WorldWideScience

Sample records for glass industry

  1. Glass Industry Bandwidth Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David M. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This is a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, for several glassmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results.

  2. Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David M. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Servaites, James [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Wolf, Warren [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2007-08-01

    This is a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, for several glassmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results.

  3. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO 3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  4. Float glass innovation in the flat glass industry

    CERN Document Server

    Uusitalo, Olavi

    2014-01-01

    A thorough industry analysis is of utmost importance for a study on the impact of technological changes on industry structure. This book evaluates the consequences of a vaguely chosen level of an industry analysis. Too broad a definition of the industry may disaggregate sub-industries, processing industries and international aspects. This is illustrated by revisiting an industry study upon which the dominant design model was based. Readers will see and understand the consequences of too broadly defined industries together with quantitative research approach can have. The book argues that the nature of the industry should define the level of the analysis. This is done by revisiting the flat glass industry study, on which Anderson and Tushman’s (1990) dominant design model is partly based. In their study Anderson and Tushman defined the flat glass industry based on four-digit SIC codes. It is argued that this definition was too broad and it disaggregated important sub-industries, processing industries and int...

  5. Energy conservation in the EC glass industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, H. de [TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    The data presented in this survey are based mainly on a recent study, performed by the Energy Technology Support Unit ETSU. Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, in the context of the EC-Thermie programme. Also, use has been made of a paper `Glass Manufacture, energy and CO{sub 2}-emissions`, presented by G.J. Copley of the British Glass Manufacturers Confederation, Sheffield, United Kingdom, presented at the Thermie Seminar in Wiesbaden, 1992. A third source of information has been the data collected by the CPIV, the European Glass Manufacturers Federation on the present and future economic situation of the EC Glass Industry. (orig.)

  6. Industrial safety glasses -- an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherr, A E

    1980-02-01

    A review is presented of recent significant developments in industrial protective eyewear. Many of these developments apply to everyday practice. The new plastic protective, prescription, and plano lenses are discussed, and their merits presented. Needs for protection in the ultraviolet and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum are described. It is shown that such spectral protection is now available in plastic lenses, but care must be taken to insure that the plastic has the required ultraviolet and near-infrared absorption. Eye protection standards have been improved. Specific changes in the standards are discussed.

  7. Analysis of elementary process steps in industrial glass melting tanks: some ideas on innovations in industrial glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional industrial glass furnaces show broad glass melt residence time distributions in the melting tanks and average residence times may be up to more than two days for high quality glass products, such as float glass or TV glass, despite the minimum residence times of 8-10 hours (or even less

  8. Characterization study of industrial waste glass as starting material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study, an industrial waste glass was characterized and the potential to assess as starting material in development of bioactive materials was investigated. A waste glass collected from the two different glass industry was grounded to fine powder. The samples were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ...

  9. Dedusting in the glass industry; Depoussierage en verrerie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tackels, G. [Saint-Gobain Concetpions Verrieres (France); Depauw, J.P. [Procedair (France); Myrope, A. [Lurgi (France)

    2000-07-01

    Here are gathered several articles concerning the dedusting in the glass industry. At present, about a third of the European glass furnaces are fitted out with filters. The best industrially available techniques used for the abatement of glass dust releases are: handle filters and electro-filters. Their principles of separation, characteristics of manufacturing and performance are detailed. (O.M.)

  10. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: electronics recycling industry communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia R; Boehm, Michael W; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Julia R.; Boehm, Michael W.; Drummond, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Given a large flow rate of CRT glass ∼10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. ► The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. ► Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. ► Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. ► Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  12. The Potential of Thermophotovoltaic Heat Recovery for the Glass Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, T.; Forbes, I.; Penlington, R.; Pearsall, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims to provide an overview of heat recovery by thermophotovoltaics (TPV) from industrial high-temperature processes and uses the glass industry in the UK as an example. The work is part of a study of potential industrial applications of TPV in the UK being carried out by the Northumbria Photovoltaics Applications Centre. The paper reviews the relevant facts about TPV technology and the glass industry and identifies locations of use for TPV. These are assessed in terms of glass sector, furnace type, process temperature, impact on the existing process, power scale and development effort of TPV. Knowledge of these factors should contribute to the design of an optimum TPV system. The paper estimates possible energy savings and reductions of CO2 emissions using TPV in the glass industry.

  13. Glass-Industry of the Future; Industrial Partnerships: Advancing Energy and Environmental Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Office of Industrial Technologies

    2001-01-01

    This tri-fold brochure describe the partnering activities of the Office of Industrial Technologies' (OIT) Industries of the Future (IOF) for Glass. Information on what works for the Glass industry, examples of successful partnerships, and benefits of partnering with OIT are included

  14. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    such as abrasion, impact etc as compared to other coating materials applied by thermal spraying in its different forms viz. ... in some systematic way information on glass and glass– ... the industries by proper maintenance of the machinery/.

  15. Use of glasses as industrial dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestic, F.

    1959-01-01

    Glasses have the property of colouring under the action of ionizing radiations. We endeavoured to specify the conditions under which the intensity of coloration can be used as a measure of the quantity of radiation to which the glass has been submitted. In the case of a glass loaded with cobalt, a study of the optical density at different wavelengths enabled us to find the factors governing the formation of coloured centres and their conservation in the glass. We give a set of calibrating curves for different values of these parameters (irradiation rate, irradiation temperature; fading time and fading temperature), enabling determination of radiation doses in the range from 10 000 to 1 000 000 rep from measured optical density. (author) [fr

  16. Development of AZS refractories for the glass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, A.M.; Rodriguez, P.

    2004-01-01

    Refractory materials can support high temperatures, thermal strength and the contact with aggressive environments, for this reason they are widely used in the cement, glass and steel industry. Commercial AZS (alumina-zirconia-silica) refractories are a good alternative in refractory materials for the glass industry' because they can support the aggressive conditions during liquid processing of glass. However, another problem encountered in glass industry is contamination by refractory' material that fall into the molten glass, which can produce a series of defects in the final product. This research was conducted to develop new formulations of AZS refractories with different amounts of ZrO 2 with the purpose of improving the characteristics, properties and the work conditions in the glass melting furnaces and, at the same time, lower the costs this type of refractories. The results obtained indicate that the composition with low content of ZrO 2 can provide better properties than the commercial product, with some modifications in the particle size distribution. Copyright (2004) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  17. Power Factor Correction for Thyristor Equipment in Glass Industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thyristor power controllers are now widely used in the glass industry for controlling furnace temperature. While offering a number of operational advantages, they operate at lagging power factors which require correction for minimum power cost. Harmonic resonance with the utility feed, however, complicate the use of ...

  18. Detection of fire protection and mineral glasses in industrial recycling using Raman mapping spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biasio, Martin; Arnold, Thomas; McGunnigle, Gerald; Kraft, Martin; Leitner, Raimund; Balthasar, Dirk; Rehrmann, Volker

    2011-06-01

    Recycling of glass requires the removal of specialist glasses, such as fireproof and mineral glasses, and glass ceramics, which are regarded as contaminants. The sorting must take place before melting for efficient glass recycling. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a real-time Raman mapping system for detecting and discriminating a range of industrially relevant glass contaminants in recovered glass streams. The components used are suitable for industrial conditions and the chemometric model is robust against imaging geometry and excitation intensity. The proposed approach is a novel alternative to established glass sorting sensors.

  19. ESR spectroscopy - an analytical tool for the glass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvers, A.; Weissmann, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, wet chemical methods have been developed for the quantitative analysis of polyvalent elements in glasses. The major disadvantage of these chemical methods is that all structural information is lost during analysis. In addition, the analysis of species by wet chemical methods is unreliable due to possible redox reactions during the decomposition process. Therefore, the emphasis is on the physical methods which can directly detect species in bulk glasses. Especially optical and ESR spectroscopy are suitable methods due to their wide range of applications and sensitivity. Concerning quantitative measurements, no comparison between ESR results and chemical analysis of species has been published so far. This work discusses the possible application of ESR spectroscopy in the glass industry by focussing on routine interpretation, the correlation to chemical procedures and quantitative analysis. Results are presented and discussed for iron and chromium in packaging glasses. For example an excellent correlation was found between the Fe 3+ ESR signal and the chemically determined Fe 3+ concentration in glass. (orig.)

  20. Breaking through the glass ceiling: an industrial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander, S K

    1996-11-01

    Many companies have recognized that the workforce of the future will be significantly more diverse than in the past. A substantial number of these new employees will be women. Industry must create an environment that attracts the best, brightest, and most talented women and provide an environment that empowers them to reach their full potential. Barriers to advancement, such as the real or perceived "glass ceiling," inhibit the individual and ultimately negatively affect the company. Successful companies will recognize that gender diversity is a critical business strategy and implement aggressive programs to assist women in breaking through the glass ceiling. Gender diversity initiatives should include examination of quality of life issues, training and development, organizational policies and practices, and management accountability. Mentoring programs clearly play an important role in gender diversity programs. Personal mentoring experiences in academic and corporate environments, as well as a pilot mentoring program at Land O'Lakes, will be discussed.

  1. Glass-ceramics with multibarrier structure obtained from industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzina, L.; Cimdins, R.; Rozenstrauha, I. [Riga Tech. Univ. (Latvia). Fac. of Chem. Technol.; Bossert, J. [Technisches Inst.: Materialwissenschaft, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany); Kravtchenko, I. [Inst. for Problems of Material Science, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Recycling problem for various kind of waste is solved by processing the waste to ecological depositable products with multibarrier structure. In order to form a multibarrier structure the ecologically incompatible substances may be diluted and chemically bound until their recycling products gain a structure like natural mineral or glass (I. barrier). After that, remineralized materials are converted into a new product by melting or powder technology using an ecological compatible type of waste as a matrix phase (II. barrier). Waste which are treated this way could be applied to produce ceramic building materials and goods such as floor tiles, stone pavement and casting products. Industrial waste from the metallurgical factory in Latvia ``Liepajas metalurgs`` are metallurgical slag, filter dust, etching waste and sewage used in technologies. The main constituents of chemical compositions of these waste are: Fe, Ca, Si, Mg, Al, Mn etc. In some types of waste a small amount of ecologically risky elements such as Cr, Ni, Zr, Sn and Pb can occur. The combination of metallurgical waste with peat ashes from Riga thermal power station, oil shale ashes or glass waste under controlled sintering procedure gives bulk materials with surface or/and bulkcrystallization. The structure of glass-ceramics built this way may prevent the migration of ecologically risky elements into environment due to corrosion or friction. Physical-chemical properties and thermal behaviour (DTA, dilatometry, melting) of waste define the range of sintering for production of glass-ceramics (powder technology) and decorative glass-ceramic materials (melting and powder technology). (orig.) 5 refs.

  2. Synthesis of glass-ceramics using glass cullet and vitrified industrial by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamberi, A.; Orkopoulos, K.; Moutsatsou, A. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-07-01

    This study concerns the recycling of inorganic waste materials for the production of glass-ceramics and the evaluation of the developed physical properties. Four industrial by-products were selected due to their mass production: (I) two high calcium lignite fly ashes, (ii) slag derived from the production of Fe-Ni and, (iii) steel slag. In order to examine the role of the SiO{sub 2} in the crystallization process, glass cullet and Egyptian sand were added. Thermal treatment, at 1450{sup o}C, enables the production of glasses using mixtures of these materials at appropriate proportions. The crystallization was achieved by heating at 900, 950 and 1000{sup o}C. The produced materials were examined concerning their structure by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS). The results showed that the crystalline phase is greatly depending on the structure of the raw material and the thermal process, influencing accordingly the hardness of the final products.

  3. Chemical durability of glass and glass-ceramic materials, developed in laboratory scale, from industrial oil shale residue. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Fonseca, M.V. de; Souza Santos, P. de

    1990-01-01

    Industrial developments frequently drive to the natural resources extinction. The recycling era has come out a long time ago and it has been evident that great part of industrial work's problems are related to the pollution and the raw materials extinction. These problems should be solved, with advantages, through industrial residues recycling. This study deals with glass and glass-ceramics materials obtained from oil shale (Irati Formation-Sao Mateus do Sul-Parana State) industrialization residues. The reached results show that a controled devitrification of retorted oil shale glass improves its performance related to chemical attack. The crystallinity caracterization of the oil shales glass-ceramic was made through X-ray diffraction. (author) [pt

  4. On-line redox sensors in industrial glass melting tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laimböck, P.R.; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Schaaf, van der J.; Kieffer, J.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation state or partial oxygen pressure (pO2) of the glass melt influences many glass melt and glass product properties such as fining and foaming behavior, radiant heat transfer, forming characteristics via (a color-dependent) cooling rate, and the glass color of the final product. For these

  5. 75 FR 60138 - Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,579] Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax, VA; Notice of Affirmative... Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax, Virginia...

  6. Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S C [Brigham Young Univ., Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center, Provo, UT (United States); Webb, B W; McQuay, M Q [Brigham Young Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Provo, UT (United States); Newbold, J [Lockheed Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The predictive capability of two comprehensive combustion codes, PCGC-3 and FLUENT, to simulate local flame structure and combustion characteristics in a industrial gas-fired, flat-glass furnace is investigated. Model predictions are compared with experimental data from the furnace for profiles of velocity, species concentrations, temperatures, and wall-incident radiative heat flux. Predictions from both codes show agreement with the measured mean velocity profiles and incident radiant flux on the crown. However, significant differences between the code predictions and measurements are observed for the flame-ozone temperatures and species concentrations. The observed discrepancies may be explained by (i) uncertainties in the distributions of mean velocity and turbulence in the portneck, (ii) uncertainties in the port-by-port stoichiometry, (iii) different grid-based approximations to the furnace geometry made in the two codes, (iv) the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry made in the chemical reaction model of both codes, and (v) simplifying assumptions made in the simulations regarding the complex coupling between the combustion space, batch blanket, and melt tank. The study illustrates the critical need for accurate boundary conditions (inlet air and fuel flow distributions, boundary surface temperatures, etc.) and the importance of representative furnace geometry in simulating these complex industrial combustion systems. (Author)

  7. HLW immobilization in glass: industrial operation and product quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Leroy, P.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    This extended summary discusses the immobilization of high level wastes from the viewpoint of the quality of the final product, i.e. the HLW glass. The R and D studies comprise 3 steps: glass formulation, glass characterization and long term behaviour studies

  8. Research of mountain rocks of Georgia for using in glass materials industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabunia, L.; Gabunia, N.; Jakhva, N.; Napetvaridze, Ts.; Alibegashvili, M.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents the results of the research of mountain rocks of Georgia in various peaces of basalts, andesite, andesite-basalt porphyry and trachite deposits in order to be used in the industry of fiber, glass-crystal materials and fasade decorative tiles. The prospects of basalt and andesite-basalt porphyry use in the industry of fiber materials in the form of monocomponents has been stated. The technology of obtaining of wear resistant, chemically stable and colored glass-crystal on the basis of andesit and trachyte, has been worked out and approved in industry. (author)

  9. Energy consumption and CO2 emissions of the European glass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Andreas; Kaminski, Jacek; Maria Scalet, Bianca; Soria, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of the energy consumption and CO 2 emissions of the European glass industry is presented. The analysis is based on data of the EU ETS for the period 2005-2007 (Phase I). The scope of this study comprises the European glass industry as a whole and its seven subsectors. The analysis is based on an assignment of the glass installations (ca. 450) within the EU ETS to the corresponding subsectors and an adequate matching of the respective production volumes. A result is the assessment of the overall final energy consumption (fuel, electricity) as well as the overall CO 2 emissions (process, combustion and indirect emissions) of the glass industry and its subsectors in the EU25/27. Moreover, figures on fuel mix as well as fuel intensity and CO 2 emissions intensity (i.e. carbon intensity) are presented for each of the subsectors on aggregated levels and for selected EU Member States separately. The average intensity of fuel consumption and direct CO 2 emissions of the EU25 glass industry decreased from 2005 to 2007 by about 4% and amounted in 2007 to 7.8 GJ and 0.57 t CO 2 per tonne of saleable product, respectively. The economic energy intensity was evaluated with 0.46 toe/1000 Euro (EU27).

  10. HLW vitrification in France industrial experience and glass quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvaux, J.L.; Delahaye, P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the vitrification process, the technology and process improvements at the La Hague plant in R 7 and T 7 facilities. The main achievements relate to the process flexibility, the reliability of the equipment and solid waste management. The quality of the vitrified glass produced and canisters compliance with agreed specifications are demonstrated through characterization studies. Since the active start-up of R 7/T 7 facilities, canisters compliance with specifications relies upon a complete quality assurance/quality control program including process control. 1 tab., 1 fig

  11. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  12. Reuse of nuclear byproducts, NaF and HF in metal glass industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.W.; Lee, H.W. [Korea Power Engineering Co., Inc., Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, S.H.; Moon, H.S.; Cho, N.C. [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd., Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    A study has been performed to evaluate the radiological safety and feasibility associated with reuse of NaF(Sodium Fluoride) and HF(Hydrofluoric Acid) which are generated as byproducts from the nuclear fuel fabrication process. The investigation of oversea`s experience reveals that the byproduct materials are most often used in the metal and glass industries. For the radiological safety evaluation, the uranium radioactivities in the byproduct materials were examined and shown to be less than radioactivities in natural materials. The radiation doses to plant personnel and the general public were assessed to be very small and could be ignored. The Korea nuclear regulatory body permits the reuse of NaF in the metal industry on the basis of associated radioactivity being {open_quote}below regulatory concern{close_quote}. HF is now under review for reuse acceptability in the steel and glass industries.

  13. Performance of glass RPC with industrial silk-screen-printed electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, M.; Candela, A.; De Deo, M.; D'Incecco, M.; Gamba, D.; Giuliano, A.; Gustavino, C.; Morganti, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchero, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance of several Glass RPCs, where the water-based graphite coating is replaced by a synthetic coating applied using the screen printing technique. As expected, the performance of the detectors is good and reproducible due to the accurate control of the coating resistivity value. The resistance of the coating to the action of mechanical and chemical agents permits an easy electrode cleaning and mounting with respect to the RPC coated with the graphite varnish. This coating, together with the use of float glass as electrode material, allows an industrial production, where the detector characteristics can be tailored as a function of the experiment requirements

  14. Roles of Co element in Fe-based bulk metallic glasses utilizing industrial FeB alloy as raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyuan Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses were fabricated by a conventional copper mold casting method using a kind of Fe-B industrial raw alloy. It is found that Fe-B-Y-Nb bulk metallic glass with 3 at% of Co addition possesses the best glass forming ability, thermal stability, hardness, magnetic property and anti-corrosion property. The hardness test result indicates a synchronically trend with glass-forming ability parameters. The excellent glass-forming ability and a combination of good mechanical and functional properties suggest that the alloys in this work might be good candidates for commercial use.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  16. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes; Vidros obtidos a partir de residuos industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Curso de Engenharia de Materiais; Bernardin, A.M., E-mail: amb@unesc.ne [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Tijucas, SC (Brazil). Tecnologia em Ceramica

    2009-07-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO{sub 3} (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  17. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  18. Exploring high-strength glass-ceramic materials for upcycling of industrial wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Gu-Seul; Park, Hyun Seo; Seo, Sung Mo; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-11-01

    To promote the recycling of industrial waste and to develop value-added products using these resources, the possibility of manufacturing glass-ceramic materials of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 system has been investigated by various heat treatment processes. Glass-ceramic materials with six different chemical compositions were prepared using steel industry slags and power plant waste by melting, casting and heat treatment. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that diopside and anorthite were the primary phases in the samples. The anorthite phase was formed in SiO2-rich material (at least 43 wt%). In CaO-rich material, the gehlenite phase was formed. By the differential scanning calorimetry analyses, it was found that the glass transition point was in the range of 973-1023 K, and the crystallization temperature was in the range of 1123-1223 K. The crystallization temperature increased as the content of Fe2O3 decreased. By the multi-step heat treatment process, the formation of the anorthite phase was enhanced. Using FactSage, the ratio of various phases was calculated as a function of temperature. The viscosities and the latent heats for the samples with various compositions were also calculated by FactSage. The optimal compositions for glass-ceramics materials were discussed in terms of their compressive strength, and micro-hardness.

  19. Application of advanced coatings to narrow neck press and blow plungers in the glass container industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penlington, R. [Northumbria Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mech. Eng. and Manufacturing Syst.; Sarwar, M. [Northumbria Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mech. Eng. and Manufacturing Syst.; Lewis, D.B. [Sheffield Hallam Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01

    Wear and failure modes exhibited by narrow neck press and blow (NNPB) plungers in the glass container industry have been related to inappropriate material selection. Problems exist with substrate and coating materials which lead to machine down time, process instability and poor product quality. Previous attempts to improve the service life of NNPB plungers have not examined the process operating characteristics and demanding nature of the application. New substrate and coating materials have been utilized and an assessment of their suitability for this application examined. Initial results from plant trials with modified plungers suggest that improvements in operational performance are achievable. This application, and other components of the mould tooling set, may benefit from improvements which may increase tool life and reduce the problems which result from the application of lubricant dopes to glass contact surfaces. (orig.)

  20. Energy saving options for glass furnaces & recovery of heat from their flue gases and experiences with batch & cullet pre-heaters applied in the glass industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Several measures, such as changes in batch composition (less batch humidity), or optimization of operating conditions, and limiting the combustion air excess, can lead to typically 2-8 % of energy savings of industrial glass furnaces. Larger energy savings are only possible by new furnace designs,

  1. Energy efficiency solutions for driers used in the glass manufacturing and processing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pătrașcu Roxana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Energy conservation is relevant to increasing efficiency in energy projects, by saving energy, by its’ rational use or by switching to other forms of energy. The goal is to secure energy supply on short and long term, while increasing efficiency. These are enforced by evaluating the companies’ energy status, by monitoring and adjusting energy consumption and organising a coherent energy management. The manufacturing process is described, starting from the state and properties of the raw material and ending with the glass drying technological processes involved. Raw materials are selected considering technological and economic criteria. Manufacturing is treated as a two-stage process, consisting of the logistic, preparation aspect of unloading, transporting, storing materials and the manufacturing process itself, by which the glass is sifted, shredded, deferrized and dried. The interest of analyzing the latter is justified by the fact that it has a big impact on the final energy consumption values, hence, in order to improve the general performance, the driers’ energy losses are to be reduced. Technological, energy and management solutions are stated to meet this problem. In the present paper, the emphasis is on the energy perspective of enhancing the overall efficiency. The case study stresses the effects of heat recovery over the efficiency of a glass drier. Audits are conducted, both before and after its’ implementation, to punctually observe the balance between the entering and exiting heat in the drying process. The reduction in fuel consumption and the increase in thermal performance and fuel usage performances reveal the importance of using all available exiting heat from processes. Technical faults, either in exploitation or in management, lead to additional expenses. Improving them is in congruence with the energy conservation concept and is in accordance with the Energy Efficiency Improvement Program for industrial facilities.

  2. Magnetic properties of glasses from geothite industrial wastes recycling (FeOOH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Rincon, J.M.; Esparza, M.; Gonzalez-Oliver, C.

    1997-01-01

    It has been carried out the magnetic properties determination for high iron oxide content glasses series obtained from a geothite red mud waste from the zinc hydrometallurgy and dolomite and glass cullet as main raw materials. It has been determined the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization values for the glasses here investigated. The results suggest that the magnetic behaviour are depending on the glass chemical composition, so that glasses can be differently classified like ferrimagnetic, ferromagnetic, superparamagnetic and paramagnetic. (Author) 6 refs

  3. Development of abrasion resistant glass-ceramics from industrial waste products. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Roode, M.

    1983-05-26

    Slag-ceramics were produced from glass compositions using pelletized slag as the major ingredient. The abrasion resistance, fracture toughness and microstructure of the prepared glass and glass-ceramics were evaluated. Glas-ceramics with good abrasion resistance were obtained when iron oxide in conjunction with carbon was used as a nucleating agent. 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Fluid flow analysis of E-glass fiber reinforced pipe joints in oil and gas industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Sujith; Leman, Z.; Zainuddin, E. S.; Sapuan, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Glass Fiber reinforced composites have become increasingly important over the past few years and now they are the first choice materials for fabricating pipes with low weight in combination with high strength and stiffness. In Oil And Gas Industry, The Pipelines transporting heavy crude oil are subjected to variable pressure waves causing fluctuating stress levels in the pipes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using solid works flow stimulation software to study the effects of these pressure waves on some specified joints in the pipes. Depending on the type of heavy crude oil being used, the flow behavior indicated a considerable degree of stress levels in certain connecting joints, causing the joints to become weak over a prolonged period of use. This research proposes a new perspective that is still required to be developed regarding the change of the pipe material, fiber winding angle in those specified joints and finally implementing cad wind technology to check the output result of the stress levels so that the life of the pipes can be optimized.

  5. Long-Term Sustainability from the Perspective of Cullet Recycling in the Container Glass Industry: Evidence from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Testa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Glass manufacturing is a high-volume process, during which large substance quantities are transformed into commercial products, and significant amounts of non-renewable resources and energy (i.e., thermal fuels and electrical power are consumed. The main purpose of this study is to give a critical explanation of the performance of the Italian container glass industry from the perspective of cullet being recycled, to outline the opportunities for transition towards circular business models that stimulate innovation in new sectors based on reverse-cycle activities for recycling. In 2015, disparate performances have been achieved as regards the container glass recycling rate in northern, central, and southern Italy, accounting for around 73%, 64%, and 55%, respectively. In fact, only northern Italy is in line with European targets, as by 2025 it will only need to increase its current performance by two percentage points, unlike central and southern Italy that will have to increase performance by, respectively, 11% and 20%. This shows a need to improve the efficiency of municipal waste collection systems in central and southern Italy, where undifferentiated waste still holds appreciable amounts of glass. Consequently, we propose several improvement channels, from the revision of waste legislation to the re-engineering of waste management supply chains.

  6. Industrial opportunities of controlled melt flow during glass melting, part 1: Melt flow evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyrčíková, Petra; Hrbek, Lukáš; Němec, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 111-117 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * controlled flow * space utilization Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2014 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2014/pdf/2014_02_111.pdf

  7. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  8. Waste heat recovery at the glass industry with the intervention of batch and cullet preheating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolianitis Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A promising option to reduce the specific energy consumption and CO2 emissions at a conventional natural gas fired container glass furnace deals with the advanced utilization of the exhaust gases downstream the air regenerators by means of batch and cullet preheating. A 3-dimensional computational model that simulates this process using mass and heat transfer equations inside a preheater has been developed. A case study for an efficient small-sized container glass furnace is presented dealing with the investigation of the impact of different operating and design configurations on specific energy consumption, CO2 emissions, flue gas energy recovery, batch temperature and preheater efficiency. In specific, the effect of various parameters is studied, including the preheater’s dimensions, flue gas temperature, batch moisture content, glass pull, combustion air excess and cullet fraction. Expected energy savings margin is estimated to 12-15%.

  9. Industrial waste as a source for fabrication of composite ceramics-glass with a controlled porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adziski R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallurgical slag with granulation (-0.125+0.063mm and 20 wt% waste TV glass were used for obtaining a glass ceramic composite with a controlled porosity. This material obtained by sintering at 950oC/2h possessed thermal stability, integral porosity of 43.6% and E-modulus and bending strength of 12 GPa and 39 MPa, respectively. The composite was characterized with a permeability of 0.47 Da and generation of air bubbles with size of 1-4 mm in a water medium.

  10. 76 FR 19472 - Consolidated Glass and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax, VA; Notice of Negative... and Mirror Corporation, a Subsidiary of Guardian Industries Corporation, Galax, Virginia (subject firm... firm, stated that the Galax, Virginia facility is owned by ``Guardian Industries, a [[Page 19473...

  11. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  12. Operational characteristics of the NNPB plunger in the glass container industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penlington, Roger

    Although glass containers are an everyday item the process responsible for their production is not scientifically understood. Developments have occurred slowly over many years, mostly on a trial and error basis and in response to economic pressures. The narrow neck press and blow (NNPB) process has evolved in recent years as a result of attempts to reduce container weight. The fundamental component of the NNPB process is the plunger which is responsible for the initiation of the cavity and control of glass distribution within the container.The NNPB plunger functions as a form tool and as a heat exchanger, thus requiring a carefully selected range of properties. The Engineer responsible for tooling selection and operation has a limited resource of scientific knowledge to enable the performance of the process to be optimised.The current NNPB plunger is subject to high rates of wear and is directly responsible for product defects, thermal instability and limits process speed.The work presented here is a scientific study of current NNPB plunger technology. The plunger has been investigated in relation to the requirements of the glass container forming process. The materials used have been examined, before and after use and their wear modes explained. The thermal properties of the plunger have, as far as is possible, been examined during the forming cycle. When combined with results from the characterisation of transformations occurring in the material, during its service life, operational requirements have been explained. The ability of the NNPB plunger to remove heat from the glass has been investigated, and has illustrated significant deficiencies in the current arrangement. Details are given as to how these deficiencies may be overcome to enable the Engineer to regain control of the process.As a result of the study many phenomena exhibited by the NNPB plunger are now understood and may be related to the performance of the process.

  13. Combustion measurements in an industrial gas-fired flat-glass furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, J; Webb, B W; McQuay, M Q [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Huber, A M [Ford Motor Co., Glass Div., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Profiles of velocity, species concentration (O{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2}), wall incident radiative heat flux and temperature are reported in the combustion space of a regenerative, side-port, 550t/day, gas-fired flat-glass furnace. A region exists of fast-moving gases near the glass, with axial velocity components exceeding 20 m s{sup -1}, and a large recirculation zone near the crown. Temperatures as high as 1985 K in the flame and as low as 1750 K in the recirculation zone are reported. A region of intense reaction is observed near the glass, with large concentration gradients and incomplete combustion even in the tail of the flame. Local incident radiant fluxes on the crown were nearly uniform spatially at a level of 680 kW m{sup -2}. In the portnecks, flat inlet velocity profiles were measured with a magnitude of approximately 11 m s{sup -1}. Significant variations were observed in the exhaust profiles of most measured variables. Large errors in exhaust mass balance suggest a complex, three-dimensional flow with recirculation zones along the side walls of the portnecks. A nominal preheat air temperature of 1420 k and a variation of exhaust temperatures between 1630 K and 1835 K were noted. O{sub 2} concentrations as high as 8.4% were measured at the exit, suggesting a bypass of oxygen-rich flow around the flame. CO{sub 2} concentrations were the highest near the batch, where the glass reactions are the most intense. (Author)

  14. Waste heat recovery at the glass industry with the intervention of batch and cullet preheating

    OpenAIRE

    Dolianitis Ioannis; Giannakopoulos Dionysios; Hatzilau Christina-Stavrula; Karellas Sotirios; Kakaras Emmanuil; Nikolova Evelina; Skarpetis Georgios; Christodoulou Nikolaos; Giannoulas Nikolaos; Zitounis Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    A promising option to reduce the specific energy consumption and CO2 emissions at a conventional natural gas fired container glass furnace deals with the advanced utilization of the exhaust gases downstream the air regenerators by means of batch and cullet preheating. A 3-dimensional computational model that simulates this process using mass and heat transfer equations inside a preheater has been developed. A case study for an efficient small-sized containe...

  15. Use of glasses as industrial dosimeters; Utilisation des verres comme dosimetres industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestic, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Le Clerc, P.; Bonnaud, M. [Centre de Recherches des Glaceries de Saint-Gobain (France)

    1959-07-01

    Glasses have the property of colouring under the action of ionizing radiations. We endeavoured to specify the conditions under which the intensity of coloration can be used as a measure of the quantity of radiation to which the glass has been submitted. In the case of a glass loaded with cobalt, a study of the optical density at different wavelengths enabled us to find the factors governing the formation of coloured centres and their conservation in the glass. We give a set of calibrating curves for different values of these parameters (irradiation rate, irradiation temperature; fading time and fading temperature), enabling determination of radiation doses in the range from 10 000 to 1 000 000 rep from measured optical density. (author) [French] Les verres ont la propriete de se colorer sous l'action des rayonnements ionisants. Nous avons cherche a preciser les conditions dans lesquelles l'intensite de la coloration peut servir de mesure de la quantite du rayonnement auquel le verre a ete soumis. Dans le cas d'un verre charge au cobalt, l'etude de la densite optique a differentes longueurs d'onde a mis en evidence divers facteurs dont depend la formation des centres colores et leur conservation dans le verre. En prenant comme parametres ces divers facteurs (temperature d'irradiation, intensite d'irradiation, temperature de conservation et duree de conservation) nous avons etabli des courus d'etalonnage permettant la determination de doses entre 10 000 et 1 000 000 rep d'apres la densite optique observee. (auteur)

  16. Use of glasses as industrial dosimeters; Utilisation des verres comme dosimetres industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestic, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Le Clerc, P; Bonnaud, M [Centre de Recherches des Glaceries de Saint-Gobain (France)

    1959-07-01

    Glasses have the property of colouring under the action of ionizing radiations. We endeavoured to specify the conditions under which the intensity of coloration can be used as a measure of the quantity of radiation to which the glass has been submitted. In the case of a glass loaded with cobalt, a study of the optical density at different wavelengths enabled us to find the factors governing the formation of coloured centres and their conservation in the glass. We give a set of calibrating curves for different values of these parameters (irradiation rate, irradiation temperature; fading time and fading temperature), enabling determination of radiation doses in the range from 10 000 to 1 000 000 rep from measured optical density. (author) [French] Les verres ont la propriete de se colorer sous l'action des rayonnements ionisants. Nous avons cherche a preciser les conditions dans lesquelles l'intensite de la coloration peut servir de mesure de la quantite du rayonnement auquel le verre a ete soumis. Dans le cas d'un verre charge au cobalt, l'etude de la densite optique a differentes longueurs d'onde a mis en evidence divers facteurs dont depend la formation des centres colores et leur conservation dans le verre. En prenant comme parametres ces divers facteurs (temperature d'irradiation, intensite d'irradiation, temperature de conservation et duree de conservation) nous avons etabli des courus d'etalonnage permettant la determination de doses entre 10 000 et 1 000 000 rep d'apres la densite optique observee. (auteur)

  17. Treatment of copper industry waste and production of sintered glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri; Cheng, Ta-Wui

    2006-06-01

    Copper waste is iron-rich hazardous waste containing heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, Co, Pb. The results of leaching tests show that the concentration of these elements exceeds the Turkish and EPA regulatory limits. Consequently, this waste cannot be disposed of in its present form and therefore requires treatment to stabilize it or make it inert prior to disposal. Vitrification was selected as the technology for the treatment of the toxic waste under investigation. During the vitrification process significant amounts of the toxic organic and inorganic chemical compounds could be destroyed, and at the same time, the metal species are immobilized as they become an integral part of the glass matrix. The copper flotation waste samples used in this research were obtained from the Black Sea Copper Works of Samsun, Turkey. The samples were vitrified after being mixed with other inorganic waste and materials. The copper flotation waste and their glass-ceramic products were characterized by X-ray analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test. The products showed very good chemical durability. The glass-ceramics fabricated at 850 degrees C/2 h have a large application potential especially as construction and building materials.

  18. Profiles of Major Suppliers to the Automotive Industry : Vol. 3. Plastics, Glass and Fiberglass Suppliers to the Automotive Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    This study summarizes extensive information collected over a two-year period (October 1978 to 1980) on suppliers of parts and components, materials, and machine tools to the automotive industry in the United States. The objective of the study was to ...

  19. Determination of optimum mixing time for raw materials with the tracer method in the glass industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallyas, M; Gemesi, J; Kurinka, J

    1983-02-01

    The authors explain how the optimum mixing time for the raw materials for glass manufacture can be determined with the aid of the radioactive tracer method. Basing themselves on measurements, they indicate the change in the degree of mixing of the individual components (soda (Na-24), sodium sulphate, coke (La-140) and bone meal (P-32) as a function of mixing time. The optimum degree of mixing and mixing time for dry and for wet mixing are determined. Finally, data for determining the permissible storage time of the mixture are given.

  20. A Re-evaluation of the Physiochemistry of Glass on the Basis of Recent Developments and its Relevance to the Glass Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Bristogianni, Telesilla; Justino de Lima, Clarissa; Louter, Christian; Bos, Freek; Belis, Jan; Veer, Fred; Nijsse, Rob

    The classical image of glass is that of a rigid, transparent brittle material characterized by a non-crystalline microstructure. This 19th and 20th century image however is mostly based on the contrast between soda lime glass and metals. It does not really make sense in the 21th century where more

  1. Industrial high-rate (~14 nm/s) deposition of low resistive and transparent ZnOx:Al films on glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Deelen, J. van; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Habets, D.; Simons, P.J.P.M.; Janssen, A.C.; Beckers, E.H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum doped ZnOx (ZnOx:Al) films have been deposited on glass in an in-line industrial-type reactor by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process at atmospheric pressure. Tertiary-butanol has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc and trimethylaluminium as dopant gas. ZnOx:Al films can be

  2. High deposition rate of low resistive and transparent ZnO:Al on glass with an industrial moving belt APCVD reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Habets, D.; Simons, P.J.P.M.; Beckers, E.H.A.; Deelen, J. van

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum doped ZnOx (ZnOx:Al) films have been deposited on glass in an in-line industrial-type reactor by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process at atmospheric pressure. ZnOx:Al films can be grown at very high deposition rates of ~ 14 nm/s for a substrate speed from 150 mm/min to 500

  3. Revisiting the Glass Ceiling: Career Progression for Women in the Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ho, Ph.D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of women who enter the hospitality industry, there are relatively few hotel general managers who are female. Why? An ongoing project is exploring this topic through interviews of female hotel managers. This article provides representative excerpts from a few of the early interviews in Boston, which provide some understanding about the attitudes of such women toward their professional environment.

  4. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of

  5. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  6. Development of Conductivity Method as an Alternative to Titration for Hydrolytic Resistance Testing Used for Evaluation of Glass Vials Used in Pharmaceutical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Phillips, Joseph; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser

    The European Pharmacopeia surface test to analyze the hydrolytic resistance is a common industrial method to understand and ensure the quality of produced glass vials. Hydrolytic resistance is evaluated by calculating the alkalinity of water extract from autoclaved vials by titration. As an alternative to this titration technique, a conductivity technique was assessed, which directly measures the ions in the water extract. A conductivity meter with a 12 mm diameter electrode was calibrated with a 100 μS/cm conductivity standard and carryover minimized by rinsing the probe in a water beaker per analysis. The limit of quantification at 1 μS/cm was determined as having a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 compared with the water blank. The conductivity method was selective for glass-composing elements (boron, sodium, aluminum, silicon, potassium, and calcium) within the vial extract. Accuracies of spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm were ±7% and had linearity with coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of ≥0.9999. Intraday precision had a relative standard deviation (RSD) (n = 5) of ≤6% for spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm. Interday precision had a RSD (n = 4) of ≤6% for 10 vials from three glass vial lots. Conductivity of water extracts from nine sets of seven lots of glass vials had a precise linear relationship [R 2 = 0.9876, RSD = 1% (n = 9)] with titration volumes of the same lots. Conductivity results in μS/cm could be converted to titration volumes in milliliters by a conversion factor of 0.0275. The simplicity, sample stability, and individual vial analysis of the conductivity technique were more advantageous than the current titration technique. The quality of glass vials used as primary containers in the pharmaceutical industry is of concern due to recent observations of glass flake-like delamination, or lamellae, under specific storage conditions. The current European Pharmacopoeia method to assess

  7. Local structure near actinides and nucleating elements in borosilicate glass for nuclear industry: Results of X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Maire, D.

    1988-01-01

    Possibilities and limits of X-ray absorption spectroscopy for cation site description in silicate glasses and possible applications for complex glasses, like glass for fission product containment, are examined. In borosilicate glasses two types of sites are evidenced for actinides at the valence 4: Coordinance 6 sites with a narrow radial distribution for the distance An-0; higher coordination (7, 8 or more) with a wider and asymmetrical radial distribution. Proportion of low coordinance sites increases when cation size decreases (Th > Np). U and Np VI and V are characterized as actinyles with a chain 0-An-0 practically linear, coordinance in a plane perpendicular to this complex is probably 5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy allows an accurate description of actinide sites in fission product glasses [fr

  8. Penetration of natural gas in industrial processes for direct burning: the case of ceramics, cement and glass industries; Penetracao do gas natural em processos industriais de queima direta: caso das industrias ceramica, cimento e vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berni, Mauro Donizeti; Leite, Alvaro A. Furtado [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Dorileo, Ivo Leandro [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (NIEPE/UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Estudos em Planejamento Energetico; Bajay, Sergio Valdir [Universidade estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia], e-mail: bajay@fem.unicamp.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Industrial sector can use the natural gas (NG) as raw material, as fuel and in co-generation. The NG as fuel is used, predominantly, to produce heat in the Brazilian industries. That rate, both main forms of industrial use of the NG are its direct burning in kilns - when the direct contact is had with the product - and the supply of process heat through boilers, for instance. Direct burning is used in the ceramic, cement and glass industries. This work discuss the penetration opportunity of the NG in the direct burning regarding the fuel oil and other energy that it can substitute, the environmental effects and the co-generation possibilities in each one of the analyzed industrial blanches in this work. (author)

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  10. Study of parameters of heat treatment in obtaining glass ceramic materials with addition of the industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Martins, G.J.M.; Riella, H.G.; Matsinhe, Jonas; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The production of materials from crystallization of glass, called glass ceramic, have proved interesting by the possibility of development of different microstructures, with reduced grain size and the presence of residual amorphous phase in different quantities. The method that uses the differential thermal analysis (DTA) provides research on the material properties over a wide temperature range, it's widely applied to crystallization processes of glass ceramic materials. Within this context, this paper aims to study the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in glass ceramic materials in the system SiO 2 - Al 2 O 3 -Li 2 O, obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ash as source of aluminosilicates, through the technique of differential thermal analysis. (author)

  11. Development of Advanced Sensor Technologies for the United States Glass Industry - Final Report - 07/20/1995 - 08/19/1999; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, B. L.; Cannon, C.

    1999-01-01

    The glass industry, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), undertook a project to significantly improve temperature measurement in glass melters, thereby reducing energy usage through improved process control. AccuTru International determined that a new kind of protective sheath would improve the life and range of applications of the temperature measuring thermocouples. In cooperation with Corning, Inc., the University of Missouri-Rolla ceramics department conducted tests on a proprietary alumina sheath technology, which shows significant promise. In addition, AccuTru obtained DOE funding to develop a self-verifying sensor. The new sensor, with alumina sheath, was tested at a Corning facility, and the results exceeded expectations. Areas for additional development efforts were identified

  12. Roadmap 2030 Dutch Glass Industry. Towards a clean, efficient and cost-effective future; Routekaart 2030 Nederlandse Glasindustrie. Naar een schone, zuinige en rendabele toekomst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    This Roadmap is the result of the covenant signed by the Dutch glass industry and the Dutch national government in 2009 on a Long Term Agreement on Energy Efficiency. Participating companies committed to continuous improvement in energy performance in both manufacturing processes as well as the supply chain from raw material to final product. The Dutch glass industry has undertaken a strategic study regarding the possibilities of achieving far-reaching energy efficiency improvement by 2030. The overall industry's target is to realise an energy efficiency improvement of 25%, compared to its energy consumption and production level of 2009. Several related areas were identified for actions and measures for energy efficiency improvement: (1) Alternatives to primary raw materials; (2) Intensified use of secondary raw materials (cullet); (3) Innovations in batch preparation; (4) Innovations in glass composition; (5) Innovations in process control; (6) Innovations in furnace design; (7) New methods of waste heat recovery; (8) Improved performance of glass products [Dutch] Dit rapport is tot stand gekomen in het kader van de Meerjarenafspraak Energie-Efficientie ETS (Emission Trading System) ondernemingen, ook wel het MEE-convenant genoemd. Dit convenant nodigt de deelnemende sectoren uit tot het opstellen van een Routekaart voor 2030. De Routekaart is een strategische studie die inzichtelijk maakt hoe invulling wordt gegeven aan het realiseren van energie-efficientie verbeteringen binnen de bedrijven en in de keten op de route naar 2030. Hoofdstuk 1 is een introductie op de Routekaart 2030 en de wijze waarop de Routekaart tot stand is gekomen. Hoofdstuk 2 beschrijft in vogelvlucht de sector, op welke manier nu al invulling wordt gegeven aan duurzame ontwikkeling en energie, en geeft een beschrijving van de Vereniging van Nederlandse Glasfabrikanten (VNG). Hoofdstuk 3 beschrijft algemene trends en de visie van de sector op de toekomst. Daarnaast wordt de markt in 2030

  13. The LHC Cryomagnet Supports in Glass-Fiber Reinforced Epoxy A Large Scale Industrial Production with High Reproducibility in Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Poncet, A; Trigo, J; Parma, V

    2008-01-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production. The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004. This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance.

  14. THE LHC CRYOMAGNET SUPPORTS IN GLASS-FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY: A LARGE SCALE INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION WITH HIGH REPRODUCIBILITY IN PERFORMANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, A.; Struik, M.; Parma, V.; Trigo, J.

    2008-01-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production.The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004.This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance

  15. Reuse of the red brick waste and dust waste of blasting chamber (glass micro spheres) in the red ceramic industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.A.; Felippe, C.E.C.; Guimaraes, C.S.; Almeida, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    The search for alternative environmentally less aggressive disposal of solid waste has been adopted to reverse the negative scenario established by the improper disposal of these materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reuse of waste: leftover red brick from the civil construction and glass micro spheres, obtained from the blasting chamber, aiming to develop a ceramic product. Mixtures containing various amounts of waste were prepared. The ceramic pieces were burned at 1000 and 1200 deg C being tested for water absorption and tensile strength and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The analysis of volatile organic compounds released during the burning process was performed. The results indicate that the ceramic material produced has a high resistance although the analysis of gases from the burning point to a negative environmental impact. (author)

  16. Advanced temperature measurement system for the US glass industry melt tanks and delivery system. Phase 1 [final] report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Improved temperature measurement in the melting and delivery systems of the glass making process will aid in energy conservation. The ``Needs Analysis`` survey found the greatest problem was the inability to identify in situ decalibration (drift). Phase I objectives are: a more rugged reliable sensor; high quality inner protective sheath; improved data transmission hardened to the melt tank environs; a system that reduces or eliminates drift; and an improved outer protection sheath. Results show that 4 of the 5 problem areas have been resolved; with the help of the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla`s materials group, the fifth may be solvable. The major identified problem, the inability to identify in-situ drift has been solved.

  17. Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, I.; Wiesenberger, H.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of the industry in Austria. It gives a review of the structure and types of the industry, the legal framework and environmental policy of industrial relevance. The environmental situation of the industry in Austria is analyzed in detail, concerning air pollution (SO 2 , NO x , CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , N 2 O, NH 3 , Pb, Cd, Hg, dioxin, furans), waste water, waste management and deposit, energy and water consumption. The state of the art in respect of the IPPC-directives (European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau) concerning the best available techniques of the different industry sectors is outlined. The application of European laws and regulations in the Austrian industry is described. (a.n.)

  18. Glass and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.L.; Vacher, R.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Most glasses used as materials are oxides glasses that are produced by a quick quench of a liquid. Glasses are characterized by the absence of periodicity in the atomic arrangements, they do not have symmetries and do not present order over a long distance. This series of 4 short articles present: 1) the properties of glass and its industrial story, 2) the glass structure, 3) a forty years long story of glass as dies used to confine wastes and 4) the methodology used to study the behaviour of glass over very long periods of time. This methodology is based on 5 steps: 1) define and specify the material to study (the prediction of long term alteration of a material is nonsense unless you know well its initial properties), 2) identify all the alteration processes that are likely to happen, determine their kinetics and the influence of environmental parameters, 3) develop mathematical models in order to simulate long-term behaviour of glasses, 4) determine the release rates of the radionuclides confined in the glass, and 5) validate data and models, it is not possible to expect a complete validation of a model that will be extrapolated over tens of thousands of years, nevertheless some ways of validation can lead to a satisfactory level of confidence taking into account reasonable uncertainties. (A.C.)

  19. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    . African states as ... regarded as the most important ingredients that went to add value to land and labour in order for countries ... B. Sutcliffe Industry and Underdevelopment (Massachusetts Addison – Wesley Publishing Company. 1971), pp.

  20. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    scholar, Walt W. Rostow presented and supported this line of thought in his analysis of ... A Brief Historical Background of Industrialization in Africa ... indicative) The western model allowed for the political economy to be shaped by market.

  1. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  2. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  3. Electrochromic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  4. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  5. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  6. Smoke filtration in the glass industry. Thomson Videoglass` global approach with closed loop recycling; Fitration des fumees dans l`industrie du verre. L`approche globale avec recyclage en boucle fermee de thomson videoglass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocek, L. [Thomson Videoglass, 77 - Bagneaux-sur-Loing (France)

    1996-12-31

    Thomson Videoglass, an ISO 9002 certified manufacturer of glass components for Tv sets in France, has introduced a global closed-loop recycling dust filtration system for glass kilns; electrostatic filters and bag filters (for the lead-containing flat glass kiln) have been selected and collected dusts are recycled in the cone glass kiln. Energy savings, operating conditions, investment and operating costs are discussed together with filter corrosion, clogging-up and service life issues and dust extraction performances

  7. Pulsed sub-microsecond dielectric barrier discharge treatment of simulated glass manufacturing industry flue gas: removal of SO2 and NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khacef, A; Cormier, J M

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the removal of SO 2 and NOx from simulated glass manufacturing industry flue gas containing O 2 , N 2 , NO, NO 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 and H 2 O using a sub-microsecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. Removal efficiencies of SO 2 and NOx (NO+NO 2 ) were achieved as a function of gas temperature for two specific energies and two initial NO, NO 2 and SO 2 concentrations. The higher SO 2 and NOx removal efficiencies were achieved in a gas stream containing 163 ppm of SO 2 , 523 ppm of NO, 49 ppm of NO 2 , 14% of CO 2 , 8% of O 2 , 16% of H 2 O and N 2 as balance. The experimental results were evaluated using the energy cost or W-value (eV/molecule removed). About 100% of SO 2 and 36% of NOx were removed at a gas temperature of 100 deg. C with an energy cost of about 45 eV/molecule removed and 36 eV/molecule removed, respectively. These results indicate that DBD plasmas have the potential to remove SO 2 and NOx from gas streams without additives

  8. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  9. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  10. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  11. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  12. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fulchiron, Ren?; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legar?, V?ronique

    2015-01-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg ) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of ap...

  13. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  14. HLW immobilization in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  15. GLASS PLATES FOR MOTOR VEHICLES AND OTHER MEANS OF TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia CĂPĂŢÎNĂ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available At present, the majority of high quality glass plate is used in vehicle industry. The paper presents the technological process for obtaining glass plate, used in vehicle industry. Besides the usual attributes of high quality plane glass, those used in vehicle industry must not result in sharp and cutting splinters when broken, being dangerous for the passengers. This quality, due to which it is called safety glass, is obtained by various methods.

  16. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  17. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  18. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  19. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    with helium at high concentrations, doped with curium and irradiated in nuclear reactor showed a homogeneous microstructure free of helium bubbles, pores or cracking. The results of the present work were used to develop a long-term diffusion model of helium in an industrial R7T7 nuclear waste glass. The model considers the thermal history, the fracturing and the alpha activity of the glass. (author) [fr

  20. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...

  1. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  2. 76 FR 33179 - Petition Requesting Safeguards for Glass Fronts of Gas Vented Fireplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... 2058. Petitioner notes that the industry standard for gas vented fireplace heaters allows glass fronts... fireplace glass, the accessible location of the glass front, the attractiveness of fire to young children...

  3. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  4. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Ponsot, In?s M. M. M.; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K.; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low te...

  5. Modelling and analysis of a heating system for industrial application, using flat-plate solar-collectors with single and double cover glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraslis, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    A calculational methodology for dimensioning a flat-plate solar-collector arrangement, which fulfils the energy requirement of a heat transfer system in one of the steps of the uranium recovery process, from the uranium-phosphorus ore at Itataia, Ceara, in Brazil. The PROSOL-1 and PROSOL-2 computer codes for determining the total area required by collector arrangement-with single and double cover glasses, respectively- taking into account the system design and meteorological conditions of the regions, were used. These codes optimize the series/parallel arranges of collectors in the whole complex and, determine the water flow in each system and the average efficiency of the collector arrangement. The technical and economical feasibility for both collector arrangement with single and double cover glasses, were verified. It was concluded that, the last one is more advantageous, allowing a reduction of 30% in the total collector area. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Immobilization of high activity nuclear wastes in sintered glass. Fabrication of blocks at semi-industrial scale by hot pressing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, D.O.; Messi, N.B.; Riquelme, R.; Sterba, M.E.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sintering process under glass pressure has been studied as an alternative of melting with the aim of obtaining a monolytic material apt to preserve the high activity nuclear wastes. Different properties of the products obtained have been evaluated where the material is selected on the basis of the results attained. The purpose of this work is the equipment development and the process adjusting for the blocks obtainment. (Author) [es

  7. A New Look through the Glass Ceiling: Where Are the Women? The Status of Women in Management in Ten Selected Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingell, John D.; Maloney, Carolyn B.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) analyzed Current Population Survey (CPS) data for 1995-2000 to assess the situation of women managers in 10 industries that employ over 70 percent of women workers. Despite a sense of continued progress toward gender equality in the workplace, in the 10 industries employing 71 percent of United States (US) women…

  8. Glass compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  9. Glass enamel and glass-ceramic coatings for chemical apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Es'kov, A.S.; Oleinik, M.I.; Shabrova, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the known anticorrosion coatings used in chemical engineering, glass enamel base coatings are distinguished by such advantages as a high degree of continuity and chemical resistance. The paper describes basic principles for the creation of acid and alkali resistant glass enamel and ceramic coatings for chemical apparatus. As the result of investgations, glass enamel coatings with increased electrical conductivity and also experimental production compositions of chemical, temperature and radiation resistant coatings for protection of chemical equipment of 12Kh18N10T stainless steel have been developed. The coatings have successfully passed testing under service conditions. A new type of coating is short-term glass enamel, which may be recommended for use in chemical machinery manufacturing and other branches of industry in oxidation-free heating and forming of stainless steels

  10. Glass manufacturing through induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.; Paya, B.; Roscini, M.; Fautrelle, Y.; Tuaz, F.; Delage, D.

    1991-01-01

    Oxides and glasses are electrical and thermal insulators, but show the characteristic of being weakly conductors of electricity when they are melt. It is then possible to heat them through HF induction. This interesting property allows the development of a melting process in cold crucible induction furnace. The process is being studied and developed by a consortium made up of CFEI, CEA Marcoule, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE and MADYLAM laboratory. The studies include 2 parts: a) One experimental part to develop the technology and research for satisfying configurations, through a small size platform (10 to 30 kg/h). The long run continuous pouring melting tests made on different kinds of glass allow to go-on with industrial range units. b) One theoretical part to understand the magneto-thermo-hydraulic phenomenon hardly in relation with the heavy dependence of the physical characteristics (electrical and heat conductivities, viscosity) according to temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs [fr

  11. Determining the sustainability of ceramic and glass industry using environmental management tools; Determinacion de la sostenibilidad de la industria mineral de la ceramica y del vidrio mediante herramientas de gestion ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espi Rodriguez, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    In the last few years we have seen the creation of an everyday larger and varied series of are creating large and varied series of environmental management tools used to analyze and classify environmentally each mineral and its physical, economic and environmental circumstances. Thus we now, count with the Material Flow Analysis (MFA) of a mining operation, the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA), Energy and Exergy Analysis, Cost Benefit Environmental Analysis, Carbon Footprints, the Best Available Technology (BTA) and many others able to analyze and classify ore deposit site types, availability of resources, environmental impact conditions, transparency in communication and almost all crucial aspects related with the environmental geometry of the mining production process. This paper focuses on the application of some management tools that best fit to the minerals used in the ceramic and glass industry. (Author) 12 refs.

  12. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  13. Ceramics and glasses for radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.

    1984-06-01

    Borosilicate glasses are mainly choosen for the confinement of fission products; industrial plants are either in operation (AVM) or in construction. Studies of ceramics as a matrix haven't received real application [fr

  14. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  15. Application of waste glass in translucent and photocatalytic concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, van B.; Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Container glass aggregates and glass powder are waste products of the glass recycling industry. In this research, these products are incorporated in self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixtures, replacing conventional aggregates and fine powders. The SCC mixtures were designed using a particle packing

  16. Industrial garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The state of the global industrial garnet industry in 1999 is discussed. Industrial garnet mined in the U.S., which accounts for approximately one-third of the world's total, is usually a solid-solution of almandine and pyrope. The U.S. is the largest consumer of industrial garnet, using an estimated 47,800 st in 1999 as an abrasive and as a filtration medium in the petroleum industry, filtration plants, aircraft and motor vehicle manufacture, shipbuilding, wood furniture finishing operations, electronic component manufacture, ceramics manufacture, and glass production. Prices for crude concentrates ranged from approximately $50 to $110/st and refined garnet from $50 to $215/st in 1999, depending on type, source, quantity purchased, quality, and application.

  17. Challenges in commercial manufacture of radiation shielding glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive hot-cells employ Radiation Shielding Windows (RSWs), assembled from specialty glasses, developed exclusively for nuclear industry. RSWs serve the twin purpose of direct viewing and shielding protection to the operator and use various types of radiation resistant and optically compatible glasses, such as low-density borosilicate glass; medium-density glass with up to 45% Lead and high-density glass with over 70% lead. Some glasses are Ceria-doped for enhancing their resistance threshold to radiation browning. A clear view of future requirement, capital and environmental costs could be the driving force towards bringing about changes in melting practices, encourage melting development, and enhancing collaboration. With DAE and CGCRI working in tandem, production of the entire range of RSW glasses by an Indian glass industry participant may no longer be a distant dream

  18. Spectroscopic studies of irradiated glasses: Application in nuclear dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to study the effects of ionizing radiation on silicate glasses in order to develop a new dosimetry system simple, precise, stable and inexpensive. Indeed, changes in mechanical properties, optical and paramagnetic glasses when subjected to ionizing radiation. The prediction of long-term behavior, physical aging under irradiation, the glass is paramount. many studies have brought many ways to avoid obscuring glass windows used in nuclear reactors or hot cells and optical devices. Recently, much work has concentrated on the application of the color induced by irradiation for developing a recyclable glass in the glass industry is of great interest economically and environmentally.

  19. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  20. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included

  1. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  2. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  3. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  4. Heterogeneities in nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladirat, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The industrial vitrification of high level radioactive wastes is a 2 stage process. During the first stage, the concentrated solution is heated in a spinning resistance oven at the temperature of 400 Celsius degrees till evaporation and calcination. The second stage begins when the dry residue falls into a melting pot that is maintained at a temperature of 1100-1150 Celsius degrees. Glass fretting is added and the glass is elaborated through the fusion of the different elements present in the melting pot. Heterogeneities in the glass may be associated to: - the presence in the solution to vitrify of insoluble elements from the dissolution of the fuel (RuO 2 , Rh, Pd), - the presence of minuscule metal scraps (Zr) that have been produced during the cutting of the fuel element, - the failures to conform to the technical specifications of the vitrification process, for instance, temperatures or flow rates when introducing the different elements in the melting pot. (A.C.)

  5. Production of highly porous glass-ceramics from metallurgical slag, fly ash and waste glass

    OpenAIRE

    Mangutova Bianka V.; Fidancevska Emilija M.; Milosevski Milosav I.; Bossert Joerg H.

    2004-01-01

    Glass-ceramics composites were produced based on fly-ash obtained from coal power stations, metallurgical slag from ferronickel industry and waste glass from TV monitors, windows and flasks. Using 50% waste flask glass in combination with fly ash and 20% waste glass from TV screens in combination with slag, E-modulus and bending strength values of the designed systems are increased (system based on fly ash: E-modulus from 6 to 29 GPa, and bending strength from 9 to 75 MPa). The polyurethane f...

  6. Radionuclides containment in nuclear glasses. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gin, Stephane; Jollivet, Patrick; Tribet, Magaly; Peuget, Sylvain; Schuller, Sophie [CEA Marcoule, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). DE2D SEVT

    2017-07-01

    Radioactive waste vitrification has been carried out industrially in several countries for nearly 40 years. Research into the formulation and long term behavior of high and intermediate level waste glasses, mainly borosilicate compositions, is still continuing in order to (i) safely condition new types of wastes and (ii) design and demonstrate the safety of the disposal of these long-lived waste forms in a deep geological repository. This article presents a summary of current knowledge on the formulation, irradiation resistance and the chemical durability of these conditioning materials, with a special focus on the fate of radionuclides during glass processing and aging. It is shown that, apart from the situation for certain elements with very low incorporation rate in glass matrices, vitrification in borosilicate glass can enable waste loadings of up to ∝20 wt% while maintaining the glass homogeneity for geological time scales and guaranteeing a high stability level in spite of irradiation and water contact.

  7. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  8. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on supplementary comparison APMP-T-S3-03 of industrial platinum resistance and liquid in glass thermometers from -40 °C to 250 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norranim, Uthai; Nguyen, Mong Kim; Ballico, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial thermometers such as industrial platinum resistance thermometers (iprts) and liquid-in-glass thermometers (LIGTs) are widely used in industry. Because Key Comparisons are limited to direct realizations of ITS-90, and not all APMP NMIs have participated in them, the national metrology institutes (NMIs) of Thailand and Australia (NIMT and NIMA) organized an APMP supplementary comparison to support the approval of CMCs (calibration and measurement capabilities) for these laboratories. The comparison, performed in 2003, covered the range from -40.0 °C to 250.0 °C, using IPRTs (Hart Scientific 5626-12-S), total immersion (ASTM 62C, 120C) and partial immersion (ASTM 40C) LIGTs. Ten NMIs from the APMP: KIM-LIPI (Indonesia), ITDI (Philippines), MSL (New Zealand), NBSM (Nepal), NMIA (Australia), NIMT (Thailand), SCL (Hong Kong), SIRIM (Malaysia), SPRING (Singapore) and VMI (Vietnam) were divided into two loops to shorten the circulation time, and these were linked by the two pilot laboratories. This report describes details of the artifacts, the circulation schedule, the measurement procedures, the results submitted by participants, uncertainties and the analysis of the results. Reference values calculated using simple mean, median and weighted mean were consistent with each other, but as the Birge criterion was satisfied, the weighted mean with its lower uncertainty was adopted. The artifacts were found to be stable over the comparison and the results of the loop linking labs consistent, allowing an uncertainty of 2 mK to 4 mK to be achieved for the IPRT reference value and 10 mK to 20 mK for the LIGT reference values. These uncertainties allowed the comparison data to be used to adequately test the uncertainties of all the participant laboratories, and hence to directly support their CMC claims. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database

  9. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently.

  10. A machine learning approach for the classification of metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossett, Eric; Perim, Eric; Toher, Cormac; Lee, Dongwoo; Zhang, Haitao; Liu, Jingbei; Zhao, Shaofan; Schroers, Jan; Vlassak, Joost; Curtarolo, Stefano

    Metallic glasses possess an extensive set of mechanical properties along with plastic-like processability. As a result, they are a promising material in many industrial applications. However, the successful synthesis of novel metallic glasses requires trial and error, costing both time and resources. Therefore, we propose a high-throughput approach that combines an extensive set of experimental measurements with advanced machine learning techniques. This allows us to classify metallic glasses and predict the full phase diagrams for a given alloy system. Thus this method provides a means to identify potential glass-formers and opens up the possibility for accelerating and reducing the cost of the design of new metallic glasses.

  11. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  12. Microporous glasses for pro-ecological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procyk, B.; Stoch, L.; Kubacki, M.; Rewilak, M.; Soltysiak, J.

    1994-01-01

    Microporous glasses are obtained by appropriate thermal and chemical treatment. On account of their sorptive properties microporous glasses represent an excellent material for storing high-energy radioactive waste products in nuclear power engineering and for binding toxins in natural environment. Microporous glasses may be used as membranes non-organic, as gel filling in chromatography. They may find application in biochemistry, chemical, metallurgical, electrochemical and other industries. The above applications depend on the internal arrangement, size and shape of pores. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  13. Immobilization of Uranium Silicides in Sintered Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, P.; Russo, D.O.; Heredia, A.D.; Sanfilippo, M.

    2003-01-01

    High activity nuclear spent fuels vitrification by fusion is a well known technology which has industrial scale in France, England, Japan, EEUU. Borosilicates glasses are used in this process.Sintered glasses are an alternative to the immobilization task in which there is also a wide experience around the world.The available technics are: cold pressing and sintering , hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing.This work compares Borosilicates and Iron silicates sintered glasses behaviour when different ammounts of nuclear simulated waste is added

  14. ION EXCHANGE IN GLASS-CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness. There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass. The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change.This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.

  15. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → A recycling/treatment process to remove lead on funnel glass surface is described. → Utilizing recycled funnel glass in mortar can reduce hazardous CRT glass wastes. → Effects of CRT glass content on the properties of cement mortar are studied. → Fly ash can effectively mitigate ASR expansion of mortar even at 100% glass content. → Alkaline medium in cement matrix successfully prevented the leaching of lead. - Abstract: Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production.

  16. Photoelastic response of permanently densified oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Mauro, John C.; Thirion, Lynn M.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2017-05-01

    The stress-induced birefringence (photoelastic response) in oxide glasses has important consequences for several applications, including glass for flat panel displays, chemically strengthened cover glass, and advanced optical glasses. While the effect of composition on the photoelastic response is relatively well documented, the effect of pressure has not been systematically studied. In this work, we evaluate the effect of hot isostatic compression on the photoelastic response of ten oxide glasses within two commonly used industrial glass families: aluminosilicates and boroaluminosilicates. Hot isostatic compression generally results in decreasing modifier-oxygen bond lengths and increasing network-former coordination numbers. These structural changes should lead to an increase in the stress optic coefficient (C) according to the model of Zwanziger et al., which can successfully predict the composition and structure dependence of C. However, in compressed glasses, we observe the opposite trend, viz., a decrease in the stress optic coefficient as a result of pressurization. We discuss this result based on measured changes in refractive index and elastic moduli within the context of atomic and lattice effects, building on the pioneering work of Mueller. We propose that the pressure-induced decrease in C is a result of changes in the shear modulus due to underlying topological changes in the glass network.

  17. Three-dimensional printing of transparent fused silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Frederik; Arnold, Karl; Bauer, Werner; Schild, Dieter; Keller, Nico; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Nargang, Tobias M.; Richter, Christiane; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2017-04-01

    Glass is one of the most important high-performance materials used for scientific research, in industry and in society, mainly owing to its unmatched optical transparency, outstanding mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance as well as its thermal and electrical insulating properties. However, glasses and especially high-purity glasses such as fused silica glass are notoriously difficult to shape, requiring high-temperature melting and casting processes for macroscopic objects or hazardous chemicals for microscopic features. These drawbacks have made glasses inaccessible to modern manufacturing technologies such as three-dimensional printing (3D printing). Using a casting nanocomposite, here we create transparent fused silica glass components using stereolithography 3D printers at resolutions of a few tens of micrometres. The process uses a photocurable silica nanocomposite that is 3D printed and converted to high-quality fused silica glass via heat treatment. The printed fused silica glass is non-porous, with the optical transparency of commercial fused silica glass, and has a smooth surface with a roughness of a few nanometres. By doping with metal salts, coloured glasses can be created. This work widens the choice of materials for 3D printing, enabling the creation of arbitrary macro- and microstructures in fused silica glass for many applications in both industry and academia.

  18. Fiscal 1999 technical achievement report. Development project on international standards for supporting new industry (Standardization of method for evaluating physical properties of new glass at high temperatures); 1999 nendo shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. New glass koon bussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In the manufacture and processing of high quality glass to be used with electronic devices and displays, values representing its physical properties at high temperatures, such as viscosity, density, cubical expansion coefficient, and surface tension are necessary. Studies were conducted about techniques for evaluating physical values of such high temperature molten materials, and efforts were under way to develop the research results into international standards. Techniques for measuring physical values of high temperature molten soda ash based glass were improved for higher precision, and techniques for evaluating physical values of high temperature molten borosilicate glass were studied. Delegates were sent to International Commission on Glass (ICG) and technical committee TC18 for joining discussion, decision was made that researchers participate in robin tests on molten glass thermal conductivity, density, and cubical expansion coefficient, and pertinent activities were launched. (NEDO)

  19. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  20. Effect of Ba in the glass characteristics of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive 137 Cs extracted from high level nuclear waste, when immobilized in a suitable matrix can be used as a γsource in medical industry. Iron phosphate glass (IPG) is one of a suitable matrix for the immobilization of 137 Cs prior to the immobilization of 137 Cs in IPG, it is essential to optimize the immobilization conditions using natural (inactive) cesium. Glass characteristics of inactive Cs loaded iron phosphate glasses were already explored in our earlier studies. However, the change in glass characteristics of 137 Cs loaded iron phosphate glass to 137 Ba loaded iron phosphate glass need to be studied before the immobilization of 137 Cs in iron phosphate glass as 137 Cs transforms to 137 Ba due to nuclear transmutation ( 137 Cs(β,γ) 137 Ba). This paper reports the studies on such a behaviour by incorporating inactive Ba in cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses. Cs and Ba loaded iron phosphate glasses were prepared by melt quench technique in air using appropriate amounts of Fe 2 O 3 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 , Ba(OH) 2.8 H 2 O and Cs 2 CO 3 . The chemicals were added such that the glass formed possesses the batch composition of (a) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -45 wt. % Cs 2 O-5 wt % BaO-P 2 O 5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs45Ba5); (b) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -25 wt. % Cs 2 O-25 wt % BaO-P 2 O5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs25Ba25). The thermal expansion measurements were also carried out using a home-built quartz push-rod dilatometer. The data related to change in thermal expansion behaviour, glass forming ability, glass stability and structural changes in phosphate network due to the partial replacement of Cs with Ba will also be discussed. (author)

  1. Characterization of the R7T7 LWR reference glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacaud, F.; Fillet, C.; Baudin, G.; Bastien-Thiry, H.

    1990-01-01

    Characterization describes the glass properties by means of standard tests with no attempt to assess its long-term behavior. Characterization involved complementary comparative investigations of nonradioactive laboratory glass specimens, radioactive glass specimens prepared in laboratory hot cells, and nonradioactive industrial glass samples fabricated in the full-scale continuous vitrification prototype facility (specimens were taken from the casting stream and core-samples were taken from a 200 kg glass block after cooling in the canister). Additional measurements are planned on actual radioactive glass samples fabricated in the R7 facility at La Hague. The results are indicated for each of the properties studied: physical, thermal and mechanical properties; structure and homogeneity examination; thermal stability and crystallization; resistance to chemical corrosion; irradiation resistance and volatilization. Comparative examination of glass samples of different origins showed consistent properties

  2. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  3. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  4. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  5. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  6. Glass Ceiling Converted Into Glass Transparency: A Study On The Factors Making Women Executives Successful In The Indian Banking Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdeva, Dr Geeta

    2014-01-01

    Economic reforms in the Indian economy along with gradual opening up of a conservative society to a modern society preceded breaking the glass ceiling or conversion Glass ceiling into a Glass Transparency in the Indian Banking Sector. This is backed by a recent study of 240 top Indian companies by EMA Partners, the global executive-search firm, which says more than a half of India's women chief executives are accounted for by the banking and financial services industry. This paper studie...

  7. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  8. Viscous Control of the Foam Glass Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    The production of foam glass as heat insulating material is an important industrial process because it enables low-cost recycling of glass waste from a variety of chemical compositions. Optimization of the foaming process of new glass waste compositions is time consuming, since many factors affect...... the foaming process such as temperature, particle size, type and concentration of foaming agent. The foaming temperature is one of the key factors, because even small temperature changes can affect the melt viscosity by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, it is important to establish the viscosity range...... in which the foaming process should take place, particularly when the type of recycled cullet is changed or several types of cullet are mixed in one batch. According to recent glass literature, the foaming process should occur at viscosity 103 to 105 Pa s. However, no systematic studies have hitherto been...

  9. Effects of Mixed Alkaline Earth Oxides in Potash Silicate Glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of mixed alkaline earth oxide in potash silicate glasses with regards to their physical properties. More recently; there has been an increase in the demand for light weight glasses which retains their physical and chemical properties for both domestic and industrial applications.

  10. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  11. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  12. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...

  13. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Wang, Li-Min, E-mail: simone.capaccioli@unipi.it, E-mail: Limin-Wang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, and College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Labardi, Massimiliano [CNR-IPCF, Sede Secondaria Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Capaccioli, Simone, E-mail: simone.capaccioli@unipi.it, E-mail: Limin-Wang@ysu.edu.cn [CNR-IPCF, Sede Secondaria Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, Pisa University, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Paluch, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2016-05-07

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  14. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-05-07

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  15. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  16. Nucleation and growth of a multicomponent metallic glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion resistance (Karve and Kulkarni 1985). The industrial ... Thermal analysis has been extensively used for study- ... is extremely important to determine the activation energy ... nucleation and growth, respectively for the metallic glass.

  17. Glass Masonry - Experimental Verification of Bed Joint under Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fíla, J.; Eliášová, M.; Sokol, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Glass is considered as a traditional material for building industry but was mostly used for glazing of the windows. At present, glass is an integral part of contemporary architecture where glass structural elements such as beams, stairs, railing ribs or columns became popular in the last two decades. However, using glass as structural material started at the beginning of 20th century, when masonry from hollow glass blocks were used. Using solid glass brick is very rare and only a few structures with solid glass bricks walls have been built in the last years. Pillars and walls made from solid glass bricks are mainly loaded by compression and/or bending from the eccentricity of vertical load or wind load. Due to high compressive strength of glass, the limiting factor of the glass masonry is the joint between the glass bricks as the smooth surface requires another type of mortar / glue compared to traditional masonry. Shear resistance and failure modes of brick bed joint was determined during series of tests using various mortars, two types of surface treatment and different thickness of the mortar joint. Shear tests were completed by small scale tests for mortar - determination of flexural and compressive strength of hardened mortar.

  18. Influence of glass furnace operational conditions on the evaporation from soda-lime and borosilicate glass melts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2000-01-01

    The evaporation of sodium and boron species from the melts in industrial glass furnaces leads to emissions of particulates (dust) and to furnace atmospheres containing reactive evaporation products. These reactive species, especially alkali vapors, can react with the superstructure refractories

  19. Dependence of Glass Mechanical Properties on Thermal and Pressure History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauchy, Mathieu

    Predicting the properties of new glasses prior to manufacturing is a topic attracting great industrial and scientific interest. Mechanical properties are currently of particular interest given the increasing demand for stronger, thinner, and more flexible glasses in recent years. However, as a non......-equilibrium material, the structure and properties of glass depend not only on its composition, but also on its thermal and pressure histories. Here we review our recent findings regarding the thermal and pressure history dependence of indentation-derived mechanical properties of oxide glasses....

  20. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  1. Fractography of glass

    CERN Document Server

    Tressler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    As the first major reference on glass fractography, contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive account of the fracture of glass as well as various fracture surface topography Contributors discuss optical fibers, glass containers, and flatglass fractography In addition, papers explore fracture origins; the growth of the original flaws of defects; and macroscopic fracture patterns from which fracture patterns evolve This volume is complete with photographs and schematics

  2. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  3. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  4. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  5. Silicate glasses. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e. borosilicate glass. A historical overview of waste form development programs in nine countries is followed by a summary of the design criteria for borosilicate glass compositions glass compositions. In the sections on glass properties the waste form is characterized in terms of potential alterations under the influence of heat, thermal gradients, radiation, aqueous solutions and combinations thereof. The topics are phase transformations, mechanical properties, radiation effects and chemical durability. The results from studies of volcanic glasses, as natural analogues for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses in order to verify predictions obtained from short-term tests in the laboratory, have been compiled in a special section on natural analogues. A special section on advanced vitrification techniques summarizes the various actual and potential processing schemes and describes the facilities. The literature has been considered until 1985. (author). 430 refs.; 68 figs.; 29 tabs

  6. Wetting and surface tension of bismate glass melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Seung-Bo; Kim, Dong-Sun; Hwang, Seongjin; Kim, Hyungsun

    2009-01-01

    Lead oxide glass frits are used widely in the electronics industry for low-temperature firing. On the other hand, one of the low-sintering and low-melting lead-free glass systems available, the bismate glass system, is considered to be an alternative to lead oxide glass. In order to extend the applications of Bi 2 O 3 glasses, this study examined the thermophysical properties of low-melting Bi 2 O 3 -B 2 O 3 -ZnO-BaO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 glass frits with various ZnO/B 2 O 3 ratios. The fundamental thermal properties, such as glass transition temperature and softening point, were examined by differential thermal analysis and a glass softening point determination system. The wetting angles, viscosities and surface tension of the various bismate glasses on an alumina substrate were measured using hot-stage microscopy and the sessile drop method. These thermophysical properties will be helpful in understanding the work of adhesion and the liquid spread kinetics of glass frits.

  7. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  8. Model based energy benchmarking for glass furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardeshpande, Vishal; Gaitonde, U.N.; Banerjee, Rangan

    2007-01-01

    Energy benchmarking of processes is important for setting energy efficiency targets and planning energy management strategies. Most approaches used for energy benchmarking are based on statistical methods by comparing with a sample of existing plants. This paper presents a model based approach for benchmarking of energy intensive industrial processes and illustrates this approach for industrial glass furnaces. A simulation model for a glass furnace is developed using mass and energy balances, and heat loss equations for the different zones and empirical equations based on operating practices. The model is checked with field data from end fired industrial glass furnaces in India. The simulation model enables calculation of the energy performance of a given furnace design. The model results show the potential for improvement and the impact of different operating and design preferences on specific energy consumption. A case study for a 100 TPD end fired furnace is presented. An achievable minimum energy consumption of about 3830 kJ/kg is estimated for this furnace. The useful heat carried by glass is about 53% of the heat supplied by the fuel. Actual furnaces operating at these production scales have a potential for reduction in energy consumption of about 20-25%

  9. Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials

  10. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  11. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  12. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  13. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  14. Nucleation in ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, G.L.A.; Waal, de H.

    1989-01-01

    Nucleation rates were detd. in a ZrF4-BaF2-NaF-LaF3-AlF3 glass (ZBLAN) using an optical method. The results were compared with a similar glass having a slightly different compn. The difference in the nucleation rate is explained by classical nucleation theory using calcd. free-energy differences

  15. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  16. Polymorphism in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, L.M.; Nikolaeva, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    To defect phase interfaces and spasmodic properties change, the inhomogeneity and the second radiation effects in quartz glass, metamict phase and intermediate states have been investigated. When irradiating with fast neutrons the transformation of quartz glass - metamict phase occurs completely. The transformation is completed at 2x10 20 part./cm 2 dose. Thermal treatment not only increases the number of inhomogeneities but also results in increasing quartz glass density. Annealing transforms the metamict phase into common quartz glass at 1400 K. The fact, that thermal treatment results in the complete transformation of metamict phase into quartz glass, and the inverse transformation occurs only partially, is quite regular, as the metamict phase has a lesser entropy and is a more ordered state. It is shown that different amorphous phases of a chemical composition have different structures and properties, that there are interfaces between them, and the transformation from one state to another in microvolumes is realized spasmodically and requires expenditure of energy

  17. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  18. Glass-ceramics: Their production from wastes - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlings, R.D.; Wu, J.P.; Boccaccini, A.R. [University of London, London (United Kingdom). Imperial College of Science & Technology, Dept. of Medicine

    2006-02-15

    Glass-ceramics are polycrystalline materials of fine microstructure that are produced by the controlled crystallisation (devitrification) of a glass. Numerous silicate based wastes, such as coal combustion ash, slag from steel production, fly ash and filter dusts from waste incinerators, mud from metal hydrometallurgy, different types of sludge as well as glass cullet or mixtures of them have been considered for the production of glass-ceramics. Developments of glass-ceramics from waste using different processing methods are described comprehensively in this review, covering R&D work carried out worldwide in the last 40 years. Properties and applications of the different glass-ceramics produced are discussed. The review reveals that considerable knowledge and expertise has been accumulated on the process of transformation of silicate waste into useful glass-ceramic products. These glass-ceramics are attractive as building materials for usage as construction and architectural components or for other specialised technical applications requiring a combination of suitable thermo-mechanical properties. Previous attempts to commercialise glass-ceramics from waste and to scale-up production for industrial exploitation are also discussed.

  19. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  20. Cold-crucible fabrication of nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification has stood the nuclear industry in good stead, for many years now, as a safe long-term conditioning technology for high-level waste. Major advances are nonetheless still being made, with the development of the cold-crucible technology, affording as it does new possibilities, in terms of volume reduction, and of extending the range of waste products amenable to incorporation. Indeed, by allowing higher melting temperatures to be achieved (1200 - 1400 C degrees), this process opens the way to a considerable increase in glass production capacities, and the fabrication of novel matrices, involving higher incorporation rates than current glasses. In the cold-crucible technology, materials put into the crucible are heated directly through induction. The crucible made of metal is cooled by water circulation. Where the glass comes into contact with the cold wall, a thin layer of solidified glass forms, with a thickness of 5-10 mm preventing the metal forming the crucible from coming into contact with the molten glass. A full scale pilot of the cold crucible was constructed at the La Hague vitrification workshop

  1. Oxynitride glasses: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.R.; Clausell, C.; Barba, A.

    2016-07-01

    Oxynitride glasses are special types of silicates or silicoaluminates which have been the object of many studies over the last forty years. They can be prepared by means of various complex methods, leading to variable levels of nitrogen incorporation, though in all cases giving limited transparency in the visible range. More recently, a new family of oxynitride glasses incorporating fluorine has been investigated. This paper outlines the effect of composition, in particular nitrogen and fluorine content, on properties such as glass transition temperature, hardness, Young's modulus, compactness and molar volume. (Author)

  2. Orbital glass in HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  3. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  4. Modelling of the glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution in the compounding of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloke, P.; Herken, T.; Schöppner, V.; Rudloff, J.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Walther, Dridger, A.

    2014-05-01

    The use of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for the production of highly stressed parts in the plastics processing industry has experienced an enormous boom in the last few years. The reasons for this are primarily the improvements to the stiffness and strength properties brought about by fiber reinforcement. These positive characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced polymers are governed predominantly by the mean glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution. It is not enough to describe the properties of a plastics component solely as a function of the mean glass fiber length [1]. For this reason, a mathematical-physical model has been developed for describing the glass fiber length distribution in compounding. With this model, it is possible on the one hand to optimize processes for the production of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, and, on the other, to obtain information on the final distribution, on the basis of which much more detailed statements can be made about the subsequent properties of the molded part. Based on experimental tests, it was shown that this model is able to accurately describe the change in glass fiber length distribution in compounding.

  5. Production of highly porous glass-ceramics from metallurgical slag, fly ash and waste glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangutova Bianka V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics composites were produced based on fly-ash obtained from coal power stations, metallurgical slag from ferronickel industry and waste glass from TV monitors, windows and flasks. Using 50% waste flask glass in combination with fly ash and 20% waste glass from TV screens in combination with slag, E-modulus and bending strength values of the designed systems are increased (system based on fly ash: E-modulus from 6 to 29 GPa, and bending strength from 9 to 75 MPa. The polyurethane foam was used as a pore creator which gave the material porosity of 70(5% (fly ash-glass composite and a porosity of 65( 5% (slag-glass composite. E-modulus values of the designed porous systems were 3.5(1.2 GPa and 8.1(3 GPa, while the bending strength values were 6.0(2 MPa and 13.2(3.5 MPa, respectively. These materials could be used for the production of tiles, wall bricks, as well as for the construction of air diffusers for waste water aeration.

  6. Physical Characteristics and Technology of Glass Foam from Waste Cathode Ray Tube Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mucsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the laboratory investigation of cathode-ray-tube- (CRT- glass-based glass foam, the so-called “Geofil-Bubbles” which can be applied in many fields, mainly in the construction industry (lightweight concrete aggregate, thermal and sound insulation, etc.. In this study, the main process engineering material properties of raw materials, such as particle size distribution, moisture content, density, and specific surface area, are shown. Then, the preparation of raw cathode ray tube glass waste is presented including the following steps: crushing, grinding, mixing, heat curing, coating, and sintering. Experiments were carried out to optimize process circumstances. Effects of sintering conditions—such as temperature, residence time, and particle size fraction of green pellet—on the mechanical stability and particle density of glass foam particles were investigated. The mechanical stability (abrasion resistance was tested by abrasion test in a Deval drum. Furthermore, the cell structure was examined with optical microscopy and SEM. We found that it was possible to produce foam glass (with proper mechanical stability and particle density from CRT glass. The material characteristics of the final product strongly depend on the sintering conditions. Optimum conditions were determined: particle size fraction was found to be 4–6 mm, temperature 800°C, and residence time 7.5 min.

  7. Assessment of water/glass interactions in waste glass melter operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Chapman, C.C.; Buelt, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    A study was made to assess the possibility of a vapor explosion in a liquid-fed glass melter and during off-standard conditions for other vitrification processes. The glass melter considered is one designed for the vitrification of high-level nuclear wastes and is comprised of a ceramic-lined cavity with electrodes for joule heating and processing equipment required to add feed and withdraw glass. Vapor explosions needed to be considered because experience in other industrial processes has shown that violent interactions can occur if a hot liquid is mixed with a cooler, vaporizable liquid. Available experimental evidence and theoretical analyses indicate that destructive glass/water interactions are low probability events, if they are possible at all. Under standard conditions, aspects of liquid-fed melter operation which work against explosive interactions include: (1) the aqueous feed is near its boiling point; (2) the feed contains high concentrations of suspended particles; (3) molten glass has high viscosity (greater than 20 poise); and (4) the glass solidifies before film boiling can collapse. While it was concluded that vapor explosions are not expected in a liquid-fed melter, available information does not allow them to be ruled out altogether. Several precautionary measures which are easily incorporated into melter operation procedures were identified and additional experiments were recommended

  8. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  9. Valorization of sugarcane bagasse ash: producing glass-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, S R; Magalhães, R S; Arenales, A; Souza, A E; Romero, M; Rincón, J M

    2014-02-15

    Some aluminosilicates, for example mullite and wollastonite, are very important in the ceramic and construction industries. The most significant glass-ceramic for building applications has wollastonite as the main crystal phase. In this work we report on the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) to produce glass-ceramics with silicates as the major crystalline phases. The glasses (frits) were prepared by mixing ash, limestone (calcium and magnesium carbonates) and potassium carbonate as the fluxing agent. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the chemical composition of the glasses and their crystallization was assessed by using thermal analysis (DTA/DSC/TGA) and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that glass-ceramic material can be produced with wollastonite as the major phase, at a temperature lower than 900 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  11. Super ionic conductive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  12. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  13. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  14. Producing glass-ceramics from waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Rawlings, R.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    An overview is given of recent research at the Department of Materials of Imperial College, London, UK, concerning the production of useful glass-ceramic products from industrial waste materials. The new work, using controlled crystallisation to improve the properties of vitrified products, could help to solve the problem of what to do with increasing amounts of slag, fly ash and combustion dust. The results show, that it is possible to produce new materials with interesting magnetic and constructive properties.

  15. HYBRID COOLING SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1980-03-01

    Mar 1, 1980 ... and plastic-ware production. ... molds in glass and plastic forming processes. ... increased more than five times over that achieved by using the gas (air) ... industrial manufacture. 2. .... commercial forming machine with the.

  16. 2000 survey of window manufacturers on the subject of switchable glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Sottile, Gregory M.

    2001-11-01

    The results of a 2000 survey of United States window manufacturers on the subject of switchable glass are discussed. The areas covered in this paper include awareness of the overall product category of switchable glass and various types of switchable glass, attitudes toward specific features of switchable glass, expectations for manufacturer production of such products, expectations for market penetration rates among end-product consumers, levels of price sensitivity among window manufacturers regarding switchable glass, and expectations for the pace of new product development within the window industry over the next five years.

  17. Study of curved glass photovoltaic module and module electrical isolation design requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    The design of a 1.2 by 2.4 m curved glass superstrate and support clip assembly is presented, along with the results of finite element computer analysis and a glass industry survey conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Installed costs for four curved glass module array configurations are estimated and compared with cost previously reported for comparable flat glass module configurations. Electrical properties of candidate module encapsulation systems are evaluated along with present industry practice for the design and testing of electrical insulation systems. Electric design requirements for module encapsulation systems are also discussed.

  18. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  19. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.; Pickenheim, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  20. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  1. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  2. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado-Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Frizon, F.; Gin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage

  3. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  4. Electrical properties of phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogus-Milankovic, A; Santic, A; Reis, S T; Day, D E

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the electrical properties of phosphate glasses where transition metal oxide such as iron oxide is the network former and network modifier is presented. Phosphate glasses containing iron are electronically conducting glasses where the polaronic conduction is due to the electron hopping from low to high iron valence state. The identification of structural defects caused by ion/polaron migration, the analysis of dipolar states and electrical conductivity in iron phosphate glasses containing various alkali and mixed alkali ions was performed on the basis of the impedance spectroscopy (IS). The changes in electrical conductivity from as-quenched phosphate glass to fully crystallized glass (glass-ceramics) by IS are analyzed. A change in the characteristic features of IS follows the changes in glass and crystallized glass network. Using IS, the contribution of glass matrix, crystallized grains and grain boundary to the total electrical conductivity for iron phosphate glasses was analyzed. It was shown that decrease in conductivity is caused by discontinuities in the conduction pathways as a result of the disruption of crystalline network where two or more crystalline phases are formed. Also, phosphate-based glasses offer a unique range of biomaterials, as they form direct chemical bonding with hard/soft tissue. The surface charges of bioactive glasses are recognized to be the most important factors in determining biological responses. The improved bioactivity of the bioactive glasses as a result of the effects of the surface charges generated by electrical polarization is discussed.

  5. Theory of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical properties of glass are direct consequences of its non-crystalline structure. The structure is described from a topological point of view, since topology is the only geometry surviving non-crystallinity, i.e. absence of metric and trivial space group. This fact has two main consequences: the overall homogeneity of glass is a gauge symmetry, and the only extended, structurally stable constituents are odd lines (or 2π-disclinations in the elastic continuum limit). A gauge theory of glass, based on odd lines as sources of frozen-in strain, can explain those properties of glasses which are both specific to, and universal in amorphous solids: low-temperature excitations, and relaxation at high temperatures. The methods of statistical mechanics can be applied to give a minimal description of amorphous structures in statistical equilibrium. Criteria for statistical equilibrium of the structure and detailed balance are given, together with structural equations of state, which turn out to be well-known empirically among botanists and metallurgists. This review is based on lectures given in 1984 in Niteroi. It contains five parts: I - Structure, from a topological viewpoint; II - gauge invariance; III - Tunneling modes; IV - Supercooled liquid and the glass transitions; V - Statistical crystallography. (Author) [pt

  6. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  7. Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale

  8. Ion exchange for glass strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gy, Rene

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a short overview of silicate glass strengthening by exchange of alkali ions in a molten salt, below the glass transition temperature (chemical tempering). The physics of alkali inter-diffusion is briefly explained and the main parameters of the process, which control the glass reinforcement, are reviewed. Methods for characterizing the obtained residual stress state and the strengthening are described, along with the simplified modelling of the stress build-up. The fragmentation of chemically tempered glass is discussed. The concept of engineered stress profile glass is presented, and finally, the effect of glass and salt compositions is overviewed

  9. Perspectives on spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Contucci, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Presenting and developing the theory of spin glasses as a prototype for complex systems, this book is a rigorous and up-to-date introduction to their properties. The book combines a mathematical description with a physical insight of spin glass models. Topics covered include the physical origins of those models and their treatment with replica theory; mathematical properties like correlation inequalities and their use in the thermodynamic limit theory; main exact solutions of the mean field models and their probabilistic structures; and the theory of the structural properties of the spin glass phase such as stochastic stability and the overlap identities. Finally, a detailed account is given of the recent numerical simulation results and properties, including overlap equivalence, ultrametricity and decay of correlations. The book is ideal for mathematical physicists and probabilists working in disordered systems.

  10. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  11. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied

  12. Using physical properties of molten glass to estimate glass composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwan Sik; Yang, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Jong Kil

    1997-01-01

    A vitrification process is under development in KEPRI for the treatment of low-and medium-level radioactive waste. Although the project is for developing and building Vitrification Pilot Plant in Korea, one of KEPRI's concerns is the quality control of the vitrified glass. This paper discusses a methodology for the estimation of glass composition by on-line measurement of molten glass properties, which could be applied to the plant for real-time quality control of the glass product. By remotely measuring viscosity and density of the molten glass, the glass characteristics such as composition can be estimated and eventually controlled. For this purpose, using the database of glass composition vs. physical properties in isothermal three-component system of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 , a software TERNARY has been developed which determines the glass composition by using two known physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity)

  13. Retro reflective glass mosaic; Mosaico Vitreo Retrorreflectante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belda, A.; Orts, M. J.; Viciano, F.; Lucas, F.

    2012-07-01

    Salquisa and Alttoglass have developed a very innovative product : the retro reflective glass mosaic. This new product can be used in both horizontal and vertical signposting and also in interior design and architecture. This particular product has many advantages compare to the traditional methods used for signposting, design or architecture. One of them is that the product is mainly made of glass therefore it can last much longer than paints for example. The used of glass mosaic for civil engineering it is opened up especially for signposting and it contributes to improve visibility at night not only in standard conditions but also in the hard ones such as wind, fog or rain at nighttimes. Higher visibility = higher security. We should remember that a high percentage of accidents occur under rain conditions at night. The glass mosaic is presented in a mesh which allows the use in both plane and curve surfaces in signposting, interior design and architecture. The retro reflective effect last under the water therefore the mosaic can be fixed in ornamental and decorative fountains, swimming pools, etc. Furthermore, the retro reflective effect can also be applied on big size ceramic tiles. This project was developed along with the Institute of Ceramic Technology (ITC), it was supported by the Center for Industrial Technological Development (CDTI) and it is also patented. (Author)

  14. Superductile bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.F.; Ruan, F.; Yang, Y.Q.; Chen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<2%) at room temperature. We report a newly developed Pd-Si binary bulk metallic glass, which exhibits a uniform plastic deformation and a large plastic engineering strain of 82% and a plastic true strain of 170%, together with initial strain hardening, slight strain softening and final strain hardening characteristics. The uniform shear deformation and the ultrahigh plasticity are mainly attributed to strain hardening, which results from the nanoscale inhomogeneity due to liquid phase separation. The formed nanoscale inhomogeneity will hinder, deflect, and bifurcate the propagation of shear bands

  15. Structural characterization of hog iron oxide content glasses obtained from zinc hydrometallurgy wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Rincon, J.M.; Musik, S.; Kozhujharov, W.

    1997-01-01

    It has been carried out the structural characterization of high oxide content glasses obtained by melting of a goethite industrial waste from the zinc hydrometallurgy with other raw materials as dolomite and glass cullet. The structural characterization has been carried out by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Diffraction by Amorphous Dispersion (RDF) and Mossbauer spectroscopy. It has been determined the interatomic distance, the oxidation state and the coordination of iron atoms in these glasses. (Author) 16 refs

  16. Modeling of glass fusion furnaces; Modelisation des fours de fusion de verre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechitoua, N. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Plard, C. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-12-31

    The furnaces used for glass melting are industrial installations inside which complex and coupled physical and chemical phenomena occur. Thermal engineering plays a major role and numerical simulation is a precious tool for the analysis of the different coupling, of their interaction and of the influence of the different parameters. In order to optimize the functioning of glass furnaces and to improve the quality of the glass produced, Electricite de France (EdF) has developed a specialized version of the ESTET fluid mechanics code, called `Joule`. This paper describes the functioning principle of glass furnaces, the interactions between heat transfers and flows inside the melted glass, the interactions between heat transfers and the thermal regulation of the furnace, the interactions between heat transfers and glass quality and the heat transfer interactions between the melted glass, the furnace walls and the combustion area. (J.S.)

  17. Aging in a Structural Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Kob, Walter; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the relaxation dynamics of a simple structural glass which has been quenched below its glass transition temperature. We demonstrate that time correlation functions show strong aging effects and investigate in what way the fluctuation dissipation theorem is violated.

  18. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Busto, Mirko; Fantoni, Moris; Fino, Debora

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. ► Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. ► Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. ► Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. ► Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

  19. Application of ceramic and glass materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamnabard, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and glass are high temperature materials that can be used in many fields of application in nuclear industries. First, it is known that nuclear fuel UO 2 is a ceramic material. Also, ability to absorb neutrons without forming long lived radio-nuclides make the non-oxide ceramics attractive as an absorbent for neutron radiation arising in nuclear power plants. Glass-ceramic materials are a new type of ceramic that produced by the controlled nucleation and crystallization of glass, and have several advantages such as very low or null porosity, uniformity of microstructure, high chemical resistance etc. over conventional powder processed ceramics. These ceramic materials are synthesized in different systems based on their properties and applications. In nuclear industries, those are resistant to leaching and radiation damage for thousands of years, Such as glass-ceramics designed for radioactive waste immobilization and machinable glass-ceramics are used. This article introduces requirements of different glass and ceramic materials used in nuclear power plants and have been focused on developments in properties and application of them

  20. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  1. What Glass Ceiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  2. Metallic glasses: structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassif, E.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a summary of the attempts made up to the present in order to discribe by structural models the atomic arrangement in metallic glasses, showing also why the structure factors and atomic distribution functions cannot be always experimentally determined with a reasonable accuracy. (M.W.O.) [pt

  3. Microchips on glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanver, L.; De Vreede, L.; Keulemans, M.

    2007-01-01

    Microchips on glass. What about a mobile phone that uses a single microchip to receive all the available frequency bands, plus extras such as television, gps, and Internet access? Or, in due time, see-though implants that will monitor your state of health, and equipment that will let you see through

  4. Glass as matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingly...

  5. Glass ... current issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.F.; Dupuy, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the School were twofold. Firstly to inform participants of actual and developing technological applications of glassy materials in which fundamental science makes a strong contribution, and secondly to bring together scientists from the widely different backgrounds of glass science and technology to promote mutual understanding and collaboration. (orig.)

  6. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  7. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  8. Degradation of glass artifacts: application of modern surface analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Michael; Wiesinger, Rita; Schreiner, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    A detailed understanding of the stability of glasses toward liquid or atmospheric attack is of considerable importance for preserving numerous objects of our cultural heritage. Glasses produced in the ancient periods (Egyptian, Greek, or Roman glasses), as well as modern glass, can be classified as soda-lime-silica glasses. In contrast, potash was used as a flux in medieval Northern Europe for the production of window panes for churches and cathedrals. The particular chemical composition of these potash-lime-silica glasses (low in silica and rich in alkali and alkaline earth components), in combination with increased levels of acidifying gases (such as SO(2), CO(2), NO(x), or O(3)) and airborne particulate matter in today's urban or industrial atmospheres, has resulted in severe degradation of important cultural relics, particularly over the last century. Rapid developments in the fields of microelectronics and computer sciences, however, have contributed to the development of a variety of nondestructive, surface analytical techniques for the scientific investigation and material characterization of these unique and valuable objects. These methods include scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy- or wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDX or SEM/WDX), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this Account, we address glass analysis and weathering mechanisms, exploring the possibilities (and limitations) of modern analytical techniques. Corrosion by liquid substances is well investigated in the glass literature. In a tremendous number of case studies, the basic reaction between aqueous solutions and the glass surfaces was identified as an ion-exchange reaction between hydrogen-bearing species of the attacking liquid and the alkali and alkaline earth ions in the glass, causing a depletion of the latter in the outermost surface layers. Although mechanistic analogies to liquid corrosion are obvious, atmospheric

  9. The current status of glass leaching studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, F.

    1983-11-01

    Glass has been selected in France as the material used to confine the activity of fission product solutions, and a continuous vitrification process has been developed at the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), the first industrial plant. Borosilicate glass was chosen in various compositions for its properties: it is a homogeneous, non-porous material that incorporates appreciable quantities of most of the fission product oxides, and is only alterable at the surface interface layer. Glass thus constitutes the primary radioactivity containment barrier, and it is essential to determine its long-term behavior. Water constitutes the principal hazard during temporary or definitive storage of the glass blocks. Two types of inherent material properties are studied from the standpoint of glass stability under leaching conditions: - chemical durability; - radioactive containability with regard to the various radionuclides, fission products and especially the actinides. Durability tests are carried out in SOXHLET devices and the alteration rates are measured by the weight loss. The containability is measured by the leach rate, i.e. by the rate of activity loss into the water. Leaching tests are conducted for several major objectives: - selection of glass compositions (leach rates); - leaching mechanism studies (hydrolyzed layer characteristics, effects of temperature, pressure, pH, etc.); - long-term behavior studies (glass specimens doped with alpha-emitters); - simulation of geological repository environments [fr

  10. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.

    chamber to compress bulk glass samples isostatically up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature before or after the ion exchange treatment of an industrial sodium-magnesium aluminosilicate glass. Compression of the samples prior to ion exchange leads to a decreased Na+-K+ inter-diffusivity, increased compressive...

  11. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  12. Glass bead cultivation of fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, H.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum...... and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier...... to specific nutrient factors. •Fungal growth on glass beads eases and improves fungal RNA extraction....

  13. Sodium diffusion in boroaluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2011-01-01

    of isothermal sodium diffusion in BAS glasses by ion exchange, inward diffusion, and tracer diffusion experiments. By varying the [SiO2]/[Al2O3] ratio of the glasses, different structural regimes of sodium behavior are accessed. We show that the mobility of the sodium ions decreases with increasing [SiO2]/[Al2O......Understanding the fundamentals of alkali diffusion in boroaluminosilicate (BAS) glasses is of critical importance for advanced glass applications, e.g., the production of chemically strengthened glass covers for personal electronic devices. Here, we investigate the composition dependence...

  14. Fun with singing wine glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency against water volume percent are made using a spreadsheet. Students can also play combinations of pitches with several glasses. A video (Ruiz 2018 Video: Singing glasses http://mjtruiz.com/ped/wineglasses/) is provided which includes an excerpt of a beautiful piece written for singing glasses and choir: Stars by Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds.

  15. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  17. Study of gamma radiation shielding properties of ZnO−TeO2 glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-25

    Jul 25, 2017 ... as industry, agriculture and medicine. It is very important ...... prominent reaction between the studied glass samples barriers and gamma rays is the ..... buildup factors for engineering materials. [20] Singh V P, Badiger N M ...

  18. Investigation of the use of waste crushed glass in the production of asphalt mixes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent study at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in South Africa has revealed the potential to substitute depleting natural aggregates with waste crushed glass in asphalt mixes. This paper presents an investigation of the use...

  19. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  20. Industrial coal utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the National Energy Act on the use of coal in US industrial and utility power plants are considered. Innovative methods of using coal in an environmentally acceptable way are discussed: furnace types, fluidized-bed combustion, coal-oil-mixtures, coal firing in kilns and combustion of synthetic gas and liquid fuels. Fuel use in various industries is discussed with trends brought about by uncertain availability and price of natural gas and fuel oils: steel, chemical, cement, pulp and paper, glass and bricks. The symposium on Industrial Coal Utilization was sponsored by the US DOE, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, April 3 to 4, 1979. Twenty-one papers have been entered individually into the EDB. (LTN)

  1. Glasses for Mali

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, Bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  2. Glass matrix armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the insides surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material

  3. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  4. Development of soda-lime glasses from ornamental rock wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babisk, Michelle Pereira

    2009-01-01

    During the ornamental rocks production, among other steps, one saw the rock blocks in order to transform them into semi-finished plates. In this step, expressive amounts of residues are generated, which are not properly discharged in nature, without any programmed utilization. The residues of silicide rocks present, in their compositions, oxides which are raw materials employed to fabricate soda-lime type glasses (containing SiO_2, Al_2O_3, CaO, Na_2O and K_2O). On the other hand the residues of carbonatic rocks are constituted of glass net modifier oxides, like CaO and MgO. In this work it was developed four types of soda-lime glasses using ornamental rock residues, where the glasses compositions were adjusted by adding sand, as silica source, as well as sodium and calcium carbonates as sources of Na_2O and CaO, respectively. The obtained glasses were characterized by means of Archimed's method for densities measurements, microstructure by using optical and electronic microscopy, phases by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness by Vickers indentation, spectroscopy (UV/VIS), and hydrolytic resistance according to ISO 719. The XRD analyses confirmed the compositions total vitrification, where the greened aspect of the samples was due to the presence of the iron oxides. The produced glasses properties were compared with those of commercial glasses aiming their industrial employment. The main difference between the produced glasses and those commercials varied primarily regarding the amount of carbonates incorporated. The results showed that the ornamental rocks residues may be used as raw materials for glasses fabrication, and they found a useful economic destination rather than discharge which promotes undesirable environmental impact. (author)

  5. Use of glasses as radiation detectors for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.

    1989-08-01

    Glass samples were tested in relation to the possibility of use in high dose dosimetry in medical and industrial areas. The main characteristics were determined: detection threshold, reproducibility, response to gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 6 Co and thermal decay at ambient temperature, with the use of optical absorption and thermoluminesce techniques. (author) [pt

  6. Fuzzy diagnosis of float-glass production furnace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaanenburg, L; TerHaseborg, H; Nijhuis, JAG; Reusch, B

    1997-01-01

    The industrial production of high-quality float-glass is usually supervised by the single human expert. It is of interest to formalize his empirical knowledge to support the furnace operator at all times during the day. The paper describes the systematic development of a fuzzy expert with 6 blocks

  7. Alumina particle degradation during solid particle impact on glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slikkerveer, P.J.; Veld, in 't H.; Verspui, M.A.; With, de G.; Reefman, D.

    2000-01-01

    Particle degradation limits the reuse of powders in industrial powder-blast processes. In this paper the degradation behavior of Al2O3 powder is studied during erosion of glass substrates. Three techniques were used on original and multiply used powders: particle size measurements, single particle

  8. Nuclear traces in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia A, M. de N.

    1978-01-01

    The charged particles produce, in dielectric materials, physical and chemical effects which make evident the damaged zone along the trajectory of the particle. This damaged zone is known as the latent trace. The latent traces can be enlarged by an etching of the detector material. This treatment attacks preferently the zones of the material where the charged particles have penetrated, producing concavities which can be observed through a low magnification optical microscope. These concavities are known as developed traces. In this work we describe the glass characteristics as a detector of the fission fragments traces. In the first chapter we present a summary of the existing basic theories to explain the formation of traces in solids. In the second chapter we describe the etching method used for the traces development. In the following chapters we determine some chatacteristics of the traces formed on the glass, such as: the development optimum time; the diameter variation of the traces and their density according to the temperature variation of the detector; the glass response to a radiation more penetrating than that of the fission fragments; the distribution of the developed traces and the existing relation between this ditribution and the fission fragments of 252 Cf energies. The method which has been used is simple and cheap and can be utilized in laboratories whose resources are limited. The commercial glass which has been employed allows the registration of the fission fragments and subsequently the realization of experiments which involve the counting of the traces as well as the identification of particles. (author)

  9. Amorphous gauge glass theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Bennett, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Assuming that a lattice gauge theory describes a fundamental attribute of Nature, it should be pointed out that such a theory in the form of a gauge glass is a weaker assumption than a regular lattice model in as much as it is not constrained by the imposition of translational invariance; translational invariance is, however, recovered approximately in the long wavelength or continuum limit. (orig./WL)

  10. Industrial applications of radioisotope techniques in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.St.

    1985-01-01

    A general review of applications of radioisotope techniques in the Polish industry for about 25 years is given. The radiotracer methods used in metallurgy, hydrometallurgy, glass industry, oil and petroleum industries, in material testing and in other industries are described. Neutron activation analysis methods as well as nuclear gauges for industry (thickness meters, density meters, conveyer belt weigher, acid concentration meters and others) are also presented. The economic advantages of industrial applications of radioisotope techniques are described too. 42 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs. (author)

  11. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  12. Diffusion in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  13. Radiation shielding glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Hajime.

    1997-01-01

    It was found that a glass composition comprising, as essential ingredients, SiO 2 , PbO, Gd 2 O 3 and alkali metal oxides can provide a shielding performance against electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons. The present invention provides radiation shielding glass containing at least from 16 to 46wt% of SiO 2 , from 47 to 75wt% of PbO, from 1 to 10wt% of Gd 2 O 3 , from 0 to 3wt% of Li 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of Na 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of K 2 O provided that Li 2 O + Na 2 O + K 2 O is from 1 to 10wt%, B 2 O 3 is from 0 to 10wt%, CeO 2 is from 0 to 3wt%, As 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt% and Sb 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt%. Since the glass can shield electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons simultaneously, radiation shielding windows can be designed and manufactured at a reduced thickness and by less constitutional numbers in a circumstance where they are present altogether. (T.M.)

  14. Autoadaptive Emailtest AZ90 for corrosion monitoring of glass-lined reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Marie, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the Chemical and Pharmaceutical Industry, glass-lined vessels often contain very corrosive and harmful products. To prevent major problems such as batch contamination, leakages or explosions, it is important to detect as soon as possible a failure of the glass-lining. The well-known electrolytic method of detection has been improved by using a permanent comparison of a reference current passing between these electrodes and a defect in the glass-lining. This is made possible with the microprocessorized glass-guard to detect a leak rate independent of the product conductivity, to be self monitoring and to give an evaluation of the conductivity

  15. Measurement of edge residual stresses in glass by the phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajovalasit, A.; Petrucci, G.; Scafidi, M.

    2011-05-01

    Control and measurement of residual stress in glass is of great importance in the industrial field. Since glass is a birefringent material, the residual stress analysis is based mainly on the photoelastic method. This paper considers two methods of automated analysis of membrane residual stress in glass sheets, based on the phase-shifting concept in monochromatic light. In particular these methods are the automated versions of goniometric compensation methods of Tardy and Sénarmont. The proposed methods can effectively replace manual methods of compensation (goniometric compensation of Tardy and Sénarmont, Babinet and Babinet-Soleil compensators) provided by current standards on the analysis of residual stresses in glasses.

  16. Incorporation of flat glass in red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, T.C.C.; Morais, A.S.C.; Pereira, P.S.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    This work have as objective evaluate the effect of incorporation of up to 10% by weight of powdered flat glass , from civil industry, in red ceramic. The bodies were obtained by uniaxial pressing at 20 MPa and fired at temperatures of 850 ° C and 1050 ° C. The parameters studied were linear firing shrinkage, apparent density, water absorption and flexural rupture stress for the evaluation of the mechanical physical properties. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy and phase identification was performed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the waste changes the microstructure and properties of red ceramics. (author)

  17. PHILIP GlASS: SCREEN MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neretina Maina S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research is devoted to the music of contemporary composer Philip Glass, which he wrote specifically for the movies including feature and documentary films by American, British and Australian directors (M.Scorsese, E.Morris, S.Daldry, P.Weir etc.. It makes a connection of the composition technologies between his filmmusic and his artmusic written in the aesthetics of minimalism (the repetition and additive processes. The works in collaboration with director G.Reggio highlights as top Glass’ creative at the film industry. It also covers the principles of compilation the composer’s music for a variety of screen opuses, movies and commercials.

  18. Laboratory testing of LITCO glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, A.; Wolf, S.; Buck, E.; Luo, J.S.; Dietz, N.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to measure, the intermediate and long-term durability of glasses developed by Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. (LITCO) for the immobilization of calcined radioactive wastes. The objective is to use accelerated corrosion tests as an aid in developing durable waste form compositions. This is a report of tests performed on two LITCO glass compositions, Formula 127 and Formula 532. The main avenue for release of radionuclides into the environment in a geologic repository is the reaction of a waste glass with ground water, which alters the glass and releases its components into solution. These stages in glass corrosion are analyzed by using accelerated laboratory tests in which the ratio of sample surface area to solution volume, SA/V, is varied. At low SA/V, the solution concentrations of glass corrosion products remain low and the reaction approaches the forward rate. At higher SA/V the solution approaches saturation levels for glass corrosion products. At very high SA/V the solution is rapidly saturated in glass corrosion products and secondary crystalline phases precipitate. Tests at very high SA/V provide information about the composition of the solution at saturation or, when no solution is recovered, the identities and the order of appearance of secondary crystalline phases. Tests were applied to Formula 127 and Formula 532 glasses to provide information about the interim and long-term stages in glass corrosion

  19. Glass containing radioactive nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe 2 O 3 for use as a storage medium for high-level-radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90 C, with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800 C, since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800 to 1050 C temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550 C and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H 2 O at 135 C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear waste forms. (author)

  20. Transferability of glass lens molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  1. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  2. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  3. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Busto, Mirko; Fantoni, Moris; Fino, Debora

    2012-05-01

    As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  5. NEW ERBIUM DOPED ANTIMONY GLASSES FOR LASER AND GLASS AMPLIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tioua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses. In this poster will offer new doped erbium glasses synthesized in silicate crucibles were obtained in the combination Sb2O3-WO3-Na2O. Several properties are measured and correlated with glass compositions. The absorption spectral studies have been performed for erbium doped glasses. The intensities of various absorption bands of the doped glasses are measured and the Judd-Ofelt parameters have been computed. From the theory of Judd-Ofelt, various radiative properties, such as transition probability, branching ratio and radiative life time for various emission levels of these doped glasses have been determined and reported. These results confirm the ability of antimony glasses for glass amplification.

  6. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We review the recent results of molecular dynamics simulations on metallic glasses. → They show the equivalence of mechanical failure and glass transition. → We discuss the microscopic mechanism behind this equivalence. → We show that the density of defects in metallic glasses is as high as a quarter. → Our concepts about the defect state in glasses need to be changed. - Abstract: The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  7. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  8. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

    2009-11-11

    This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for

  9. Characterization of selenium doped silica glasses synthesized by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, R.A.; Toffoli, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is a rare element in nature. It is used in the food, pharmaceutical, and glass industries. In commercial glasses, selenium is the element responsible for most of the pink or light red color, but its effect is primarily dependent on the oxidation state of the element in the glassy matrix. Besides, selenium is highly volatile, and as high as 80 wt% may be lost in the furnace during the industrial glass elaboration. The sol– gel method yields synthesized materials of high purity and homogeneity, and uses low processing temperatures. Samples of silica glass were obtained by sol-gel method, incorporating precursors of selenium, with the main objective of reducing selenium losses during its heating. The results of optical absorption, XRD and thermal analysis (TGA, DSC) of the glasses are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Complexity of Curved Glass Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosić, T.; Svetel, I.; Cekić, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the increasing number of research on the architectural structures of curvilinear forms and technological and practical improvement of the glass production observed over recent years, there is still a lack of comprehensive codes and standards, recommendations and experience data linked to real-life curved glass structures applications regarding design, manufacture, use, performance and economy. However, more and more complex buildings and structures with the large areas of glass envelope geometrically complex shape are built every year. The aim of the presented research is to collect data on the existing design philosophy on curved glass structure cases. The investigation includes a survey about how architects and engineers deal with different design aspects of curved glass structures with a special focus on the design and construction process, glass types and structural and fixing systems. The current paper gives a brief overview of the survey findings.

  11. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al 2 O 3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  12. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (ΔH) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides

  13. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  14. Precision glass molding: Toward an optimal fabrication of optical lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Weidong

    2017-03-01

    It is costly and time consuming to use machining processes, such as grinding, polishing and lapping, to produce optical glass lenses with complex features. Precision glass molding (PGM) has thus been developed to realize an efficient manufacture of such optical components in a single step. However, PGM faces various technical challenges. For example, a PGM process must be carried out within the super-cooled region of optical glass above its glass transition temperature, in which the material has an unstable non-equilibrium structure. Within a narrow window of allowable temperature variation, the glass viscosity can change from 105 to 1012 Pas due to the kinetic fragility of the super-cooled liquid. This makes a PGM process sensitive to its molding temperature. In addition, because of the structural relaxation in this temperature window, the atomic structure that governs the material properties is strongly dependent on time and thermal history. Such complexity often leads to residual stresses and shape distortion in a lens molded, causing unexpected changes in density and refractive index. This review will discuss some of the central issues in PGM processes and provide a method based on a manufacturing chain consideration from mold material selection, property and deformation characterization of optical glass to process optimization. The realization of such optimization is a necessary step for the Industry 4.0 of PGM.

  15. The quality study of recycled glass phosphor waste for LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Chin; Chen, Guan-Hao; Yue, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Cin-Fu; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2017-02-01

    To study the feasibility and quality of recycled glass phosphor waste for LED packaging, the experiments were conducted to compare optical characteristics between fresh color conversion layer and that made of recycled waste. The fresh color conversion layer was fabricated through sintering pristine mixture of Y.A.G. powder [yellow phosphor (Y3AlO12 : Ce3+). Those recycled waste glass phosphor re-melted to form Secondary Molten Glass Phosphor (S.M.G.P.). The experiments on such low melting temperature glass results showed that transmission rates of S.M.G.P. are 9% higher than those of first-sintered glass phosphor, corresponding to 1.25% greater average bubble size and 36% more bubble coverage area in S.M.G.P. In the recent years, high power LED modules and laser projectors have been requiring higher thermal stability by using glass phosphor materials for light mixing. Nevertheless, phosphor and related materials are too expensive to expand their markets. It seems a right trend and research goal that recycling such waste of high thermal stability and quality materials could be preferably one of feasible cost-down solutions. This technical approach could bring out brighter future for solid lighting and light source module industries.

  16. ECO INDUSTRIAL STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana López Pascual

    2015-06-01

    The facades will become aesthetically pleasing for the public space or such with the installation of a new technology of a photovoltaic-glass with transparency that can be used for windows or displays. A social program of artistic murals will accompany this with the aim for awareness on environmental protection. This is a project seeks to intervene in the public space, inviting the private sector for the economic investment and nurture to gives neighbours and all Barcelona's citizens a new and attractive image of this Industrial State

  17. Glass corrosion in natural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Barkatt, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Experiments carried out during the progress period are summarized. Experiments carried out involving glass samples exposed to solutions of Tris have shown the appearance of 'spikes' upon monitoring glass dissolution as a function of time. The periodic 'spikes' observed in Tris-based media were interpreted in terms of cracking due to excessive stress in the surface region of the glass. Studies of the interactions of silicate glasses with metal ions in buffered media were extended to systems containing Al. Caps buffer was used to establish the pH. The procedures used are described and the results are given. Preliminary studies were initiated as to the feasibility of adding a slowly dissolving solid compound of the additive to the glass-water system to maintain a supply of dissolved additive. It appears that several magnesium compounds have a suitable combination of solubility and affinity towards silicate glass surfaces to have a pronounced retarding effect on the extraction of uranium from the glass. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that introducing a magnesium source into geologic repositories for nuclear waste glass in the form of a sparingly soluble Mg-based backfill material may cause a substantial reduction in the extent of long-term glass corrosion. The studies described also provide mechanistic understanding of the roles of various metal solutes in the leachant. Such understanding forms the basis for developing long-term predictions of nuclear waste glass durability under repository conditions. From what is known about natural highly reduced glasses such as tektites, it is clear that iron is dissolved as ferrous iron with little or no ferric iron. The reducing conditions were high enough to cause metallic iron to exsolve out of the glass in the form of submicroscopic spherules. As the nuclear waste glass is much less reduced, a study was initiated on other natural glasses in addition to the nuclear waste glass. Extensive measurements were

  18. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  19. Fabrication of Radiation Shielding Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavichai, Nattaya; Pormsean, Suriyont; Dararutana, Pisutti; Sirikulrat, Narin

    2003-06-01

    In this work, lead glass doped with 50%, 55%,60%, 65%, and 70% w/w Pb 3 O 4 . After that, glass mixtures were melt at 1,250οC with 4 hours soaking time. Molten glass was shaped by mould casting technique then annealed at 700οC and cooled down to room temperature. It was found that the glass with 60%w/w Pb 3 O 4 show maximum absorption coefficient of about 0.383 cm -1 with I-131 at energy 364 keV. The observed refractive indices of the samples range between 1.5908 to 1.5922

  20. Logística reversa numa empresa de laminação de vidros: um estudo de caso Reverse logistics in a glass lamination industry: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Eduardo Gonçalves

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta uma aplicação da Logística Reversa numa empresa multinacional que atua na área de laminação de vidros no Brasil. Na empresa estudada, a sucata gerada pelos seus clientes pode ser usada para realimentar o seu processo de produção. Inicialmente, são discutidos os principais aspectos relacionados ao tema, tais como, definição de Logística Reversa, ciclo de vida do produto, motivos e destinos do retorno, além dos fatores que influenciam a eficiência de um processo de Logística Reversa. A seguir, ilustradas pelo estudo de caso, são apresentadas e comentadas as etapas para uma implementação de um sistema de Logística Reversa ser bem sucedida. Finalmente, comentam-se as dificuldades, ganhos e vantagens competitivas obtidas por empresas que adotaram soluções da Logística Reversa, em particular na empresa em que o estudo de caso foi desenvolvido.This paper introduces a Reverse Logistics application in a multinational plastic film industry in Brazil, where the waste generated by its customers can reload the production process. Firstly, the main features concerning the theme and the factors that influence an efficient process of Reverse Logistics are discussed. Afterwards, using a case study, the steps focusing on the implementation of Reverse Logistics, which were successful in a company, are introduced and discussed. Finally, the difficulties, gains and competitive advantages obtained by the companies that have adopted Reverse Logistic solutions, particularly the company where the case study was developed, are commented upon.

  1. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region

  2. Simulation of Self-Irradiation of High-Sodium Content Nuclear Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, Alexey S.; Ojovan, Michael I.; Batyukhnova, Olga G.; Lee, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Alkali-borosilicate glasses are widely used in nuclear industry as a matrix for immobilisation of hazardous radioactive wastes. Durability or corrosion resistance of these glasses is one of key parameters in waste storage and disposal safety. It is influenced by many factors such as composition of glass and surrounding media, temperature, time and so on. As these glasses contain radioactive elements most of their properties including corrosion resistance are also impacted by self-irradiation. The effect of external gamma-irradiation on the short-term (up to 27 days) dissolution of waste borosilicate glasses at moderate temperatures (30 deg. to 60 deg. C) was studied. The glasses studied were Magnox Waste glass used for immobilisation of HLW in UK, and K-26 glass used in Russia for ILW immobilisation. Glass samples were irradiated under γ-source (Co-60) up to doses 1 and 11 MGy. Normalised rates of elemental release and activation energy of release were measured for Na, Li, Ca, Mg, B, Si and Mo before and after irradiation. Irradiation up to 1 MGy results in increase of leaching rate of almost all elements from both MW and K-26 with the exception of Na release from MW glass. Further irradiation up to a dose of 11 MGy leads to the decrease of elemental release rates to nearly initial value. Another effect of irradiation is increase of activation energies of elemental release. (authors)

  3. Restorative Glass : Reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Barou, L.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Nijsse, R.; Veer, F.A.; Henk, Schellen; van Schijndel, Jos

    2016-01-01

    The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and

  4. New Erbium Doped Antimony Glasses for Laser and Glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses.

  5. The glass sphinx: a massive stacked glass structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, F.P.; Heijden, van der T.; Schreurs, P.; Bos, F.; Louter, C.; Nijsse, R.; Veer, F.

    The refurbishment of the Meuse river boulevard in Venlo instigated Scheuten Glass to donate a giant-sized, 6 metre high version of the stacked glass statue the Sphinx, which had originally been made as a 80 cm sculpture to commemorate the city's 650th anniversary back in 1993. Many hurdles had to be

  6. Structural Glass Beams with Embedded Glass Fibre Reinforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, P.C.; Leung, Calvin; Kolstein, M.H.; Vambersky, J.N.J.A.; Bos, Freek; Louter, Pieter Christiaan; Veer, Fred

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities of pultruded glass fibre rods as embedded reinforcement in SentryGlas (SG) laminated glass beams. To do so, a series of pullout tests, to investigate the bond strength of the rods to the laminate, and a series of beam tests, to investigate the post-breakage

  7. Glass Formation, Chemical Properties and Surface Analysis of Cu-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihisa Inoue

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the influence of alloying elements Mo, Nb, Ta and Ni on glass formation and corrosion resistance of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs. In order to obtain basic knowledge for application to the industry, corrosion resistance of the Cu–Hf–Ti–(Mo, Nb, Ta, Ni and Cu–Zr–Ag–Al–(Nb bulk glassy alloy systems in various solutions are reported in this work. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis is performed to clarify the surface-related chemical characteristics of the alloy before and after immersion in the solutions; this has lead to a better understanding of the correlation between the surface composition and the corrosion resistance.

  8. Glass ceramic fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaschek, O.; Paulitsch, P.

    1983-01-01

    As the correlation between mineralogical phase and chemical composition influences the type of application at different high temperatures, we studied the mineralogical phases of nine crystal glass fibres of the temperature ranges 1 150 degrees Celsius (Type 1), 1 400 degrees Celsius (Type 2) and 1 500 degrees Celsius (Type 3) at various high temperatures. The methods used in the study were microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential thermal analysis. The investigations showed that mullite forms in glassy fibres of the system Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 from 850 degrees Celsius to 990 degrees Celsius as 2/1 mullite; 3/2 mullite appeared above 990 degrees Celsius besides the crystallization of cristobalite. Fibres with 95 per cent Al 2 O 3 include the phases delta-Al 2 O 3 and alpha- Al 2 O 3 and mullite. Delta- Al 2 O 3 is stable up to 1 100 degrees Celsius. Alpha-Al 2 O 3 and mullite are only stable phases at 1 400 degrees Celsius. These different crystal phases influence the quality of the technical fibre according to the stability field of glass and crystals. This study has determined that it is possible to identify different fibres from different productions by their mineralogical compositions and to relate them to the high temperature application

  9. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  10. Glass-making furnaces, cement kilns and baking ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Possible areas for future strategic R and D within the European Community in the cement, glass and bake industries are identified based upon the current scenario of R and D in process industries and following views of main industries and research experts. Priority topics for R and D should include advanced flow modelling, the implementation of control strategies and expert systems and the development of on-line sensors. Fundamental research in some areas, such as advanced diagnostic techniques and sensor systems and modelling of two-phase and pollutant formation, is considered of primary importance.

  11. Supporting industries energy and environmental profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-09-21

    As part of its Industries of the Future strategy, the Industrial Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy works with energy-intensive industries to improve efficiency, reduce waste, and increase productivity. These seven Industries of the Future (IOFs) – aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel – rely on several other so-called “supporting industries” to supply materials and processes necessary to the products that the IOFs create. The supporting industries, in many cases, also provide great opportunities for realizing energy efficiency gains in IOF processes.

  12. Energy economy in Nordic industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, P H; Finnedal, B H

    1980-01-01

    The employment, economic and energetic situation in various industrial branches and their importance for industry as a whole is mapped for Nordic countries. Future Nordic energy projects can base their attempts to decrease energy costs per unit on this report. In food and stimulants industry, chemical, glass and ceramic industry over 90% energy is used for processing while in steel- and metal-industry the processing consumes only about 25%. Rentability of new investments in energy saving should be considered in these branches against investments in automation, new equipment etc. Common Nordic energy-saving projects can provide much better energy economy. For instance 4% of USA energy which had formerly been used in drying processes is drastically decreased and if the USA result can be transferred to Nordic conditions DKr 160 million can be save. Prospective common projects are process-types like drying, spray-drying, heat treatments of mineral proproducts, and evaporation.

  13. Characterization and Morphological Properties of Glass Fiber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    used as the matrix for the glass fibre-epoxy resin formation. E- Glass fibre ... reinforcement of composites, coatings of materials, and other ..... composite for the manufacture of glass-ceramic materials ... reinforced epoxy composites with carbon.

  14. Optical properties of alkaline earth borate glasses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The alkaline earth borate glasses containing heavy metal oxides show good solubility of rare-earth ions. Glasses containing PbO exhibit low glass transition temperature (Tg) and high ..... These oxygen ions carry a partial negative charge and.

  15. Optical properties of alkaline earth borate glasses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ... devices; radiation shields, surgical lasers and their glass ceramic counter ... Alkaline earth oxides improve glass forming capability while heavy metal ... reports on optical properties of MO-B2O3 glasses containing alkaline earth oxides.

  16. Properties of gallium lanthanum sulphide glass

    OpenAIRE

    Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Khan, K.; Weatherby, E.; Yao, J.; Hewak, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses has been studied in order to ascertain properties across the entire glass forming region. This is the first comprehensive study of GLS glass over a wide compositional range.

  17. How isotopes benefit industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The life of bus engines and the time taken to make beer are not at first sight connected with atomic energy. Yet the first has been considerably lengthened and the second even more considerably shortened in different countries as a result of using nuclear techniques and materials. They are only two examples; there are many others which have improved efficiency in factories, oilfields, chemical plants and other industries. They indicate not only the results of ingenuity but the rewards possible from more widespread use of the new methods. At a symposium on radioisotope tracers in industry and geophysics organized by the Agency and held in Prague during November many reports showed not only what is possible but what is actually being accomplished in a number of industries as a matter of daily routine. The economic benefits were also demonstrated, and although the developments have been mainly in countries already highly industrialized, the potential for new industries in developing countries was clear. Research to improve performance of motorcar, aircraft and tractor engines has been directed at establishing the causes of friction, corrosion and wear. In brewing beer it has been possible to accelerate fermentation. Pollution both of water and air can be reduced and methods of waste disposal improved. Many economies have been effected in oil production. Better quality and lower costs have resulted from work in chemical plants and processes such as glass making, metal refining, plastics and many others. Dams and railways were also mentioned among the great variety of subjects suitable for radioisotope techniques

  18. How isotopes benefit industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-02-15

    The life of bus engines and the time taken to make beer are not at first sight connected with atomic energy. Yet the first has been considerably lengthened and the second even more considerably shortened in different countries as a result of using nuclear techniques and materials. They are only two examples; there are many others which have improved efficiency in factories, oilfields, chemical plants and other industries. They indicate not only the results of ingenuity but the rewards possible from more widespread use of the new methods. At a symposium on radioisotope tracers in industry and geophysics organized by the Agency and held in Prague during November many reports showed not only what is possible but what is actually being accomplished in a number of industries as a matter of daily routine. The economic benefits were also demonstrated, and although the developments have been mainly in countries already highly industrialized, the potential for new industries in developing countries was clear. Research to improve performance of motorcar, aircraft and tractor engines has been directed at establishing the causes of friction, corrosion and wear. In brewing beer it has been possible to accelerate fermentation. Pollution both of water and air can be reduced and methods of waste disposal improved. Many economies have been effected in oil production. Better quality and lower costs have resulted from work in chemical plants and processes such as glass making, metal refining, plastics and many others. Dams and railways were also mentioned among the great variety of subjects suitable for radioisotope techniques

  19. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass-based materials for structural and functional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna; Bernardo, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass-based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass-ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica-rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron-rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass-based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste-derived glasses into glass-ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low-cost alternative for glass-ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up-to-date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste-derived, glass-based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent market studies reveal that augmented reality (AR) devices, such as smart glasses, will substantially influence the media landscape. Yet, little is known about the intended adoption of smart glasses, particularly: Who are the early adopters of such wearables? We contribute to the growing bo...

  1. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  2. Zirconium based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.K.; Neogy, S.; Savalia, R.T.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic glasses have come into prominence in recent times because their nanocrystalline atomic arrangement imparts many useful and unusual properties to these metallic solids. In this study, bulk glasses have been obtained in Zr based multicomponent alloy by induction melting these alloys in silica crucibles and casting these in form of rods 3 and 6 mm in diameter in a copper mould

  3. International Congress on Glass XII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doremus, R H; LaCourse, W C; Mackenzie, J D; Varner, J R; Wolf, W W [eds.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 158 papers are included under nine headings: structure and glass formation; optical properties; electrical and magnetic properties; mechanical properties and relaxation; mass transport; chemical durability and surfaces; nucleation; crystallization; and glass ceramics; processing; and automatic controls. Separate abstracts were prepared for eight papers; four of the remaining papers had been processed previously for the data base. (DLC)

  4. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  5. Lead-iron phosophate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses (LIPNWG) are the subject of the present chapter. They were discovered in 1984 while the authors were attempting to find a sintering aid for certain types of crystalline monazite ceramic high-level nuclear waste forms. In the present chapter, the term waste glass is synonymous with nuclear waste glass (NWG), and the acronym LIP is often used for lead-iron phosphate. Lead-iron phosphate glasses, like many of the previously studied phosphate glasses, are corrosion resistant in aqueous solutions at temperatures below 100 degrees C, and they can be melted and poured at temperatures that are relatively low in comparison with the processing temperatures required for current silicate glass compositions. Unlike the phosphate glasses investigated previously, however, LIPNWGs do not suffer from alteration due to devitrification during realistic and readily, achievable cooling periods. Additionally, lead-iron phosphate glass melts are not nearly as corrosive as the sodium phosphate melts investigated during the 1960s; and, therefore, they can be melted and processed using crucibles made from a variety of materials

  6. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  7. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  8. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  9. The future of the chemical industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinnar, R.

    1991-01-01

    As Lincoln, we first must ask where we are before we ask whither. I'd therefore like to define where our industry is and how it got there before we look at the challenges facing us. If we view the chemical and petroleum industries through the glass of macroeconomics, they look very healthy. Let's start with size. Table 1 shows that these two industries each provide about 10% of the total U.S. manufacturing output. This paper shows the fraction of the total GNP contributed by the chemical industry and by the petroleum industry and compares them with total manufacturing. The authors note that total manufacturing grew more slowly than the total GNP, whereas over the last 40 years, the chemical industry grew close to the rate of the GNP. For a large industry, this is the best we can hope for. The chemical industry is one of the very few major industries that has consistently maintained a positive trade balance

  10. Phonon scattering in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review some recent theoretical and experimental developments in the study of metallic glasses at temperatures near or below 1K. In this temperature regime, it appears that practically all glasses, whether metallic or insulating, behave in a similar fashion. The fact that such similarities occur, despite substantial structural differences between metallic and insulating glasses, constitutes a major theoretical challenge. This challenge, however, is not directly addressed in what follows. Instead, the evidence for universal behavior and the theory which is necessary to understand this evidence are emphasized. It turns out that most of this evidence involves a comparison of phonon scattering in metallic glasses with its counterpart in insulating glasses

  11. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 ∼ 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature (∼ 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms

  12. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  13. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  14. Development of Models to Predict the Redox State of Nuclear Waste Containment Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, O.; Guirat, R.; Advocat, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Departement de Traitement et de Conditionnement des Dechets, Marcoule, BP 71171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Phalippou, J. [Universite de Montpellier II, Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Vitrification is one of the recommended immobilization routes for nuclear waste, and is currently implemented at industrial scale in several countries, notably for high-level waste. To optimize nuclear waste vitrification, research is conducted to specify suitable glass formulations and develop more effective processes. This research is based not only on experiments at laboratory or technological scale, but also on computer models. Vitrified nuclear waste often contains several multi-valent species whose oxidation state can impact the properties of the melt and of the final glass; these include iron, cerium, ruthenium, manganese, chromium and nickel. Cea is therefore also developing models to predict the final glass redox state. Given the raw materials and production conditions, the model predicts the oxygen fugacity at equilibrium in the melt. It can also estimate the ratios between the oxidation states of the multi-valent species contained in the molten glass. The oxidizing or reductive nature of the atmosphere above the glass melt is also taken into account. Unlike the models used in the conventional glass industry based on empirical methods with a limited range of application, the models proposed are based on the thermodynamic properties of the redox species contained in the waste vitrification feed stream. The thermodynamic data on which the model is based concern the relationship between the glass redox state and the oxygen fugacity in the molten glass. The model predictions were compared with oxygen fugacity measurements for some fifty glasses. The experiments carried out at laboratory and industrial scale with a cold crucible melter. The oxygen fugacity of the glass samples was measured by electrochemical methods and compared with the predicted value. The differences between the predicted and measured oxygen fugacity values were generally less than 0.5 Log unit. (authors)

  15. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading

  16. A new viscosity model for waste glass formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, A.L.K.

    1996-01-01

    Waste glass formulation requires prediction, with reasonable accuracy, of properties over much wider ranges of composition than are typically encountered in any single industrial application. Melt viscosity is one such property whose behavior must be predicted in formulating new waste glasses. A model was developed for silicate glasses which relates the Arrhenius activation energy for flow to an open-quotes effectiveclose quotes measure of non-bridging oxygen content in the melt, NBO eff . The NBO eff parameter incorporates the differing effects of modifying cations on the depolymerization of the silicate network. The activation energy-composition relationship implied by the model is in accordance with experimental behavior. The model was validated against two different databases, with satisfactory results

  17. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper

  18. An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

    2005-08-01

    This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data

  19. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  20. The leaching of radioactivity from highly radioactive glass blocks buried below the water table: fifteen years of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, W.F.

    1976-03-01

    The results from two test burials of high-level fission products incorporated into nepheline syenite glass indicate that the nuclear wastes from fuel processing for a 30,000 MWe nuclear power industry could be incorporated into such glass and stored beneath the water table in the waste management area of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) without harm to the environment. (author)

  1. Glass packages in interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO 2 . The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  2. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  3. A method for making a glass supported system, such glass supported system, and the use of a glass support therefor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unnikrishnan, S.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Fazal, I.; Louwerse, M.C.; Mogulkoc, B.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for making a glass supported micro or nano system, comprising the steps of: i) providing a glass support; ii) mounting at least one system on at least one glass support; and iii) bonding the system to the glass support, such that the system is circumferentially

  4. Restorative glass: reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidra Oikonomopoulou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and aesthetical integrity. Concurrently, the material’s unique mechanical properties enable the structural consolidation of the monument. As a proof of concept, the restoration of Lichtenberg Castle is proposed. Solid cast glass units are suggested to complete the missing parts, in respect to the existing construction technique and aesthetics of the original masonry. Aiming for a reversible system, the glass units are interlocking, ensuring the overall stability without necessitating permanent, adhesive connections. This results in an elegant and reversible intervention.

  5. GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2004-01-01

    A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model

  6. The ions displacement through glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevegnani, F.X.

    1980-01-01

    A method to introduce sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, iron and other ions in vacuum or gas light bulb by mean of a strong stationay electric field. The experiments showed that the mass deposited inside the bulbs obey Faraday's law of electrolysis, although the process of mass transfer is not that of a conventional electrolysis. A method which allows to show that hydrogen ions do not penetrate the glass structure is also described. Using radioactive tracers, it is shown that heavy ions, such PO 4 --- do not penetrate the glass structure. The vitreous state and the glass properties were studied for interpreting experimental results. (Author) [pt

  7. Recent developments in laser glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a proliferation of new glass-forming compositions including oxides, halides, oxyhalides, and chalcogenides. Many of these glasses are applicable to lasers and have greatly expanded the range of optical properties and spectroscopic parameters available to the laser designer. Our knowledge and understanding of many properties of interest for laser action - transparency, linear and nonlinear refractive indices, and damage threshold of the host glass and the absorption spectrum, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, fluorescence wavelength, stimulated emission cross section, and spectroscopic inhomogeneities of the lasing ion Nd 3 + - are reviewed

  8. Shattered glass seeking the densest matter: the color glass condensate

    CERN Multimedia

    Appell, D

    2004-01-01

    "Physicists investigating heavy-particle collisions believe they are on the track of a universal form of matter, one common to very high energy particles ranging from protons to heavy nuclei such as uranium. Some think that this matter, called a color glass condensate, may explain new nuclear properties and the process of particle formation during collisions. Experimentalists have recently reported intriguing data that suggest a color glass condensate has actually formed in past work" (1 page)

  9. Fiscal 2000 project for development of international standards for supporting novel industries. Standardization of methods for evaluating high-temperature physical properties of new glass; 2000 nendo shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo. New garasu koonbussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Research and development is under way about methods for evaluating the physical properties of high-temperature glass melt for the development of the methods into international standards. In this fiscal year, a technique of measuring high-temperature physical properties of amino silicate glass melt was developed, and the techniques of measuring high-temperature physical properties of molten soda lime glass and borate-silicate glass were improved. As the result, evaluation techniques compatible with international standards were developed for high-temperature glass melt physical properties such as viscosity, density, coefficient of volume expansion, surface tension, specific heat, thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, oxidation/reduction potentials, and the structure of molten glass. Techniques of evaluating gas solubility and the coefficient of gas diffusion, however, need further basic research and development. The author took part in a round robin test relating to the measurement of glass melt density and heat conductivity at CG/TC18, and measured the said two properties. The result of the round robin test was discussed at TC18 held in Amsterdam in May this year. (NEDO)

  10. Industrial Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Industrial engineering is a discipline that is concerned with increasing the effectiveness of (primarily) manufacturing and (occasionally).......Industrial engineering is a discipline that is concerned with increasing the effectiveness of (primarily) manufacturing and (occasionally)....

  11. Farmaceutische industrie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros JPM; van der Poel P; Etman EJ; Montfoort JA; LAE

    1995-01-01

    Dit rapport over de farmaceutische industrie is gepubliceerd binnen het Samenwerkingsproject Procesbeschrijvingen Industrie Nederland (SPIN). In het kader van dit project is informatie verzameld over industriele bedrijven of industriele processen ter ondersteuning van het overheidsbeleid op het

  12. Properties Of Soda/Yttria/Silica Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of glass-formation compositional region of soda/ yttria/silicate system and of selected physical properties of glasses within compositional region part of continuing effort to identify glasses with high coefficients of thermal expansion and high softening temperatures, for use as coatings on superalloys and as glass-to-metal seals.

  13. Glass as a medium for the ultimate disposal of highly radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1983-09-01

    The conversion of high level radioactive liquid wastes into glass is now considered in every nuclear country. The glass composition must take into account the components of the solutions and be formulated in order to meet certain requirements, mainly those necessary for safe further disposal. The compositions of these glasses, all borosilicates, are consequently unusual. Heat due to β γ decay generates some devitrification but it has not yet been demonstrated that this is detrimental. β irradiation has minor effects on the glass structure but the effect of α emitters is not presently totally investigated. If stored energy consequenses are negligible, further experiments must be carried out to ascertain the effect of helium build up or the behaviour of the mechanical properties. Processes of industrial interest have been developped and a plant has already produced radioactive glass blocks for 5 years

  14. Ultrahigh-pressure polyamorphism in GeO2 glass with coordination number >6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Ikuta, Daijo; Shibazaki, Yuki; Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of pressure-induced structural changes in glasses is important in various scientific fields as well as in engineering and industry. However, polyamorphism in glasses under high pressure remains poorly understood because of experimental challenges. Here we report new experimental findings of ultrahigh-pressure polyamorphism in GeO2 glass, investigated using a newly developed double-stage large-volume cell. The Ge-O coordination number (CN) is found to remain constant at ∼6 between 22.6 and 37.9 GPa. At higher pressures, CN begins to increase rapidly and reaches 7.4 at 91.7 GPa. This transformation begins when the oxygen-packing fraction in GeO2 glass is close to the maximal dense-packing state (the Kepler conjecture = ∼0.74), which provides new insights into structural changes in network-forming glasses and liquids with CN higher than 6 at ultrahigh-pressure conditions.

  15. Studies on the synthesis and characterization of cesium-containing iron phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Chandramohan, P.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2009-02-01

    Isotopes of cesium and strontium can be utilized as radiation source for various industrial and medical applications after their separation from high level nuclear waste. However, these elements need to be immobilized in a suitable matrix. In the present work, a systematic approach has been made to immobilize inactive cesium into iron phosphate glass. Up to 36 mol% of Cs 2O has been loaded successfully without crystallization. The glass transition temperature of the cesium loaded glass was found to increase initially and then decrease as a function of Cs 2O content. Mössbauer studies show that the concentration of Fe 3+ ions in the cesium loaded glasses is >95%. Volatilization experiments at 1263 K show that the weight loss is >0.5% for a period of 4 h. The 36 mol% of Cs 2O loaded iron phosphate glass with high Fe 3+ content described in this paper is reported for the first time.

  16. Characterization of raw materials to obtain the mass for white ware, using waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, M.S.L.; Porto, V.S.; Meneses, R.L; Albuquerque, A.V.; Guedes, B.F.R.; Morais, C.R.S.; Santana, L.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem faced in the post modern society is the huge amount of glass, accumulated in landfills cities. The glass material is one hundred percent recyclable and has the property to act as fluxes as well as feldspar. Given this premise, this study aimed to characterize materials - raw materials and waste glass regional plan for development of ceramic bodies with the similar behavior produced industrially, using shards of glass to partially replace the feldspar. The materials - raw materials used were clay, ball clay, kaolin, quartz, feldspar and shard of glass, being characterized by the techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, differential thermal analysis vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared region, the Ray-Diffraction X and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the waste had higher rates of vitreous oxides fluxes and similar. (author)

  17. Into the looking glass: Utility industry restructuring and you

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses why and how the electric utility monopoly is breaking up and the opportunities and challenges this represents to mechanical engineers and building owners. Deregulation is generally touted as a means to lower the costs of goods and services and stimulate innovation. Electric utility deregulation will lead to similar innovation, especially if it is properly implemented. This point was reinforced by Jeff Skilling, president and COO, Enron Corp., in testimony to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on March 6, 1997. Mr. Skilling cited two independent studies estimating consumer savings of 30 to 40% and savings as great as 50% over a 10-year period. This is equal to $60 to 80 billion annually. Clearly these savings are significant and will have a positive impact on just about all aspects of the domestic economy

  18. Structural principles in network glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boolchand, P.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial progress in decoding the structure of network glasses has taken place in the past few years. Crucial insights into the molecular structure of glasses have emerged by application of Raman bond and Moessbauer site spectroscopy. In this context, the complimentary role of each spectroscopy as a check on the interpretation of the other, is perhaps one of the more significant developments in the field. New advances in the theory of the subject have also taken place. It is thus appropriate to inquire what general principles if any, have emerged on the structure of real glasses. The author reviews some of the principal ideas on the structure of inorganic network glasses with the aid of specific examples. (Auth.)

  19. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  20. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  1. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  2. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  3. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  4. Waste glass as eco-friendly replacement material in construction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gayatri; Sharma, Anu

    2018-05-01

    Atpresent time the biggest issue is increasing urban population, industrialization and development all over the world. The quantity of the raw materials of construction products like cement, concrete etc is gradually depleting. This is important because if we don't find the alternative material to accomplish need of this industry, with every year it will put pressure on natural resources which are limited in quantity. This major issue can be solved by partial replacing with waste glass of different construction products. This paper gives an overview of the current growth and recycling situation of waste glass and point out the direction for the proper use of waste glass as replacement of construction material. These will not only help in the reuse of waste glass but also create eco-friendly environment.

  5. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in 100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass microspheres, composed of micron-sized, metallic rhenium particles dispersed within a magnesium alumino borate glass matrix were produced by sintering ReO2 powder and glass frit at 1050°C. A 50 mg injection of radioactive rhenium glass

  6. Cesium glass irradiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The precipitation process for the decontamination of soluble SRP wastes produces a material whose radioactivity is dominated by 137 Cs. Potentially, this material could be vitrified to produce irradiation sources similar to the Hanford CsCl sources. In this report, process steps necessary for the production of cesium glass irradiation sources (CGS), and the nature of the sources produced, are examined. Three options are considered in detail: direct vitrification of precipitation process waste; direct vitrification of this waste after organic destruction; and vitrification of cesium separated from the precipitation process waste. Direct vitrification is compatible with DWPF equipment, but process rates may be limited by high levels of combustible materials in the off-gas. Organic destruction would allow more rapid processing. In both cases, the source produced has a dose rate of 2 x 10 4 rads/hr at the surface. Cesium separation produces a source with a dose rate of 4 x 10 5 at the surface, which is nearer that of the Hanford sources (2 x 10 6 rads/hr). Additional processing steps would be required, as well as R and D to demonstrate that DWPF equipment is compatible with this intensely radioactive material

  7. Sustainable Innovation of Glass Design and Craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Petersen, Maria

    2014-01-01

    , reduction of production and transportation of new glass is desirable (Environmental Protection Agency, 2012), and can be realized by recycling glass, that has already been manufactured, used and collected for recycling, but has ended up in landfills due to the market mechanisms that allow manufacturing...... and deposition of glass is reduced Today glass production predominantly consists of window glass, glass wool for insulation and containers such as bottles and jelly jars. Glass craft and design hold only a fraction of the market. Still there is reason to believe that generation and implementation of new...

  8. Contrasting the magnetic response between magnetic-glass and reentrant spin-glass

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, S. B.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic-glass is a recently identified phenomenon in various classes of magnetic systems undergoing a first order magnetic phase transition. We shall highlight here a few experimentally determined characteristics of magnetic-glass and the relevant set of experiments, which will enable to distinguish a magnetic-glass unequivocally from the well known phenomena of spin-glass and reentrant spin-glass.

  9. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 2, Operating electric glass melters. James N. Edmonson, Lecturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains basic information on electric furnaces used for glass melting and on the properties of glass useful for the stabilization of radioactive wastes. Furnace nomenclature, furnace types, typical silicate glass composition and properties, thermal conductivity information, kinetics of the melting process, glass furnace refractory materials composition and thermal conductivity, and equations required for the operation of glass melters are included

  10. Investigations on vanadium doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusudana Rao, P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass samples studied in the present work have been prepared by melt quenching technique. They were prepared by mixing and grinding together by appropriate amounts of Li 2 O - Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 doped with V 2 O 5 in an agate motor before transferring into crucible. The mixtures were heated in an electric furnace at 1225K for 20 mm. The melt was then quenched to room temperature by pouring it on plane brass plate and pressing it with another brass plate. White and yellow coloured glasses have been obtained with good optical quality and high transparency. Finally the vitreous sample were annealed for 3 hrs at 423K to relieve residual internal stress and slowly cooled to room temperature. The polished glasses have been used for XRD, FTIR analysis and for DSC report. The DSC thermo grams for all the glasses were recorded on in the temperature range 50-550℃ with a heating rate of 10℃/min. Electron spin resonance and optical absorption of 20Li 2 O - 10 Na 2 O - (70-X)B 2 O 3 doped with XV 2 O 5 glass system are studied. ESR spectra of V 4+ ions doped in the glass exhibit peak at g =1.98. Spin Hamiltonian parameters are calculated. It was found that these parameters are dependent upon alkali ion concentration in the glass and the VO +2 ion in an octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression. The physical parameters of all glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition

  11. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  12. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  13. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  14. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input

  15. Bioactive glasses: Frontiers and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry L. Hench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980’s it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are: a discovery; b clinical application; c tissue regeneration; and d innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

  16. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling

  17. Heat stress assessment in artistic glass units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'AMBROSIO Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor; Riccio, Giuseppe; Bartalini, Massimo; Strambi, Fabio; Malchaire, Jacques

    2018-04-07

    Heat stress in glass industry is mainly studied in large and highly mechanized manufacturing Units. To the contrary, few studies were carried out in small factories specialized in hand-made products. To stress the need of combined objective and medical surveys in these environments, this paper deals with a simultaneous climatic and physiological investigation of working conditions in artistic crystal glass factories in Tuscany (Italy). The microclimatic monitoring, through a continuous survey has been carried out in early spring. The main physiological parameters (metabolic rate, heart rate, tympanic temperature and water loss) were measured over the whole shifts. The results show that, despite the arduousness of the working conditions, the heat stress levels are physiologically tolerable. The predictions made using the PHS model at the Analysis level described in ISO 15265 agree closely to the observed values, validating the use of PHS model in these conditions. This model was then used to analyse what is likely to be the situation during the summer. It is concluded that the heat constraint will be very high and that some steps must be taken from the spring to monitor closely the exposed workers in the summer and take measures to prevent any heat accident.

  18. Crystallization of Yttrium and Samarium Aluminosilicate Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Lago, Diana Carolina; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Aluminosilicate glasses containing samarium and yttrium (SmAS and YAS glasses) exhibit high glass transition temperatures, corrosion resistance, and glass stability on heating which make them useful for technological applications. Yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres are currently being used for internal selective radiotherapy of liver cancer. During the preparation process, crystallization needs to be totally or partially avoided depending on the final application. Thus knowing the cry...

  19. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  20. Industrial electrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melvin, J.G.

    1983-03-01

    The technical and economic scope for industrial process electrification in Canada is assessed in the light of increasing costs of combustion fuels relative to electricity. It is concluded that electricity is capable of providing an increasing share of industrial energy, eventually aproaching 100 percent. The relatively low cost of electricity in Canada offers industry the opportunity of a head start in process electrification with consequent advantages in world markets both for industrial products and for electrical process equipment and technology. A method is described to promote the necessary innovation by providing access to technology and financing. The potential growth of electricity demand due to industrial electrification is estimated

  1. Materials analyses of ceramics for glass furnace recuperators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G.W.; Tennery, V.J.

    1979-11-01

    The use of waste heat recuperation systems offers significant promise for meaningful energy conservation in the process heat industries. This report details the analysis of candidate ceramic recuperator materials exposed to simulated industrial glass furnace hot flue gas environments. Several candidate structural ceramic materials including various types of silicon carbide, several grades of alumina, mullite, cordierite, and silicon nitride were exposed to high-temperature flue gas atmospheres from specially constructed day tank furnaces. Furnace charging, operation, and batch composition were selected to closely simulate industrial practice. Material samples were exposed in flues both with and without glass batch in the furnace for times up to 116 d at temperatures from 1150 to 1550/sup 0/C (2100 to 2800/sup 0/F). Exposed materials were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence to identify material degradation mechanisms. The materials observations were summarized as: Silicon carbide exhibited enhanced corrosion at lower temperatures (1150/sup 0/C) when alkalies were deposited on the carbide from the flue gas and less corrosion at higher temperatures (1550/sup 0/C) when alkalies were not deposited on the carbide; alumina corrosion depended strongly upon purity and density and alumina contents less than 99.8% were unsatisfactory above 1400/sup 0/C; and mullite and cordierite are generally unacceptable for application in soda-lime glass melting environments at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/C.

  2. Cesium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution of Analytical Reference Glass-1 in Both Powder and Shard Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.J.; Spencer, W.A.

    1998-04-01

    CsOH has been shown to be an effective and convenient dissolution reagent for Analytical Reference Glass-1 (ARG-1). This glass standard was prepared from nonradioactive DWPF Start-up Glass. Therefore, its composition is similar to DWPF product glass and many of the glass matrices prepared at SRTC.The principal advantage of the CsOH fusion dissolution is that the reagent does not add the alkali metals Li, Na, and K usually needed by SRS customers. Commercially available CsOH is quite pure so that alkali metals can be measured accurately, often without blank corrections. CsOH fusions provide a single dissolution method for applicable glass to replace multiple dissolution schemes used by most laboratories. For example, SRTC glass samples are most commonly dissolved with a Na 2 O 2 -NaOH fusion (ref.1) and a microwave- assisted acid dissolution with HNO 3 -HF-H 3 BO 3 -HCl (ref.2). Othe laboratories use fusion methods based on KOH, LiBO 2 , and Na 2 CO 3 CsOH fusion approach reduces by half not only the work in the dissolution laboratory, but also in the spectroscopy laboratories that must analyze each solution.Experiments also revealed that glass shards or pellets are rapidly attacked if the flux temperature is raised considerably above the glass softening point. The softening point of ARG-1 glass is near 650 degrees C. Fusions performed at 750 degrees C provided complete dissolutions and accurate elemental analyses of shards. Successful dissolution of glass shards was demonstrated with CsOH, Na 2 O 2 , NaOH, KOH, and RbOH. Ability to dissolve glass shards is of considerable practical importance. Crushing glass to a fine powder is a slow and tedious task, especially for radioactive glasses dissolved in shielded cells. CsOH fusion of glass powder or shards is a convenient, cost-effective dissolution scheme applicable in SRTC, the DWPF, and the commercial glass industry

  3. Industrial use of coal and clean coal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibson, I; Plante, J J.M.

    1990-06-01

    This report builds upon two reports published in 1988, namely {ital The use of Coal in the Industrial, Commercial, Residential and Transportation Sectors} and {ital Innovative Clean Coal Technology Deployment}, and provides more specific recommendations pertaining to coal use in the US industrial sector. The first chapter addresses industrial boilers which are common to many industrial users. The subsequent nine chapters cover the following: coke, iron and steel industries; aluminium and other metals; glass, brick, ceramic, and gypsum industries; cement and lime industries; pulp and paper industry; food and kindred products; durable goods industry; textile industry; refining and chemical industry. In addition, appendices supporting the contents of the study are provided. Each chapter covers the following topics as applicable: energy overview of the industry sector being discussed; basic processes; foreign experience; impediments to coal use; incentives that could make coal a fuel of choice; current and projected use of clean coal technology; identification of coal technology needs; conclusions; recommendations.

  4. High-Level Waste Glass Formulation Model Sensitivity Study 2009 Glass Formulation Model Versus 1996 Glass Formulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsher, J.D.; Meinert, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the differences between two HLW glass formulation models (GFM): The 1996 GFM and 2009 GFM. A glass formulation model is a collection of glass property correlations and associated limits, as well as model validity and solubility constraints; it uses the pretreated HLW feed composition to predict the amount and composition of glass forming additives necessary to produce acceptable HLW glass. The 2009 GFM presented in this report was constructed as a nonlinear optimization calculation based on updated glass property data and solubility limits described in PNNL-18501 (2009). Key mission drivers such as the total mass of HLW glass and waste oxide loading are compared between the two glass formulation models. In addition, a sensitivity study was performed within the 2009 GFM to determine the effect of relaxing various constraints on the predicted mass of the HLW glass.

  5. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  6. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  7. Simulating the physicochemical properties of borosilicate and lanthanum borosilicate glasses using a polarizable force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacaud, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    as result of the nuclear waste vitrification, the knowledge and understanding of the dynamic and structural properties of glasses, including the behavior of radionuclides, is important (in liquid and solid phases). It can influence the glass waste properties, the lifetime of the vitrification process and the amount of radionuclides introduced in the glass matrix. Molecular dynamic simulations have been done to study the influence of the glass matrix composition into the structural and dynamic properties of the glass. a simplified glass, with 3 major oxides of the R7T7 glass such as SiO_2, B_2O_3 and Na_2O, have been used to simulate the R7T7 industrial nuclear glass (a 30 oxides glass). The inclusion of La_2O_3 allows us to simulate the impact of fission products and minor actinides into the properties of the glass matrix. Both systems, the SiO_2-B_2O_3-Na_2O and SiO_2-B_2O_3-Na_2O-La_2O_3, allow us to study the sodium and lanthanum effect on the properties of the glass. During this work, a polarizable force field has been developed to do these simulations. The results obtained at room temperature let us reproduce the experimental results of the structure, the distribution of BIII/BIV and the density. a study has been done on the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the liquid. The distribution BIV/BIII and the influence of the structural changes on the density along with the temperature have also been observed with thermal quenching. The current limits of this approach are also described. (author) [fr

  8. Recycling of waste glass as a partial replacement for fine aggregate in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2009-02-01

    Waste glass creates serious environmental problems, mainly due to the inconsistency of waste glass streams. With increasing environmental pressure to reduce solid waste and to recycle as much as possible, the concrete industry has adopted a number of methods to achieve this goal. The properties of concretes containing waste glass as fine aggregate were investigated in this study. The strength properties and ASR expansion were analyzed in terms of waste glass content. An overall quantity of 80 kg of crushed waste glass was used as a partial replacement for sand at 10%, 15%, and 20% with 900 kg of concrete mixes. The results proved 80% pozzolanic strength activity given by waste glass after 28 days. The flexural strength and compressive strength of specimens with 20% waste glass content were 10.99% and 4.23%, respectively, higher than those of the control specimen at 28 days. The mortar bar tests demonstrated that the finely crushed waste glass helped reduce expansion by 66% as compared with the control mix.

  9. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M., E-mail: jean-marc.delaye@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD, Service d’Etude et Comportement des Matériaux de Conditionnement, BP17171 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France)

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO{sub 2} content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  10. Deformation mechanisms during nanoindentation of sodium borosilicate glasses of nuclear interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilymis, D A; Delaye, J-M

    2014-07-07

    In this paper we analyze results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of Vickers nanoindentation, performed for sodium borosilicate glasses of interest in the nuclear industry. Three glasses have been studied in their pristine form, as well as a disordered one that is analogous to the real irradiated glass. We focused in the behavior of the glass during the nanoindentation in order to reveal the mechanisms of deformation and how they are affected by microstructural characteristics. Results have shown a strong dependence on the SiO2 content of the glass, which promotes densification due to the open structure of SiO4 tetrahedra and also due to the strength of Si-O bonds. Densification for the glasses is primarily expressed by the relative decrease of the Si-O-Si and Si-O-B angles, indicating rotation of the structural units and decrease of free volume. The increase of alkali content on the other hand results to higher plasticity of the matrix and increased shear flow. The most important effect on the deformation mechanism of the disordered glasses is that of the highly depolymerized network that will also induce shear flow and, in combination with the increased free volume, will result in the decreased hardness of these glasses, as has been previously observed.

  11. Chiral-glass transition and replica symmetry breaking of a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass

    OpenAIRE

    Hukushima, K.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations are performed for a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass with the nearest-neighbor Gaussian coupling to investigate its spin-glass and chiral-glass orderings. The occurrence of a finite-temperature chiral-glass transition without the conventional spin-glass order is established. Critical exponents characterizing the transition are different from those of the standard Ising spin glass. The calculated overlap distribution suggests the appearance ...

  12. Wafer-level manufacturing technology of glass microlenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, U.; Hoeftmann, T.; Wieland, R.; Hansch, W.

    2014-08-01

    In high-tech products, there is an increasing demand to integrate glass lenses into complex micro systems. Especially in the lighting industry LEDs and laser diodes used for automotive applications require encapsulated micro lenses. To enable low-cost production, manufacturing of micro lenses on wafer level base using a replication technology is a key technology. This requires accurate forming of thousands of lenses with a diameter of 1-2 mm on a 200 mm wafer compliant with mass production. The article will discuss the technical aspects of a lens manufacturing replication process and the challenges, which need to be solved: choice of an appropriate master for replication, thermally robust interlayer coating, choice of replica glass, bonding and separation procedure. A promising approach for the master substrate material is based on a lens structured high-quality glass wafer with high melting point covered by a coating layer of amorphous silicon or germanium. This layer serves as an interlayer for the glass bonding process. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes allow a deposition of layer coatings with different hydrogen and doping content influencing their chemical and physical behavior. A time reduced molding process using a float glass enables the formation of high quality lenses while preserving the recyclability of the mother substrate. The challenge is the separation of the replica from the master mold. An overview of chemical methods based on optimized etching of coating layer through small channels will be given and the impact of glass etching on surface roughness is discussed.

  13. Aqueous corrosion of silicate glasses. Analogy between volcanic glasses and the French nuclear waste glass R7T7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, F.

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of borosilicate glasses upon aqueous corrosion is controlled for long periods of time (>10,000 years) by processes which are not directly accessible by means of laboratory experiments. The analogical approach consists here to compare leaching performances between the french nuclear waste glass R7T7 and natural volcanic glasses, basaltic and rhyolitic ones. The three glasses were leached in the same conditions; open system, 90 deg C, initial pH of 9.7. Basaltic and R7T7 glasses having the same kinetic of dissolution, the basaltic glass was chosen as the best analogue. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  14. Relative leach behavior of waste glasses and naturally occurring glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated nuclear waste glasses of the sodium-borosilicate type with a low waste loading and of the zinc-borosilicate type with a high waste loading have been compared with obsidians. The resuls indicate that the waste glasses would corrode in normal natural environments at a rate of about 0.1 μm per year at 30 0 C and about 5 μm per year at 90 0 C, compared with obsidians which seem to corrode at, or less than, about 0.01 μm per year at 30 0 C and less than 1 μm per year at 90 0 C. Activation energies for reactions of the two waste glasses with pure water are about 20 kcal/g-mol. 3 figures, 7 tables

  15. Database for waste glass composition and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.D.; Chapman, C.C.; Mendel, J.E.; Williams, C.G.

    1993-09-01

    A database of waste glass composition and properties, called PNL Waste Glass Database, has been developed. The source of data is published literature and files from projects funded by the US Department of Energy. The glass data have been organized into categories and corresponding data files have been prepared. These categories are glass chemical composition, thermal properties, leaching data, waste composition, glass radionuclide composition and crystallinity data. The data files are compatible with commercial database software. Glass compositions are linked to properties across the various files using a unique glass code. Programs have been written in database software language to permit searches and retrievals of data. The database provides easy access to the vast quantities of glass compositions and properties that have been studied. It will be a tool for researchers and others investigating vitrification and glass waste forms

  16. Volumetric change of simulated radioactive waste glass irradiated by electron accelerator. [Silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Seichi; Furuya, Hirotaka; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Kozaka, Tetsuo; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    1987-11-01

    Density changes of simulated radioactive waste glasses, silica glass and Pyrex glass irradiated by an electron accelerator were measured by a ''sink-float'' technique. The density changes of the waste and silica glasses were less than 0.05 %, irradiated at 2.0 MeV up to the fluence of 1.7 x 10/sup 17/ ecm/sup 2/, while were remarkably smaller than that of Pyrex glass of 0.18 % shrinkage. Precision of the measurements in the density changes of the waste glass was lower than that of Pyrex glass possibly because of the inhomogeneity of the waste glass

  17. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  18. Yield point of metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Shear bands form in most bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) within a narrow range of uniaxial strain ε y ≅ 2%. We propose this critical condition corresponds to embryonic shear band (ESB) propagation, not its nucleation. To propagate an ESB, the far-field shear stress τ ∞ ∼ Eε y /2 must exceed the quasi-steady-state glue traction τ glue of shear-alienated glass until the glass transition temperature is approached internally due to frictional heating, at which point ESB matures as a runaway shear crack. The incubation length scale l inc necessary for this maturation is estimated to be ∼10 2 nm for Zr-based BMGs, below which sample size-scale shear localization does not happen. In shear-alienated glass, the last resistance against localized shearing comes from extremely fast downhill dissipative dynamics of timescale comparable to atomic vibrations, allowing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture this recovery process which governs τ glue . We model four metallic glasses: a binary Lennard-Jones system, two binary embedded atom potential systems and a quinternary embedded atom system. Despite vast differences in the structure and interatomic interactions, the four MD calculations give ε y predictions of 2.4%, 2.1%, 2.6% and 2.9%, respectively

  19. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  20. Effects of heavy weight waste glass recycled as fine aggregate on the mechanical properties of mortar specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, So Yeong; Choi, Yoon Suk; Yang, Eun Ik

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The properties of mortar used heavy weight waste glass as fine aggregate were compared. • Unit volume weight and shielding performance increased with the content of waste glass. • However, the strength decreased as the waste glass substitution increased. • The waste glass substitution affected on pores ranging from 10–100 nm. - Abstract: The quantities of heavy weight waste glass have increased over time due to rapid industrialization and changes in the quality of life. Moreover, most of this waste is not recycled. Concrete is the most widely used construction material, the huge amounts of natural resources are required to make concrete. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the possibility of recycling of heavy weight waste glass as an ingredient in the manufacturing of concrete. In this study, the suitability of heavy weight waste glass as a fine aggregate material is considered. The results of flow test, unit volume weight, radiation shielding performance, compressive strength, flexural strength, and micropore and macropore distribution of mortar are compared and evaluated. It was found that when the heavy weight waste glass substitution ratio increases, the fluidity, unit volume weight and radiation shielding performance also increase. However, the compressive and flexural strength of mortar gradually decrease with an increase in the substitution ratio of heavy weight waste glass. Moreover, the micro pore size distribution is significantly affected by the substitution of heavy weight waste glass.

  1. Development and modification of glass membranes for aggressive gas separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindbraaten, Arne

    2004-07-01

    Chlorine as a chemical is widespread in industry and found in a great variety of processes ranging from water purification to plastic production. In this thesis, a magnesium production factory was chosen as an example because it involved both chlorine - air separation and hydrogen -hydrogen chloride separation. Previously, various types of membrane materials have been tested out for their applicability in the chosen process. The materials previously tested either lacked sufficient membrane performance or sufficient membrane stability. As an attempt to improve both the membrane performance and stability, glass membranes are used in this thesis. Glass membranes are prepared from a borosilicate glass, via a phase separation followed by an acid leaching route. By choosing the appropriate phase separation temperature and acid to glass ratio, the membrane can be produced with an average pore diameter of 2 nm (or 4 nm). However, the 2 nm average pore size is still too large to separate gases with separation selectivities beyond the selectivities predicted from Knudsen diffusion theory. If the pores are narrowed, the selectivity may be raised while the flux hopefully is maintained. The narrowing of the pores was done by a silane coupling to the surface OH-groups on the glass. The silane coupling agent is of the dimethyl-acyl-chlorosilane type, where the length of the acyl chain varies from 1 carbon up to 18 carbons. Glass fibres are also tested in this work, which are produced without phase separation and their average pore size is smaller than the surface-modified glasses. To be able to compare the performance of the various membranes, performance measurements are performed and these measurements are evaluated by the separation power (product of the selectivity and the permeability of the fastest permeating compound). Because of the harsh chlorine or hydrogen chloride environment, to which the membranes are exposed in this work, the membrane stability is at least as

  2. Process industry properties in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing

    2005-01-01

    In this article the writer has described the definition of process industry, expounded the fact classifying nuclear industry as process industry, compared the differences between process industry and discrete industry, analysed process industry properties in nuclear industry and their important impact, and proposed enhancing research work on regularity of process industry in nuclear industry. (authors)

  3. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  4. Studies of glasses by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Boden, G.

    1981-04-01

    Investigations of silica glasses, pyrocerams and metallic glasses by positron annihilation (lifetime, Doppler broadening) are presented. The measurements on silica glasses showed, that silica glass fused from naturally occuring quartz exhibits a higher order than that one produced from SiCl 4 . Furthermore it was found that the order of silica glasses increases after heat treatment above 900 0 C. Thus the X-amorphous state of silica glasses could be characterized by positron annihilation what is impossible at present by diffraction methods. (author)

  5. Oxycarbonitride glass formation by melt solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imon, M M; Risbud, S H

    1986-04-01

    Experimental results are presented from the synthesis and characterization of multianion oxycarbonitride glasses composed of MgSiAlON glass powders with SiC additions of 5, 10, or 15 wt pct. Nitrogen additions to the oxide MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses increased devitrification resistance, but carbon additions to MgSiAlON glasses promote crystal nucleation. These properties are relevant to the oxycarbonitride glasses use in refractory glass-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic composite systems with good elevated temperature performance. 9 references.

  6. Gauge theory of glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5∼ t correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data

  7. X-ray luminescent glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray luminescent glasses comprising a divalent cation such as an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cations such as pb, cd, or zn, and certain rare earth metaphosphates are suitable as vitreous, x-ray phosphors or x-ray luminescent glass fibers in an x-ray intensifying screen. The glasses have the composition n(Mo X p2o5)((1-y)tb2o3 X yce2o3 X 3p2o5) wherein N is greater than zero but less than or equal to 16, M is an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cation such as pb, cd, or zn, and Y is greater than or equal to zero but less than one

  8. Phase transitions and glass transition in a hyperquenched silica–alumina glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, D.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions, glass transition, and dynamic behavior in the hyperquenched 69SiO2–31Al2O3 (mol%) glass (SA glass). Upon reheating, the SA glass exhibits a series of thermal responses. Subsequent to the sub-Tg enthalpy release, the glass undergoes a large jump in isobaric heat...... capacity (ΔCp) during glass transition, implying the fragile nature of the SA glass. The mullite starts to form before the end of glass transition, indicating that the SA glass is extremely unstable against crystallization. After the mullite formation, the remaining glass phase exhibits an increased Tg...... and a suppressed ΔCp. The formation of cristobalite at 1553 K indicates the dominance of silica in the remaining glass matrix. The cristobalite gradually re-melts as the isothermal heat-treatment temperature is raised from 1823 to 1853 K, which is well below the melting point of cristobalite, while the amount...

  9. Glass Foreign Body Hand Radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ehsani-Nia, DO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 27-year-old female sustained an injury to her left hand after she tripped and fell on a vase. She presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of pain over the laceration. Upon examination, patient presented with multiple small abrasions of the medial aspect of the left 5thdigit that are minimally tender. Additionally, she has one 0.5cm linear laceration of the medial aspect of the 5thmetacarpal with severe tenderness in the area and palpable underlying foreign body. Significant findings: Left hand plain radiography demonstrated a subcutaneous foreign body medial to the 5thmetacarpal that is radiopaque, trapezoidal in shape, and measures approximately 11mm x 3mm. Discussion: Laceration repairs are amongst the most common procedures in the emergency department; however, consideration for foreign body is often underdiagnosed. Imaging is performed in only about 11% of all traumatic wounds in the ED.1 Of those injuries relating to the hand that are subsequently imaged, about 15% are found to have a foreign body.2,3 Additionally, it is estimated that foreign bodies are present in 7% to 8.7% of all wounds caused by glass objects.4,5 Glass is among the most common foreign bodies in lacerations, and fortunately they are radiopaque and relatively well visualized radiographically. It has been demonstrated that 2mm glass foreign bodies have a 99% detection rate with radiography, and 1mm glass foreign bodies an 83% detection rate.6 Patient perception of foreign body has a positive predictive value of 31%, making it a poor source in influencing clinical decision-making to obtain wound radiographs.3 Clinicians should have a high suspicion for foreign body in lacerations, particularly those caused by glass, and utilize close physical examination and imaging for evaluation. Topics: Radiography, glass, foreign body, trauma

  10. Image-based spectroscopic sensor for the automatic control gas burners in the glass-processing industry. Multichannel spectral detection of flame emissions and multivariate analysis methods allow for optical quality monitoring and control of industrial burners; Bildgebende optische Spektralsensorik zur automatischen Regelung von Gasbrennern fuer die Glas verarbeitende Industrie. Durch mehrkanalige spektrale Aufnahmen der Flammenemission und multivariate Auswertemethoden kann die Qualitaet der Gasversorgung bei industriellen Brennern optisch ueberwacht und geregelt werden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knetsch, R.; Arnold, W. [Herbert Arnold GmbH und Co. KG, Weilburg (Germany); Erfurth, F.; Scheibe, A.; Nyuyki, B.; Schmidt, W.D. [GMBU e.V., Jena (Germany). Fachsektion Photonik und Sensorik

    2009-07-01

    The precise composition of the combustion gas mixture of burners is essential for the maximum achievable flame temperature as well as for the economic use of raw material. We present a mobile device for optical flame analysis and optimization of gas supply for industrial burners. The relative fuel-oxygen-ratio can be assessed by means of spectral emission in the visible and UV region by factoring in the distribution of gas emissions along the flame. Based on spectral imaging technology our sensor allows for calculation of a flame index stating the quality of fuel supply. A laboratory sample of the flame sensor has been tested with different burners using natural gas and propane. The flame index has been determined successful for several fuel-oxygen-ratios. Practical experiments showed that uncomplicated software-based adaptation of the device to several burner configurations is possible.

  11. Mobile glasses-free 3D using compact waveguide hologram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, K.; Choi, C.; Morozov, A.; Putilin, A.; Bovsunovskiy, I.; Kim, S.; Ahn, J.; Lee, H.-S.; Lee, S.

    2013-02-01

    The exploding mobile communication devices make 3D data available anywhere anytime. However, to record and reconstruct 3D, the huge number of optical components is often required, which makes overall device size bulky and image quality degraded due to the error-prone tuning. In addition, if additional glass is required, then user experience of 3D is exhausting and unpleasant. Holography is the ultimate 3D that users experience natural 3D in every direction. For mobile glasses-free 3D experience, it is critical to make holography device that can be as compact and integrated as possible. For reliable and economical mass production, integrated optics is needed as integrated circuits in semiconductor industry. Thus, we propose mobile glasses-free 3D using compact waveguide hologram in terms of overall device sizes, quantity of elements and combined functionality of each element. The main advantages of proposed solution are as follows: First, this solution utilizes various integral optical elements, where each of them is a united not adjustable optical element, replacing separate and adjustable optical elements with various forms and configurations. Second, geometrical form of integral elements provides small sizes of whole device. Third, geometrical form of integral elements allows creating flat device. And finally, absence of adjustable elements provide rigidly of whole device. The usage of integrated optical means based on waveguide holographic elements allows creating a new type of compact and high functional devices for mobile glasses-free 3D applications such as mobile medical 3D data visualization.

  12. Mobile glasses-free 3D using compact waveguide hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyun, K; Choi, C; Kim, S; Ahn, J; Lee, H-S; Lee, S; Morozov, A; Bovsunovskiy, I; Putilin, A

    2013-01-01

    The exploding mobile communication devices make 3D data available anywhere anytime. However, to record and reconstruct 3D, the huge number of optical components is often required, which makes overall device size bulky and image quality degraded due to the error-prone tuning. In addition, if additional glass is required, then user experience of 3D is exhausting and unpleasant. Holography is the ultimate 3D that users experience natural 3D in every direction. For mobile glasses-free 3D experience, it is critical to make holography device that can be as compact and integrated as possible. For reliable and economical mass production, integrated optics is needed as integrated circuits in semiconductor industry. Thus, we propose mobile glasses-free 3D using compact waveguide hologram in terms of overall device sizes, quantity of elements and combined functionality of each element. The main advantages of proposed solution are as follows: First, this solution utilizes various integral optical elements, where each of them is a united not adjustable optical element, replacing separate and adjustable optical elements with various forms and configurations. Second, geometrical form of integral elements provides small sizes of whole device. Third, geometrical form of integral elements allows creating flat device. And finally, absence of adjustable elements provide rigidly of whole device. The usage of integrated optical means based on waveguide holographic elements allows creating a new type of compact and high functional devices for mobile glasses-free 3D applications such as mobile medical 3D data visualization.

  13. Industrial Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  14. Industrial symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacchi, Romain; Remmen, Arne

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the development of industrial symbiosis through a practical model for physical, organizational, and social interactions in six different cases from around the world. The results provide a framework that can be used by industrial symbiosis practitioners to facilitate the creation...

  15. Fission tracks diameters in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon Ruiperez, L.; Veiguela, J.

    1974-01-01

    Standard glass microscope slides have been irradiated with fission fragments from the uranium. The etching track conditions have been the same for the series, having changed the etching time only for each specimen. For each glass, a minimum of 250 measurements of the tracks diameters have been made, the distributions of which are the bimodal type. Diameters-etching dependence with time is roughly lineal. Energy determinations have been made with the help of the diameters-energy relations. The calculated values agree very well with the know ones. (author) [es

  16. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  17. Characteristics of radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masashi; Shiraishi, Akemi; Murakami, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, a film badge is recently replaced by a new type radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimeter for external personal monitoring. Some fundamental characteristics of this dosimeter, such as dose dependence linearity, energy dependence, angular dependence, dose evaluation accuracy at mixed irradiation conditions, fading, etc., were examined at the Facility of Radiation Standard (FRS), JAERI. The results have proved that the RPL glass dosimeter has sufficient characteristics for practical use as a personal dosimeter for all of the items examined. (author)

  18. START - glass model of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marn, J.; Ramsak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear engineering in the area of process engineering the University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering has invested in procuring and erecting glass model of pressurized water reactor. This paper deals with description of the model, its capabilities, and plans for its use within nuclear engineering community of Slovenia. The model, made primarily of glass, serves three purposes: educational, professional development and research. As an example, medium break loss of coolant accident is presented in the paper. Temperatures within primary and secondary side, and pressure on primary side of reactor coolant system are followed. The characteristic points are emphasized, and commented.(author)

  19. Glass Ceiling : Women in management

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, Virve

    2010-01-01

    This study has examined the phenomenon called Glass Ceiling. It has approached the phenomenon in two different views. One is career development and another one is women in management. Main purpose for this study was to inspect women working life and career opportunities. Why women’s career developments end in a certain level? What is glass ceiling and how to break it? Paper also investigates reasons behind the effect. Prejudices and biases are the worst enemies for women’s career. How to chan...

  20. Energy analysis of 108 industrial processes. Phase 1, industrial applications study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, B. B.; Brown, H. L.

    1979-06-01

    Extensive data are compiled for energy balances in 108 industrial processes. Specific information on unit operation, material, temperature, unrecoverable losses, along with the process flow diagram is given for each of the industries. The following industries are included: meak packing; milk; canned fruits and vegetables; baked goods; sugar refining; soybean; textiles; wood products; building materials; alkalies and chlorine; inorganic gases; pigments, chemicals; plastic materials and resins; synthetic rubbers; organic fibers; pharmaceutical preparations; organic chemicals; petroleum products; fertilizers; rubber products; glass; blast furnaces and steel mills; metals; farm machinery; motor vehicles; and photographic materials. The SIC's for each industry are identified.

  1. 2001 Industry Studies: Services Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cervone, Michael

    2001-01-01

    .... has maintained its economic strength in traditional services industries such as transportation, tourism, public utilities, finance and insurance, accounting, engineering, architecture, medical, legal...

  2. Industry honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN has organised a day to thank industry for its exceptional contributions to the LHC project. Lucio Rossi addresses CERN’s industrial partners in the Main Auditorium.The LHC inauguration provided an opportunity for CERN to thank all those who have contributed to transforming this technological dream into reality. Industry has been a major player in this adventure. Over the last decade it has lent its support to CERN’s teams and participating institutes in developing, building and assembling the machine, its experiments and the computing infrastructure. CERN involved its industrial partners in the LHC inauguration by organising a special industry prize-giving day on 20 October. Over 70 firms accepted the invitation. The firms not only made fundamental contributions to the project, but some have also supported LHC events in 2008 and the inauguration ceremony through generous donations, which have been coordinated by Carmen Dell’Erba, who is responsible for secu...

  3. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...... of the system industry has to inform at the planning stage and afterwards in yearly reports on their waste arising and how the waste is managed. If available such information is very helpful in obtaining information about that specific industry. However, in many countries there is very little information...

  4. Characterization of tannery sludge from the leather industry of Franca industrial district, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambi, M.M.; Toffoli, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The industry of leather manufacture generates large quantities of solid leather waste with characteristics of high-polluting and hazardous conditions. Among these wastes, stands out the wet blue leather (chromed leather scraps), and the tanning sludge and secondary sludge generated in the processes of effluents treatment. These wastes contain Cr(III), which, under oxidizing conditions, can turn into Cr (VI), which is highly toxic. However, these wastes are a potential source of chromium oxide (traditional industrial pigment), which could be used by the glass and ceramic enamel industries. In this study, a preliminary characterization of a chromium sludge from the industrial district of Franca-SP was conducted. X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA / TG) analyses were used to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of this solid waste. The potential of using this material as an available and cheap pigment for the manufacture of enamels and glass is discussed. (author)

  5. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  6. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  7. Development of dense glass-ceramic from recycled soda-lime-silicate glass and fly ash for tiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaffar, Mohd Idham; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza; Hassan, Mahadi Abu

    2017-12-01

    Dense glass-ceramics were prepared by sinter-crystallization process from a combination of soda-lime-silicate glass waste and fly ash. Bentonite clay that acted as a binder was also added in a prepared formulation. The powder mixture of soda-lime glass, fly ash and bentonite clay were compacted by using uniaxial hydraulic press machine and sintered at six (6) various temperatures namely 750, 800, 850, 900, 950 and 1000 °C. The heating rate and sintering time were set at 5 °C/min and 30 minutes respectively. The results revealed that modulus of rupture (MOR), density and linear shrinkage increase first from 750 to 800 °C but decrease later after 800 to 1000 °C. In the meantime, water absorption was showing completely an opposite trend. The glass-ceramic sintered at 800 °C was found to have the best combination of physical-mechanical properties and has the potential to be applied in the construction industry particularly as floor and wall tiles because of the simple manufacturing process at low temperature.

  8. Flight Deck I-Glasses, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight Deck i-Glasses is a color, stereoscopic 3-D display mounted on consumer style eye glass frames that will enhance operator performance and multi-modal...

  9. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  10. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  11. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau; Fu, Hui-Chun

    2017-01-01

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures

  12. Manganese activated phosphate glass for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.

    1975-01-01

    A measuring element comprises a metaphosphate glass doped with manganese as an activator. The manganese activated metaphosphate glass can detect and determine radiation doses in the range between milliroentgens and more than 10 megaroentgens. (auth)

  13. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the ... Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. ..... with equal probability. This has a ...

  14. Using Google Glass in Surgical Settings: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nancy J; Dougherty, Bryn; Myers, Aundria; Badawy, Sherif M

    2018-03-06

    In recent years, wearable devices have become increasingly attractive and the health care industry has been especially drawn to Google Glass because of its ability to serve as a head-mounted wearable device. The use of Google Glass in surgical settings is of particular interest due to the hands-free device potential to streamline workflow and maintain sterile conditions in an operating room environment. The aim is to conduct a systematic evaluation of the literature on the feasibility and acceptability of using Google Glass in surgical settings and to assess the potential benefits and limitations of its application. The literature was searched for articles published between January 2013 and May 2017. The search included the following databases: PubMed MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO (EBSCO), and IEEE Xplore. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts and assessed full-text articles. Original research articles that evaluated the feasibility, usability, or acceptability of using Google Glass in surgical settings were included. This review was completed following the Preferred Reporting Results of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Of the 520 records obtained, 31 met all predefined criteria and were included in this review. Google Glass was used in various surgical specialties. Most studies were in the United States (23/31, 74%) and all were conducted in hospital settings: 29 in adult hospitals (29/31, 94%) and two in children's hospitals (2/31, 7%). Sample sizes of participants who wore Google Glass ranged from 1 to 40. Of the 31 studies, 25 (81%) were conducted under real-time conditions or actual clinical care settings, whereas the other six (19%) were conducted under simulated environment. Twenty-six studies were pilot or feasibility studies (84%), three were case studies (10%), and two were randomized controlled trials (6%). The majority of studies examined the potential use of

  15. Platinoids and molybdenum in nuclear waste containment glasses: a structural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Grand, M.

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with the structure of borosilicate nuclear glasses and with some relationships between structure and macroscopic properties. Two types of elements which may disturb the industrial process - platinoids (Ru and Pd) and molybdenum - are central to this work. Platinoids induce weak modifications on the structure of the glass, causing a depolymerization of the glassy network, an increase of the [3] B/ [4] B ratio and a modification of the medium range order around Si between 3.3 and 4.5 angstrom. The modifications of viscosity and density induced by platinoids in the glass are not due to the structural effect of the platinoids. The increase of viscosity is attributed to needle shaped RuO 2 . It can be moderated by imposing reducing conditions during the elaboration of the glass. The slight difference between experimental and calculated densities is due to the increase of the volume percentage of bubbles in the glass with increasing platinoid content. Mo is either present in the glass as molybdic groupings, or mobilized in chemically complex molybdic crystalline phases. The chemical composition and mineralogy of these phases has been obtained using electronic microprobe data and XRD with Rietveld analysis. The distribution of the different elements between the crystalline phases and the glass is strongly influenced by the structural role of the various cations in the glass. The Mo present in the glass appears as MoO 4 tetrahedra, independent of the borosilicate network. The formation of the crystalline phases can be explained by the existence of a precursor in which the MoO 4 tetrahedra are concentrated in rich alkali and earth-alkali bearing areas of the glass. (author)

  16. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T "phase diagram" for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  17. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Starr, Francis W.

    2014-01-01

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  18. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  19. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  20. Granular packing as model glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yujie

    2017-01-01

    Static granular packings are model hard-sphere glass formers. The nature of glass transition has remained a hotly debated issue. We review recent experimental progresses in using granular materials to study glass transitions. We focus on the growth of glass order with five-fold symmetry in granular packings and relate the findings to both geometric frustration and random first-order phase transition theories. (paper)

  1. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  2. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  3. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  4. Percolation and spin glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, A.; Tahir-Kheli, R.A.; Wortis, M.; Bhatti, N.A.

    1980-10-01

    The behaviour of clusters of curved and normal plaquette particles in a bond random, +-J, Ising model is studied in finite square and triangular lattices. Computer results for the concentration of antiferromagnetic bonds when percolating clusters first appears are found to be close to those reported for the occurrence and disappearance of spin glass phases in these systems. (author)

  5. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  6. Physical ageing of silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemilov, S.V. [S. I. Vavilov State Optical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2003-02-01

    The presented review has been devoted to the problem of volume-determined properties relaxation of silicate glasses at room temperature. It is shown that the experimental data are described by the simple Debye exponential law or by a superposition of two exponents. Their parameters are calculated and systematized. A molecular-kinetic model is proposed for these ageing processes. It proceeds from the possibility of volume relaxation due to the cooperative β-relaxation mechanism with no change in the system's topology. The characteristic ageing times can be calculated according to equations obtained based on the viscosity data in the glass transition range. The precision of the calculations is about {+-} 15% at the time variations from a few weeks up to about 15 years. The system of calculated parameters is proposed which characterizes the completeness of ageing and its rate at any glass age. Optical and thermometric glasses have been ranked by their tendency to ageing. The scheme of future investigations predetermined by practice is defined. (orig.)

  7. Spin glasses and neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, N.; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche

    1989-01-01

    The mean-field theory of spin glass models has been used as a prototype of systems with frustration and disorder. One of the most interesting related systems are models of associative memories. In these lectures we review the main concepts developed to solve the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and its application to neural networks. (orig.)

  8. Industrial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C K

    1992-01-01

    Industrial ecology addresses issues that will impact future production, use, and disposal technologies; proper use of the concept should reduce significantly the resources devoted to potential remediation in the future. This cradle-to-reincarnation production philosophy includes industrial processes that are environmentally sound and products that are environmentally safe during use and economically recyclable after use without adverse impact on the environment or on the net cost to society. This will require an industry-university-government round table to set the strategy and agenda for progress. PMID:11607254

  9. Glass-ceramics as building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics are materials composed as any ceramic material by several crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous or vitreous matrix, but their manufacture process implies the controlled devitrification or nucleation and growth of phases from an original glass. The original shape of the original glass molded by conventional methods is carried out by using pressing and sintering followed by crystallization steps. By both processing routes are obtained transparent and/or opaque materials, with or without colours, which after adequate control and design of composition and microstructure have numerous domestic and architectonic applications. They can be used as pavements or wall coatings and in various decorative elements. In fact, their use is very extensive in east-European, American and Asian (Japan countries in constructions for covering large surfaces. The greater advantage of the glass-ceramic process is that due to the own process of vitrification allows the incorporation in their structure of a wide range of compositions from mining and industrial residues, such as red muds, ashes, fangos, scraps... which they can in this way not only be inertizated, but furthermore it be converted without risk for the environment into products useful in construction applications, offering to the architect and to the decorator a new range of "eco-materials" with multiple complementary possibilities of the already existing architectural materials in the market.

    Los productos o materiales vitrocerámicos se componen, como cualquier material de tipo cerámico, de una o varias fases cristalinas embebidas en una matriz amorfa o vítrea, pero cuyo proceso de fabricación implica la desvitrificación o nucleación y cristalización controlada de un vidrio original o de partida. En el proceso de obtención de estos materiales se puede conservar la forma original conferida al vidrio de partida por los métodos convencionales de moldeado de vidrios

  10. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Shawn M; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

    2012-02-27

    America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120°C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less

  11. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27

    America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less

  12. Durable Glass For Thousands Of Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al 3+ rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Stable Glasses Using Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sarah; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Yijie; Ablajan, Keyume; Zhang, Yue; Walsh, Patrick; Turner, Kevin; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Glasses with enhanced stability over ordinary, liquid quenched glasses have been formed via the process of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) by using a sufficiently slow deposition rate and a substrate temperature slightly below the glass transition temperature. These stable glasses have been shown to exhibit higher density, lower enthalpy, and better kinetic stability over ordinary glass, and are typically optically birefringent, due to packing and orientational anisotropy. Given these exceptional properties, it is of interest to further investigate how the properties of stable glasses compare to those of ordinary glass. In particular, the mechanical properties of stable glasses remain relatively under-investigated. While the speed of sound and elastic moduli have been shown to increase with increased stability, little is known about their hardness and fracture toughness compared to ordinary glasses. In this study, glasses of 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene were deposited at varying temperatures relative to their glass transition temperature, and their mechanical properties measured by nanoindentation. Hardness and elastic modulus of the glasses were compared across substrate temperatures. After indentation, the topography of these films were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to further compare the relationship between thermodynamic and kinetic stability and mechanical failure. Z.F. and P.W. acknowledge funding from NSF(DMREF-1628407).

  14. Characterization of Fe -doped silver phosphate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... to their several spe- cial properties such as large thermal expansion coefficients, ... increase the conductivity of these glasses is to increase the modifier or dopant ... phosphate glasses were measured by the a.c. impedance spectroscopic .... and Fe2O3-doped Ag2O–P2O5 glasses were determined from. DSC curves and ...

  15. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length of the ...

  16. Nickel-iron spherules from aouelloul glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; Dwornik, E.J.; Merrill, C.W.

    1966-01-01

    Nickel-iron spherules, ranging from less than 0.2 to 50 microns in diameter and containing 1.7 to 9.0 percent Ni by weight, occur in glass associated with the Aouelloul crater. They occur in discrete bands of siliceous glass enriched in dissolved iron. Their discovery is significant tangible evidence that both crater and glass originated from terrestrial impact.

  17. Jagged Edges of the Glass Ceiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Victoria L.

    2004-01-01

    Although many aspiring young women might believe the glass ceiling was shattered a decade ago, they still need to understand how that glass ceiling impacted an older generation of women in educational leadership. They also must be aware that some segments of the glass ceiling might still exist. This article provides a historical overview of the…

  18. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 ) and a fresnoite-based (Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 ) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  19. Aging in chalcohalide glasses: Origin and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Wang, W.

    2012-01-01

    the elemental concentration depth profiles in the surface layer of the glasses by using secondary neutral mass spectroscopy. The results show that anionic diffusion processes occur in the glasses during aging. The aging process leads to a decrease in microhardness of the studied glasses, which is attributed...

  20. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  1. Grinding Glass Disks On A Belt Sander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, James J., III

    1995-01-01

    Small machine attached to table-top belt sander makes possible to use belt sander to grind glass disk quickly to specified diameter within tolerance of about plus or minus 0.002 in. Intended to be used in place of production-shop glass grinder. Held on driveshaft by vacuum, glass disk rotated while periphery ground by continuous sanding belt.

  2. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  3. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  4. Superconducting state parameters of ternary metallic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    to binary metallic glasses. They are of interest since third element can modify the physical properties of binary metallic glasses and can also be used as a probe to study the host. ..... conducting nature in the present case. When we. Figure 6. Variation of transition temperature (TC) with valance (Z) of ternary metallic glasses.

  5. The corrosion behavior of DWPF glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyzed the corroded surfaces of reference glasses developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to characterize their corrosion behavior. The corrosion mechanism of nuclear waste glasses must be known in order to provide source terms describing radionuclide release for performance assessment calculations. Different DWPF reference glasses were corroded under conditions that highlighted various aspects of the corrosion process and led to different extents of corrosion. The glasses corroded by similar mechanisms, and a phenomenological description of their corrosion behavior is presented here. The initial leaching of soluble glass components results in the formation of an amorphous gel layer on the glass surface. The gel layer is a transient phase that transforms into a layer of clay crystallites, which equilibrates with the solution as corrosion continues. The clay layer does not act as a barrier to either water penetration or glass dissolution, which continues beneath it, and may eventually separate from the glass. Solubility limits for glass components may be established by the eventual precipitation of secondary phases; thus, corrosion of the glass becomes controlled by the chemical equilibrium between the solution and the assemblage of secondary phases. In effect, the solution is an intermediate phase through which the glass transforms to an energetically more favorable assemblage of phases. Implications regarding the prediction of long-term glass corrosion behavior are discussed

  6. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  7. Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An exactly solvable model for glass to spin-glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisanti, A.; Leuzzi, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the full phase diagram of the spherical 2+p spin-glass model with p≥4. The main outcome is the presence of a phase with both properties of full replica symmetry breaking phases of discrete models, e.g., the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and those of one replica symmetry breaking. This phase has a finite complexity which leads to different dynamic and static properties. The phase diagram is rich enough to allow the study of different kinds of glass to spin glass and spin glass to spin glass phase transitions

  8. Using Google Glass in Nonsurgical Medical Settings: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Bryn; Badawy, Sherif M

    2017-10-19

    Wearable technologies provide users hands-free access to computer functions and are becoming increasingly popular on both the consumer market and in various industries. The medical industry has pioneered research and implementation of head-mounted wearable devices, such as Google Glass. Most of this research has focused on surgical interventions; however, other medical fields have begun to explore the potential of this technology to support both patients and clinicians. Our aim was to systematically evaluate the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of using Google Glass in nonsurgical medical settings and to determine the benefits, limitations, and future directions of its application. This review covers literature published between January 2013 and May 2017. Searches included PubMed MEDLINE, Embase, INSPEC (Ebsco), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), IEEE Explore, Web of Science, Scopus, and Compendex. The search strategy sought all articles on Google Glass. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts, assessed full-text articles, and extracted data from articles that met all predefined criteria. Any disagreements were resolved by discussion or consultation by the senior author. Included studies were original research articles that evaluated the feasibility, usability, or acceptability of Google Glass in nonsurgical medical settings. The preferred reporting results of systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed for reporting of results. Of the 852 records examined, 51 met all predefined criteria, including patient-centered (n=21) and clinician-centered studies (n=30). Patient-centered studies explored the utility of Google Glass in supporting patients with motor impairments (n=8), visual impairments (n=5), developmental and psychiatric disorders (n=2), weight management concerns (n=3), allergies (n=1), or other health concerns (n=2). Clinician-centered studies explored the utility of Google Glass

  9. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, Ziga, E-mail: ziga.smit@ijs.si [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, Timotej [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jezersek, David [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Istenic, Janka [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  10. The first Polish conference: Special glasses and amorphous materials. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The present issue brings a collection of papers submitted to the 1. Polish Conference on special glasses and amorphous materials, held on June 1993 at the University of Mining and Metallurgy in Cracow. It was a survey of the research topics and attainments of the research teams working in this referring to the nature of the glassy state of the matter and the relation between glasses and other amorphous materials, properties of these materials as well as modern methods of their synthesis both at low and high temperatures. Some of the results presented at the Conference have already found application in industry. Here belong, among others, the works on optic fibres. Several new materials which have been recently elaborated may also find interesting and new practical application. (author)

  11. Industrial practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez Torrez, Patricia Irma

    1999-01-01

    This document reports the industrial practices carried out by the author viewing the requirements fulfilled for obtention the academic degree in chemical engineering of the San Andres University - Bolivia

  12. Electronics Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ginter, Michael J; Andersen, James L; Becker, John A; Belliveau, Gerald E; Eppich, Frank J; Awai, Herman T; Hanko, David J; Hughes, Bob; Jones, Douglas; Larson, Kelly J

    2007-01-01

    .... area, New York State, Silicon Valley (California), Taiwan, and China. This approach provides a wide range of perspectives from which to examine the selected industry's current condition, outlook, and challenges...

  13. Chemical surface modification of glass beads for the treatment of paper machine process waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jradi, Khalil; Daneault, Claude; Chabot, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of detrimental contaminants on a solid sorbent is proposed to remove these contaminants from process waters to increase water recycling and reduce effluent loads in the papermaking industry. A self-assembly process of attaching (covalent grafting) cationic aminosilane molecules to glass beads was investigated. The existence and the hydrolytic stability of self-assembled monolayers and multilayers were confirmed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Effects of reaction time and curing on aminosilane layer structures are also discussed. The curing step after silanization seems to be crucial in the hydrophobization of the quaternary ammonium silane coated onto glass beads, and curing could affect the final chemical structure of the ammonium groups of grafted organosilane. Results indicated that modified glass beads have a strong hydrophobicity, which is attributed to the hydrophobic property of the longest carbon chain grafted onto the glass surface. Adsorption of a model contaminant (stearic acid) onto chemically modified glass beads was determined using colloidal titration. Hydrophobic interactions could be the main driving force involved between the long carbon chains of stearic acid and the carbon chains of the aminosilane layers on glass bead surfaces. Finally, self-assembly processes applied onto glass beads may have two promising applications for papermaking and self-cleaning systems.

  14. Adapting technology from other industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the light of tougher requirements on water chemistry and liquid discharged to the environment, and with an awareness that more efficient filtration can reduce plant radiation levels, vendors are starting to adapt proven filtration technology from other industries for use in nuclear plants. Two materials have been found that work quite well in nuclear service. The first, a glass-fibre paper pleated together with a supported membrane, offers excellent dirt holding capacity and very predictable efficiency levels. The second, a meltblown, calendered polypropylene, has an asymmetric pore structure that allows it to act to some degree as a depth filter and has the same efficiency as a supported membrane. (author)

  15. Industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Health and Safety Executive Information Sheet on industrial radiography aims to inform directors and managers of industrial radiography companies on the safety precautions necessary to ensure that their personnel do not exceed dose guidelines for exposure to ionizing radiation. The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR85) require that exposure doses for radiographers are kept as low reasonably practicable. Equipment maintenance, and the employment of proper emergency procedures will help to ensure personnel safety. (UK)

  16. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Structure and Properties of Lithium Phosphate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J-J; Cygan, R.T.; Alam, T.M.

    1999-07-09

    A new forcefield model was developed for the computer simulation of phosphate materials that have many important applications in the electronics and biomedical industries. The model provides a fundamental basis for the evaluation of phosphate glass structure and thermodynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations of a series of lithium phosphate glass compositions were performed using the forcefield model. A high concentration of three-membered rings (P{sub 3}O{sub 3}) occurs in the glass of intermediate composition (0.2 Li{sub 2}O {center_dot} 0.8P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) that corresponds to the minimum in the glass transition temperature curve for the compositional series. Molecular orbital calculations of various phosphate ring clusters indicate an increasing stabilization of the phosphate ring structure going from two- to four-membered rings.

  18. Understanding the origin of the fracture toughness evolution of nuclear glasses under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieu, L.-H.

    2011-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, complex borosilicate glasses are used for the confinement of fission products and long-life minor actinides. Under irradiations, the structure and the mechanical properties of these glasses evolve. In this work, atomistic and multi-scale simulations of three simplified borosilicate glasses were run to understand the origin of their fracture behavior change under irradiation. Under the radiation effects, elasticity decreases and plasticity increases. Fracture happens due to the formation and coalescence of nano-cavities. The structural modifications under the radiation effects lead to a delay of the coalescence and of the irradiated glass rupture. Several phenomena overlay to explain this behavior, especially the cavities distribution modifications, the sodium mobility, and the borate and silicate entities organization in the glassy network. Depending on the nature of the more important mechanism, the fracture toughness can increase or decrease under radiation. (author) [fr

  19. Fracture appraisal of large scale glass block under various realistic thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, F.; Vernaz, E.; Saint-Gaudens, M.

    1982-06-01

    Fracturing of nuclear waste glass caused primarily by thermal and residual stresses during cooling increases the potential leaching surface area and the number of small particles. A theoretical study shows that it is possible to calculate the stresses created but it is difficult to evaluate the state of fracture. Theoretical results are completed by an experimental study with inactive industrial scale glass blocks. The critical stages of its thermal history are simulated and the total surface area of the pieces is measured by comparison of leaching rate of the fractured glass with known samples in the same conditions. Quenching due to water impact, air cooling in a storage fit and experimental reassembly of fractured glass by re-heating are examined

  20. Application of Genetic Algorithm to the Design Optimization of Complex Energy Saving Glass Coating Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, F. M.; Azmin, F. A.; Shibghatullah, A. S.; Suaidi, M. K.; Ahmad, B. H.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Salleh, S. N.; Shukor, M. Md

    2014-04-01

    Attenuation of GSM, GPS and personal communication signal leads to poor communication inside the building using regular shapes of energy saving glass coating. Thus, the transmission is very low. A brand new type of band pass frequency selective surface (FSS) for energy saving glass application is presented in this paper for one unit cell. Numerical Periodic Method of Moment approach according to a previous study has been applied to determine the new optimum design of one unit cell energy saving glass coating structure. Optimization technique based on the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to obtain an improved in return loss and transmission signal. The unit cell of FSS is designed and simulated using the CST Microwave Studio software at based on industrial, scientific and medical bands (ISM). A unique and irregular shape of an energy saving glass coating structure is obtained with lower return loss and improved transmission coefficient.

  1. Application of genetic algorithm to the design optimization of complex energy saving glass coating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johar, F M; Azmin, F A; Suaidi, M K; Ahmad, B H; Aziz, M Z A Abd; Salleh, S N; Shukor, M Md; Shibghatullah, A S

    2014-01-01

    Attenuation of GSM, GPS and personal communication signal leads to poor communication inside the building using regular shapes of energy saving glass coating. Thus, the transmission is very low. A brand new type of band pass frequency selective surface (FSS) for energy saving glass application is presented in this paper for one unit cell. Numerical Periodic Method of Moment approach according to a previous study has been applied to determine the new optimum design of one unit cell energy saving glass coating structure. Optimization technique based on the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to obtain an improved in return loss and transmission signal. The unit cell of FSS is designed and simulated using the CST Microwave Studio software at based on industrial, scientific and medical bands (ISM). A unique and irregular shape of an energy saving glass coating structure is obtained with lower return loss and improved transmission coefficient.

  2. Thermal modelling of the multi-stage heating system with variable boundary conditions in the wafer based precision glass moulding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    pressures. Finally, the three-dimensional modelling of the multi-stage heating system in the wafer based glass moulding process is simulated with the FEM software ABAQUS for a particular industrial application for mobile phone camera lenses to obtain the temperature distribution in the glass wafer...

  3. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Some Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses and Their Glass Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo Hussein, E.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses containing bismuth oxide have attracted considerable attention, although it is non-conventional glass forming oxide, but it has wide applications. In this work, it is aimed to prove that bismuth silicate glass can act as a good shielding material for γ- rays. For this purpose glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO_2 was prepared using melting-annealing technique. Also effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass such as PbO, BaO or SrO were also studied. The formed glasses were also heat treated at 450 degree C for 4 hours to give the corresponding heat treated glasses. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that the prepared glasses and heat treated glasses have very good stability when exposed to γ- irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using these glasses as gamma ray shielding materials. Many properties have been investigated, such as density to understand the structural properties, also mechanical properties were verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing their durability in both acidic and basic solutions. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass and heat treated glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 553 K, which proved that these glasses have very low conductivity even at high temperature. The formed phases of heat treated glass or glass ceramic samples were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also studying the structure of glasses and heat treated glasses before and after irradiation was investigated by the Infrared transmitting spectra. Calculations of optical band gap energies were demonstrated for some selected glasses and heat treated glasses from the data of UV optical absorption spectra to support the probability of using these bismuth silicate glasses for gamma radiation shielding processing.

  4. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  5. Strong-Superstrong Transition in Glass Transition of Metallic Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Wang; Hong-Yan, Peng; Xiao-Yu, Xu; Bao-Ling, Chen; Chun-Lei, Wu; Min-Hua, Sun

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fragility of bulk metallic glass (BMG) of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 alloy is studied by three-point beam bending methods. The fragility parameter mfor Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG is calculated to be 24.5 at high temperature, which means that the liquid is a 'strong' liquid, while to be 13.4 at low temperature which means that the liquid is a 'super-strong' liquid. The dynamical behavior of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG in the supercooled region undergoes a strong to super-strong transition. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a strong-to-superstrong transition is found in the metallic glass. Using small angle x-ray scattering experiments, we find that this transition is assumed to be related to a phase separation process in supercooled liquid. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  6. Inelastic neutron scattering from glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchenau, U.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron spectra below and above the glass transition temperature show a pronounced difference between strong and fragile glass formers in Angell's fragility scheme. The strong anharmonic increase of the inelastic scattering with increasing temperature in fragile substances is absent in the strongest glass former SiO 2 . That difference is reflected in the temperature dependence of Brillouin sound velocities above the glass transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of sound waves and local modes at the low frequency boson peak. A relation between the fragility and the temperature dependence of the transverse hypersound velocity at the glass temperature is derived. (author)

  7. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  8. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  9. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  10. Evaluation of Behaviours of Laminated Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, L.; Japins, G.; Kalnins, K.

    2015-11-01

    Visual appearance of building facades and other load bearing structures, which now are part of modern architecture, is the reason why it is important to investigate in more detail the reliability of laminated glass for civil structures. Laminated glass in particular has become one of the trendy materials, for example Apple© stores have both load carrying capacity and transparent appearance. Glass has high mechanical strength and relatively medium density, however, the risk of sudden brittle failure like concrete or other ceramics determine relatively high conservatism in design practice of glass structures. This should be changed as consumer requirements evolve calling for a safe and reliable design methodology and corresponding building standards. A design methodology for glass and glass laminates should be urgently developed and included as a chapter in Eurocode. This paper presents initial experimental investigation of behaviour of simple glass sheets and laminated glass samples in 4-point bending test. The aim of the current research is to investigate laminated glass characteristic values and to verify the obtained experimental results with finite element method for glass and EVA material in line with future European Structural Design of Glass Components code.

  11. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Smith, P.K.; Hrma, P.; Bowan, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive waste-glass melters require physical control limits and redox control of glass to assure continuous operation, and maximize production rates. Typical waste-glass melter operating conditions, and waste-glass chemical reaction paths are discussed. Glass composition, batching and melter temperature control are used to avoid the information of phases which are disruptive to melting or reduce melter life. The necessity and probable limitations of control for electric melters with complex waste feed compositions are discussed. Preliminary control limits, their bases, and alternative control methods are described for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and ground glass frit or glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, and their effect on waste-glass production rates. Relatively high melting rates of waste batches containing mixtures of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates are attributable to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and limits defined for existing waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Through balancing the high nitrate wastes of the WVDP with reducing agents, the high glass melting rates and sustained melting without foaming required for successful WVDP operations have been demonstrated. 65 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs

  12. Redox phenomena in glass melts; Les phenomenes d'oxydoreduction dans les verres d'oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, O.; Di Nardo, Ch. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SCD), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    One of the major concerns in the glass-making industry is the control of redox mechanisms, which condition the glass properties and particularly refinement and color. The development of vitrification processes and vitreous materials for nuclear waste containment further emphasized the advantages of optimizing the glass oxidation state. The oxidation state of polyvalent species in a glass melt essentially depends on the basicity of the glass and the oxygen fugacity in the melt at a given temperature. Theoretical studies show that redox couples in glass melts can be classified according to their characteristic oxygen fugacities. This corresponds to the oxygen fugacity for which the concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of the couple are equal. The quantity f{sub O{sub 2}}{sub char}. depends primarily on the redox couple considered, the basicity and the temperature of the glass melt. A classification of 36 redox couples is proposed here, covering a temperature range from 1085 deg C to 1500 deg C for silicate glass compositions for which the basicity can be characterized by theoretical optical basicity values [2) between 0.55 and 0.65. This classification is based on a variety of published experimental results obtained by different techniques. Figure 1 shows the satisfactory agreement obtained from these various studies. Figure 2 shows that the increase in f{sub O{sub 2}}{sub char}. with temperature in glasses with the same level of basicity ({lambda}= 0.57 {+-} 0.02) is consistent with the theory. From the characteristic oxygen fugacity values, potentiometric measurements of the oxygen fugacity in glass with an oxygen sensor allow in situ evaluation of the redox ratio. Voltammetric investigations of glasses can be used to supplement and refine the classification. The resulting Epeak values, expressed in terms of characteristic oxygen fugacity, are fully consistent with the values for other glasses of comparable basicity measured at comparable temperature

  13. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context

  14. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  15. Characterization of Savannah River Plant waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the glass characterization programs at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is to ensure that glass containing Savannah River Plant high-level waste can be permanently stored in a federal repository, in an environmentally acceptable manner. To accomplish this objective, SRL is carrying out several experimental programs, including: fundamental studies of the reactions between waste glass and water, particularly repository groundwater; experiments in which candidate repository environments are simulated as accurately as possible; burial tests of simulated waste glass in candidate repository geologies; large-scale tests of glass durability; and determination of the effects of process conditions on glass quality. In this paper, the strategy and current status of each of these programs is discussed. The results indicate that waste packages containing SRP waste glass will satisfy emerging regulatory criteria

  16. Phase separation in an ionomer glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Tian, K.V.; Dobó-Nagy, C.

    2015-01-01

    The G338 ionomer glass is a fluoro-alumino-silicate system, which is used as the powder component of glass ionomer cements (GICs) in dental applications. However, despite progress in understanding the nature of this glass, chemical identity of its separated amorphous phases has not yet been...... amorphous phases in G388 are Ca/Na-Al-Si-O, Ca-Al-F and Ca-P-O-F phases, respectively. However, the exact chemical compositions of the three phases still require further exploration. The results of this work are important for understanding the impact of phase separation within ionomer glasses on the setting...... conclusively determined. In this work, we identify these phases by performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses on both the as-received glass and heat-treated samples. We detected three glass transitions in the as-received G338 glass during DSC upscaning, implying...

  17. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  18. Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

  19. Industrial gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.; Jackson, D.; Coeyman, M.

    1993-01-01

    Industrial gas companies have fought hard to boost sales and hold margins in the tough economic climate, and investments are well down from their 1989-'91 peak. But 'our industry is still very strong long term' says Alain Joly, CEO of industry leader L'Air Liquide (AL). By 1994, if a European and Japanese recovery follows through on one in the U.S., 'we could see major [investment] commitments starting again,' he says. 'Noncryogenic production technology is lowering the cost of gas-making possible new applications, oxygen is getting plenty of attention in the environmental area, and hydrogen also fits into the environmental thrust,' says Bob Lovett, executive v.p./gases and equipment with Air Products ampersand Chemicals (AP). Through the 1990's, 'Industrial gases could grow even faster than in the past decade,' he says. Virtually a new generation of new gases applications should become reality by the mid-1990s, says John Campbell, of industry consultants J.R. Campbell ampersand Associates (Lexington, MA). Big new oxygen volumes will be required for powder coal injection in blast furnaces-boosting a steel mill's requirement as much as 40% and coal gasification/combined cycle (CGCC). Increased oil refinery hydroprocessing needs promise hydrogen requirements

  20. Design of the scanning mode coated glass color difference online detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weihong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Dajiang; Zhang, Baojun; Fu, Guangwei

    2008-03-01

    A design of scanning mode coated glass color difference online detection system was introduced. The system consisted of color difference data acquirement part and orbit control part. The function of the color difference data acquirement part was to acquire glass spectral reflectance and then processed them to get the color difference value. Using fiber for light guiding, the reflected light from surface of glass was transmitted into light division part, and the dispersive light was imaged on linear CCD, and then the output signals from the CCD was sampled pixel by pixel, and the spectral reflectance of coated glass was obtained finally. Then, the acquired spectral reflectance signals was sent to industrial personal computer through USB interface, using standard color space and color difference formula nominated by International Commission on Illumination (CIE) in 1976 to process these signals, and the reflected color parameter and color difference of coated glass was gained in the end. The function of the orbit control part was to move the detection probe by way of transverse scanning mode above the glass strip, and control the measuring start-stop time of the color difference data acquirement part at the same time. The color difference data acquirement part of the system was put on the orbit which is after annealing area in coated glass production line, and the protected fiber probe was placed on slide of the orbit. Using single chip microcomputer to control transmission mechanism of the slide, which made the slide move by way of transverse scanning mode on the glass strip, meanwhile, the color difference data acquirement part of the system was also controlled by the single chip microcomputer, and it made the acquirement part measure color difference data when the probe reached the needed working speed and required place on the glass strip. The scanning mode coated glass color difference online detection system can measure color parameter and color difference of

  1. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  2. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  3. Formulation of heat absorbing glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez-Casariego, Pedro

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available In the thermal exchanges between buildings and environment, glazing is an element of major importance, for it largely influences the so-called Solar Heat Gain and Thermal Losses. These parameters can be modified by applying different type of coatings onto glass surface or by adding colorant compounds during glass melting. The latter is a cheaper way to control the Solar Heat Gain. The knowledge of the laws governing the interaction between colorant compounds and solar radiation, allows us to define glass formulations achieving specific aesthetic requirements and solar energy absorption. In this paper two examples of application of the modelling of glass colorants spectral absorptance are presented. First is addressed to obtaining a glass with high luminous transmittance and low solar energy transmittance, and the other one to obtaining a glass with neutral colour appearance and minimized solar energy transmittance. Calculation formulas are defined together with photometric properties so-obtained. These type of glasses are particularly suitable to be used as building and automotive glazing, for they retain the mechanical characteristics and possibilities of transformation of standard glass.

    En los intercambios de energía entre un edificio y el medio exterior, el vidrio es el elemento de mayor importancia, por su influencia en la Ganancia de Calor Solar y en las Pérdidas Térmicas. Estos parámetros pueden ser modificados mediante el depósito de capas sobre el vidrio o mediante la adición de compuestos absorbentes de la radiación solar. Esta última vía es la más económica para controlar la Ganancia de Calor Solar. El conocimiento de las leyes que gobiernan la interacción de los diversos colorantes con la radiación solar, permite definir formulaciones de vidrios con características especificas de tipo estético y de absorción energética. En este trabajo se presentan dos ejemplos de aplicación de esta modelización de las

  4. Development of a glass GEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Yuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Fushie, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMs) apply the concept of gas amplification inside many tiny holes, realizing robust and high-gain proportional counters. However, the polyimide substrate of GEMs prevents them from being used in sealed detector applications. We have fabricated and tested glass GEMs (G-GEMs) with substrates made of photosensitive glass material from the Hoya Corporation. We fabricated G-GEMs with several different hole diameters and thicknesses and successfully operated test G-GEMs with a 100×100 mm 2 effective area. The uniformity of our G-GEMs was good, and the energy resolution for 5.9 keV X-rays was 18.8% under uniform irradiation of the entire effective area. A gas gain by the G-GEMs of up to 6700 was confirmed with a gas mixture of Ar (70%)+CH 4 (30%). X-ray imaging using the charge division readout method was demonstrated

  5. Lid heater for glass melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures

  6. A damage-tolerant glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriou, Marios D; Launey, Maximilien E; Garrett, Glenn; Schramm, Joseph P; Hofmann, Douglas C; Johnson, William L; Ritchie, Robert O

    2011-02-01

    Owing to a lack of microstructure, glassy materials are inherently strong but brittle, and often demonstrate extreme sensitivity to flaws. Accordingly, their macroscopic failure is often not initiated by plastic yielding, and almost always terminated by brittle fracture. Unlike conventional brittle glasses, metallic glasses are generally capable of limited plastic yielding by shear-band sliding in the presence of a flaw, and thus exhibit toughness-strength relationships that lie between those of brittle ceramics and marginally tough metals. Here, a bulk glassy palladium alloy is introduced, demonstrating an unusual capacity for shielding an opening crack accommodated by an extensive shear-band sliding process, which promotes a fracture toughness comparable to those of the toughest materials known. This result demonstrates that the combination of toughness and strength (that is, damage tolerance) accessible to amorphous materials extends beyond the benchmark ranges established by the toughest and strongest materials known, thereby pushing the envelope of damage tolerance accessible to a structural metal.

  7. Ovarian cancer mortality and industrial pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Javier; Lope, Virginia; López-Abente, Gonzalo; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether there might be excess ovarian cancer mortality among women residing near Spanish industries, according to different categories of industrial groups and toxic substances. An ecologic study was designed to examine ovarian cancer mortality at a municipal level (period 1997-2006). Population exposure to pollution was estimated by means of distance from town to facility. Using Poisson regression models, we assessed the relative risk of dying from ovarian cancer in zones around installations, and analyzed the effect of industrial groups and pollutant substances. Excess ovarian cancer mortality was detected in the vicinity of all sectors combined, and, principally, near refineries, fertilizers plants, glass production, paper production, food/beverage sector, waste treatment plants, pharmaceutical industry and ceramic. Insofar as substances were concerned, statistically significant associations were observed for installations releasing metals and polycyclic aromatic chemicals. These results support that residing near industries could be a risk factor for ovarian cancer mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Progress in Industrial Mathematics at ECMI 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Capasso, Vincenzo; Greco, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry (ECMI) was founded in 1986 by leading groups of mathematicians in Europe for the following scopes: i) direct involvement of mathematicians in R&D activities; ii) international cooperation at a European scale; iii) education of industrial mathematicians to meet the growing demand for such experts. ECMI 2000 shows that ECMI has offered a unique example of effective international cooperation thanks to the financial support of the European Framework programmes. In particular they have helped ECMI establishing a set of Special Interest Groups to favour interaction with industry . This volume includes minisymposia about their activities, in particular microelectronics, glass, polymers, finance, traffic, and textiles. Applied mathematicians and other professionals working in academia or industry will find the book to be a useful and stimulating source of mathematical applications related to industrial problems.

  9. Application of lanthanide ions doped in different glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondiyal, Charu Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of optical excitation energy from one ion/molecule to another ion/molecule has proved to be of potential importance in industrial application as well as research. Rare earth elements (RE) although not as rare as some of them occur more prevalently then other well known material (e.g. silver, tin, tungsten) are special group of elements of the periodic table comprising lanthanide series (from lanthanum to lutetium) and actinide series (from actinium to lawrencium). Most of the actinides are highly radioactive hence their uses are limited. Fluorescence is the particular optical property of lanthanide (RE) ions. The narrow absorption and emission lines exhibited by the RE ions in crystals, glasses and solutions have always made these ions attractive as sensitive probes of solids and liquid state and also makes them useful in laser technology, CRT displays, UV to visible converters and optical communications etc. In recent years there has been a special interest to study the properties and applications of rare earth doped in glasses. Lanthanide ions in glasses play an important role, especially by retaining their emission capabilities, in the host matrix. Glass as a dielectric material plays an important role in science and industry. Its chemical, physical and particular optical properties make it suitable for applications such as opto-electronic materials, laboratory equipment, laser gain media, etc. Photoluminescence from rare earth doped glasses are of major interest in the research area of optoelectronic device applications like phosphors, display monitors, lasers and amplifiers for communication systems. Now a days, development of optical devices based on rare-earth ions doped materials is one of the interesting fields of research. Rare earth doped glasses are widely used as laser materials, optical amplifiers, optical memory devices, magneto-optical devices, medical lasers, eye safe lasers, flat panel displays, fluorescent lamps, white LED's etc

  10. Transport of Butane in a Porous Vycor Glass Membrane in the Region of Condensation Pressure.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uchytil, Petr; Petričkovič, Roman; Seidel-Morgenstern, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 293, 1-2 (2007) , s. 15-21 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : mass transport * porous vycor glass * capillary condensation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.432, year: 2007

  11. Recycling of glass: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Merrild, Hanna Kristina; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    -wash facility (combustion of fuels) as well as indirect downstream activities in terms of using the recovered glass waste in other industries and, thereby, avoiding emissions from conventional production. The GHG accounting was presented as aggregated global warming factors (GWFs) for the direct and indirect...

  12. Future energy-efficient and low-emissions glass melting processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Lankhorst, A.M.; Santen, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    All over the world, there is an increasing drive to develop new technologies or concepts for industrial glass melting furnaces, with the main aim to increase the energy efficiency, tabilize production and reduce emissions. The application of new process sensors, improved furnace design, intelligent

  13. Female healthcare managers and the glass ceiling. The obstacles and opportunities for women in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, C

    1991-01-01

    Despite the large number of women in the healthcare field, healthcare management resembles other industries in its severe lack of women in upper-management positions and in the "glass ceiling" that contributes to this dearth. Although not enough has been specifically written on women healthcare managers, the author reviews what is available, along with some of the general management literature.

  14. Preliminary flowsheet for the conversion of Hanford high-level waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beary, M.M.; Chick, L.A.; Ely, P.C.; Gott, S.A.

    1977-06-01

    The flowsheets describe a process for converting waste removed from the Hanford underground waste tanks to more immobile form. The process involves a chemical separation of the radionuclides from industrial chemicals, and then making glass from the resulting small volume of highly radioactive waste. Removal of Sr, actinides, cesium, and technetium is discussed

  15. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV), coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive a...

  16. Basic Research on Oxynitride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    AG0 (1900 K) = -136.321 kcal (3) Si() + 1/202 (g) + SiO(g) AG (1900 K) = -60.237 kcal The reactions can be combined to yield the overall reaction (4...glass were continu- ously exposed to 95"C distilled water for 350 h in a Soxhlet apparatus. The sample weight losses after that time were 0.111Z

  17. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  18. Chemical durability of silicoborate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.I.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Rubio, J.; Fernandez, A.; Oteo, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A general view of the durability in silicoborate glasses is presented with more emphasis on the etching factors (chemical composition, lattice structure, pH...) the techniques used for this study and the experimental results. Likewise, the research presently developed in this area at the Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, is related to the applications. Future research in this field is also mentioned. (author) 15 figs

  19. Energy industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna; Wieszczycka, Karolina

    2018-04-01

    The potential sources of metals from energy industries are discussed. The discussion is organized based on two main metal-contains wastes from power plants: ashes, slags from combustion process and spent catalysts from selective catalytic NOx reduction process with ammonia, known as SCR. The compositions, methods of metals recovery, based mainly on leaching process, and their further application are presented. Solid coal combustion wastes are sources of various compounds such as silica, alumina, iron oxide, and calcium. In the case of the spent SCR catalysts mainly two metals are considered: vanadium and tungsten - basic components of industrial ones.

  20. Industrial sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    The industrial sector is categorized as related to among others, the provision of technical and engineering services, supply of products, testing and troubleshooting of parts, systems and industrial plants, quality control and assurance as well as manufacturing and processing. A total of 161 entities comprising 47 public agencies and 114 private companies were selected for the study in this sector. The majority of the public agencies, 87 %, operate in Peninsular Malaysia. The remainders were located in Sabah and Sarawak. The findings of the study on both public agencies and private companies are presented in subsequent sections of this chapter. (author)