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Sample records for glass soda-lime glass

  1. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different

  2. Glass-Forming Ability of Soda Lime Borate Liquids

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the composition dependence of glass-forming ability (GFA) of a series of iron-containing soda lime borate liquids by substituting Na2O for B2O3. We have characterized GFA by measuring the glass stability against crystallization using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC......). The results show that the GFA decreases when substituting Na2O for B2O3. Moreover, we find that there is no direct link between the kinetic fragility and GFA for the soda lime borate series studied herein. We have also discovered and clarified a striking thermal history dependence of the glass stability...

  3. Characterization of cutting soda-lime glass sludge for the formulation of red ceramic products

    Filogonio, P.H.C.; Reis, A.S.; Louzada, D.M.; Della, V.P.

    2014-01-01

    Considering previous works that have demonstrated the feasibility of soda-lime glass incorporation into red ceramics, this paper aims to determine the potential for incorporation of cutting soda-lime glass sludge in red ceramic manufacturing. Therefore, the waste was characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution and thermal behavior. The results confirm the chemical and mineralogical similarity between waste and soda-lime glass. Because of this similarity, it is concluded that the soda-lime glass waste has the capability to be used in the manufacturing of red ceramics. (author)

  4. Development of soda-lime glasses from ornamental rock wastes

    Babisk, Michelle Pereira

    2009-01-01

    During the ornamental rocks production, among other steps, one saw the rock blocks in order to transform them into semi-finished plates. In this step, expressive amounts of residues are generated, which are not properly discharged in nature, without any programmed utilization. The residues of silicide rocks present, in their compositions, oxides which are raw materials employed to fabricate soda-lime type glasses (containing SiO_2, Al_2O_3, CaO, Na_2O and K_2O). On the other hand the residues of carbonatic rocks are constituted of glass net modifier oxides, like CaO and MgO. In this work it was developed four types of soda-lime glasses using ornamental rock residues, where the glasses compositions were adjusted by adding sand, as silica source, as well as sodium and calcium carbonates as sources of Na_2O and CaO, respectively. The obtained glasses were characterized by means of Archimed's method for densities measurements, microstructure by using optical and electronic microscopy, phases by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness by Vickers indentation, spectroscopy (UV/VIS), and hydrolytic resistance according to ISO 719. The XRD analyses confirmed the compositions total vitrification, where the greened aspect of the samples was due to the presence of the iron oxides. The produced glasses properties were compared with those of commercial glasses aiming their industrial employment. The main difference between the produced glasses and those commercials varied primarily regarding the amount of carbonates incorporated. The results showed that the ornamental rocks residues may be used as raw materials for glasses fabrication, and they found a useful economic destination rather than discharge which promotes undesirable environmental impact. (author)

  5. Internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silicate glasses.

    Reinsch, S; Müller, R; Deubener, J; Behrens, H

    2013-11-07

    The internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silica glasses with total water content (C(W)) up to 1.9 wt. % was studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) using temperature-frequency sweeps from 723 K to 273 K and from 1 s(-1) to 50 s(-1). Total water content and concentrations of H2O molecules (C(H2O)) and OH groups (C(OH)) in the DMA specimens were determined by infrared spectroscopy. For low water contents (C(W) ≈ C(OH) friction peaks below the glass transition (α relaxation) were assigned to the low-temperature motion of alkali ions (γ relaxation) and cooperative movements of dissimilar mobile species under participation of OH at higher temperature (β(OH) relaxation). For large water contents (C(W) > 1 wt. %), where significant amounts of molecular water are evident (C(H2O) > 0.15 wt. %), however, internal friction spectra change unexpectedly: the β(OH) peak heights saturate and a low temperature shoulder appears on the β-relaxation peak. This emerging relaxation mode (β(H2O) relaxation) was assigned to the motions of H2O molecules. β(H2O) relaxation was found to be faster than β(OH) but slower than γ relaxation. Activation energy of the different relaxation modes increased in the order γ < β(H2O) < β(OH) < α.

  6. Nanosecond (ns) laser transfer of silver nanoparticles from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to transparent soda-lime glass and shock waves formation

    Sow, Mohamed Chérif; Blondeau, Jean-Philippe; Sagot, Nadine; Ollier, Nadège; Tite, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles growth by nanosecond laser irradiation of silver exchanged soda-lime glasses. • Silver nanoparticles transfer. • Nanosecond laser induced shock waves formation on glass. - Abstract: In this contribution, we showed for the first time in our knowledge a single-step process for silver clusters and nanoparticles growth and transfer from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to un-exchanged soda-lime glass (transparent glass in visible and NIR domain) by nanosecond (ns) laser irradiation. The transferred silver nanoparticles in transparent glass are strongly linked to the glass surface. In addition, we point out the formation of shock waves, with selective silver clustering on the top wave. This technique provides an alternative and simple way to obtain metallic nanoparticles in different media which can be traversed by laser wavelength used. Moreover, this experiment is made at room temperature and air environment. It is worth noting that our technique requires a glass previously doped with the corresponding silver ions

  7. Kinetics of dissolution of a biocide soda-lime glass powder containing silver nanoparticles

    Esteban-Tejeda, L.; Silva, A. C. da; Mello-Castanho, S. R.; Pacharroman, C.; Moya, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have studied the lixiviation kinetics of silver nanoparticles, as well as the solubility of a particulate system ( 2 lixiviation followed a Jander model (α 2 /4 ≈ Kt). It has been proven that nanostructured soda-lime glass/nAg composed by particles <30 μm with a 20 wt% of silver are a strong biocide versus Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. This soda-lime glass/nAg acts as a perfect dispenser of silver nanoparticles to the liquid media, avoiding the fast increasing of its concentration over the toxicity limit for human cells and for the environment.

  8. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al 2 O 3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  9. Surface morphology study in high speed milling of soda lime glass

    Konneh, Mohamed; Bagum, Mst. Nasima; Ali, Mohammad Yeakub; Amin, A. K. M. Nurul

    2018-05-01

    Soda lime glass has a wide range of applications in optical, bio-medical and semi-conductor industries. It is undeniably a challenging task to produce micro finish surface on an amorphous brittle solid like soda lime glass due to its low fracture toughness. In order to obtain such a finish surface, ductile machining has been exploited, as this usually cause's plastic flow which control crack propagation. At sub-micro scale cutting parameters, researchers achieved nano finish surface in micro milling operation using coated tool. However it is possible to enhance the rate of material removal (RMR) of soda lime glass at flexible cutting condition. High speed cutting at micro meter level, extend of thermal softening might be prominent than the strain gradient strengthening. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of high cutting speed end milling parameters on the surface texture of soda lime glass using uncoated carbide tool. The spindle speed, depth of cut and feed rate were varied from 20,000 to 40,000 rpm, 10 to 30 mm/min and 30 to 50 µm respectively. Mathematical model of roughness has been developed using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Experimental verification confirmed that surface roughness (Ra) 0.38 µm is possible to achieve at increased RMR, 4.71 mm3/min.

  10. Fractal Loop Heat Pipe Performance Comparisons of a Soda Lime Glass and Compressed Carbon Foam Wick

    Myre, David; Silk, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares heat flux performance of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) wick structure fabricated from compressed carbon foam with that of a wick structure fabricated from sintered soda lime glass. Each wick was used in an LHP containing a fractal based evaporator. The Fractal Loop Heat Pipe (FLHP) was designed and manufactured by Mikros Manufacturing Inc. The compressed carbon foam wick structure was manufactured by ERG Aerospace Inc., and machined to specifications comparable to that of the initial soda lime glass wick structure. Machining of the compressed foam as well as performance testing was conducted at the United States Naval Academy. Performance testing with the sintered soda lime glass wick structures was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Heat input for both wick structures was supplied via cartridge heaters mounted in a copper block. The copper heater block was placed in contact with the FLHP evaporator which had a circular cross-sectional area of 0.88 cm(sup 2). Twice distilled, deionized water was used as the working fluid in both sets of experiments. Thermal performance data was obtained for three different Condenser/Subcooler temperatures under degassed conditions. Both wicks demonstrated comparable heat flux performance with a maximum of 75 W/cm observed for the soda lime glass wick and 70 W /cm(sup 2) for the compressed carbon foam wick.

  11. Formation of superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    Ahsan, Md. Shamim, E-mail: shamim@kaist.ac.kr [Photonics Application Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro (373-1 Guseong-dong), Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Electronics and Communication Engineering Discipline, School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Khulna University, Khulna-9208 (Bangladesh); Dewanda, Fadia, E-mail: fdewanda@kaist.ac.kr [Photonics Application Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro (373-1 Guseong-dong), Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Man Seop, E-mail: leems1502@kaist.ac.kr [Photonics Application Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro (373-1 Guseong-dong), Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sekita, Hitoshi, E-mail: sekita@cyber-laser.com [Cyber Laser Inc., 7-7 Sinkawasaki, KBIC 101 205, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-0032 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Tetsumi, E-mail: sumiy@cyber-laser.com [Cyber Laser Inc., 7-7 Sinkawasaki, KBIC 101 205, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-0032 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We formed superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface by femtosecond laser pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Periodic microstructures are printed on the glass surface for superhydrophobicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contact angle of water droplet on the microstructured glass surface is 155 Degree-Sign . Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The transparency of superhydrophobic glass is higher than 77% in visible spectrum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explain the formation mechanism of superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates the fabrication of superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface by engineering periodic microgratings with self-formed periodic micro-ripples inside the microgratings using a single beam femtosecond laser. The wetting property of the microstructured surface is improved from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic, presenting a water droplet contact angle ranges from 152 Degree-Sign to 155 Degree-Sign . The microstructured glass surface shows excellent transparency, which is higher than 77% in the visible spectrum. We strongly believe that our proposed technology can achieve superhydrophobic glass surfaces over a large area for applications in diverse fields.

  12. Formation of superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    Ahsan, Md. Shamim; Dewanda, Fadia; Lee, Man Seop; Sekita, Hitoshi; Sumiyoshi, Tetsumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We formed superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface by femtosecond laser pulses. ► Periodic microstructures are printed on the glass surface for superhydrophobicity. ► The contact angle of water droplet on the microstructured glass surface is 155°. ► The transparency of superhydrophobic glass is higher than 77% in visible spectrum. ► We explain the formation mechanism of superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates the fabrication of superhydrophobic soda-lime glass surface by engineering periodic microgratings with self-formed periodic micro-ripples inside the microgratings using a single beam femtosecond laser. The wetting property of the microstructured surface is improved from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic, presenting a water droplet contact angle ranges from 152° to 155°. The microstructured glass surface shows excellent transparency, which is higher than 77% in the visible spectrum. We strongly believe that our proposed technology can achieve superhydrophobic glass surfaces over a large area for applications in diverse fields.

  13. Studies on the Potential of Waste Soda Lime Silica Glass in Glass Ionomer Cement Production

    V. W. Francis Thoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GIC are produced through acid base reaction between calcium-fluoroaluminosilicate glass powder and polyacrylic acid (PAA. Soda lime silica glasses (SLS, mainly composed of silica (SiO2, have been utilized in this study as the source of SiO2 for synthesis of Ca-fluoroaluminosilicate glass. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the potential of SLS waste glass in producing GIC. Two glasses, GWX 1 (analytical grade SiO2 and GWX 2 (replacing SiO2 with waste SLS, were synthesized and then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX. Synthesized glasses were then used to produce GIC, in which the properties were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and compressive test (from 1 to 28 days. XRD results showed that amorphous glass was produced by using SLS waste glass (GWX 2, which is similar to glass produced using analytical grade SiO2 (GWX 1. Results from FT-IR showed that the setting reaction of GWX 2 cements is slower compared to cement GWX 1. Compressive strengths for GWX 1 cements reached up to 76 MPa at 28 days, whereas GWX 2 cements showed a slightly higher value, which is 80 MPa.

  14. Establishing Relationship between Process Parameters and Temperature during High Speed End Milling of Soda Lime Glass

    Nasima Bagum, Mst.; Konneh, Mohamed; Yeakub Ali, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    In glass machining crack free surface is required in biomedical and optical industry. Ductile mode machining allows materials removal from brittle materials in a ductile manner rather than by brittle fracture. Although end milling is a versatile process, it has not been applied frequently for machining soda lime glass. Soda lime glass is a strain rate and temperature sensitive material; especially around glass transition temperature Tg, ductility increased and strength decreased. Hence, it is envisaged that the generated temperature by high-speed end milling (HSEM) could be brought close to the glass transition temperature, which promote ductile machining. In this research, the objective is to investigate the effect of high speed machining parameters on generated temperature. The cutting parameters were optimized to generate temperature around glass transition temperature of soda lime using response surface methodology (RSM). Result showed that the most influencing process parameter is feed rate followed by spindle speed and depth of cut to generate temperature. Confirmation test showed that combination of spindle speed 30,173 rpm, feed rate 13.2 mm/min and depth of cut 37.68 µm generate 635°C, hence ductile chip removal with machined surface Ra 0.358 µm was possible to achieve.

  15. Soda-Lime-Silicate Float Glass: A Property Comparison

    2017-10-01

    temperature. West Conshohocken (PA): ASTM International; 2012. 4. Quinn GD, Swab JJ . Fracture toughness of glasses as measured by the SCF and SEPB methods...Swab JJ , Patel PJ, Tran X, Gilde L, Luoto E, Gaviola MH, Gott A, Paulson B, Kilczewski S. Equibiaxial flexure strength of glass: influence of glass

  16. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda-lime-silica waste glass.

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak

    2014-04-01

    Soda-lime-silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Fracture Process of Tempered Soda-Lime-Silica Glass

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This work presents experimental observations of the characteristic fracture process of tempered glass. Square specimens with a side length of 300 mm, various thicknesses and a residual stress state characterized by photoelastic measurements were used. Fracture was initiated using a 2.5 mm diamond...

  18. Effect of embedded silver nanoparticles on refractive index of soda lime glass

    Sonal, Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2018-05-01

    Silver glass nanocomposites were prepared by exposing silver doped soda lime glass slides obtained via ion-exchange reaction to a beam of 200 keV Argon ions (Ar+) at an off normal angle of 400 with doses of 5x1015 ions cm-2 and 1x1016 ions cm-2. These nanocomposites were further characterized using UV-visible spectrophotometer so as to study their transmission and reflection behavior and compute their refractive index and real and imaginary parts of dielectric function.

  19. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PREPARATION OF ZEOLITE X COATINGS ON SODA-LIME TYPE GLASS PLATES

    M. Tatlier

    Full Text Available Abstract The dissolution of glass in highly alkaline reaction mixtures and the impact of this phenomenon on zeolite coating formation were investigated. Coating samples were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM and thermogravimetry (TG. It was demonstrated that zeolite X coatings might be prepared on soda-lime glass. Glass dissolved to some degree, up to 2% of its original mass, in the reaction mixtures for the conditions investigated. This dissolution affected the zeolite synthesis taking place on the glass surface, resulting in phases different from those obtained on inert metal surfaces in some cases, especially for the use of reaction mixtures with relatively high Si/Al ratios. The percentage of dissolution of glass plates increased with their decreasing thickness, indicating a surface phenomenon for the dissolution. The stabilities of the coatings, which varied with the synthesis conditions, benefited from the addition of extra thin layers of polyacrylic acid.

  1. OD bands in the IR spectra of a deuterated soda-lime-silica glass

    Peuker, C.; Brzezinka, K.W.; Gaber, M.; Kohl, A.; Geissler, H. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    IR spectra of a deuterated glass of the composition (in mol%) 16 Na{sub 2}O . 10 CaO . 74 SiO{sub 2} complete earlier spectroscopic studies on water-poor soda-lime-silica glasses. The approved IR spectroscopic method of the deuterium exchange allows a reliable assignment of the hydroxyl bands also in the case of glasses. By spectra comparison the assignment of the IR bands at 3500 and 2800 cm{sup -1} to hydroxyl groups with different hydrogen bonding is verified. The IR band at about 4500 cm{sup -1} is interpreted as both a combination of the stretching vibrations {nu}O-H and {nu}Si-OH and a combination of the stretching vibration {nu}O-H and the deformation vibration {delta}SiOH. The bands at 1763 and 1602 cm{sup -1} are attributed to combination vibrations of the glass network. (orig.)

  2. Formation of silver colloids on ion exchanged soda lime silicate glasses by irradiation

    Yoshimura, E.M.; Okuno, E.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation (gamma rays, X-rays and electrons) on soda lime silicate glasses, in which part of the Na + was substituted by Ag + by means of an ionic exchange process, was studied. The techniques of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to follow the formation of silver colloids by irradiation. Also the thermoluminescence (TL) of the samples was measured and three peaks between room temperature and 450 C were observed. The TEM and TSDC results agree that, as expected, ionizing radiation promotes the formation of silver colloids on the ion exchanged surface of soda lime glasses. Soft X-rays are much more efficient in the process than gamma rays and electrons. The correlation with thermoluminescence glow curves indicates that the intensity of a TL peak at 230 C can provide a rapid means of evaluating the presence of silver colloids. TL sensitivities, measured as area under the glow curve per unit mass and unit dose, are very similar for ion exchanged and not exchanged samples submitted to X-ray irradiation, although the peak temperatures differ in about 40 C in the two cases. For both electron and gamma irradiated samples, the TL sensitivity drops about an order of magnitude when compared to the X-ray irradiated ones. (orig.)

  3. Effect of sintering on crystallization and structural properties of soda lime silica glass

    Zaid Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sintering temperatures on crystallization and structural of the soda lime silica (SLS glass was reported. Elemental weight composition of the SLS glass powder was identified through Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF analysis while the thermal behavior of the glass was determined using Differential thermal analysis (DTA technique. Archimedes’ method and direct geometric measurement were respectively used to determine bulk density and linear shrinkage of the glass samples. Crystallisation behavior of the samples was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis and chemical bonds present in the samples were measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Results showed an increase in the density and linear shrinkage of the samples as a function of the sintering temperature. The XRD analysis revealed the formation of α-quartz (SiO2 and a minor amount of devitrite phases in the samples and these were further verified through the detection of chemical bonds by FTIR after sintering at 800ºC. The properties of the glass-ceramics can be explained on the basis of crystal chemistry which indicated that the alkali ions formed as carriers in the random network structure and can be recommended for the manufacture of glass fiber or toughened glass-ceramic insulators.

  4. A completely transparent, adhesively bonded soda-lime glass block masonry system

    F. Oikonomopoulou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A pioneering, all transparent, self-supporting glass block facade is presented in this paper. Previously realized examples utilize embedded metal components in order to obtain the desired structural performance despite the fact that these elements greatly affect the facade’s overall transparency level. Undeniably, the oxymoron ‘transparency and strength’ remains the prime concern in such applications. In this paper, a new, innovative structural system for glass block facades is described, which demonstrably meets both criteria. The structure is exclusively constructed by monolithic glass blocks, bonded with a colourless, UV-curing adhesive, obtaining thus a maximum transparency. In addition, the desired structural performance is achieved solely through the masonry system, without any opaque substructure. Differing from previous realized projects, solid soda-lime glass blocks are used rather than borosilicate ones. This article provides an overview of the integrated architectural and structural design and discusses the choice of materials. The structural verification of the system is demonstrated. The results show that the adhesively bonded glass block structure has the required self-structural behaviour, but only if strict tolerances are met in the geometry of the glass blocks.

  5. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C.H.M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle–glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers’ hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H 2 /N 2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle–glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required

  6. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Meyer, Willem C.H.M. [Necsa, South African Nuclear Energy Corporation, PO Box 582, Pretoria, Gauteng (South Africa); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle–glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers’ hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle–glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

  7. A study on the plasticity of soda-lime silica glass via molecular dynamics simulations

    Urata, Shingo; Sato, Yosuke

    2017-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were applied to construct a plasticity model, which enables one to simulate deformations of soda-lime silica glass (SLSG) by using continuum methods. To model the plasticity, stress induced by uniaxial and a variety of biaxial deformations was measured by MD simulations. We found that the surfaces of yield and maximum stresses, which are evaluated from the equivalent stress-strain curves, are reasonably represented by the Mohr-Coulomb ellipsoid. Comparing a finite element model using the constructed plasticity model to a large scale atomistic model on a nanoindentation simulation of SLSG reveals that the empirical method is accurate enough to evaluate the SLSG mechanical responses. Furthermore, the effect of ion-exchange on the SLSG plasticity was examined by using MD simulations. As a result, it was demonstrated that the effects of the initial compressive stress on the yield and maximum stresses are anisotropic contrary to our expectations.

  8. Development of dense glass-ceramic from recycled soda-lime-silicate glass and fly ash for tiling

    Mustaffar, Mohd Idham; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza; Hassan, Mahadi Abu

    2017-12-01

    Dense glass-ceramics were prepared by sinter-crystallization process from a combination of soda-lime-silicate glass waste and fly ash. Bentonite clay that acted as a binder was also added in a prepared formulation. The powder mixture of soda-lime glass, fly ash and bentonite clay were compacted by using uniaxial hydraulic press machine and sintered at six (6) various temperatures namely 750, 800, 850, 900, 950 and 1000 °C. The heating rate and sintering time were set at 5 °C/min and 30 minutes respectively. The results revealed that modulus of rupture (MOR), density and linear shrinkage increase first from 750 to 800 °C but decrease later after 800 to 1000 °C. In the meantime, water absorption was showing completely an opposite trend. The glass-ceramic sintered at 800 °C was found to have the best combination of physical-mechanical properties and has the potential to be applied in the construction industry particularly as floor and wall tiles because of the simple manufacturing process at low temperature.

  9. Selective formation of GaN-based nanorod heterostructures on soda-lime glass substrates by a local heating method

    Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Yong-Jin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Chan Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Jong Min [Frontier Research Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, PO Box 111, Kiheung 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Gyu-Chul, E-mail: joonie.choi@samsung.com, E-mail: gcyi@snu.ac.kr [National Creative Research Initiative Center for Semiconductor Nanorods, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    We report on the fabrication of high-quality GaN on soda-lime glass substrates, heretofore precluded by both the intolerance of soda-lime glass to the high temperatures required for III-nitride growth and the lack of an epitaxial relationship with amorphous glass. The difficulties were circumvented by heteroepitaxial coating of GaN on ZnO nanorods via a local microheating method. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of ZnO nanorods and GaN layers using the microheater arrays produced high-quality GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructures at only the desired regions on the soda-lime glass substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures indicated the formation of an abrupt, semicoherent interface. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was also applied to confirm the high optical quality of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures. Mg-doped GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructure arrays, whose GaN shell layers were grown with various different magnesocene flow rates, were further investigated by using photoluminescence spectroscopy for the p-type doping characteristics. The suggested method for fabrication of III-nitrides on glass substrates signifies potentials for low-cost and large-size optoelectronic device applications.

  10. Selective formation of GaN-based nanorod heterostructures on soda-lime glass substrates by a local heating method.

    Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Yong-Jin; Jeon, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee; Baik, Chan Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Jong Min; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2011-05-20

    We report on the fabrication of high-quality GaN on soda-lime glass substrates, heretofore precluded by both the intolerance of soda-lime glass to the high temperatures required for III-nitride growth and the lack of an epitaxial relationship with amorphous glass. The difficulties were circumvented by heteroepitaxial coating of GaN on ZnO nanorods via a local microheating method. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of ZnO nanorods and GaN layers using the microheater arrays produced high-quality GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructures at only the desired regions on the soda-lime glass substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures indicated the formation of an abrupt, semicoherent interface. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was also applied to confirm the high optical quality of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures. Mg-doped GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructure arrays, whose GaN shell layers were grown with various different magnesocene flow rates, were further investigated by using photoluminescence spectroscopy for the p-type doping characteristics. The suggested method for fabrication of III-nitrides on glass substrates signifies potentials for low-cost and large-size optoelectronic device applications.

  11. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  12. Effects of ion implantation on the hardness and friction behaviour of soda-lime silica glass

    Bull, S.J.; Page, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Ion implantation-induced changes in the near-surface mechanical properties of soda-lime silica glass have been investigated by indentation and scratch testing and have been found to be more complicated than changes in the corresponding properties of crystalline ceramic materials. Argon, nitrogen, carbon and potassium ions were used with energies in the range 45-300 keV. Hardness and scratch friction tests were performed under ambient laboratory conditions. At low doses, a decrease in hardness and an increase in both friction and surface stress are observed which are attributed to the electronic damage produced by ion implantation. At higher doses, the hardness increases again and a maximum is produced similar to the behaviour observed for crystalline materials. Similarly there is found to be a second stress and friction peak at this dose. This behaviour is shown to be due to the build-up of displacement damage produced by ion implantation and is thus very similar to the radiation hardening (and eventual amorphization) behaviour of ion-implanted crystalline ceramics. For glass, ''amorphization'' probably corresponds to some change in the existing amorphous state which, in turn, is responsible for the reduction in hardness, stress and friction at the highest doses. (author)

  13. Iron oxide coating films in soda-lime glass by triboadhesion

    Aguilar, J. O.; Arjona, M. J. [Boulevard Bahia s/n esq. Ignacio Comonfort, Chetumal (Mexico); Rodriguez-Lelis, J. M. [Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    In the triboadhesion process the coating material is passed through a rotating cotton mop and the substrate to be coated. The cotton mop rotates at high velocity and exerts pressure on the surface of the substrate. The combined effect of pressure and velocity of the coating mop on the substrate increases its temperature close to the melting point, allowing deposition and diffusion of the coating material within the substrate. After it is deposited, its particles are embedded within the base material forming a thin film composite. The amount of the coating material deposited on the substrate has its maximum at the surface and then decreases as a function of the local temperature within the base material. Bearing this in mind, in the present work, triboadhesion is employed to deposit iron oxide in a substrate of soda-lime glass, with the purpose of determining the feasibility of using this technique for solar control coatings. It was found, through electronic scan microscopy, that a composite material film is formed following the coating direction. Reflectance and transmittance tests were carried out on the glass samples. A 20% difference was found in the visible spectral region (VIS), and a reduction between 10 and 20% in the Near Infrared Region (NIR). These results showed that the triboadhesion is a promising technique for the application of thin films for solar control or solar cells

  14. Iron oxide coating films in soda-lime glass by triboadhesion

    Aguilar, J. O.; Arjona, M. J.; Rodriguez-Lelis, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the triboadhesion process the coating material is passed through a rotating cotton mop and the substrate to be coated. The cotton mop rotates at high velocity and exerts pressure on the surface of the substrate. The combined effect of pressure and velocity of the coating mop on the substrate increases its temperature close to the melting point, allowing deposition and diffusion of the coating material within the substrate. After it is deposited, its particles are embedded within the base material forming a thin film composite. The amount of the coating material deposited on the substrate has its maximum at the surface and then decreases as a function of the local temperature within the base material. Bearing this in mind, in the present work, triboadhesion is employed to deposit iron oxide in a substrate of soda-lime glass, with the purpose of determining the feasibility of using this technique for solar control coatings. It was found, through electronic scan microscopy, that a composite material film is formed following the coating direction. Reflectance and transmittance tests were carried out on the glass samples. A 20% difference was found in the visible spectral region (VIS), and a reduction between 10 and 20% in the Near Infrared Region (NIR). These results showed that the triboadhesion is a promising technique for the application of thin films for solar control or solar cells

  15. Characterization of waste soda-lime glass from the process lapping; Caracterizacao do rejeito de vidro sodo-calcico proveniente do processo de lapidacao

    Galvao, A.C.P.; Farias, A.C.M. de; Mendes, J.U.L., E-mail: galvao_alvaro@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The beneficiation process of plates by stoning of soda-lime glass in glass industry generates, by itself, a residue not used (waste). The waste of this material is sent to landfills, causing environmental impacts. This study aimed to characterize and evaluate the waste of stoning of soda-lime glass (GP). After its acquisition, the GP was processed by grinding and sieving and subsequently characterized through the chemical analysis (XRF, XRD, EDS), morphology by SEM, particle size by laser diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and DSC). It was observed that the particles of GP are micrometer and irregular with the predominant presence of Na, Si and Ca, which are the characteristic elements of an amorphous soda-lime glass. The assessment of the chemical, morphological and thermogravimetric characteristics of GP allowed to suggest its reuse as reinforcing fillers or filler in composite materials to obtain thermal insulators. (author)

  16. Characterization of waste of soda-lime glass generated from lapping process to reuse as filler in composite materials as thermal insulation

    A. C. P. Galvão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe beneficiation plate process by soda-lime glass lapping in the glass industry generates, an untapped residue (waste. The waste of this material is sent to landfills, causing impact on the environment. This work aimed to characterize and evaluate the waste of soda-lime glass (GP lapping. After its acquisition, the GP was processed by grinding and sieving and further characterized by the chemical/mineralogical analysis (XRF, EDS and XRD, SEM morphology, particle size by laser diffraction, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA and DSC and thermophysical analyses. It was observed that the GP particles are irregular and micrometric with the predominant presence of Na, Si and Ca elements characteristic of amorphous soda-lime glass. The assessment of the chemical/mineralogical, morphological, thermophysical and thermal gravimetric characteristics of GP suggest its reuse as reinforcing fillers or filler in composite materials to obtain thermal insulation.

  17. Use of wasted foundry sand (WFS) as a partial substitute for silica in a soda lime glass

    Martin, A.C.; Ueno, O.K.; Folgueras, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    The waste foundry sand (WFS) is the main waste generates in foundry industries. Studies in the literature suggest the use of WFS in different materials, such as concrete, brick or asphalt. This work aims to partially replace the silica of a soda-lime glass by the WFS. The waste foundry sand has in its composition elements such as iron and aluminum that can affect the glass quality, which justifies the residue processing to reduce the impurity content. The treatments, that included mechanical agitation and thermal treatment, resulted in a slight decrease in the percent of iron with consequent increase of the silica content. After treatment, some sands were incorporated into the glass, that showed green color but with lower absorption intensity for the sand with less iron content. It was observed that it's possible to obtain glasses using WFS, however, there is difficulty in color controlling. (author

  18. Effect of ZnO on the Physical Properties and Optical Band Gap of Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Aziz, Sidek Hj. Abdul; Zakaria, Azmi; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reports on the physical properties and optical band gap of five samples of soda lime silicate (SLS) glass combined with zinc oxide (ZnO) that were prepared by a melting and quenching process. To understand the role of ZnO in this glass structure, the density, molar volume and optical band gaps were investigated. The density and absorption spectra in the Ultra-Violet-Visible (UV-Visible) region were recorded at room temperature. The results show that the densities of the glass samples increased as the ZnO weight percentage increased. The molar volume of the glasses shows the same trend as the density: the molar volume increased as the ZnO content increased. The optical band gaps were calculated from the absorption edge, and it was found that the optical band gap decreased from 3.20 to 2.32 eV as the ZnO concentration increased. PMID:22837711

  19. Impact of soda-lime borosilicate glass composition on water penetration and water structure at the first time of alteration

    Rebiscoul, D.; Bruguier, F.; Gin, S.; Magnin, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the impact of soda-lime borosilicate glass composition and particularly the effect of charge compensators such Ca and Na and, of network formers such Si and Zr, on water penetration and water structure at the first time of alteration were investigated. Two non-destructive techniques were combined: the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection geometry to precise the predominant alteration mechanisms and assess the water structure in altered zone and the grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry to determine the thickness of the altered glass zone allowing to calculate the water diffusion coefficients through the glasses. The results of glass alteration at pH = 3 and 30 degrees C have shown that hydrolysis was the predominant mechanism after few seconds for glass having a high amount of non-binding oxygen. For the other glasses, which for the diffusion was the limiting reaction, the calculated water diffusion coefficients were comprised between 10 -21 and 10 -19 m 2 .s -1 and vary as a function of glass composition. An activation energy of 76.9 kJ.mol -1 was calculated and appears to be higher than inert gas diffusion through the glass highlighting that water molecules strongly interact with the glass matrix. (authors)

  20. Effect of barrier layers on the properties of indium tin oxide thin films on soda lime glass substrates

    Lee, Jung-Min; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Ji, Mi-Jung; An, Yong-Tae; Park, Jung-Ho; Kwon, Jae-Hong; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the electrical, structural and optical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited on soda lime glass (SLG) haven been investigated, along with high strain point glass (HSPG) substrate, through radio frequency magnetron sputtering using a ceramic target (In 2 O 3 :SnO 2 , 90:10 wt.%). The ITO films deposited on the SLG show a high electrical resistivity and structural defects compared with those deposited on HSPG due to the Na ions from the SLG diffusing to the ITO film by annealing. However, these properties can be improved by intercalating a barrier layer of SiO 2 or Al 2 O 3 between the ITO film and the SLG substrate. SIMS analysis has confirmed that the barrier layer inhibits the Na ion's diffusion from the SLG. In particular, the ITO films deposited on the Al 2 O 3 barrier layer, show better properties than those deposited on the SiO 2 barrier layer.

  1. A laser-based technology for fabricating a soda-lime glass based microfluidic device for circulating tumour cell capture.

    Nieto, Daniel; Couceiro, Ramiro; Aymerich, Maria; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We developed a laser-based technique for fabricating microfluidic microchips on soda-lime glass substrates. The proposed methodology combines a laser direct writing, as a manufacturing tool for the fabrication of the microfluidics structures, followed by a post-thermal treatment with a CO2 laser. This treatment will allow reshaping and improving the morphological (roughness) and optical qualities (transparency) of the generated microfluidics structures. The use of lasers commonly implemented for material processing makes this technique highly competitive when compared with other glass microstructuring approaches. The manufactured chips were tested with tumour cells (Hec 1A) after being functionalized with an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody coating. Cells were successfully arrested on the pillars after being flown through the device giving our technology a translational application in the field of cancer research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of γ-irradiation on the electrical conductivity of some soda lime silicate glass containing blast furnace slag

    Elalaily, N.A.; Khalil, Magda M.I.; Ahmed, L.S.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of electric field strength on conduction in soda lime silicate glass doped with blast furnace slag with different concentration was studied and the value of jump distance was calculated. The structure and the mixed anion effect in the conductivity have been examined by measuring the electrical conductivity of glass samples at temperature ranging between 20 and 250 deg. C. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of the examined glasses are divided into three ranges depending on the temperature range. The first is from room temperature to about 49.5 deg. C, the second is at a temperature range of 60.3-104 deg. C where the glass shows a decrease in its conductivity with the increase in temperature. This was followed by another increase in the electrical conductivity with the increase in temperature. The results also showed that the glass becomes more insulating as the slag content increased. The effect of irradiation was also studied by exposing glass samples to two different irradiation doses. It can be noticed that irradiation causes an increase in the electrical conductivity, especially at high temperature. The results were discussed and correlated according to the molecular structure of the prepared glass

  3. Effect of sintering temperature on physical, structural and optical properties of wollastonite based glass-ceramic derived from waste soda lime silica glasses

    Karima Amer Almasri

    Full Text Available The impact of different sintering temperatures on physical, optical and structural properties of wollastonite (CaSiO3 based glass-ceramics were investigated for its potential application as a building material. Wollastonite based glass-ceramics was provided by a conventional melt-quenching method and followed by a controlled sintering process. In this work, soda lime silica glass waste was utilized as a source of silicon. The chemical composition and physical properties of glass were characterized by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF and Archimedes principle. The Archimedes measurement results show that the density increased with the increasing of sintering temperature. The generation of CaSiO3, morphology, size and crystal phase with increasing the heat-treatment temperature were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Fourier transforms infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The average calculated crystal size gained from XRD was found to be in the range 60 nm. The FESEM results show a uniform distribution of particles and the morphology of the wollastonite crystal is in relict shapes. The appearance of CaO, SiO2, and Ca-O-Si bands disclosed from FTIR which showed the formation of CaSiO3 crystal phase. In addition to the calculation of the energy band gap which found to be increased with increasing sintering temperature. Keywords: Soda lime silica glass, Wollastonite, Sintering, Structural properties, Optical properties

  4. Structural analysis and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate glass

    Iida, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kobzi, Balázs; Sinkó, Katalin; Homonnay, Zoltán [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Kuzmann, Ernő [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1512 (Hungary); Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, RuđerBošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan); Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hematite was precipitated by heat treatment of iron aluminosilicate glass. • The hematite phase shows visible light photocatalytic activity. • We could prepare an effective photocatalyst from ‘ubiquitous elements’. - Abstract: A relationship between structure and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate (15Na{sub 2}O⋅15CaO⋅40Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅(30−x)SiO{sub 2}) glass (xNCFAS) was investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and UV–visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV–VIS). The {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectrum of 11NCFAS glass measured after heat-treatment at 1000 °C for 100 min was composed of a paramagnetic doublet due to Fe{sup III}(T{sub d}) and two magnetic sextets due to regular hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and hematite with larger internal magnetic field. X-ray diffraction patterns of heat-treated xNCFAS samples resulted in decrease of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increase of Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 22}O{sub 33} or CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with alumina content. A quick decrease in methylene blue (MB) concentration from 15.6 to 4.7 μmol L{sup −1} was observed in the photocatalytic reaction test with 40 mg of heat-treated 11NCFAS glass under visible light-exposure. The largest first-order rate constant of MB decomposition (k) was estimated to be 9.26 × 10{sup −3} min{sup −1}. Tauc’s plot yielded a band gap energy (E{sub g}) of 1.88 eV for heat-treated 11NCFAS glass, which is smaller than previously reported E{sub g} of 2.2 eV for α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These results prove that addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into iron-containing soda lime silicate glass is favorable for the preparation of improved visible light-photocatalyst with ‘ubiquitous’ elements.

  5. The effects of gamma irradiation on the elastic properties of soda lime glass doped with cerium oxide

    Laopaiboon, R.; Laopaiboon, J.; Pencharee, S. [Glass Technology Excellent Center (GTEC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, 34190 (Thailand); Nontachat, S. [Department of Radiotherapy, Ubon Ratchathani Cancer Centre, Ubon Ratchathani, 34190 (Thailand); Bootjomchai, C., E-mail: cherdsak_per@hotmail.co.th [Glass Technology Excellent Center (GTEC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, 34190 (Thailand)

    2016-05-05

    Soda lime glass doped with cerium oxide was prepared using a conventional melt quenching technique. The density and molar volume of the glass samples were measured. Ultrasonic wave velocities of the glass samples were carried out using a pulse echo technique. The density and ultrasonic velocities were used for determining elastic moduli of the glass samples, both before and after irradiation with gamma rays at 1 kGy. The results revealed that the influence of gamma irradiation caused the matrix structure of the glass samples to be damaged by creating displacements, electronic defects and/or breaks in the network bonds, leading to the formation of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs). Elastic properties were investigated under the influence of gamma irradiation. The results also revealed that the structures of the glass samples were distorted by irradiation. Damage by irradiation created the NBOs and/or the transformation of main glass network structures from Q{sub 4} to Q{sub 3}. Evidence of these results was acquired from FTIR spectra. The results of FTIR supported the results and were obtained from ultrasonic velocities. In addition, the elastic properties obtained from experiments were compared with theoretical values calculated from the Makishima and Mackenzie model (M–M model). - Highlights: • Results show good agreement between experimental and theoretical of elastic moduli. • Influence of irradiation created a distorted network structure. • Transformation of network structure from Ref. Q{sub 4} to Q{sub 3} after irradiation. • FTIR result is good evidence of the result is obtained from ultrasonic technique.

  6. Reaction of soda-lime-silica glass melt with water vapour at melting temperatures

    Vernerová, Miroslava; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 416, MAY 15 (2015), s. 21-30 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * sulfate * water vapour * bubble nucleation * melt foaming * glass melting Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  7. Use of rice rusk ash and spent catalyst as a source of raw material for the production and characterization of soda-lime silicate glasses destined for packaging

    Araujo, M.S.; Martinelli, J.R.; Genova, L.A.; Prado, U.S. do

    2016-01-01

    Study on the use of rice husk ash (RHA) and waste catalyst (ECAT), two industrial solid waste generated in large quantities in Brazil, getting soda-lime glass for the production of packaging. Both the waste may be classified as class II waste according to NBR 10,004. Samples were produced adding Na_2CO_3 and CaO to obtain a composition within the range of commercial soda-lime glasses. The results showed that both can be used as received (without any previous treatment) replacing important raw materials, source of Al_2O_3 and SiO2, necessary for glass formation. The produced samples were amber due to the presence of nickel (Ni2+ ions) from the ECAT and optical transmittance of 18%. These also showed good homogeneity, i.e., absence of bubbles and striae and dissolution rate higher than a commercial soda-lime glass. In general, the samples are presented suitable for applications that require low transmittance such as colored glass containers, which does not require perfect visibility and transparency. Finally, the waste level of incorporation was approximately 78 mass%. (author)

  8. The Effects of Salt Water on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of soda-lime silicate were measured in distilled and salt water of various concentrations in order to determine if stress corrosion susceptibility is affected by the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film. Past research indicates that solvents effect the rate of crack growth, however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the slow crack growth parameters A and n. However, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  9. Effects of Aqueous Solutions on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth (SCG) parameters of soda-lime-silicate were measured in distilled and saltwater of various concentrations in order to determine if the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film affects stress corrosion susceptibility. Past research indicates that solvents affect the rate of crack growth; however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the SCG parameters A and n at high concentrations; however, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  10. Preparation of soda-lime glass using rock wool waste; Preparacao de vidros sodo-calcicos utilizando residuo de la de rocha

    Aleixo, F.C.; Della, V.P. [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Ballmann, T.J.S.; Folgueras, M.V. [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil); Junkes, J.A., E-mail: janajunkes@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Tiradentes, Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Discarded by the mining industry during the maintenance stoppages of pelletizing furnaces, rock wool has in its composition SiO{sub 2} (56%), Na{sub 2} O (12%) and CaO (7%) propitious for obtaining soda-lime glasses. Under this focus, this work developed soda-lime glasses formulations, using as main raw-material rock wool waste in proportions from 50 to 100% by adjusting the chemical composition of the formulations with sand, sodium and calcium carbonates, as silica, soda and lime sources, respectively. In some formulations the sodium carbonate was replaced by sodium sulfate, which acts as a refining agent, improving homogenization and reducing the bubble formation during the melting. Initially, the raw-materials were evaluated by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The tests showed that the rock wool waste has potential to be used in soda-lime glasses production, however, the chemical composition must be corrected. After knowing the waste potential, seven mixtures were prepared and molten at 1550 °C for 1 to 2 h. It has been found that the maximum rock wool waste percentage that can be used is between 60 and 80%, and that the 2 h melting time resulted in more homogeneous glasses and fewer bubbles according to the addition of sodium sulfate which is efficient for bubbles removal. (author)

  11. A dynamic fatigue study of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses using small scale indentation flaws

    Dabbs, T.P.; Lawn, B.R.; Kelly, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic fatigue characteristics of two glasses, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate, in water have been studied using a controlled indentation flaw technique. It is argued that the indentation approach offers several advantages over more conventional fatigue testing procedures: (i) the reproducibility of data is relatively high, eliminating statistics as a basis of analysis: (ii) the flaw ultimately responsible for failure is well defined and may be conveniently characterised before and after (and during, if necessary) the strength test; (iii) via adjustment of the indentation load, the size of the flaw can be suitably predetermined. Particular attention is devoted to the third point because of the facility it provides for systematic investigation of the range of flaw sizes over which macroscopic crack behaviour remains applicable. The first part of the paper summarises the essential fracture mechanics theory of the extension of an indentation flaw to failure. In the next part of the paper the results of dynamic fatigue tests on glass rods in distilled water are described. Data are obtained for Vickers indentation loads in the range 0.05 to 100 N, corresponding to contact dimensions of 2 to 100 μm. Finally, the implications of the results in relation to the response of 'natural' flaws are discussed. (author)

  12. Study of the influence of chemical composition on the pozzolanicity of soda-lime glass microparticles

    Sales, R.B.C.; Mohallem, N.D.S.; Aguilar, M.T.P.

    2014-01-01

    The use of residues presents interesting possibilities for obtaining eco-efficient concretes. Research has investigated the use of glass residue in Portland cement composite, whether as an aggregate or a supplementary material. However, there is still no consensus on the influence of the chemical composition of glass on the behaviour of the composites in which it is used. This paper aims to analyse the influence of this composition on the performance of cement composites produced with microparticles of colourless and amber glass. Pozzolanicity was assessed by means of direct tests (modified Chapelle and electrical conductivity) and indirect tests (chemical characterization, X-ray diffraction, thermo analysis and pozzolanic activity index). Most of the results show that microparticles of both types of glass display pozzolanic activity, with no significant differences between them. This indicates the potential for the use of glass microparticles as a supplementary material in cement composites. (author)

  13. Modeling and evaluating of surface roughness prediction in micro-grinding on soda-lime glass considering tool characterization

    Cheng, Jun; Gong, Yadong; Wang, Jinsheng

    2013-11-01

    The current research of micro-grinding mainly focuses on the optimal processing technology for different materials. However, the material removal mechanism in micro-grinding is the base of achieving high quality processing surface. Therefore, a novel method for predicting surface roughness in micro-grinding of hard brittle materials considering micro-grinding tool grains protrusion topography is proposed in this paper. The differences of material removal mechanism between convention grinding process and micro-grinding process are analyzed. Topography characterization has been done on micro-grinding tools which are fabricated by electroplating. Models of grain density generation and grain interval are built, and new predicting model of micro-grinding surface roughness is developed. In order to verify the precision and application effect of the surface roughness prediction model proposed, a micro-grinding orthogonally experiment on soda-lime glass is designed and conducted. A series of micro-machining surfaces which are 78 nm to 0.98 μm roughness of brittle material is achieved. It is found that experimental roughness results and the predicting roughness data have an evident coincidence, and the component variable of describing the size effects in predicting model is calculated to be 1.5×107 by reverse method based on the experimental results. The proposed model builds a set of distribution to consider grains distribution densities in different protrusion heights. Finally, the characterization of micro-grinding tools which are used in the experiment has been done based on the distribution set. It is concluded that there is a significant coincidence between surface prediction data from the proposed model and measurements from experiment results. Therefore, the effectiveness of the model is demonstrated. This paper proposes a novel method for predicting surface roughness in micro-grinding of hard brittle materials considering micro-grinding tool grains protrusion

  14. A simulation approach to material removal in microwave drilling of soda lime glass at 2.45 GHz

    Lautre, Nitin Kumar; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Pradeep, Kumar; Das, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    Material removal during microwave drilling is basically due to thermal ablation of the material in the vicinity of the drilling tool. The microtip of the tool, also termed as concentrator, absorbs microwaves and ionizes the dielectric in its proximity creating a zone of plasma. The plasma takes the shape of a sphere owing to the atmospheric sphere, which acts as the source of thermal energy to be used for processing a material. This mechanism of heating, also called localized microwave heating, was used in the present study to drill holes in 1.2-mm-thick soda lime glass. The mechanism of material removal had been analyzed through simulation of the hot spot region, and the results were attempted to explain through experiment observations. It was realized that the glass being a poor conductor of heat, a low power (90 W in this case) yields better drilling results owing to more localized heat corresponding to a low-volume plasma sphere. The low application time prevents further heat transfer, and a localized concentration of heat becomes possible that primarily causes the material ablation. The plasma sphere appears sustain while the tool moves through the bulk of the glass thickness although its volume gets further shrunk. The process needs careful selection of the parameters. The simulation results show relatively low temperature in the top half (opposite to the tool tip) of the plasma sphere which eventually causes the semimolten viscous glass to collapse into the drill cavity as the tool advances into the bulk and stops the movement of the tool. The continued plasma sphere raises the tip temperature, which makes the tip to melt and gets blunt. The plasma formation ceases owing to larger diameter of the tool, and the tool gets stuck which could be verified through experimental results.

  15. Visible light activated catalytic effect of iron containing soda-lime silicate glass characterized by 57Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Shiro Kubuki; Jun Iwanuma; Yusuke Takahashi; Kazuhiko Akiyama; Ernoe Kuzmann; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; Tetsuaki Nishida

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between local structure and visible light activated catalytic effect of iron containing soda lime silicate glass with the composition of 15Na 2 O·15CaO·xFe 2 O 3 ·(70-x)SiO 2 , x = 5-50 mass %, abbreviated as NCFSx was investigated by means of 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). Moessbauer spectra of NCFSx glass with 'x' being equal to or larger than 30 after isothermal annealing at 1,000 deg C for 100 min consisted of a paramagnetic doublet and a magnetic sextet. The former had isomer shift (δ) of 0.24 mm s -1 and quadrupole splitting (Δ) of 0.99 mm s -1 due to distorted Fe III O 4 tetrahedra, and the latter had δ of 0.36 mm s -1 and internal magnetic field (H int ) of 51.8 T due to hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ). The absorption area (A) of α-Fe 2 O 3 varied from 47.2 to 75.9, 93.1, 64.8 and 47.9 % with 'x' from 30 to 35, 40, 45 and 50, indicating that the amount of precipitated α-Fe 2 O 3 varied with the Fe 2 O 3 content of NCFSx glass. The precipitation of α-Fe 2 O 3 was also confirmed by XRD study of annealed NCFS glass with 'x' larger than 30. A relaxed sexted with δ, H int and Γ of 0.34 mm s -1 and 37.9 T and 1.32 mm s -1 was observed from the Moessbauer spectra of annealed NCFSx glass with 'x' of 45 and 50, implying that the precipitation of non-stoichiometric iron hydroxide oxide with the composition of Fe 1.833 (OH) 0.5 O 2.5 having the similar structure of α-Fe 2 O 3 and α-FeOOH. A remarkable decrease in the concentration of methylene blue (MB) from 10 to 0.0 μmol L -1 with the first-order rate constant (k) of 2.87 × 10 -2 h -1 was observed for 10-day leaching test using annealed NCFS50 glass under visible light irradiation. ESI-MS study indicated that existence of fragments with m/z value of 129, 117 and 207 etc. originating from MB having m/z of 284. This

  16. Analysis of soda-lime glasses using non-negative matrix factor deconvolution of Raman spectra

    Woelffel , William; Claireaux , Corinne; Toplis , Michael J.; Burov , Ekaterina; Barthel , Etienne; Shukla , Abhay; Biscaras , Johan; Chopinet , Marie-Hélène; Gouillart , Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Novel statistical analysis and machine learning algorithms are proposed for the deconvolution and interpretation of Raman spectra of silicate glasses in the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 system. Raman spectra are acquired along diffusion profiles of three pairs of glasses centered around an average composition of 69. 9 wt. % SiO 2 , 12. 7 wt. % CaO , 16. 8 wt. % Na 2 O. The shape changes of the Raman spectra across the compositional domain are analyzed using a combination of princi...

  17. A completely transparent, adhesively bonded soda-lime glass block masonry system

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Veer, F.A.; Nijsse, R.; Baardolf, G.

    2014-01-01

    A pioneering, all transparent, self-supporting glass block facade is presented in this paper. Previously realized examples utilize embedded metal components in order to obtain the desired structural performance despite the fact that these elements greatly affect the facade’s overall transparency

  18. Sulphate decomposition and sodium oxide activity in soda-lime-silica glass metls

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Reaction equilibrium constants for the sulfate decomposition process, which releases oxygen and sulfur oxide gas in sodalimesilica glass melts, have been determined. The chemical solubility of SO2, probably in the form of sulfite ions in sodalimesilica melts, has also been determined. The chemical

  19. Structural and optical properties of Eu3+ activated low cost zinc soda lime silica glasses

    Nur Alia Sheh Omar

    Full Text Available A low cost method was employed to synthesize ZnO-SLS:xEu3+ phosphors using recyclable bottle glass as silica source. The structural and optical properties of ZnO-SLS:xEu3+ (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt.% glasses were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared reflectance (FTIR, UV-visible (Uv-Vis and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. Structural investigation using XRD measurement had broadened the halo peak with the doping of dopants. FTIR spectra showed the glass system consists of –OH and SiO4 bands. Meanwhile, the optical measurement using UV-Vis absorption has been induced a blue shift of the electronic absorption edge. The emission peak intensity of ZnO-SLS:xEu3+ phosphors was enhanced with the progression of doping concentration and thus, revealed their potential as red emitting phosphors under 400 nm excitation. Keywords: Eu3+ doped ZnO-SLS glasses, Solid state method, Optical band gap, Photoluminescence

  20. Oxidation state variation under {beta}-irradiation in an iron-bearing soda lime glass system

    Rossano, S; Boizot, B [Lab. des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Jean-Soro, L; Hullebusch, E van; Gouzin, L; Combes, R [Lab. Geomateriaux et Environnement, EA 4119, Univ. Paris-Est Marne la Vallee (France); Farges, F [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle de Paris, UMR CNRS 7202, Paris (France); Labanowski, J [Lab. de Chimie et Microbiologie de l' Eau, UMR CNRS 6008, Univ. de Poitiers (France); Linares, J [GEMAC, UMR 8635, Univ. de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); Swarbrick, J C [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38043 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Harfouche, M, E-mail: stephanie.rossano@univ-paris-est.f [Paul Scherrer Institut, Swiss Light Source, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation on glasses in the system SiO{sub 2}-CaO-Na{sub 2}O-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is investigated as a function of iron concentration or / and irradiation dose by a pre-edge analysis at the iron K-edge. While reduction phenomenon is clearly observed for large irradiation doses (5 C), the effect of irradiation for intermediate doses is more challenging to interpret. Comparison between X-ray absorption measurements, colorimetry results and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance measurements suggest that iron environment may be modified without the ions being reduced.

  1. Crystallization kinetics of a soda lime silica glass with TiO2 addition

    De la Parra A, S. M.; Alvarez M, A.; Torres G, L. C.; Sanchez, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies conducted into Na 2 O-CaO-3SiO 2 glass composition suggest that its phase transformation occurs from the surface towards the interior of the sample. In a study carried out in 1982, it was reported that no addition of nucleating agents modified the mechanism. Taking advantage of the disposition materials synthesized by nanotechnology, in this study TiO 2 in nanometer size was used with the idea that, because of its qualities, it could modify the crystallization mechanism. The glasses obtained as well as the thermally treated samples, were evaluated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) powder method, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and by optical microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Within the range of TiO 2 concentration studied (0 - 10 wt %), 10 wt % of TiO 2 considerably reduced the Na 2 O-2CaO-3SiO 2 phase crystallization process. The crystallization mechanism was not modified and TiO 2 did not form compounds with the matrix components. (Author)

  2. Effect of thermal treatments on sputtered silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on soda-lime glasses: ionic exchange and antibacterial activity

    Ferraris, M.; Ferraris, S., E-mail: sara.ferraris@polito.it; Miola, M.; Perero, S.; Balagna, C.; Verne, E. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering (Italy); Gautier, G. [IMAMOTER Institute for Agricultural and Earthmoving Machines (Italy); Manfredotti, Ch.; Battiato, A.; Vittone, E. [University of Torino, Physics Department, NIS Excellence Centre and CNISM (Italy); Speranza, G. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler FBK (Italy); Bogdanovic, I. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Experimental Physics Department (Croatia)

    2012-12-15

    Silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings were deposited on both soda-lime and silica glasses by radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering. The effect of thermal treatments on the microstructure in the range of 150-450 Degree-Sign C were examined by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Time of Flight-Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. Sodium/silver ionic exchange was evidenced for coatings sputtered on soda-lime substrates after heating at 450 Degree-Sign C; presence of silver ions and/or silver nanoclusters, nanocluster size and their position inside the sputtered layers will be discussed for as-deposited and heated coatings on both substrates. The antibacterial activity of all coatings was determined against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans by disk diffusion method and colonies forming units count; in agreement with microstructural results, the antibacterial activity present on all coatings was slightly reduced after heating at 450 Degree-Sign C. All coatings have been submitted to humidity plus UV ageing and sterilization by autoclave, gamma ray and ethylene oxide gas. Tape resistance (ASTM D3359-97) tests have been done on each coating before and after ageing and sterilizations, revealing a good adhesion on soda-lime substrates, except for those aged in humidity plus UV and sterilized by autoclave. Scratch tests and nanoindentation tests have been done on each coating, as-deposited and after heating at 450 Degree-Sign C. The coating hardness was improved by heating only when coatings were deposited on silica. The heating of coatings deposited on soda-lime substrates gave opposite effect on their hardness.

  3. Alkali passivation mechanism of sol-gel derived TiO2-SiO2 films coated on soda-lime-silica glass substrates

    Matsuda, A; Matsuno, Y; Katayama, S; Tsuno, T [Nippon Steel Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Toge, N; Minami, T [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan). College of Engineering

    1992-09-01

    TiO2-SiO2 films prepared by the sol-gel method serves as an effective alkali passivation layer on a soda-lime-silica glass substrate and the film is superior to a sol-gel derived pure SiO2 film from the view point of weathering resistance improvement. To clarify the reason, alkali passivation mechanism of sol-gel derived TiO2-SiO2 glass films with different TiO2 contents coated on a soda-lime-silica glass substrate was studied by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses, and compared with the results of a sol-gel derived pure SiO2 film. As a result, the following conclusions were obtained: An increase in TiO2 content in the TiO2 SiO2 film increases the sodium concentration in the film, which was induced by sodium migration from the glass substrate during the heat-treatment. Because of the presence of sodium the TiO2 -SiO2 films serve not as a barrier but as an effective getter of alkali ions and thereby effectively improve the weathering resistance Of the glass substrate. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar+ laser beam

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar + laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10 4 W/cm 2 ) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  5. Bone Loss at Implant with Titanium Abutments Coated by Soda Lime Glass Containing Silver Nanoparticles: A Histological Study in the Dog

    Martinez, Arturo; Guitián, Francisco; López-Píriz, Roberto; Bartolomé, José F.; Cabal, Belén; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression. PMID:24466292

  6. Bone loss at implant with titanium abutments coated by soda lime glass containing silver nanoparticles: a histological study in the dog.

    Arturo Martinez

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression.

  7. Influence of glass furnace operational conditions on the evaporation from soda-lime and borosilicate glass melts.

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2000-01-01

    The evaporation of sodium and boron species from the melts in industrial glass furnaces leads to emissions of particulates (dust) and to furnace atmospheres containing reactive evaporation products. These reactive species, especially alkali vapors, can react with the superstructure refractories

  8. Wiping frictional properties of electrospun hydrophobic/hydrophilic polyurethane nanofiber-webs on soda-lime glass and silicon-wafer.

    Watanabe, Kei; Wei, Kai; Nakashima, Ryu; Kim, Ick Soo; Enomoto, Yuji

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we conducted the frictional tests of hydrophobic and hydrophilic polyurethane (PUo and PUi) nanofiber webs against engineering materials; soda-lime glass and silicon wafer. PUi/glass combination, with highest hydrophilicity, showed the highest friction coefficient which decrease with the increase of the applied load. Furthermore, the effects of fluorine coating are also investigated. The friction coefficient of fluorine coated hydrophobic PU nanofiber (PUof) shows great decrease against the silicon wafer. Finally, wiping ability and friction property are investigated when the substrate surface is contaminated. Nano-particle dusts are effectively collected into the pores by wiping with PUo and PUi nanofiber webs both on glass and silicon wafer. The friction coefficient gradually increased with the increase of the applied load.

  9. Nonlinear relationship between the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response and the Al/B ratio in a soda-lime aluminoborosilicate glass

    Farooqi, Rahmat Ullah, E-mail: rufarooqi@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    We have investigated the effect of Al/B ratio on the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response. In an aluminoborosilicate soda-lime glass based on a modified International Simple Glass, ISG-3, the Al/B ratio varied from 0 to 0.55 (in mole fractions). In agreement with various models of the PCT response as a function of glass composition, we observed a monotonic increase of B and Na releases with decreasing Al/B mole ratio, but only when the ratio was higher than 0.05. Below this value (Al/B < 0.05), we observed a sharp decrease that we attribute to B in tetrahedral coordination.

  10. Microstructure characterization of the soda-lime-glass/copper-indium-gallium-selenium interface in Cu-poor Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Wang, Jian, E-mail: wangjustb@gmail.com; Qiao, Yi; Zhu, Jie, E-mail: jiezhu@ustb.edu.cn

    2015-05-29

    The microstructure characteristics of the soda-lime-glass/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (SLG/CIGS) interface in Cu-poor CIGS films are investigated by transmission electron microscopy and selected area electronic diffraction (SAED). The SAED patterns show very sharp and strong spots, indicating the main structure of CIGS chalcopyrite. Small dispersed crystals with size distribution from 2 to 5 nm seem to be embedded in amorphous matrix, and additional spots indicate the presence of an ordered vacancy compound (OVC). This observation is consistent with the Raman results, and the OVC phase with the nanoclusters exists in the CIGS matrix, instead of layer structure. Lattice distortion results in local changes in contrast. Some pseudo-disordered structure is observed, however, the structure is actually the chalcopyrite CIGS structure. 180° rotation twins are also observed at the SLG/CIGS interface. Lattice distortion is widely observed at the interface of the Cu-poor CIGS films, and the extra spots could be caused by different lattice orientations. - Highlights: • Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) were prepared on bare soda-lime-glass (SLG) substrates. • Microstructure of the SLG/CIGS interface was investigated. • An ordered vacancy compound (OVC) phase was observed. • The OVC phase with nanoclusters exists in the CIGS matrix, instead of layer structure. • 180° rotation twins were observed at the SLG/CIGS interface.

  11. Influence of Thermal Annealing and a Glass Coating on the Strength of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    2017-11-01

    7. Fletcher PC, Tillman JJ . Effect of silicone quenching and acid polishing on the strength of glass. J Am Ceram Soc. 1964;47(8):379–382. 8...advanced ceramics at ambient temperature. West Conshohocken (PA): ASTM International; 2015. 14. Swab JJ , Thies SR, Wright JC, Shoenstein JA, Patel PJ

  12. Characterization of residues of effluent treatment plant from lapping process of soda-lime glass and its application in the production of concrete

    Antonio, Aline Pignaton; Calmon, Joao Luiz; Tristao, Fernando Avancini

    2012-01-01

    This study enunciates the physical, chemical and mineralogical composition of the residue from the process of ETE cutting of soda-lime glasses and its application in concrete as a replacement to the weight of CPV ARI RS cement, at levels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Tests were performed on fresh and hardened (ages 3, 7, 28 and 300 days). The results were compared and statistically analyzed. In the fresh state, reductions in the amount of exuding water and consistency were observed. The results of compressive strength were statistically different, while the results for the tensile strength by diametrical compression and modulus of elasticity results were belonging to homogeneous groups. Beneficial effects the levels of residue on the cementitious matrix and the transition zone of concrete were identified by SEM, particularly concrete in S15

  13. Use of rice rusk ash and spent catalyst as a source of raw material for the production and characterization of soda-lime silicate glasses destined for packaging

    Araujo, Mariana Silva de

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the use of two industrial solid wastes (ISW), generated in large quantities in Brazil, were presented in production of soda-lime silicate glasses destined for packaging. The evaluated wastes were rice husk ash (RHA) and the spent catalyst at the Petrochemical Fluid Catalytic Cracking units (ECAT), both may be classified as a class II solid waste according to NBR 10.004. This new proposal for the allocation of such wastes is an alternative to current provisions, seeking not only to minimize environmental impacts, but also enrich them as raw materials. For the samples production, besides ISW were used melting oxide (Na 2 CO 3 ) and stabilizer oxide (CaO).The results demonstrate that both can be used in their raw form (without treatment) replacing important raw materials, sources of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 , essential for glass formation. The samples obtained presented amber color due to the presence of nickel (Ni² + ion) from ECAT and 18% of optical transmittance. They also showed a good homogeneity, i.e., absence of bubbles and striae and 1,33 x 10 -8 g/cm²·day of hydrolytic resistance according to ISO695-1984. Thus, the obtained glass is suitable for applications requiring low light transmittance such as colored glasses containers in general, which does not require perfect visibility and transparency. The incorporation in the final composition was approximately 78% in mass. (author)

  14. Impact effects of gamma irradiation on the optical and FT infrared absorption spectra of some Nd3+-doped soda lime phosphate glasses

    Marzouk, M. A.; Elkashef, I. M.; Elbatal, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of the present work is to study by two collective optical and FTIR spectral measurements some prepared Nd2O3-doped soda lime phosphate glasses before and after gamma irradiation with dose (9 Mrad). The spectral data reveal two strong UV absorption peaks which are correlated with unavoidable trace iron impurities beside extended additional characteristic bands due to Nd3+ ions. Gamma irradiation on the undoped glass produces slight decrease of the intensity of the UV absorption and the generation of an induced visible band and these effects are controlled with two photochemical reduction of some Fe3+ ions to Fe2+ ions together with the formation of nonbridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) or phosphorous oxygen hole center (POHC). The impact effect of gamma irradiation on the spectra of Nd2O3-doped glasses is limited due to suggested shielding behavior of neodymium ions. FT-infrared spectra show vibrational modes due to main Q2-Q3 phosphate groups and the response of gamma irradiation of the IR spectra is low and the limited variations are related to suggested changes in some bond angles and bond lengths which cause the observed decrease to the intensities of some IR bands.

  15. In vitro bioactivity of soda lime borate glasses with substituted SrO in sodium phosphate solution

    Mohamed A. Marzouk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Borate glasses with the basic composition 0.6B2O3·0.2Na2O·0.2CaO and SrO progressively substituting CaO were prepared and characterized for their bone-bonding ability. The obtained glasses were thermally treated and converted to their glass-ceramic derivatives. In this study, FTIR spectral analyses were done for the prepared glasses and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in a sodium phosphate solution for extended times. The appearance of two IR bands within the spectral range 550–680 cm-1 after immersion confirms the formation of hydroxyapatite. X-ray diffraction studies and scanning electron microscope analysis supported the obtained infrared spectroscopy results. The solubility test (measurements of the weight loss in aqueous sodium phosphate solution was conducted for measuring the dissolution of both glassy and crystalline derivatives to find out the role of SrO. The corrosion behaviour of the glasses and glass-ceramics indicate the increase of weight loss with the increase of SrO content. Different suggested proposals were introduced to explain this abnormal behaviour.

  16. Study of phase separation and crystallization phenomena in soda-lime borosilicate glass enriched in MoO3

    Magnin, M.

    2009-09-01

    Molybdenum oxide immobilization (MoO 3 , as fission product) is one of the major challenges in the nuclear glass formulation issues for high level waste solutions conditioning since many years, these solutions arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Phase separation and crystallisation processes may arise in molten glass when the MoO 3 content is higher than its solubility limit that may depend on glass composition. Molybdenum combined with other elements such as alkali and alkaline-earth may form crystalline molybdates, known as 'yellow phases' in nuclear glasses which may decrease the glass durability. In order to confine high level wastes (HLW) such as the fission product solutions arising from the reprocessing of high burn-up UOX-type nuclear spent fuels, a new glass composition (HLW glass) is being optimized. This work is devoted to the study of the origin and the mechanism of phase separation and crystallization phenomena induced by molybdenum oxide incorporation in the HLW glass. From microstructural and structural point of view, the molybdenum oxide behavior was studied in glass compositions belonging to the SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O-CaO simplified system which constituted basis for the HLW glass formulation. The structural role of molybdenum oxide in borosilicate network explaining the phase separation and crystallization tendency was studied through the coupling of structural ( 95 Mo, 29 Si, 11 B, 23 Na MAS NMR, XRD) and microstructural (SEM, HRTEM) analysis techniques. The determination of phase separation (critical temperature) and crystallization (liquidus temperature) appearance temperatures by in situ viscosimetry and Raman spectroscopy experiments allowed us to propose a transformation scenario during melt cooling. These processes and the nature of the crystalline phases formed (CaMoO 4 , Na 2 MoO 4 ) that depend on the evolution of MoO 3 , CaO and B 2 O 3 contents were correlated with changes of sodium and calcium cations proportions in the

  17. An Analysis of the Nonlinear Spectral Mixing of Didymium and Soda-Lime Glass Beads Using Hyperspectral Imagery (HSI) Microscopy

    2014-05-01

    2001). Learning with Kernels: Support Vector Machines , Regularization, Optimization, and Beyond. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 644 p. [26] Banerjee...A., Burlina, P., and Broadwater, J., (2007). A Machine Learning Approach for finding hyperspectral endmembers. Proceedings of the IEEE International... lime glass beads using hyperspectral imagery (HSI) microscopy Ronald G. Resmini1*, Robert S. Rand2, David W. Allen3, and Christopher J. Deloye1

  18. β-Irradiation Effects on the Formation and Stability of CaMoO4 in a Soda Lime Borosilicate Glass Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Storage.

    Patel, Karishma B; Boizot, Bruno; Facq, Sébastien P; Lampronti, Giulio I; Peuget, Sylvain; Schuller, Sophie; Farnan, Ian

    2017-02-06

    Molybdenum solubility is a limiting factor to actinide loading in nuclear waste glasses, as it initiates the formation of water-soluble crystalline phases such as alkali molybdates. To increase waste loading efficiency, alternative glass ceramic structures are sought that prove resistant to internal radiation resulting from radioisotope decay. In this study, selective formation of water-durable CaMoO 4 in a soda lime borosilicate is achieved by introducing up to 10 mol % MoO 3 in a 1:1 ratio to CaO using a sintering process. The resulting homogeneously dispersed spherical CaMoO 4 nanocrystallites were analyzed using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies prior to and post irradiation, which replicated internal β-irradiation damage on an accelerated scale. Following 0.77 to 1.34 GGy of 2.5 MeV electron radiation CaMoO 4 does not exhibit amorphization or significant transformation. Nor does irradiation induce glass-in-glass phase separation in the surrounding amorphous matrix, or the precipitation of other molybdates, thus proving that excess molybdenum can be successfully incorporated into a structure that it is resistant to β-irradiation proportional to 1000 years of storage without water-soluble byproducts. The CaMoO 4 crystallites do however exhibit a nonlinear Scherrer crystallite size pattern with dose, as determined by a Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns and an alteration in crystal quality as deduced by anisotropic peak changes in both XRD and Raman spectroscopy. Radiation-induced modifications in the CaMoO 4 tetragonal unit cell occurred primarily along the c-axis indicating relaxation of stacked calcium polyhedra. Concurrently, a strong reduction of Mo 6+ to Mo 5+ during irradiation is observed by EPR, which is believed to enhance Ca mobility. These combined results are used to hypothesize a crystallite size alteration model based on a combination of relaxation and diffusion

  19. Potassium/sodium ion exchange of sodium aluminosilicate and soda-lime glasses with potassium nitrate melts

    Richter, E.

    1983-08-01

    The alkali self-diffusion coefficients, the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficients, and the actual equilibrium constants of the ion exchange process were determinated for model glasses of the Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 type and the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 type by nuclear techniques. The measured self-diffusion data and interdiffusion coefficients were used to estimate the stress profiles initiated by the K/Na exchange below the transformation temperature in the surface region. The activation volume of the sodium and potassium ions for diffusion through the surface zone stressed by ion exchange was determined. The disturbing influence of small concentrations of determined divalent cations in KNO 3 (especially Ca 2+ ) was investigated and thermodynamically described. Possibilities were demonstrated to remove these disturbances by anionic admixtures to the KNO 3 melt. Conclusions were drawn for the technical process of the chemical strengthening of glass by K/Na ion exchange at lower temperatures. (author)

  20. ZnO films grown by pulsed-laser deposition on soda lime glass substrates for the ultraviolet inactivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    Jean-Paul Mosnier, Richard J O'Haire, Enda McGlynn, Martin O Henry, Stephen J McDonnell, Maria A Boyle and Kevin G McGuigan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We found that a ZnO film of 2 μm thickness which was laser-deposited at room temperature onto a plain soda lime glass substrate, exhibits notable antibacterial activity against a biofilm of Staphylococcus epidermidis when back-illuminated by a UVA light source with a peak emission wavelength of about 365 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS were used to characterize the ZnO films before and after the interactions with the biofilm and the ultraviolet light, respectively. The as-deposited film was highly textured with the wurtzite (0002 in-plane orientation (c-axis perpendicular to ZnO surface and had a surface rms roughness of 49.7 nm. In the as-deposited film, the Zn to O ratio was 1 to 0.95. After the UV and biofilm treatments, the ZnO film surface had become rougher (rms roughness 68.1 nm and presented uniform micron-sized pitting randomly distributed, while the zinc to oxygen ratio had become 1 to 2.2. In this case, both the UV-visible and Raman spectra pointed to degradation of the structural quality of the material. On the strength of these data, we propose a model for the mediation of the bactericidal activity in which the photogeneration of highly oxidizing species and the presence of active surface defect sites both play an important role. This study is of particular interest for the acute problem of disinfection of pathogenic biofilms which form on medical device/implant surfaces.

  1. Use of wasted foundry sand (WFS) as a partial substitute for silica in a soda lime glass; Utilizacao de areia descartada de fundicao (ADF) como substituinte parcial da silica em um vidro soda-cal

    Martin, A.C.; Ueno, O.K.; Folgueras, M.V., E-mail: amandacarolinemartin@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (CCT/UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas

    2016-07-01

    The waste foundry sand (WFS) is the main waste generates in foundry industries. Studies in the literature suggest the use of WFS in different materials, such as concrete, brick or asphalt. This work aims to partially replace the silica of a soda-lime glass by the WFS. The waste foundry sand has in its composition elements such as iron and aluminum that can affect the glass quality, which justifies the residue processing to reduce the impurity content. The treatments, that included mechanical agitation and thermal treatment, resulted in a slight decrease in the percent of iron with consequent increase of the silica content. After treatment, some sands were incorporated into the glass, that showed green color but with lower absorption intensity for the sand with less iron content. It was observed that it's possible to obtain glasses using WFS, however, there is difficulty in color controlling. (author.

  2. Use of rice rusk ash and spent catalyst as a source of raw material for the production and characterization of soda-lime silicate glasses destined for packaging; Utilizacao de residuos de catalisador (ECAT) e cinzas da casca de arroz (CCA) na elaboracao de vidros silicatos soda-cal destinados ao setor de embalagem

    Araujo, M.S.; Martinelli, J.R.; Genova, L.A.; Prado, U.S. do, E-mail: araujo.mariaana@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    Study on the use of rice husk ash (RHA) and waste catalyst (ECAT), two industrial solid waste generated in large quantities in Brazil, getting soda-lime glass for the production of packaging. Both the waste may be classified as class II waste according to NBR 10,004. Samples were produced adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaO to obtain a composition within the range of commercial soda-lime glasses. The results showed that both can be used as received (without any previous treatment) replacing important raw materials, source of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO2, necessary for glass formation. The produced samples were amber due to the presence of nickel (Ni2+ ions) from the ECAT and optical transmittance of 18%. These also showed good homogeneity, i.e., absence of bubbles and striae and dissolution rate higher than a commercial soda-lime glass. In general, the samples are presented suitable for applications that require low transmittance such as colored glass containers, which does not require perfect visibility and transparency. Finally, the waste level of incorporation was approximately 78 mass%. (author)

  3. Phase Separation and Crystallization in soda-lime borosilicate glass enriched in MoO{sub 3} studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy at high temperature

    Magnin, M.; Schuller, S.; Advocat, T. [CEA Valrho, DEN/DTCD/SCDV, Laboratoire d' Etude de Base sur les Verres, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Caurant, D.; Majerus, O. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris- LCMCP - UMR-CNRS 7574, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris - ENSCP, Paristech, 75231 Paris (France); Ligny, D. de [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents- LPCML - UMR-CNRS 5620, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2008-07-01

    Phase separation and crystallisation processes may arise in molten glass when the MoO{sub 3} content exceeds its solubility limit. Molybdenum combined with other elements such as alkali and alkaline-earth may form crystalline molybdates, known as 'yellow phases' in nuclear glasses. In order to establish the sequence of phase separation and crystallization processes occurring during the cooling of the melt, a non-radioactive simplified glass composition was chosen in the SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO system, with 2 mol.% MoO{sub 3}. Various cooling scenarios were tested: cooling by air blowing, quenching between two copper plates and cooling on metallic plate. The resulting glass specimens were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy in temperature. These observations made it possible to determine the sequence and the appearance temperature of phenomena upon cooling: first, a phase separation occurs, (small droplets dispersed in the molten glass) followed by molybdates crystallization inside the droplets. (authors)

  4. The influence of post-annealing treatment on the wettability of Ag+/Na+ ion-exchanged soda-lime glasses

    Razzaghi, Ahmad; Maleki, Maniya; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of thermal annealing and the duration of ion-exchange on the wetting parameters of the Ag + /Na + ion-exchanged glasses have been reported. The analysis of wetting angle in different post-annealing temperatures shows that the wetting angle is increased by increasing the annealing temperature. The wetting parameters of Ag + /Na + ion-exchanged glasses at different ion-exchanged periods of time have been also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–Visible spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have been used for determination of surface morphology and composition analysis of the prepared samples. The results of SEM show changes in the surface of the samples for different post-annealing temperatures. The optical characterization using UV–Vis spectroscopy shows an increase in the intensity of the absorption peak with increasing the ion-exchange duration. The FTIR spectroscopy confirms the formation of silver oxide material on the surface of Ag + /Na + ion-exchanged glasses.

  5. Characterization of residues of effluent treatment plant from lapping process of soda-lime glass and its application in the production of concrete; Caracterizacao de residuo de estacao de tratamento de efluentes de processo de lapidacao de vidro sodo-calcico e sua aplicacao na producao de concreto

    Antonio, Aline Pignaton; Calmon, Joao Luiz; Tristao, Fernando Avancini, E-mail: apignaton@hotmail.com, E-mail: calmonbarcelona@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandoavancini@ct.ufes.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Civil

    2012-07-01

    This study enunciates the physical, chemical and mineralogical composition of the residue from the process of ETE cutting of soda-lime glasses and its application in concrete as a replacement to the weight of CPV ARI RS cement, at levels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Tests were performed on fresh and hardened (ages 3, 7, 28 and 300 days). The results were compared and statistically analyzed. In the fresh state, reductions in the amount of exuding water and consistency were observed. The results of compressive strength were statistically different, while the results for the tensile strength by diametrical compression and modulus of elasticity results were belonging to homogeneous groups. Beneficial effects the levels of residue on the cementitious matrix and the transition zone of concrete were identified by SEM, particularly concrete in S15.

  6. Study of the influence of chemical composition on the pozzolanicity of soda-lime glass microparticles; Estudo da influencia da composicao quimica na pozolanicidade de microparticulas de vidro soda-cal

    Sales, R.B.C. [Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (UEMG), MG (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Sales, F.A.; Correa, E.C.; Patricio, P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), MG (Brazil); Mohallem, N.D.S.; Aguilar, M.T.P., E-mail: teresa@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The use of residues presents interesting possibilities for obtaining eco-efficient concretes. Research has investigated the use of glass residue in Portland cement composite, whether as an aggregate or a supplementary material. However, there is still no consensus on the influence of the chemical composition of glass on the behaviour of the composites in which it is used. This paper aims to analyse the influence of this composition on the performance of cement composites produced with microparticles of colourless and amber glass. Pozzolanicity was assessed by means of direct tests (modified Chapelle and electrical conductivity) and indirect tests (chemical characterization, X-ray diffraction, thermo analysis and pozzolanic activity index). Most of the results show that microparticles of both types of glass display pozzolanic activity, with no significant differences between them. This indicates the potential for the use of glass microparticles as a supplementary material in cement composites. (author)

  7. Shock wave propagation in soda lime glass using optical ...

    2016-06-16

    Jun 16, 2016 ... probe beam in the transverse direction coupled with an optical streak .... (650 ps) was split using a beam splitter after the fifth amplifier stage in the ..... [17] A S Joshi et al, Fusion Engg. Design 44, 067 (1999). [18] A K Sharma ...

  8. Stress relaxation in tempered glass caused by heat soak testing

    Schneider, Jens; Hilcken, Jonas; Aronen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Heat soak testing of tempered glass is a thermal process required after the tempering process itself to bring glasses of commercial soda-lime-silica-glass to failure that are contaminated with nickel sulphide inclusions, diameter 50 mm to 500 mm typically. Thus, the tests avoid a so-called "spont...... of commercial soda-lime-silica glass, it causes stress relaxation in tempered glass and the fracture pattern of the glass changes accordingly, especially thin glasses are affected. Based on the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Model, this paper comprises the theoretical background of the stress...

  9. Glasses

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  10. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  11. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included

  12. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  13. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high temperature.

  14. Element analysis on Japanese ancient glass by PIXE method

    Koizumi, Y.; Kobayashi, K.

    2001-01-01

    The authors analyzed ancient glasses using PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) method associated with the accelerator used for the trace analysis of environments and organisms. They examined whether the material properties of the glasses made by ancient technology have correlation with those of each era or each region both in and out of Japan. The alkali lime glasses excavated from Japanese ancient ruins are classified as soda lime glasses and potash lime glasses, and intermediate glasses containing both are also detected. As for the glasses between the late Yayoi period and the early Tumulus period in eastern Japan, glass beads were mostly classified as potash lime glasses. In the mid and late Tumulus periods, soda lime glasses and the glasses with an intermediate composition increased in addition to potash lime glasses. In the analysis of the glass beads excavated from the ruins of the late Yayoi period to the early Tumult period in Tsushima, potash lime glasses and soda lime glasses coexisted in the same period. Most of the coloring components of deep-blue system mostly found in eastern Japan were manganese and iron, and the coloring components such as blue, green, sky blue, etc. were copper. Yellow was the color expressed with lead or lead - iron. The coloring materials were common regardless of the classification of glasses based on main components. (A.O.)

  15. Diffusion and ionic conduction in oxide glasses

    Mehrer, H; Imre, A W; Tanguep-Nijokep, E

    2008-01-01

    The ion transport properties of soda-lime silicate and alkali borate glasses have been studied with complimentary tracer diffusion and impedance spectroscopy techniques in order to investigate the ion dynamics and mixed-alkali effect (MAE). In soda-lime silicate glasses the tracer diffusivity of 22 Na alkali ions is more than six orders of magnitude faster than the diffusivity of earth alkali 45 Ca ions. This observation is attributed to a stronger binding of bivalent earth alkali ions to the glass network as compared to that of alkali ions. The conductivity of the investigated standard soda-lime silicate glasses is mostly due to the high mobility of sodium ions and a temperature independent Haven ratio of about 0.45 is obtained. For single alkali sodium-borate glasses, the Haven ratio is also temperature independent, however, it is decreases with decreasing temperature for rubidium-borate glass. The MAE was investigated for Na-Rb borate glasses and it was observed that the tracer diffusivities of 22 Na and 86 Rb ions cross, when plotted as function of the relative alkali content. This crossover occurs near the Na/(Na+Rb) ratio of the conductivity minimum due to MAE. The authors suggest that this crossover and the trend of diffusion coefficients is the key to an understanding of the MAE

  16. Surface cracking in proton-irradiated glass

    Jensen, T.; Lawn, B.R.; Dalglish, R.L.; Kelly, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Some observations are reported of the surface fracture behaviour of soda-lime glass slabs (6mm thick Pilkington float glass) irradiated with 480 kV protons. A simple indentation microfracture technique provided a convenient means of probing the irradiated surface regions. Basically, the technique involves loading a standard Vickers diamond pyramid indenter onto the area of interest such that a well-developed deformation/fracture pattern is generated. (author)

  17. A Re-evaluation of the Physiochemistry of Glass on the Basis of Recent Developments and its Relevance to the Glass Industry

    Veer, F.A.; Bristogianni, Telesilla; Justino de Lima, Clarissa; Louter, Christian; Bos, Freek; Belis, Jan; Veer, Fred; Nijsse, Rob

    The classical image of glass is that of a rigid, transparent brittle material characterized by a non-crystalline microstructure. This 19th and 20th century image however is mostly based on the contrast between soda lime glass and metals. It does not really make sense in the 21th century where more

  18. Photon emission induced by brittle fracture of borosilicate glasses

    Shiota, Tadashi, E-mail: tshiota@ceram.titech.ac.jp [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sato, Yoshitaka [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kishi, Tetsuo [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Yasuda, Kouichi [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Photon emission (PE) at wavelength ranges of 430–490 nm (B-PE), 500–600 nm (G-PE) and 610–680 nm (R-PE) caused by brittle fracture was simultaneously measured in the nanosecond-to-microsecond and millisecond time domains for two types of borosilicate glasses: Pyrex-type Tempax glass and BK7 glass. The results were compared to those for silica and soda lime glasses. The time dependence of the PE of Tempax glass was similar to that of silica glass, while the PE intensity was lower. Because Tempax glass contains both silica-rich and borate-rich amorphous phases, the PE must be mainly produced by the fracture of the silica-rich phase. Moreover, the proportion of B-PE of Tempax glass was higher than that of silica glass. This suggests that the measured B-PE might also include very weak PE caused by the fracture of the borate-rich phase. The PE time dependence of BK7 glass was similar to that of soda lime glass, which was different from the case for Tempax glass. The PE intensity of BK7 glass was slightly higher than that of soda lime glass, but much lower than that of Tempax glass. The result indicates that non-bridging oxygen in the glasses affects crack propagation behavior and reduces the PE. - Highlights: • Photon emission (PE) upon brittle fracture of borosilicate glasses was measured. • Pyrex-type Tempax and BK7 glasses showed different PE characteristics. • The rupture of Si–O bonds produces much stronger PE than that of B–O bonds. • Non-bridging oxygen in glass affects crack propagation behavior and reduces the PE.

  19. Mechanical Properties of a High Lead Glass Used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Smith, Nathan A.; Ersahin, Akif

    2015-01-01

    The elastic constants, strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth parameters, and mirror constant of a high lead glass supplied as tubes and funnels were measured using ASTM International (formerly ASTM, American Society for Testing and Materials) methods and modifications thereof. The material exhibits lower Young's modulus and slow crack growth exponent as compared to soda-lime silica glass. Highly modified glasses exhibit lower fracture toughness and slow crack growth exponent than high purity glasses such as fused silica.

  20. Taylor impact of glass rods

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below ∼2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above ∼3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at ∼4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7±0.5 and 4.6±0.5 mm μs -1 for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density

  1. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That

  2. Bone bonding ability of some borate bio-glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives

    Fatma H. Margha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary borate glasses from the system Na2O·CaO·B2O3 together with soda-lime-borate samples containing 5 wt.% of MgO, Al2O3, SiO2 or P2O5 were prepared. The obtained glasses were converted to their glass-ceramic derivatives by controlled heat treatment. X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the separated crystalline phases in glass-ceramics after heat treatment of the glassy samples. The glasses and corresponding glass-ceramics after immersion in water or diluted phosphate solution for extended times were characterized by the grain method (adopted by several authors and recommended by ASTM and Fourier-transform infrared spectra to justify the formation of hydroxyapatite as an indication of the bone bonding ability. The influence of glass composition on bioactivity potential was discussed too.

  3. Diffusion in glass

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  4. Glass Furnace Project, October 1982-March 1983

    Armstrong, K.M.; Klingler, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the Glass Furnace Project currently under way at Mound, a treatment technology for low-level radioactive waste is being evaluated that will combine volume reduction and immobilization in one step. Initial work focused on demonstrating the ability of the furnace to efficiently incinerate nonradioactive, simulated power-plant waste and on determining the adequacy of immobilization in a soda-lime silica matrix. Further evaluation of the system will involve a demonstration of the combustion and containment of radioactive waste. In preparation for this next phase of the program, preliminary investigation and design work were conducted during the past six months. 5 figures, 1 table

  5. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass

  6. Influence of the sintering temperature in the microstructure of foam glass obtained from waste glass

    Pokorny, A.; Vicenzi, J.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, foam glasses were produced from grounded soda-lime glass and a synthetic carbonate, used as a foaming agent, with a similar composition to a dolomite lime, added with different oxides (SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , MnO 2 , Na 2 O, K 2 O, TiO 2 and P 2 O 5 ). The objective was to evaluate the influence of sintering temperature on the properties and microstructure of the obtained material. In addition, the effect of addition of the oxides in the expansion of the ceramic bodies was evaluated. The ceramic bodies were formulated with 3 weight percent of synthetic carbonate, uniaxially pressed and fired within the temperature range from 700 deg C to 950 deg C, with a heating rate of 150K/h. The technological characterization of the ceramic bodies involved the determination of the volumetric expansion and their microstructures have been characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results have shown foam glass can be obtained from grounded soda-lime glass, using synthetic carbonate, with the introduction of the different oxides, as foaming agent. (author)

  7. Magnetic properties of Fe-Nd silica glass ceramics

    Nayak, Manjunath T.; Desa, J. A. Erwin; Babu, P. D.

    2018-04-01

    Soda lime silica glass ceramics containing iron and neodymium have been synthesized. The XRD pattern revealed that the glass samples devitrified into multiple phases. Fe2O3 as an initial component converted into Fe3O4 in the sample during the synthesis, and was the main contributor to the magnetic property of the sample. The inclusion of Nd was found to enhance the magnetization of the sample at 5K. The coercivity of the sample increased with decrease in temperature from room to 5K.

  8. Durability of Mortar Made with Fine Glass Powdered Particles

    Rosemary Bom Conselho Sales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different studies investigate the use of waste glass in Portland cement compounds, either as aggregates or as supplementary cementitious materials. Nevertheless, it seems that there is no consensus about the influence of particle color and size on the behavior of the compounds. This study addresses the influence of cement replacement by 10 and 20% of the colorless and amber soda-lime glass particles sized around 9.5 μm on the performance of Portland cement mortars. Results revealed that the partial replacement of cement could contribute to the production of durable mortars in relation to the inhibition of the alkali-aggregate reaction. This effect was more marked with 20% replacement using amber glass. Samples containing glass microparticles were more resistant to corrosion, in particular those made of colorless glass. The use of colorless and amber glass microparticles promoted a reduction in wear resistance.

  9. Effect of neutron irradiation on etching, optical and structural properties of microscopic glass slide used as a solid state nuclear track detector

    Singh, Surinder; Kaur Sandhu, Amanpreet; Prasher, Sangeeta; Prakash Pandey, Om

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic glass slides are soda-lime glasses which are readily available and are easy to manufacture with low production cost. The application of these glasses as nuclear track detector will help us to make use of these glasses as solid-state nuclear track detector. The present paper describes the variation in the etching, optical and structural properties of the soda-lime microscopic glass slides due to neutron irradiation of different fluences. The color transformation and an increase in the optical absorption with neutron irradiation are observed. Both the bulk and track etch rates are found to increase with neutron fluence, thus showing a similar dependence on neutron fluence, but the sensitivity remains almost constant

  10. The viscosity window of the silicate glass foam production

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    which can offer a practical starting point for the optimisation procedure. The melt viscosity might be the most important parameter for controlling the foaming process and the glass foam density. In this work, we attempt to define a viscosity range in which foaming of different glasses results...... in a maximum of foam expansion. The expansion maximum is obtained for different glasses (labware, E-glass, CRT panel, soda-lime-silica) by foaming with CaCO3 at isokom temperature and from literature data. In general, the viscosity window was found to be within 104–106 Pa s when foaming with MnO2 or metal...... carbonates (CaCO3, Na2CO3, MgCO3, SrCO3, dolomite) whereas SiC requires higher temperatures and correspondingly lower viscosities (103.3–104.0 Pa s). These findings can help assessing the implementation of new resources in the glass foam production....

  11. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  12. Numerical study on fabricating rectangle microchannel in microfluidic chips by glass molding process

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Tianfeng

    2017-09-01

    This paper studied the glass molding process (GMP) for fabricating a typical microstructure of glass microfluidic chips, i. e., rectangle microchannel, on soda-lime glass by finite element method. More than 100 models were established on the platform of Abaqus/Standard. The influence of parameters, i. e., temperature, aspect ratio, side wall angle and friction coefficient on deformation were studied, and the predicted morphology of the molded microchannel were presented as well. The research could provide fundamental experience for optimizing GMP process in the future.

  13. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility. PMID:24961911

  14. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  15. Inclusion of Material Non-Linearity and Inelasticity into a Continuum-Level Material Model for Soda-Lime Glass

    2012-01-01

    Grujicic et al. /Materials and Design 35 (2012) 144–155 where Zsh is the average size of the shielding zone defined as: ktðtÞZshðtÞ ¼ Z t 0 dkt dt...of the flaws at time s, given as 1kt ðtÞ dkt dt s withR t 0 ktðtÞ dkt dt sds ¼ 1 (since for a shielding zone to exist the crack must have...the term dktdt s can be written as: dkt dt ¼ k0m _r mtm1 Sm0 ð12Þ After substitution of Eq. (12) into Eq. (11) and, in turn, into Eq. (10

  16. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Pawel Sikora

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100% to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed.

  17. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Sikora, Pawel; Augustyniak, Adrian; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Rucinska, Teresa; Nawrotek, Pawel; Mijowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide) were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100%) to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed. PMID:28773823

  18. Glass sealing

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  19. Conversion of Hanford salt cake to glass: laboratory studies

    Schulz, W.W.; Dressen, A.L.; Hobbick, C.W.; Kupfer, M.J.

    1976-05-01

    Approximately 140 million liters of solid salt cake (mainly NaNO 3 ), produced by evaporation of aged, alkaline high-level wastes, will be stored in underground tanks when the present Hanford Waste Management Program is completed in the early 1980's. These solid wastes can be converted to silicate-based glasses by melting them either at 1200 to 1300 0 C with appropriate amounts of sand and lime (soda-lime formulation) or at 1000 to 1100 0 C with appropriate amounts of Columbia River basalt and B 2 O 3 (basalt formulation). Both formulations yield dense, immobile glasses of low water leachability (10 -7 to 10 -6 g cm -2 day -1 ) suitable for terminal storage. The soda-lime formulation is presently preferred over the basalt formulation because it can accommodate more salt cake (50 wt percent versus 30 to 40 wt percent) while yielding a glass whose volume is 10 to 20 percent less than the volume of the salt cake in the melt charge

  20. Electrochromic Glasses.

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  1. Study on processing parameters of glass cutting by nanosecond 532 nm fiber laser

    Wang, Jin; Gao, Fan; Xiong, Baoxing; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao

    2018-03-01

    The processing parameters of soda-lime glass cutting with several nanosecond 532 nm pulsed fiber laser are studied in order to obtain sufficiently large ablation rate and better processing quality. The influences of laser processing parameters on effective cutting speed and cutting quality of 1 2 mm thick soda-lime glass are studied. The experimental results show that larger laser pulse energy will lead to higher effective cutting speed and larger maximum edge collapse of the front side of the glass samples. Compared with that of 1.1 mm thick glass samples, the 2.0 mm thick glass samples is more difficult to cut. With the pulse energy of 51.2 μJ, the maximum edge collapse is more than 200 μm for the 2.0 mm thick glass samples. In order to achieve the high effective cutting speed and good cutting quality at the same time, the dual energy overlapping method is used to obtain the better cutting performance for the 2.0 mm thick glass samples, and the cutting speed of 194 mm/s and the maximum edge collapse of less than 132 μm are realized.

  2. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  3. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    Worsch, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above T g of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO 2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  4. Sorption of streptococcus faecium to glass

    Oerstavik, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed by which to study the sorption of Streptococcus faecium to soda-lime cover glasses. Conditions were chosen to minimize the influence on sorption of bacterial polymer production, passive sorption being studied rather than attachment mediated by metabolic activities. Sorption of S. faecium increased with increasing temperature (to 50degC), time, and cell concentration, but equilibrium apparently was not reached even after incubation for 8 hours or at a cell concentration of 3 x 10 10 per ml. Sorption increased with solute molarity up to 0.1 M concentration of NaCl and KCl, indicating an effect of the electrical double layers on the apposition of cells to the glass surface. Desorption of bacteria could be obtained after multiple washings of the glasses in buffer or by the action of Tween 80, but not if sorbed bacteria were left in distilled water, various salt solutions, urea, or in suspensions of unlabelled bacteria. It was concluded that sorption occurred as a result of chemical interactions between the glass and the cell surface. Tween 80 at a concentration of 1 per cent inhibited sorption to 26 per cent of buffer controls, 2 M urea was less effective, and 1 M NaCl was without effect. It is suggested that hydrophobic interactions may be of importance in the binding of S. faecium to glass. (author)

  5. Experimental studies of glued Aluminum-glass joints

    Ligaj, B.; Wirwicki, M.; Karolewska, K.; Jasińska, A.

    2018-04-01

    Glued steel-glass or aluminum-glass joints are to be found, among other things, in vehicles (cars, buses, trains, trams) as windscreen assembly pieces for the supporting structure. For the purposes of the experiments, samples were made in which the top beam was made of the AW-2017A aluminum alloy and the bottom beam was made of thermally reinforced soda-lime glass whereas the glued joints were made of one-component polyurethane glue Körapur 175. The tests were performed under four-point bending conditions at monotonic incremental bending moment values on the Instron 5965 durability machine. The experimental study of the durability of glued joints under four-point bending conditions with the monotonic incremental bending moment allows to determine the values of stresses, whose value is related to initiation of damage of the tested joint.

  6. Ion beam induced nanosized Ag metal clusters in glass

    Mahnke, H.-E.; Schattat, B.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Novakovic, N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver metal clusters have been formed in soda lime glass by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation at ISL. The metal cluster formation was detected with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) in fluorescence mode, and the shape of the clusters was imaged with transmission electron microscopy. While annealing in reducing atmosphere alone, leads to the formation of metal clusters in Ag-containing glasses, where the Ag was introduced by ion-exchange, such clusters are not very uniform in size and are randomly distributed over the Ag-containing glass volume. Irradiation with 600-MeV Au ions followed by annealing, however, results in clusters more uniform in size and arranged in chains parallel to the direction of the ion beam

  7. Physical properties and thermoluminescence of glasses designed for radiation dosimetry measurements

    Laopaiboon, R.; Bootjomchai, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • TL stability of soda-lime glass was corrected by dopants. • D LDL values indicated that the glass samples have good radiation sensitivity. • Bond compression model theory was used to confirm the results from experimental. • High elastic moduli of glass samples indicated that high stability of structure. - Abstract: Soda lime glasses doped with CeO 2 , Nd 2 O 3 and MnO 2 were prepared. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties, such as glow curves and linearity of TL response on irradiation dose were investigated. Results showed that the TL properties depended on the type and concentration of the dopants. Samples were selected to calculate energy trap depth parameters. To design materials for radiation dosimetry, physical properties, ion concentration, elastic properties and effective atomic numbers are important. Theoretical bond compression models were used to determine the elastic moduli for comparison with experimental values. Results show fair agreement between theoretical and experimental measurements. The high elastic moduli of the glass samples indicated high rigidity and stability of the glass matrix structure

  8. Fabrication of Glass Microchannel via Glass Imprinting using a Vitreous Carbon Stamp for Flow Focusing Droplet Generator

    Refatul Haq, Muhammad; Kim, Youngkyu; Kim, Jun; Oh, Pyoung-hwa; Ju, Jonghyun; Kim, Seok-Min; Lim, Jiseok

    2017-01-01

    This study reports a cost-effective method of replicating glass microfluidic chips using a vitreous carbon (VC) stamp. A glass replica with the required microfluidic microstructures was synthesized without etching. The replication method uses a VC stamp fabricated by combining thermal replication using a furan-based, thermally-curable polymer with carbonization. To test the feasibility of this method, a flow focusing droplet generator with flow-focusing and channel widths of 50 µm and 100 µm, respectively, was successfully fabricated in a soda-lime glass substrate. Deviation between the geometries of the initial shape and the vitreous carbon mold occurred because of shrinkage during the carbonization process, however this effect could be predicted and compensated for. Finally, the monodispersity of the droplets generated by the fabricated microfluidic device was evaluated. PMID:29286341

  9. Fabrication of Glass Microchannel via Glass Imprinting using a Vitreous Carbon Stamp for Flow Focusing Droplet Generator

    Hyungjun Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a cost-effective method of replicating glass microfluidic chips using a vitreous carbon (VC stamp. A glass replica with the required microfluidic microstructures was synthesized without etching. The replication method uses a VC stamp fabricated by combining thermal replication using a furan-based, thermally-curable polymer with carbonization. To test the feasibility of this method, a flow focusing droplet generator with flow-focusing and channel widths of 50 µm and 100 µm, respectively, was successfully fabricated in a soda-lime glass substrate. Deviation between the geometries of the initial shape and the vitreous carbon mold occurred because of shrinkage during the carbonization process, however this effect could be predicted and compensated for. Finally, the monodispersity of the droplets generated by the fabricated microfluidic device was evaluated.

  10. Glass consistency and glass performance

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  11. Colloidal glasses

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  12. Silicate glasses

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  13. Colouration of medieval glass bracelets studied by total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis

    Detcheva, Albena; Velinova, Ralitsa; Ivanova, Elisaveta; Jordanov, Juri; Karadjov, Metody

    2014-01-01

    The contents of 3d-transition metals (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) in fragments of medieval glass bracelets, found in the necropolis of Stambolovo and the castle of Mezek, Bulgaria, were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis using gallium as internal standard. The samples were analysed as slurries in Triton X 114. The experimental parameters: grain size of the glass sample, concentrations of glass sample, Triton X114 and internal standard in the slurry, volume of the slurry aliquot taken for analysis, as well as the excitation time, were optimised. For method validation the certified reference material BAM-S005 Type A soda-lime glass was used. It was proven that the elements Co, Mn and Fe are responsible for colour generation in the investigated glass samples. The precision of the determinations is characterised by an RSD in the range 3–11%

  14. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  15. Thermally stable dexsil-400 glass capillary columns

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Olerich, G.

    1980-01-01

    The factors affecting efficiency, thermal stability, and reproducibility of Dexsil-400 glass capillary columns for gas chromatography in general, and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particular were investigated. Columns were drawn from Kimble KG-6 (soda-lime) glass or Kimox (borosilicate) glass. All silylation was carried out at 200 0 C. Columns were coated according to the static method. Freshly prepared, degassed solutions of Dexsil-400 in pentane or methylene chloride were used. Thermal stability of the Dexsil 400 columns with respect to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were tested. Column-to-column variability is a function of each step in the fabrication of the columns. The degree of etching, extent of silylation, and stationary phase film thickness must be carefully controlled. The variability in two Dexsil-400 capillary column prepared by etching, silylation with solution of hexa methyl disilazone (HMDS), and static coating is shown and also indicates the excellent selectivity of Dexsil-400 for the separation of alkylated aromatic compounds. The wide temperature range of Dexsil-400 and the high efficiency of the capillary columns also allow the analysis of complex mixtures with minimal prefractionation. Direct injection of a coal liquefaction product is given. Analysis by GC/MS indicated the presence of parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs, nitrogen and sulfur heterocycles, and their alkylated derivatives. 4 figures

  16. Thin films prepared from tungstate glass matrix

    Montanari, B.; Ribeiro, S.J.L.; Messaddeq, Y. [Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355, CEP 14800-900, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Li, M.S. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, CP 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Poirier, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, UNIFAL-MG, CEP 37130-000, Alfenas-MG (Brazil)], E-mail: gael@unifal-mg.edu.br

    2008-01-30

    Vitreous samples containing high concentrations of WO{sub 3} (above 40% M) have been used as a target to prepare thin films. Such films were deposited using the electron beam evaporation method onto soda-lime glass substrates. These films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), perfilometry, X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), M-Lines and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. In this work, experimental parameters were established to obtain stable thin films showing a chemical composition close to the glass precursor composition and with a high concentration of WO{sub 3}. These amorphous thin films of about 4 {mu}m in thickness exhibit a deep blue coloration but they can be bleached by thermal treatment near the glass transition temperature. Such bleached films show several guided modes in the visible region and have a high refractive index. Controlled crystallization was realized and thus it was possible to obtain WO{sub 3} microcrystals in the amorphous phase.

  17. Cosmos & Glass

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  18. Glass Glimpsed

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  19. Spin glasses

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  20. Fabrication and evaluation of hybrid materials from A-zeolite and ground glass powders for vitrified radioactive waste

    Kamitani, Masataka; Kondo, Mitsunori; Hiki, Tomonori; Tagami, Toru; Nakahira, Atsushi; Wakihara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The samples from A-type zeolite and ground soda-lime glass powders were solidified by calcinations at 600 to 800°C in air atmosphere. These hybrid zeolite/glass samples at 700°C were in part insufficiently densified and hybrid samples were fully densified at 800°C, although the densification was not generated at 600°C. A-zeolites were still stable in glass melt at 800°C for hybrid zeolite/glass samples. These hybrid zeolite/glass samples had the ion exchange ability of 20% against Sr 2+ and the high ability over 80% against Cs + as well as A-zeolite. Microstructures of obtained hybrid zeolite/glass samples were evaluated. (author)

  1. Micromachining of glass by the third harmonic of nanosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser

    Ramil, A. [Centro de Investigacions Tecnoloxicas, Universidade da Coruna, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)], E-mail: aramil@cdf.udc.es; Lamas, J.; Alvarez, J.C.; Lopez, A.J.; Saavedra, E.; Yanez, A. [Centro de Investigacions Tecnoloxicas, Universidade da Coruna, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The ablation processing of glass was performed by using the third harmonic of nanosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser. The objective of this work was the formation of deep holes with a high aspect ratio in soda lime glass; with this purpose different ways to raster the glass surface with the focused laser beam, i.e., single line, parallel lines and orthogonally crossing lines, have been tried and the effect of different parameters as the number of lines and number of scans in the depth and inclination of the sidewalls of the hole has been analyzed. Moreover, to reduce the time consumption in the laser processing of glass plates the relationship between penetration depths and overlapping factor has been studied and an optimum value of scan speed has been obtained for a particular case.

  2. Characterization of surface layers formed under natural environmental conditions on medieval glass from Siponto (Southern Italy)

    Genga, Alessandra; Siciliano, Maria; Fama, Lia; Filippo, Emanuela; Siciliano, Tiziana; Mangone, Annarosa; Traini, Angela; Laganara, Caterina

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) was used to investigate the alteration processes that occur on silica-soda-lime glass exposed to soil materials and dated from XI to second half of XIII sec. The chemical data were collected for altered glass gel and fresh glass. In order to study the influence of chemical composition on weathering process, 16 glasses have been selected on the basis of the chemical characterization and on the basis of the different corrosion processes present on the fragments. Six selected samples had been produced with the use of natron as fluxer and 10 samples with the use of plant ash as fluxer. The analysed pieces come from Siponto excavations (Foggia, Italy) and they include feet and rims of chalices, fragments of lamps and of globular bottles

  3. GLASS BOX

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  4. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Fournier, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.fournier@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Department of Applied Quantum Physics & Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Odorico, Michaël [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, BP17171, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (S{sub geo}) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (S{sub BET}) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale—contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a S{sub BET}/S{sub geo} ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to S{sub geo} should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to S{sub BET} should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%. - Highlights: • Initial dissolution

  5. A Comparative Study of Production of Glass Microspheres by using Thermal Process

    Lee, May Yan; Tan, Jully; Heng, Jerry YY; Cheeseman, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Microspheres are spherical particles that can be distinguished into two categories; solid or hollow. Microspheres typical ranges from 1 to 200 μm in diameter. Microsphere are made from glass, ceramic, carbon or plastic depending on applications. Solid glass microsphere is manufactured by direct burning of glass powders while hollow glass microspheres is produced by adding blowing agent to glass powder. This paper presented the production of glass microspheres by using the vertical thermal flame (VTF) process. Pre-treated soda lime glass powder with particle sized range from 90 to 125μm was used in this work. The results showed that glass microspheres produced by two passes through the flame have a more spherical shape as compared with the single pass. Under the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), it is observed that there is a morphology changed from uneven surface of glass powders to smooth spherical surface particles. Qualitative analysis for density of the pre-burned and burned particles was performed. Burned particles floats in water while pre-burned particles sank indicated the change of density of the particles. Further improvements of the VTF process in terms of the VTF set-up are required to increase the transformation of glass powders to glass microspheres.

  6. Influence of the sintering temperature in the microstructure of foam glass obtained from waste glass; Influencia da temperatura de queima na microestrutura de espumas vitreas obtidas a partir de residuos de vidro

    Pokorny, A.; Vicenzi, J.; Bergmann, C.P., E-mail: andrea_pokorny@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In this work, foam glasses were produced from grounded soda-lime glass and a synthetic carbonate, used as a foaming agent, with a similar composition to a dolomite lime, added with different oxides (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, TiO{sub 2} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}). The objective was to evaluate the influence of sintering temperature on the properties and microstructure of the obtained material. In addition, the effect of addition of the oxides in the expansion of the ceramic bodies was evaluated. The ceramic bodies were formulated with 3 weight percent of synthetic carbonate, uniaxially pressed and fired within the temperature range from 700 deg C to 950 deg C, with a heating rate of 150K/h. The technological characterization of the ceramic bodies involved the determination of the volumetric expansion and their microstructures have been characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results have shown foam glass can be obtained from grounded soda-lime glass, using synthetic carbonate, with the introduction of the different oxides, as foaming agent. (author)

  7. The shock response of float-glass laminates

    Bourne, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Interfaces within glass targets give rise to variations in the mode of failure of material components. The wide use of such laminates merits further investigation of the failure mechanism. It is already known that when shocked above a threshold of 4 GPa, glass fails under compression behind a propagating front following the compression front. Work is presented which indicates how this failure process is altered by bonding together two plates to introduce an interface, rather than leaving a monolithic target. After crossing an internal interface, the failure wave propagates only after a delay in soda-lime glass and the failed strength of the material is increased at the inner interface compared with that at the impact face. Addition of a second interface illustrates these effects. Recent work has shown that failure of more than two plates bonded together during impact shapes the pulse transmitted through materials. Indeed it has been suggested that glass sheets bonded together show some of the features of polycrystalline brittle materials. In this work, the stress has been monitored at different stations in the laminate to ascertain the effect of varying the number of tiles within the laminate. It is found that the pulse rises to ca. 4 GPa quickly and then is ramped more gradually as the number of glass sheets is increased

  8. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material

    Felisberto, R.; Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  9. Glass compositions

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  10. Study of mosaic glasses from the Alpha Basilica (sixth century of Nikopolis in Epirus, Greece

    Cesare Fiori

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After collecting the essential historical, archaeological, and artistic information relative to the ancient town of Nikopolis in Epirus and its Alpha (or Doumetios Basilica, built in the sixth century A.D., glass tesserae belonging to degraded and lost parts of the mosaic floors of the basilica were analysed, determining their chemical composition and the possible presence of crystalline phases. As in all glasses produced in the Mediterranean area in that epoch, they are soda-lime silicate glasses, in part with lead, obtained using natron as a flux. The typology of the glass corresponds to that of Roman glasses, of the first centuries A.D., and is the same as that employed for the basilicas of Ravenna in the fifth and sixth centuries; in particular, a comparison was made with the glass tesserae of the St Vitale Basilica. The technological base for producing coloured glasses is also practically the same as that of the mosaic glasses of Ravenna. In particular, antimony was used as an opacifying element and a fusion was carried out under reducing conditions to obtain red glass with microparticles of metallic copper. Thus, it can be supposed there was a common source of production of the mosaic glasses used in Nikopolis and Ravenna in the sixth century and that this source was in the Near Orient.

  11. PIXE and PGAA - Complementary methods for studies on ancient glass artefacts (from Byzantine, late medieval to modern Murano glass)

    Constantinescu, Bogdan; Cristea-Stan, Daniela; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Zoltán; Kovács, Imre; Harsányi, Ildikó; Kasztovszky, Zsolt

    2018-02-01

    Combined external milli-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) analysis was applied to characterize the composition of paste and colorants from some fragments of Byzantine bracelets (10th-12th Centuries AD), late medieval (17th-18th Centuries AD) and modern Murano glass pieces. As fluxes, PGAA revealed the samples are soda-lime glass, except four samples - two medieval vessel white shards and two dark Byzantine fragments of bracelets - which have potash flux. Aluminium was detected in various proportions in all samples indicating different sources for the added sand. The presence of Magnesium is relevant only in one bracelet fragment suggesting the use of plant (wood?) ash and confirming that the Byzantine bracelet is manufactured from the mixture of both types of glass (natron and plant ash based). PGAA also indicated the presence of low quantities of Cadmium, high level of Arsenic and Lead (possibly lead arsenate) in one medieval sample and of ZnO in Murano glass, and of CoO traces (maximum 0.1%) in all blue-colored Byzantine, late medieval to modern Murano glass artefacts. PIXE confirmed the use of small quantities of CoO for blue color, indicated Manganese combined with Iron for dark glass, Copper for green, Lead, Tin and an Arsenic compound (orpiment?) for yellow and in the case of modern Murano glass Selenium and Cadmium to obtain a reddish color. Despite PIXE - PIGE combination is probably the best one for glass analysis, our external milli-PIXE - PGAA methods proved to be adequate complementary tools to determine many chemical elements from glass composition - Si, Na, K, Ca, Al, Mg, various metallic oxides.

  12. Investigations of Archaeological Glass Bracelets and Perfume Bottles Excavated in Ancient Ainos (Enez) by Multiple Analytical Techniques

    Celik, S.; Akyuz, T.; Akyuz, S.; Ozel, A. E.; Kecel-Gunduz, S.; Basaran, S.

    2018-03-01

    Fragments of two perfume bottles belonging to the Hellenistic and Roman periods, and five bracelets belonging to the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman periods, excavated in the archaeological site of Enez during the excavations in 2000, have been investigated. The samples were analyzed using micro-Raman, FTIR, and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques, in order to study the ancient technology of glass production and to determine chemical compositions of the basic components and coloring elements of the glassware. All the investigated glasses can be characterized as low-magnesia-soda-lime silicate glasses, whose colors are induced by metal ions. The melting points of the investigated glasses are estimated to be quite close to each other and around 1000°C.

  13. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  14. Nitrate glass

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  15. Impact of optical properties of front glass substrates on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells using lift-off process

    Tamura, Akihiro, E-mail: ro005080@ed.ritsumei.ac.jp [College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-0058 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhiro [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-0058 (Japan); Minemoto, Takashi [College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-0058 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Transmittance of a front glass is one of the important factors in the development of high efficiency superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells. In this study, we investigated the impact of optical properties of the front glass on the solar cell performance of the CIGS solar cells fabricated using the lift-off process. First, optical properties of quartz substrates and soda-lime glass (SLG) substrates with various thicknesses were investigated. Although optical properties of the SLG substrates depend on the thickness, those of the quartz substrates hardly depend on the thickness. Secondly, the superstrate-type CIGS solar cells were fabricated using 1-mm-thick SLG or 1-mm-thick quartz substrates. As a result, the short-circuit current density of the superstrate-type CIGS solar cell with 1-mm-thick quartz substrate was approximately 7% higher than that with 1-mm-thick SLG substrate, and its conversion efficiency was 7.1%. The external quantum efficiency of the solar cells was also improved using the quartz substrate as a front glass because transmittance and absorptance of the quartz substrate were superior to those of the SLG substrate. We therefore conclude that optical properties of the front glasses play an important role in the improvement of the superstrate-type solar cells. - Highlights: • Superstrate type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells are fabricated by lift-off process. • Various glasses are used as front glass for lift-off. • The impact of optical properties of the glasses on cell performance is investigated. • Quartz front glass gives 7% higher short-circuit current than soda-lime glass. • High transmittance is desired for front glass.

  16. Characterization of some tin-contained ancient glass beads found in China by means of SEM-EDS and raman spectroscopy.

    Li, Qinghui; Liu, Song; Su, Bomin; Zhao, Hongxia; Fu, Qiang; Dong, Junqing

    2013-02-01

    A total of nine tin-contained ancient glass beads were characterized by a combination of scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy. These glass beads dated from 1st century BC to 10th century AD were excavated from the Xinjiang and Guangxi provinces of China. Two kinds of tin-based opacifiers/colorants included crystalline cassiterite (SnO(2)) and lead-tin yellow types II were first found in these soda lime glass beads. The tentative chronology of the tin-based opacifiers/colorants used in ancient glasses from China and the West was compared. In addition, several transition metal ions colorants were also found in these beads. The detailed study of the glassy matrices, crystalline inclusions, and the microstructural heterogeneities for these glass beads has revealed some valuable information to trace the possible making technology and provenances. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion

    Farooq, Imran; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO 2 –P 2 O 5 –CaO–CaF 2 –Na 2 O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na 2 O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na 2 O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization. (paper)

  18. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion.

    Farooq, Imran; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2-Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization.

  19. Investigation of local environment around rare earths (La and Eu) by fluorescence line narrowing during borosilicate glass alteration

    Molières, Estelle; Panczer, Gérard; Guyot, Yannick; Jollivet, Patrick; Majérus, Odile; Aschehoug, Patrick; Barboux, Philippe; Gin, Stéphane; Angeli, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The local environment of europium in soda-lime borosilicate glasses with a range of La 2 O 3 content was probed by continuous luminescence and Fluorescence Line Narrowing (FLN) to investigate the local environment of rare earth elements in pristine and leached glass. After aqueous leaching at 90 °C at pH 7 and 9.5, rare earths were fully retained and homogeneously distributed in the amorphous alteration layer (commonly called gel). Two separate silicate environments were observed in pristine and leached glasses regardless of the lanthanum content and the leaching conditions. A borate environment surrounding europium was not observed in pristine and leached glasses. During glass alteration, OH groups were located around the europium environment, which became more organized (higher symmetry) in the first coordination shell. -- Highlights: • No borate environment surrounding europium was detected in pristine borosilicate glasses. • Up to 12 mol% of REE2O3 in glass, local environment of europium does not significantly change. • Europium environment becomes more ordered and symmetric in gels than in pristine glasses. • Two distinct silicate sites were observed, as well in pristine glass as in gels (leached glasses). • In altered glasses, OH groups were located around europium

  20. Investigation of local environment around rare earths (La and Eu) by fluorescence line narrowing during borosilicate glass alteration

    Molières, Estelle [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Panczer, Gérard; Guyot, Yannick [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Jollivet, Patrick [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Majérus, Odile; Aschehoug, Patrick; Barboux, Philippe [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, UMR-CNRS 7574, École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP Chimie-ParisTech), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France); Gin, Stéphane [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Angeli, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA – DEN-DTCD-LCV-SECM Laboratoire d' études du Comportement à Long Terme, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-01-15

    The local environment of europium in soda-lime borosilicate glasses with a range of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was probed by continuous luminescence and Fluorescence Line Narrowing (FLN) to investigate the local environment of rare earth elements in pristine and leached glass. After aqueous leaching at 90 °C at pH 7 and 9.5, rare earths were fully retained and homogeneously distributed in the amorphous alteration layer (commonly called gel). Two separate silicate environments were observed in pristine and leached glasses regardless of the lanthanum content and the leaching conditions. A borate environment surrounding europium was not observed in pristine and leached glasses. During glass alteration, OH groups were located around the europium environment, which became more organized (higher symmetry) in the first coordination shell. -- Highlights: • No borate environment surrounding europium was detected in pristine borosilicate glasses. • Up to 12 mol% of REE2O3 in glass, local environment of europium does not significantly change. • Europium environment becomes more ordered and symmetric in gels than in pristine glasses. • Two distinct silicate sites were observed, as well in pristine glass as in gels (leached glasses). • In altered glasses, OH groups were located around europium.

  1. Investigation of the mechanical properties of silica glasses by indentation tests

    Juhasz, A. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Voeroes, G. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Tasnadi, P. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Kovacs, I. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Somogyi, I. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary) Brody Research Center, G.E. Tungsram, Budapest (Hungary)); Szoellosi, J. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary) Brody Research Center, G.E. Tungsram, Budapest (Hungary))

    1993-11-01

    Soda lime silica glasses were investigated by continuous indentation tests. The load indentation depth curves were taken during the loading as well as the unloading period by a computer controlled MTS machine. It was found that the loading force is a quadratic function of the indentation depth during both the loading and unloading stage of the deformation. The validity of the quadratic relationship in the case of the unloading stage seems to be characteristic only for glasses. Taking into account the elastic relaxation of the indentation depth an estimation is given for the size of the hydrostatic core which is necessary to symmetrize the stress field around the indenter. Using the measured length of the radial cracks started from the corners of the Vickers indentation pattern the K[sub IC] values were calculated. (orig.).

  2. Composition-Structure-Property Relations of Compressed Borosilicate Glasses

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Fuglsang, Søren D.; Pedersen, Rune H.; Tjell, Anders Ø.; Østergaard, Martin B.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-08-01

    Hot isostatic compression is an interesting method for modifying the structure and properties of bulk inorganic glasses. However, the structural and topological origins of the pressure-induced changes in macroscopic properties are not yet well understood. In this study, we report on the pressure and composition dependences of density and micromechanical properties (hardness, crack resistance, and brittleness) of five soda-lime borosilicate glasses with constant modifier content, covering the extremes from Na-Ca borate to Na-Ca silicate end members. Compression experiments are performed at pressures ≤1.0 GPa at the glass transition temperature in order to allow processing of large samples with relevance for industrial applications. In line with previous reports, we find an increasing fraction of tetrahedral boron, density, and hardness but a decreasing crack resistance and brittleness upon isostatic compression. Interestingly, a strong linear correlation between plastic (irreversible) compressibility and initial trigonal boron content is demonstrated, as the trigonal boron units are the ones most disposed for structural and topological rearrangements upon network compaction. A linear correlation is also found between plastic compressibility and the relative change in hardness with pressure, which could indicate that the overall network densification is responsible for the increase in hardness. Finally, we find that the micromechanical properties exhibit significantly different composition dependences before and after pressurization. The findings have important implications for tailoring microscopic and macroscopic structures of glassy materials and thus their properties through the hot isostatic compression method.

  3. Materials analyses of ceramics for glass furnace recuperators

    Weber, G.W.; Tennery, V.J.

    1979-11-01

    The use of waste heat recuperation systems offers significant promise for meaningful energy conservation in the process heat industries. This report details the analysis of candidate ceramic recuperator materials exposed to simulated industrial glass furnace hot flue gas environments. Several candidate structural ceramic materials including various types of silicon carbide, several grades of alumina, mullite, cordierite, and silicon nitride were exposed to high-temperature flue gas atmospheres from specially constructed day tank furnaces. Furnace charging, operation, and batch composition were selected to closely simulate industrial practice. Material samples were exposed in flues both with and without glass batch in the furnace for times up to 116 d at temperatures from 1150 to 1550/sup 0/C (2100 to 2800/sup 0/F). Exposed materials were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence to identify material degradation mechanisms. The materials observations were summarized as: Silicon carbide exhibited enhanced corrosion at lower temperatures (1150/sup 0/C) when alkalies were deposited on the carbide from the flue gas and less corrosion at higher temperatures (1550/sup 0/C) when alkalies were not deposited on the carbide; alumina corrosion depended strongly upon purity and density and alumina contents less than 99.8% were unsatisfactory above 1400/sup 0/C; and mullite and cordierite are generally unacceptable for application in soda-lime glass melting environments at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/C.

  4. There Is Still Room for Improvement: Presentation of a Neutral Borosilicate Glass with Improved Chemical Stability for Parenteral Packaging.

    Boltres, Bettine; Tratzky, Stephan; Kass, Christof; Eichholz, Rainer; Naß, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For pharmaceutical parenteral packaging the glass compositions have always been either Type I borosilicate or Type III soda-lime glass. As both the compositions and certain chemical and physical properties are mandated by international standards, there has not been room for any changes. However, by applying only minor adjustments, a borosilicate glass was developed that showed improved chemical stability. The chemical composition is still in the range of currently used borosilicate glasses, which makes it a Type I glass according to all current pharmacopeia. A study was performed on glass vials comparing the new glass with the standard FIOLAX(®) and two other publicly available glasses. In an extraction study with water at 121 °C the new glass showed the highest chemical stability with the lowest amount of extractables. In an accelerated ageing study, which was done with water, phosphate, and carbonate buffer at 40 °C for 12 months, the new glass also proved to have the lowest amount of leachables. In this article the new glass and the results from the studies are presented, showing the reader how much of an effect can be attained with only minor adjustments if the scientific fundamentals are clear. The pharmaceutical market has been quite constant and risk-oriented due to the high impact on the safety of the patient. As any change necessitates a complicated change process, this has, in consequence, lead the industry to resist changing the parenteral primary packaging material for decades. The main glasses have either been Type I borosilicate or Type III soda-lime glass. On the other hand, a combination of improved inspection systems and the development of more sensitive biologically based drugs has elevated the standards for parental packaging materials. For example, the measurement of extractables and leachables from the packaging material steadily came into focus. In this article, a new glass is presented that still belongs to the group of Type I borosilicate

  5. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  6. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  7. Recycling of Glass

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  8. Spin glasses

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  9. FY 1999 report on the results of the development of recycling technology of waste architectural materials, glass, etc. Development of the simple glass coloring/decoloring technology; 1999 nendo kenchiku haizai glass nado recycle gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Kan'igata glass chakudasshoku gijutsu kaihatsu

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of increasing the ratio of recycling of waste architectural materials, glass, etc., the development was proceeded with of easy coloring of colorless glass by light irradiation and decoloring of it by heat treatment. The important point for technical development is to develop glass materials which are colored by light and decolored by heat at a level of technique with practicality and to develop coloring/decoloring device. Studies were made in the following three fields: 1) optimization of coloring/decoloring conditions for coloring/decoloring occurring from defects (color centers) under light irradiation; 2) optimization of coloring/decoloring conditions occurring from colorless ions and particulate formation under light irradiation; 3) development of a visible drawing device. In 1), bottle, sheet glass, and soda-lime silicate glass are colored brown by X-ray/UV radiation, but the coloring is bad in stability. However, it was found that the addition of silver oxide improved stability. In 2), it was recognized that when the glass containing a trace of Mn was melted in the reducing atmosphere, it became colorless, and when radiated by X-ray and heat-treated at approximately 200 degrees C, it was colored bluish violet which was vivid and stable. (NEDO)

  10. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then β irradiated at different doses up to 10 9 Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe 3+ reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe 3+ amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h 0 /e-) consuming equilibrium. He + and Kr 3+ ions and γ irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  11. Complexing agents and pH influence on chemical durability of type I moulded glass containers.

    Biavati, Alberto; Poncini, Michele; Ferrarini, Arianna; Favaro, Nicola; Scarpa, Martina; Vallotto, Marta

    2017-06-16

    Among the factors that affect the glass surface chemical durability, pH and complexing agents presence in aqueous solution have the main role (1). Glass surface attack can be also related to the delamination issue with glass particles appearance in the pharmaceutical preparation. A few methods to check for glass containers delamination propensity and some control guidelines have been proposed (2,3). The present study emphasizes the possible synergy between a few complexing agents with pH on the borosilicate glass chemical durability. Hydrolytic attack was performed in small volume 23 ml type I glass containers autoclaved according to EP or USP for 1 hour at 121°C, in order to enhance the chemical attack due to time, temperature and the unfavourable surface/volume ratio. 0,048 M or 0.024 M (moles/liter) solutions of the acids citric, glutaric, acetic, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and sodium phosphate with water for comparison, were used for the trials. The pH was adjusted ± 0,05 units at fixed values 5,5-6,6-7-7,4-8-9 by LiOH diluted solution. Since silicon is the main glass network former, silicon release into the attack solutions was chosen as the main index of the glass surface attack and analysed by ICPAES. The work was completed by the analysis of the silicon release in the worst attack conditions, of moulded glass, soda lime type II and tubing borosilicate glass vials to compare different glass compositions and forming technologies. Surface analysis by SEM was finally performed to check for the surface status after the worst chemical attack condition by citric acid. Copyright © 2017, Parenteral Drug Association.

  12. Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering study of silver nanoparticles in ion-exchanged glasses

    Cheng, Weidong, E-mail: 57399942@qq.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Wu, Zhaojun [Department of Practice Teaching and Equipment Management, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Gu, Xiaohua [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Xing, Xueqing; Mo, Guang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Zhonghua, E-mail: wuzh@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-05-15

    The size and distribution of silver nanoparticles in ion-exchanged silicate glass induced by thermal treatments in air at different temperatures were investigated by means of grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering technique, X-ray diffraction and optical absorption spectra. Silver–sodium ion exchange of soda-lime silicate glasses was done at 350 °C for 240 min, then the samples were treated by thermal annealing in air at different temperatures 400, 500 and 550 °C, respectively, for 1 h. After the annealing treatment above 400 °C for 1 h, smaller Ag nanoparticles occurred, together with bigger ones. Both dissolution of smaller Ag nanoparticles and diffusion of larger ones are discussed in these stages of annealing in this contribution.

  13. Bioactivity studies on TiO2-bearing Na2O–CaO–SiO2–B2O3 glasses

    Jagan Mohini, G.; Sahaya Baskaran, G.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Piasecki, M.; Veeraiah, N.

    2015-01-01

    Soda lime silica borate glasses mixed with different concentrations of TiO 2 are synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. As a part of study on bioactivity of these glasses, the samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for prolonged times (~ 21 days) during which weight loss along with pH measurements is carried out at specific intervals of time. The XRD and SEM analyses of post-immersed samples confirm the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite layer (HA) on the surface of the samples. To assess the role of TiO 2 on the formation of HA layer and degradability of the samples the spectroscopic studies viz. optical absorption and IR spectral studies on post- and pre-immersed samples have been carried out. The analysis of the results of degradability together with spectroscopic studies as a function of TiO 2 concentration indicated that about 6.0 mol% of TiO 2 is the optimal concentration for achieving better bioactivity of these glasses. The presence of the maximal concentration octahedral titanium ions in this glass that facilitates the formation of HA layer is found to be the reason for such a higher bioactivity. - Highlights: • Soda lime silica borate glasses mixed with TiO 2 are synthesized. • Bioactivity of the glasses is studied by immersing them in SBF solution. • XRD and SEM studies indicated the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface. • Quantum of degradability is the highest in the glasses mixed with 6.0 mol% of TiO 2. • The results are analyzed using IR and optical absorption studies

  14. Degradation of glass artifacts: application of modern surface analytical techniques.

    Melcher, Michael; Wiesinger, Rita; Schreiner, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    A detailed understanding of the stability of glasses toward liquid or atmospheric attack is of considerable importance for preserving numerous objects of our cultural heritage. Glasses produced in the ancient periods (Egyptian, Greek, or Roman glasses), as well as modern glass, can be classified as soda-lime-silica glasses. In contrast, potash was used as a flux in medieval Northern Europe for the production of window panes for churches and cathedrals. The particular chemical composition of these potash-lime-silica glasses (low in silica and rich in alkali and alkaline earth components), in combination with increased levels of acidifying gases (such as SO(2), CO(2), NO(x), or O(3)) and airborne particulate matter in today's urban or industrial atmospheres, has resulted in severe degradation of important cultural relics, particularly over the last century. Rapid developments in the fields of microelectronics and computer sciences, however, have contributed to the development of a variety of nondestructive, surface analytical techniques for the scientific investigation and material characterization of these unique and valuable objects. These methods include scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy- or wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDX or SEM/WDX), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this Account, we address glass analysis and weathering mechanisms, exploring the possibilities (and limitations) of modern analytical techniques. Corrosion by liquid substances is well investigated in the glass literature. In a tremendous number of case studies, the basic reaction between aqueous solutions and the glass surfaces was identified as an ion-exchange reaction between hydrogen-bearing species of the attacking liquid and the alkali and alkaline earth ions in the glass, causing a depletion of the latter in the outermost surface layers. Although mechanistic analogies to liquid corrosion are obvious, atmospheric

  15. Mechanical properties of silicate glasses exposed to a low-Earth orbit

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ron; Kinser, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a 5.8 year exposure to low earth orbit environment upon the mechanical properties of commercial optical fused silica, low iron soda-lime-silica, Pyrex 7740, Vycor 7913, BK-7, and the glass ceramic Zerodur were examined. Mechanical testing employed the ASTM-F-394 piston on 3-ball method in a liquid nitrogen environment. Samples were exposed on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in two locations. Impacts were observed on all specimens except Vycor. Weibull analysis as well as a standard statistical evaluation were conducted. The Weibull analysis revealed no differences between control samples and the two exposed samples. We thus concluded that radiation components of the Earth orbital environment did not degrade the mechanical strength of the samples examined within the limits of experimental error. The upper bound of strength degradation for meteorite impacted samples based upon statistical analysis and observation was 50 percent.

  16. lead glass brick

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  17. Radiation induced coloring of glasses measured during and after electron irradiation

    Swyler, K.J.; Hardy, W.H. II; Levy, P.W.

    1975-01-01

    The growth of color centers during irradiation, and the decay after irradiation, were studied in two glasses using recently developed equipment for making optical absorption and luminescence measurements during and after electron irradiation. The glasses studied were NBS 710, a soda-lime silicate glass, and NBS 711, a lead silicate glass. Both glasses exhibit similar coloring characteristics. The radiation-induced absorption spectra consists of a weak gaussian shaped band in the visible, a stronger gaussian band in the ultraviolet, and a band edge ''shift'' which may be accurately approximated by a third gaussian band. For all absorption bands, the color center vs dose (or irradiation time) curves can be accurately resolved into two saturating exponential and one linear component. The decay curves obtained after the irradiation is terminated can be accurately expressed by three exponential components. Coloring and decay curves made at different dose rates indicate that the processes responsible for decay after irradiation and electron hole recombination during irradiation play important roles in determining the rate and extent of coloring. Results are qualitatively in agreement with some very simple kinetic treatments for color center formation. In some, but not all, respects the quantitative agreement is also good. Lastly, the results indicate that it is necessary to make measurements during irradiation to establish the formation kinetics of color centers that are unstable at the bombardment temperature. (U.S.)

  18. Characterization of yellow and colorless decorative glasses from the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Bangkok, Thailand

    Klysubun, Wantana; Ravel, Bruce; Klysubun, Prapong; Sombunchoo, Panidtha; Deenan, Weeraya

    2013-06-01

    Yellow and colorless ancient glasses, which were once used to decorate the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Bangkok, Thailand, around 150 years ago, are studied to unravel the long-lost glass-making recipes and manufacturing techniques. Analyses of chemical compositions, using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SRXRF), indicate that the Thai ancient glasses are soda lime silica glasses (60 % SiO2; 10 % Na2O; 10 % CaO) bearing lead oxide between 2-16 %. Iron (1.5-9.4 % Fe2O3) and manganese (1.7 % MnO) are present in larger abundance than the other 3 d transition metals detected (0.04-0.2 %). K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) provide conclusive evidence on the oxidation states of Fe being 3+ and Mn being 2+ and on short-length tetrahedral structures around the cations. This suggests that iron is used as a yellow colorant with manganese as a decolorant. L 3-edge XANES results reveal the oxidation states of lead as 2+. The results from this work provide information crucial for replicating these decorative glasses for the future restoration of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha.

  19. Fouling of heat exchanger surfaces by dust particles from flue gases of glass furnaces

    Mutsaers, P.L.M.; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Waal, H. de (Nederlandse Centrale Organisatie voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek, Delft. Inst. of Applied Physics)

    1989-08-01

    Fouling by dust particles generally leads to a reduction of the heat transfer and causes corrosion of secondary heat exchangers. A deposition model, including thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, has been derived and applied to describe the deposition (i.e. fouling) process and the nature of the deposition products in a secondary heat exchanger. The deposition model has been verified by means of laboratory experiments, for the case of flue gases from soda-lime glass furnaces. Corrosion of iron-containing metallic materials, caused by the deposition products, has been briefly investigated with the same equipment. There is a close similarity between the experimental results and model calculations. The largest deposition rates from flue gases on cylindrical tubes in cross-flow configuration, are predicted and measured at the upstream stagnation point. The lowest deposition rates are determined at downstream stagnation point locations. At tube surface temperatures of approximately 520 to 550 K, the fouling rate on the tube reaches a maximum. In this temperature region NaHSO{sub 4} is the most important deposition product. This component is mainly formed at temperatures from 470 up to 540 K. The compound Na{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} seems to be stable up to 570 K, for even higher temperatures Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} has been found. These deposition products react with iron, SO{sub 3}, oxygen and water vapour forming the complex corrosion product Na{sub 3}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. NaHSO{sub 4}, which is formed at tube surface temperatures below 540 K, causes more severe corrosion of iron-containing materials than Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Maintaining temperatures of the heat exchanger surfaces above 550 to 600 K reduces the fouling tendency and corrosion in case of flue gases from oil-fired soda-lime glass furnaces. (orig.).

  20. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material; Imobilizacao de metais pesados oriundos de lodo galvanico em material vitreo

    Felisberto, R., E-mail: regina.felisberto@poa.ifrs.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PPGEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  1. Glass and nuclear wastes

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  2. Microstructuring of glasses

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  3. Design of a day tank glass furnace using a transient model and steady-state computation fluid dynamics

    Díaz-Ibarra, Oscar; Abad, Pablo; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    To design day tanks with energy efficiency and good operation standards, a detailed transient model that considers the melting, refining, cooling and working stages of the glass production process was developed. With the model, the required power input was determined, with glass coverage with batch (β) as parameter, for a furnace with a daily production of 1130 kg of soda-lime glass and 14 h for melting/refining. A detailed analysis of the energy balance with the model showed that during the daily cycle about 70% of the energy input is released with the flue gas. During the working stage most of the energy escapes through the doors. As the peak of energy consumption is during the refining process, the power requirement for this stage defines the global power requirement. Calculated energy efficiencies vary between 13% and 16% for β = 70% and 30% respectively. A steady state CFD simulation of the combustion chamber and glass tank shows that a side-fired burner configuration allows for lower gas velocities and temperatures close to the glass and the furnace walls while guaranteeing the same heat transfer characteristics to the glass than the more traditional end-fired (U-type) furnaces. -- Highlights: ► A transient model of a day tank glass furnace captures main process characteristics. ► Heat loss through doors during working stage impacts thermal efficiency. ► A side-fired burner configuration should be preferred to an end-fired approach

  4. Measurement of optical glasses

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  5. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  6. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  7. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  8. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...

  9. Leaching of glass

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  10. Chemical–physical characterisation of Early Iron Age glass beads from Central Europe

    Agua, F.; Conde, J.F.; Kobylińska, U.; Kobyliński, Z.; García-Heras, M.; Villegas, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    Archaeological excavation of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology (Polish Academy of Sciences, PAN) at several Iron Age sites located in West Poland and South Germany has allowed the recovery of an important set of coloured glass beads mostly decorated (6th–4th centuries BC). The present paper summarises the results obtained through the chemical and microstructural characterisation of such beads. The research was carried out by binocular microscope observations, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and visible spectrophotometry. The main objective was to attain information on the production technology and conservation state of these beads. The results indicated that all them were produced with soda lime silicate glass, even though two groups can be separated: (i) beads containing high MgO percentages made from plant ashes as an alkaline source, and (ii) beads containing low MgO percentages made from natron as an alkaline source. As regards decorations, opaque white was obtained from tin oxide, turquoise blue from Cu2+-ions, and opaque yellow from lead antimonate. Additionally, results showed microstructural and microcrystalline differences between some glass beads studied here and other glass beads from Mediterranean areas, dated in the same chronological period. This fact pointed out the valuable role given to these beads by Iron Age communities from Central Europe. (Author)

  11. Finishing of display glass for mobile electronics using 3M Trizact diamond tile abrasive pads

    Zheng, Lianbin; Fletcher, Tim; Na, Tee Koon; Sventek, Bruce; Romero, Vince; Lugg, Paul S.; Kim, Don

    2010-10-01

    This paper will describe a new method being used during the finishing of glass displays for mobile electronics including mobile hand held devices and notebook computers. The new method consists of using 3M TrizactTM Diamond Tile Abrasive Pads. TrizactTM Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive grinding technology developed by 3M Company. The TrizactTM Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder) - inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology can be applied in both double and single side grinding applications. A unique advantage of TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology is the combination of high stock removal and low sub-surface damage. Grinding results will be presented for both 9 micron and 20 micron grades of TrizactTM Diamond Tile abrasive pads used to finish several common display glasses including Corning GorillaTM glass and Soda Lime glass.

  12. 1998 Annual Study Report. Standardization of methods for evaluating properties of new glass at high temperature; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. New glass koon bussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    High-temperature properties of glass melts, e.g., density, volume expansion coefficient, surface tension, viscosity, specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity, redox equilibrium and gas solubility, are basic factors that must be considered in high quality glass melting technology and computer simulation of the glass tank furnace. The structure of the glass melts is also important for understanding these properties. This R and D program is aimed at proposing the international standards for the methods of measuring these high-temperature properties of the melts. The 1988 efforts are directed to the measuring technologies for density, volume expansion coefficient, surface tension, viscosity, specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity, redox equilibrium, gas solubility and melt structures of soda-lime-silica glass melts. The R and D for measuring methods for high-temperature melts through international cooperation and establishment of the international standards for these methods are proposed in the joint CGR/HVG/TNO/GPF conference, which provides the arena for information exchange by glass manufacturers. (NEDO)

  13. A molecular dynamics study of the atomic structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x glasses.

    Mead, Robert N; Mountjoy, Gavin

    2006-07-27

    The local atomic environment of Ca in (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x glasses is of interest because of the role of Ca in soda-lime glass, the application of calcium silicate glasses as biomaterials, and the previous experimental measurement of the Ca-Ca correlation in CaSiO(3) glass. Molecular dynamics has been used to obtain models of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x glasses with x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5, and with approximately 1000 atoms and size approximately 25 A. As expected, the models contain a tetrahedral silica network, the connectivity of which decreases as x increases. In the glass-forming region, i.e., x = 0.4 and 0.5, Ca has a mixture of 6- and 7-fold coordination. Bridging oxygen makes an important contribution to the coordination of Ca, with most bridging oxygens coordinated to 2 Si plus 1 Ca. The x = 0.5 model is in reasonable agreement with previous experimental studies, and does not substantiate the previous theory of cation ordering, which predicted Ca arranged in sheets. In the phase-separated region, i.e., x = 0.1 and 0.2, there is marked clustering of Ca.

  14. Preparation method and thermal properties of samarium and europium-doped alumino-phosphate glasses

    Sava, B.A., E-mail: savabogdanalexandru@yahoo.com [National Institute of Research and Development for Optoelectronics, Department for Optospintronics, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG – 5, RO-77125 Magurele (Romania); Elisa, M., E-mail: astatin18@yahoo.com [National Institute of Research and Development for Optoelectronics, Department for Optospintronics, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG – 5, RO-77125 Magurele (Romania); Boroica, L., E-mail: boroica_lucica@yahoo.com [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125 Magurele (Romania); Monteiro, R.C.C., E-mail: rcm@fct.unl.pt [Center of Materials Research/Institute for Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication, (CENIMAT/I3N), Department of Materials Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • Improved preparation method of rare-earth-doped phosphate glasses was done. • Working and annealing temperatures were lower than for undoped phosphate glass. • Doped glass viscosity is also lower and has quasi-linear variation with temperature. • Exothermic peak appears at about 555 °C and 685 °C, due to devitrification in glass. -- Abstract: The present work investigates alumino-phosphate glasses from Li{sub 2}O–BaO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} system containing Sm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, prepared by two different ways: a wet raw materials mixing route followed by evaporation and melt-quenching, and by remelting of shards. The linear thermal expansion coefficient measured by dilatometry is identical for both rare-earth-doped phosphate glasses. Comparatively to undoped phosphate glass the linear thermal expansion coefficient increases with 2 × 10{sup −7} K{sup −1} when dopants are added. The characteristic temperatures very slowly decrease but can be considered constant with atomic weight, atomic number and f electrons number of the doping ions in the case of T{sub g} (vitreous transition temperature) and T{sub sr} (high annealing temperature) but slowly increase in the case of T{sub ir} (low annealing temperature–strain point) and very slowly increase, being practically constant in the case of T{sub D} (dilatometric softening temperature). Comparatively to undoped phosphate glass the characteristic temperatures of Sm and Eu-doped glasses present lower values. The higher values of electrical conductance for both doped glasses, comparatively to usual soda-lime-silicate glass, indicate a slightly reduced stability against water. The viscosity measurements, showed a quasi-linear variation with temperature the mean square deviation (R{sup 2}) being ranged between 0.872% and 0.996%. The viscosity of doped glasses comparatively to the undoped one is lower at the same temperature. Thermogravimetric

  15. Fractography of glass

    Tressler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    As the first major reference on glass fractography, contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive account of the fracture of glass as well as various fracture surface topography Contributors discuss optical fibers, glass containers, and flatglass fractography In addition, papers explore fracture origins; the growth of the original flaws of defects; and macroscopic fracture patterns from which fracture patterns evolve This volume is complete with photographs and schematics

  16. Diamond turning of glass

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  17. Glass to contain wastes

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  18. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  19. Study on the most early glass eye-beads in China unearthed from Xu Jialing Tomb in Xichuan of Henan Province, China

    GAN FuXi; CHENG HuanSheng; HU YongQing; MA Bo; GU DongHong

    2009-01-01

    The eye-beads dating to the early Warring States Period unearthed from Xu Jialing Tomb in Xichuan County of Henan Province, China are studied. The structure and the chemical composition of the samples are analysed by the undestructive methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. The results show that these eye-beads are of glass state. Its chemical composition indicates that they belong to the glass of soda lime silicate system (Na2O-CaO-SiO2). By comparing the decorative design and the chemical composition of the samples with those from ancient Babylon and ancient Egypt, we think that these ancient eye-beads in Xichuan were most possibly imported from the West.

  20. Study on the most early glass eye-beads in China unearthed from Xu Jialing Tomb in Xichuan of Henan Province,China

    2009-01-01

    The eye-beads dating to the early Warring States Period unearthed from Xu Jialing Tomb in Xichuan County of Henan Province, China are studied. The structure and the chemical composition of the sam- ples are analysed by the undestructive methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. The results show that these eye-beads are of glass state. Its chemical composition indicates that they belong to the glass of soda lime silicate system (Na2O-CaO-SiO2). By comparing the decorative design and the chemical composition of the samples with those from ancient Babylon and ancient Egypt, we think that these ancient eye-beads in Xichuan were most possibly im- ported from the West.

  1. Bioactivity studies on TiO{sub 2}-bearing Na{sub 2}O–CaO–SiO{sub 2}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    Jagan Mohini, G. [Department of Physics, Andhra Loyola College, Vijayawada 520 008, Andhra Pradesh (India); Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, A.P. (India); Sahaya Baskaran, G. [Department of Physics, Andhra Loyola College, Vijayawada 520 008, Andhra Pradesh (India); Ravi Kumar, V. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, A.P. (India); Piasecki, M. [Institute of Physics, J. Dlugosz University, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, Czestochowa (Poland); Veeraiah, N., E-mail: nvr8@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522 510, A.P. (India)

    2015-12-01

    Soda lime silica borate glasses mixed with different concentrations of TiO{sub 2} are synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. As a part of study on bioactivity of these glasses, the samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for prolonged times (~ 21 days) during which weight loss along with pH measurements is carried out at specific intervals of time. The XRD and SEM analyses of post-immersed samples confirm the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite layer (HA) on the surface of the samples. To assess the role of TiO{sub 2} on the formation of HA layer and degradability of the samples the spectroscopic studies viz. optical absorption and IR spectral studies on post- and pre-immersed samples have been carried out. The analysis of the results of degradability together with spectroscopic studies as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration indicated that about 6.0 mol% of TiO{sub 2} is the optimal concentration for achieving better bioactivity of these glasses. The presence of the maximal concentration octahedral titanium ions in this glass that facilitates the formation of HA layer is found to be the reason for such a higher bioactivity. - Highlights: • Soda lime silica borate glasses mixed with TiO{sub 2} are synthesized. • Bioactivity of the glasses is studied by immersing them in SBF solution. • XRD and SEM studies indicated the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface. • Quantum of degradability is the highest in the glasses mixed with 6.0 mol% of TiO{sub 2.} • The results are analyzed using IR and optical absorption studies.

  2. Silicate glasses. Chapter 1

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e. borosilicate glass. A historical overview of waste form development programs in nine countries is followed by a summary of the design criteria for borosilicate glass compositions glass compositions. In the sections on glass properties the waste form is characterized in terms of potential alterations under the influence of heat, thermal gradients, radiation, aqueous solutions and combinations thereof. The topics are phase transformations, mechanical properties, radiation effects and chemical durability. The results from studies of volcanic glasses, as natural analogues for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses in order to verify predictions obtained from short-term tests in the laboratory, have been compiled in a special section on natural analogues. A special section on advanced vitrification techniques summarizes the various actual and potential processing schemes and describes the facilities. The literature has been considered until 1985. (author). 430 refs.; 68 figs.; 29 tabs

  3. Glass and vitrification

    Barton, J.L.; Vacher, R.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Most glasses used as materials are oxides glasses that are produced by a quick quench of a liquid. Glasses are characterized by the absence of periodicity in the atomic arrangements, they do not have symmetries and do not present order over a long distance. This series of 4 short articles present: 1) the properties of glass and its industrial story, 2) the glass structure, 3) a forty years long story of glass as dies used to confine wastes and 4) the methodology used to study the behaviour of glass over very long periods of time. This methodology is based on 5 steps: 1) define and specify the material to study (the prediction of long term alteration of a material is nonsense unless you know well its initial properties), 2) identify all the alteration processes that are likely to happen, determine their kinetics and the influence of environmental parameters, 3) develop mathematical models in order to simulate long-term behaviour of glasses, 4) determine the release rates of the radionuclides confined in the glass, and 5) validate data and models, it is not possible to expect a complete validation of a model that will be extrapolated over tens of thousands of years, nevertheless some ways of validation can lead to a satisfactory level of confidence taking into account reasonable uncertainties. (A.C.)

  4. Optimising the bioreceptivity of porous glass tiles based on colonization by the alga Chlorella vulgaris

    Ferrándiz-Mas, V.; Bond, T.; Zhang, Z.; Melchiorri, J.; Cheeseman, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Green façades on buildings can mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. An option to obtain green facades is through the natural colonisation of construction materials. This can be achieved by engineering bioreceptive materials. Bioreceptivity is the susceptibility of a material to be colonised by living organisms. The aim of this research was to develop tiles made by sintering granular waste glass that were optimised for bioreceptivity of organisms capable of photosynthesis. Tiles were produced by pressing recycled soda-lime glass with a controlled particle size distribution and sintering compacted samples at temperatures between 680 and 740 °C. The primary bioreceptivity of the tiles was evaluated by quantifying colonisation by the algae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris), which was selected as a model photosynthetic micro-organism. Concentrations of C. vulgaris were measured using chlorophyll-a extraction. Relationships between bioreceptivity and the properties of the porous glass tile, including porosity, sorptivity, translucency and pH are reported. Capillary porosity and water sorptivity were the key factors influencing the bioreceptivity of porous glass. Maximum C. vulgaris growth and colonisation was obtained for tiles sintered at 700 °C, with chlorophyll-a concentrations reaching up to 11.1 ± 0.4 μg/cm"2 of tile. Bioreceptivity was positively correlated with sorptivity and porosity and negatively correlated with light transmittance. The research demonstrates that the microstructure of porous glass, determined by the processing conditions, significantly influences bioreceptivity. Porous glass tiles with high bioreceptivity that are colonised by photosynthetic algae have the potential to form carbon-negative façades for buildings and green infrastructure. - Highlights: • Porous tiles made by sintering waste glass at variable temperatures • Bioreceptivity assessed by measuring colonisation by the algae C. vulgaris • Tiles sintered at 700 °C gave maximum

  5. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  6. The chemical durability of glasses suitable for the storage of high level radioactive wastes, (1)

    Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo; Kawamoto, Takamichi; Nanbu, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Takao.

    1975-01-01

    To develop the glassy materials suitable for the long-term storage of high level radioactive wastes, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-alumina-silica system has been investigated. The test was carried out by the following three ways, (1) glass-disk immersion method, (2) continuous leach method and (3) method prescribed in JIS-R3502. In the continuous leach method, glass grains were exposed to circulating water at a constant temperature for a week to obtain the leach factor or leach rate. It was found from the experimental results that, as the silica content increased, the melting temperature of the glasses progressively increased and the chemical durability was considerably improved, and that B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O constituents were preferentially dissolved in water leaving relatively insoluble components such as SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 . The rate at which B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O in glass are leached out is governed by three processes, that is, (1) the boundary reaction on the glass surface, (2) the diffusion process through the hydrated layer, and (3) the disintegration of hydrated layer. The first process probably corresponds to the hydration of boric oxides on the glass surface or to the ion exchange between protons in solution and Na + ions in glass, and the second process seems to correspond to the diffusion of protons through the hydrated layer on the glass surface. Although the ratio of [Na-BO 4 ]/[BO 3 ] in the borax-silica glasses was determined to be 0.5 by means of NMR measurement, Na 2 O/B 2 O 3 ratio in leached solution was less than 0.5, indicating that [BO 3 ] groups in glass were more soluble than [Na-BO 4 ] groups. From the viewpoint of appreciation of safety, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-aluminasilica system was rather unsatisfactory, but that of the glasses containing silica in quantities was comparable to the soda-lime silicate sheet glasses. (auth.)

  7. Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations (±10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample

  8. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  9. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  10. Electric glass capturing markets

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  11. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  12. Nucleation in ZBLAN glasses

    de Leede, G.L.A.; Waal, de H.

    1989-01-01

    Nucleation rates were detd. in a ZrF4-BaF2-NaF-LaF3-AlF3 glass (ZBLAN) using an optical method. The results were compared with a similar glass having a slightly different compn. The difference in the nucleation rate is explained by classical nucleation theory using calcd. free-energy differences

  13. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  14. Polymorphism in glasses

    Landa, L.M.; Nikolaeva, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    To defect phase interfaces and spasmodic properties change, the inhomogeneity and the second radiation effects in quartz glass, metamict phase and intermediate states have been investigated. When irradiating with fast neutrons the transformation of quartz glass - metamict phase occurs completely. The transformation is completed at 2x10 20 part./cm 2 dose. Thermal treatment not only increases the number of inhomogeneities but also results in increasing quartz glass density. Annealing transforms the metamict phase into common quartz glass at 1400 K. The fact, that thermal treatment results in the complete transformation of metamict phase into quartz glass, and the inverse transformation occurs only partially, is quite regular, as the metamict phase has a lesser entropy and is a more ordered state. It is shown that different amorphous phases of a chemical composition have different structures and properties, that there are interfaces between them, and the transformation from one state to another in microvolumes is realized spasmodically and requires expenditure of energy

  15. The role of different network modifying cations on the speciation of the Co2 + complex in silicates and implication in the investigation of historical glasses

    Fornacelli, Cristina; Ceglia, Andrea; Bracci, Susanna; Vilarigues, Marcia

    2018-01-01

    In the last decades the speciation of the cobalt complex in a glass matrix has been extensively studied. Bivalent cobalt ions in glasses of different composition commonly adopt a tetrahedral coordination, though hexa- or penta-coordinated species are also possible. Changes in the absorbance spectrum of Co-doped glasses were attested in previous studies according to the introduction of different modifying cations. A shifting of the first sub-band characterizing the typical triplets of tetrahedral Co2 + ions in both the visible and near infrared regions was observed, but discrepancies in literature suggested a relevant role of glass composition on the definition of the optical signature of cobalt. Co-doped glasses with different composition (soda-lime, potash-lime, mixed alkali and ZnO-Na2O-CaO-SiO2) were studied via Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS). Pseudo-Voigt functions were used for the deconvolution of the absorbance spectra and the features of the bands characteristic of each cobalt complex were investigated. The structural role played by each modifying cation and the fundamental implications of glass basicity on the speciation of different Co-complexes were stressed. Changes in glass structure resulted in different equilibria between the three absorbing species whose specific optical signatures in the 480-530 nm region interact to determine the resulting absorbance spectrum.

  16. Glass leaching performance

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  17. Microbial communities associated with the anthropogenic, highly alkaline environment of a saline soda lime, Poland

    Kalwasi?ska, Agnieszka; Felf?ldi, Tam?s; Szab?, Attila; Deja-Sikora, Edyta; Kosobucki, Przemys?aw; Walczak, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Soda lime is a by-product of the Solvay soda process for the production of sodium carbonate from limestone and sodium chloride. Due to a high salt concentration and alkaline pH, the lime is considered as a potential habitat of haloalkaliphilic and haloalkalitolerant microbial communities. This artificial and unique environment is nutrient-poor and devoid of vegetation, due in part to semi-arid, saline and alkaline conditions. Samples taken from the surface layer of the lime and from the depth...

  18. Ag clustering investigation in laser irradiated ion-exchanged glasses by optical and vibrational spectroscopy

    Trave, E., E-mail: enrico.trave@unive.it [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Cattaruzza, E.; Gonella, F.; Calvelli, P. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, I-30123 Venezia (Italy); Quaranta, A. [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Rahman, A.; Mariotto, G. [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modify the properties of Ag{sup +} exchanged glasses by thermal and laser treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced microstructural changes are analyzed by optical and Raman spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-based species in the glass show a peculiar PL activity in the UV-Vis range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman and OA analysis allow for determining the Ag cluster size evolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser processing leads to different cluster formation and fragmentation mechanisms. - Abstract: Ion exchange process is widely used to dope silicate glass layers with silver for several applications, ranging from light waveguide to nanostructured composite glass fabrication. The silver-doped structure and its physical properties depend on the preparation parameters as well as on subsequent treatments. In particular, laser irradiation of the ion exchanged glasses has been demonstrated to be an effective tool to control cluster size and size distribution. Nevertheless, a complete comprehension of the basic phenomena and a systematic characterization of these systems are still lacking. In this paper, an extended optical characterization is presented for soda-lime glass slides, doped with silver by Ag{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion exchange, thermally treated and irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser beam at different wavelengths, and for different energy density. The samples were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques, namely, optical absorption, photoluminescence and micro-Raman analysis. The availability of all these characterization techniques allowed pointing out a suitable scenario for the Ag clustering evolution as a function of the ion exchange, annealing and laser irradiation parameters.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  20. Oxynitride glasses: a review

    Garcia, A.R.; Clausell, C.; Barba, A.

    2016-07-01

    Oxynitride glasses are special types of silicates or silicoaluminates which have been the object of many studies over the last forty years. They can be prepared by means of various complex methods, leading to variable levels of nitrogen incorporation, though in all cases giving limited transparency in the visible range. More recently, a new family of oxynitride glasses incorporating fluorine has been investigated. This paper outlines the effect of composition, in particular nitrogen and fluorine content, on properties such as glass transition temperature, hardness, Young's modulus, compactness and molar volume. (Author)

  1. Orbital glass in HTSC

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  2. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  3. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  4. Waste glass weathering

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  5. Super ionic conductive glass

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  6. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  7. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  8. Micro-Raman and micro-XRF analysis of glass beads from the Chungde site, Taiwan

    Liou, Y. S.; Wang, S. C.; Liu, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    A large number of ancient glass beads dating back from Late Neolithic Age to early Historical Period (ca. 2300-400 BP) of Taiwan have been uncovered from archaeological sites. These glass beads with variant colors, shapes, and stylistics have long been considered to possess socio-cultural significance. Due to the color and chemical composition of glass bead might be determined by raw materials, fluxing agents, colorants, opacifiers and stabilizers. In addition, ancient glass beads are rare and precious, non-destructive analysis has been employed to decipher about the provenances, manufacturing techniques, and exchange/trade routes. In this work, micro-Raman spectroscopy and micro X-ray fluorescent spectrometer (μ-XRF) were used to examine ten ancient glass beads excavated from the Chungde site, Hualien, Taiwan, dating back to 1500-800 BP, to unravel the mineralogical and chemical compositions. Micro Raman experimental results show that glass and anorthite glass are the main constituents accompanying with trace level of quartz, albite, siderite, ankerite, and amazonite. The Raman Index of Polymerization (Ip) indicate that the sintering temperature of the glass beads is in the range of 1000~1400°C. Furthermore, the chemical compositions are corresponding to the maximum stretching vibration peak wave number (νmax Si-O Stretching) and the maximum bending vibration peak wave number (δmax Si-O Bending), which are essentially consistent with that of the India-Pacific beads. The μ-XRF results indicate the presence of oxides including SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, Na2O, K2O, CaO, MgO, SnO2, TiO2, CuO, etc., and could be classified to high aluminum of soda-lime glass system. According to ternary phase diagram analysis of CaO-K2O-Na2O and K2O-Al2O3-CaO, the ancient glass beads analyzed could be attributed to the India-Pacific beads, and is in accordance with that of Raman spectra. The combination of these facts leads to the conclusion that glass beads obtained from the Chungde

  9. Scaling properties of fracture surfaces on glass strengthened by ionic exchange

    Garza-Mendez, F.J.; Hinojosa-Rivera, M.; Gomez, I.; Sanchez, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the results of the statistical topometric analysis of fracture surfaces of soda-lime-silica glass with and without ionic exchange treatment are reported. In this case, the mechanism of substitution is K + -Na + . atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to record the topometric data from the fracture surface. The roughness exponent (ζ) and the correlation length (ξ) were calculated by the variable bandwidth method. The analysis for both glasses (subjected and non-subjected to ionic exchange) for ζ shows a value ∼0.8, this value agrees well with that reported in the literature for rapid crack propagation in a variety of materials. The correlation length shows different values for each condition. These results, along with those of microhardness indentations suggest that the self-affine correlation length is influenced by the complex interactions of the stress field of microcracks with that resulting from the collective behavior of the point defects introduced by the strengthening mechanism of ionic exchange

  10. Machining a glass rod with a lathe-type electro-chemical discharge machine

    Furutani, Katsushi; Maeda, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the performance of electro-chemical discharge machining (ECDM) of a revolving glass rod. ECDM has been studied for machining insulating materials such as glass and ceramics. In conventional ECDM, an insulating workpiece is dipped in an electrolyte as a working fluid and a tool electrode is pressed on the surface with a small load. In the experiments, a workpiece was revolved to provide fresh working fluid into a gap between the tool electrode and the workpiece. A soda lime grass rod was machined with a thin tungsten rod in NaCl solution. The applied voltage was changed up to 40 V. The rotation speed was set to 0, 0.3, 3 and 30 min −1 . Discharge was observed over an applied voltage of 30 V. The width and depth of the machined grooves and the surface roughness of their bottom were increased with increase of the applied voltage. Although the depth of machining at 3 min −1 was the same as that at 30 min −1 , the width and roughness at 30 min −1 were smaller than those at 3 min −1 . Moreover, because the thickness of vaporization around the tool electrode was decreased with increase of the rotation speed, the width of the machined groove became smaller

  11. Effect of thermal history on the structure of chemically and vapor deposited silver films on glass

    Shelby, J.E.; Nichols, M.C.; Smith, D.K. Jr.; Vitko, J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of silver agglomeration in second surface mirrors used for solar applications has emphasized consideration of the effect of thermal history on the optical properties of mirrors. Thermal history effects may arise from the processing of mirrors, the application of protective coatings, or from outdoor exposure. Mirrors may be subject to elevated temperatures (T less than or equal to 400 0 C) for short periods of time, or to low temperatures (T less than or equal to 60 0 C) for long (less than or equal to 30 years) periods of time. Although a significant amount of work has been done on thermally driven agglomeration of silver films, most of these studies have been restricted to vapor deposited films on vitreous silica. Large area reflectors, such as those used in heliostats, will almost certainly be deposited by commercial chemical methods on substrates of soda-lime-silicate or other glasses which differ considerably from vitreous silica in composition and properties. The present study addresses the effect of this change in deposition technique and substrate on silver agglomeration. These problems were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, reflectometry, and x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that both the method used to deposit the silver and the type of glass affect the agglomeration process and the character of the reflective film

  12. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  13. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  14. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  15. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Adamson, D.; Pickenheim, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  16. Complexing Agents and pH Influence on Chemical Durability of Type I Molded Glass Containers.

    Biavati, Alberto; Poncini, Michele; Ferrarini, Arianna; Favaro, Nicola; Scarpa, Martina; Vallotto, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Among the factors that affect the glass surface chemical durability, pH and complexing agents present in aqueous solution have the main role. Glass surface attack can be also related to the delamination issue causing glass particles' appearance in the pharmaceutical preparation. A few methods to check for glass containers delamination propensity and some control guidelines have been proposed. The present study emphasizes the possible synergy between a few complexing agents with pH on borosilicate glass chemical durability.Hydrolytic attack was performed in small-volume 23 mL type I glass containers autoclaved according to the European Pharmacopoeia or United States Pharmacopeia for 1 h at 121 °C, in order to enhance the chemical attack due to time, temperature, and the unfavorable surface/volume ratio. Solutions of 0.048 M or 0.024 M (M/L) of the acids citric, glutaric, acetic, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), together with sodium phosphate with water for comparison, were used for the trials. The pH was adjusted ±0.05 units at fixed values 5.5, 6.6, 7, 7.4, 8, and 9 by LiOH diluted solution.Because silicon is the main glass network former, silicon release into the attack solutions was chosen as the main index of the glass surface attack and analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry. The work was completed by the analysis of the silicon release in the worst attack conditions of molded glass, soda lime type II glass, and tubing borosilicate glass vials to compare different glass compositions and forming technologies. Surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy was finally performed to check for the surface status after the worst chemical attack condition by citric acid. LAY ABSTRACT: Glass, like every packaging material, can have some usage limits, mainly in basic pH solutions. The issue of glass surface degradation particles that appear in vials (delamination) has forced a number of drug product recalls in recent years

  17. Structure-solubility relationships in fluoride-containing phosphate based bioactive glasses

    Shaharyar, Yaqoot

    The dissolution of fluoride-containing bioactive glasses critically affects their biomedical applications. Most commercial fluoride-releasing bioactive glasses have been designed in the soda-lime-silica system. However, their relatively slow chemical dissolution and the adverse effect of fluoride on their bioactivity are stimulating the study of novel biodegradable materials with higher bioactivity, such as biodegradable phosphate-based bioactive glasses, which can be a viable alternative for applications where a fast release of active ions is sought. In order to design new biomaterials with controlled degradability and high bioactivity, it is essential to understand the connection between chemical composition, molecular structure, and solubility in physiological fluids.Accordingly, in this work we have combined the strengths of various experimental techniques with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, to elucidate the impact of fluoride ions on the structure and chemical dissolution of bioactive phosphate glasses in the system: 10Na2O - (45-x) CaO - 45P2O5 - xCaF2, where x varies between 0 -- 10 mol.%. NMR and MD data reveal that the medium-range atomic-scale structure of thse glasses is dominated by Q2 phosphate units followed by Q1 units, and the MD simulations further show that fluoride tends to associate with network modifier cations to form alkali/alkaline-earth rich ionic aggregates. On a macroscopic scale, we find that incorporating fluoride in phosphate glasses does not affect the rate of apatite formation on the glass surface in simulated body fluid (SBF). However, fluoride has a marked favorable impact on the glass dissolution in deionized water. Similarly, fluoride incorporation in the glasses results in significant weight gain due to adsorption of water (in the form of OH ions). These macroscopic trends are discussed on the basis of the F effect on the atomistic structure of the glasses, such as the F-induced phosphate network re-polymerization, in a

  18. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  19. Electrical properties of phosphate glasses

    Mogus-Milankovic, A; Santic, A; Reis, S T; Day, D E

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the electrical properties of phosphate glasses where transition metal oxide such as iron oxide is the network former and network modifier is presented. Phosphate glasses containing iron are electronically conducting glasses where the polaronic conduction is due to the electron hopping from low to high iron valence state. The identification of structural defects caused by ion/polaron migration, the analysis of dipolar states and electrical conductivity in iron phosphate glasses containing various alkali and mixed alkali ions was performed on the basis of the impedance spectroscopy (IS). The changes in electrical conductivity from as-quenched phosphate glass to fully crystallized glass (glass-ceramics) by IS are analyzed. A change in the characteristic features of IS follows the changes in glass and crystallized glass network. Using IS, the contribution of glass matrix, crystallized grains and grain boundary to the total electrical conductivity for iron phosphate glasses was analyzed. It was shown that decrease in conductivity is caused by discontinuities in the conduction pathways as a result of the disruption of crystalline network where two or more crystalline phases are formed. Also, phosphate-based glasses offer a unique range of biomaterials, as they form direct chemical bonding with hard/soft tissue. The surface charges of bioactive glasses are recognized to be the most important factors in determining biological responses. The improved bioactivity of the bioactive glasses as a result of the effects of the surface charges generated by electrical polarization is discussed.

  20. Theory of glass

    Rivier, N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical properties of glass are direct consequences of its non-crystalline structure. The structure is described from a topological point of view, since topology is the only geometry surviving non-crystallinity, i.e. absence of metric and trivial space group. This fact has two main consequences: the overall homogeneity of glass is a gauge symmetry, and the only extended, structurally stable constituents are odd lines (or 2π-disclinations in the elastic continuum limit). A gauge theory of glass, based on odd lines as sources of frozen-in strain, can explain those properties of glasses which are both specific to, and universal in amorphous solids: low-temperature excitations, and relaxation at high temperatures. The methods of statistical mechanics can be applied to give a minimal description of amorphous structures in statistical equilibrium. Criteria for statistical equilibrium of the structure and detailed balance are given, together with structural equations of state, which turn out to be well-known empirically among botanists and metallurgists. This review is based on lectures given in 1984 in Niteroi. It contains five parts: I - Structure, from a topological viewpoint; II - gauge invariance; III - Tunneling modes; IV - Supercooled liquid and the glass transitions; V - Statistical crystallography. (Author) [pt

  1. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  2. Ion exchange for glass strengthening

    Gy, Rene

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a short overview of silicate glass strengthening by exchange of alkali ions in a molten salt, below the glass transition temperature (chemical tempering). The physics of alkali inter-diffusion is briefly explained and the main parameters of the process, which control the glass reinforcement, are reviewed. Methods for characterizing the obtained residual stress state and the strengthening are described, along with the simplified modelling of the stress build-up. The fragmentation of chemically tempered glass is discussed. The concept of engineered stress profile glass is presented, and finally, the effect of glass and salt compositions is overviewed

  3. Perspectives on spin glasses

    Contucci, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Presenting and developing the theory of spin glasses as a prototype for complex systems, this book is a rigorous and up-to-date introduction to their properties. The book combines a mathematical description with a physical insight of spin glass models. Topics covered include the physical origins of those models and their treatment with replica theory; mathematical properties like correlation inequalities and their use in the thermodynamic limit theory; main exact solutions of the mean field models and their probabilistic structures; and the theory of the structural properties of the spin glass phase such as stochastic stability and the overlap identities. Finally, a detailed account is given of the recent numerical simulation results and properties, including overlap equivalence, ultrametricity and decay of correlations. The book is ideal for mathematical physicists and probabilists working in disordered systems.

  4. Waste glass melting stages

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  5. Waste glass melting stages

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied

  6. Effect of alkali earth oxides on hydroxy-carbonated apatite nano layer formation for SiO2-BaO-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 glass system

    Kiran, P.; Ramakrishna, V.; Shashikala, H. D.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2017-11-01

    Barium soda lime phosphosilicate [(58SiO2-(32 - x)BaO- xCao-6Na2O-4P2O5 (where x = 15, 20, 25 and 30 mol%)] samples were synthesised using conventional sol-gel method at 700 °C sintering temperature. Thermal, structural properties were studied using thermo gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Using Raman spectra non-bridging oxygen concentrations were estimated. The hydroxy-carbonated apatite (HCA) layer formation on samples was analysed for 7 days using simulated body fluid (SBF) soaked samples. The growth of HCA layers self-assembled on the sample surface was discussed as a function of NBO/BO ratio. Results indicated that the number of Ca2+ ions released into SBF solution in dissolution process and weight loss of SB-treated samples vary with NBO/BO ratio. The changes in NBO/BO ratios were observed to be proportional to HCA forming ability of barium soda lime phosphosilicate glasses.

  7. Using physical properties of molten glass to estimate glass composition

    Choi, Kwan Sik; Yang, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Jong Kil

    1997-01-01

    A vitrification process is under development in KEPRI for the treatment of low-and medium-level radioactive waste. Although the project is for developing and building Vitrification Pilot Plant in Korea, one of KEPRI's concerns is the quality control of the vitrified glass. This paper discusses a methodology for the estimation of glass composition by on-line measurement of molten glass properties, which could be applied to the plant for real-time quality control of the glass product. By remotely measuring viscosity and density of the molten glass, the glass characteristics such as composition can be estimated and eventually controlled. For this purpose, using the database of glass composition vs. physical properties in isothermal three-component system of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 , a software TERNARY has been developed which determines the glass composition by using two known physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity)

  8. Superductile bulk metallic glass

    Yao, K.F.; Ruan, F.; Yang, Y.Q.; Chen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<2%) at room temperature. We report a newly developed Pd-Si binary bulk metallic glass, which exhibits a uniform plastic deformation and a large plastic engineering strain of 82% and a plastic true strain of 170%, together with initial strain hardening, slight strain softening and final strain hardening characteristics. The uniform shear deformation and the ultrahigh plasticity are mainly attributed to strain hardening, which results from the nanoscale inhomogeneity due to liquid phase separation. The formed nanoscale inhomogeneity will hinder, deflect, and bifurcate the propagation of shear bands

  9. Aging in a Structural Glass

    Kob, Walter; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the relaxation dynamics of a simple structural glass which has been quenched below its glass transition temperature. We demonstrate that time correlation functions show strong aging effects and investigate in what way the fluctuation dissipation theorem is violated.

  10. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  11. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  12. What Glass Ceiling?

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  13. Metallic glasses: structural models

    Nassif, E.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a summary of the attempts made up to the present in order to discribe by structural models the atomic arrangement in metallic glasses, showing also why the structure factors and atomic distribution functions cannot be always experimentally determined with a reasonable accuracy. (M.W.O.) [pt

  14. Microchips on glass

    Nanver, L.; De Vreede, L.; Keulemans, M.

    2007-01-01

    Microchips on glass. What about a mobile phone that uses a single microchip to receive all the available frequency bands, plus extras such as television, gps, and Internet access? Or, in due time, see-though implants that will monitor your state of health, and equipment that will let you see through

  15. Glass as matter

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingly...

  16. Glass ... current issues

    Wright, A.F.; Dupuy, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the School were twofold. Firstly to inform participants of actual and developing technological applications of glassy materials in which fundamental science makes a strong contribution, and secondly to bring together scientists from the widely different backgrounds of glass science and technology to promote mutual understanding and collaboration. (orig.)

  17. Stained Glass and Flu

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  18. Gamma ray shielding characteristic of BiZnBo-SLS and PbZnBo-SLS glass

    Syuhada Ahmad, Nor; Shahrim Mustafa, Iskandar; Mansor, Ishak; Malik, Muhammad Fadhirul Izwan bin Abdul; Ain Nabilah Razali, Nur; Nordin, Sufiniza

    2018-05-01

    The radiation shielding and optical properties of x [RmOn] (0.5‑x) [ZnO] 0.2 [B2O3] 0.3 [SLS], where RmOn are Bi2O3 and PbO with x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30, 0.40, and 0.45 have been prepared by using the melt-quenching method at 1200 °C and was investigated on their physical, structural and gamma ray shielding properties. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) data revealed that the particle morphologies is aggregated and irregular in shapes and size. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping data confirmed that all mentioned element all present on the prepared glass. Soda Lime Silica (SLS) that is mainly composed of SiO2 has been utilized in this study as the source of SiO2 for fabrication of glass system. From the result, the density and molar volume of both glass samples increased as Bi2O3 and PbO content increased. The gamma ray shielding properties, such as linear attenuation and mass attenuation coefficient, were increased while half value layer (HVL) and mean free path (MFP) were decreased as the increased in Bi2O3 and PbO concentrations. It is recognized that the mass attenuation coefficient value of Bi2O3 and PbO glass are slightly different. From this study, it can be concluded that from the non-toxicity and shielding point of view, the bismuth glass is a good shield to gamma radiation as compared to lead glass.

  19. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  20. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    Wentworth, S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  1. Glass bead cultivation of fungi

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, H.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum...... and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier...... to specific nutrient factors. •Fungal growth on glass beads eases and improves fungal RNA extraction....

  2. Sodium diffusion in boroaluminosilicate glasses

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2011-01-01

    of isothermal sodium diffusion in BAS glasses by ion exchange, inward diffusion, and tracer diffusion experiments. By varying the [SiO2]/[Al2O3] ratio of the glasses, different structural regimes of sodium behavior are accessed. We show that the mobility of the sodium ions decreases with increasing [SiO2]/[Al2O......Understanding the fundamentals of alkali diffusion in boroaluminosilicate (BAS) glasses is of critical importance for advanced glass applications, e.g., the production of chemically strengthened glass covers for personal electronic devices. Here, we investigate the composition dependence...

  3. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  4. Fun with singing wine glasses

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency against water volume percent are made using a spreadsheet. Students can also play combinations of pitches with several glasses. A video (Ruiz 2018 Video: Singing glasses http://mjtruiz.com/ped/wineglasses/) is provided which includes an excerpt of a beautiful piece written for singing glasses and choir: Stars by Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds.

  5. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  7. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  8. Glasses for Mali

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, Bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  9. Glass manufacturing through induction

    Boen, R.; Paya, B.; Roscini, M.; Fautrelle, Y.; Tuaz, F.; Delage, D.

    1991-01-01

    Oxides and glasses are electrical and thermal insulators, but show the characteristic of being weakly conductors of electricity when they are melt. It is then possible to heat them through HF induction. This interesting property allows the development of a melting process in cold crucible induction furnace. The process is being studied and developed by a consortium made up of CFEI, CEA Marcoule, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE and MADYLAM laboratory. The studies include 2 parts: a) One experimental part to develop the technology and research for satisfying configurations, through a small size platform (10 to 30 kg/h). The long run continuous pouring melting tests made on different kinds of glass allow to go-on with industrial range units. b) One theoretical part to understand the magneto-thermo-hydraulic phenomenon hardly in relation with the heavy dependence of the physical characteristics (electrical and heat conductivities, viscosity) according to temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs [fr

  10. Glass matrix armor

    Calkins, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the insides surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material

  11. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  12. HLW immobilization in glass

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  13. Nuclear traces in glass

    Segovia A, M. de N.

    1978-01-01

    The charged particles produce, in dielectric materials, physical and chemical effects which make evident the damaged zone along the trajectory of the particle. This damaged zone is known as the latent trace. The latent traces can be enlarged by an etching of the detector material. This treatment attacks preferently the zones of the material where the charged particles have penetrated, producing concavities which can be observed through a low magnification optical microscope. These concavities are known as developed traces. In this work we describe the glass characteristics as a detector of the fission fragments traces. In the first chapter we present a summary of the existing basic theories to explain the formation of traces in solids. In the second chapter we describe the etching method used for the traces development. In the following chapters we determine some chatacteristics of the traces formed on the glass, such as: the development optimum time; the diameter variation of the traces and their density according to the temperature variation of the detector; the glass response to a radiation more penetrating than that of the fission fragments; the distribution of the developed traces and the existing relation between this ditribution and the fission fragments of 252 Cf energies. The method which has been used is simple and cheap and can be utilized in laboratories whose resources are limited. The commercial glass which has been employed allows the registration of the fission fragments and subsequently the realization of experiments which involve the counting of the traces as well as the identification of particles. (author)

  14. Amorphous gauge glass theory

    Nielsen, H.B.; Bennett, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Assuming that a lattice gauge theory describes a fundamental attribute of Nature, it should be pointed out that such a theory in the form of a gauge glass is a weaker assumption than a regular lattice model in as much as it is not constrained by the imposition of translational invariance; translational invariance is, however, recovered approximately in the long wavelength or continuum limit. (orig./WL)

  15. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses; Influence du dopage par certains elements de transition sur les effets d'irradiation dans des verres d'interet nucleaire

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-15

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then {beta} irradiated at different doses up to 10{sup 9} Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe{sup 3+} reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe{sup 3+} amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h{sup 0}/e-) consuming equilibrium. He{sup +} and Kr{sup 3+} ions and {gamma} irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  16. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  17. Radiation shielding glass

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Hajime.

    1997-01-01

    It was found that a glass composition comprising, as essential ingredients, SiO 2 , PbO, Gd 2 O 3 and alkali metal oxides can provide a shielding performance against electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons. The present invention provides radiation shielding glass containing at least from 16 to 46wt% of SiO 2 , from 47 to 75wt% of PbO, from 1 to 10wt% of Gd 2 O 3 , from 0 to 3wt% of Li 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of Na 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of K 2 O provided that Li 2 O + Na 2 O + K 2 O is from 1 to 10wt%, B 2 O 3 is from 0 to 10wt%, CeO 2 is from 0 to 3wt%, As 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt% and Sb 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt%. Since the glass can shield electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons simultaneously, radiation shielding windows can be designed and manufactured at a reduced thickness and by less constitutional numbers in a circumstance where they are present altogether. (T.M.)

  18. Microbial communities associated with the anthropogenic, highly alkaline environment of a saline soda lime, Poland.

    Kalwasińska, Agnieszka; Felföldi, Tamás; Szabó, Attila; Deja-Sikora, Edyta; Kosobucki, Przemysław; Walczak, Maciej

    2017-07-01

    Soda lime is a by-product of the Solvay soda process for the production of sodium carbonate from limestone and sodium chloride. Due to a high salt concentration and alkaline pH, the lime is considered as a potential habitat of haloalkaliphilic and haloalkalitolerant microbial communities. This artificial and unique environment is nutrient-poor and devoid of vegetation, due in part to semi-arid, saline and alkaline conditions. Samples taken from the surface layer of the lime and from the depth of 2 m (both having pH ~11 and EC e up to 423 dS m -1 ) were investigated using culture-based (culturing on alkaline medium) and culture-independent microbiological approaches (microscopic analyses and pyrosequencing). A surprisingly diverse bacterial community was discovered in this highly saline, alkaline and nutrient-poor environment, with the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria (representing 52.8% of the total bacterial community) and Firmicutes (16.6%) showing dominance. Compared to the surface layer, higher bacterial abundance and diversity values were detected in the deep zone, where more stable environmental conditions may occur. The surface layer was dominated by members of the genera Phenylobacterium, Chelativorans and Skermanella, while in the interior layer the genus Fictibacillus was dominant. The culturable aerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria strains isolated in this study belonged mostly to the genus Bacillus and were closely related to the species Bacillus pseudofirmus, B. cereus, B. plakortidis, B. thuringensis and B. pumilus.

  19. Optimising the bioreceptivity of porous glass tiles based on colonization by the alga Chlorella vulgaris

    Ferrándiz-Mas, V., E-mail: v.ferrandiz@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BU (United Kingdom); Bond, T., E-mail: t.bond@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BU (United Kingdom); Zhang, Z., E-mail: zhen.zhang14@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BU (United Kingdom); Melchiorri, J., E-mail: jpmelchiorri@gmail.com [ARBOREA Research, Bessemer Building, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, C.R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BU (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Green façades on buildings can mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. An option to obtain green facades is through the natural colonisation of construction materials. This can be achieved by engineering bioreceptive materials. Bioreceptivity is the susceptibility of a material to be colonised by living organisms. The aim of this research was to develop tiles made by sintering granular waste glass that were optimised for bioreceptivity of organisms capable of photosynthesis. Tiles were produced by pressing recycled soda-lime glass with a controlled particle size distribution and sintering compacted samples at temperatures between 680 and 740 °C. The primary bioreceptivity of the tiles was evaluated by quantifying colonisation by the algae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris), which was selected as a model photosynthetic micro-organism. Concentrations of C. vulgaris were measured using chlorophyll-a extraction. Relationships between bioreceptivity and the properties of the porous glass tile, including porosity, sorptivity, translucency and pH are reported. Capillary porosity and water sorptivity were the key factors influencing the bioreceptivity of porous glass. Maximum C. vulgaris growth and colonisation was obtained for tiles sintered at 700 °C, with chlorophyll-a concentrations reaching up to 11.1 ± 0.4 μg/cm{sup 2} of tile. Bioreceptivity was positively correlated with sorptivity and porosity and negatively correlated with light transmittance. The research demonstrates that the microstructure of porous glass, determined by the processing conditions, significantly influences bioreceptivity. Porous glass tiles with high bioreceptivity that are colonised by photosynthetic algae have the potential to form carbon-negative façades for buildings and green infrastructure. - Highlights: • Porous tiles made by sintering waste glass at variable temperatures • Bioreceptivity assessed by measuring colonisation by the algae C. vulgaris • Tiles sintered at 700 °C gave

  20. Na/Ca Intermixing around Silicate and Phosphate Groups in Bioactive Phosphosilicate Glasses Revealed by Heteronuclear Solid-State NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Mathew, Renny; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2015-04-30

    We characterize the intermixing of network-modifying Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions around the silicate (QSi(n)) and phosphate (QP(n)) tetrahedra in a series of 16 Na2O–CaO–SiO2–P2O5 glasses, whose P content and silicate network connectivity were varied independently. The set includes both bioactive and bioinactive compositions and also encompasses two soda-lime-silicate members devoid of P, as well as two CaO–SiO2 glasses and one Na2O–SiO2–P2O5 glass. The various Si/P↔Na/Ca contacts were probed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with heteronuclear magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimentation utilizing (23)Na{(31)P} and (23)Na{(29)Si} REDOR, as well as (31)P{ (23)Na} and (29)Si{(23)Na} REAPDOR. We introduce an approach for quantifying the extent of Na(+)/Ca(2+) ordering around a given QP(n) or QSi(n) group, encoded by the preference factor 0⩽ PM ⩽ 1 conveying the relative weights of a random cation intermixing (PM = 0) and complete preference/ordering (PM = 1) for one of the species M, which represents either Na(+) or Ca(2+). The MD-derived preference factors reveal phosphate and silicate species surrounded by Na(+)/Ca(2+) ions intermixed nearly randomly (PM ≲ 0.15), except for the QSi(4) and QSi(1) groups, which manifest more significant cation ordering with preference for Na+ and Ca2+, respectively. The overall weak preferences are essentially independent of the Si and P contents of the glass, whereas PM primarily correlates with the total amount of network modifiers: as the latter is increased, the Na/Ca distribution around the {QP(0), QSi(1), QSi(2)} groups with preference for Ca2(+ )tend to randomize (i.e., PCa decreases), while the PNa-values grow slightly for the {QP(1), QSi(3), QSi(4)} species already preferring coordination of Na. The set of experimental preference factors {PCa} for the orthophosphate (QP(0)) groups extracted from (31)P{(23)Na} REAPDOR NMR-derived M2(P–Na) dipolar second moments agrees

  1. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis focuses on the study of helium behavior in R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Helium is generated by the minor actinides alpha decays incorporated in the glass matrix. Therefore, four types of materials were used in this work. These are non radioactive R7T7 glasses saturated with helium under pressure, glasses implanted with 3 He + ions, glasses doped with curium and glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor. The study of helium solubility in saturated R7T7 glass has shown that helium atoms are inserted in the glass free volume. The results yielded a solubility of about 10 16 at. cm -3 atm. -1 . The incorporation limit of helium in this type of glass has been determined; its value amounted to about 2*10 21 at. cm -3 , corresponding to 2.5 at.%. Diffusion studies have shown that the helium migration is controlled by the single population dissolved in the glass free volume. An ideal diffusion model was used to simulate the helium release data which allowed to determine diffusion coefficients obeying to the following Arrhenius law: D = D 0 exp(-E a /kBT), where D 0 = 2.2*10 -2 and 5.4*10 -3 cm 2 s -1 and E a = 0.61 eV for the helium saturated and the curium doped glass respectively. These results reflect a thermally activated diffusion mechanism which seems to be not influenced by the glass radiation damage and helium concentrations studied in the present work (up to 8*10 19 at. g -1 , corresponding to 0.1 at.%). Characterizations of the macroscopic, structural and microstructural properties of glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor did not reveal any impact associated with the presence of helium at high concentrations. The observed modifications i.e. a swelling of 0.7 %, a decrease in hardness by 38 %, an increase between 8 and 34 % of the fracture toughness and a stabilization of the glass structure under irradiation, were attributed to the glass nuclear damage induced by the irradiation in reactor. Characterizations by SEM and TEM of R7T7 glasses implanted

  2. Molar volume, excess enthalpy, and Prigogine-Defay ratio of some silicate glasses with different (P,T) histories.

    Wondraczek, Lothar; Behrens, Harald

    2007-10-21

    Structural relaxation in silicate glasses with different (p,T) histories was experimentally examined by differential scanning calorimetry and measurements of molar volume under ambient pressure. Temperature and pressure-dependent rates of changes in molar volume and generation of excess enthalpy were determined for sodium trisilicate, soda lime silicate, and sodium borosilicate (NBS) compositions. From the derived data, Prigogine-Defay ratios are calculated and discussed. Changes of excess enthalpy are governed mainly by changes in short-range structure, as is shown for NBS where boron coordination is highly sensitive to pressure. For all three glasses, it is shown how the relaxation functions that underlie volume, enthalpy, and structural relaxation decouple for changes in cooling rates and pressure of freezing, respectively. The magnitude of the divergence between enthalpy and volume may be related to differences in structural sensitivity to changes in the (p,V,T,t) space on different length scales. The findings suggest that the Prigogine-Defay ratio is related to the magnitude of the discussed decoupling effect.

  3. Structural study of thin films prepared from tungstate glass matrix by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Montanari, Bianca; Barbosa, Anne J.; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.; Messaddeq, Younes [Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, CP 355, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Poirier, Gael [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, UNIFAL-MG, CEP 37130-000 Alfenas, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: gael@unifal-mg.edu.br; Li, Maximo S. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, CP 369, CEP 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-06-30

    Thin films were prepared using glass precursors obtained in the ternary system NaPO{sub 3}-BaF{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} and the binary system NaPO{sub 3}-WO{sub 3} with high concentrations of WO{sub 3} (above 40% molar). Vitreous samples have been used as a target to prepare thin films. Such films were deposited using the electron beam evaporation method onto soda-lime glass substrates. Several structural characterizations were performed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the tungsten L{sub I} and L{sub III} absorption edges. XANES investigations showed that tungsten atoms are only sixfold coordinated (octahedral WO{sub 6}) and that these films are free of tungstate tetrahedral units (WO{sub 4}). In addition, Raman spectroscopy allowed identifying a break in the linear phosphate chains as the amount of WO{sub 3} increases and the formation of P-O-W bonds in the films network indicating the intermediary behavior of WO{sub 6} octahedra in the film network. Based on XANES data, we suggested a new attribution of several Raman absorption bands which allowed identifying the presence of W-O{sup -} and W=O terminal bonds and a progressive apparition of W-O-W bridging bonds for the most WO{sub 3} concentrated samples (above 40% molar) attributed to the formation of WO{sub 6} clusters.

  4. Laboratory testing of LITCO glasses

    Ellison, A.; Wolf, S.; Buck, E.; Luo, J.S.; Dietz, N.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to measure, the intermediate and long-term durability of glasses developed by Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. (LITCO) for the immobilization of calcined radioactive wastes. The objective is to use accelerated corrosion tests as an aid in developing durable waste form compositions. This is a report of tests performed on two LITCO glass compositions, Formula 127 and Formula 532. The main avenue for release of radionuclides into the environment in a geologic repository is the reaction of a waste glass with ground water, which alters the glass and releases its components into solution. These stages in glass corrosion are analyzed by using accelerated laboratory tests in which the ratio of sample surface area to solution volume, SA/V, is varied. At low SA/V, the solution concentrations of glass corrosion products remain low and the reaction approaches the forward rate. At higher SA/V the solution approaches saturation levels for glass corrosion products. At very high SA/V the solution is rapidly saturated in glass corrosion products and secondary crystalline phases precipitate. Tests at very high SA/V provide information about the composition of the solution at saturation or, when no solution is recovered, the identities and the order of appearance of secondary crystalline phases. Tests were applied to Formula 127 and Formula 532 glasses to provide information about the interim and long-term stages in glass corrosion

  5. Glass containing radioactive nuclear waste

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe 2 O 3 for use as a storage medium for high-level-radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90 C, with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800 C, since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800 to 1050 C temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550 C and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H 2 O at 135 C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear waste forms. (author)

  6. Transferability of glass lens molding

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  7. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  8. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  9. NEW ERBIUM DOPED ANTIMONY GLASSES FOR LASER AND GLASS AMPLIFICATION

    B. Tioua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses. In this poster will offer new doped erbium glasses synthesized in silicate crucibles were obtained in the combination Sb2O3-WO3-Na2O. Several properties are measured and correlated with glass compositions. The absorption spectral studies have been performed for erbium doped glasses. The intensities of various absorption bands of the doped glasses are measured and the Judd-Ofelt parameters have been computed. From the theory of Judd-Ofelt, various radiative properties, such as transition probability, branching ratio and radiative life time for various emission levels of these doped glasses have been determined and reported. These results confirm the ability of antimony glasses for glass amplification.

  10. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    Egami, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We review the recent results of molecular dynamics simulations on metallic glasses. → They show the equivalence of mechanical failure and glass transition. → We discuss the microscopic mechanism behind this equivalence. → We show that the density of defects in metallic glasses is as high as a quarter. → Our concepts about the defect state in glasses need to be changed. - Abstract: The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  11. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  12. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  13. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  14. Complexity of Curved Glass Structures

    Kosić, T.; Svetel, I.; Cekić, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the increasing number of research on the architectural structures of curvilinear forms and technological and practical improvement of the glass production observed over recent years, there is still a lack of comprehensive codes and standards, recommendations and experience data linked to real-life curved glass structures applications regarding design, manufacture, use, performance and economy. However, more and more complex buildings and structures with the large areas of glass envelope geometrically complex shape are built every year. The aim of the presented research is to collect data on the existing design philosophy on curved glass structure cases. The investigation includes a survey about how architects and engineers deal with different design aspects of curved glass structures with a special focus on the design and construction process, glass types and structural and fixing systems. The current paper gives a brief overview of the survey findings.

  15. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (ΔH) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides

  16. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  17. Glass corrosion in natural environments

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Barkatt, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Experiments carried out during the progress period are summarized. Experiments carried out involving glass samples exposed to solutions of Tris have shown the appearance of 'spikes' upon monitoring glass dissolution as a function of time. The periodic 'spikes' observed in Tris-based media were interpreted in terms of cracking due to excessive stress in the surface region of the glass. Studies of the interactions of silicate glasses with metal ions in buffered media were extended to systems containing Al. Caps buffer was used to establish the pH. The procedures used are described and the results are given. Preliminary studies were initiated as to the feasibility of adding a slowly dissolving solid compound of the additive to the glass-water system to maintain a supply of dissolved additive. It appears that several magnesium compounds have a suitable combination of solubility and affinity towards silicate glass surfaces to have a pronounced retarding effect on the extraction of uranium from the glass. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that introducing a magnesium source into geologic repositories for nuclear waste glass in the form of a sparingly soluble Mg-based backfill material may cause a substantial reduction in the extent of long-term glass corrosion. The studies described also provide mechanistic understanding of the roles of various metal solutes in the leachant. Such understanding forms the basis for developing long-term predictions of nuclear waste glass durability under repository conditions. From what is known about natural highly reduced glasses such as tektites, it is clear that iron is dissolved as ferrous iron with little or no ferric iron. The reducing conditions were high enough to cause metallic iron to exsolve out of the glass in the form of submicroscopic spherules. As the nuclear waste glass is much less reduced, a study was initiated on other natural glasses in addition to the nuclear waste glass. Extensive measurements were

  18. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  19. Fabrication of Radiation Shielding Glass

    Tavichai, Nattaya; Pormsean, Suriyont; Dararutana, Pisutti; Sirikulrat, Narin

    2003-06-01

    In this work, lead glass doped with 50%, 55%,60%, 65%, and 70% w/w Pb 3 O 4 . After that, glass mixtures were melt at 1,250οC with 4 hours soaking time. Molten glass was shaped by mould casting technique then annealed at 700οC and cooled down to room temperature. It was found that the glass with 60%w/w Pb 3 O 4 show maximum absorption coefficient of about 0.383 cm -1 with I-131 at energy 364 keV. The observed refractive indices of the samples range between 1.5908 to 1.5922

  20. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region

  1. Restorative Glass : Reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Barou, L.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Nijsse, R.; Veer, F.A.; Henk, Schellen; van Schijndel, Jos

    2016-01-01

    The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and

  2. New Erbium Doped Antimony Glasses for Laser and Glass ...

    Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses.

  3. The glass sphinx: a massive stacked glass structure

    Bos, F.P.; Heijden, van der T.; Schreurs, P.; Bos, F.; Louter, C.; Nijsse, R.; Veer, F.

    The refurbishment of the Meuse river boulevard in Venlo instigated Scheuten Glass to donate a giant-sized, 6 metre high version of the stacked glass statue the Sphinx, which had originally been made as a 80 cm sculpture to commemorate the city's 650th anniversary back in 1993. Many hurdles had to be

  4. Structural Glass Beams with Embedded Glass Fibre Reinforcement

    Louter, P.C.; Leung, Calvin; Kolstein, M.H.; Vambersky, J.N.J.A.; Bos, Freek; Louter, Pieter Christiaan; Veer, Fred

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities of pultruded glass fibre rods as embedded reinforcement in SentryGlas (SG) laminated glass beams. To do so, a series of pullout tests, to investigate the bond strength of the rods to the laminate, and a series of beam tests, to investigate the post-breakage

  5. Glass ceramic fibres

    Blaschek, O.; Paulitsch, P.

    1983-01-01

    As the correlation between mineralogical phase and chemical composition influences the type of application at different high temperatures, we studied the mineralogical phases of nine crystal glass fibres of the temperature ranges 1 150 degrees Celsius (Type 1), 1 400 degrees Celsius (Type 2) and 1 500 degrees Celsius (Type 3) at various high temperatures. The methods used in the study were microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential thermal analysis. The investigations showed that mullite forms in glassy fibres of the system Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 from 850 degrees Celsius to 990 degrees Celsius as 2/1 mullite; 3/2 mullite appeared above 990 degrees Celsius besides the crystallization of cristobalite. Fibres with 95 per cent Al 2 O 3 include the phases delta-Al 2 O 3 and alpha- Al 2 O 3 and mullite. Delta- Al 2 O 3 is stable up to 1 100 degrees Celsius. Alpha-Al 2 O 3 and mullite are only stable phases at 1 400 degrees Celsius. These different crystal phases influence the quality of the technical fibre according to the stability field of glass and crystals. This study has determined that it is possible to identify different fibres from different productions by their mineralogical compositions and to relate them to the high temperature application

  6. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  7. Alpha radiation and in-pile annealing effects on the fracture properties of a sintered alumino borosilicate glass

    Bevilacqua, Arturo M.; Prado, Miguel O.; Messi de Bernasconi, Norma B.; Heredia, Arturo D.; Sanfilippo, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The alpha radiation and the in-pile during irradiation effects on the hardness, the crack nucleation and the fracture toughness of the German alumino borosilicate glass SG7 were investigated by using the Vickers indentation. Cold pressed and sintered samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons, in the Argentine nuclear reactors RA-3 and RA-6, to produce alpha particles in the whole volume of the glass by means of the (n, alpha)-reaction with B-10. The Vickers hardness, the crack nucleation, as 50 percent fracture probability load, plotted as the Weibull's fracture probability distribution function and the fracture toughness, as critical stress intensity factor K Ic , were correlated to the four cumulative disintegration values. It was ascertained that: a) the Vickers hardness decreases from 5.6 GPa for the non-irradiated sample up to 4.7 GPa for the sample irradiated 70 h at the lower neutron flux (4.0 x 10 - sup 18 - alpha disintegration per cm - sup 3 -), b) the 50 % fracture probability load increases from 1.4 N for the non-irradiated sample up to 4.7 g for the sample irradiated 22 h at the higher flux (6.8 x 10 - sup 18 - alpha disintegration per cm - sup 3 -), and c) the stress intensity factor increases from 0.80 MPa.m - sup 1/2 - for the non irradiated sample up to 0.86 MPa.m - sup 1/2 - for the sample mentioned in b). The in-pile annealing was analyzed by comparing the crack nucleation after irradiation with data obtained by heavy ion irradiation followed by thermal annealing. Results for the SG7 glass were compared to those for soda-lime and borosilicate glasses. (author)

  8. Characterization and Morphological Properties of Glass Fiber ...

    PROF HORSFALL

    used as the matrix for the glass fibre-epoxy resin formation. E- Glass fibre ... reinforcement of composites, coatings of materials, and other ..... composite for the manufacture of glass-ceramic materials ... reinforced epoxy composites with carbon.

  9. Optical properties of alkaline earth borate glasses

    user

    The alkaline earth borate glasses containing heavy metal oxides show good solubility of rare-earth ions. Glasses containing PbO exhibit low glass transition temperature (Tg) and high ..... These oxygen ions carry a partial negative charge and.

  10. Optical properties of alkaline earth borate glasses

    user

    ... devices; radiation shields, surgical lasers and their glass ceramic counter ... Alkaline earth oxides improve glass forming capability while heavy metal ... reports on optical properties of MO-B2O3 glasses containing alkaline earth oxides.

  11. Properties of gallium lanthanum sulphide glass

    Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Khan, K.; Weatherby, E.; Yao, J.; Hewak, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses has been studied in order to ascertain properties across the entire glass forming region. This is the first comprehensive study of GLS glass over a wide compositional range.

  12. Who will buy smart glasses?

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent market studies reveal that augmented reality (AR) devices, such as smart glasses, will substantially influence the media landscape. Yet, little is known about the intended adoption of smart glasses, particularly: Who are the early adopters of such wearables? We contribute to the growing bo...

  13. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  14. Zirconium based bulk metallic glasses

    Dey, G.K.; Neogy, S.; Savalia, R.T.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic glasses have come into prominence in recent times because their nanocrystalline atomic arrangement imparts many useful and unusual properties to these metallic solids. In this study, bulk glasses have been obtained in Zr based multicomponent alloy by induction melting these alloys in silica crucibles and casting these in form of rods 3 and 6 mm in diameter in a copper mould

  15. International Congress on Glass XII

    Doremus, R H; LaCourse, W C; Mackenzie, J D; Varner, J R; Wolf, W W [eds.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 158 papers are included under nine headings: structure and glass formation; optical properties; electrical and magnetic properties; mechanical properties and relaxation; mass transport; chemical durability and surfaces; nucleation; crystallization; and glass ceramics; processing; and automatic controls. Separate abstracts were prepared for eight papers; four of the remaining papers had been processed previously for the data base. (DLC)

  16. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  17. Lead-iron phosophate glass

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses (LIPNWG) are the subject of the present chapter. They were discovered in 1984 while the authors were attempting to find a sintering aid for certain types of crystalline monazite ceramic high-level nuclear waste forms. In the present chapter, the term waste glass is synonymous with nuclear waste glass (NWG), and the acronym LIP is often used for lead-iron phosphate. Lead-iron phosphate glasses, like many of the previously studied phosphate glasses, are corrosion resistant in aqueous solutions at temperatures below 100 degrees C, and they can be melted and poured at temperatures that are relatively low in comparison with the processing temperatures required for current silicate glass compositions. Unlike the phosphate glasses investigated previously, however, LIPNWGs do not suffer from alteration due to devitrification during realistic and readily, achievable cooling periods. Additionally, lead-iron phosphate glass melts are not nearly as corrosive as the sodium phosphate melts investigated during the 1960s; and, therefore, they can be melted and processed using crucibles made from a variety of materials

  18. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  19. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  20. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  1. Phonon scattering in metallic glasses

    Black, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review some recent theoretical and experimental developments in the study of metallic glasses at temperatures near or below 1K. In this temperature regime, it appears that practically all glasses, whether metallic or insulating, behave in a similar fashion. The fact that such similarities occur, despite substantial structural differences between metallic and insulating glasses, constitutes a major theoretical challenge. This challenge, however, is not directly addressed in what follows. Instead, the evidence for universal behavior and the theory which is necessary to understand this evidence are emphasized. It turns out that most of this evidence involves a comparison of phonon scattering in metallic glasses with its counterpart in insulating glasses

  2. Fiscal 2000 project for development of international standards for supporting novel industries. Standardization of methods for evaluating high-temperature physical properties of new glass; 2000 nendo shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo. New garasu koonbussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Research and development is under way about methods for evaluating the physical properties of high-temperature glass melt for the development of the methods into international standards. In this fiscal year, a technique of measuring high-temperature physical properties of amino silicate glass melt was developed, and the techniques of measuring high-temperature physical properties of molten soda lime glass and borate-silicate glass were improved. As the result, evaluation techniques compatible with international standards were developed for high-temperature glass melt physical properties such as viscosity, density, coefficient of volume expansion, surface tension, specific heat, thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, oxidation/reduction potentials, and the structure of molten glass. Techniques of evaluating gas solubility and the coefficient of gas diffusion, however, need further basic research and development. The author took part in a round robin test relating to the measurement of glass melt density and heat conductivity at CG/TC18, and measured the said two properties. The result of the round robin test was discussed at TC18 held in Amsterdam in May this year. (NEDO)

  3. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  4. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  5. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading

  6. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  7. Glass packages in interim storage

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO 2 . The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  8. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  9. A method for making a glass supported system, such glass supported system, and the use of a glass support therefor

    Unnikrishnan, S.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Fazal, I.; Louwerse, M.C.; Mogulkoc, B.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for making a glass supported micro or nano system, comprising the steps of: i) providing a glass support; ii) mounting at least one system on at least one glass support; and iii) bonding the system to the glass support, such that the system is circumferentially

  10. Glass enamel and glass-ceramic coatings for chemical apparatus

    Es'kov, A.S.; Oleinik, M.I.; Shabrova, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the known anticorrosion coatings used in chemical engineering, glass enamel base coatings are distinguished by such advantages as a high degree of continuity and chemical resistance. The paper describes basic principles for the creation of acid and alkali resistant glass enamel and ceramic coatings for chemical apparatus. As the result of investgations, glass enamel coatings with increased electrical conductivity and also experimental production compositions of chemical, temperature and radiation resistant coatings for protection of chemical equipment of 12Kh18N10T stainless steel have been developed. The coatings have successfully passed testing under service conditions. A new type of coating is short-term glass enamel, which may be recommended for use in chemical machinery manufacturing and other branches of industry in oxidation-free heating and forming of stainless steels

  11. Restorative glass: reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    Faidra Oikonomopoulou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and aesthetical integrity. Concurrently, the material’s unique mechanical properties enable the structural consolidation of the monument. As a proof of concept, the restoration of Lichtenberg Castle is proposed. Solid cast glass units are suggested to complete the missing parts, in respect to the existing construction technique and aesthetics of the original masonry. Aiming for a reversible system, the glass units are interlocking, ensuring the overall stability without necessitating permanent, adhesive connections. This results in an elegant and reversible intervention.

  12. GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2004-01-01

    A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model

  13. The ions displacement through glasses

    Sevegnani, F.X.

    1980-01-01

    A method to introduce sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, iron and other ions in vacuum or gas light bulb by mean of a strong stationay electric field. The experiments showed that the mass deposited inside the bulbs obey Faraday's law of electrolysis, although the process of mass transfer is not that of a conventional electrolysis. A method which allows to show that hydrogen ions do not penetrate the glass structure is also described. Using radioactive tracers, it is shown that heavy ions, such PO 4 --- do not penetrate the glass structure. The vitreous state and the glass properties were studied for interpreting experimental results. (Author) [pt

  14. Recent developments in laser glasses

    Weber, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a proliferation of new glass-forming compositions including oxides, halides, oxyhalides, and chalcogenides. Many of these glasses are applicable to lasers and have greatly expanded the range of optical properties and spectroscopic parameters available to the laser designer. Our knowledge and understanding of many properties of interest for laser action - transparency, linear and nonlinear refractive indices, and damage threshold of the host glass and the absorption spectrum, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, fluorescence wavelength, stimulated emission cross section, and spectroscopic inhomogeneities of the lasing ion Nd 3 + - are reviewed

  15. Shattered glass seeking the densest matter: the color glass condensate

    Appell, D

    2004-01-01

    "Physicists investigating heavy-particle collisions believe they are on the track of a universal form of matter, one common to very high energy particles ranging from protons to heavy nuclei such as uranium. Some think that this matter, called a color glass condensate, may explain new nuclear properties and the process of particle formation during collisions. Experimentalists have recently reported intriguing data that suggest a color glass condensate has actually formed in past work" (1 page)

  16. Femtosecond laser texturing of glass substrates for improved light in-coupling in thin-film photovoltaics

    Imgrunt, J.; Chakanga, K.; von Maydell, K.; Teubner, U.

    2017-12-01

    Due to their low thickness, thin-film solar cells usually suffer from poor light absorption. To improve this situation, light-management is necessary. Within the present work, in order to enhance light coupling, an ultra-short-pulse laser is used for texturing substrates. Here commercially available multi component soda lime glass substrates are patterned with a dot grid at ambient air pressure with 150 fs pulses, centered at a wavelength of 775 nm. The structures consist of small depressions with approximately 3 μ m diameter. Varying depths of around 300 nm could be well reproduced. Reducing the pitch (distance between structure-to-structure centers), from ten to approximately one times the crater diameter, influences the structure quality and increases the deformation of the surface in the vicinity of the depressions. Consequently, the diffuse light scattering is improved from 0 to 30% haze. Overall, the presented approach is quite simple. This single-step texturing technique which can be easily used on different substrates is applicable in a wide range of thin-film solar cells. It has the advantage that ultra-thin electrodes can be used as the front contact as well as the potential to be integrated into a PV production line. Thus, complicated layer stacks for absorption enhancement can be avoided.

  17. Contribution of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry to the study of irradiation effects on diffusion properties in oxides glasses

    Calmon, P.

    1990-10-01

    We have studied the impurity diffusion of heavy elements (lead, uranium) in soda lime silicate glasses under irradiation with ions (He + 1000 KeV,Ar + 250-500 KeV), with gamma rays (1.17-1.33 MeV) and with X-rays (40-60 KeV). RF sputtering and ionic implantation methods have been used for the diffusion target preparation. A comparison of these technics reveals ionic implantation as the most suitable method. For the analysis of profiles the backscattering spectrometry has been used. RBS simulation programs have been developed in order to treat some complex situations like lateral inhomogeneities and composition changes of the sample. Enhanced diffusion and occasionally precipitation have been observed under ions irradiation for lead, while uranium was more diffusing under gamma rays irradiations. On the contrary no X-rays effect have been noted. Our results show that network modifiers impurities diffusion (in our case lead) are generally controlled by sodium redistributions. The radiation damages are not negligible and electronic excitations play a dominant role [fr

  18. Properties Of Soda/Yttria/Silica Glasses

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of glass-formation compositional region of soda/ yttria/silicate system and of selected physical properties of glasses within compositional region part of continuing effort to identify glasses with high coefficients of thermal expansion and high softening temperatures, for use as coatings on superalloys and as glass-to-metal seals.

  19. Structural principles in network glasses

    Boolchand, P.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial progress in decoding the structure of network glasses has taken place in the past few years. Crucial insights into the molecular structure of glasses have emerged by application of Raman bond and Moessbauer site spectroscopy. In this context, the complimentary role of each spectroscopy as a check on the interpretation of the other, is perhaps one of the more significant developments in the field. New advances in the theory of the subject have also taken place. It is thus appropriate to inquire what general principles if any, have emerged on the structure of real glasses. The author reviews some of the principal ideas on the structure of inorganic network glasses with the aid of specific examples. (Auth.)

  20. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  1. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  2. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  3. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  4. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  5. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in 100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass microspheres, composed of micron-sized, metallic rhenium particles dispersed within a magnesium alumino borate glass matrix were produced by sintering ReO2 powder and glass frit at 1050°C. A 50 mg injection of radioactive rhenium glass

  6. Cesium glass irradiation sources

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The precipitation process for the decontamination of soluble SRP wastes produces a material whose radioactivity is dominated by 137 Cs. Potentially, this material could be vitrified to produce irradiation sources similar to the Hanford CsCl sources. In this report, process steps necessary for the production of cesium glass irradiation sources (CGS), and the nature of the sources produced, are examined. Three options are considered in detail: direct vitrification of precipitation process waste; direct vitrification of this waste after organic destruction; and vitrification of cesium separated from the precipitation process waste. Direct vitrification is compatible with DWPF equipment, but process rates may be limited by high levels of combustible materials in the off-gas. Organic destruction would allow more rapid processing. In both cases, the source produced has a dose rate of 2 x 10 4 rads/hr at the surface. Cesium separation produces a source with a dose rate of 4 x 10 5 at the surface, which is nearer that of the Hanford sources (2 x 10 6 rads/hr). Additional processing steps would be required, as well as R and D to demonstrate that DWPF equipment is compatible with this intensely radioactive material

  7. Sustainable Innovation of Glass Design and Craft

    Sparre-Petersen, Maria

    2014-01-01

    , reduction of production and transportation of new glass is desirable (Environmental Protection Agency, 2012), and can be realized by recycling glass, that has already been manufactured, used and collected for recycling, but has ended up in landfills due to the market mechanisms that allow manufacturing...... and deposition of glass is reduced Today glass production predominantly consists of window glass, glass wool for insulation and containers such as bottles and jelly jars. Glass craft and design hold only a fraction of the market. Still there is reason to believe that generation and implementation of new...

  8. Contrasting the magnetic response between magnetic-glass and reentrant spin-glass

    Roy, S. B.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic-glass is a recently identified phenomenon in various classes of magnetic systems undergoing a first order magnetic phase transition. We shall highlight here a few experimentally determined characteristics of magnetic-glass and the relevant set of experiments, which will enable to distinguish a magnetic-glass unequivocally from the well known phenomena of spin-glass and reentrant spin-glass.

  9. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 2, Operating electric glass melters. James N. Edmonson, Lecturer

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains basic information on electric furnaces used for glass melting and on the properties of glass useful for the stabilization of radioactive wastes. Furnace nomenclature, furnace types, typical silicate glass composition and properties, thermal conductivity information, kinetics of the melting process, glass furnace refractory materials composition and thermal conductivity, and equations required for the operation of glass melters are included

  10. Investigations on vanadium doped glasses

    Madhusudana Rao, P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass samples studied in the present work have been prepared by melt quenching technique. They were prepared by mixing and grinding together by appropriate amounts of Li 2 O - Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 doped with V 2 O 5 in an agate motor before transferring into crucible. The mixtures were heated in an electric furnace at 1225K for 20 mm. The melt was then quenched to room temperature by pouring it on plane brass plate and pressing it with another brass plate. White and yellow coloured glasses have been obtained with good optical quality and high transparency. Finally the vitreous sample were annealed for 3 hrs at 423K to relieve residual internal stress and slowly cooled to room temperature. The polished glasses have been used for XRD, FTIR analysis and for DSC report. The DSC thermo grams for all the glasses were recorded on in the temperature range 50-550℃ with a heating rate of 10℃/min. Electron spin resonance and optical absorption of 20Li 2 O - 10 Na 2 O - (70-X)B 2 O 3 doped with XV 2 O 5 glass system are studied. ESR spectra of V 4+ ions doped in the glass exhibit peak at g =1.98. Spin Hamiltonian parameters are calculated. It was found that these parameters are dependent upon alkali ion concentration in the glass and the VO +2 ion in an octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression. The physical parameters of all glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition

  11. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  12. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  13. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  14. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  15. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input

  16. Bioactive glasses: Frontiers and challenges

    Larry L. Hench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980’s it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are: a discovery; b clinical application; c tissue regeneration; and d innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

  17. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling

  18. Crystallization of Yttrium and Samarium Aluminosilicate Glasses

    Lago, Diana Carolina; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Aluminosilicate glasses containing samarium and yttrium (SmAS and YAS glasses) exhibit high glass transition temperatures, corrosion resistance, and glass stability on heating which make them useful for technological applications. Yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres are currently being used for internal selective radiotherapy of liver cancer. During the preparation process, crystallization needs to be totally or partially avoided depending on the final application. Thus knowing the cry...

  19. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  20. High-Level Waste Glass Formulation Model Sensitivity Study 2009 Glass Formulation Model Versus 1996 Glass Formulation Model

    Belsher, J.D.; Meinert, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the differences between two HLW glass formulation models (GFM): The 1996 GFM and 2009 GFM. A glass formulation model is a collection of glass property correlations and associated limits, as well as model validity and solubility constraints; it uses the pretreated HLW feed composition to predict the amount and composition of glass forming additives necessary to produce acceptable HLW glass. The 2009 GFM presented in this report was constructed as a nonlinear optimization calculation based on updated glass property data and solubility limits described in PNNL-18501 (2009). Key mission drivers such as the total mass of HLW glass and waste oxide loading are compared between the two glass formulation models. In addition, a sensitivity study was performed within the 2009 GFM to determine the effect of relaxing various constraints on the predicted mass of the HLW glass.

  1. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  2. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  3. Chiral-glass transition and replica symmetry breaking of a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass

    Hukushima, K.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations are performed for a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass with the nearest-neighbor Gaussian coupling to investigate its spin-glass and chiral-glass orderings. The occurrence of a finite-temperature chiral-glass transition without the conventional spin-glass order is established. Critical exponents characterizing the transition are different from those of the standard Ising spin glass. The calculated overlap distribution suggests the appearance ...

  4. Aqueous corrosion of silicate glasses. Analogy between volcanic glasses and the French nuclear waste glass R7T7

    Goldschmidt, F.

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of borosilicate glasses upon aqueous corrosion is controlled for long periods of time (>10,000 years) by processes which are not directly accessible by means of laboratory experiments. The analogical approach consists here to compare leaching performances between the french nuclear waste glass R7T7 and natural volcanic glasses, basaltic and rhyolitic ones. The three glasses were leached in the same conditions; open system, 90 deg C, initial pH of 9.7. Basaltic and R7T7 glasses having the same kinetic of dissolution, the basaltic glass was chosen as the best analogue. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  5. Relative leach behavior of waste glasses and naturally occurring glasses

    Adams, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated nuclear waste glasses of the sodium-borosilicate type with a low waste loading and of the zinc-borosilicate type with a high waste loading have been compared with obsidians. The resuls indicate that the waste glasses would corrode in normal natural environments at a rate of about 0.1 μm per year at 30 0 C and about 5 μm per year at 90 0 C, compared with obsidians which seem to corrode at, or less than, about 0.01 μm per year at 30 0 C and less than 1 μm per year at 90 0 C. Activation energies for reactions of the two waste glasses with pure water are about 20 kcal/g-mol. 3 figures, 7 tables

  6. Database for waste glass composition and properties

    Peters, R.D.; Chapman, C.C.; Mendel, J.E.; Williams, C.G.

    1993-09-01

    A database of waste glass composition and properties, called PNL Waste Glass Database, has been developed. The source of data is published literature and files from projects funded by the US Department of Energy. The glass data have been organized into categories and corresponding data files have been prepared. These categories are glass chemical composition, thermal properties, leaching data, waste composition, glass radionuclide composition and crystallinity data. The data files are compatible with commercial database software. Glass compositions are linked to properties across the various files using a unique glass code. Programs have been written in database software language to permit searches and retrievals of data. The database provides easy access to the vast quantities of glass compositions and properties that have been studied. It will be a tool for researchers and others investigating vitrification and glass waste forms

  7. Volumetric change of simulated radioactive waste glass irradiated by electron accelerator. [Silica glass

    Sato, Seichi; Furuya, Hirotaka; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Kozaka, Tetsuo; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    1987-11-01

    Density changes of simulated radioactive waste glasses, silica glass and Pyrex glass irradiated by an electron accelerator were measured by a ''sink-float'' technique. The density changes of the waste and silica glasses were less than 0.05 %, irradiated at 2.0 MeV up to the fluence of 1.7 x 10/sup 17/ ecm/sup 2/, while were remarkably smaller than that of Pyrex glass of 0.18 % shrinkage. Precision of the measurements in the density changes of the waste glass was lower than that of Pyrex glass possibly because of the inhomogeneity of the waste glass

  8. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  9. Yield point of metallic glass

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Shear bands form in most bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) within a narrow range of uniaxial strain ε y ≅ 2%. We propose this critical condition corresponds to embryonic shear band (ESB) propagation, not its nucleation. To propagate an ESB, the far-field shear stress τ ∞ ∼ Eε y /2 must exceed the quasi-steady-state glue traction τ glue of shear-alienated glass until the glass transition temperature is approached internally due to frictional heating, at which point ESB matures as a runaway shear crack. The incubation length scale l inc necessary for this maturation is estimated to be ∼10 2 nm for Zr-based BMGs, below which sample size-scale shear localization does not happen. In shear-alienated glass, the last resistance against localized shearing comes from extremely fast downhill dissipative dynamics of timescale comparable to atomic vibrations, allowing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture this recovery process which governs τ glue . We model four metallic glasses: a binary Lennard-Jones system, two binary embedded atom potential systems and a quinternary embedded atom system. Despite vast differences in the structure and interatomic interactions, the four MD calculations give ε y predictions of 2.4%, 2.1%, 2.6% and 2.9%, respectively

  10. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  11. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  12. Studies of glasses by positron annihilation

    Brauer, G.; Boden, G.

    1981-04-01

    Investigations of silica glasses, pyrocerams and metallic glasses by positron annihilation (lifetime, Doppler broadening) are presented. The measurements on silica glasses showed, that silica glass fused from naturally occuring quartz exhibits a higher order than that one produced from SiCl 4 . Furthermore it was found that the order of silica glasses increases after heat treatment above 900 0 C. Thus the X-amorphous state of silica glasses could be characterized by positron annihilation what is impossible at present by diffraction methods. (author)

  13. Oxycarbonitride glass formation by melt solidification

    Imon, M M; Risbud, S H

    1986-04-01

    Experimental results are presented from the synthesis and characterization of multianion oxycarbonitride glasses composed of MgSiAlON glass powders with SiC additions of 5, 10, or 15 wt pct. Nitrogen additions to the oxide MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses increased devitrification resistance, but carbon additions to MgSiAlON glasses promote crystal nucleation. These properties are relevant to the oxycarbonitride glasses use in refractory glass-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic composite systems with good elevated temperature performance. 9 references.

  14. Heterogeneities in nuclear waste glass

    Ladirat, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The industrial vitrification of high level radioactive wastes is a 2 stage process. During the first stage, the concentrated solution is heated in a spinning resistance oven at the temperature of 400 Celsius degrees till evaporation and calcination. The second stage begins when the dry residue falls into a melting pot that is maintained at a temperature of 1100-1150 Celsius degrees. Glass fretting is added and the glass is elaborated through the fusion of the different elements present in the melting pot. Heterogeneities in the glass may be associated to: - the presence in the solution to vitrify of insoluble elements from the dissolution of the fuel (RuO 2 , Rh, Pd), - the presence of minuscule metal scraps (Zr) that have been produced during the cutting of the fuel element, - the failures to conform to the technical specifications of the vitrification process, for instance, temperatures or flow rates when introducing the different elements in the melting pot. (A.C.)

  15. Gauge theory of glass transition

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5∼ t correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data

  16. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO 3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  17. X-ray luminescent glasses

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray luminescent glasses comprising a divalent cation such as an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cations such as pb, cd, or zn, and certain rare earth metaphosphates are suitable as vitreous, x-ray phosphors or x-ray luminescent glass fibers in an x-ray intensifying screen. The glasses have the composition n(Mo X p2o5)((1-y)tb2o3 X yce2o3 X 3p2o5) wherein N is greater than zero but less than or equal to 16, M is an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cation such as pb, cd, or zn, and Y is greater than or equal to zero but less than one

  18. Phase transitions and glass transition in a hyperquenched silica–alumina glass

    Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, D.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions, glass transition, and dynamic behavior in the hyperquenched 69SiO2–31Al2O3 (mol%) glass (SA glass). Upon reheating, the SA glass exhibits a series of thermal responses. Subsequent to the sub-Tg enthalpy release, the glass undergoes a large jump in isobaric heat...... capacity (ΔCp) during glass transition, implying the fragile nature of the SA glass. The mullite starts to form before the end of glass transition, indicating that the SA glass is extremely unstable against crystallization. After the mullite formation, the remaining glass phase exhibits an increased Tg...... and a suppressed ΔCp. The formation of cristobalite at 1553 K indicates the dominance of silica in the remaining glass matrix. The cristobalite gradually re-melts as the isothermal heat-treatment temperature is raised from 1823 to 1853 K, which is well below the melting point of cristobalite, while the amount...

  19. Glass Foreign Body Hand Radiograph

    Hamid Ehsani-Nia, DO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 27-year-old female sustained an injury to her left hand after she tripped and fell on a vase. She presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of pain over the laceration. Upon examination, patient presented with multiple small abrasions of the medial aspect of the left 5thdigit that are minimally tender. Additionally, she has one 0.5cm linear laceration of the medial aspect of the 5thmetacarpal with severe tenderness in the area and palpable underlying foreign body. Significant findings: Left hand plain radiography demonstrated a subcutaneous foreign body medial to the 5thmetacarpal that is radiopaque, trapezoidal in shape, and measures approximately 11mm x 3mm. Discussion: Laceration repairs are amongst the most common procedures in the emergency department; however, consideration for foreign body is often underdiagnosed. Imaging is performed in only about 11% of all traumatic wounds in the ED.1 Of those injuries relating to the hand that are subsequently imaged, about 15% are found to have a foreign body.2,3 Additionally, it is estimated that foreign bodies are present in 7% to 8.7% of all wounds caused by glass objects.4,5 Glass is among the most common foreign bodies in lacerations, and fortunately they are radiopaque and relatively well visualized radiographically. It has been demonstrated that 2mm glass foreign bodies have a 99% detection rate with radiography, and 1mm glass foreign bodies an 83% detection rate.6 Patient perception of foreign body has a positive predictive value of 31%, making it a poor source in influencing clinical decision-making to obtain wound radiographs.3 Clinicians should have a high suspicion for foreign body in lacerations, particularly those caused by glass, and utilize close physical examination and imaging for evaluation. Topics: Radiography, glass, foreign body, trauma

  20. Fission tracks diameters in glasses

    Garzon Ruiperez, L.; Veiguela, J.

    1974-01-01

    Standard glass microscope slides have been irradiated with fission fragments from the uranium. The etching track conditions have been the same for the series, having changed the etching time only for each specimen. For each glass, a minimum of 250 measurements of the tracks diameters have been made, the distributions of which are the bimodal type. Diameters-etching dependence with time is roughly lineal. Energy determinations have been made with the help of the diameters-energy relations. The calculated values agree very well with the know ones. (author) [es

  1. Plate shell structures of glass

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  2. Characteristics of radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters

    Ito, Masashi; Shiraishi, Akemi; Murakami, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, a film badge is recently replaced by a new type radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimeter for external personal monitoring. Some fundamental characteristics of this dosimeter, such as dose dependence linearity, energy dependence, angular dependence, dose evaluation accuracy at mixed irradiation conditions, fading, etc., were examined at the Facility of Radiation Standard (FRS), JAERI. The results have proved that the RPL glass dosimeter has sufficient characteristics for practical use as a personal dosimeter for all of the items examined. (author)

  3. START - glass model of PWR

    Marn, J.; Ramsak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear engineering in the area of process engineering the University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering has invested in procuring and erecting glass model of pressurized water reactor. This paper deals with description of the model, its capabilities, and plans for its use within nuclear engineering community of Slovenia. The model, made primarily of glass, serves three purposes: educational, professional development and research. As an example, medium break loss of coolant accident is presented in the paper. Temperatures within primary and secondary side, and pressure on primary side of reactor coolant system are followed. The characteristic points are emphasized, and commented.(author)

  4. Glass Ceiling : Women in management

    Rantala, Virve

    2010-01-01

    This study has examined the phenomenon called Glass Ceiling. It has approached the phenomenon in two different views. One is career development and another one is women in management. Main purpose for this study was to inspect women working life and career opportunities. Why women’s career developments end in a certain level? What is glass ceiling and how to break it? Paper also investigates reasons behind the effect. Prejudices and biases are the worst enemies for women’s career. How to chan...

  5. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  6. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  7. Flight Deck I-Glasses, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight Deck i-Glasses is a color, stereoscopic 3-D display mounted on consumer style eye glass frames that will enhance operator performance and multi-modal...

  8. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    Hendy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  9. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...

  10. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  11. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  12. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    He, Jr-Hau; Fu, Hui-Chun

    2017-01-01

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures

  13. Manganese activated phosphate glass for dosimetry

    Regulla, D.

    1975-01-01

    A measuring element comprises a metaphosphate glass doped with manganese as an activator. The manganese activated metaphosphate glass can detect and determine radiation doses in the range between milliroentgens and more than 10 megaroentgens. (auth)

  14. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the ... Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. ..... with equal probability. This has a ...

  15. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T "phase diagram" for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  16. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Starr, Francis W.

    2014-01-01

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  17. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  18. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  19. Granular packing as model glass formers

    Wang Yujie

    2017-01-01

    Static granular packings are model hard-sphere glass formers. The nature of glass transition has remained a hotly debated issue. We review recent experimental progresses in using granular materials to study glass transitions. We focus on the growth of glass order with five-fold symmetry in granular packings and relate the findings to both geometric frustration and random first-order phase transition theories. (paper)

  20. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  1. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  2. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  3. Percolation and spin glass transition

    Sadiq, A.; Tahir-Kheli, R.A.; Wortis, M.; Bhatti, N.A.

    1980-10-01

    The behaviour of clusters of curved and normal plaquette particles in a bond random, +-J, Ising model is studied in finite square and triangular lattices. Computer results for the concentration of antiferromagnetic bonds when percolating clusters first appears are found to be close to those reported for the occurrence and disappearance of spin glass phases in these systems. (author)

  4. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  5. Physical ageing of silicate glasses

    Nemilov, S.V. [S. I. Vavilov State Optical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2003-02-01

    The presented review has been devoted to the problem of volume-determined properties relaxation of silicate glasses at room temperature. It is shown that the experimental data are described by the simple Debye exponential law or by a superposition of two exponents. Their parameters are calculated and systematized. A molecular-kinetic model is proposed for these ageing processes. It proceeds from the possibility of volume relaxation due to the cooperative β-relaxation mechanism with no change in the system's topology. The characteristic ageing times can be calculated according to equations obtained based on the viscosity data in the glass transition range. The precision of the calculations is about {+-} 15% at the time variations from a few weeks up to about 15 years. The system of calculated parameters is proposed which characterizes the completeness of ageing and its rate at any glass age. Optical and thermometric glasses have been ranked by their tendency to ageing. The scheme of future investigations predetermined by practice is defined. (orig.)

  6. Spin glasses and neural networks

    Parga, N.; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche

    1989-01-01

    The mean-field theory of spin glass models has been used as a prototype of systems with frustration and disorder. One of the most interesting related systems are models of associative memories. In these lectures we review the main concepts developed to solve the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and its application to neural networks. (orig.)

  7. Durable Glass For Thousands Of Years

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al 3+ rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Stable Glasses Using Nanoindentation

    Wolf, Sarah; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Yijie; Ablajan, Keyume; Zhang, Yue; Walsh, Patrick; Turner, Kevin; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Glasses with enhanced stability over ordinary, liquid quenched glasses have been formed via the process of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) by using a sufficiently slow deposition rate and a substrate temperature slightly below the glass transition temperature. These stable glasses have been shown to exhibit higher density, lower enthalpy, and better kinetic stability over ordinary glass, and are typically optically birefringent, due to packing and orientational anisotropy. Given these exceptional properties, it is of interest to further investigate how the properties of stable glasses compare to those of ordinary glass. In particular, the mechanical properties of stable glasses remain relatively under-investigated. While the speed of sound and elastic moduli have been shown to increase with increased stability, little is known about their hardness and fracture toughness compared to ordinary glasses. In this study, glasses of 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene were deposited at varying temperatures relative to their glass transition temperature, and their mechanical properties measured by nanoindentation. Hardness and elastic modulus of the glasses were compared across substrate temperatures. After indentation, the topography of these films were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to further compare the relationship between thermodynamic and kinetic stability and mechanical failure. Z.F. and P.W. acknowledge funding from NSF(DMREF-1628407).

  9. Characterization of Fe -doped silver phosphate glasses

    ... to their several spe- cial properties such as large thermal expansion coefficients, ... increase the conductivity of these glasses is to increase the modifier or dopant ... phosphate glasses were measured by the a.c. impedance spectroscopic .... and Fe2O3-doped Ag2O–P2O5 glasses were determined from. DSC curves and ...

  10. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length of the ...

  11. Nickel-iron spherules from aouelloul glass

    Chao, E.C.T.; Dwornik, E.J.; Merrill, C.W.

    1966-01-01

    Nickel-iron spherules, ranging from less than 0.2 to 50 microns in diameter and containing 1.7 to 9.0 percent Ni by weight, occur in glass associated with the Aouelloul crater. They occur in discrete bands of siliceous glass enriched in dissolved iron. Their discovery is significant tangible evidence that both crater and glass originated from terrestrial impact.

  12. Jagged Edges of the Glass Ceiling

    Robinson, Victoria L.

    2004-01-01

    Although many aspiring young women might believe the glass ceiling was shattered a decade ago, they still need to understand how that glass ceiling impacted an older generation of women in educational leadership. They also must be aware that some segments of the glass ceiling might still exist. This article provides a historical overview of the…

  13. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    Rusin, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 ) and a fresnoite-based (Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 ) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  14. Aging in chalcohalide glasses: Origin and consequences

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Wang, W.

    2012-01-01

    the elemental concentration depth profiles in the surface layer of the glasses by using secondary neutral mass spectroscopy. The results show that anionic diffusion processes occur in the glasses during aging. The aging process leads to a decrease in microhardness of the studied glasses, which is attributed...

  15. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  16. Grinding Glass Disks On A Belt Sander

    Lyons, James J., III

    1995-01-01

    Small machine attached to table-top belt sander makes possible to use belt sander to grind glass disk quickly to specified diameter within tolerance of about plus or minus 0.002 in. Intended to be used in place of production-shop glass grinder. Held on driveshaft by vacuum, glass disk rotated while periphery ground by continuous sanding belt.

  17. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  18. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  19. Superconducting state parameters of ternary metallic glasses

    Administrator

    to binary metallic glasses. They are of interest since third element can modify the physical properties of binary metallic glasses and can also be used as a probe to study the host. ..... conducting nature in the present case. When we. Figure 6. Variation of transition temperature (TC) with valance (Z) of ternary metallic glasses.

  20. The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed

  1. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  2. Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An exactly solvable model for glass to spin-glass transition

    Crisanti, A.; Leuzzi, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the full phase diagram of the spherical 2+p spin-glass model with p≥4. The main outcome is the presence of a phase with both properties of full replica symmetry breaking phases of discrete models, e.g., the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and those of one replica symmetry breaking. This phase has a finite complexity which leads to different dynamic and static properties. The phase diagram is rich enough to allow the study of different kinds of glass to spin glass and spin glass to spin glass phase transitions

  3. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    Smit, Ziga, E-mail: ziga.smit@ijs.si [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, Timotej [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jezersek, David [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Istenic, Janka [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  4. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    Fulchiron, Ren?; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legar?, V?ronique

    2015-01-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg ) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of ap...

  5. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Some Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses and Their Glass Derivatives

    Abo Hussein, E.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses containing bismuth oxide have attracted considerable attention, although it is non-conventional glass forming oxide, but it has wide applications. In this work, it is aimed to prove that bismuth silicate glass can act as a good shielding material for γ- rays. For this purpose glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO_2 was prepared using melting-annealing technique. Also effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass such as PbO, BaO or SrO were also studied. The formed glasses were also heat treated at 450 degree C for 4 hours to give the corresponding heat treated glasses. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that the prepared glasses and heat treated glasses have very good stability when exposed to γ- irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using these glasses as gamma ray shielding materials. Many properties have been investigated, such as density to understand the structural properties, also mechanical properties were verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing their durability in both acidic and basic solutions. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass and heat treated glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 553 K, which proved that these glasses have very low conductivity even at high temperature. The formed phases of heat treated glass or glass ceramic samples were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also studying the structure of glasses and heat treated glasses before and after irradiation was investigated by the Infrared transmitting spectra. Calculations of optical band gap energies were demonstrated for some selected glasses and heat treated glasses from the data of UV optical absorption spectra to support the probability of using these bismuth silicate glasses for gamma radiation shielding processing.

  6. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  7. Strong-Superstrong Transition in Glass Transition of Metallic Glass

    Dan, Wang; Hong-Yan, Peng; Xiao-Yu, Xu; Bao-Ling, Chen; Chun-Lei, Wu; Min-Hua, Sun

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fragility of bulk metallic glass (BMG) of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 alloy is studied by three-point beam bending methods. The fragility parameter mfor Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG is calculated to be 24.5 at high temperature, which means that the liquid is a 'strong' liquid, while to be 13.4 at low temperature which means that the liquid is a 'super-strong' liquid. The dynamical behavior of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG in the supercooled region undergoes a strong to super-strong transition. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a strong-to-superstrong transition is found in the metallic glass. Using small angle x-ray scattering experiments, we find that this transition is assumed to be related to a phase separation process in supercooled liquid. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  8. Inelastic neutron scattering from glass formers

    Buchenau, U.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron spectra below and above the glass transition temperature show a pronounced difference between strong and fragile glass formers in Angell's fragility scheme. The strong anharmonic increase of the inelastic scattering with increasing temperature in fragile substances is absent in the strongest glass former SiO 2 . That difference is reflected in the temperature dependence of Brillouin sound velocities above the glass transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of sound waves and local modes at the low frequency boson peak. A relation between the fragility and the temperature dependence of the transverse hypersound velocity at the glass temperature is derived. (author)

  9. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  10. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  11. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  12. Evaluation of Behaviours of Laminated Glass

    Sable, L.; Japins, G.; Kalnins, K.

    2015-11-01

    Visual appearance of building facades and other load bearing structures, which now are part of modern architecture, is the reason why it is important to investigate in more detail the reliability of laminated glass for civil structures. Laminated glass in particular has become one of the trendy materials, for example Apple© stores have both load carrying capacity and transparent appearance. Glass has high mechanical strength and relatively medium density, however, the risk of sudden brittle failure like concrete or other ceramics determine relatively high conservatism in design practice of glass structures. This should be changed as consumer requirements evolve calling for a safe and reliable design methodology and corresponding building standards. A design methodology for glass and glass laminates should be urgently developed and included as a chapter in Eurocode. This paper presents initial experimental investigation of behaviour of simple glass sheets and laminated glass samples in 4-point bending test. The aim of the current research is to investigate laminated glass characteristic values and to verify the obtained experimental results with finite element method for glass and EVA material in line with future European Structural Design of Glass Components code.

  13. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    Bickford, D.F.; Smith, P.K.; Hrma, P.; Bowan, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive waste-glass melters require physical control limits and redox control of glass to assure continuous operation, and maximize production rates. Typical waste-glass melter operating conditions, and waste-glass chemical reaction paths are discussed. Glass composition, batching and melter temperature control are used to avoid the information of phases which are disruptive to melting or reduce melter life. The necessity and probable limitations of control for electric melters with complex waste feed compositions are discussed. Preliminary control limits, their bases, and alternative control methods are described for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and ground glass frit or glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, and their effect on waste-glass production rates. Relatively high melting rates of waste batches containing mixtures of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates are attributable to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and limits defined for existing waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Through balancing the high nitrate wastes of the WVDP with reducing agents, the high glass melting rates and sustained melting without foaming required for successful WVDP operations have been demonstrated. 65 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs

  14. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context

  15. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  16. Characterization of Savannah River Plant waste glass

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the glass characterization programs at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is to ensure that glass containing Savannah River Plant high-level waste can be permanently stored in a federal repository, in an environmentally acceptable manner. To accomplish this objective, SRL is carrying out several experimental programs, including: fundamental studies of the reactions between waste glass and water, particularly repository groundwater; experiments in which candidate repository environments are simulated as accurately as possible; burial tests of simulated waste glass in candidate repository geologies; large-scale tests of glass durability; and determination of the effects of process conditions on glass quality. In this paper, the strategy and current status of each of these programs is discussed. The results indicate that waste packages containing SRP waste glass will satisfy emerging regulatory criteria

  17. Phase separation in an ionomer glass

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Tian, K.V.; Dobó-Nagy, C.

    2015-01-01

    The G338 ionomer glass is a fluoro-alumino-silicate system, which is used as the powder component of glass ionomer cements (GICs) in dental applications. However, despite progress in understanding the nature of this glass, chemical identity of its separated amorphous phases has not yet been...... amorphous phases in G388 are Ca/Na-Al-Si-O, Ca-Al-F and Ca-P-O-F phases, respectively. However, the exact chemical compositions of the three phases still require further exploration. The results of this work are important for understanding the impact of phase separation within ionomer glasses on the setting...... conclusively determined. In this work, we identify these phases by performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses on both the as-received glass and heat-treated samples. We detected three glass transitions in the as-received G338 glass during DSC upscaning, implying...

  18. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  19. Luminescence investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}solar cells with different Ga-contents grown in a three-stage-process on glass substrate

    Wendt, Kristin; Mueller, Mathias; Hempel, Thomas; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Juergen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany); Abou-Ras, Daniel; Rissom, Thorsten; Unold, Thomas; Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental advantage of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) alloys as absorber materials in thin-film solar cells is their direct band gap energies which can be varied between 1.04 eV (CuInSe{sub 2}) and 1.68 eV (CuGaSe{sub 2}). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of complete CIGS solar cells with a systematic variation of the Ga-content in the absorber layer will be presented. The CIGS cells investigated were grown on a Mo back contact sputtered on soda lime glass and have a Ga-concentration ranging over the entire range from CuInSe{sub 2} to CuGaSe{sub 2}. Samples with Ga-contents between 100 % and 33 % show two broad luminescence bands. In contrast, CuInSe{sub 2} exhibits only one broad luminescence band. Each band is composed of two or three different transitions. Varying excitation density over four orders of magnitude results for samples with Ga-content of 0 % and 33 % in a blueshift of the main peak with increasing excitation density. For higher Ga-concentrations, first a blue- and then a redshift of the dominating peak with increasing excitation density is visible. The temperature dependence of the PL spectra is investigated going from 4 K to 300 K.

  20. Improved transparent-conducting properties in N2- and H2- annealed GaZnO thin films grown on glass substrates

    Lee, Youngmin; Kim, Deukyoung; Lee, Sejoon

    2012-01-01

    The effects of N 2 - and H 2 - annealing on the transparent-conducting properties of Ga-doped ZnO (GaZnO) were examined. The as-grown GaZnO thin film, which was deposited on a soda-lime glass substrate by r.f. magnetron sputtering, exhibited moderate transparent-conducting properties: a resistivity of ∼10 0 Ω·cm and an optical transmittance of ∼86%. After annealing in N 2 or H 2 , the GaZnO samples showed great improvements in both the electrical and the optical properties. Particularly, in the H 2 -annealed sample, a dramatic decrease in the resistivity (7 x 10 -4 Ω·cm) with a considerable increase in the carrier concentration (4.22 x 10 21 cm -3 ) was observed. This is attributed to both an increase in the number of Ga-O bonds and a reduction in the number of chemisorbed oxygen atoms though H 2 annealing. The sample revealed an enhanced optical transmittance (∼91%), which comes from the Burstein-Moss effect. Namely, a blue-shift of the optical absorption edge, which results from the increased carrier concentration, was observed in the H 2 -annealed sample. The results suggest that hydrogen annealing can help improve the transparent conducting properties of GaZnO via a modification of the electrochemical bonding structures.

  1. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  2. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos.

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  3. Formulation of heat absorbing glasses

    Álvarez-Casariego, Pedro

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available In the thermal exchanges between buildings and environment, glazing is an element of major importance, for it largely influences the so-called Solar Heat Gain and Thermal Losses. These parameters can be modified by applying different type of coatings onto glass surface or by adding colorant compounds during glass melting. The latter is a cheaper way to control the Solar Heat Gain. The knowledge of the laws governing the interaction between colorant compounds and solar radiation, allows us to define glass formulations achieving specific aesthetic requirements and solar energy absorption. In this paper two examples of application of the modelling of glass colorants spectral absorptance are presented. First is addressed to obtaining a glass with high luminous transmittance and low solar energy transmittance, and the other one to obtaining a glass with neutral colour appearance and minimized solar energy transmittance. Calculation formulas are defined together with photometric properties so-obtained. These type of glasses are particularly suitable to be used as building and automotive glazing, for they retain the mechanical characteristics and possibilities of transformation of standard glass.

    En los intercambios de energía entre un edificio y el medio exterior, el vidrio es el elemento de mayor importancia, por su influencia en la Ganancia de Calor Solar y en las Pérdidas Térmicas. Estos parámetros pueden ser modificados mediante el depósito de capas sobre el vidrio o mediante la adición de compuestos absorbentes de la radiación solar. Esta última vía es la más económica para controlar la Ganancia de Calor Solar. El conocimiento de las leyes que gobiernan la interacción de los diversos colorantes con la radiación solar, permite definir formulaciones de vidrios con características especificas de tipo estético y de absorción energética. En este trabajo se presentan dos ejemplos de aplicación de esta modelización de las

  4. Development of a glass GEM

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Yuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Fushie, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMs) apply the concept of gas amplification inside many tiny holes, realizing robust and high-gain proportional counters. However, the polyimide substrate of GEMs prevents them from being used in sealed detector applications. We have fabricated and tested glass GEMs (G-GEMs) with substrates made of photosensitive glass material from the Hoya Corporation. We fabricated G-GEMs with several different hole diameters and thicknesses and successfully operated test G-GEMs with a 100×100 mm 2 effective area. The uniformity of our G-GEMs was good, and the energy resolution for 5.9 keV X-rays was 18.8% under uniform irradiation of the entire effective area. A gas gain by the G-GEMs of up to 6700 was confirmed with a gas mixture of Ar (70%)+CH 4 (30%). X-ray imaging using the charge division readout method was demonstrated

  5. Lid heater for glass melter

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures

  6. A damage-tolerant glass.

    Demetriou, Marios D; Launey, Maximilien E; Garrett, Glenn; Schramm, Joseph P; Hofmann, Douglas C; Johnson, William L; Ritchie, Robert O

    2011-02-01

    Owing to a lack of microstructure, glassy materials are inherently strong but brittle, and often demonstrate extreme sensitivity to flaws. Accordingly, their macroscopic failure is often not initiated by plastic yielding, and almost always terminated by brittle fracture. Unlike conventional brittle glasses, metallic glasses are generally capable of limited plastic yielding by shear-band sliding in the presence of a flaw, and thus exhibit toughness-strength relationships that lie between those of brittle ceramics and marginally tough metals. Here, a bulk glassy palladium alloy is introduced, demonstrating an unusual capacity for shielding an opening crack accommodated by an extensive shear-band sliding process, which promotes a fracture toughness comparable to those of the toughest materials known. This result demonstrates that the combination of toughness and strength (that is, damage tolerance) accessible to amorphous materials extends beyond the benchmark ranges established by the toughest and strongest materials known, thereby pushing the envelope of damage tolerance accessible to a structural metal.

  7. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV), coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive a...

  8. Basic Research on Oxynitride Glasses.

    1982-07-01

    AG0 (1900 K) = -136.321 kcal (3) Si() + 1/202 (g) + SiO(g) AG (1900 K) = -60.237 kcal The reactions can be combined to yield the overall reaction (4...glass were continu- ously exposed to 95"C distilled water for 350 h in a Soxhlet apparatus. The sample weight losses after that time were 0.111Z

  9. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  10. Chemical durability of silicoborate glasses

    Nieto, M.I.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Rubio, J.; Fernandez, A.; Oteo, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A general view of the durability in silicoborate glasses is presented with more emphasis on the etching factors (chemical composition, lattice structure, pH...) the techniques used for this study and the experimental results. Likewise, the research presently developed in this area at the Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, is related to the applications. Future research in this field is also mentioned. (author) 15 figs

  11. Numerical study of the glass-glass transition in short-ranged attractive colloids

    Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero

    2004-01-01

    We report extensive numerical simulations in the glass region for a simple model of short-ranged attractive colloids, the square well model. We investigate the behaviour of the density autocorrelation function and of the static structure factor in the region of temperatures and packing fractions where a glass-glass transition is expected according to theoretical predictions. We strengthen our observations by studying both waiting time and history dependence of the numerical results. We provide evidence supporting the possibility that activated bond-breaking processes destabilize the attractive glass, preventing the full observation of a sharp glass-glass kinetic transition

  12. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  13. Edge-Strengthening of Structural Glass with Protective Coatings

    Lindqvist Maria; Louter Christian; Lebet Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    In modern buildings, glass is increasingly used as a load-carrying material in structural components, such as glass beams. For glass beams especially the edge strength of glass is important. However, the strength of glass is not a material constant but depends on various parameters, which makes glass, amongst other things, a challenging building material. One of the parameters influencing glass strength is the combination of humidity and stress, which may cause stress corrosion. The aim of th...

  14. A review of glass-ionomers: From conventional glass-ionomer to bioactive glass-ionomer

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials used in the body, especially the materials used in various oral cavity regions should be stable and passive without any interactions with the body tissues or fluids. Dental amalgam, composite resins and dental cements are the materials of choice with such properties. The first attempts to produce active materials, which could interact with the human body tissues and fluids were prompted by the concept that fluoride-releasing materials exert useful effects in the body. The concept of using the "smart" materials in dentistry has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Conventional glass-ionomer (GI cements have a large number of applications in dentistry. They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. GI is predominantly used as cements in dentistry; however, they have some disadvantages, the most important of which is lack of adequate strength and toughness. In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of the conventional GI, resin-modified glass-ionomers have been marketed, with hydrophilic monomers, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylated (HEMA. Some recent studies have evaluated GI with bioactive glass in its structure to validate the claims that such a combination will improve tooth bioactivity, regeneration capacity and restoration. There is ever-increasing interest in the application of bioactive materials in the dental field in an attempt to remineralize affected dentin. The aim of this review article is to evaluate these materials and their characteristics and applications.

  15. Borosilicate glass for gamma irradiation fields

    Baydogan, N.; Tugrul, A. B.

    2012-11-01

    Four different types of silicate glass specimens were irradiated with gamma radiation using a Co-60 radioisotope. Glass specimens, with four different chemical compositions, were exposed to neutron and mixed neutron/gamma doses in the central thimble and tangential beam tube of the nuclear research reactor. Optical variations were determined in accordance with standardisation concept. Changes in the direct solar absorbance (αe) of borosilicate glass were examined using the increase in gamma absorbed dose, and results were compared with the changes in the direct solar absorbance of the three different type silicate glass specimens. Solar absorption decreased due to decrease of penetration with absorbed dose. αe of borosilicate increased considerably when compared with other glass types. Changes in optical density were evaluated as an approach to create dose estimation. Mixed/thermal neutron irradiation on glass caused to increse αe.

  16. In situ study of glasses decomposition layer

    Zarembowitch-Deruelle, O.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the involved mechanisms during the decomposition of glasses by water and the consequences on the morphology of the decomposition layer, in particular in the case of a nuclear glass: the R 7 T 7 . The chemical composition of this glass being very complicated, it is difficult to know the influence of the different elements on the decomposition kinetics and on the resulting morphology because several atoms have a same behaviour. Glasses with simplified composition (only 5 elements) have then been synthesized. The morphological and structural characteristics of these glasses have been given. They have then been decomposed by water. The leaching curves do not reflect the decomposition kinetics but the solubility of the different elements at every moment. The three steps of the leaching are: 1) de-alkalinization 2) lattice rearrangement 3) heavy elements solubilization. Two decomposition layer types have also been revealed according to the glass heavy elements rate. (O.M.)

  17. A curious relationship between Potts glass models

    Yamaguchi, Chiaki

    2015-08-01

    A Potts glass model proposed by Nishimori and Stephen [H. Nishimori, M.J. Stephen, Phys. Rev. B 27, 5644 (1983)] is analyzed by means of the replica mean field theory. This model is a discrete model, has a gauge symmetry, and is called the Potts gauge glass model. By comparing the present results with the results of the conventional Potts glass model, we find the coincidences and differences between the models. We find a coincidence that the property for the Potts glass phase in this model is coincident with that in the conventional model at the mean field level. We find a difference that, unlike in the case of the conventional p-state Potts glass model, this system for large p does not become ferromagnetic at low temperature under a concentration of ferromagnetic interaction. The present results support the act of numerically investigating the present model for study of the Potts glass phase in finite dimensions.

  18. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    Ghosh, S; Ghosh, A

    2005-01-01

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  19. An Economic Theory of Glass Ceiling

    Paul A. Grout; In-Uck Park; Silvia Sonderegger

    2009-01-01

    In the 'glass ceiling' debate there appear to be two strongly held and opposing interpretations of the evidence, one suggesting it is really the result of gender differences and the other that there is discrimination by gender. This paper provides an economic theory of the glass ceiling and one of the main insights of our analysis is that in some real sense these two interpretations are not in conflict with each other. The glass ceiling emerges as an equilibrium phenomenon when firms compete ...

  20. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  1. Immobilization of radioactive waste in glass matrices

    Wicks, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A promising process for long-term management of high-level radioactive waste is to immobilize the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix. Among the most important criteria characterizing the integrity of the large-scale glass-waste forms are that they possess good chemical stability (including low leachability), thermal stability, mechanical integrity, and high radiation stability. Fulfillment of these criteria ensures the maximum margin of safety of glass-waste products, following solidification, handling, transportation, and long-term storage

  2. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  3. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  5. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... between 750 and 850°C. We investigated the influence of milling time, particle size, foaming and oxidizing agent concentrations, temperature and time on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. Only moderate foaming was observed in carbon containing samples, while the addition...... of the oxidizing agent greatly improved the foaming quality. The results showed that the amount of oxygen available from the glass is not sufficient to combust all of the added carbon, therefore, additional oxygen was supplied via manganese reduction. In general, a minimum in the foam glass density was observed...

  6. Can painted glass felt or glass fibre cloth be used as vapour barrier?

    El-Khattam, Amira; Andersen, Mie Them; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    In most Nordic homes the interior surfaces of walls and ceilings have some kind of surface treatment for aesthetical reasons. The treatments can for example be glass felt or glass fibre cloth which are painted afterwards. To evaluate the hygrothermal performance of walls and ceilings...... treatments. The surface treatments were glass felt or glass fibre cloth with different types of paints or just paint. The paint types were acrylic paint and silicate paint. The results show that the paint type has high influence on the water vapour resistance while the underlay i.e. glass felt or glass fibre...... acrylic paint on glass felt or glass fibre cloth cannot be used instead of a vapour barrier....

  7. Iron phosphate glass containing simulated fast reactor waste: Characterization and comparison with pristine iron phosphate glass

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Ravindran, T.R.; Govindaraj, R.; Govindan Kutty, K.V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization was carried out on an iron phosphate glass waste form containing 20 wt.% of a simulated nuclear waste. High temperature viscosity measurement was carried out by the rotating spindle method. The Fe 3+ /Fe ratio and structure of this waste loaded iron phosphate glass was investigated using Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy respectively. Specific heat measurement was carried out in the temperature range of 300–700 K using differential scanning calorimeter. Isoconversional kinetic analysis was employed to understand the crystallization behavior of the waste loaded iron phosphate glass. The glass forming ability and glass stability of the waste loaded glass were also evaluated. All the measured properties of the waste loaded glass were compared with the characteristics of pristine iron phosphate glass

  8. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  9. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    Maddrell, Ewan; Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na 2 O–Al 2 O 3 –B 2 O 3 –SiO 2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  10. Float glass innovation in the flat glass industry

    Uusitalo, Olavi

    2014-01-01

    A thorough industry analysis is of utmost importance for a study on the impact of technological changes on industry structure. This book evaluates the consequences of a vaguely chosen level of an industry analysis. Too broad a definition of the industry may disaggregate sub-industries, processing industries and international aspects. This is illustrated by revisiting an industry study upon which the dominant design model was based. Readers will see and understand the consequences of too broadly defined industries together with quantitative research approach can have. The book argues that the nature of the industry should define the level of the analysis. This is done by revisiting the flat glass industry study, on which Anderson and Tushman’s (1990) dominant design model is partly based. In their study Anderson and Tushman defined the flat glass industry based on four-digit SIC codes. It is argued that this definition was too broad and it disaggregated important sub-industries, processing industries and int...

  11. Dipolar ferromagnets and glasses (invited)

    Rosenbaum, T.F.; Wu, W.; Ellman, B.; Yang, J.; Aeppli, G.; Reich, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    What is the ground state and what are the dynamics of 10 23 randomly distributed Ising spins? We have attempted to answer these questions through magnetic susceptibility, calorimetric, and neutron scattering studies of the randomly diluted dipolar-coupled Ising magnet LiHo x Y 1-x F 4 . The material is ferromagnetic for dipole concentrations at least as low as x=0.46, with a Curie temperature obeying mean-field scaling relative to that of pure LiHoF 4 . In the dilute spin limit, an x=0.045 crystal shows very unusual glassy properties characterized by decreasing barriers to relaxation as T→0. Its properties are consistent with a single low degeneracy ground state with a large gap for excitations. A slightly more concentrated x=0.167 sample, however, supports a complex ground state with no appreciable gap, in accordance with prevailing theories of spin glasses. The underlying causes of such disparate behavior are discussed in terms of random clusters as probed by neutron studies of the x=0.167 sample. In addition to tracing the evolution of the glassy and ferromagnetic states with dipole concentration, we investigate the effects of a transverse magnetic field on the Ising spin glass, LiHo 0.167 Y 0.833 F 4 . The transverse field mixes the eigenfunctions of the ground-state Ising doublet with the otherwise inaccessible excited-state levels. We observe a rapid decrease in the characteristic relaxation times, large changes in the spectral form of the relaxation, and a depression of the spin-glass transition temperature with the addition of quantum fluctuations

  12. Radiation damages on superionic conducting glasses

    Awano, T.; Handa, K.; Matsuyama, T.

    2000-01-01

    We measured ESR spectra of color centers on AgI-AgPO 3 , AgI-Ag 2 O-B 2 O 3 , AgI-Ag 2 MoO 4 , AgI-Ag 2 WO 4 , (CH 3 ) 4 NI-(C 2 H 5 ) 4 NI-AgI (TMAI-TEAI-AgI) and its derivatives of superionic conducting glasses. In organic-inorganic mixed glasses, organic ion radicals were observed. They were not affected by ionic conductivity. On the contrary, Ag 2+ , Ag 0 and aggregated Ag 0 were observed in inorganic glasses. These color centers in inorganic glasses were affected by ionic conductivity. (author)

  13. SON68 glass alteration enhanced by magnetite

    Godon, Nicole; Gin, Stephane; Rebiscoul, Diane; Frugier, Pierre [CEA, DEN-Marcoule, F30207, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and modeling results of SON68 glass / magnetite interactions while in contact with synthetic groundwater from a clay environment. It is shown that magnetite enhances glass alteration, first by the sorption of Si released from the glass onto magnetite surfaces, then by a second process that could be the precipitation of an iron silicate mineral or the transformation of magnetite into a more reactive phase like hematite or goethite. This study globally suggests a detrimental effect of magnetite on the long-term durability of nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions. (authors)

  14. Energy conservation in the EC glass industry

    Waal, H. de [TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    The data presented in this survey are based mainly on a recent study, performed by the Energy Technology Support Unit ETSU. Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, in the context of the EC-Thermie programme. Also, use has been made of a paper `Glass Manufacture, energy and CO{sub 2}-emissions`, presented by G.J. Copley of the British Glass Manufacturers Confederation, Sheffield, United Kingdom, presented at the Thermie Seminar in Wiesbaden, 1992. A third source of information has been the data collected by the CPIV, the European Glass Manufacturers Federation on the present and future economic situation of the EC Glass Industry. (orig.)

  15. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  16. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...... by varying the temperature of heat treatment. The predominant crystalline phase in the glass was identified as augite. It was found that the hardness of the glass phase decreased slightly with an increase in the degree of crystallisation, while that of the augite phase drastically decreased....

  17. Transverse Ising spin-glass model

    Santos, Raimundo R. dos; Santos, R.M.Z. dos.

    1984-01-01

    The zero temperature behavior of the Transverse Ising spin-glass (+-J 0 ) model is discussed. The d-dimensional quantum model is shown to be equivalent to a classical (d + 1)- dimensional Ising spin-glass with correlated disorder. An exact Renormalization Group treatment of the one-dimensional quantum model indicates the existence of a spin-glass phase. The Migdal-Kadanoff approximation is used to obtain the phase diagram of the quantum spin-glass in two-dimensions. (Author) [pt

  18. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan

  19. Mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses

    Connelly, A.J.; Hand, R.J.; Bingham, P.A.; Hyatt, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses are important as they will determine the degree of cracking that may occur either on cooling or following a handling accident. Recent interest in the vitrification of intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) as well as high level radioactive waste (HLW) has led to the development of new waste glass compositions that have not previously been characterised. Therefore the mechanical properties, including Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, hardness, indentation fracture toughness and brittleness of a series of glasses designed to safely incorporate wet ILW have been investigated. The results are presented and compared with the equivalent properties of an inactive simulant of the current UK HLW glass and other nuclear waste glasses from the literature. The higher density glasses tend to have slightly lower hardness and indentation fracture toughness values and slightly higher brittleness values, however, it is shown that the variations in mechanical properties between these different glasses are limited, are well within the range of published values for nuclear waste glasses, and that the surveyed data for all radioactive waste glasses fall within relatively narrow range.

  20. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  1. Raman band intensities of tellurite glasses.

    Plotnichenko, V G; Sokolov, V O; Koltashev, V V; Dianov, E M; Grishin, I A; Churbanov, M F

    2005-05-15

    Raman spectra of TeO2-based glasses doped with WO3, ZnO, GeO2, TiO2, MoO3, and Sb2O3 are measured. The intensity of bands in the Raman spectra of MoO3-TeO2 and MoO3-WO3-TeO2 glasses is shown to be 80-95 times higher than that for silica glass. It is shown that these glasses can be considered as one of the most promising materials for Raman fiber amplifiers.

  2. Characterization of Low Density Glass Filled Epoxies

    Quesenberry, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the experimental determination and modeling of several thermophysical and mechanical properties of glass filled epoxy composite systems for potential use as electronic potting compounds...

  3. Degradation of glass in the soil

    Romich, H.; Gerlach, S.; Mottner, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fur Silicatforschung (ISC), Wertheim-Bronnbach (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Glass has been produced and used in Europe for over 2000 years. Glass objects from the Roman period onwards have been excavated during the last centuries. In general, Roman glass is chemically quite stable, and often the only sign of chemical alteration is an iridescent surface, caused by the leaching of cations, which leads to the formation of a hydrated silica-rich layer. Medieval potash glasses are much less durable, and their surfaces are often found deeply leached, sometimes to a point that no unaltered glass remains. These surfaces may be coherent, though fragile, or they are laminar, with no cohesion between the layers at all. In this study an analytical examination of a series of fragments of archaeological glass retrieved from different sites near Cologne and Stuttgart (Germany) has been carried out. Samples of corroded glasses were analysed by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX (surface and cross sections) in order to obtain information about the chemical composition of the bulk glass and the weathered layers. Since the environmental parameters have constantly varied for archaeological objects, mechanistic studies have to rely on laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. For an extensive exposure programme standardised soil or natural garden earth was used, for which the pH was modified. Several corrosion sensitive potash-lime silicate glasses have been designed to study the effect of glass composition. A model glass consisting of SiO{sub 2} (54.2), CaO (28.8) and K{sub 2}O (17.0 weight-%) mostly lead to the formation of a crust on the leached layer, with a total thickness of 100 micrometer (for soil with pH 7 to 8, 12 months exposure). Model glasses also containing Al, Mg and P have built up preferably laminated structures (total thickness up to 200 micrometer). This presentation will give an overview about the variety of degradation phenomena observed on originals and compare the results with controlled laboratory

  4. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    Ebert, W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  5. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Ponsot, In?s M. M. M.; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K.; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low te...

  6. Influence of the glass particle size on the foaming process and physical characteristics of foam glasses

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. The effect of the glass particle size on the foaming process, the apparent density and the pore morphology is revealed. The results show that the foaming is mainly caused...... by the reduction of manganese. Foam glasses with a density of

  7. Proceedings of the national conference on functional glasses/glass-ceramics and ceramics: souvenir

    2015-01-01

    This conference deals with issues relevant to functional glasses and glass ceramics which are technologically important materials for lasers, radioactive waste immobilization, radiation shielding, bio-glasses etc. It covers wide range of subjects and their applications right from managing the side effects of nuclear wastes and shielding the radiation, to sol-gel based bio-glass and its composites. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  8. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line

    Brophy, Brenor [Enki Technology Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs and a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.

  9. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    D. A. Pedernera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new process is presented by which water soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg, homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures, Thom, and ice melting temperatures, Tm, of various aqueous inorganic, organic and multi-component solutions are investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter. The investigated solutes are: various polyols, glucose, raffinose, levoglucosan, an aromatic compound, sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate and mixtures of dicarboxylic acids (M5, of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate (M5AS, of two polyols, of glucose and ammonium nitrate, and of raffinose and M5AS. The results indicate that aqueous solutions of the investigated inorganic solutes show Tg values that are too low to be of atmospheric importance. In contrast, aqueous organic and multi-component solutions readily form glasses at low but atmospherically relevant temperatures (≤230 K. To apply the laboratory data to the atmospheric situation, the measured phase transition temperatures were transformed from a concentration to a water activity scale by extrapolating water activities determined between 252 K and 313 K to lower temperatures. The obtained state diagrams reveal that the higher the molar mass of the aqueous organic or multi-component solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. To a lesser extent, Tg also depends on the hydrophilicity of the organic solutes. Therefore, aerosol particles containing larger (≳150 g mol−1 and

  10. Damages by radiation in glasses

    Olguin, F.; Gutierrez, C.; Cisniega, G.; Flores, J.H.; Golzarri, J.I.; Espinoza, G.

    1997-01-01

    As a part of the works carried out to characterize the electrons beam from the Pelletron accelerator of the Mexican Nuclear Center aluminium-silicate glass samples were irradiated. The purpose of these irradiations is to cause alterations in the amorphous microstructure of the material by means of the creation of color centers. The population density of these defects, consequence to the irradiation, is function of the exposure time which varied from 1 to 30 minutes, with an electronic beam energy of 400 keV, doing the irradiations at free atmosphere. the obtained spectra are correlated by damage which the radiation produced. (Author)

  11. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Johnson, J A [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Holland, D [Physics Department, Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bland, J [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Johnson, C E [Physics Department, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Thomas, M F [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-19

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sub x} - [ZnCl{sub 2}]{sub 1-x} where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb){sub 2}(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn){sub 2}(OSb){sub 2}].

  12. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Johnson, J A; Holland, D; Bland, J; Johnson, C E; Thomas, M F

    2003-01-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb 2 O 3 ] x - [ZnCl 2 ] 1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb) 2 (OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn) 2 (OSb) 2

  13. Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters

    Mendel, J.E.

    1978-12-01

    A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal

  14. Synthesis for Lunar Simulants: Glass, Agglutinate, Plagioclase, Breccia

    Weinstein, Michael; Wilson, Stephen A.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Stoeser, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The video describes a process for making glass for lunar regolith simulants that was developed from a patented glass-producing technology. Glass composition can be matched to simulant design and specification. Production of glass, pseudo agglutinates, plagioclase, and breccias is demonstrated. The system is capable of producing hundreds of kilograms of high quality glass and simulants per day.

  15. glasses

    thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis and impedance spectroscopy. .... KT ). (2). Figure 4. Cole–cole plot of 60V2O5–5P2O5–33B2O3–2CeO2. ... According to this model, as .... Figure 13 represents the Nyquist plot for the composition.

  16. A Novel, Demountable Structural Glass System Out of Dry-Assembly, Interlocking Cast Glass Components

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Barou, L.; Jacobs, Erwin; Frigo, G.; Veer, F.A.; Nijsse, R.; Louter, Christian; Bos, Freek; Belis, Jan; Veer, Fred; Nijsse, Rob

    Cast glass components are a promising solution for engineering pure glass structures of high transparency and load-carrying capacity due to their large cross-sectional area and monolithic nature. Currently, the few realized structures employing cast glass components rely either on a steel

  17. Comparison of a model vapor deposited glass films to equilibrium glass films

    Flenner, Elijah; Berthier, Ludovic; Charbonneau, Patrick; Zamponi, Francesco

    Vapor deposition of particles onto a substrate held at around 85% of the glass transition temperature can create glasses with increased density, enthalpy, kinetic stability, and mechanical stability compared to an ordinary glass created by cooling. It is estimated that an ordinary glass would need to age thousands of years to reach the kinetic stability of a vapor deposited glass, and a natural question is how close to the equilibrium is the vapor deposited glass. To understand the process, algorithms akin to vapor deposition are used to create simulated glasses that have a higher kinetic stability than their annealed counterpart, although these glasses may not be well equilibrated either. Here we use novel models optimized for a swap Monte Carlo algorithm in order to create equilibrium glass films and compare their properties with those of glasses obtained from vapor deposition algorithms. This approach allows us to directly assess the non-equilibrium nature of vapor-deposited ultrastable glasses. Simons Collaboration on Cracking the Glass Problem and NSF Grant No. DMR 1608086.

  18. Reinforced glass beams composed of annealed, heat-strengthened and fully tempered glass

    Louter, P.C.; Belis, J.L.I.F.; Bos, F.P.; Veer, F.A.

    Annealed, heat-strengthened and fully tempered SG-laminated reinforced glass beam specimens were subjected to four-point bending tests to investigate the effects of glass type on their structural response. During the test the beams showed linear elastic response until initial glass failure, followed

  19. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    Harris, W.H.; Guillen, D.P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, P.; Yano, T.; Lee, S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2017), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : borosilicate glass * computed tomography * glass melting * morphology * nuclear waste * X-ray Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  20. Analysis of elementary process steps in industrial glass melting tanks: some ideas on innovations in industrial glass melting

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional industrial glass furnaces show broad glass melt residence time distributions in the melting tanks and average residence times may be up to more than two days for high quality glass products, such as float glass or TV glass, despite the minimum residence times of 8-10 hours (or even less