram of trehalose-water mixtures (i.e., Tg as a function of the solution composition) based on experimental data. The structure and dynamics of the hydrogen-bonding network in the trehalose-water systems were also analyzed. The hydrogen-bonding lifetime was determined to be an order of magnitude higher in the glassy state than in the liquid state, while the constitution of the hydrogen-bonding network exhibited no noticeable change through the glass transition. It was also found that trehalose molecules preferred to form small, scattered clusters above Tg, but self-aggregation was substantially increased below Tg. The average cluster size in the glassy state was observed to be dependent on the trehalose concentration. Our findings provided insights into the glass transition characteristics of aqueous trehalose solutions as they relate to biopreservation.

  12. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  13. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    composed of VO5 pyramids. The vanadates-based glasses show semiconducting ..... the composition 1 mol% of CeO2. The AC conductivity obeys a power law. The glass samples exhibit typical inor- ganic semiconducting behaviour. The activation energy and conductivity at room temperature were found to be 0.09 eV ...

  14. Liquid -to-glass transition in bulk glass-forming Cu55-xZr45Agx alloys using molecular dynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celtek M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results from molecular dynamics (MD studies concerning the microscopic structure of the ternary, bulk metallic glass-forming Cu55-x Zr45Agx (x=0,10,20 alloys using tight-binding potentials. Understanding of the nature of Glass Forming Ability (GFA of studied alloys, GFA parameters, glass transition temperature (T-g, melting temperature (T-m, reduced glass transition temperature (T-g/T-m, the supercooled liquid region and other parameters were simulated and compared with experiments. The computed pair distribution functions reproduce well experimental x-ray data of Inoue and co-workers. Structure analysis of the Cu-Zr-Ag alloy based on MD simulation will be also presented

  15. Transition-metal ions in Nd-doped glasses: spectra and effects on Nd fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Krashkevich, D.

    1985-01-01

    We have measured transition-metal ion (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) spectra and their effects on Nd fluorescence quenching in Nd-doped phosphate and silicate glasses. Our purpose was to determine the maximum allowable impurity content given particular limits on the absorption loss at 1053 nm and the Nd fluorescence quenching rate. To keep the absorption loss -1 the transition-metal impurity content should be kept below 0.5 ppMw. To keep the increase in the Nd fluorescence decay rate below 1%, the impurity content should be 20 cm -3

  16. Ellipsometry measurements of glass transition breadth in bulk films of random, block, and gradient copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, M M; Kim, J; Marrou, S R; Torkelson, J M

    2010-03-01

    Bulk films of random, block and gradient copolymer systems were studied using ellipsometry to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical differentiation technique pioneered by Kawana and Jones for studying the glass transition temperature (T (g)) behavior and thermal expansivities of copolymers possessing different architectures and different levels of nanoheterogeneity. In a series of styrene/n -butyl methacrylate (S/nBMA) random copolymers, T (g) breadths were observed to increase from approximately 17( degrees ) C in styrene-rich cases to almost 30( degrees ) C in nBMA-rich cases, reflecting previous observations of significant nanoheterogeneity in PnBMA homopolymers. The derivative technique also revealed for the first time a substantial increase in glassy-state expansivity with increasing nBMA content in S/nBMA random copolymers, from 1.4x10(-4) K-1 in PS to 3.5x10(-4) K-1 in PnBMA. The first characterization of block copolymer T (g) 's and T (g) breadths by ellipsometry is given, examining the impact of nanophase-segregated copolymer structure on ellipsometric measurements of glass transition. The results show that, while the technique is effective in detecting the two T (g) 's expected in certain block copolymer systems, the details of the glass transition can become suppressed in ellipsometry measurements of a rubbery minor phase under conditions where the matrix is glassy; meanwhile, both transitions are easily discernible by differential scanning calorimetry. Finally, broad glass transition regions were measured in gradient copolymers, yielding in some cases extraordinary T (g) breadths of 69- 71( degrees ) C , factors of 4-5 larger than the T (g) breadths of related homopolymers and random copolymers. Surprisingly, one gradient copolymer demonstrated a slightly narrower T (g) breadth than the S/nBMA random copolymers with the highest nBMA content. This highlights the fact that nanoheterogeneity relevant to the glass transition response in selected

  17. Transition to Glass: Pilot Training for High-Technology Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Chute, Rebecca D.; Moses, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This report examines the activities of a major commercial air carrier between 1993 and late 1996 as it acquired an advanced fleet of high-technology aircraft (Boeing 757). Previously, the airline's fleet consisted of traditional (non-glass) aircraft, and this report examines the transition from a traditional fleet to a glass one. A total of 150 pilots who were entering the B-757 transition training volunteered for the study, which consisted of three query phases: (1) first day of transition training, (2) 3 to 4 months after transition training, and (3) 12 to 14 months after initial operating experience. Of these initial 150 pilots, 99 completed all three phases of the study, with each phase consisting of probes on attitudes and experiences associated with their training and eventual transition to flying the line. In addition to the three questionnaires, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Although the primary focus of this study was on the flight training program, additional factors such as technical support, documentation, and training aids were investigated as well. The findings generally indicate that the pilot volunteers were highly motivated and very enthusiastic about their training program. In addition, the group had low levels of apprehension toward automation and expressed a high degree of satisfaction toward their training. However, there were some concerns expressed regarding the deficiencies in some of the training aids and lack of a free-play flight management system training device.

  18. Characterization of the glass transition of water predicted by molecular dynamics simulations using nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreck, Cara A; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2014-02-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations allow detailed study of the experimentally inaccessible liquid state of supercooled water below its homogeneous nucleation temperature and the characterization of the glass transition. Simple, nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials are commonly used in classical molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous systems due to their lower computational cost and their ability to reproduce a wide range of properties. Because the quality of these predictions varies between the potentials, the predicted glass transition of water is likely to be influenced by the choice of potential. We have thus conducted an extensive comparative investigation of various three-, four-, five-, and six-point water potentials in both the NPT and NVT ensembles. The T(g) predicted from NPT simulations is strongly correlated with the temperature of minimum density, whereas the maximum in the heat capacity plot corresponds to the minimum in the thermal expansion coefficient. In the NVT ensemble, these points are instead related to the maximum in the internal pressure and the minimum of its derivative, respectively. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen-bonding properties at the glass transition reveals that the extent of hydrogen-bonds lost upon the melting of the glassy state is related to the height of the heat capacity peak and varies between water potentials.

  19. First Clear-Cut Experimental Evidence of a Glass Transition in a Polymer with Intrinsic Microporosity: PIM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huajie; Chua, Yeong Zen; Yang, Bin; Schick, Christoph; Harrison, Wayne J; Budd, Peter M; Böhning, Martin; Schönhals, Andreas

    2018-04-19

    Polymers with intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) represent a novel, innovative class of materials with great potential in various applications from high-performance gas-separation membranes to electronic devices. Here, for the first time, for PIM-1, as the archetypal PIM, fast scanning calorimetry provides definitive evidence of a glass transition ( T g = 715 K, heating rate 3 × 10 4 K/s) by decoupling the time scales responsible for glass transition and decomposition. Because the rigid molecular structure of PIM-1 prevents any conformational changes, small-scale bend and flex fluctuations must be considered the origin of its glass transition. This result has strong implications for the fundamental understanding of the glass transition and for the physical aging of PIMs and other complex polymers, both topical problems of materials science.

  20. The peculiar behavior of the glass transition temperature of amorphous drug-polymer films coated on inert sugar spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Van Den Mooter, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Fluid bed coating has been proposed in the past as an alternative technology for manufacturing of drug-polymer amorphous solid dispersions, or so-called glass solutions. It has the advantage of being a one-step process, and thus omitting separate drying steps, addition of excipients, or manipulation of the dosage form. In search of an adequate sample preparation method for modulated differential scanning calorimetry analysis of beads coated with glass solutions, glass transition broadening and decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg ) were observed with increasing particle size of crushed coated beads and crushed isolated films of indomethacin (INDO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Substituting INDO with naproxen gave comparable results. When ketoconazole was probed or the solvent in INDO-PVP films was switched to dichloromethane (DCM) or a methanol-DCM mixture, two distinct Tg regions were observed. Small particle sizes had a glass transition in the high Tg region, and large particle sizes had a glass transition in the low Tg region. This particle size-dependent glass transition was ascribed to different residual solvent amounts in the bulk and at the surface of the particles. A correlation was observed between the deviation of the Tg from that calculated from the Gordon-Taylor equation and the amount of residual solvent at the Tg of particles with different sizes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Computational modelling of large deformations in layered-silicate/PET nanocomposites near the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figiel, Łukasz; Dunne, Fionn P. E.; Buckley, C. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Layered-silicate nanoparticles offer a cost-effective reinforcement for thermoplastics. Computational modelling has been employed to study large deformations in layered-silicate/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites near the glass transition, as would be experienced during industrial forming processes such as thermoforming or injection stretch blow moulding. Non-linear numerical modelling was applied, to predict the macroscopic large deformation behaviour, with morphology evolution and deformation occurring at the microscopic level, using the representative volume element (RVE) approach. A physically based elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model, describing the behaviour of the PET matrix within the RVE, was numerically implemented into a finite element solver (ABAQUS) using an UMAT subroutine. The implementation was designed to be robust, for accommodating large rotations and stretches of the matrix local to, and between, the nanoparticles. The nanocomposite morphology was reconstructed at the RVE level using a Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that placed straight, high-aspect ratio particles according to the specified orientation and volume fraction, with the assumption of periodicity. Computational experiments using this methodology enabled prediction of the strain-stiffening behaviour of the nanocomposite, observed experimentally, as functions of strain, strain rate, temperature and particle volume fraction. These results revealed the probable origins of the enhanced strain stiffening observed: (a) evolution of the morphology (through particle re-orientation) and (b) early onset of stress-induced pre-crystallization (and hence lock-up of viscous flow), triggered by the presence of particles. The computational model enabled prediction of the effects of process parameters (strain rate, temperature) on evolution of the morphology, and hence on the end-use properties.

  2. Multicolor emission based on amorphous-to-crystalline phase transitions in nanostructured Mn-doped glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Terakado, Nobuaki; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2017-12-01

    We fabricated glass-ceramics composed of emissive nanocrystals that show variation in photoluminescence coloration. The change in emission color is based on the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in a Mn-containing zincogermanate glass. The transformation occurred at a 50 °C temperature range (538–588 °C), resulting in a change in photoluminescence color from orange to white to green. The color change is attributed to the co-crystallization of emissive nanophases and a change in the coordination state of Mn2+. Using laser-induced crystallization, we also achieved the space-selective arrangement of the different photoluminescence colors, indicating that photoluminescence coloration can be tuned in this Mn-doped glass.

  3. Thermal lens and interferometric method for glass transition and thermo physical properties measurements in Nd2O3 doped sodium zincborate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, N G C; Steimacher, A; Rohling, J H; Medina, A N; Bento, A C; Baesso, M L; Jacinto, C; Catunda, T; Lima, S M; Karthikeyan, B

    2008-12-22

    In this work the time resolved thermal lens method is combined with interferometric technique, the thermal relaxation calorimetry, photoluminescence and lifetime measurements to determine the thermo physical properties of Nd(2)O(3) doped sodium zincborate glass as a function of temperature up to the glass transition region. Thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, fluorescence quantum efficiency, linear thermal expansion coefficient and thermal coefficient of electronic polarizability were determined. In conclusion, the results showed the ability of thermal lens and interferometric methods to perform measurements very close to the phase transition region. These techniques provide absolute values for the measured physical quantities and are advantageous when low scan rates are required.

  4. Strain glass transition in a multifunctional β-type Ti alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Jinghui; Wu, Haijun; Yang, Sen; Ding, Xiangdong; Wang, Dong; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi; Song, Xiaoping; Gao, Jianrong

    2014-02-01

    Recently, a class of multifunctional Ti alloys called GUM metals attracts tremendous attentions for their superior mechanical behaviors (high strength, high ductility and superelasticity) and novel physical properties (Invar effect, Elinvar effect and low modulus). The Invar and Elinvar effects are known to originate from structural or magnetic transitions, but none of these transitions were found in the GUM metals. This challenges our fundamental understanding of their physical properties. In this study, we show that the typical GUM metal Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-1.2O (at%) alloy undergoes a strain glass transition, where martensitic nano-domains are frozen gradually over a broad temperature range by random point defects. These nano-domains develop strong texture after cold rolling, which causes the lattice elongation in the rolling direction associated with the transition upon cooling and leads to its Invar effect. Moreover, its Elinvar effect and low modulus can also be explained by the nano-domain structure of strain glass.

  5. Dynamical transition in molecular glasses and proteins observed by spin relaxation of nitroxide spin probes and labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golysheva, Elena A.; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu.; Dzuba, Sergei A.

    2017-08-01

    In glassy substances and biological media, dynamical transitions are observed in neutron scattering that manifests itself as deviations of the translational mean-squared displacement, , of hydrogen atoms from harmonic dynamics. In biological media, the deviation occurs at two temperature intervals, at ˜100-150 K and at ˜170-230 K, and it is attributed to the motion of methyl groups in the former case and to the transition from harmonic to anharmonic or diffusive motions in the latter case. In this work, electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy—a pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance—is applied to study the spin relaxation of nitroxide spin probes and labels introduced in molecular glass former o-terphenyl and in protein lysozyme. The anisotropic contribution to the rate of the two-pulse ESE decay, ΔW, is induced by spin relaxation appearing because of restricted orientational stochastic molecular motion; it is proportional to τc, where is the mean-squared angle of reorientation of the nitroxide molecule around the equilibrium position and τc is the correlation time of reorientation. The ESE time window allows us to study motions with τc τc temperature dependence shows a transition near 240 K, which is in agreement with the literature data on . For spin probes of essentially different size, the obtained data were found to be close, which evidences that motion is cooperative, involving a nanocluster of several neighboring molecules. For the dry lysozyme, the τc values below 260 K were found to linearly depend on the temperature in the same way as it was observed in neutron scattering for . As spin relaxation is influenced only by stochastic motion, the harmonic motions seen in ESE must be overdamped. In the hydrated lysozyme, ESE data show transitions near 130 K for all nitroxides, near 160 K for the probe located in the hydration layer, and near 180 K for the label in the protein interior. For this system, the two latter transitions are not

  6. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  7. Impact of Maxwell rigidity transitions on resistance drift phenomena in GexTe1-x glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckas, J.; Olk, A.; Jost, P.; Volker, H.; Alvarez, J.; Jaffré, A.; Zalden, P.; Piarristeguy, A.; Pradel, A.; Longeaud, C.; Wuttig, M.

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous chalcogenides usually exhibit a resistivity, which increases with age following a power law ρ ˜ tα. Existing theories link this change in amorphous state resistivity to structural relaxation. Here, the impact of fundamental glass properties on resistance drift phenomena in amorphous GexTe1-x networks is studied. Employing Raman spectroscopy, the Maxwell rigidity transition from flexible to stressed rigid is determined to occur in the compositional range 0.250 0.265) exhibit rather strong resistance drift, where the drift parameters increase steadily from α = 0.13 for amorphous GeTe to α = 0.29 for compositions near the stiffness threshold xc. On the other hand, the drift parameter in flexible glasses (x decreases with decreasing Ge content x to values as low as α = 0.05. These findings illustrate the strong impact of the stiffness threshold on resistance drift phenomena in chalcogenides.

  8. Experimental signatures of a nonequilibrium phase transition governing the yielding of a soft glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hima Nagamanasa, K; Gokhale, Shreyas; Sood, A K; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2014-06-01

    We present direct experimental signatures of a nonequilibrium phase transition associated with the yield point of a prototypical soft solid-a binary colloidal glass. By simultaneously quantifying single-particle dynamics and bulk mechanical response, we identified the threshold for the onset of irreversibility with the yield strain. We extracted the relaxation time from the transient behavior of the loss modulus and found that it diverges in the vicinity of the yield strain. This critical slowing down is accompanied by a growing correlation length associated with the size of regions of high Debye-Waller factor, which are precursors to yield events in glasses. Our results affirm that the paradigm of nonequilibrium critical phenomena is instrumental in achieving a holistic understanding of yielding in soft solids.

  9. Emergence of Long-Ranged Stress Correlations at the Liquid to Glass Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Manuel; Zippelius, Annette; Fuchs, Matthias

    2017-12-01

    A theory for the nonlocal shear stress correlations in supercooled liquids is derived from first principles. It captures the crossover from viscous to elastic dynamics at an idealized liquid to glass transition and explains the emergence of long-ranged stress correlations in glass, as expected from classical continuum elasticity. The long-ranged stress correlations can be traced to the coupling of shear stress to transverse momentum, which is ignored in the classic Maxwell model. To rescue this widely used model, we suggest a generalization in terms of a single relaxation time τ for the fast degrees of freedom only. This generalized Maxwell model implies a divergent correlation length ξ ∝τ as well as dynamic critical scaling and correctly accounts for the far-field stress correlations. It can be rephrased in terms of generalized hydrodynamic equations, which naturally couple stress and momentum and furthermore allow us to connect to fluidity and elastoplastic models.

  10. Connection between slow and fast dynamics of molecular liquids around the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niss, Kristine; Dalle-Ferrier, Cecile; Frick, Bernhard; Russo, Daniela; Dyre, Jeppe; Alba-Simionesco, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The mean-square displacement (MSD) was measured by neutron scattering at various temperatures and pressures for a number of molecular glass-forming liquids. The MSD is invariant along the glass-transition line at the pressure studied, thus establishing an 'intrinsic' Lindemann criterion for any given liquid. A one-to-one connection between the MSD's temperature dependence and the liquid's fragility is found when the MSD is evaluated on a time scale of ∼4 ns, but does not hold when the MSD is evaluated at shorter times. The findings are discussed in terms of the elastic model and the role of relaxations, and the correlations between slow and fast dynamics are addressed.

  11. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  12. The glass transition and diffusion in simulated liquid TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo Van Hoang [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HochiMinh City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, HochiMinh City (Viet Nam)

    2007-10-17

    The glass transition and diffusion in liquid TiO{sub 2} have been studied in a model containing 3000 atoms via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The density dependence of the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, of liquid TiO{sub 2} has been found and is discussed. Diffusion of atomic species in 3.80 g cm{sup -3} TiO{sub 2} models has been investigated over a wide temperature range from 2100 to 7000 K. We found that the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant of atomic species follows an Arrhenius law at relatively low temperatures above the melting point, and at higher temperatures it deviates from an Arrhenius law. Differences between the structures of amorphous TiO{sub 2} models at three different densities in the range from 3.80 to 4.20 g cm{sup -3} have been found and are discussed. In addition, a transition from a low-density liquid (ldl) form to a high-density liquid (hdl) form was found and is discussed.

  13. Predict the glass transition temperature of glycerol-water binary cryoprotectant by molecular dynamic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dai-Xi; Liu, Bao-Lin; Liu, Yi-shu; Chen, Cheng-lung

    2008-04-01

    Vitrification is proposed to be the best way for the cryopreservation of organs. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of vitrification solutions is a critical parameter of fundamental importance for cryopreservation by vitrification. The instruments that can detect the thermodynamic, mechanical and dielectric changes of a substance may be used to determine the glass transition temperature. T(g) is usually measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this study, the T(g) of the glycerol-aqueous solution (60%, wt/%) was determined by isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamic simulation (NPT-MD). The software package Discover in Material Studio with the Polymer Consortium Force Field (PCFF) was used for the simulation. The state parameters of heat capacity at constant pressure (C(p)), density (rho), amorphous cell volume (V(cell)) and specific volume (V(specific)) and radial distribution function (rdf) were obtained by NPT-MD in the temperature range of 90-270K. These parameters showed a discontinuity at a specific temperature in the plot of state parameter versus temperature. The temperature at the discontinuity is taken as the simulated T(g) value for glycerol-water binary solution. The T(g) values determined by simulation method were compared with the values in the literatures. The simulation values of T(g) (160.06-167.51K) agree well with the DSC results (163.60-167.10K) and the DMA results (159.00K). We drew the conclusion that molecular dynamic simulation (MDS) is a potential method for investigating the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of glycerol-water binary cryoprotectants and may be used for other vitrification solutions.

  14. Expected anomalies of the neutron cross section near the liquid-glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotze, W.

    1987-01-01

    In the frameworks of a microscopic theory the anomalies of the neutron cross section near the liquid-glass transition are discussed. The central concept of the theory is the correlation function for density fluctuations of wave vector q and frequency ω. Its absorptive part is proportional to the dynamical structure factor S(q, ω), this is the scattering law for coherent neutron scattering. Tagged particle motion is evaluated as well and it yields the incoherent neutron scattering cross section S i (q, ω) in. The predictions of the theory for S(q, ω) and Si (q, ω) a q-ω domain are given

  15. Effect of aging time on a glass transition of amorphous polymers at heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadač, J.; Říha, Pavel; Slobodian, P.; Saha, P.; Kubát, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 108, special issue 1 (2014), s. 59-65 ISSN 0009-2770 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : physical aging * glass transition * PMMA * relaxation function Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.272, year: 2014 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/docs/full/2014_s1_s59-s65.pdf

  16. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials and electrochemical batteries.8 Rare earth metal ions when added to borate act as network modifiers and change the properties of glasses. In rare earth ... room temperature to 600◦C. For electrical measurements, samples were polished and conducting silver paste was deposited on both sides. The sample area ...

  17. Fuel Pellets from Wheat Straw: The Effect of Lignin Glass Transition and Surface Waxes on Pelletizing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.

    2012-01-01

    and a high concentration of hydrophobic waxes on its outer surface that may limit the pellet strength. The present work studies the impact of the lignin glass transition on the pelletizing properties of wheat straw. Furthermore, the effect of surface waxes on the pelletizing process and pellet strength...... are investigated by comparing wheat straw before and after organic solvent extraction. The lignin glass transition temperature for wheat straw and extracted wheat straw is determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. At a moisture content of 8%, transitions are identified at 53°C and 63°C, respectively....... Pellets are pressed from wheat straw and straw where the waxes have been extracted from. Two pelletizing temperatures were chosen—one below and one above the glass transition temperature of lignin. The pellets compression strength, density, and fracture surface were compared to each other. Pellets pressed...

  18. A phenomenological molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-09-07

    This work formulates, at a molecular level, a phenomenological theoretical description of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in tensile extension, exhibited by all polymeric glasses of high molecular weight (MW). The starting point is our perception of a polymer glass (under large deformation) as a structural hybrid, consisting of a primary structure due to the van der Waals bonding and a chain network whose junctions are made of pairs of hairpins and function like chemical crosslinks due to the intermolecular uncrossability. During extension, load-bearing strands (LBSs) emerge between the junctions in the affinely strained chain network. Above the BDT, i.e., at "warmer" temperatures where the glass is less vitreous, the influence of the chain network reaches out everywhere by activating all segments populated transversely between LBSs, starting from those adjacent to LBSs. It is the chain network that drives the primary structure to undergo yielding and plastic flow. Below the BDT, the glassy state is too vitreous to yield before the chain network suffers a structural breakdown. Thus, brittle failure becomes inevitable. For any given polymer glass of high MW, there is one temperature TBD or a very narrow range of temperature where the yielding of the glass barely takes place as the chain network also reaches the point of a structural failure. This is the point of the BDT. A theoretical analysis of the available experimental data reveals that (a) chain pullout occurs at the BDT when the chain tension builds up to reach a critical value f(cp) during tensile extension; (b) the limiting value of f(cp), extrapolated to far below the glass transition temperature T(g), is of a universal magnitude around 0.2-0.3 nN, for all eight polymers examined in this work; (c) pressurization, which is known [K. Matsushige, S. V. Radcliffe, and E. Baer, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 20, 1853 (1976)] to make brittle polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) ductile at room

  19. Thermostimulated transitions of radiation colour centers in fiber light guides on the base of pure quartz glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, A.V.; Dianov, E.M.; Karpechev, V.N.; Kornienko, L.S.; Rybaltovskij, A.O.; Chernov, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    Study on properties and characteristics of induced absorption (IA) in glass fiber light guides (GFLG) with a pure quartz glass core is continued. Effect of thermal-stimulated construction of colour radiation centers (CRC) giving induced absorption bands at 670, 550, and 380 nm has been detected. Effective temperatures of these IA band annealings have been determined as well as bands at 340 nm and induced absorption IR edge. Positions of IA band halfwidths and maxima on the assumption that IA bands have the Gauss form. It is assumed that CRC photo- and thermostimulated construction may occur with participation of physically dissolved in a glass grid gases or their radiolysis products

  20. Short range structural models of the glass transition temperatures and densities of 0.5Na2S + 0.5[xGeS2 + (1 - x)PS5/2] mixed glass former glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Christian; Schuller, Katherine; Martin, Steve W

    2014-04-03

    The 0.5Na2S + 0.5[xGeS2 + (1 - x)PS5/2] mixed glass former (MGF) glass system exhibits a nonlinear and nonadditive negative change in the Na(+) ion conductivity as one glass former, PS5/2, is exchanged for the other, GeS2. This behavior, known as the mixed glass former effect (MGFE), is also manifest in a negative deviation from the linear interpolation of the glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of the binary end-member glasses, x = 0 and x = 1. Interestingly, the composition dependence of the densities of these ternary MGF glasses reveals a slightly positive MGFE deviation from a linear interpolation of the densities of the binary end-member glasses, x = 0 and x = 1. From our previous studies of the structures of these glasses using IR, Raman, and NMR spectroscopies, we find that a disproportionation reaction occurs between PS7/2(4-) and GeS3(2-) units into PS4(3-) and GeS5/2(1-) units. This disproportionation combined with the formation of Ge4S10(4-) anions from GeS5/2(1-) groups leads to the negative MGFE in T(g). A best-fit model of the T(g)s of these glasses was developed to quantify the amount of GeS5/2(1-) units that form Ge4S10(4-) molecular anions in the ternary glasses (∼ 5-10%). This refined structural model was used to develop a short-range structural model of the molar volumes, which shows that the slight densification of the ternary glasses is due to the improved packing efficiency of the germanium sulfide species.

  1. Weak- versus strong-disorder superfluid—Bose glass transition in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggen, Elmer V. H.; Lemarié, Gabriel; Capponi, Sylvain; Laflorencie, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Using large-scale simulations based on matrix product state and quantum Monte Carlo techniques, we study the superfluid to Bose glass transition for one-dimensional attractive hard-core bosons at zero temperature, across the full regime from weak to strong disorder. As a function of interaction and disorder strength, we identify a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless critical line with two different regimes. At small attraction where critical disorder is weak compared to the bandwidth, the critical Luttinger parameter Kc takes its universal Giamarchi-Schulz value Kc=3 /2 . Conversely, a nonuniversal Kc>3 /2 emerges for stronger attraction where weak-link physics is relevant. In this strong-disorder regime, the transition is characterized by self-similar power-law-distributed weak links with a continuously varying characteristic exponent α .

  2. Fluoride-sulfophosphate glasses as hosts for broadband optical amplification through transition metal activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W C; Le, Q H; Zhang, Q Y; Wondraczek, L

    2017-08-21

    Unusually stable multi-anion glasses of the fluoride-sulfophosphate type (FPS) are introduced as a new host material for optically active cation species. Despite a notoriously low polymerization grade, anion mixing in this glass system enables facile manufacture of bulk or fiber devices which combine several advantages of fluoride and phosphate glasses while using the stabilizing effect of sulfate additions. Using the example of chromium doping, we demonstrate broad red photoluminescence at 734 nm and inhomogeneous broadening of the R -line at 694 nm, originating from the 4 T 2 → 4 A 2 and 2 E → 4 A 2 transitions of Cr 3+ , respectively. The luminescence mechanism is further analyzed on the basis of the corresponding Tanabe-Sugano diagram. Tailored through chemical composition, internally nucleated precipitation of a nanocrystalline fluoride phase enables switching between high-field and low-field configurations of the Cr 3+ ion, resulting in the specific emission properties and setting the path towards FPS-based optical devices.

  3. Electrical Conductivity, Relaxation and the Glass Transition: A New Look at a Familiar Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul W.; Cooper, Alfred R.; DeGuire, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    Annealed samples from a single melt of a 10 mol% K2O-90SiO2 glass were reheated to temperatures ranging from 450 to 800 C, held isothermally for 20 min, and then quenched in either air or a silicon oil bath. The complex impedance of both the annealed and quenched samples was measured as a function of temperature from 120 to 250 C using ac impedance spectroscopy from 1 Hz to 1 MHz. The dc conductivity, sigma(sub dc), was measured from the low frequency intercept of depressed semicircle fits to the complex impedance data. When the sigma(sub dc) at 150 C was plotted against soak temperature, the results fell into three separate regions that are explained in terms of the glass structural relaxation time, tau(sub S). This sigma(sub dc) plot provides a new way to look the glass transition range, Delta T(sub r). In addition, sigma(sub dc) was measured for different soak times at 550 C, from which an average relaxation time of 7.3 min was calculated. It was found that the size and position of the Delta T(sub r) is controlled by both the soak time and cooling rate.

  4. On the dynamics of liquids in their viscous regime approaching the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Angell, C A; Richert, R

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Mallamace et al. (Eur. Phys. J. E 34, 94 (2011)) proposed a crossover temperature, T(×), and claimed that the dynamics of many supercooled liquids follow an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence between T(×) and the glass transition temperature T(g). The opposite, namely super-Arrhenius behavior in this viscous regime, has been demonstrated repeatedly for molecular glass-former, for polymers, and for the majority of the exhaustively studied inorganic glasses of technological interest. Therefore, we subject the molecular systems of the Mallamace et al. study to a "residuals" analysis and include not only viscosity data but also the more precise data available from dielectric relaxation experiments over the same temperature range. Although many viscosity data sets are inconclusive due to their noise level, we find that Arrhenius behavior is not a general feature of viscosity in the T(g) to T(×) range. Moreover, the residuals of dielectric relaxation times with respect to an Arrhenius law clearly reveal systematic curvature consistent with super-Arrhenius behavior being an endemic feature of transport properties in this viscous regime. We also observe a common pattern of how dielectric relaxation times decouple slightly from viscosity.

  5. Determination of the Glass Transition Temperature of Freestanding and Supported Azo-Polymer Thin Films by Thermal Assisted Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernykh Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce and apply the method for determination of the glass transition temperature of the sub-100 nm thick freestanding and supported polymer films based on thermally assisted atomic force microscopy (AFM. In proposed approach changes of the phase of an oscillating AFM cantilever are used to determine glass transition temperature. An anomalous decrease of the glass transition temperature for both free-standing and supported azobenzene-functionalized polymer thin films is shown.

  6. Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, K

    2010-01-01

    Audio recording of the sea from the breakwater in Plymouth Sound, by Stuart Moore. Presentations and exhibitions of the film Glass include: Finding Place exhibition, Plymouth (3 > 26 February 2010); University of the West of England's Radical British Screens symposium (3 September 2010); Plymouth University Festival of Research: Materiality and Technology film programme presented by the Centre for Media Art and Design Research (MADr), Jill Craigie Cinema, Plymouth University (14 March 2011); ...

  7. Relaxation transition in glass-forming polybutadiene as revealed by nuclear resonance X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaya, Toshiji; Inoue, Rintaro [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Saito, Makina [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, S. S. 14 Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Seto, Makoto [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Yoda, Yoshitaka [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo-ken 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    We investigated the arrest mechanism of molecular motions in a glass forming polybutadiene near the glass transition using a new nuclear resonance synchrotron X-ray scattering technique to cover a wide time range (10{sup −9} to 10{sup −5} s) and a scattering vector Q range (9.6–40 nm{sup −1}), which have never been accessed by other methods. Owing to the wide time and Q ranges it was found for the first time that a transition of the α-process to the slow β-process (or the Johari-Goldstein process) was observed in a Q range higher than the first peak in the structure factor S(Q) at the critical temperature T{sub c} in the mode coupling theory. The results suggest the important roles of hopping motions below T{sub c}, which was predicted by the recent extended mode coupling theory and the cooperative motions due to the strong correlation at the first peak in S(Q) in the arrest mechanism.

  8. Determination of Material Properties Near the Glass Transition Temperature for an Isogrid Boom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Joseph R.; Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed and results obtained to determine the temperature dependence of the modulus of elasticity for a thermoplastic isogrid tube. The isogrid tube was subjected to axial tensile loads of 0-100 lbf and strain was measured at room and elevated temperatures of 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 190, and 200 F. These were based on tube manufacturer specifying an incorrect glass transition temperature of 210 F. Two protocols were used. For the first protocol the tube was brought to temperature and a tensile test performed. The tube was allowed to cool between tests. For the second protocol the tube was ramped to the desired test temperature and held. A tensile test was performed and the tube temperature ramped to the next test temperature. The second protocol spanned the entire test range. The strain rate was constant at 0.008 in/min. Room temperature tests resulted in the determination of an average modulus of 2.34 x 106 Psi. The modulus decreased above 100 F. At 140 F the modulus had decreased by 7.26%. The two test protocols showed good agreement below 160 F. At this point the glass transition temperature had been exceeded. The two protocols were not repeated because the tube failed.

  9. Impact of caramelization on the glass transition temperature of several caramelized sugars. Part II: Mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Liu, Yeting; Bhandari, Bhesh; Zhou, Weibiao

    2008-07-09

    Further to part I of this study, this paper discusses mathematical modeling of the relationship between caramelization of several sugars including fructose, glucose, and sucrose and their glass transition temperatures ( T g). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used for creating caramelized sugar samples and determining their glass transition temperatures ( T g). UV-vis absorbance measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used for quantifying the extent of caramelization. Specifically, absorbances at 284 and 420 nm were obtained from UV-vis measurement, and the contents of sucrose, glucose, fructose, and 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF) in the caramelized sugars were obtained from HPLC measurements. Results from the UV and HPLC measurements were correlated with the Tg values measured by DSC. By using both linear and nonlinear regressions, two sets of mathematical models were developed for the prediction of Tg values of sugar caramels. The first set utilized information obtained from both UV-vis measurement and HPLC analysis, while the second set utilized only information from the UV-vis measurement, which is much easier to perform in practice. As a caramelization process is typically characterized by two stages, separate models were developed for each of the stages within a set. Furthermore, a third set of nonlinear equations were developed, serving as criteria to decide at which stage a caramelized sample is. The models were evaluated through a validation process.

  10. Impact of caramelization on the glass transition temperature of several caramelized sugars. Part I: Chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Liu, Yeting; Bhandari, Bhesh; Zhou, Weibiao

    2008-07-09

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between caramelization of several sugars including fructose, glucose, and sucrose and their glass transition temperature (Tg). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used for creating caramelized sugar samples as well as determining their glass transition temperature, which was found to decrease first and then increase as the holding time at the highest temperature increased. The extent of caramelization was quantified by UV-vis absorbance measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Results showed that the amount of small molecules from the degradation of sugar increased very fast at the beginning of heating, and this increase slowed down in the later stage of caramelization. On the other hand, there was a lag phase in the formation of large molecules from the degradation of sugar at the beginning of heating, followed by a fast increase in the later stage of caramelization. The obtained results clearly indicate the impact of melting condition on the T g of sugars through formation of intermediates and end products of caramelization. Generally, when the heating condition is relatively mild, small molecules are formed first by decomposition of the sugar, which leads to a decrease of the overall Tg, and as the heating time becomes longer and/or the heating condition becomes more severe, polymerization takes over and more large molecules are formed, which results in an increase of the overall Tg. Mathematical modeling of the relationship will be presented as part II of the study in a separate paper.

  11. Structure and dynamics of soft repulsive colloidal suspensions in the vicinity of the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassous, Jérôme J; Casal-Dujat, Lucia; Medebach, Martin; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Vincent, Romaric; Reinhold, Frank; Boyko, Volodymyr; Willerich, Immanuel; Menzel, Andreas; Moitzi, Christian; Reck, Bernd; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2013-08-20

    We use a combination of different scattering techniques and rheology to highlight the link between structure and dynamics of dense aqueous suspensions of soft repulsive colloids in the vicinity of a glass transition. Three different latex formulations with an increasing amount of the hydrophilic component resulting in either purely electrostatically or electrosterically stabilized suspensions are investigated. From the analysis of the static structure factor measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, we derive an effective volume fraction that includes contributions from interparticle interactions. We further investigate the dynamics of the suspensions using 3D cross-correlation dynamic light scattering (3DDLS) and rheology. We analyze the data using an effective hard sphere model and in particular compare the linear viscoelasticity and flow behavior to the predictions of mode coupling theory, which accounts for a purely kinetic glass transition determined by the equilibrium structure factor. We demonstrate that seemingly very different colloidal systems exhibit the same generic behavior when the effects from interparticle interactions are incorporated using an effective volume fraction description.

  12. Dielectric relaxation of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol around the glass transition by thermally stimulated depolarization currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese-Igor, S; Alegría, A; Colmenero, J

    2015-06-07

    We explore new routes for characterizing the Debye-like and α relaxation in 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) monoalcohol by using low frequency dielectric techniques including thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) techniques and isothermal depolarization current methods. In this way, we have improved the resolution of the overlapped processes making it possible the analysis of the data in terms of a mode composition as expected for a chain-like response. Furthermore the explored ultralow frequencies enabled to study dynamics at relatively low temperatures close to the glass transition (Tg). Results show, on the one hand, that Debye-like and α relaxation timescales dramatically approach to each other upon decreasing temperature to Tg. On the other hand, the analysis of partial polarization TSDC data confirms the single exponential character of the Debye-like relaxation in 2E1H and rules out the presence of Rouse type modes in the scenario of a chain-like response. Finally, on crossing the glass transition, the Debye-like relaxation shows non-equilibrium effects which are further emphasized by aging treatment and would presumably emerge as a result of the arrest of the structural relaxation below Tg.

  13. Treatments of intrinsic viscosity and glass transition temperature data of poly(2,6-dimethylphenylmethacrylate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamidi, Nasrollah; Massoudi, Ruhullah

    2003-01-01

    A useful relationship, ln(T g )=ln(T g,∞ )-m[η] -ν , between intrinsic viscosity and glass transition temperature for a series of homologous polymers was obtained by combining the Mark-Houwink-Kuhn-Sakurada (MHKS) relation for intrinsic viscosity and molecular mass, and the Fox-Flory equation for glass transition temperature and number-average molecular mass. This relationship was applied to poly(2,6-dimethylphenylmethacrylate) (PDMPh) in a variety of solvents (ideal to good) such as toluene, tetrahydrofuran/water, tetrahydrofuran, and chlorobenzene systems. The parameter α estimated by this procedure in toluene, tetrahydrofuran/water, tetrahydrofuran, and chlorobenzene systems are 0.50 6 , 0.51 1 , 0.56 7 , and 0.67 3 , respectively which are in agreement with those of Mark-Houwink-Kuhn-Sakurada values by less than 5% differences. The T g,∞ quantity estimated from this equation also is within the standard deviation of that obtained from the Fox-Flory method. The m quantity is increasing as the thermodynamic quality of the solvent improves, therefore, m may be considered as an indicator of coil conformations in a given solvent

  14. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties.

  15. Thermodynamic Properties, Sorption Isotherms and Glass Transition Temperature of Cape Gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption and desorption isotherms of fresh and dried Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L. were determined at three temperatures (20, 40 and 60 °C using a gravimetric technique. The data obtained were fitted to several models including Guggenheim-Anderson- De Boer (GAB, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, Henderson, Caurie, Smith, Oswin, Halsey and Iglesias-Chirife. A non-linear least square regression analysis was used to evaluate the models. The Iglesias-Chirife model fitted best the experimental data. Isosteric heat of sorption was also determined from the equilibrium sorption data using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and was found to decrease exponentially with increasing moisture content. The enthalpy-entropy compensation theory was applied to the sorption isotherms and indicated an enthalpy-controlled sorption process. Glass transition temperature (Tg of Cape gooseberry was also determined by differential scanning calorimetry and modelled as a function of moisture content with the Gordon-Taylor, the Roos and the Khalloufi models, which proved to be excellent tools for predicting glass transition of Cape gooseberry.

  16. Surface silver-doping of biocompatible glasses to induce antibacterial properties. Part II: Plasma sprayed glass-coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miola, M; Ferraris, S; Di Nunzio, S; Robotti, P F; Bianchi, G; Fucale, G; Maina, G; Cannas, M; Gatti, S; Massé, A; Vitale Brovarone, C; Verné, E

    2009-03-01

    A 57% SiO(2), 3% Al(2)O(3), 34% CaO and 6% Na(2)O glass (SCNA) has been produced in form of powders and deposited by plasma spray on titanium alloy and stainless steel substrates. The obtained coatings have been subjected to a patented ion-exchange treatment to introduce silver ions in the surface inducing an antibacterial behavior. Silver surface-enriched samples have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, SEM observation, EDS analysis, in vitro bioactivity tests, leaching tests by GFAAS (graphite furnace atomic adsorption spectroscopy) analyses, cells adhesion and proliferation, and antibacterial tests using Staphylococcus Aureus strain. In vitro tests results showed that the modified samples acquired an antimicrobial action against tested bacteria maintaining unaffected the biocompatibility of the glass. Furthermore the ion-exchange treatment can be successfully applied to glass-coated samples without affecting the properties of the coatings; the simplicity and reproducibility of the method make it suitable for glass or glass-ceramic coatings of different composition in order to produce coated devices for bone healing and/or prostheses, able to reduce bacterial colonization and infections risks.

  17. Studies of natural and 60Co gamma radio-induced conduction in metaphosphate glasses and silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengual Gil, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    A study of natural and 60 Co gamma radio-induced conduction in metaphosphate glasses and silica is presented. The experimental study of natural conduction current in metaphosphate glasses in function of temperature enables to observe two different values of the activation energies in the respective temperature ranges T>223K and T [fr

  18. Local visible-light induced modification of the inside of glass and COC microfluidic channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, R.R.; Pujari, S.P.; Vrouwe, E.X.; Zuilhof, H.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to locally modify the inside of microfluidic channels with functional groups that allow coupling of biologically-relevant molecules is of ever-rising relevance. We report the first example of visible-light induced hydrosilylation on hydrogen-terminated silanized glass (H-?-Glass) and

  19. The sorption induced glass transition in amorphous glassy polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.; Briels, Willem J.

    1999-01-01

    Sorption of CO2 in both the glassy and the rubbery state of an amorphous polyethylenelike polymer was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature was chosen such that the system was in its glassy state at low solute concentrations and its rubbery state at large solute

  20. SU-F-T-17: A Feasibility Study for the Transit Dosimetry with a Glass Dosimeter in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S; Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W; Chung, M; Kim, D [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Gangdonggu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Confirming the dose delivered to a patient is important to make sure the treatment quality and safety of the radiotherapy. Measuring a transit dose of the patient during the radiotherapy could be an interesting way to confirm the patient dose. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the transit dosimetry with a glass dosimeter in brachytherapy. Methods: We made a phantom that inserted the glass dosimeters and placed under patient lying on a couch for cervix cancer brachytherapy. The 18 glass dosimeters were placed in the phantom arranged 6 per row. A point putting 1cm vertically from the source was prescribed as 500.00 cGy. Solid phantoms of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 cm were placed between the source and the glass dosimeter. The transit dose was measured each thickness using the glass dosimeters and compared with a treatment planning system (TPS). Results: When the transit dose was smaller than 10 cGy, the average of the differences between measured values and calculated values by TPS was 0.50 cGy and the standard deviation was 0.69 cGy. If the transit dose was smaller than 100 cGy, the average of the error was 1.67 ± 4.01 cGy. The error to a point near the prescription point was −14.02 cGy per 500.00 cGy of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distances from the sources to skin of the patient generally are within 10 cm for cervix cancer cases in brachytherapy. The results of this preliminary study showed the probability of the glass dosimeter as the transit dosimeter in brachytherapy.

  1. The ferromagnetic-spin glass transition in PdMn alloys: symmetry breaking of ferromagnetism and spin glass studied by a multicanonical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tomohiko; Saita, Takahiro

    2011-03-16

    The magnetism of Pd(1-x)Mn(x) is investigated theoretically. A localized spin model for Mn spins that interact with short-range antiferromagnetic interactions and long-range ferromagnetic interactions via itinerant d electrons is set up, with no adjustable parameters. A multicanonical Monte Carlo simulation, combined with a procedure of symmetry breaking, is employed to discriminate between the ferromagnetic and spin glass orders. The transition temperature and the low-temperature phase are determined from the temperature variation of the specific heat and the probability distributions of the ferromagnetic order parameter and the spin glass order parameter at different concentrations. The calculation results reveal that only the ferromagnetic phase exists at x glass phase exists at x > 0.04, and that the two phases coexist at intermediate concentrations. This result agrees semi-quantitatively with experimental results.

  2. Field-induced cluster spin glass and inverse symmetry breaking enhanced by frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Zimmer, F. M.; Magalhaes, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    We consider a cluster disordered model to study the interplay between short- and long-range interactions in geometrically frustrated spin systems under an external magnetic field (h). In our approach, the intercluster long-range disorder (J) is analytically treated to get an effective cluster model that is computed exactly. The clusters follow a checkerboard lattice with first-neighbor (J1) and second-neighbor (J2) interactions. We find a reentrant transition from the cluster spin-glass (CSG) state to a paramagnetic (PM) phase as the temperature decreases for a certain range of h. This inverse symmetry breaking (ISB) appears as a consequence of both quenched disorder with frustration and h, that introduce a CSG state with higher entropy than the polarized PM phase. The competitive scenario introduced by antiferromagnetic (AF) short-range interactions increases the CSG state entropy, leading to continuous ISB transitions and enhancing the ISB regions, mainly in the geometrically frustrated case (J1 =J2). Remarkably, when strong AF intracluster couplings are present, field-induced CSG phases can be found. These CSG regions are strongly related to the magnetization plateaus observed in this cluster disordered system. In fact, it is found that each field-induced magnetization jump brings a CSG region. We notice that geometrical frustration, as well as cluster size, play an important role in the magnetization plateaus and, therefore, are also relevant in the field-induced glassy states. Our findings suggest that competing interactions support ISB and field-induced CSG phases in disordered cluster systems under an external magnetic field.

  3. Elemental redistribution behavior in tellurite glass induced by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Yu; Zhou, Jiajia; Khisro, Said Nasir; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Abnormal elements redistribution behavior was observed in tellurite glass. • The refractive index and Raman intensity distribution changed significantly. • The relative glass composition remained unchanged while the glass density changed. • First time report on the abnormal element redistribution behavior in glass. • The glass network structure determines the elemental redistribution behavior. - Abstract: The success in the fabrication of micro-structures in glassy materials using femtosecond laser irradiation has proved its potential applications in the construction of three-dimensional micro-optical components or devices. In this paper, we report the elemental redistribution behavior in tellurite glass after the irradiation of high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses. The relative glass composition remained unchanged while the glass density changed significantly, which is quite different from previously reported results about the high repetition rate femtosecond laser induced elemental redistribution in silicate glasses. The involved mechanism is discussed with the conclusion that the glass network structure plays the key role to determine the elemental redistribution. This observation not only helps to understand the interaction process of femtosecond laser with glassy materials, but also has potential applications in the fabrication of micro-optical devices

  4. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the

  5. The stochastic transition from size dependent to size independent yield strength in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F. C.; Wang, S.; He, Q. F.; Zhang, H.; Sun, B. A.; Lu, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    It has been an enduring and heated debate whether the yield strength of metallic glasses (MGs) is size dependent or size independent. In this work, we first develop a micromechanical model by taking into account the stochasticity for shear band initiation in microcompression. Our modeling is subsequently verified through the extensive in-situ and ex-situ microcompression experiments. Through the efforts of combined experiments and modeling, we show a size-controlled stochastic transition from the size dependent to the size independent yield strength in the MG micropillars. Such a stochastic transition is featured with a strong fluctuation in the measured yield strengths when the micropillar size is near an intrinsic length scale which varies with the chemical composition of MGs. In contrast, such a size-controlled transition appear deterministic with little data scattering in tension. At the fundamental level, our results unfold a size dependent shear band initiation process in MGs, which may be applicable to other amorphous materials of technological importance.

  6. Electron beam-induced mass transport in As–Se thin films: compositional dependence and glass network topological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trunov, M L; Cserháti, C; Lytvyn, P M; Kaganovskii, Yu; Kökényesi, S

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam (e-beam)-induced changes of surface profile morphology in As c Se 1−c (0.2 0.2 Se 0.8 are connected with lateral mass transport, which increases drastically near rigidity transition, i.e. at a coordination number r ∼ 2.2 of the glass structures when the rigidity starts to percolate through the structure. The model of the process, which reflects the compositional dependence of the stimulated mass transport, is presented. (paper)

  7. Structural evolution during fragile-to-strong transition in CuZr(Al) glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, C.; Hu, L.N.; Sun, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we show experimental evidence for the dynamic fragile-to-strong (F-S) transition in a series of CuZr(Al) glass-forming liquids (GFLs). A detailed analysis of the dynamics of 98 glass-forming liquids indicates that the F-S transition occurs around Tf-s ≈ 1.36 Tg. Using...... the hyperquenching-annealing-x-ray scattering approach, we have observed a three-stage evolution pattern of medium-range ordering (MRO) structures during the F-S transition, indicating a dramatic change of the MRO clusters around Tf-s upon cooling. The F-S transition in CuZr(Al) GFLs is attributed to the competition...... among the MRO clusters composed of different locally ordering configurations. A phenomenological scenario has been proposed to explain the structural evolution from the fragile to the strong phase in the CuZr(Al) GFLs....

  8. Polymer chain dynamics and glass transition in athermal polymer/nanoparticle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunjoon; Green, Peter F.

    2009-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs), prepared by incorporating nanoparticles within a polymer host, generally exhibit properties that differ significantly from those of the host, even with small amounts of nanoparticles. A significant challenge is how to tailor the properties of these materials for applications (structural and biomedical to optoelectronic), because PNCs derive their properties from a collective and complex range of entropic and enthalpic interactions. Here, we show that PNCs, prepared from athermal mixtures of polymer-chain-grafted gold nanoparticles and unentangled polymer chains, may exhibit increases or decreases in their relaxation dynamics, and viscosity, by over an order of magnitude through control of nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, grafting density and grafting chain degree of polymerization. In addition, we show how the glass transition may also be tailored by up to 10∘ with the addition of less than 1.0 wt% nanoparticles to the polymer host.

  9. Effect of thermal history on mechanical properties of polyetheretherketone below the glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Chung, Shirley Y.; Hong, Su-Don

    1987-01-01

    The effect of thermal history on the tensile properties of polyetheretherketone neat resin films was investigated at different test temperatures (125, 25, and -100) using four samples: fast-quenched amorphous (Q); quenched, then crystallized at 180 C (C180); slowly cooled (for about 16 h) from the melt (SC); and air-cooled (2-3 h) from the melt (AC). It was found that thermal history significantly affects the tensile properties of the material below the glass transition. Fast quenched amorphous films were most tough, could be drawn to greatest strain before rupture, and undergo densification during necking; at the test temperature of -100 C, these films had the best ultimate mechanical properties. At higher temperatures, the semicrystalline films AC and C180 had properties that compared favorably with the Q films. The SC films exhibited poor mechanical properties at all test temperatures.

  10. Evaluation of glass transition temperature and dynamic mechanical properties of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kazuma; Watanabe, Ikuya; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Murata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed methods for evaluation of glass transition temperature (Tg) of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins using dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry in addition to the dynamic mechanical properties. The Tg values of 3 different reline resins were determined using a dynamic viscoelastometer and differential scanning calorimeter, and rheological parameters were also determined. Although all materials exhibited higher storage modulus and loss modulus values, and a lower loss tangent at 37˚C with a higher frequency, the frequency dependence was not large. Tg values obtained by dynamic mechanical analysis were higher than those by differential scanning calorimetry and higher frequency led to higher Tg, while more stable Tg values were also obtained by that method. These results suggest that dynamic mechanical analysis is more advantageous for characterization of autopolymerized hard direct denture reline resins than differential scanning calorimetry.

  11. Rubber adhesion below the glass transition temperature: Role of frozen-in elastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulichev, A. G.; Tiwari, A.; Dorogin, L.; Echtermeyer, A. T.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2017-11-01

    We have studied how the adhesion between rubber and a flat countersurface depends on temperature. When the two solids are separated at room temperature negligible adhesion is detected, which is due to the elastic deformation energy stored in the rubber, which is given back during pull-off and help to break the adhesive bonds. When the system is cooled down below the glass transition temperature, the elastic deformation imposed on the system at room temperature is “frozen-in” and the stored-up elastic energy is not given back during separation at the low temperature. This results in a huge increase in the pull-off force. This study is crucial for many applications involving rubber at low temperatures, e.g., rubber seals for cryogenic or space applications.

  12. Static critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition in spin glass re-entrant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haetinger, Cláudia M; Ghivelder, Luis; Schaf, Jacob; Pureur, Paulo

    2009-12-16

    The static critical phenomenology near the Curie temperature of the re-entrant metallic alloys Au(0.81)Fe(0.19), Ni(0.78)Mn(0.22), Ni(0.79)Mn(0.21) and amorphous a-Fe(0.98)Zr(0.08) is studied using a variety of experimental techniques and methods of analysis. We have generally found that the values for the exponents α, β, γ and δ depart significantly from the predictions for the 3D Heisenberg model and are intermediate between these expectations and the values characterizing a typical spin glass transition. Comparing the exponents obtained in our work with indices for other re-entrant systems reported in the literature, a weak universality class may be defined where the exponents are distributed within a certain range around average values.

  13. Possible crossover to percolation scenario near superfluid-Bose-glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syromyatnikov, A. V.; Sizanov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss magnetically ordered (;superfluid;) phase near quantum transition to Bose-glass phase in a simple modeling system, Heisenberg antiferromagnet in spatial dimension d > 2 in external magnetic field with disorder in exchange coupling constants. Our analytical consideration is based on hydrodynamic description of long-wavelength excitations and it is valid in the entire critical region near the quantum critical point (QCP). We demonstrate that the system behaves in full agreement with predictions by Fisher et al. (Phys. Rev. B 40, 546 (1989)) in close vicinity of QCP. On the other hand, we show that many recent experimental and numerical results obtained in various 3D systems can be described by our formulas using percolation critical exponents. Then, it is a possibility that a percolation critical regime arises in the ordered phase in some 3D systems not very close to QCP.

  14. Investigation of dynamic glass transitions and structure transformations in cryovacuum condensates of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldiyarov, A.; Aryutkina, M.; Drobyshev, A.; Kaikanov, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2009-01-01

    An IR spectrometric investigation of the dynamic glass transition of ethanol from the rotationally disordered crystal to the orientationally disordered crystal is carried out. The samples considered are thin films formed from the gas phase at a substrate temperature of T=16 K. The measurements are performed using the experimental apparatus which has been described in detail in our recent work. The sample thickness was d=2 μm, and the typical rate of annealing is approximately 10 K/min. The results are compared with the phase diagram of solid ethanol proposed by M.A. Ramos et al. We observe good agreement between the temperature intervals of existence of the amorphous and crystalline states. The low-temperature amorphous phase (12-70 K) is described by the present authors as amorphous solid ethanol by analogy with the amorphous solid water

  15. The Glass Transition of Miscible Binary Polymer-Polymer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Peter; Besancon, Brian; Soles, Christopher

    2007-03-01

    Studies of the glass transition temperatures, Tg, of completely miscible thin film blends of tetramethyl bisphenol-A polycarbonate (TMPC) and deuterated polystyrene (dPS), supported by SiOx/Si, were examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and incoherent elastic neutron scattering (INS). While both sets of measurements independently reveal that Tg exhibits qualitatively similar trends with film thickness, h, there were important quantitative differences, which depended on composition. The Tgs measured by INS were consistently larger than those determined by SE for PS weight fractions φ>0.1. These observations are rationalized in terms of theory based on the notion of a self- concentration and reveal evidence of heterogeneous component behavior in these miscible polymer-polymer systems.

  16. Temperature-induced structural changes in fluorozirconate glasses and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Youngman, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The atomic structure and its temperature dependence in fluorozirconate glasses and supercooled liquids have been studied with high-resolution and high-temperature 19 F and 23 Na nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 19 F NMR spectra in these glasses show the presence of multiple F environments. Temperature dependence of the 19 F magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra indicates a progressive change in the average F coordination environment in the glass structure, besides motional narrowing due to substantial mobility of F - ions. The observed change in the average 19 F NMR chemical shift is consistent with progressive breaking of the Zr-F-Zr linkages in the glass structure with increasing temperature. The onset of such a change in F speciation is observed at temperatures well below T g . This result is evidence of changes in the average equilibrium structure in an inorganic glass-forming liquid at T g , albeit on a local scale. The 23 Na NMR spectra indicate that the cations in these glasses become significantly mobile only at temperatures T≥T g , which allows for the onset of global structural relaxation and viscous flow

  17. Densification and depression in glass transition temperature in polystyrene thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignaud, G; S Chebil, M; Bal, J K; Delorme, N; Beuvier, T; Grohens, Y; Gibaud, A

    2014-10-07

    Ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity were used to characterize the mass density and the glass transition temperature of supported polystyrene (PS) thin films as a function of their thickness. By measuring the critical wave vector (qc) on the plateau of total external reflection, we evidence that PS films get denser in a confined state when the film thickness is below 50 nm. Refractive indices (n) and electron density profiles measurements confirm this statement. The density of a 6 nm (0.4 gyration radius, Rg) thick film is 30% greater than that of a 150 nm (10Rg) film. A depression of 25 °C in glass transition temperature (Tg) was revealed as the film thickness is reduced. In the context of the free volume theory, this result seems to be in apparent contradiction with the fact that thinner films are denser. However, as the thermal expansion of thinner films is found to be greater than the one of thicker films, the increase in free volume is larger for thin films when temperature is raised. Therefore, the free volume reaches a critical value at a lower Tg for thinner films. This critical value corresponds to the onset of large cooperative movements of polymer chains. The link between the densification of ultrathin films and the drop in their Tg is thus reconciled. We finally show that at their respective Tg(h) all films exhibit a critical mass density of about 1.05 g/cm(3) whatever their thickness. The thickness dependent thermal expansion related to the free volume is consequently a key factor to understand the drop in the Tg of ultrathin films.

  18. Glass transition of partially crystallized gelatin-water mixtures studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kaito; Kita, Rio; Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yagihara, Shin

    2014-03-01

    The glass transition of partially crystallized gelatin-water mixtures was investigated for gelatin concentrations of 40 and 20 wt. % by broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in wide frequency (10 mHz-50 GHz) and temperature (113-298 K) ranges. Three dielectric relaxation processes were clearly observed. The origin of each relaxation process was the same as that observed for partially crystallized bovine serum albumin (BSA)-water mixtures [N. Shinyashiki et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 14448 (2009)]. The relaxation process at the highest frequency is originated from uncrystallized water (UCW) in the hydration shell of gelatin. Its relaxation time is almost the same as that of water in uncrystallized system; water in various binary aqueous mixtures and confined water in nanoscale region. The relaxation process at the intermediate frequency is originated from ice, and its relaxation time and strength were similar to those for the relaxation of pure ice, particularly above 240 K. The glass transition temperature Tg, is defined by BDS measurement as the temperature at which dielectric relaxation time τ, is 100-1000 s. The relaxation process at the lowest frequency, Tg is approximately 200 K, is originated from the cooperative motion of water and gelatin. This relaxation is strong and has a similar relaxation strength to that of hydrated BSA. At Tg for the relaxation process involving the cooperative motion of gelatin and water, the temperature dependence of the relaxation process of UCW crosses over from Vogel-Fulcher behavior to Arrhenius behavior with decreasing temperature. A characteristic property of the gelatin-water mixture is a change in the temperature dependence of the relaxation time of the relaxation processes of hydrated gelatin at approximately 260 K.

  19. Effect of aging time on the volumetric and enthalpic glass transition of a-PMMA upon heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říha, Pavel; Hadač, J.; Slobodian, P.; Sáha, P.; Rychwalski, R. W.; Kubát, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 25 (2007), s. 7356-7363 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/05/0803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : a-PMMA * Glass transition * Aging Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2007

  20. Glass transition study of blends of poly(N-methyldodecano-12-lactam) with poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Sikora, Antonín; Labský, Jiří; Puffr, Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 7 (2005), s. 1681-1687 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/1248; GA AV ČR IAA4050301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer blends * glass transition * hydrogen bonds Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2005

  1. Origins of the two simultaneous mechanisms causing glass transition temperature reductions in high molecular weight freestanding polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, Daniele, E-mail: ngai@df.unipi.it, E-mail: Prevosto@df.unipi.it [CNR-IPCF, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Capaccioli, Simone [CNR-IPCF, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ngai, K. L., E-mail: ngai@df.unipi.it, E-mail: Prevosto@df.unipi.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    From ellipsometry measurements, Pye and Roth [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 235701 (2011)] presented evidence of the presence of two glass transitions originating from two distinctly different and simultaneous mechanisms to reduce the glass transition temperature within freestanding polystyrene films with thickness less than 70 nm. The upper transition temperature T{sub g}{sup u}(h) is higher than the lower transition temperature T{sub g}{sup l}(h) in the ultrathin films. After comparing their data with the findings of others, using the same or different techniques, they concluded that new theoretical interpretation is needed to explain the two transitions and the different dependences of T{sub g}{sup u}(h) and T{sub g}{sup l}(h) on film thickness and molecular weight. We address the problem based on advance in delineating the different viscoelastic mechanisms in the glass-rubber transition zone of polymers. Theoretical considerations as well as experiments have shown in time-scales immediately following the segmental α-relaxation are the sub-Rouse modes with longer length scale but shorter than that of the Rouse modes. The existence of the sub-Rouse modes in various polymers including polystyrene has been repeatedly confirmed by experiments. We show that the sub-Rouse modes can account for the upper transition and the properties observed. The segmental α-relaxation is responsible for the lower transition. This is supported by the fact that the segmental α-relaxation in ultrathin freestanding PS films had been observed by dielectric relaxation measurements and photon correlation spectroscopy. Utilizing the temperature dependence of the segmental relaxation times from these experiments, the glass transition temperature T{sub g}{sup α} associated with the segmental relaxation in the ultrathin film is determined. It turns out that T{sub g}{sup α} is nearly the same as T{sub g}{sup l}(h) of the lower transition, and hence definitely segmental α-relaxation is the

  2. Open globe injuries induced by glass bottles containing carbonated drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Wolfgang F; Gramer, Eugen

    2010-03-01

    Reports on open globe injuries caused by exploding bottles containing carbonated drinks have already raised the demand to switch from multi-use glass bottles to plastic bottles. We retrospectively analyzed our files to find out whether this type of injury is limited to multi-use glass bottles, and to what extent carelessness contributed to the injury Among 1,402 open globe injuries that were treated in the departments of ophthalmology at the universities of Freiburg and Würzburg between 1981 and 2004, we retrospectively identified 33 injuries caused by exploding bottles containing carbonated drinks. Patients were excluded from analysis when the destruction of the bottle was intended (destroyed with a hammer, or bottle used as a weapon). The circumstances of the injury, the treatment and the functional outcome was analyzed. 2.4% of all open globe injuries were related to exploding bottles, with a risk of one injury per 1 million inhabitants per year. Ten eyes suffered from a spontaneous explosion of the bottle when it was moved on a shelf or taken out of a box. Eighteen eyes received the injury after the bottle had fallen down and exploded (six of them in children 2 to 8 years). Five bottles exploded during opening of the bottle. In four cases, the bottle cap came off spontaneously and penetrated the eye. Eleven injuries (33%) occurred at work, five of them while moving the bottle and six during breaks at work. Spontaneous explosions in multi-use glass bottles could easily be avoided by changing to plastic bottles; however, exploding single-use glass bottles Containing sparkling wine also contributed to the injuries. In many cases, carelessness was involved. Glass bottles should be never exposed to heat or shaking, and children should never carry glass bottles containing carbonated drinks.

  3. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.

    Glass exhibits a significant change in microstructure and properties when subjected to high pressure, since the short- and intermediate-range structures of a glass are tunable through compression. Understanding the link between the microscopic structure and macroscopic properties of glasses under...... and more damage resistant glasses. However, the interplay among isostatic compression, pressure-induced changes in alkali diffusivity, compressive stress generated through ion exchange, and the resulting mechanical properties are poorly understood. In this work, we employ a specially designed gas pressure...... stress, and slightly increased hardness. Compression after the ion exchange treatment changes the shape of the potassium-sodium diffusion profiles and significantly increases glass hardness. We discuss these results in terms of the underlying structural changes in network-modifier environments...

  4. Modification of the glass surface induced by redox reactions and internal diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Deubener, Joachim; Yue, Yuanzheng

    In this paper we report a novel way to modify the glass surface in favor of some physical performances. The main step is to perform iso-thermal treatments on the selected silicate glasses containing transition metal at temperatures near the glass transition temperature for various durations under...... different gases. As a result, we have observed a striking phenomenon, i.e., the outward diffusion of divalent cations occurs not only under an oxidizing atmosphere of heat-treatment, but also under nitrogen, even under reducing atmospheres like H2/N2 (10/90). The extent of the cationic diffusion depends...... on temperature and duration of heat-treatments. The mechanism of the diffusion depends on the type of the gases used for the heat-treatments. In this paper we propose several possible models describing mechanisms of the cationic diffusion, and hence, of the formation of the nano-layer. We also report the effect...

  5. Volume changes in glass induced by an electron beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavenda, T.; Gedeon, O.; Jurek, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 322, Mar (2014), s. 7-12 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : borosilicate glass * electron irradiation * densification * alkali migration Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  6. Investigation of gamma radiation induced changes in local structure of borosilicate glass by TDPAC and EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashwani, E-mail: kashwani@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radioanalytical Chemistry Division (India); Nayak, C.; Rajput, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division (India); Mishra, R. K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Waste Management Division (India); Bhattacharyya, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division (India); Kaushik, C. P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Waste Management Division (India); Tomar, B. S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radioanalytical Chemistry Division (India)

    2016-12-15

    Gamma radiation induced changes in local structure around the probe atom (Hafnium) were investigated in sodium barium borosilicate (NBS) glass, used for immobilization of high level liquid waste generated from the reprocessing plant at Trombay, Mumbai. The (NBS) glass was doped with {sup 181}Hf as a probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy studies, while for studies using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, the same was doped with 0.5 and 2 % (mole %) hafnium oxide. The irradiated as well as un-irradiated glass samples were studied by TDPAC and EXAFS techniques to obtain information about the changes (if any) around the probe atom due to gamma irradiation. TDPAC spectra of unirradiated and irradiated glasses were similar and reminescent of amorphous materials, indicating negligible effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure around Hafnium probe atom, though the quaqdrupole interaction frequency (ω{sub Q}) and asymmetry parameter (η) did show a marginal decrease in the irradiated glass compared to that in the unirradiated glass. EXAFS measurements showed a slight decrease in the Hf-O bond distance upon gamma irradiation of Hf doped NBS glass indicating densification of the glass matrix, while the cordination number around hafnium remains unchanged.

  7. The glass transition and enthalpy recovery of a single polystyrene ultrathin film using Flash DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yung P; Simon, Sindee L

    2017-05-28

    The kinetics of the glass transition are measured for a single polystyrene ultrathin film of 20 nm thickness using Flash differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). T g is measured over a range of cooling rates from 0.1 to 1000 K/s and is depressed compared to the bulk. The depression decreases with increasing cooling rate, from 12 K lower than the bulk at 0.1 K/s to no significant change at 1000 K/s. Isothermal enthalpy recovery measurements are performed from 50 to 115 °C, and from these experiments, the temperature dependence of the induction time along the glass line is obtained, as well as the temperature dependence of the time scale required to reach equilibrium, providing a measure of the shortest effective glassy relaxation time and the longest effective equilibrium relaxation time, respectively. The induction time for the ultrathin film is found to be similar to the bulk at all temperatures presumably because the T g values are the same due to the use of a cooling rate of 1000 K/s prior to the enthalpy recovery measurements. On the other hand, the times required to reach equilibrium for the ultrathin film and bulk are similar at 100 °C, and considerably shorter for the ultrathin film at 90 °C, consistent with faster dynamics under nanoconfinement at low temperatures. The magnitude of the "T g depression" is smaller when using the equilibrium relaxation time from the structural recovery experiment as a measure of the dynamics than when measuring T g after a cooling experiment. A relaxation map is developed to summarize the results.

  8. The glass transition and enthalpy recovery of a single polystyrene ultrathin film using Flash DSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yung P.; Simon, Sindee L.

    2017-05-01

    The kinetics of the glass transition are measured for a single polystyrene ultrathin film of 20 nm thickness using Flash differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Tg is measured over a range of cooling rates from 0.1 to 1000 K/s and is depressed compared to the bulk. The depression decreases with increasing cooling rate, from 12 K lower than the bulk at 0.1 K/s to no significant change at 1000 K/s. Isothermal enthalpy recovery measurements are performed from 50 to 115 °C, and from these experiments, the temperature dependence of the induction time along the glass line is obtained, as well as the temperature dependence of the time scale required to reach equilibrium, providing a measure of the shortest effective glassy relaxation time and the longest effective equilibrium relaxation time, respectively. The induction time for the ultrathin film is found to be similar to the bulk at all temperatures presumably because the Tg values are the same due to the use of a cooling rate of 1000 K/s prior to the enthalpy recovery measurements. On the other hand, the times required to reach equilibrium for the ultrathin film and bulk are similar at 100 °C, and considerably shorter for the ultrathin film at 90 °C, consistent with faster dynamics under nanoconfinement at low temperatures. The magnitude of the "Tg depression" is smaller when using the equilibrium relaxation time from the structural recovery experiment as a measure of the dynamics than when measuring Tg after a cooling experiment. A relaxation map is developed to summarize the results.

  9. Nonlinear optics of light induced structural transitions in confined gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Kevin Francis

    2002-01-01

    An ultra-high-vacuum system has been constructed to facilitate atomic-beam deposition of gallium on cryogenically cooled substrates, including optical fibre tips. Alongside this, a fibre-optic pump-probe diagnostic system, based on semiconductor lasers, has been developed to perform in-situ measurements of the linear and transient nonlinear optical properties of gallium nanostructures, both during and after deposition. This unique combination of deposition and optical diagnostic techniques has provided a new means of studying the growth and optical characteristics of gallium nanostructures under highly controlled conditions. The linear and nonlinear optical properties of a new material structure, namely gallium/glass interfaces prepared by ultrafast pulsed laser deposition (UPLD), have been studied for the first time. The reflectivity characteristics of these high-quality interfaces were measured under varying conditions of temperature and light intensity at 810 nm: At temperatures several degrees below gallium's melting point T m , excitation intensities of just a few kW.cm -2 were seen to induce reflectivity changes of more than 30%. Experiments performed with a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator have illustrated that UPLD gallium/silica interfaces show a nonlinear response to optical excitation in the 440-680 nm wavelength range: Fluences of less than 10 mJ.cm -2 were seen to induce reflectivity changes of up to 35%, even at temperatures 15 deg below T m . It has been found that low power (17 μW average) laser illumination of cryogenically cooled substrates during atomic-beam deposition of gallium leads to the formation of uniformly sized gallium nanoparticles. This phenomenon is believed to be the result of a non-thermal light-assisted particle self-assembly process. Gallium nanoparticles have been seen to show a strongly temperature-dependent nonlinear response to low intensity, infrared (1550 nm) optical excitation: 1 μs pulses with peak intensities

  10. A New Vogel-Like Law: Ionic Conductivity, Dielectric Relaxation and Viscosity Near the Glass Transition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bendler, John

    2001-01-01

    A model, based on defect diffusion, is developed that describes temperature and pressure dependence of dielectric relaxation, ionic conductivity and viscosity of glass-forming liquids near the glass...

  11. Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

  12. Fundamental considerations in the effect of molecular weight on the glass transition of the gelatin/cosolute system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Kasapis, Stefan; Kontogiorgos, Vassilis

    2012-05-01

    Four molecular fractions of gelatin produced by alkaline hydrolysis of collagen were investigated in the presence of cosolute to record the mechanical properties of the glass transition in high-solid preparations. Dynamic oscillatory and stress relaxation moduli in shear were recorded from 40°C to temperatures as low as -60°C. The small-deformation behavior of these linear polymers was separated by the method of reduced variables into a basic function of time alone and a basic function of temperature alone. The former allowed the reduction of isothermal runs into a master curve covering 17 orders of magnitude in the time domain. The latter follows the passage from the rubbery plateau through the glass transition region to the glassy state seen in the variation of shift factor, a(T) , as a function of temperature. The mechanical glass transition temperature (T(g) ) is pinpointed at the operational threshold of the free volume theory and the predictions of the reaction rate theory. Additional insights into molecular dynamics are obtained via the coupling model of cooperativity, which introduces the concept of coupling constant or interaction strength of local segmental motions that govern structural relaxation at the vicinity of T(g) . The molecular weight of the four gelatin fractions appears to have a profound effect on the transition temperature or coupling constant of vitrified matrices, as does the protein chemistry in relation to that of amorphous synthetic polymers or gelling polysaccharides. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Soft glassy colloidal arrays in an ionic liquid: colloidal glass transition, ionic transport, and structural color in relation to microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Sano, Yuta; Inaba, Aya; Kondoh, Masashi; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2010-10-21

    The colloidal glass transition, ionic transport, and optical properties of soft glassy colloidal arrays (SGCAs) that consist of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-grafted silica nanoparticles (PMMA-g-NPs) and a room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)amide ([C(2)mim][NTf(2)]), were investigated. At lower particle concentrations, PMMA-g-NPs were well-suspended in the IL without any aggregation or sedimentation, and the dilute suspensions showed liquid-like behavior. However, above a certain particle concentration, the suspensions became solidified and exhibited different structural colors depending on the particle concentrations. The liquid-solid transition of the SGCAs was essentially caused by colloidal glass transition. Due to the soft repulsive interaction between the particles, the effective volume fraction of the particle (ϕ(eff)) required for colloidal glass transition was higher than that of the hard sphere system and found to be approximately 0.70-0.74. The SGCA had sufficient ionic conductivity, which was greater than 10(-3) S cm(-1) at room temperature, even in the highly concentrated region. For ionic transport of the cation and the anion in the SGCAs, the decrease in diffusivity observed with the addition of the particles (D(g)/D(0)) was slightly greater for the [NTf(2)] anion than that of the [C(2)mim] cation, suggesting that the [NTf(2)] anion preferentially interacts with the PMMA chains. The SGCAs showed homogeneous, nonbrilliant, and angle-independent structural colors above the glass transition volume fraction. In addition, the color of the SGCAs changed from red to green to blue as the particle concentration increased. A linear relationship was found between the maximum wavelength of the reflection spectra and the center-to-center distance in the SGCAs.

  14. Structural features of silver-doped phosphate glasses in zone of femtosecond laser-induced modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasileva, A.A.; Nazarov, I.A.; Olshin, P.K.; Povolotskiy, A.V.; Sokolov, I.A.; Manshina, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser writing of two-dimensional microstructures (waveguides) is demonstrated in bulk phosphate glasses doped with silver ions. Silver-content phosphate and silver-content niobium–phosphate glasses with high concentration of silver oxide 55 mol% were used as samples for fs laser writing. The chemical network structure of the synthesized samples is analyzed through Raman spectroscopy and was found to be strongly sensitive to Nb incorporation. It was found that the direct laser writing process enables not only reorganization of glass network, but also formation of color centers and silver nanoparticles that are revealed in appearance of luminescence signal and plasmon absorption. The process of NPs' formation is more efficient for Nb-phosphate glass, while color centers are preferably formed in phosphate glass. - Graphical abstract: Formation of silver NPs on the surface of 0.5Ag 2 O–0.4P 2 O 5 –0,1Nb 2 O 5 glass induced by CW laser irradiation. - Highlights: • The structure of 0.5Ag 2 O–0.1Nb 2 O 5 –0.4P 2 O 5 and 0.55Ag 2 O–0.45P 2 O 5 glasses was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. • Fs laser writing induces formation of silver NPs in investigated glasses. • Surface plasmon resonance in the absorption spectra confirms the formation of NP. • The possibility of CW laser induced formation of silver NPs on the surface of sample with niobium is shown

  15. Substrate and surfactant effects on the glass-liquid transition of thin water films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Ryutaro

    2006-09-07

    Temperature-programmed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TP-TOF-SIMS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) have been used to perform a detailed investigation of the adsorption, desorption, and glass-liquid transition of water on the graphite and Ni(111) surfaces in the temperature range 13-200 K. Water wets the graphite surface at 100-120 K, and the hydrogen-bonded network is formed preferentially in the first monolayer to reduce the number of nonbonding hydrogens. The strongly chemisorbed water molecules at the Ni(111) surface do not form such a network and play a role in stabilizing the film morphology up to 160 K, where dewetting occurs abruptly irrespective of the film thickness. The surface structure of the water film formed on graphite is fluctuated considerably, resulting in deweting at 150-160 K depending on the film thickness. The dewetted patches of graphite are molecularly clean, whereas the chemisorbed water remains on the Ni(111) surface even after evaporation of the film. The abrupt drop in the desorption rate of water molecules at 160 K, which has been attributed to crystallization in the previous TPD studies, is found to disappear completely when a monolayer of methanol is present on the surface. This is because the morphology of supercooled liquid water is changed by the surface tension, and it is quenched by termination of the free OH groups on the surface. The surfactant methanol desorbs above 160 K since the hydrogen bonds of the water molecules are reconstructed. The drastic change in the properties of supercooled liquid water at 160 K should be ascribed to the liquid-liquid phase transition.

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced concentric ring microstructures on Zr-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Fengxu; Yang Jianjun; Xiaonong Zhu; Liang Chunyong; Wang Hongshui

    2010-01-01

    Surface morphological evolution of Zr-based metallic glass ablated by femtosecond lasers is investigated in atmosphere condition. Three types of permanent ring structures with micro-level spacing are observed for different laser shots and fluences. In the case of low laser fluences, the generation of annular patterns with nonthermal features is observed on the rippled structure with the subwavelength scale, and the ring spacing shows a decrease tendency from the center to the margin. While in the case of high laser fluences, the concentric rings formation within the laser spot is found to have evident molten traces and display the increasing ring spacing along the radial direction. Moreover, when the laser shots accumulation becomes large, the above two types of ring microstructures begin to develop into the common ablation craters. Analysis and discussion suggests that the stress-induced condensation of ablation vapors and the frozen thermocapillary waves on the molten surfaces should be responsible for the formation of two different types of concentric ring structures, respectively. Eventually, a processing window for each resulting surface microstructure type is obtained experimentally and indicates the possibility to control the morphological transitions among different types.

  17. Micro-Raman spectroscopy studies of the phase separation mechanisms of transition-metal phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazali, Italo Odone; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz; Gimenez, Iara de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    Glass-ceramics are prepared by controlled separation of crystal phases in glasses, leading to uniform and dense grain structures. On the other hand, chemical leaching of soluble crystal phases yields porous glass-ceramics with important applications. Here, glass/ceramic interfaces of niobo-, vanado- and titano-phosphate glasses were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy, whose spatial resolution revealed the multiphase structures. Phase-separation mechanisms were also determined by this technique, revealing that interface composition remained unchanged as the crystallization front advanced for niobo- and vanadophosphate glasses (interface-controlled crystallization). For titanophosphate glasses, phase composition changed continuously with time up to the equilibrium composition, indicating a spinodal-type phase separation. (author)

  18. Ac-conductivity and dielectric relaxations above glass transition temperature for parylene-C thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahouli, A. [Joseph Fourier University (UJF), Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2ELab), Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laboratory for Materials, Organization and Properties (LabMOP), Tunis (Tunisia); Sylvestre, A. [Joseph Fourier University (UJF), Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2ELab), Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Jomni, F.; Yangui, B. [Laboratory for Materials, Organization and Properties (LabMOP), Tunis (Tunisia); Legrand, J. [Varioptic SA, Lyon (France)

    2012-03-15

    45% semi-crystalline parylene-C (-H{sub 2}C-C{sub 6}H{sub 3}Cl-CH{sub 2}-){sub n} thin films (5.8 {mu}m) polymers have been investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy for temperatures above the glass transition (T{sub g} =90 C). Good insulating properties of parylene-C were obtained until operating temperatures as high as 200 C. Thus, low-frequency conductivities from 10 {sup -15} to 10 {sup -12} S/cm were obtained for temperatures varying from 90 to 185 C, respectively. This conductivity is at the origin of a significant increase in the dielectric constant at low frequency and at high temperature. As a consequence, Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) polarization at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces is put in evidence with activation energy of 1.5 eV. Coupled TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis) and DTA (differential thermal analysis) revealed that the material is stable up to 400 C. This is particularly interesting to integrate this material for new applications as organic field effect transistors (OFETs). Electric conductivity measured at temperatures up to 200 C obeys to the well-known Jonscher law. The plateau observed in the low frequency part of this conductivity is temperature-dependent and follows Arrhenius behavior with activation energy of 0.97 eV (deep traps). (orig.)

  19. Study of glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites using molecular dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, B.; Liu, Y.; Zou, J.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Dai, L. L.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites capable of detecting a damage precursor using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular structures of a cross-linked epoxy network (which consist of epoxy resin, hardener and stress-sensitive material) have been simulated and experimentally validated. The chemical constituents of the molecular structures are di-glycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF: epoxy resin), di-ethylene tri-amine (DETA: hardener) and tris-(cinnamoyloxymethyl)-ethane (TCE: stress-sensitive material). The cross-linking degree is varied by manipulating the number of covalent bonds through tuning a cutoff distance between activated DGEBF and DETA during the non-equilibrium MD simulation. A relationship between the cross-linking degree and Tgs has been studied numerically. In order to validate a proposed MD simulation framework, MD-predicted Tgs of materials used in this study have been compared to the experimental results obtained by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two molecular models have been constructed for comparative study: (i) neat epoxy (epoxy resin with hardener) and (ii) smart polymer (neat epoxy with stress-sensitive material). The predicted Tgs show close agreement with the DSC results.

  20. Using Combined Computational Techniques to Predict the Glass Transition Temperatures of Aromatic Polybenzoxazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Phumzile; Wan Hassan, Wan Aminah; Hamerton, Ian; Howlin, Brendan J.

    2013-01-01

    The Molecular Operating Environment software (MOE) is used to construct a series of benzoxazine monomers for which a variety of parameters relating to the structures (e.g. water accessible surface area, negative van der Waals surface area, hydrophobic volume and the sum of atomic polarizabilities, etc.) are obtained and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR) models are formulated. Three QSPR models (formulated using up to 5 descriptors) are first used to make predictions for the initiator data set (n = 9) and compared to published thermal data; in all of the QSPR models there is a high level of agreement between the actual data and the predicted data (within 0.63–1.86 K of the entire dataset). The water accessible surface area is found to be the most important descriptor in the prediction of Tg. Molecular modelling simulations of the benzoxazine polymer (minus initiator) carried out at the same time using the Materials Studio software suite provide an independent prediction of Tg. Predicted Tg values from molecular modelling fall in the middle of the range of the experimentally determined Tg values, indicating that the structure of the network is influenced by the nature of the initiator used. Hence both techniques can provide predictions of glass transition temperatures and provide complementary data for polymer design. PMID:23326419

  1. Using combined computational techniques to predict the glass transition temperatures of aromatic polybenzoxazines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumzile Mhlanga

    Full Text Available The Molecular Operating Environment software (MOE is used to construct a series of benzoxazine monomers for which a variety of parameters relating to the structures (e.g. water accessible surface area, negative van der Waals surface area, hydrophobic volume and the sum of atomic polarizabilities, etc. are obtained and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR models are formulated. Three QSPR models (formulated using up to 5 descriptors are first used to make predictions for the initiator data set (n = 9 and compared to published thermal data; in all of the QSPR models there is a high level of agreement between the actual data and the predicted data (within 0.63-1.86 K of the entire dataset. The water accessible surface area is found to be the most important descriptor in the prediction of T(g. Molecular modelling simulations of the benzoxazine polymer (minus initiator carried out at the same time using the Materials Studio software suite provide an independent prediction of T(g. Predicted T(g values from molecular modelling fall in the middle of the range of the experimentally determined T(g values, indicating that the structure of the network is influenced by the nature of the initiator used. Hence both techniques can provide predictions of glass transition temperatures and provide complementary data for polymer design.

  2. Molecular relaxation behavior and isothermal crystallization above glass transition temperature of amorphous hesperetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shete, Ganesh; Khomane, Kailas S; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relaxation behavior of amorphous hesperetin (HRN), using dielectric spectroscopy, and assessment of its crystallization kinetics above glass transition temperature (Tg ). Amorphous HRN exhibited both local (β-) and global (α-) relaxations. β-Relaxation was observed below Tg , whereas α-relaxation prominently emerged above Tg . β-Relaxation was found to be of Johari-Goldstein type and was correlated with α-process by coupling model. Secondly, isothermal crystallization experiments were performed at 363 K (Tg + 16.5 K), 373 K (Tg + 26.5 K), and 383 K (Tg + 36.5 K). The kinetics of crystallization, obtained from the normalized dielectric strength, was modeled using the Avrami model. Havriliak-Negami (HN) shape parameters, αHN and αHN .βHN , were analyzed during the course of crystallization to understand the dynamics of amorphous phase during the emergence of crystallites. HN shape parameters indicated that long range (α-like) were motions affected to a greater extent than short range (β-like) motions during isothermal crystallization studies at all temperature conditions. The variable behavior of α-like motions at different isothermal crystallization temperatures was attributed to evolving crystallites with time and increase in electrical conductivity with temperature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. A molecular dynamics approach for predicting the glass transition temperature and plasticization effect in amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jasmine; Nunes, Cletus; Jonnalagadda, Sriramakamal

    2013-11-04

    The objectives of this study were as follows: (i) To develop an in silico technique, based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to predict glass transition temperatures (Tg) of amorphous pharmaceuticals. (ii) To computationally study the effect of plasticizer on Tg. (iii) To investigate the intermolecular interactions using radial distribution function (RDF). Amorphous sucrose and water were selected as the model compound and plasticizer, respectively. MD simulations were performed using COMPASS force field and isothermal-isobaric ensembles. The specific volumes of amorphous cells were computed in the temperature range of 440-265 K. The characteristic "kink" observed in volume-temperature curves, in conjunction with regression analysis, defined the Tg. The MD computed Tg values were 367 K, 352 K and 343 K for amorphous sucrose containing 0%, 3% and 5% w/w water, respectively. The MD technique thus effectively simulated the plasticization effect of water; and the corresponding Tg values were in reasonable agreement with theoretical models and literature reports. The RDF measurements revealed strong hydrogen bond interactions between sucrose hydroxyl oxygens and water oxygen. Steric effects led to weak interactions between sucrose acetal oxygens and water oxygen. MD is thus a powerful predictive tool for probing temperature and water effects on the stability of amorphous systems during drug development.

  4. Structure-to-glass transition temperature relationships in high temperature stable condensation polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W. B.; Gratz, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a hexafluoroisopropylidene (6F) connecting group in aryl dianhydrides used to prepare aromatic condensation polyimides provides high glass transition temperature (T sub g) polyimides with excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if a trifluorophenyl-ethylidene (3F) connecting group would have a similar effect on the T sub g of aromatic condensation polyimides. A new dianhydride containing the 3F connecting group was synthesized. This dianhydride and an aromatic diamine also containing the 3F connecting group were used together and in various combinations with known diamines or known dianhydrides, respectively, to prepare new 3F containing condensation polyimides. Known polyimides, including some with the 6F connecting linkage, were also prepared for comparison purposes. The new 3F containing polymers and the comparison polymers were prepared by condensation polymerization via the traditional amic-acid polymerization method in N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent. The solutions were characterized by determining their inherent viscosities and then were thermally converted into polyimide films under nitrogen atmosphere at 300 to 500 C, usually 350 C. The T sub g's of the films and resin discs were then determined by thermomechanical analysis and were correlated as a function of the final processing temperatures of the films and resin discs. The results showed that similarities existed in the T sub g's depending on the nature of the connecting linkage in the monomers used to prepare the condensation polyimides.

  5. Low-Cost, High Glass-Transition Temperature, Thermosetting Polyimide Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.

    1999-01-01

    PMR-15 polyimide, developed in the mid-1970's at the NASA Lewis Research Center, is recognized as a state-of-the-art high-temperature resin for composite applications in the temperature range of 500 to 550 F (260 to 288 C). PMR-15 offers easy processing and good property retention at a reasonable cost. For these reasons, it is widely used in both military and commercial aircraft engine components. Traditionally, polyimide composites have been designed for long-term use at 500 to 600 F over thousands of hours. However, new applications in reusable launch vehicles (RLV's) require lightweight materials that can perform for short times (tens of hours) at temperatures between 800 and 1000 F (425 and 538 C). Current efforts at Lewis are focused on raising the use temperature of polyimide composites by increasing the glass-transition temperature of the matrix resins. Achieving this dramatic increase in the upper use temperature without sacrificing polymer and composite processability is a major technical challenge.

  6. Effect of salt on the glass transition of condensed tapioca starch systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Lillian; Panyoyai, Naksit; Shanks, Robert A; Kasapis, Stefan

    2017-08-15

    This work examines the effect of including hydrated NaCl and CaCl 2 (up to 6% w/w) on the physicochemical properties of condensed tapioca starch. Samples were prepared by hot pressing at 120°C to produce condensed systems that covered a range of moisture contents from 7.34% w/w (23% relative humidity) to 19.52% w/w (75% relative humidity). Tensile storage modulus and heat flow measurements were taken using DMA and MDSC, which were accompanied by FTIR, WAXD and ESEM. Increasing the salt level enhances the mechanical strength of starch in the glassy state and shifts the glass transition temperature to a higher value. Antiplasticising effects of NaCl and CaCl 2 on the non-phosphorylated tapioca starch are indistinguishable from each other. Observations are complemented by intensification of absorbance peaks in FTIR spectra and a systematic change in shape and intensity of diffraction patterns with increasing addition of salt consistent with interactions between added ions and macromolecule. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Tuning Glass Transition in Polymer Nanocomposites with Functionalized Cellulose Nanocrystals through Nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xin; Xia, Wenjie; Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2015-10-14

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) exhibit impressive interfacial and mechanical properties that make them promising candidates to be used as fillers within nanocomposites. While glass-transition temperature (Tg) is a common metric for describing thermomechanical properties, its prediction is extremely difficult as it depends on filler surface chemistry, volume fraction, and size. Here, taking CNC-reinforced poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites as a relevant model system, we present a multiscale analysis that combines atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) surface energy calculations with coarse-grained (CG) simulations of relaxation dynamics near filler-polymer interfaces to predict composite properties. We discover that increasing the volume fraction of CNCs results in nanoconfinement effects that lead to an appreciation of the composite Tg provided that strong interfacial interactions are achieved, as in the case of TEMPO-mediated surface modifications that promote hydrogen bonding. The upper and lower bounds of shifts in Tg are predicted by fully accounting for nanoconfinement and interfacial properties, providing new insight into tuning these aspects in nanocomposite design. Our multiscale, materials-by-design framework is validated by recent experiments and breaks new ground in predicting, without any empirical parameters, key structure-property relationships for nanocomposites.

  8. A detailed view of microparticle formation by in-process monitoring of the glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Kerstin; Frieß, Wolfgang; Scheler, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres were prepared by a well-controlled emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation process. The objective of this study was to investigate how drug release can be modified by changing the morphology of the polymer matrix. The matrix structure was controlled by the preparation temperature which was varied between 10 and 35 °C, thus changing the 4 weeks release pattern from almost linear kinetics to a sigmoidal profile with a distinct lag phase and furthermore decreasing the encapsulation efficiency. By monitoring the glass transition temperature during the extraction process, it was shown that the preparation temperature determines the particle morphology by influencing the time span in which the polymer chains were mobile and flexible during the extraction process. Further factors determining drug release were found to be the molecular weight of the polymer and the rate of solvent removal. The latter, however, has also influence on the encapsulation efficiency with slow removal causing a higher drug loss. A secondary modification of the outer particle structure could be achieved by ethanolic post-treatment of the particles, which caused an extension of the lag phase and subsequently an accelerated drug release. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Glass transition and degree of conversion of a light-cured orthodontic composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela M. D. S. Sostena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the glass transition temperature (Tg and degree of conversion (DC of a light-cured (Fill Magic versus a chemically cured (Concise orthodontic composite. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anelastic relaxation spectroscopy was used for the first time to determine the Tg of a dental composite, while the DC was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. The light-cured composite specimens were irradiated with a commercial LED light-curing unit using different exposure times (40, 90 and 120 s. RESULTS: Fill Magic presented lower Tg than Concise (35-84ºC versus 135ºC, but reached a higher DC. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Fill Magic has lower Tg than Concise due to its higher organic phase content, and that when this light-cured composite is used to bond orthodontic brackets, a minimum energy density of 7.8 J/cm² is necessary to reach adequate conversion level and obtain satisfactory adhesion.

  10. Impact of the glass transition on exciton dynamics in polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Philipp; Proepper, Daniel; Graf, Alexander; Jores, Stefan; Boris, Alexander V.; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2017-11-01

    In the development of organic electronics, unlimited design possibilities of conjugated polymers offer a wide variety of mechanical and electronic properties. Thereby, it is crucially important to reveal universal physical characteristics that allow efficient and forward developments of new chemical compounds. In particular for organic solar cells, a deeper understanding of exciton dynamics in polymer films can help to improve the charge generation process further. For this purpose, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) is commonly used as a model system, although exciton decay kinetics have found different interpretations. Using temperature-dependent time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in combination with low-temperature spectroscopic ellipsometry, we can show that P3HT is indeed a model system in which excitons follow a simple diffusion/hopping model. Based on our results we can exclude the relevance of hot-exciton emission as well as a dynamic torsional relaxation upon photoexcitation on a ps time scale. Instead, we depict the glass transition temperature of polymers to strongly affect exciton dynamics.

  11. Ordering transitions induced by Coulomb interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovere, M.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1988-11-01

    We briefly review recent progress in treating phase transitions to ordered states driven by Coulomb interactions. Wigner crystallization of the one-component plasma, in the degenerate Fermi limit and in the classical limit, is the foremost example and developments in its theory are discussed in some detail. Attention is also given to quasi-twodimensional realizations of the plasma model in the laboratory. The usefulness of these ideas in relation to freezing and ordering transitions is illustrated with reference to alkali metals, elemental and polar semiconductors, and various types of ionic systems (molten salts, colloidal suspensions and astrophysical plasmas). (author). 70 refs, 5 figs

  12. The behavior of stress correlations and glass transition temperature in liquid aluminum at cooling and heating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirova, E. M.; Pisarev, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamics study of stress correlations and shear viscosity behavior of the rapidly cooled and re-heated liquid aluminum film is performed. The embedded atom method potential is used at the simulation. The stress correlation behavior is studied in the plane of the film and along the direction normal to the plane. The behavior of the kinematic viscosity and the stress correlations are compared for cooling and heating process. Using two methods we showed that the glass transition for the cooling process is higher than for the heating. The first method is based on the stress correlations in the plane of the film and the steep change of the kinematic viscosity. The second method is based on the transverse oscillations in the film. The glass transition temperature is estimated from the dependence of the oscillation damping on temperature. The increasing in the kinematic viscosity correlates with the decrease of transverse oscillations damping in the film.

  13. Observation of exchanging role of gold and silver nanoparticles in bimetallic thin film upon annealing above the glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htet Kyaw, Htet; Tay Zar Myint, Myo; Hamood Al-Harthi, Salim; Maekawa, Toru; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Sellai, Azzouz; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-08-01

    The exchange role of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) in bimetallic films co-evaporated onto soda-lime glass substrates with Au-Ag volume ratios of 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 have been demonstrated. Annealing of the films above the glass transition temperature in air led to non-alloying nature of the films, silver neutrals (Ag0) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the surface, along with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) inside the glass matrix. Moreover, the size distribution and interparticle spacing of the AuNPs on the surface were governed by the Ag content in the deposited film. In contrast, the content of Au in the film played an opposite role leading to the migration of Ag ions (i.e. Ag0 being transformed to Ag ions after annealing in oxygen ambient) to form AgNPs inside the glass matrix. The higher the Au content in the film is, the more likely Ag0 to stay on the surface and impacts on the size distribution of AuNPs and consequently on the refractive index sensitivity measurements. Experimental realisation of this fact was reflected from the best performance for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensitivity test achieved with Au-Ag ratio of 1:2. The Au/Ag/glass bimetallic dynamic results of this study can be pertinent to sensor applications integrated with optical devices.

  14. Effect of water content on the glass transition temperature of mixtures of sugars, polymers, and penetrating cryoprotectants in physiological buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Emma M.; Karlsson, Jens O. M.; Eroglu, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Long-term storage of viable mammalian cells is important for applications ranging from in vitro fertilization to cell therapy. Cryopreservation is currently the most common approach, but storage in liquid nitrogen is relatively costly and the requirement for low temperatures during shipping is inconvenient. Desiccation is an alternative strategy with the potential to enable viable cell preservation at more convenient storage temperatures without the need for liquid nitrogen. To achieve stability during storage in the dried state it is necessary to remove enough water that the remaining matrix forms a non-crystalline glassy solid. Thus, the glass transition temperature is a key parameter for design of cell desiccation procedures. In this study, we have investigated the effects of moisture content on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of mixtures of sugars (trehalose or raffinose), polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone or Ficoll), penetrating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutes. Aqueous solutions were dried to different moisture contents by equilibration with saturated salt solutions, or by baking at 95°C. The glass transition temperatures of the dehydrated samples were then measured by differential scanning calorimetry. As expected, Tg increased with decreasing moisture content. For example, in a desiccation medium containing 0.1 M trehalose in PBS, Tg ranged from about 360 K for a completely dry sample to about 220 K at a water mass fraction of 0.4. Addition of polymers to the solutions increased Tg, while addition of penetrating cryoprotectants decreased Tg. Our results provide insight into the relationship between relative humidity, moisture content and glass transition temperature for cell desiccation solutions containing sugars, polymers and penetrating cryoprotectants. PMID:29304068

  15. Bonding at Compatible and Incompatible Amorphous Interfaces of Polystyrene and Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiko, Yuri M.; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Films of high-molecular-weight amorphous polystyrene (PS, M-w = 225 kg/mol, M-w/M-n = 3, T-g-bulk = 97degreesC, where T-g-bulk is the glass transition temperature of the bulk sample) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA, M-w = 87 kg/mol, M-w/M-n = 2, Tg-bulk = 109degreesC) were brought into contact...

  16. Healing of interfaces of high and ultra-high-molecular- weight polystyrene below the bulk glass transition temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiko, Yuri M.; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    into contact to themselves below the glass transition temperature T-g of the bulk Tg-bulk, in a lap-shear joint geometry, at a constant healing temperature T-h for a healing time t(h) of 10 min to 24 h. The lap-shear strength sigma of the symmetric HMWPS-HMWPS and UHMWPS-URMWPS interfaces has been measured...

  17. Effect of water content on the glass transition temperature of mixtures of sugars, polymers, and penetrating cryoprotectants in physiological buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Andrew C; Lee, Youngjoo; Burgess, Emma M; Karlsson, Jens O M; Eroglu, Ali; Higgins, Adam Z

    2018-01-01

    Long-term storage of viable mammalian cells is important for applications ranging from in vitro fertilization to cell therapy. Cryopreservation is currently the most common approach, but storage in liquid nitrogen is relatively costly and the requirement for low temperatures during shipping is inconvenient. Desiccation is an alternative strategy with the potential to enable viable cell preservation at more convenient storage temperatures without the need for liquid nitrogen. To achieve stability during storage in the dried state it is necessary to remove enough water that the remaining matrix forms a non-crystalline glassy solid. Thus, the glass transition temperature is a key parameter for design of cell desiccation procedures. In this study, we have investigated the effects of moisture content on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of mixtures of sugars (trehalose or raffinose), polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone or Ficoll), penetrating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutes. Aqueous solutions were dried to different moisture contents by equilibration with saturated salt solutions, or by baking at 95°C. The glass transition temperatures of the dehydrated samples were then measured by differential scanning calorimetry. As expected, Tg increased with decreasing moisture content. For example, in a desiccation medium containing 0.1 M trehalose in PBS, Tg ranged from about 360 K for a completely dry sample to about 220 K at a water mass fraction of 0.4. Addition of polymers to the solutions increased Tg, while addition of penetrating cryoprotectants decreased Tg. Our results provide insight into the relationship between relative humidity, moisture content and glass transition temperature for cell desiccation solutions containing sugars, polymers and penetrating cryoprotectants.

  18. Effect of water content on the glass transition temperature of mixtures of sugars, polymers, and penetrating cryoprotectants in physiological buffer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Drake

    Full Text Available Long-term storage of viable mammalian cells is important for applications ranging from in vitro fertilization to cell therapy. Cryopreservation is currently the most common approach, but storage in liquid nitrogen is relatively costly and the requirement for low temperatures during shipping is inconvenient. Desiccation is an alternative strategy with the potential to enable viable cell preservation at more convenient storage temperatures without the need for liquid nitrogen. To achieve stability during storage in the dried state it is necessary to remove enough water that the remaining matrix forms a non-crystalline glassy solid. Thus, the glass transition temperature is a key parameter for design of cell desiccation procedures. In this study, we have investigated the effects of moisture content on the glass transition temperature (Tg of mixtures of sugars (trehalose or raffinose, polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone or Ficoll, penetrating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide, and phosphate buffered saline (PBS solutes. Aqueous solutions were dried to different moisture contents by equilibration with saturated salt solutions, or by baking at 95°C. The glass transition temperatures of the dehydrated samples were then measured by differential scanning calorimetry. As expected, Tg increased with decreasing moisture content. For example, in a desiccation medium containing 0.1 M trehalose in PBS, Tg ranged from about 360 K for a completely dry sample to about 220 K at a water mass fraction of 0.4. Addition of polymers to the solutions increased Tg, while addition of penetrating cryoprotectants decreased Tg. Our results provide insight into the relationship between relative humidity, moisture content and glass transition temperature for cell desiccation solutions containing sugars, polymers and penetrating cryoprotectants.

  19. Induced birefringence in optically isotropic glass by a short pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Paramita; Gupta, K. C.; Murali, C. G.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Godwal, B. K.

    2006-10-01

    We have observed laser induced birefringence in optically isotropic glasses as well as in Nd:YAG crystal using polarized pulses of wavelength 1.06 µm and duration 100 ps with an intensity near 109 W cm-2. The laser used in the experiment was a Nd:YAG oscillator-amplifier system. The change in the material induced by the laser was not a permanent change but existed for as long as the laser pulse lasted. We observed conoscopic patterns when the laser was passed through glass or the Nd:YAG crystal. These patterns are typically seen when light is passed through birefringent materials kept between a polarizer and analyser. This observation immediately suggests that the glass or the crystal possesses optical birefringence. This birefringence is demonstrated in fused silica glass, Nd:glass and Nd:YAG crystal. The circular symmetric conoscopic patterns show that the optic axis is formed along the direction of laser propagation. The laser induced birefringence depended on the laser intensity and we characterized the magnitude of this change by measuring the output pulse at the end of the crossed polarizer.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Arn + Cluster Backscattering from Polymer Surfaces: a New Method to Determine the Surface Glass Transition Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleunis, Claude; Cristaudo, Vanina; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2018-01-01

    In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to study the intensity variations of the backscattered Arn + clusters as a function of temperature for several amorphous polymer surfaces (polyolefins, polystyrene, and polymethyl methacrylate). For all these investigated polymers, our results show a transition of the ratio Ar2 +/(Ar2 + + Ar3 +) when the temperature is scanned from -120 °C to +125 °C (the exact limits depend on the studied polymer). This transition generally spans over a few tens of degrees and the temperature of the inflection point of each curve is always lower than the bulk glass transition temperature (Tg) reported for the considered polymer. Due to the surface sensitivity of the cluster backscattering process (several nanometers), the presented analysis could provide a new method to specifically evaluate a surface transition temperature of polymers, with the same lateral resolution as the gas cluster beam. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Arn+ Cluster Backscattering from Polymer Surfaces: a New Method to Determine the Surface Glass Transition Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleunis, Claude; Cristaudo, Vanina; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2018-01-01

    In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to study the intensity variations of the backscattered Ar n + clusters as a function of temperature for several amorphous polymer surfaces (polyolefins, polystyrene, and polymethyl methacrylate). For all these investigated polymers, our results show a transition of the ratio Ar 2 + /(Ar 2 + + Ar 3 + ) when the temperature is scanned from -120 °C to +125 °C (the exact limits depend on the studied polymer). This transition generally spans over a few tens of degrees and the temperature of the inflection point of each curve is always lower than the bulk glass transition temperature (T g ) reported for the considered polymer. Due to the surface sensitivity of the cluster backscattering process (several nanometers), the presented analysis could provide a new method to specifically evaluate a surface transition temperature of polymers, with the same lateral resolution as the gas cluster beam. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  2. How carbon nanotubes affect the cure kinetics and glass transition temperature of their epoxy composites? – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the widespread and contradictory results regarding the glass transition temperature of carbon nanotube (CNT/epoxy composites, we reviewed and analyzed the literature results dealing with the effect of unmodified multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT on the cure behaviour of an epoxy resin (as a possible source of this discrepancy. The aim of this work was to clarify the effective role of unmodified multiwall carbon nanotubes on the cure kinetics and glass transition temperature (Tg of their epoxy composites. It was found that various authors reported an acceleration effect of CNT. The cure reaction was promoted in its early stage which may be due to the catalyst particles present in the CNT raw material. While SWNT may lead to a decrease of Tg due to their bundling tendency, results reported for MWNT suggested an increased or unchanged Tg of the composites. The present status of the literature does not allow to isolate the effect of MWNT on the Tg due to the lack of a study providing essential information such as CNT purity, glass transition temperature along with the corresponding cure degree.

  3. Glass-Transition Temperature Profile Measured in a Wood Cell Wall Using Scanning Thermal Expansion Microscope (SThEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniow, J. S.; Maigret, J.-E.; Jensen, C.; Trannoy, N.; Chirtoc, M.; Beaugrand, J.

    2012-11-01

    This study aims to assess the in situ spatial distribution of glass-transition temperatures ( T g) of the main lignocellulosic biopolymers of plant cell walls. Studies are conducted using scanning thermal expansion microscopy to analyze the cross-section of the cell wall of poplar. The surface topography is mapped over a range of probe-tip temperatures to capture the change of thermal expansion on the sample surface versus temperature. For different temperature values chosen between 20 °C and 250 °C, several quantitative mappings were made to show the spatial variation of the thermal expansion. As the glass transition affects the thermal expansion coefficient and elastic modulus considerably, the same data line of each topography image was extracted to identify specific thermal events in their topographic evolution as a function of temperature. In particular, it is shown that the thermal expansion of the contact surface is not uniform across the cell wall and a profile of the glass-transition temperature could thus be evidenced and quantified corresponding to the mobility of lignocellulosic polymers having a role in the organization of the cell wall structures.

  4. The transition time induced narrow linewidth of the electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Luming; Peng Xiang; Liu Cheng; Guo Hong; Chen Xuzong

    2004-01-01

    We observed a narrow linewidth (∼60 kHz) in a Doppler-broadened system showing electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium atomic vapour. The transition time induced reduction of the linewidth is illustrated both theoretically and experimentally

  5. Induced waveform transitions of dissipative solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, Bogdan A.; Tuz, Vladimir R.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of an externally applied force upon the dynamics of dissipative solitons is analyzed in the framework of the one-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation supplemented by a potential term with an explicit coordinate dependence. The potential accounts for the external force manipulations and consists of three symmetrically arranged potential wells whose depth varies along the longitudinal coordinate. It is found out that under an influence of such potential a transition between different soliton waveforms coexisting under the same physical conditions can be achieved. A low-dimensional phase-space analysis is applied in order to demonstrate that by only changing the potential profile, transitions between different soliton waveforms can be performed in a controllable way. In particular, it is shown that by means of a selected potential, stationary dissipative soliton can be transformed into another stationary soliton as well as into periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic spatiotemporal dissipative structures.

  6. Prediction of the Formulation Dependence of the Glass Transition Temperature for Amine-Epoxy Copolymers Using a Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Based on the AM1 Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrill, Jason

    2004-01-01

    A designer Quantitative Structure-Property Relationsbip (QSPR) based upon molecular properties calculated using the AM1 semi-empirical quantum mechanical metbod was developed to predict the glass transition temperature (Tg...

  7. Effect of sugar addition on glass transition temperatures of cassava starch with low to intermediate moisture contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Yetzury; Guevara, Marvilan; Pérez, Adriana; Cova, Aura; Sandoval, Aleida J; Müller, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    This work studies how sucrose (S) addition modifies the thermal properties of cassava starch (CS). Neat CS and CS-S blends with 4, 6 and 8% sugar contents (CS-S-4%, CS-S-6% and CS-S-8%) were prepared and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), in a wide range of moisture levels (2-20%). In equilibrated samples with moisture contents lower than 10%, twoendothermic steps were observed during first DSC heating scans and two corresponding relaxation maxima in tan δ were detected by DMTA. The first transition, detected at around 45-55°C by both DSC and DMTA, is frequently found in starchy foods, while the second observed at higher temperatures is associated to the glass transition temperature of the blends. At higher moisture contents, only one thermal transition was observed. Samples analyzed immediately after cooling from the melt (i.e., after erasing their thermal history), exhibited a single glass transition temperature, regardless of their moisture content. Addition of sugar promotes water plasticization of CS only at high moisture contents. In the low moisture content range, anti-plasticization was observed for both neat and sugar-added CS samples. Addition of sugar decreases the moisture content needed to achieve the maximum value of the glass transition temperature before plasticization starts. The results of this work may be valuable for the study of texture establishment in low moisture content extruded food products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis and characterization of degradation pathologies of Roman glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomar, T.; Oujja, M.; García-Heras, M.; Villegas, M.A.; Castillejo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility and possibilities of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in the full study of non-destructible historic glasses have been explored in the present work. Thirteen Roman glass samples, including seven entire glass beads, from the ancient town of Augusta Emerita (SW Spain) were characterized by LIBS in combination with other conventional techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. LIBS stratigraphic analysis, carried out by the application of successive laser pulses on the same spot, has been mainly targeted at characterizing particular features of non-destructible historic glasses, such as bulk chemical composition, surface degradation pathologies (dealkalinization layers and deposits), chromophores, and opacifying elements. The obtained data demonstrate that LIBS can be a useful and alternative technique for spectroscopic studies of historical glasses, especially for those conserved under burial conditions and when it deals with studying non-destructible samples. - Highlights: • Determination of chromophores and opacifiers in non-destructible glass by LIBS • Manganese is determined as principal component of dark deposits. • Antimony appears in all decorations while lead is only present in yellow ones. • Stratigraphic analysis enables the identification of dealkalinization layers

  9. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis and characterization of degradation pathologies of Roman glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomar, T. [Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C/Albasanz 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain); Oujja, M., E-mail: m.oujja@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); García-Heras, M.; Villegas, M.A. [Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C/Albasanz 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, M. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, C/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-09-01

    The feasibility and possibilities of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in the full study of non-destructible historic glasses have been explored in the present work. Thirteen Roman glass samples, including seven entire glass beads, from the ancient town of Augusta Emerita (SW Spain) were characterized by LIBS in combination with other conventional techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. LIBS stratigraphic analysis, carried out by the application of successive laser pulses on the same spot, has been mainly targeted at characterizing particular features of non-destructible historic glasses, such as bulk chemical composition, surface degradation pathologies (dealkalinization layers and deposits), chromophores, and opacifying elements. The obtained data demonstrate that LIBS can be a useful and alternative technique for spectroscopic studies of historical glasses, especially for those conserved under burial conditions and when it deals with studying non-destructible samples. - Highlights: • Determination of chromophores and opacifiers in non-destructible glass by LIBS • Manganese is determined as principal component of dark deposits. • Antimony appears in all decorations while lead is only present in yellow ones. • Stratigraphic analysis enables the identification of dealkalinization layers.

  10. Contribution to the investigation of induced coloured centres in sodalime glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornu Thenard, S.

    1978-01-01

    Electron beam induced coloration of sodalime glasses naturally coloured prior to irradiation due to chromium present in the batch is studied by absorption and emission spectroscopy techniques. The influence of isochronal and isothermal heat treatments is investigated. The two possible interpretations of the observed phenomena which might seem contradictory are discussed [fr

  11. Pressure-induced phase transition in a ternary microemulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Michihiro; Seto, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    Static and dynamic structure of a ternary microemulsion system including AOT (Aerosol-OT; dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt) were investigated in order to clarify the mechanism of the structural phase transition induced by pressure. From the static measurement by means of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS), it was observed that the dense water-in-oil droplet structure at ambient temperature and pressure transformed to two-phase coexistence with the lamellar phase and the bicontinuous phase with increasing pressure as the case of increasing temperature. The characteristic features of pressure-induced phase transition were quite similar to the temperature-induced one below the phase transition temperature and pressure, however, above the transition temperature and pressure, they were different. From the dynamical measurement by means of the neutron spin echo (NSE), membrane dynamics at high-pressure phase was observed completely different from the high temperature phase. The result showed that with increasing temperature the membrane became flexible and, on the other hand, it became rigid with increasing pressure. These differences suggested the different mechanism of the pressure-induced phase transition from the temperature-induced one. (author)

  12. Irradiation induced crystalline to amorphous transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgoin, J.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a crystalline solid with energetic heavy particles results in cascades of defects which, with increasing dose, overlap and form a continuous disordered layer. In semiconductors the physical properties of such disordered layers are found to be similar to those of amorphous layers produced by evaporation. It is shown in the case of silicon, that the transition from a disordered crystalline (X) layer to an amorphous (α) layer occurs when the Gibbs energy of the X phase and of the defects it contains becomes larger than the Gibbs energy of the α phase. (author)

  13. Disorder-induced transitions in resonantly driven Floquet topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titum, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel H.; Refael, Gil

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effects of disorder in Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) occurring in semiconductor quantum wells. Such FTIs are induced by resonantly driving a transition between the valence and conduction bands. We show that when disorder is added, the topological nature of such FTIs persists as long as there is a mobility gap at the resonant quasienergy. For strong enough disorder, this gap closes and all the states become localized as the system undergoes a transition to a trivial insulator. Interestingly, the effects of disorder are not necessarily adverse: we show that in the same quantum well, disorder can also induce a transition from a trivial to a topological system, thereby establishing a Floquet topological Anderson insulator (FTAI). We identify the conditions on the driving field necessary for observing such a transition.

  14. Field-induced stacking transition of biofunctionalized trilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masato Nakano, C. [Flintridge Preparatory School, La Canada, California 91011 (United States); Sajib, Md Symon Jahan; Samieegohar, Mohammadreza; Wei, Tao [Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Trilayer graphene (TLG) is attracting a lot of attention as their stacking structures (i.e., rhombohedral vs. Bernal) drastically affect electronic and optical properties. Based on full-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we here predict electric field-induced rhombohedral-to-Bernal transition of TLG tethered with proteins. Furthermore, our simulations show that protein's electrophoretic mobility and diffusivity are enhanced on TLG surface. This phenomenon of controllable TLG stacking transition will contribute to various applications including biosensing.

  15. Glass transition behavior of octyl β-D-glucoside and octyl β-D-thioglucoside/water binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Asakura, Kouichi; Osanai, Shuichi

    2010-11-22

    The lyotropic behavior and glass-forming properties of octyl β-D-glucoside (C8Glu) and octyl β-D-thioglucoside (C8SGlu)/water binary mixtures were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarizing optical microscopy (POM). The results clearly indicate that the mixture forms a glass in the supercooling state of liquid crystalline phases such as cubic, lamellar, and smectic. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the mixture was strongly dependent on solute concentration, with a higher concentration correlating with a higher T(g). The experimental T(g) was consistent with the predicted value calculated using the Couchman-Karasz equation in both the C8Glu and C8SGlu/water mixtures. The change of heat capacity at T(g) showed the two bending points under variation of concentrations. And the highest temperature of phase transition from lamellar to isotropic solution was observed at around 50% molar concentration. It was expected that non-percolated state of water existed in extremely higher concentration ranges. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantification of Protein Hydration, Glass Transitions, and Structural Relaxations of Aqueous Protein and Carbohydrate-Protein Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Yrjö H; Potes, Naritchaya

    2015-06-11

    Water distribution and miscibility of carbohydrate and protein components in biological materials and their structural contributions in concentrated solids are poorly understood. In the present study, structural relaxations and a glass transition of protein hydration water and antiplasticization of the hydration water at low temperatures were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for bovine whey protein (BWP), aqueous glucose-fructose (GF), and their mixture. Thermal transitions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin components of BWP included water-content-dependent endothermic but reversible dehydration and denaturation, and exothermic and irreversible aggregation. An α-relaxation assigned to hydration water in BWP appeared at water-content-dependent temperatures and increased to over the range of 150-200 K at decreasing water content and in the presence of GF. Two separate glass transitions and individual fractions of unfrozen water of ternary GF-BWP-water systems contributed to uncoupled α-relaxations, suggesting different roles of protein hydration water and carbohydrate vitrification in concentrated solids during freezing and dehydration. Hydration water in the BWP fraction of GF-BWP systems was derived from equilibrium water sorption and glass transition data of the GF fraction, which gave a significant universal method to quantify (i) protein hydration water and (ii) the unfrozen water in protein-carbohydrate systems for such applications as cryopreservation, freezing, lyophilization, and dehydration of biological materials. A ternary supplemented phase diagram (state diagram) established for the GF-BWP-water system can be used for the analysis of the water distribution across carbohydrate and protein components in such applications.

  17. MICROWAVE INDUCED DEGRADATION OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED POLYESTER FOR FIBER AND RESIN RECOVERY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Hülya; Nielsen, Rudi Pankratz; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    A solvolysis process to depolymerize the resin in glass fiber reinforced composites and recover the glass fibers has been investigated using microwave induced irradiation. The depolymerization was carried out in HNO3 with concentrations in the range of 1M-7M and in KOH with concentrations ranging...... of depolymerization was achieved using KOH at concentrations ranging from 1-3.5M. Maximum 63 % resin removal was achieved using 1 M KOH and the resin removal efficiency decreased at higher KOH concentrations (3.5M). The glass fiber surfaces were damaged at both concentrations with more pronounced damages using 3.5M...... KOH. It was not possible to recover monomers using KOH....

  18. Ion-implantation-induced phase separation and crystallization in lithia-silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.; Peercy, P.S.; Doyle, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    Crystallization of annealed Li 2 O.2SiO 2 glasses implanted with inert ions and fused SiO 2 glass implanted with Li ions was monitored using infrared reflection spectroscopy. Elastic recoil detection analysis was used to study changes in the Li and H concentration induced in these glasses by implantation and annealing. Implantation of Li 2 O.2SiO 2 with inert ions results in Li depletion, accompanied by H indiffusion, in the implanted region. For Li-implanted SiO 2 , crystallization of α-quartz is accompanied by appreciable Li diffusion to the surface and attendant H migration to the Li-depleted region. The crystallization mechanisms are discussed in terms of phase separation in the lithia-silica system

  19. Optical, chemical and mechanical modifications induced by ion implantation on glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinellato, V.; Nicoletti, F.; Polato, P.; Gottardi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Soda-lime glasses have been implanted with 50 keV Ar ions. Modifications induced on the glass surface have been studied as a function of implanted dose, with particular regard to optical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Optical measurements indicate a reduction of the refractive index, connected to the surface sodium content. The sodium profile has been measured using the Na 23 (p,α)Ne 20 nuclear reaction. An improvement of the mechanical resistance has been observed at low implantation dose, together with a change of the chemical durability. An expansion of glass has been observed by S.E.M. and interferometric microscopy for 80 keV implantation energy. (author)

  20. Traction and lubricant film temperature as related to the glass transition temperature and solidification. [using infrared spectroscopy on EHD contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, J. L.; Peterkin, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Does a traction fluid have to be a glass or solid under operating conditions. Infrared spectra on dynamic EHD contacts of several types of fluid were used to determine the surface and oil-film temperatures. Polarized spectral runs were made to study molecular alignment. Static glass transition pressures at appropriate temperatures were between 0.1 and 2.0 GPa, with the traction fluid showing the highest. In the EHD contact region, the traction fluid showed both the highest film temperatures as well as the greatest degree of molecular alignment. A plot of the difference between the film and surface temperatures vs shear rate resulted in a master plot valid for all the fluids. From this work, the authors propose a model of 'fluid' traction, where friction between parallel rough molecules provides the traction.

  1. The kinetic glass transition of the Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass former-supercooled liquids on a long time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    Viscosity and enthalpy relaxation from the amorphous state into the supercooled liquid state was investigated in the bulk metallic glass forming Zr 46.75 Ti 8.25 Cu 7.5 Ni 10 Be 27.5 alloy below the calorimetric glass transition. At different temperatures, the viscosities relax into states that obey the same Vogel endash Fulcher endash Tammann relation as the data obtained at higher temperatures in the supercooled liquid. Enthalpy recovery experiments after relaxation in the same temperature range show that the enthalpy of the material reaches values that also corresponds to the supercooled liquid state. The glass relaxes into a metastable supercooled liquid state, if it is observed on a long time scale. Equilibration is possible far below the calorimetric glass transition and very likely even below the isentropic temperature. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  2. Entanglement transitions induced by large deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Udaysinh T.

    2017-12-01

    The probability of large deviations of the smallest Schmidt eigenvalue for random pure states of bipartite systems, denoted as A and B , is computed analytically using a Coulomb gas method. It is shown that this probability, for large N , goes as exp[-β N2Φ (ζ ) ] , where the parameter β is the Dyson index of the ensemble, ζ is the large deviation parameter, while the rate function Φ (ζ ) is calculated exactly. Corresponding equilibrium Coulomb charge density is derived for its large deviations. Effects of the large deviations of the extreme (largest and smallest) Schmidt eigenvalues on the bipartite entanglement are studied using the von Neumann entropy. Effect of these deviations is also studied on the entanglement between subsystems 1 and 2, obtained by further partitioning the subsystem A , using the properties of the density matrix's partial transpose ρ12Γ. The density of states of ρ12Γ is found to be close to the Wigner's semicircle law with these large deviations. The entanglement properties are captured very well by a simple random matrix model for the partial transpose. The model predicts the entanglement transition across a critical large deviation parameter ζ . Log negativity is used to quantify the entanglement between subsystems 1 and 2. Analytical formulas for it are derived using the simple model. Numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the analytical results.

  3. Radiation induced coloring of glasses measured during and after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Hardy, W.H. II; Levy, P.W.

    1975-01-01

    The growth of color centers during irradiation, and the decay after irradiation, were studied in two glasses using recently developed equipment for making optical absorption and luminescence measurements during and after electron irradiation. The glasses studied were NBS 710, a soda-lime silicate glass, and NBS 711, a lead silicate glass. Both glasses exhibit similar coloring characteristics. The radiation-induced absorption spectra consists of a weak gaussian shaped band in the visible, a stronger gaussian band in the ultraviolet, and a band edge ''shift'' which may be accurately approximated by a third gaussian band. For all absorption bands, the color center vs dose (or irradiation time) curves can be accurately resolved into two saturating exponential and one linear component. The decay curves obtained after the irradiation is terminated can be accurately expressed by three exponential components. Coloring and decay curves made at different dose rates indicate that the processes responsible for decay after irradiation and electron hole recombination during irradiation play important roles in determining the rate and extent of coloring. Results are qualitatively in agreement with some very simple kinetic treatments for color center formation. In some, but not all, respects the quantitative agreement is also good. Lastly, the results indicate that it is necessary to make measurements during irradiation to establish the formation kinetics of color centers that are unstable at the bombardment temperature. (U.S.)

  4. The order parameter of glass transition: Spontaneously delocalized nanoscale solitary wave with transverse ripplon-like soft wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Lin Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In macromolecular self-avoiding random walk, movement of each chain-particle accompanies an instantaneous spin system with de Gennes n = 0 that provides extra energy, extra vacancy volume and relaxation time needed for chain-particles co-movement. Using these additional and instantaneous spin systems not only directly yields the same Brownian motion mode in glass transition (GT and reptation-tube model, but also proves that the entangled chain length corresponding to the Reynolds number in hydrodynamics and the inherent diffusion - delocalization mode of entangled chains, from frozen glass state to melt liquid state, is a chain-size solitary wave with transverse ripplon-like soft wave. Thus, the order parameter of GT is found. The various currently available GT theories, such as Static Replica, Random First-Order Transition, Potential Energy Landscape, Mode-Coupling and Nanoscale Heterogeneity, can be unified using the additional and instantaneous spin system. GT served as an inspiration and continues to serve as the paradigm in the universal random delocalization transitions from disorder to more disorder until turbulence.

  5. Evidence for reentrant spin glass behavior in transition metal substituted Co-Ga alloys near critical concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Sk. Mohammad; Srinivas, V.; Kasiviswanathan, S.; Vagadia, Megha; Nigam, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    In the present study magnetic and electrical transport properties of transition metal substituted Co-Ga alloys (near critical cobalt concentration) have been investigated. Analysis of temperature and field dependence of dc magnetization and ac susceptibility (ACS) data suggests an evidence of reentrant spin glass (RSG) phase in Co55.5TM3Ga41.5 (TM = Co, Cr, Fe, Cu). The magnetic transition temperatures (TC and Tf) are found to depend on the nature of TM element substitution with the exchange coupling strength Co-Fe > Co-Co > Co-Cu > Co-Cr. From magnetization dynamics precise transition temperatures for the glassy phases are estimated. It is found that characteristic relaxation times are higher than that of spin glasses with minimal spin-cluster formation. The RSG behavior has been further supported by the temperature dependence of magnetotransport studies. From the magnetic field and substitution effects it has been established that the magnetic and electrical transport properties are correlated in this system.

  6. Electrochemical determination of the glass transition temperature of thin polyelectrolyte brushes at solid-liquid interfaces by impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-García, Teodoro; Rodríguez-Presa, María José; Gervasi, Claudio; Moya, Sergio; Azzaroni, Omar

    2013-07-16

    Devising strategies to assess the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polyelectrolyte assemblies at solid-electrolyte interfaces is very important to understand and rationalize the temperature-dependent behavior of polyelectrolyte films in a wide range of settings. Despite the evolving perception of the importance of measuring Tg under aqueous conditions in thin film configurations, its straightforward measurement poses a challenging situation that still remains elusive in polymer and materials science. Here, we describe a new method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to estimate the glass transition temperature of planar polyelectrolyte brushes at solid-liquid interfaces. To measure Tg, the charge transfer resistance (Rct) of a redox probe diffusing through the polyelectrolyte brush was measured, and the temperature corresponding to the discontinuous change in Rct was identified as Tg. Furthermore, we demonstrate that impedance measurements not only facilitate the estimation of Tg but also enable a reliable evaluation of the transport properties of the polymeric interface, i.e., determination of diffusion coefficients, close to the thermal transition. We consider that this approach bridges the gap between electrochemistry and the traditional tools used in polymer science and offers new opportunities to characterize the thermal behavior of complex polymeric interfaces and macromolecular assemblies.

  7. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeloth, Michael; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich Weiss Straße 4, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Sugii, Taisuke, E-mail: taisuke.sugii.zs@hitachi.com [Center for Technology Innovation – Mechanical Engineering, Research & Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature T{sub g} in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that T{sub g} increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition T{sub g} in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that T{sub g} is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment.

  8. Effect of water on glass transition in starch/sucrose matrices investigated through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep Kumar; Zaydouri, Abdelhadi; Roudaut, Gaëlle; Duplâtre, Gilles

    2011-11-21

    Glass transition is studied through positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) in maize starch matrices containing 10 (batch STS10) and 20 (STS20) w/w% sucrose, as a function of temperature (T) and water content (c(w)). To circumvent important losses of water upon heating while recording the PALS spectra, a new method is developed: instead of a series of measurements of τ(3), the triplet positronium lifetime, at different T, the latter is kept constant and the series relates to c(w), which is left to decrease at a constant rate. Similarly to the changes in τ(3) with T, the τ(3)vs. c(w) plots obtained show a smooth linear increase until a break, denoting the occurrence of glass transition, followed by a sharper increase. The gradients appear to be independent of T. The variation of the glass transition temperature, T(g), with c(w) shows a broad sigmoid with a large linear central part; as expected from the plasticising effect of sucrose, the plot for STS20 lies some 10 K below that for STS10. Results from differential scanning calorimetry for STS20 yield T(g) values some 15 K higher than from PALS. On the basis of the general shape of the τ(3)vs. T variations, a general equation is set for τ(3)(T, c(w)), leading one to expect a similar shape for τ(3)vs. c(w), as experimentally observed. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  9. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by eluates from orthodontic glass ionomer cements in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Angelieri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of some orthodontic glass ionomer cements commercially available by means of the single cell gel (comet assay. For this purpose, five commercial orthodontic glass ionomer cements (Vidrion C®, Meron®, Optiband®, Multicure® and Ultra Band Lok® were tested in murine fibroblasts in vitro. For this purpose, eluates from each cement were prepared according manufactures instructions at 0, 2, 4, 8, 18, 32 and 64 days of immersion in artificial saliva at 37 °C. All orthodontic glass ionomer cements failed to induce cytotoxicity to murine fibroblasts for all periods evaluated in this study. However, Vidrion C® was able to induce genotoxicity after 64 days of exposure to eluates. Meron® also demonstrated genotoxicity as depicted by increasing DNA damage on 2nd day. Multicure® demonstrated genotoxicity on 32nd day and Ultra band Lok on 18th, 32nd days of exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrated that orthodontic cements derived from resin-modified glass ionomer composite (Multicure® and compomer (Ultra Band Lok® cause genetic damage in mammalian cells in vitro.

  10. Ultrafast Hot Electron Induced Phase Transitions in Vanadium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Au/Cr/VO2/Si system was investigated in pump–probe experiments. Hot-electrons generated in the Au were found to penetrate into the underlying VO2 and couple with its lattice inducing a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in ~2 picoseconds.

  11. Shear-induced transitions in a ternary polymeric system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    The first three-dimensional simulation of shear-induced phase transitions in a polymeric system has been performed. The method is based on dynamic density-functional theory. The pathways between a bicontinuous phase with developing gyroid mesostructure and a lamellar/cylinder phase coexistence are

  12. Condensate-induced transitions and critical spin chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Månsson, T.; Lahtinen, V.; Suorsa, J.; Ardonne, E.

    2013-01-01

    We show that condensate-induced transitions between two-dimensional topological phases provide a general framework to relate one-dimensional spin models at their critical points. We demonstrate this using two examples. First, we show that two well-known spin chains, namely, the XY chain and the

  13. New Insights into Lamellar Structure Development and SAXS/WAXD Sequence Appearance During Uniaxial Stretching of Amorphous Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Above Glass Transition Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami,D.; Burger, C.; Ran, S.; Avila-Orta, C.; Sics, I.; Chu, B.; Chiao, S.; Hsiao, B.; Kikutani, T.

    2008-01-01

    An in situ study of structure formation in amorphous poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) during uniaxial stretching at a temperature 30 C above glass transition temperature was carried out using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. Three major deformation-induced structure transitions were confirmed. (1) At small strains, the applied load increased initially but leveled off afterward. Sporadic isotropic crystallization without preferred orientation was observed by WAXD, where no hierarchical structure was seen by SAXS. (2) At intermediate strains, strain hardening took place. Although WAXD showed persistent progression of isotropic crystallization, SAXS indicated formation of a layered structure as well as a fibrillar domain in large scale. This behavior is not consistent with the mechanisms for shish-kebab or spinodal-assisted structure formation. Instead, it can be explained by flow-induced demixing of crystal and amorphous phases through layerlike flocking motion perpendicular to the stretching direction. (3) At high strains, the ratio between the applied load and strain was about constant. In this stage, crystal reorientation and lateral crystal growth took place. The corresponding structure changes could be categorized into three subregions. In the first region, the (010) crystalline plane began to orient. In the second region, the (100) crystalline plane began to orient. In the last region, the structure change became stable and the sample eventually broke apart.

  14. Nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, P.L.; Bounds, J.A.; Haight, R.C.; Luk, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the two-step pumping scheme for a gamma-ray laser, an essential step is that of exciting the nucleus from a long-lived storage isomer to a nearby short-lived state that then decays to the upper lasing level. An experiment is in progress to induce this transfer by first exciting the atomic electrons with uv photons. The incident photons couple well to the electrons, which then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, excitation of the 235 U nucleus is being sought, using a high-brightness uv laser. The excited nuclear state, having a 26-minute half-life, decays by internal converison, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic beam of 235 U which is then bombarded by the uv laser beam. Ions are collected, and conversion electrons are detected by a channel elctron multiplier. In preliminary experiments, an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting a 235 U atom in the uv beam for one picosecond at an intensity of about 10 15 W/cm 2 . Experiments with higher sensitivities and at higher uv beam intensities are underway. 6 refs., 1 fig

  15. Shear-induced breaking of cages in colloidal glasses: Scattering experiments and mode coupling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Christian P; Denisov, Dmitry; Dang, Minh Triet; Struth, Bernd; Schall, Peter; Fuchs, Matthias

    2015-07-21

    We employ x-ray scattering on sheared colloidal suspensions and mode coupling theory to study structure factor distortions of glass-forming systems under shear. We find a transition from quadrupolar elastic distortion at small strains to quadrupolar and hexadecupolar modes in the stationary state. The latter are interpreted as signatures of plastic rearrangements in homogeneous, thermalized systems. From their transient evolution with strain, we identify characteristic strain and length-scale values where these plastic rearrangements dominate. This characteristic strain coincides with the maximum of the shear stress versus strain curve, indicating the proliferation of plastic flow. The hexadecupolar modes dominate at the wavevector of the principal peak of the equilibrium structure factor that is related to the cage-effect in mode coupling theory. We hence identify the structural signature of plastic flow of glasses.

  16. Transition Communities and the Glass Ceiling of Environmental Sustainability Policies at Three Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardellas Santiago, Miguel; Meira Cartea, Pablo; Iglesias da Cunha, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper deals with the experiences of three European universities that have implemented transition initiatives, using the Transition Network's methodology to promote their sustainability plans. The Transition Communities' model for change is presented from a socio-educational perspective as an effective methodology for encouraging…

  17. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jfreire@invi.uned.es

    2008-07-16

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, two distinct values of B have been considered for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, mixed models with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of ordering or crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of the abrupt change in the curves associated with a thermodynamic transition. It is concluded that ordering is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves, which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches.

  18. Bias-induced insulator-metal transition in organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. H.; Xie, S. J.; Mei, L. M.; Yan, YiJing

    2007-07-01

    The authors investigate the bias-induced insulator-metal transition in organic electronics devices on the basis of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model [W. P. Su et al., Phys. Rev. B 22, 2099 (1980)] combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The insulator-metal transition is explained with the energy level crossover that eliminates the Peierls phase [R. Peierls, Quantum Theory of Solids (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1955)] and delocalizes the electron states near the threshold voltage. This may account for the experimental observations on the devices that exhibit intrinsic bistable conductance switching with large on-off ratio.

  19. Density crosslink study of gamma irradiated LDPE predicted by gel-fraction, swelling and glass transition temperature characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Elisabeth C.L.; Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Moraes, Guilherme F.; Ono, Lilian S.; Parra, D.F.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results showed that the crosslink density of polymeric stocks may be predicted from values of gel content based on the reactive portion of the stocks, that is, exclusive of plasticizers and fillers. Where entanglements may be neglected, the crosslink density is directly proportional to functions of the gel and sol contents. In order to predict the behavior of carbon-chain polymers exposed to ionizing radiation, an empirical rule can be used. According to this rule, polymers containing a hydrogen atom at each carbon atom predominantly undergo crosslinking. During irradiation, chain scission occurs simultaneously and competitively with crosslinking, the end result being determined by the ratio of the yields of the two reactions. The ratio of crosslinking to scission depends basically on factors including total irradiation dose, dose rate and the presence of oxygen. The glass transition temperature (Tg), temperature below which the polymer segments do not have sufficient energy to move past one another, marks the onset of segmental mobility for a polymer. Properties such as melt index, melt strength, crystallinity, glass transition, gel fraction, swelling ratio and elasticity modulus were assessed in LDPE (2.6 g.10 min -1 melt index) gamma irradiated within a 10, 15, 20 and 30 kGy and results obtained were further discussed prior conclusion. (author)

  20. Development of DMBZ-15 High-Glass-Transition-Temperature Polyimides as PMR-15 Replacements Given R&D 100 Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    PMR-15, a high-temperature polyimide developed in the mid-1970s at the NASA Lewis Research Center,1 offers the combination of low cost, easy processing, and good high-temperature performance and stability. It has been recognized as the leading polymer matrix resin for carbon-fiber-reinforced composites used in aircraft engine components. The state-of-the-art PMR-15 polyimide composite has a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 348 C (658 F). Since composite materials must be used at temperatures well below their glass-transition temperature, the long-term use temperatures of PMR-15 composites can be no higher than 288 C (550 F). In addition, PMR-15 is made from methylene dianiline (MDA), a known liver toxin. Concerns about the safety of workers exposed to MDA during the fabrication of PMR-15 components and about the environmental impact of PMR-15 waste disposal have led to the industry-wide implementation of special handling procedures to minimize the health risks associated with this material. These procedures have increased manufacturing and maintenance costs significantly and have limited the use of PMR-15 in commercial aircraft engine components.

  1. Mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their glass transition temperatures investigated using inert gas permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers are heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg, and as a result, the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across 5 orders of magnitude (∼10(-14) to 10(-9) cm(2)/s). The diffusivity data are compared to viscosity measurements and reveal a breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship at low temperatures. However, the data are well fit by the fractional Stokes-Einstein equation with an exponent of 0.66. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  2. Electronic structure and the glass transition in pnictide and chalcogenide semiconductor alloys. II. The intrinsic electronic midgap states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugayevych, Andriy; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2010-12-21

    We propose a structural model that treats in a unified fashion both the atomic motions and electronic excitations in quenched melts of pnictide and chalcogenide semiconductors. In Part I [A. Zhugayevych and V. Lubchenko, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 234503 (2010)], we argued these quenched melts represent aperiodic ppσ-networks that are highly stable and, at the same time, structurally degenerate. These networks are characterized by a continuous range of coordination. Here we present a systematic way to classify these types of coordination in terms of discrete coordination defects in a parent structure defined on a simple cubic lattice. We identify the lowest energy coordination defects with the intrinsic midgap electronic states in semiconductor glasses, which were argued earlier to cause many of the unique optoelectronic anomalies in these materials. In addition, these coordination defects are mobile and correspond to the transition state configurations during the activated transport above the glass transition. The presence of the coordination defects may account for the puzzling discrepancy between the kinetic and thermodynamic fragility in chalcogenides. Finally, the proposed model recovers as limiting cases several popular types of bonding patterns proposed earlier including: valence-alternation pairs, hypervalent configurations, and homopolar bonds in heteropolar compounds.

  3. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF EPDM ELASTOMER AND ON THE CONDUCTIVITY OF POLYANILINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E; Marie Kane, M

    2008-12-12

    Four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer were exposed to tritium gas initially at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for between three and four months in closed containers. Material properties that were characterized include density, volume, mass, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. EPDM samples released significant amounts of gas when exposed to tritium, and the glass transition temperature increased by about 3 C. during the exposure. Effects of ultraviolet and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of polyaniline films are also documented as complementary results to planned tritium exposures. Future work will determine the effects of tritium gas exposure on the electrical conductivity of polyaniline films, to demonstrate whether such films can be used as a sensor to detect tritium. Surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma rays and ultraviolet light. The results of the gamma and UV experiments will be correlated with the tritium exposure results.

  4. Insights into glass transition and relaxation behavior using temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, J.C.; Allan, D.C.

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Our simulations of TMDSC signals prove that the frequency correction of non-reversing heat flow can give a master curve within a certain range of freque...... insights about the glass structural response to thermal treatments....

  5. Mean-field solution of the Potts glass near the transition temperature to the ordered phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janiš, Václav; Klíč, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 6 (2011), "064446-1"-"064446-10" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Potts glass * hierarchic solutions with replicated spins * continuous replica-symmetry breaking Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011

  6. Surface-Dependent Transitions during Self-Assembly of Phospholipid Membranes on Mica, Silica, and Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, Martin; Billy, D.; Benda, Aleš; Speijer, H.; Hof, Martin; Hermens, W. T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 23 (2004), s. 10129-10137 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : silica and glass * phospholipid * surface-dependent Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.295, year: 2004

  7. Role of Sulfur as a Reducing Agent for the Transition Metals Incorporated into Lithium Silicate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Hassaan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Li2O·0.25Fe2O3·0.25NiO·1.5SiO2 glass was prepared with and without 5 wt % sulfur (S while melting the mixture of the starting materials at 1350 °C for 1 h in air. A part of the as-prepared glass was heat treated for 1 h near its crystallization temperature (Tc as determined from differential thermal analysis. Each glass was also investigated by means of Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and DC conductivity. The Mössbauer spectra showed ionic Fe2+ and Fe3+ species in the glass as well as in the precipitated phase obtained after heat treatment. XRD patterns demonstrated the glassy phase formation in the as-quenched samples irrespective of the presence of sulfur. The heat treated samples showed different precipitated phases containing iron particles of nanometer size. The electric conductivity measurements showed that sulfur-doped samples had high values of (σ probably because of small polaron hopping between Fe2+ and Fe3+.

  8. Remineralization efficiency of bioactive glass on artificially induced carious lesion an in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Sathya Narayana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of bioactive glass containing product on remineralization of artificial induced carious enamel lesion and to compare its efficiency with other remineralization products using an in-vitro pH cycling method. The null hypothesis tested was bioactive glass has no effect on enamel remineralization. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 enamel samples of human molar teeth were subjected to artificial caries lesion formation using pH cycling method and was verified using high resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM. Each demineralized sample was then divided into five test groups each containing twenty. Group A - Bioactive glass (SHY-NM, Group B - Fluoride tooth paste (Amflor, Group C - CPP-ACP (Tooth mousse, Group D - CPP-ACPF (Tooth mousse plus, Group E - control. All the test groups were exposed to the pH cycling regime, the remineralizing agents were applied for 10 min except control. After 10 days period, the entire test groups were evaluated with HRSEM and quantitative assessment by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The obtained data was analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA, Student′s t-test and Tukey′s multiple comparison tests. P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Rejection of the null hypothesis and highlights the concept of biomimetic bioactive glass as an effective remineralizing agent. Clinical Relevance: To focus on the importance of minimal invasive treatment on incipient carious lesion by remineralization.

  9. Direct observation of shear–induced nanocrystal attachment and coalescence in CuZr-based metallic glasses: TEM investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajlaoui, K.; Alrasheedi, Nashmi H.; Yavari, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    In-situ tensile straining tests were performed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to analyse the deformation processes in CuZr-based metallic glasses and to directly observe the phase transformation occurrence. We report evidence of shear induced coalescence of nanocrystals in the vicinity of deformed regions. Nanocrystals grow in shear bands, come into contact, being attached and progressively coalesce under applied shear stress. - Highlights: • In-situ tensile straining test in TEM was investigated on CuZr-Based metallic glass. • Strain induces nanocrystallization and subsequent attachment and coalescence of nanocrystals. • The coalescence of nanocrystals compensates strain softening in metallic glasses.

  10. High temperature spin-glass-like transition in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 nanofibers near the Curie point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruie; Yang, Sen; Li, Yitong; Chen, Kaiyun; Jiang, Yun; Fu, Bi; Zhang, Yin; Zhou, Chao; Xu, Minwei; Zhou, Xuan

    2017-06-28

    The glassy transition of superparamagnetic (SPM) (r glass-like (SGL) behavior near the Curie point (T C ), i.e., T 0 = 330 K, in La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 (LSMO) nanofibers (NFs) composed of nanoparticles beyond the SPM size (r ≫ r 0 ), resulting in a significant increase of the glass transition temperature. This SGL transition near the T C of bulk LSMO can be explained to be the scenario of locally ordered clusters embedded in a disordered host, in which the assembly of nanoparticles has a magnetic core-shell model driven by surface spin glass. The presence of a surface spin glass of nanoparticles was proved by the Almeida-Thouless line δT f ∝ H 2/3 , exchange bias, and reduced saturation magnetization of the NF system. Composite dynamics were found - that is, both the SPM and the super-spin-glass (SSG) behavior are found in such an NF system. The bifurcation of the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization vs. temperature curves at the ZFC peak, and the flatness of FC magnetization involve SSG, while the frequency-dependent ac susceptibility anomaly follows the Vogel-Fulcher law that implies weak dipole interactions of the SPM model. This finding can help us to find a way to search for high temperature spin glass materials.

  11. Determination of the Glass-Transition Temperature of GRPS and CFRPS Using a Torsion Pendulum in Regimes of Freely Damped Vibrations and Quasi-Stastic Torsion of Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startsev, V. O.; Lebedev, M. P.; Molokov, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    A method to measure the glass-transition temperature of polymers and polymeric matrices of composite materials with the help of an inverse torsion pendulum over a wide range of temperatures is considered combining the method of free torsional vibrations and a quasi-static torsion of specimens. The glass-transition temperature Tg of a KMKS-1-80. T10 fiberglass, on increasing the frequency of freely damped torsional vibrations from 0.7 to 9.6 Hz, was found to increase from 132 to 140°C. The value of Tg of these specimens, determined by measuring the work of their torsion through a small fixed angle was 128.6°C ± 0.8°C. It is shown that the use of a torsion pendulum allows one to determine the glass-transition temperature of polymeric or polymer matrices of PCMs in dynamic and quasi-static deformation regimes of specimens.

  12. Study on the spin crossover transition and glass transition for Fe(II) complex film, [Fe(II)(H-triazole){sub 3}]-Nafion, by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Akio; Kamebuchi, Hajime, E-mail: cc106909@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Enomoto, Masaya [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Division I (Japan); Kojima, Norimichi [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    [Fe(II)(H-trz){sub 3}]-Nafion (trz = triazole) is a transparent spin crossover complex film, where the spin crossover transition between the low-spin (S = 0) and the high-spin (S = 2) states takes place between 225 K and 300 K. In this film, two doublets corresponding to the low-spin and high-spin states were observed in the {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra, reflecting the spin crossover transition. From the analysis of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra, the Debye temperatures of the low-spin and high-spin sites were estimated at 185 K and 176 K, respectively, in the temperature range between 10 K and 150 K. In this film, the total intensity of the Moessbauer spectra corresponding to the low-spin and high-spin sites drastically decreases above 200 K, reflecting the glass transition of Nafion, where the lattice vibration of [Fe(H-trz){sub 3}]{sub n}{sup 2n+} is softened just as in solution due to micro-Brown motion of the segment of Nafion polymer membrane.

  13. Final Report on DE-FG02-04ER46107: Glasses, Noise and Phase Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Clare C. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2011-12-31

    We showed that noise has distinct signatures at phase transitions in spin systems. We also studied charge noise, critical current noise, and flux noise in superconducting qubits and Josephson junctions.

  14. Transition from glass to digital slide microscopy in the teaching of oral pathology in a Brazilian dental school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger; Lopes, Márcio-Ajudarte; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several medical and dental schools have described their experience in the transition from conventional to digital microscopy in the teaching of general pathology and histology disciplines; however, this transitional process has scarcely been reported in the teaching of oral pathology. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to report the transition from conventional glass slide to virtual microscopy in oral pathology teaching, a unique experience in Latin America. Study Design: An Aperio ScanScope® scanner was used to digitalize histological slides used in practical lectures of oral pathology. The challenges and benefits observed by the group of Professors from the Piracicaba Dental School (Brazil) are described and a questionnaire to evaluate the students’ compliance to this new methodology was applied. Results: An improvement in the classes was described by the Professors who mainly dealt with questions related to pathological changes instead of technical problems; also, a higher interaction with the students was described. The simplicity of the software used and the high quality of the virtual slides, requiring a smaller time to identify microscopic structures, were considered important for a better teaching process. Conclusions: Virtual microscopy used to teach oral pathology represents a useful educational methodology, with an excellent compliance of the dental students. Key words:Digital microscopy, virtual microscopy, dental education, virtual slides, oral pathology. PMID:25129250

  15. Field-induced transitions in DySb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, T.O.; Lander, G.H.; Korty, F.W.; Kouvel, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    The NaCl-structured compound DySb, which in zero field transforms abruptly at T/sub N/ approximately 9.5 0 K to a Type-II antiferromagnetic (A) state with a nearly tetragonal lattice distortion, was previously found to exhibit rapid field-induced changes in magnetization at 1.5 0 K. The field-induced transitions in a DySb crystal have been studied by neutron diffraction and magnetization measurements in fields up to approximately 60 kOe applied parallel to each of the principal axes. In the broken bracket 100 broken bracket case, the transition from the A to an intermediate ferrimagnetic (Q) state is first-order at 4.2 0 K (critical field H/sub c/ approximately 21 kOe) but is continuous from approximately 6 0 K up to T/sub N/: as H/sub c/ → 0. The Q-to-paramagnetic (P) transition is rapid but continuous at 4.2 0 K (H/sub c/ approximately 40 kOe) and becomes broad as T/sub N/ is approached. In the broken bracket 110 broken bracket case the A-to-Q transition remains essentially first-order from 4.2 0 K (H/sub c/ approximately 15 kOe) up to T/sub N/; above T/sub N/ rapid P-to-Q transitions occur at very high fields. The magnetic structure of the Q state is found to be that of HoP. (U.S.)

  16. Rheology of confined granular flows: scale invariance, glass transition, and friction weakening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, P; Valance, A; Métayer, J-F; Sanchez, P; Crassous, J; Louge, M; Delannay, R

    2008-12-12

    We study fully developed, steady granular flows confined between parallel flat frictional sidewalls using numerical simulations and experiments. Above a critical rate, sidewall friction stabilizes the underlying heap at an inclination larger than the angle of repose. The shear rate is constant and independent of inclination over much of the flowing layer. In the direction normal to the free surface, the solid volume fraction increases on a scale equal to half the flowing layer depth. Beneath a critical depth at which internal friction is invariant, grains exhibit creeping and intermittent cage motion similar to that in glasses, causing gradual weakening of friction at the walls.

  17. Analysis on the phase transition behavior of Cu base bulk metallic glass by electrical resistivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Young Su; Chung, Sung Jae; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Hong, Kyung Tae; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Byeon, Jai Won; Yoon, Jin-Kook; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyung Sub

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of Cu 43 Zr 43 Al 7 Ag 7 (numbers indicate at.%) bulk metallic glass was investigated using the isothermal electrical resistivity measurements at 450 deg. C in the supercooled liquid region. The crystallization process is a single step phase transformation. To analyze the electrical resistivity reduction, microstructure evolutions were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. The Avrami parameter of the electrical resistivity reduction step was 1.73, indicating that the crystallization process is a diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic compounds with decreasing nucleation rate

  18. Evaluation of effect of 3D video glasses on perceived pain and unpleasantness induced by restorative dental treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Bo; Svensson, Peter; Wenzel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies on modulation of anxiety, pain and unpleasantness have documented a positive effect of video glasses (I-Glasses(TM), Virtual i-O(TM), Seattle, USA) on the perceived pain and unpleasantness under different laboratory and clinical conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate...... whether distraction induced by video glasses also had an effect on the perceived intensity of pain and unpleasantness during dental treatment. Pain and unpleasantness was evoked by the preparation (drilling) of a minor dental cavity (class I). Twenty-three patients (17 female and six male, age range 20......-49 years) with a need for an occlusal dental restoration in two homologous teeth participated in the study, In this split-mouth design, the patient received the dental treatment wearing 3D video glasses and without video glasses (control situation) in a randomized order. The tooth cavities were prepared...

  19. Thermal stability and practical applications of UV induced index changes in silica glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathje, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    This thesis represents the partial fulfilment of the requirements for the danish ph.d. degree. I have been involved in both basic research of UV induced refractive index changes in silica glasses and in concrete applications. I have performed work on the thermal stability of UV-induced index...... fibers two separate engergy distributions are resolved indicating that two different defect types are present. The influence of core concentricity error on the asymmetric directional bend induced resonance splitting of a long period fiber grating was investigated. A qualitiative model to describe...... the asymmetry showed good agreement with the obeserved data. The results were used to make a direction sensitive bend sensor of only one fiber. The sensor has further the advantage that it is insensitve to cross sensitivity from temperature, strin, and other external factors. Finally, an investigation of Nragg...

  20. Annealing effect reversal by water sorption-desorption and heating above the glass transition temperature-comparison of properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, A; Jean, Y C; Suryanarayanan, R

    2013-08-05

    Our objective is to compare the physical properties of materials obtained from two different methods of annealing reversal, that is, water sorption-desorption (WSD) and heating above glass transition temperature (HAT). Trehalose was annealed by storing at 100 °C for 120 h. The annealing effect was reversed either by WSD or HAT, and the resulting materials were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), water sorption studies, and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). While the products obtained by the two methods of annealing reversal appeared to be identical by conventional characterization methods, they exhibited pronounced differences in their water sorption behavior. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), by measuring the fractional free volume changes in the processed samples, provided a mechanistic explanation for the differences in the observed behavior.

  1. First-order dynamical phase transition in models of glasses: an approach based on ensembles of histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrahan, Juan P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Jack, Robert L [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lecomte, Vivien; Duijvendijk, Kristina van; Wijland, Frederic van [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes (CNRS UMR 7057), Universite Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Pitard, Estelle [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (CNRS UMR 5587), Universite de Montpellier II, place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-02-20

    We investigate the dynamics of kinetically constrained models of glass formers by analysing the statistics of trajectories of the dynamics, or histories, using large deviation function methods. We show that, in general, these models exhibit a first-order dynamical transition between active and inactive dynamical phases. We argue that the dynamical heterogeneities displayed by these systems are a manifestation of dynamical first-order phase coexistence. In particular, we calculate dynamical large deviation functions, both analytically and numerically, for the Fredrickson-Andersen model, the East model, and constrained lattice gas models. We also show how large deviation functions can be obtained from a Landau-like theory for dynamical fluctuations. We discuss possibilities for similar dynamical phase-coexistence behaviour in other systems with heterogeneous dynamics.

  2. Freeze-Drying Above the Glass Transition Temperature in Amorphous Protein Formulations While Maintaining Product Quality and Improving Process Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaz, Roberto A; Pansare, Swapnil; Patel, Sajal Manubhai

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the ability to conduct primary drying during lyophilization at product temperatures above the glass transition temperature of the maximally freeze-concentrated solution (Tg′) in amorphous formulations for four proteins from three different classes. Drying above Tg′ resulted in significant reductions in lyophilization cycle time. At higher protein concentrations, formulations freeze dried above Tg′ but below the collapse temperature yielded pharmaceutically acceptable cakes. However, using an immunoglobulin G type 4 monoclonal antibody as an example, we found that as protein concentration decreased, minor extents of collapse were observed in formulations dried at higher temperatures. No other impacts to product quality, physical stability, or chemical stability were observed in this study among the different drying conditions for the different proteins. Drying amorphous formulations above Tg′, particularly high protein concentration formulations, is a viable means to achieve significant time and cost savings in freeze-drying processes.

  3. Study on the Glass Transition Process of Polymer System Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong-Jin; Liu, Yu-Ling; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Ping-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    The change in the infrared spectrum of polymer samples with temperature and their differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experimental results are analyzed. According to the van't Hoff equation at constant pressure, the changes in the absorbance ratio corresponding to high and low vibrational states are calculated, and the apparent enthalpy differences of the vibration energy states transformation of the characteristic group can be obtained. From the experimental results, we can find that characteristic vibration modes of a chemical group in a polymer are under the influence of the glass transition process of the polymer with a different extent. The characteristic vibration modes of the same chemical group behave differently due to the influence of the polymer system at which the chemical moiety is situated.

  4. Hilbert-Glass Transition: New Universality of Temperature-Tuned Many-Body Dynamical Quantum Criticality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pekker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We study a new class of unconventional critical phenomena that is characterized by singularities only in dynamical quantities and has no thermodynamic signatures. One example of such a transition is the recently proposed many-body localization-delocalization transition, in which transport coefficients vanish at a critical temperature with no singularities in thermodynamic observables. Describing this purely dynamical quantum criticality is technically challenging as understanding the finite-temperature dynamics necessarily requires averaging over a large number of matrix elements between many-body eigenstates. Here, we develop a real-space renormalization group method for excited states that allows us to overcome this challenge in a large class of models. We characterize a specific example: the 1 D disordered transverse-field Ising model with generic interactions. While thermodynamic phase transitions are generally forbidden in this model, using the real-space renormalization group method for excited states we find a finite-temperature dynamical transition between two localized phases. The transition is characterized by nonanalyticities in the low-frequency heat conductivity and in the long-time (dynamic spin correlation function. The latter is a consequence of an up-down spin symmetry that results in the appearance of an Edwards-Anderson-like order parameter in one of the localized phases.

  5. Predict the glass transition temperature and plasticization of β-cyclodextrin/water binary system by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guohui; Zhao, Tianhai; Wan, Jie; Liu, Chengmei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Risi

    2015-01-12

    The glass transition temperature, diffusion behavior and plasticization of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), and three amorphous β-CD/water mixtures (3%, 5% and 10% [w/w] water, respectively) were investigated by molecular dynamics simulation, which were performed using Condensed-phase Optimized Molecular Potentials for Atomistic Simulation Studies (COMPASS) force field and isothermal-isobaric ensembles. The specific volumes of four amorphous cells were obtained as a function of temperature. The glass transition temperatures (T(g)) were estimated to be 334.25 K, 325.12 K, 317.32 K, and 305.41 K for amorphous β-CD containing 0%, 3%, 5% and 10% w/w water, respectively, which compares well with the values observed in published literature. The radial distribution function was computed to elucidate the intermolecular interactions between amorphous β-CD and water, which acts as a plasticizer. These results indicate that the hydrogen bond interactions of oxygen in hydroxyl ions was higher than oxygen in acetal groups in β-CD amorphous mixtures with that in water, due to less accessibility of ring oxygens to the surrounding water molecules. The mobility of water molecules was investigated over various temperature ranges, including the rubbery and glassy phases of the β-CD/water mixtures, by calculating the diffusion coefficients and the fractional free volume. In β-CD amorphous models, the higher mobility of water molecules was observed at temperatures above Tg, and almost no change was observed at temperatures below T(g). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solid state chemistry of proteins: I. glass transition behavior in freeze dried disaccharide formulations of human growth hormone (hGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikal, Michael J; Rigsbee, D R; Roy, M L

    2007-10-01

    Although freeze dried formulations are commonly characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), a protein-rich system behaves as a "strong glass", and the glass transition temperature, T(g), cannot be directly determined by DSC. A strong glass means a small heat capacity change at T(g), triangle upC(p), and a very broad glass transition region, or a large triangle upT(g). However, direct experimental evidence for a small triangle upC(p) and a large triangle upT(g) have been lacking. Here, we utilize extrapolation of thermal analysis data in protein:disaccharide mixtures to evaluate T(g), triangle upT(g), and triangle upC(p) for "pure" human growth hormone (hGH) from low to moderate residual water. We find that triangle upT(g) is indeed large and triangle upC(p) is very small. Also, the T(g) for pure hGH decreases from a value of about 136 degrees C when dry to around 25 degrees C at 12% water. This glass transition is not the onset of mobility within the protein molecule but rather signals onset of whole molecule rotation and translation. We also observe complex pre-T(g) thermal events in the DSC data, which are interpreted as consequences of relaxation events, largely due to the disaccharide, and are characteristic of freeze dried systems having a broad distribution of relaxing substates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Pressure-controlled nucleation and growth in Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass close to and beyond glass transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Mingxiang; Yao Yushu; Zhao Deqian; Zhuang Yanxin; Wang Weihua

    2002-01-01

    By high-pressure annealing close to and beyond glass transition temperature, the behavior of nucleation and growth of crystals in Zr 41 Ti 14 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) is investigated. The experimental results indicate that exerting a high pressure during annealing can markedly decrease the nucleation temperature of the BMG. The growth rate of crystals first increases and then decreases with increase of annealing pressure. The effect of pressure on nucleation and growth of crystals is phenomenologically explained

  8. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-21

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ∼20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  9. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  10. Quantitative determination of copper in a glass matrix using double pulse laser induced breakdown and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmed A I; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    A series of lithium-lead-borate glasses of a variable copper oxide loading were quantitatively analyzed in this work using two distinct spectroscopic techniques, namely double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). DP-LIBS results measured upon a combined nanosecond lasers irradiation running at 266nm and 1064nm pulses of a collinear configuration directed to the surface of borate glass samples with a known composition. This arrangement was employed to predict the electron's temperature (Te) and density (Ne) of the excited plasma from the recorded spectra. The intensity of elements' responses using this scheme is higher than that of single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) setup under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, the EPR data shows typical Cu (II) EPR-signals in the borate glass system that is networked at a distorted tetragonal Borate-arrangement. The signal intensity of the Cu (II) peak at g⊥=2.0596 has been used to quantify the Cu-content accurately in the glass matrix. Both techniques produced linear calibration curves of Cu-metals in glasses with excellent linear regression coefficient (R(2)) values. This study establishes a good correlation between DP-LIBS analysis of glass and the results obtained using EPR spectroscopy. The proposed protocols prove the great advantage of DP-LIBS system for the detection of a trace copper on the surface of glasses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypoxia activated EGFR signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Misra

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process which requires the conversion of polarized epithelial cells to mesenchymal cells, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. EMT is essential during embryonic morphogenesis and has been implicated in the progression of primary tumors towards metastasis. Hypoxia is known to induce EMT; however the molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Using the A431 epithelial cancer cell line, we show that cells grown under hypoxic conditions migrated faster than cells grown under normal oxygen environment. Cells grown under hypoxia showed reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM probably due to reduced number of Vinculin patches. Growth under hypoxic conditions also led to down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin expression. The increased motility of cells grown under hypoxia could be due to redistribution of Rac1 to the plasma membrane as opposed to increased expression of Rac1. EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor is a known inducer of EMT and growth of A431 cells in the absence of oxygen led to increased expression of EGFR (EGF Receptor. Treatment of A431 cells with EGF led to reduced cell adhesion to ECM, increased cell motility and other EMT characteristics. Furthermore, this transition was blocked by the monoclonal antibody Cetuximab. Cetuximab also blocked the hypoxia-induced EMT suggesting that cell growth under hypoxic conditions led to activation of EGFR signaling and induction of EMT phenotype.

  12. Measurement of glass transition temperature, residual heat of reaction and mixing ratio of epoxy resins using near infrared spectroscopy: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmøller, Lars Plejdrup; Laursen, Peter Clemen

    2003-01-01

    As a measure of the degree of curing of epoxy resins, the glass transition temperature, Tg, and the residual heat of reaction, DeltaHr, are often used. In this study, near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration (partial least squares regression (PLSR)) have been used to monitor the two...

  13. Dynamic cooperative behavior of constituting species at the glass transition vicinity: Inspirational links to Bořivoj Hlaváček (1941-2014) legacy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šesták, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2015), s. 167-173 ISSN 1388-6150 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : glass transition temperature * crossover and void temperature * linear and nonlinear oscillations * viscoelasticity * shear viscosity Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics OBOR OECD: Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.781, year: 2015

  14. Glass transition temperatures of microphase separated semi-interpenetrating polymer networks of polystyrene-inter-poly(cross)-2-ethylhexyl-methacrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, L.A.; de Graaf, Leontine A.; Möller, Martin; Moller, M.

    1995-01-01

    The glass transition temperature of semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) of atactic polystyrene (PS) in crosslinked methacrylates was studied by systematic variation of the morphology, that is domain size, continuity and concentration in the domains. Semi-IPNs were prepared from

  15. Tension induced phase transitions in biomimetic fluid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Marc; Vlahovska, Petia

    2012-11-01

    Membranes in eukaryotic cells are mixtures of hundreds of lipid species. The lipid diversity enables membranes to phase separate and form domains, called rafts, which play a critical role in cell functions such as signaling and trafficking. The phase transitions underlying raft formation have been extensively studied as a function of temperature and composition. However, the third dimension of the phase diagram, i.e., the tension (2D pressure), is still unexplored because membrane tension is difficult to control and quantify. To overcome this challenge, we develop two approaches, capillary micromechanics and electrodeformation, in which the tension is regulated by the area dilation accompanying deformation of a vesicle (a closed membrane). The first technique consists of forcing an initially quasi-spherical vesicle through a tapered glass microcapillary, while the second method utilizes uniform electric fields to deform the vesicle into an ellipsoid. Domains are visualized using a fluorescent dye, which preferentially partitions in one of the phases. The experimental results suggest that the miscibility temperature (at which domains form in an initially homogeneous membrane) increases with applied tension. Domain motions and coarsening are also investigated.

  16. Noise induced transition in Josephson junction with second harmonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Nivedita

    2018-01-01

    We show a noise induced transition in Josephson junction with fundamental as well as second harmonic. A periodically modulated multiplicative colored noise can stabilize an unstable configuration in such a system. The stabilization of the unstable configuration has been captured in the effective potential of the system obtained by integrating out the high frequency components of the noise. This is a classical approach to understand the stability of an unstable configuration due to the presence of such stochasticity in the system and our numerical analysis confirms the prediction from the analytical calculation.

  17. Nanosecond KTN varifocal lens without electric field induced phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Campbell, Adrian; Henry, Michael; Yin, Stuart (Shizhuo); Hoffman, Robert C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a nanosecond speed KTN varifocal lens. The tuning principle of varifocal lens is based on the high-speed refractive index modulation from the nanosecond speed tunable electric field. A response time on the order of nanoseconds was experimentally demonstrated, which is the fastest varifocal lens reported so far. The results confirmed that the tuning speed of the KTN varifocal lens could be significantly increased by avoiding the electric field induced phase transition. Such a nanosecond speed varifocal lens can be greatly beneficial for a variety of applications that demand high speed axial scanning, such as high-resolution 3D imaging and high-speed 3D printing.

  18. Pressure-induced phase transition in GaN nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Q; Zhang, W; Wang, X; Zhang, J; Cui, T; Xie, Y; Liu, J; Zou, G

    2002-01-01

    High-pressure in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments on GaN nanocrystals with 50 nm diameter have been carried out using a synchrotron x-ray source and a diamond-anvil cell up to about 79 GPa at room temperature. A pressure-induced first-order structural phase transition from the wurtzite-type structure to the rock-salt-type structure starts at about 48.8 GPa. The rock-salt-type phase persists to the highest pressure in our experimental range.

  19. Thermomechanical Modeling of Laser-Induced Structural Relaxation and Deformation of Glass: Volume Changes in Fused Silica at High Temperatures [Thermo-mechanical modeling of laser-induced structural relaxation and deformation of SiO2 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignes, Ryan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Soules, Thomas F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Stolken, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Settgast, Randolph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Elhadj, Selim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Matthews, Manyalibo J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Mauro, J.

    2012-12-17

    In a fully coupled thermomechanical model of the nanoscale deformation in amorphous SiO2 due to laser heating is presented. Direct measurement of the transient, nonuniform temperature profiles was used to first validate a nonlinear thermal transport model. Densification due to structural relaxation above the glass transition point was modeled using the Tool-Narayanaswamy (TN) formulation for the evolution of structural relaxation times and fictive temperature. TN relaxation parameters were derived from spatially resolved confocal Raman scattering measurements of Si–O–Si stretching mode frequencies. These thermal and microstructural data were used to simulate fictive temperatures which are shown to scale nearly linearly with density, consistent with previous measurements from Shelby et al. Volumetric relaxation coupled with thermal expansion occurring in the liquid-like and solid-like glassy states lead to residual stresses and permanent deformation which could be quantified. But, experimental surface deformation profiles between 1700 and 2000 K could only be reconciled with our simulation by assuming a roughly 2 × larger liquid thermal expansion for a-SiO2 with a temperature of maximum density ~150 K higher than previously estimated by Bruckner et al. Calculated stress fields agreed well with recent laser-induced critical fracture measurements, demonstrating accurate material response prediction under processing conditions of practical interest.

  20. Physical Aging of Thin and Ultrathin Free-Standing Polymer Films: Effect of Stress and Reduced Glass Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Justin; Roth, Connie

    2014-03-01

    While great effort has been made in elucidating the effect of confinement on the glass transition (Tg) in polymers, considerably less work has been done on physical aging. Starting with supported films, we have previously shown that the reduced physical aging rates in ultrathin polystyrene (PS) films can be linked to the reduced Tg near the free surface [Macromolecules 2010, 43, 8296]. We then showed that high molecular weight (MW) free-standing PS films have two reduced Tgs suggesting that two separate mechanisms are acting simultaneously to propagate enhanced mobility at the free surface deeper into the film [PRL 2011, 107, 235701]. To help determine the mechanisms of these two reduced Tgs, we performed physical aging measurements on these high MW free-standing PS films. For thick films (220-1800 nm) in which there are no Tg reductions, we find that the physical aging rate depends strongly on stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch between film and support. This stress, applied to the films as they are quenched into the glassy state, can nearly double the physical aging rate when changing the frame material from polycarbonate to silicon [Macromolecules 2013, DOI:10.1021/ma401872u]. Finally, ultrathin high MW PS films held at a temperature between the two Tgs do exhibit physical aging, indicating that at least some of the film is glassy between these two transitions.

  1. Aluminium-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kezzoula, F.; Hammouda, A.; Kechouane, M.; Simon, P.; Abaidia, S.E.H.; Keffous, A.; Cherfi, R.; Menari, H.; Manseri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering technique with argon and hydrogen plasma mixture on Al deposited by thermal evaporation on glass substrates. The a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films were annealed at different temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 deg. C during 4 h in vacuum-sealed bulb. The effects of annealing temperature on optical, structural and morphological properties of as-grown as well as the vacuum-annealed a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films are presented in this contribution. The averaged transmittance of a-Si:H/Al film increases upon increasing the annealing temperature. XRD measurements clearly evidence that crystallization is initiated at 450 deg. C. The number and intensity of diffraction peaks appearing in the diffraction patterns are more important in a-Si:H/Al than that in a-Si/Al layers. Results show that a-Si:H films deposited on Al/glass crystallize above 450 deg. C and present better crystallization than the a-Si layers. The presence of hydrogen induces an improvement of structural properties of poly-Si prepared by aluminium-induced crystallization (AIC).

  2. Electrically Induced Multiple Metal-Insulator Transitions in Oxide Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Javier; Kalcheim, Yoav; Trastoy, Juan; Charnukha, Aliaksei; Basov, Dimitri N.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2017-11-01

    We show that electrical resistive switching can trigger the appearance of multiple metal-insulator transitions (MITs) in VO2 and V2O3 planar nanodevices. We have fabricated planar devices to electrically induce oxygen vacancy drift and filament formation. We show that oxygen migration can create ordered vanadium-oxide phases of varying stoichiometry with an intrinsic MIT, resulting in well-defined hysteresis loops in the R vs T characteristics of the device. We also show that oxygen migration induces oxide phases displaying correlated behaviors. Our results open up the possibility to electrically control the MIT, enabling alternative functionalities in memristive devices and allowing for alternative paradigms in neuromorphic computing or memory applications.

  3. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-10-26

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  4. Phase-glass scaling near the coherence transition in granular HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa-Rojas, J.; Landinez Tellez, D.A. [Grupo de Fisica de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A. A. 14490, Bogota DC (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Grupo de Peliculas Delgadas, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360, Cali (Colombia)

    2005-07-01

    Systematic measurements of electrical magnetoconductivity near the coherence transition of granular HoBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin films are reported. Experiments performed in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 2500 Oe reveal that close to the coherence transition temperature T{sub c0}(H), the correlation length scales as a power law of temperature with a thermal-dependent critical exponent, {nu}. In low external fields the corresponding value of {nu} is consistent with the two-dimensional phase-glass model, which is in the same dynamical universality class of the so-called vortex-glass model. At applied fields H > 1000 Oe, the vortex dynamics becomes stronger and the coherence transition is not observed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. An application for impedance spectroscopy in the characterisation of the glass transition during the lyophilization cycle: the example of a 10% w/v maltodextrin solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoff; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Polygalov, Eugene; Ermolina, Irina

    2013-11-01

    Impedance spectroscopy has been used for the measurement of the glass transition of a 10 % maltodextrin solution contained within a glass vial, with externally attached electrodes. Features of the pseudo-relaxation process, associated with the composite impedance of the glass vial-solution assembly, were characterised by the peak amplitude, C(peak)(″), and peak frequency, f(peak), of the capacitance spectra and the equivalent circuit elements that model the impedance spectra (i.e. the solution resistance and solution capacitance) and monitored every 3 min during re-heating of the solution. The time derivatives of all four parameters studied provided a glass transition in close agreement with DSC measurements (-17 °C) and at a precision of ± 0.5 °C. The temperature dependencies of the solution resistance and peak frequency were then characterised with the Arrhenius and Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann fit functions, at temperatures below and above Tg, respectively. The energy of activation (below Tg) was estimated at ~20 kJ mol(-1), and the fragility index (If) of the glass forming liquid (above Tg) was estimated at 0.9. The significance of the fragility index to the development, optimisation and control of the freeze-drying cycle is highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Internal structure transition of spin-on glass by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Makoto; Taniguchi, Jun; Sawada, Nobuo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Miyamoto, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on spin-on glass (SOG) were investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy. We were able to employ heat treatment as a 'development process', since we discovered that heat treatment breaks different bonds in SOG depending on whether it is applied before or after EB irradiation of SOG. In the case, when heat treatment was applied before EB irradiation of SOG, it was possible to break the Si-C bond at about 500 deg. C. In the case, when heat treatment was applied after EB irradiation of SOG, on the other hand, the -SiC bond could be broken at a lower temperature of about 400 deg. C. Using this difference between the two bond-breaking temperatures, it was possible to develop SOG using thermal desorption development (TDD). Moreover, the bond-breaking mechanisms revealed that the organic components in SOG play an important role in TDD. Hence, in order to determine the influence of organic components on TDD, the development characteristics of SOG samples with 10% and 15% organic contents were investigated

  7. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at T g is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change −V m ×Δp at T g where V m is the molar volume. A stable glass–liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤T g , the Kauzmann temperature T K where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between T K and T g , the maximum nucleation rate at T K of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at T g and T K . Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at T g are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid–liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at T K of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at T g without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition

  8. On the glass transition of the one-component metallic melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 475, October (2017), s. 362-367 ISSN 0022-0248 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : equilibrium and non-equilibrium solidification * criterion of the phase transition scenario * one-component metal melts Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics OBOR OECD: Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0022024817304281/1-s2.0-S0022024817304281-main.pdf?_tid=a12ba97e-873b-11e7-b6be-00000aacb35e&acdnat=1503407763_5cdbcdb15d504baf5f8dfb94886b3100

  9. Structure, glass transition temperature and spectroscopic properties of 10Li2O-xP2O5-(89-x)TeO2-1CuO (5≤x≤25 mol%) glass system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upender, G; Babu, J Chinna; Mouli, V Chandra

    2012-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR), Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption studies on 10Li2O-xP2O5-(89-x)TeO2-1CuO glasses (where x=5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mol%) have been carried out. The amorphous nature of the glasses was confirmed using XRD and FESEM measurements. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of glass samples have been estimated from DSC traces and found that the Tg increases with increasing P2O5 content. Both the IR and Raman studies have been showed that the present glass system consists of [TeO3], [TeO4], [PO3] and [PO4] units. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters such as g∥, g⊥, and A∥ have been determined from EPR spectra and it was found that the Cu2+ ion is present in tetragonal distorted octahedral site with [Formula: see text] as the ground state. Bonding parameters and bonding symmetry of Cu2+ ions have been calculated by correlating EPR and optical data and were found to be composition dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part II. Process analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panne, U.; Clara, M.; Haisch, C.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is employed for in situ and on-line process analysis of major glass constituents during a vitrification process for fly and bottom ashes from waste incineration. The system is based on an Nd:YAG laser for plasma ignition, while the elemental emissions from the plasma are detected time-resolved by an intensified multichannel analyzer. The perpendicular, single axis, imaging optics allow a remote sensing of the composition of the hot glass melt. Taking into account the plasma characteristics for calibration, good agreement between the LIPS analysis and the established reference analysis is achieved for the concentration ratios of SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and CaO. In addition, LIPS is applied to the analysis of aerosols generated by homogeneous nucleation during the heating-up of the investigated fly ashes. A distinctive temperature dependence of the heavy metal concentration of the aerosols is observed.

  11. Natural and induced by gamma radiation electronic properties of phosphate and silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthe, Th.

    1980-03-01

    The first part of the thesis concerns an experimental study of the electric and electronic properties of phosphate glasses activated with silver at different temperatures. The conductivity of these glasses shows an interesting aspect i.e. these are two characteristic temperature ranges. Above 230 K the model of Arrhenius is respected with an average activation energy of 0.80 eV. Below 230 K the activation energy falls rapidly to 50 meV. These results are compared with those obtained in the study of radio-photoluminescence under continuous gamma irradiation. The phenomena question the transitory kinetic processes, the linearity of which can be considered as the resultant of the stationary equilibrium of the population of the classes corresponding to the metastable states. These processes are thermically activated with the variation of the activation energy over the same temperature ranges. It would seen that the observed effects are due to a particular structure. The second part of this work deals with the conduction induced by gamma radiation in silica. The results can be explained by Onsager's theory of dissociation of the created electron-hole pairs. This method allows the determination of the yield of free electron-hole pairs at zero field and of the ionization energy: both are important parameters in the dosimetric study of ionizing radiation. (author)

  12. Twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) and work hardening in Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Qiao, J W; Wang, Z H; Rao, W; Kang, G Z

    2017-05-12

    The present study demonstrates that Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a normal composition of Ti 43 Zr 32 Ni 6 Ta 5 Be 14 containing ductile dendrites dispersed in the glass matrix has been developed, and deformation mechanisms about the tensile property have been investigated by focusing on twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect. The Ti-based MGMC has excellent tensile properties and pronounced tensile work-hardening capacity, with a yield strength of 1100 MPa and homogeneous elongation of 4%. The distinguished strain hardening is ascribed to the formation of deformation twinning within the dendrites. Twinning generated in the dendrites works as an obstacle for the rapid propagation of shear bands, and then, the localized necking is avoided, which ensures the ductility of such kinds of composites. Besides, a finite-element model (FEM) has been established to explain the TWIP effect which brings out a work-hardening behavior in the present MGMC instead of a localized strain concentration. According to the plasticity theory of traditional crystal materials and some new alloys, TWIP effect is mainly controlled by stacking fault energy (SFE), which has been analyzed intensively in the present MGMC.

  13. Microanalysis of tool steel and glass with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebe, Klaus; Uhl, Arnold; Lucht, Hartmut

    2003-10-20

    A laser microscope system for the microanalytical characterization of complex materials is described. The universal measuring principle of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in combination with echelle optics permits a fast simultaneous multielement analysis with a possible spatial resolution below 10 pm. The developed system features completely UV-transparent optics for the laser-microscope coupling and the emission beam path and enables parallel signal detection within the wavelength range of 200-800 nm with a spectral resolution of a few picometers. Investigations of glass defects and tool steels were performed. The characterization of a glass defect in a tumbler by a micro-LIBS line scan, with use of a 266-nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for excitation, is possible by simple comparison of plasma spectra of the defect and the surrounding area. Variations in the main elemental composition as well as impurities by trace elements are detected at the same time. Through measurement of the calibration samples with the known concentration of the corresponding element, a correlation between the intensity of spectral lines and the element concentration was also achieved. The change of elemental composition at the transient stellite solder of tool steels has been determined by an area scan. The two-dimensional pictures show abrupt changes of the element distribution along the solder edge and allow fundamental researches of dynamic modifications (e.g., diffusion) in steel.

  14. Universal amorphous-amorphous transition in GexSe100-x glasses under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildirim, Can; Micoulaut, Matthieu; Boolchand, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Pressure induced structural modifications in vitreous GexSe100−x (where 10 ≤ x ≤ 25) are investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) along with supplementary X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. Universal changes in distances and angle......–20 GPa, depending on the composition. This increase is attributed to the metallization event that can be traced with the red shift in Ge K edge energy which is also identified by the principal peak position of the structure factor. The densification mechanisms are studied in details by means of AIMD...... simulations and compared to the experimental results. The evolution of bond angle distributions, interatomic distances and coordination numbers are examined and lead to similar pressure-induced structural changes for any composition....

  15. Effect of surfactant concentration on characteristics of mesoporous bioactive glass prepared by evaporation induced self-assembly process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Chi-Chung; Chien, Chi-Sheng; Kung, Jung-Chang; Chen, Jian-Chih; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lu, Pei-Shan; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► All the unwanted organic contents were removed completely at temperatures above 600 °C. ► Specific surface area and pore volume of Mesoporous bioactive glasses reached maximum at the critical surfactant concentration. ► SAED pattern suggests that some glassy structures in the Bioactive Glasses became crystalline due to the heat treatment. ► The MBGs can induce the formation of an apatite-like layer on their surface in SBF, even after short soaking periods. - Abstract: Mesoporous bioactive glasses were prepared by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. The main objective of the present study is to determine the effect of surfactant concentration on the synthesis of SiO 2 –CaO–P 2 O 5 mesoporous bioactive glasses; the characterization techniques used include X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. The results show that the specific surface area initially increased with increasing surfactant concentrations in the range of 2.1–9.1 wt% and significantly decreased from 328.7 to 204.0 m 2 /g in the concentration range of 9.1–12.5 wt%. For texture evaluation, the selected area electron diffraction patterns of the mesoporous bioactive glass precursor gels (9.1 wt% F127) calcined at different temperatures were analyzed; these patterns support the notion that some glassy structures in bioactive glasses become crystalline following heat treatment. The scanning electron microscopy images and X-ray diffraction patterns obtained agree with the inductively coupled plasma with atomic emission spectroscopy results as the mesoporous bioactive glasses can induce the formation of an apatite-like layer on their surface in SBF, even after short soaking periods.

  16. Effect of surfactant concentration on characteristics of mesoporous bioactive glass prepared by evaporation induced self-assembly process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Chi-Chung [Department of Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Family Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chien, Chi-Sheng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Chi Mei Foundation Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Kung, Jung-Chang [Department of Family Dentistry, Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jian-Chih [Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shy-Shin [Department of Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Family Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lu, Pei-Shan [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chi-Jen, E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the unwanted organic contents were removed completely at temperatures above 600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific surface area and pore volume of Mesoporous bioactive glasses reached maximum at the critical surfactant concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAED pattern suggests that some glassy structures in the Bioactive Glasses became crystalline due to the heat treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBGs can induce the formation of an apatite-like layer on their surface in SBF, even after short soaking periods. - Abstract: Mesoporous bioactive glasses were prepared by the evaporation-induced self-assembly method. The main objective of the present study is to determine the effect of surfactant concentration on the synthesis of SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} mesoporous bioactive glasses; the characterization techniques used include X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. The results show that the specific surface area initially increased with increasing surfactant concentrations in the range of 2.1-9.1 wt% and significantly decreased from 328.7 to 204.0 m{sup 2}/g in the concentration range of 9.1-12.5 wt%. For texture evaluation, the selected area electron diffraction patterns of the mesoporous bioactive glass precursor gels (9.1 wt% F127) calcined at different temperatures were analyzed; these patterns support the notion that some glassy structures in bioactive glasses become crystalline following heat treatment. The scanning electron microscopy images and X-ray diffraction patterns obtained agree with the inductively coupled plasma with atomic emission spectroscopy results as the mesoporous bioactive glasses can induce the formation of an apatite-like layer on their surface in SBF, even after short soaking periods.

  17. Critical V2O5/TeO2 ratio inducing abrupt property changes in vanadium tellurite glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Rodrigues, Ana C. M.; Mossin, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Transition metal containing glasses have unique electrical properties and are therefore often used for electrochemical applications, such as in batteries. Among oxide glasses, vanadium tellurite glasses exhibit the highest electronic conductivity and thus the high potential for applications....... In this work, we investigate how the dynamic and physical properties vary with composition in the vanadium tellurite system. The results show that there exists a critical V2O5 concentration of 45 mol %, above which the local structure is subjected to a drastic change with increasing V2O5, leading to abrupt...... changes in both hardness and liquid fragility. Electronic conductivity does not follow the expected correlation to the valence state of the vanadium as predicted by the Mott-Austin equation but shows a linear correlation to the mean distance between vanadium ions. These findings could contribute...

  18. Contrasting dynamics of fragile and non-fragile polyalcohols through the glass, and dynamical, transitions: A comparison of neutron scattering and dielectric relaxation data for sorbitol and glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliardo, F; Angell, C A; Magazù, S

    2017-01-01

    Glycerol and sorbitol are glass-forming hydrogen-bonded systems characterized by intriguing properties which make these systems very interesting also from the applications point of view. The goal of this work is to relate the hydrogen-bonded features, relaxation dynamics, glass transition properties and fragility of these systems, in particular to seek insight into their very different liquid fragilities. The comparison between glycerol and sorbitol is carried out by collecting the elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) intensity as a function of temperature and of the instrumental energy resolution. Intensity data vs temperature and resolution are analyzed in terms of thermal restraint and Resolution Elastic Neutron Scattering (RENS) approaches. The number of OH groups, which are related to the connecting sites, is a significant parameter both in the glass transition and in the dynamical transition. On the other hand, the disordered nature of sorbitol is confirmed by the existence of different relaxation processes. From the applications point of view, glycerol and sorbitol have remarkable bioprotectant properties which make these systems useful in different technological and industrial fields. Furthermore, polyols are rich in glassforming liquid phenomenology and highly deserving of study in their own right. The comparison of EINS and calorimetric data on glycerol and sorbitol helps provide a connection between structural relaxation, dynamical transition, glass transition, and fragility. The evaluation of the inflection point in the elastic intensity behavior as a function of temperature and instrumental energy resolution provides a confirmation of the validity of the RENS approach. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Protein Internal Dynamics Associated With Pre-System Glass Transition Temperature Endothermic Events: Investigation of Insulin and Human Growth Hormone by Solid State Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Grobelny, Pawel J; Bogner, Robin H; Pikal, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Lyophilized proteins are generally stored below their glass transition temperature (T g ) to maintain long-term stability. Some proteins in the (pure) solid state showed a distinct endotherm at a temperature well below the glass transition, designated as a pre-T g endotherm. The pre-T g endothermic event has been linked with a transition in protein internal mobility. The aim of this study was to investigate the internal dynamics of 2 proteins, insulin and human growth hormone (hGH), both of which exhibit the pre-T g endothermic event with onsets at 50°C-60°C. Solid state hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of both proteins was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy over a temperature range from 30°C to 80°C. A distinct sigmoidal transition in the extent of H/D exchange had a midpoint of 56.1 ± 1.2°C for insulin and 61.7 ± 0.9°C for hGH, suggesting a transition to greater mobility in the protein molecules at these temperatures. The data support the hypothesis that the pre-T g event is related to a transition in internal protein mobility associated with the protein dynamical temperature. Exceeding the protein dynamical temperature is expected to activate protein internal motion and therefore may have stability consequences. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear level density variation with angular momentum induced shape transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Variation of Nuclear level density (NLD) with the excitation energy and angular momentum in particular has been a topic of interest in the recent past and there have been continuous efforts in this direction on the theoretical and experimental fronts but a conclusive trend in the variation of nuclear level density parameter with angular momentum has not been achieved so far. A comprehensive investigation of N=68 isotones around the compound nucleus 119 Sb from neutron rich 112 Ru (Z=44) to neutron deficient 127 Pr (Z= 59) nuclei is presented to understand the angular momentum induced variations in inverse level density parameter and the possible influence of deformation and structural transitions on the variations on NLd

  1. Strain-induced topological quantum phase transition in phosphorene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Park, Jejune; Woo, Sungjong; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    Using ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the structural stability and electronic properties of phosphorene oxides (POx) with different oxygen compositions x. A variety of configurations are modeled and optimized geometrically to search for the equilibrium structure for each x value. Our electronic structure calculations on the equilibrium configuration obtained for each x reveal that the band gap tends to increase with the oxygen composition of x 0.5. We further explore the strain effect on the electronic structure of the fully oxidized phosphorene, PO, with x = 1. At a particular strain without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is observed a band gap closure near the Γ point in the k space. We further find the strain in tandem with SOC induces an interesting band inversion with a reopened very small band gap (5 meV), and thus gives rise to a topological quantum phase transition from a normal insulator to a topological insulator. Such a topological phase transition is confirmed by the wave function analysis and the band topology identified by the Z2 invariant calculation.

  2. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-Stabilizing Bioactive Glasses for Directing Mesenchymal Stem Cell Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Maria M.; Tsigkou, Olga; Nair, Rekha; Jones, Julian R.; Jell, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen tension is a known regulator of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) plasticity, differentiation, proliferation, and recruitment to sites of injury. Materials capable of affecting the MSC oxygen-sensing pathway, independently of the environmental oxygen pressure, are therefore of immense interest to the tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine community. In this study, we describe the evaluation of the effect of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-stabilizing bioactive glasses (BGs) on human MSCs. The dissolution products from these hypoxia-mimicking BGs stabilized HIF-1α in a concentration-dependent manner, altered cell proliferation and metabolism, and upregulated a number of genes involved in the hypoxic response (HIF1A, HIF2A, and VHL), MSC survival (SAG and BCL2), extracellular matrix remodeling (MMP1), and angiogenesis (VEGF and PDGF). These HIF-stabilizing materials can therefore be used to improve MSC survival and enhance regeneration in a number of TE strategies. PMID:25167933

  3. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate of a monomeric system on the porosity and activity of an immobilized enzyme prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperatures has been studied. Slow cooling gave the same effect on porosity of the polymer as decreasing the monomer concentration. A glass-forming solvent such as diethylene glycol was added to water to study the effect of the supercooling tendency of the solvent. Addition of diethylene glycol decreased porosity and also enzymic activity. Water was replaced by the miscible solvent p-dioxane and the immiscible solvent n-decane in order to clarify the effect of solvent. p-Dioxane had a similar effect to water on the relation between the monomer concentration, porosity and activity. On the other hand, polymer prepared from the system containing n-decane showed different immobilization properties owing to the presence of independent pores in the matrix. (author)

  4. Impact of hydrogenated starch hydrolysate on glass transition, hygroscopic behavior and crystallization of isomalt-based systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanitha Tananuwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Glass transition behavior, adsorption isotherm and crystallization of isomalt-hydrogenated starch hydrolysate (HSH mixtures (0-20% HSH and pure HSH were investigated. At similar solid content, Tg decreased as HSH concentration increased. Tg data at different solid contents were well-fitted with Gordon-Taylor equation (gR2≥0.97. Adsorption isotherm showed that systems with greater HSH concentration became more hygroscopic. Accelerated storage test (30°C, 84% RH of modeled hard candy containing 10% HSH and pure isomalt formula was done. HSH enhanced water uptake and crystallization of polyols in hard candy during aging without packaging; however, those effects were lessen for the samples aged in polyethylene terephthalate/cast polypropylene (PET/CPP pouches, and were negligible after the application of superior moisture barrier, oriented polypropylene/metalized cast polypropylene (OPP/MCPP film. Although HSH adversely affected storage stability of sugarless hard candies, it could be add into the formulation together with the application of packaging having a good moisture barrier.

  5. Fabrication of (PPC/NCC)/PVA composites with inner-outer double constrained structure and improved glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shaoying; Li, Li; Wang, Qi

    2018-07-01

    Improving glass transition temperature (T g ) and mechanical property of the environment-friendly poly(propylene carbonate) via intermacromolecular complexation through hydrogen bonding is attractive and of great importance. A novel and effective strategy to prepare (polypropylene carbonate/nanocrystalline cellulose)/polyvinyl alcohol ((PPC/NCC)/PVA) composites with inner-outer double constrained structure was reported in this work. Outside the PPC phase, PVA, as a strong skeleton at microscale, could constrain the movement of PPC molecular chains by forming hydrogen bonding with PPC at the interface of PPC and PVA phases; inside the PPC phase, the rod-like NCC could restrain the flexible molecular chains of PPC at nanoscale by forming multi-hydrogen bonding with PPC. Under the synergistic effect of this novel inner-outer double constrained structure, T g , mechanical properties and thermal stability of (PPC/NCC)/PVA composite were significantly increased, e.g. T g of the composite researched the maximum value of 49.6 °C, respectively 15.6 °C, 5.7 °C and 4.2 °C higher than that of PPC, PPC/NCC and PPC/PVA composite. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The architecture of the adsorbed layer at the substrate interface determines the glass transition of supported ultrathin polystyrene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuzheng; Xu, Hao; Han, Jun; Zhu, Yumei; Zuo, Biao; Wang, Xinping; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-12

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying the effect of polymer/solid interfacial interactions on the dynamics of thin polymer films, the glass transition of thin end-functionalized polystyrene films supported on SiO 2 -Si, such as proton-terminated PS (PS-H), α,ω-dicarboxy-terminated PS (PS-COOH), and α,ω-dihydroxyl-terminated PS (PS-OH), was investigated. All the PS films exhibited a substantial depression in T g with decreasing film thickness, while the extent of such depression was strongly dependent on the chemical structure of the end groups and molecular weights. It was found that T - T of the various PS films increased linearly with increasing h ads /R g , in which h ads is the thickness of the interfacial adsorbed layer and R g is the radius of gyration of PS. The h ads /R g is a direct reflection of the macromolecular chain conformation within the adsorbed layer which was affected by its end groups and molecular weights. These findings are in line with the work of Napolitano, and present direct experimental evidence.

  7. Effect of borojo (Borojoa patinoi Cuatrecasas) three-phase composition and gum arabic on the glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bernal, Jenny M; Tello, Edisson; Flores-Andrade, Enrique; Perea-Flores, Maria de Jesús; Vallejo-Cardona, Alba A; Gutiérrez-López, Gustavo F; Quintanilla-Carvajal, Maria X

    2016-02-01

    The search for natural, novel, high-quality, stable food ingredients is an ongoing practice in the food industry. Pulp of borojo (Borojoa patinoi Cuatrecasas), which is a fruit of the Colombian Pacific region, can be separated into three phases: liquid (LP), medium (MP) and solid (SP) phases. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the three-phase composition and gum arabic on their glass transitions temperatures (T(g)). The best mixture, LP-MP, MP-SP and LP-SP and gum arabic (GA) was identified by response surface methodology. When adding GA to SP borojo phase in a 1:1 proportion, the resulting T(g) of the mixture was 132.27 °C whereas Tg for GA and SP-phase were 154.89 °C and 79.86 °C respectively, which supported this combination as attractive from a processing perspective and supports an industrial advantage of using borojo as food ingredient. Phases were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and mass spectrometry. Low molecular weight compounds such as fructose for MP lowered T(g) whereas the presence of lignin increased T(g) of the mixtures as with the SP. The addition of GA significantly increased T(g) of borojo phases so leading to propose them as novel food processing materials. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Effect of hydrolyzed whey protein on surface morphology, water sorption, and glass transition temperature of a model infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Grace M; O'Mahony, James A; Kelly, Alan L; O'Callaghan, Donal J

    2016-09-01

    Physical properties of spray-dried dairy powders depend on their composition and physical characteristics. This study investigated the effect of hydrolyzed whey protein on the microstructure and physical stability of dried model infant formula. Model infant formulas were produced containing either intact (DH 0) or hydrolyzed (DH 12) whey protein, where DH=degree of hydrolysis (%). Before spray drying, apparent viscosities of liquid feeds (at 55°C) at a shear rate of 500 s(-1) were 3.02 and 3.85 mPa·s for intact and hydrolyzed infant formulas, respectively. On reconstitution, powders with hydrolyzed whey protein had a significantly higher fat globule size and lower emulsion stability than intact whey protein powder. Lactose crystallization in powders occurred at higher relative humidity for hydrolyzed formula. The Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer equation, fitted to sorption isotherms, showed increased monolayer moisture when intact protein was present. As expected, glass transition decreased significantly with increasing water content. Partial hydrolysis of whey protein in model infant formula resulted in altered powder particle surface morphology, lactose crystallization properties, and storage stability. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Incorporation of defects into the central atoms model of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, Eric A.; Zhu Aiwu; Shiflet, G.J.; Joseph Poon, S.

    2011-01-01

    The central atoms model (CAM) of a metallic glass is extended to incorporate thermodynamically stable defects, similar to vacancies in a crystalline solid, within the amorphous structure. A bond deficiency (BD), which is the proposed defect present in all metallic glasses, is introduced into the CAM equations. Like vacancies in a crystalline solid, BDs are thermodynamically stable entities because of the increase in entropy associated with their creation, and there is an equilibrium concentration present in the glassy phase. When applied to Cu-Zr and Ni-Zr binary metallic glasses, the concentration of thermally induced BDs surrounding Zr atoms reaches a relatively constant value at the glass transition temperature, regardless of composition within a given glass system. Using this 'critical' defect concentration, the predicted temperatures at which the glass transition is expected to occur are in good agreement with the experimentally determined glass transition temperatures for both alloy systems.

  10. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses; Influence du dopage par certains elements de transition sur les effets d'irradiation dans des verres d'interet nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-15

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then {beta} irradiated at different doses up to 10{sup 9} Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe{sup 3+} reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe{sup 3+} amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h{sup 0}/e-) consuming equilibrium. He{sup +} and Kr{sup 3+} ions and {gamma} irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  11. Role of crushing-induced fragmentation in the consolidation of quartz ceramic and glass powders during high-pressure torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Pilyugin, V. P.; Patselov, A. M.; Tolmachev, T. P.

    2017-10-01

    The consolidation of a quartz powders in crystalline (ceramics) and amorphous (glass) states is detected during high-pressure torsion in Bridgman anvils. The consolidation is shown to depend on preceding crushing-induced fragmentation. The role of the surfaces that appear during crushing and cracking is discussed. The dissipative channels that compete with fracture are determined.

  12. Relief grating induced by photo-expansion in Ga-Ge-S and Ga-Ge-As-S glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Messaddeq, S. H.; Li, M. S.; Ležal, Dimitrij; Messaddeq, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2002), s. 375-380 ISSN 1454-4164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : light-induced effects * chalcogenide glasses * relief gratings Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2002

  13. High-energy γ-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, R.; Kozdras, A.; Kozyukhin, S.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of Co 60 γ-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge x Se 100-x glasses (5 ≤ x ≤ 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This γ-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 ≤ x ≤ 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with γ-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  14. Two Glass Transitions Associated to Different Dynamic Disorders in the Nematic Glassy State of a Non-Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimer Dopped with γ-Alumina Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Berart, Sergio; López, David O.; Salud, Josep; Diego, José Antonio; Sellarès, Jordi; Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; de la Fuente, María Rosario; Ros, María Blanca

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the nematic glassy state of the non-symmetric LC dimer α-(4-cyanobiphenyl-4′-yloxy)-ω-(1-pyrenimine-benzylidene-4′-oxy) undecane is studied by means of calorimetric and dielectric measurements. The most striking result of the work is the presence of two different glass transition temperatures: one due to the freezing of the flip-flop motions of the bulkier unit of the dimer and the other, at a lower temperature, related to the freezing of the flip-flop and precessional motions of the cyanobiphenyl unit. This result shows the fact that glass transition is the consequence of the freezing of one or more coupled dynamic disorders and not of the disordered phase itself. In order to avoid crystallization when the bulk sample is cooled down, the LC dimer has been confined via the dispersion of γ-alumina nanoparticles, in several concentrations.

  15. Two Glass Transitions Associated to Different Dynamic Disorders in the Nematic Glassy State of a Non-Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimer Dopped with g-Alumina Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Diez-Berart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the nematic glassy state of the non-symmetric LC dimer α-(4-cyanobiphenyl-4′-yloxy-ω-(1-pyrenimine-benzylidene-4′-oxy undecane is studied by means of calorimetric and dielectric measurements. The most striking result of the work is the presence of two different glass transition temperatures: one due to the freezing of the flip-flop motions of the bulkier unit of the dimer and the other, at a lower temperature, related to the freezing of the flip-flop and precessional motions of the cyanobiphenyl unit. This result shows the fact that glass transition is the consequence of the freezing of one or more coupled dynamic disorders and not of the disordered phase itself. In order to avoid crystallization when the bulk sample is cooled down, the LC dimer has been confined via the dispersion of γ-alumina nanoparticles, in several concentrations.

  16. 5th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Jennison, Dwight R; Stechel, Ellen B; DIET V; Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    1993-01-01

    This volume in the Springer Series on Surface Sciences presents a recent account of advances in the ever-broadening field of electron-and photon-stimulated sur­ face processes. As in previous volumes, these advances are presented as the proceedings of the International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; the fifth workshop (DIET V) was held in Taos, New Mexico, April 1-4, 1992. It will be abundantly clear to the reader that "DIET" is not restricted to desorption, but has for several years included photochemistry, non-thermal surface modification, exciton self-trapping, and many other phenomena that are induced by electron or photon bombardment. However, most stimulated surface processes do share a common physics: initial electronic excitation, localization of the excitation, and conversion of electronic energy into nuclear kinetic energy. It is the rich variation of this theme which makes the field so interesting and fruitful. We have divided the book into eleven parts in orde...

  17. Tempol effect on epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad; Dadras, Farahnaz; Ghadimipour, Hamid Reza; Seif Rabiei, Mohamad Ali; Khoshjou, Farhad

    2017-01-01

    One of common mechanisms in pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases is epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). On the other hand oxidative stress has been known to participate in kidney damage of diabetic nephropathy (DN). We studied if tempol, a well-known antioxidant agent, can ameliorate EMT in DN induced in male rats. Twenty-seven male rats were equally divided in to 4 groups. Group I (control or C), group II (diabetic or D), group III (T) rats which was given tempol (100 mg/kg/day) by gavages for 28 days and group IV (D&T) was diabetic rats that also received same dose of tempol. After treatment, their kidneys were studied by immunohistochemicalstaining. Pathological changes in the kidney were detected concurrently with increasing kidney weight and urinary albumin excretion. In addition, EMT indices, i.e. decline of E-cadherin and increase of α SMA staining were significantly emerged in the renal tubular cells of diabetic group and were partially modified in diabetic group which were simultaneously treated by tempol. Tempol can modify, but not significantly, EMT induced by DN.

  18. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  19. Spin glass transition in the rhombohedral LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bie, Xiaofei; Yang, Xu; Han, Bing; Chen, Nan; Liu, Lina; Wei, Yingjin; Wang, Chunzhong; Chen, Hong; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The Rietveld analysis of XRD data reveals a single phase with rhombohedral structure. •Dc susceptibility data suggest a spin glass behavior at low T in the 333 compound. •The ac susceptibility measurements have been observed in the typical SG system. •Three models have been employed to study the behavior of the spin glass state. •Both geometrical frustration and disorder play important role in the formation of SG. -- Abstract: Layered LiNi 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 O 2 has been synthesized by co-precipitation method, and the magnetic properties were comprehensively studied by dc and ac susceptibilities. The dc magnetization curves show the irreversibility and spin freezing behavior at 109 K and 9 K. The evolution of real and imaginary part of ac susceptibility under different frequencies indicates a spin glass transition at low temperature. Three models (the Néel–Arrhenius law, the Vogel–Fulcher law, and the power law) have been employed to study the relaxation behavior of the spin glass state. Both frustration and disorder play important role in the formation of spin glass

  20. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field