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Sample records for glass forming material

  1. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  2. Quantitative model of super-Arrhenian behavior in glass forming materials

    Caruthers, J. M.; Medvedev, G. A.

    2018-05-01

    The key feature of glass forming liquids is the super-Arrhenian temperature dependence of the mobility, where the mobility can increase by ten orders of magnitude or more as the temperature is decreased if crystallization does not intervene. A fundamental description of the super-Arrhenian behavior has been developed; specifically, the logarithm of the relaxation time is a linear function of 1 /U¯x , where U¯x is the independently determined excess molar internal energy and B is a material constant. This one-parameter mobility model quantitatively describes data for 21 glass forming materials, which are all the materials where there are sufficient experimental data for analysis. The effect of pressure on the loga mobility is also described using the same U¯x(T ,p ) function determined from the difference between the liquid and crystalline internal energies. It is also shown that B is well correlated with the heat of fusion. The prediction of the B /U¯x model is compared to the Adam and Gibbs 1 /T S¯x model, where the B /U¯x model is significantly better in unifying the full complement of mobility data. The implications of the B /U¯x model for the development of a fundamental description of glass are discussed.

  3. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  4. Reversible and Irreversible Behavior of Glass-forming Materials from the Standpoint of Hierarchical Dynamical Facilitation

    Keys, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Using molecular simulation and coarse-grained lattice models, we study the dynamics of glass-forming liquids above and below the glass transition temperature. In the supercooled regime, we study the structure, statistics, and dynamics of excitations responsible for structural relaxation for several atomistic models of glass-formers. Excitations (or soft spots) are detected in terms of persistent particle displacements. At supercooled conditions, we find that excitations are associated with correlated particle motions that are sparse and localized, and the statistics and dynamics of these excitations are facilitated and hierarchical. Excitations at one point in space facilitate the birth and death of excitations at neighboring locations, and space-time excitation structures are microcosms of heterogeneous dynamics at larger scales. Excitation-energy scales grow logarithmically with the characteristic size of the excitation, giving structural-relaxation times that can be predicted quantitatively from dynamics at short time scales. We demonstrate that these same physical principles govern the dynamics of glass-forming systems driven out-of-equilibrium by time-dependent protocols. For a system cooled and re-heated through the glass transition, non-equilibrium response functions, such as heat capacities, are notably asymmetric in time, and the response to melting a glass depends markedly on the cooling protocol by which the glass was formed. We introduce a quantitative description of this behavior based on the East model, with parameters determined from reversible transport data, that agrees well with irreversible differential scanning calorimetry. We find that the observed hysteresis and asymmetric response is a signature of an underlying dynamical transition between equilibrium melts with no trivial spatial correlations and non-equilibrium glasses with correlation lengths that are both large and dependent upon the rate at which the glass is prepared. The correlation

  5. Preparation of glass-forming materials from granulated blast furnace slag

    Alonso, M.; Sáinz, E.; Lopez, F. A.

    1996-10-01

    Glass precursor materials, to be used for the vitrification of hazardous wastes, have been prepared from blast furnace slag powder through a sol-gel route. The slag is initially reacted with a mixture of alcohol (ethanol or methanol) and mineral acid (HNO3 or H2SO4) to give a sol principally consisting of Si, Ca, Al, and Mg alkoxides. Gelation is carried out with variable amounts of either ammonia or water. The gelation rate can be made as fast as desired by adding excess hydrolizing agent or else by distilling the excess alcohol out of the alkoxide solution. The resulting gel is first dried at low temperature and ground. The powder thus obtained is then heat treated at several temperatures. The intermediate and final materials are characterized by thermal analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. From the results, the operating conditions yielding a variety of glass precursors differing in their composition are established. The method, in comparison with direct vitrification of slag, presents a number of advantages: (1) the glass precursor obtained devitrifies at higher temperatures; (2) it enables the adjustment, to a certain extent, of the chemical composition of the glass precursor; and (3) it permits recovering marketable materials at different stages of the process.

  6. [Influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder for infiltrating ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting].

    Jin, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-fei; Yang, Zheng-yu; Tong, Yi-ping; Zhu, Li; Ma, Jian-feng

    2012-10-01

    The influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder was studied in this paper, which is to infiltrate ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting. The performance of different component was analyzed to optimize glass formula. Six groups of glass powder were designed and prepared by conventional melt-quenching method. ZTA ceramic blocks were covered with glass paste, which were formed by gel-casting and sintered in 1200 degrees centigrade, then infiltrated in 1150 degrees centigrade for twice to make glass/ZTA ceramic composites. By detecting differential thermal analysis and melting range of infiltration glass power, as well as flexural strength, linear shrinkage, SEM and EDS of glass/ZTA ceramic composites, the optimized glass group was determined out. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package by means of paired t test or one way ANOVA. The bending strength of group Li1 was (291.2±27.9) MPa, significantly higher than group Li2 and group La2(Pglass of group Li1 can lubricate ZTA ceramics well, their structure was compact and had a few small pores. Intergranular fracture existed on cross surface as well as transgranular fracture. The results showed that Li1(30%La2O3-15%Al2O3-15%SiO2-15%B2O3-5%Li2O) glass infiltrated ZTA ceramic composite had the best capability. Glass/ZTA composite material can be prepared by gel-casting and infiltrating way, and this process is simple and economically suitable for general dental laboratory.

  7. Forming Glasses from Se and Te

    Pierre Lucas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite being close neighbors on the Periodic Table, selenium and tellurium present a totally different abilities to form glasses. Se is a very good glass former, and gives rise to numerous glass compositions which are popular for their transparency in the infrared range and their stability against crystallization. These glasses can be shaped into sophisticated optical devices such as optical fibers, planar guides or lenses. Nevertheless, their transparencies are limited at about 12 μm (depending on the thickness of the optical systems due to the relatively small mass of the Se element. On the other hand, tellurium is heavier and its use in substitution for Se permits to shift the IR cutoff beyond 20 μm. However, the semimetallic nature of Te limits its glass formation ability and this glass family is known to be unstable and consequently has found application as phase change material in the Digital Versatile Disk (DVD technology. In this paper, after a review of selenide glasses and their applications, it will be shown how, in a recent past, it has been possible to stabilize tellurium glasses by introducing new elements like Ga or I in their compositions.

  8. Nano-Micro Materials Enabled Thermoelectricity From Window Glasses

    Inayat, Salman Bin

    2012-01-01

    of individual glass strips to form the thickness depth of the glass on subsequent curing of the strips, and c) embedding nano-manufactured thermoelectric pillars, have been implemented for innovative integration of thermoelectric materials into window glasses

  9. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    D. A. Pedernera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new process is presented by which water soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg, homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures, Thom, and ice melting temperatures, Tm, of various aqueous inorganic, organic and multi-component solutions are investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter. The investigated solutes are: various polyols, glucose, raffinose, levoglucosan, an aromatic compound, sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate and mixtures of dicarboxylic acids (M5, of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate (M5AS, of two polyols, of glucose and ammonium nitrate, and of raffinose and M5AS. The results indicate that aqueous solutions of the investigated inorganic solutes show Tg values that are too low to be of atmospheric importance. In contrast, aqueous organic and multi-component solutions readily form glasses at low but atmospherically relevant temperatures (≤230 K. To apply the laboratory data to the atmospheric situation, the measured phase transition temperatures were transformed from a concentration to a water activity scale by extrapolating water activities determined between 252 K and 313 K to lower temperatures. The obtained state diagrams reveal that the higher the molar mass of the aqueous organic or multi-component solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. To a lesser extent, Tg also depends on the hydrophilicity of the organic solutes. Therefore, aerosol particles containing larger (≳150 g mol−1 and

  10. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  11. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  12. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    Rusin, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 ) and a fresnoite-based (Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 ) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  13. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  14. Immobilisation of radwastes in glass containers and products formed thereby

    Macedo, P.B.; Simmons, C.J.; Lagakos, N.; Simmons, J.H.; Tran, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    A method of preventing the dissemination of toxic material to the environment comprises forming an admixture of toxic material and glass packing in a hollow doped glass container of high silica content, or forming the admixture in a first container and then depositing at least a portion of the admixture in a hollow doped glass container of high silica content. The glass container is then heated to collapse its walls and to seal the container so that the toxic material is entrapped and sealed within the collapsed doped glass container. The thermal expansion coefficient of the container may be decreased prior to use by exchanging hydrogen ion in pores thereof with other cations followed by collapsing the pores. (author)

  15. Method for forming materials

    Tolle, Charles R [Idaho Falls, ID; Clark, Denis E [Idaho Falls, ID; Smartt, Herschel B [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Karen S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  16. Glass Forming Ability in Systems with Competing Orderings

    Russo, John; Romano, Flavio; Tanaka, Hajime

    2018-04-01

    Some liquids, if cooled rapidly enough to avoid crystallization, can be frozen into a nonergodic glassy state. The tendency for a material to form a glass when quenched is called "glass-forming ability," and it is of key significance both fundamentally and for materials science applications. Here, we consider liquids with competing orderings, where an increase in the glass-forming ability is signaled by a depression of the melting temperature towards its minimum at triple or eutectic points. With simulations of two model systems where glass-forming ability can be tuned by an external parameter, we are able to interpolate between crystal-forming and glass-forming behavior. We find that the enhancement of the glass-forming ability is caused by an increase in the structural difference between liquid and crystal: stronger competition in orderings towards the melting point minimum makes a liquid structure more disordered (more complex). This increase in the liquid-crystal structure difference can be described by a single adimensional parameter, i.e., the interface energy cost scaled by the thermal energy, which we call the "thermodynamic interface penalty." Our finding may provide a general physical principle for not only controlling the glass-forming ability but also the emergence of glassy behavior of various systems with competing orderings, including orderings of structural, magnetic, electronic, charge, and dipolar origin.

  17. Package materials, waste form

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The schedules for waste package development for the various host rocks were presented. The waste form subtask activities were reviewed, with the papers focusing on high-level waste, transuranic waste, and spent fuel. The following ten papers were presented: (1) Waste Package Development Approach; (2) Borosilicate Glass as a Matrix for Savannah River Plant Waste; (3) Development of Alternative High-Level Waste Forms; (4) Overview of the Transuranic Waste Management Program; (5) Assessment of the Impacts of Spent Fuel Disassembly - Alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System; (6) Reactions of Spent Fuel and Reprocessing Waste Forms with Water in the Presence of Basalt; (7) Spent Fuel Stabilizer Screening Studies; (8) Chemical Interactions of Shale Rock, Prototype Waste Forms, and Prototype Canister Metals in a Simulated Wet Repository Environment; (9) Impact of Fission Gas and Volatiles on Spent Fuel During Geologic Disposal; and (10) Spent Fuel Assembly Decay Heat Measurement and Analysis

  18. Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Lokken, R.O.

    1981-11-01

    Glass ceramic waste forms have been investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt % simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90 0 C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, (g/m 2 ), show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 g/m 2 when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant

  19. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  20. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of......The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite......-wollastonite-tridymite and that of anorthite-wollastonite-gehlenite. The series includes the eutectic compositions as end members. The second series consists of five compositions on a line parallel to the joining line on the alumina rich side. In the present work, GFA is described in terms of glass stability, i.e., the ability of a glass...... to resist crystallization during reheating. In addition, the fragility index (m) is derived by fitting the viscosity data with the Avramov-Milchev equation. The results show that m is inversely proportional to the glass stability for the two series of melts, implying that m is an indirect measure of GFA...

  1. Simulation of Glass Fiber Forming Processes

    Von der Ohe, Renate

    Two glass fiber forming processes have been simulated using FEM, which are the drawing of continuous glass fibers for reinforcement purposes and the spinning of discontinuous glass fibers - stone wool for insulation. The aim of this work was to set up a numerical model for each process, and to use...... this model in finding relationships between the production conditions and the resulting fiber properties. For both processes, a free surface with large deformation and radiative and convective heat transfer must be taken into account. The continuous fiber drawing has been simulated successfully......, and parametric studies have been made. Several properties that characterize the process have been calculated, and the relationship between the fictive temperature and the cooling rate of the fibers has been found. The model for the discontinuous fiber spinning was brought to the limits of the commercial code...

  2. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial ...

    Unknown

    such as abrasion, impact etc as compared to other coating materials applied by thermal spraying in its different forms viz. ... in some systematic way information on glass and glass– ... the industries by proper maintenance of the machinery/.

  3. Glass solidification material confinement test device

    Namiki, Shigekazu.

    1997-01-01

    In a device for confining glass solidification materials, a pipeline connecting a detection vessel and a detector is formed to have a double walled structure, and air blowing holes are formed on the wall of the inner pipe, and an air supply mechanism is connected to inner and outer pipes for supplying blowing air thereby preventing deposition on the inner pipe wall. The air blowing holes are formed by constituting the pipe by using a porous sintered material and porous portions thereof are defined as the air blowing holes, or holes are formed on the pipe wall made of a metal by machining. A blowing boundary layer is formed by blowing the supplied air along the pipe wall of the inner pipe, by which deposition of the sucked materials to the inner wall of the inner pipe is prevented, and all of the materials sucked from the detection vessel are collected to the detector. In addition, an air exit pipe is formed into a double walled structure so as to be supplied blowing air from the air supply mechanism thereby enabling to prevent deposition of sucked materials more reliably. (N.H.)

  4. ESCA studies on leached glass forms

    Dawkins, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) results for frit, obsidian, NBS standard, and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) glass forms that have been subjected to cumulative water leachings of 36 hours show that [Na] exhibits the largest and fastest change of all the elements observed. Leaching of surface Na occurred within minutes. Surface Na depletion increased with leach time. Continuous x-ray irradiation and argon ion milling induced Na mobility, precluding semiquantitative ESCA analysis at normal operating temperatures. However, the sample stage has been equipped with a liquid nitrogen supply and alkali mobility should be eliminated in future work

  5. Forming of bulk metallic glass microcomponents

    Wert, John A.; Thomsen, Christian; Jensen, Rune Debel

    2009-01-01

    The present article considers forward extrusion, closed-die forging and backward extrusion processes for fabrication of individual microcomponents from two bulk metallic glass (BMG) compositions: Mg60Cu30Y10 and Zr44Cu40Ag8Al8. Two types of tooling were used in the present work: relatively massive...... die sets characteristic of cold forming operations for crystalline metals and lightweight die sets adapted to the special characteristics of BMGs. In addition to demonstrating that microcomponents of several geometries can be readily fabricated from BMGs, rheological properties are combined...

  6. Low sintering temperature glass waste forms for sequestering radioactive iodine

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Krumhansl, James L.; Garino, Terry J.; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2012-09-11

    Materials and methods of making low-sintering-temperature glass waste forms that sequester radioactive iodine in a strong and durable structure. First, the iodine is captured by an adsorbant, which forms an iodine-loaded material, e.g., AgI, AgI-zeolite, AgI-mordenite, Ag-silica aerogel, ZnI.sub.2, CuI, or Bi.sub.5O.sub.7I. Next, particles of the iodine-loaded material are mixed with powdered frits of low-sintering-temperature glasses (comprising various oxides of Si, B, Bi, Pb, and Zn), and then sintered at a relatively low temperature, ranging from 425.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. The sintering converts the mixed powders into a solid block of a glassy waste form, having low iodine leaching rates. The vitrified glassy waste form can contain as much as 60 wt % AgI. A preferred glass, having a sintering temperature of 500.degree. C. (below the silver iodide sublimation temperature of 500.degree. C.) was identified that contains oxides of boron, bismuth, and zinc, while containing essentially no lead or silicon.

  7. Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale

  8. Bioactive glasses materials, properties and applications

    Ylänen, Heimo

    2011-01-01

    Due to their biocompatibility and bioactivity, bioactive glasses are used as highly effective implant materials throughout the human body to replace or repair damaged tissue. As a result, they have been in continuous use since shortly after their invention in the late 1960s and are the subject of extensive research worldwide.Bioactive glasses provides readers with a detailed review of the current status of this unique material, its properties, technologies and applications. Chapters in part one deal with the materials and mechanical properties of bioactive glass, examining topics such

  9. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    Kolitsch, A.; Richter, E.; Wolf, M.

    1978-10-01

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  10. Immobilization of radwastes in glass containers and products formed thereby

    Macedo, P.B.; Litovitz, T.A.; Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Lagakos, N.; Tran, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    A mixture of glass packing and radioactive or other toxic material is placed in a solid glass container, and the container is heated to drive off volatile components and collapse and seal the container

  11. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids

    Hansen, Henriette Wase

    on alpha relaxation dynamics, and for the two van der Waals liquids, also when we have separation of timescales, i.e. the alpha relaxation is not contributing to the picosecond dynamics. The concept of isomorphs is observed to break down in two cases for the hydrogen bonding system: in density scaling......The overall theme of this work has been to experimentally test the shoving model and isomorph theory related to the dynamics of glass-forming liquids, both of which, rather than being universal explanations, are expected to work in the simplest case. We test the connection between fast and slow...... dynamics in light of the shoving model from the temperature dependence of the mean-squared displacement from neutron scattering at nanosecond timescale and the elastic modulus from shear mechanics. We find the fast dynamics to correlate with the alpha relaxation time and fragility in agreement...

  12. Using glass as a shielding material

    Yousef, S.

    2002-04-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  13. Using glass as a shielding material

    Yousef, S.

    2003-01-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  14. Analysis of form deviation in non-isothermal glass molding

    Kreilkamp, H.; Grunwald, T.; Dambon, O.; Klocke, F.

    2018-02-01

    Especially in the market of sensors, LED lighting and medical technologies, there is a growing demand for precise yet low-cost glass optics. This demand poses a major challenge for glass manufacturers who are confronted with the challenge arising from the trend towards ever-higher levels of precision combined with immense pressure on market prices. Since current manufacturing technologies especially grinding and polishing as well as Precision Glass Molding (PGM) are not able to achieve the desired production costs, glass manufacturers are looking for alternative technologies. Non-isothermal Glass Molding (NGM) has been shown to have a big potential for low-cost mass manufacturing of complex glass optics. However, the biggest drawback of this technology at the moment is the limited accuracy of the manufactured glass optics. This research is addressing the specific challenges of non-isothermal glass molding with respect to form deviation of molded glass optics. Based on empirical models, the influencing factors on form deviation in particular form accuracy, waviness and surface roughness will be discussed. A comparison with traditional isothermal glass molding processes (PGM) will point out the specific challenges of non-isothermal process conditions. Furthermore, the underlying physical principle leading to the formation of form deviations will be analyzed in detail with the help of numerical simulation. In this way, this research contributes to a better understanding of form deviations in non-isothermal glass molding and is an important step towards new applications demanding precise yet low-cost glass optics.

  15. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. Vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters, as is presently done with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is cooled rapidly, thus retaining its vitreous structure

  16. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate glass. Vitreous lead-iron-phosphate glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than borosilicate glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is presently done with borosilicate glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from borosilicate glass. Therefore, in order to realize the performance advantages of the lead-iron-phosphate material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is rapidly cooled, thus retaining its vitreous structure. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  18. Simulation of an Aspheric Glass Lens Forming Behavior in Progressive GMP Process

    Chang, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Min; Kang, Jeong Jin; Hong, Seok Kwan; Shin, Gwang Ho; Heo, Young Moo; Jung, Tae Sung

    2007-01-01

    Recently, GMP(Glass Molding Press) process is mainly used to produce aspheric glass lenses. Because glass lens is heated at high temperature above Tg (Transformation Temperature) for forming the glass, the quality of aspheric glass lens is deteriorated by residual stresses which are generated in a aspheric glass lens after forming. In this study, as a fundamental study to develop the mold for progressive GMP process, we conducted a aspheric glass lens forming simulation. Prior to a aspheric glass lens forming simulation, compression and thermal conductivity tests were carried out to obtain mechanical and thermal properties of K-PBK40 which is newly developed material for precision molding, and flow characteristics of K-PBK40 were obtained at high temperature. Then, using the flow characteristics obtained, compression simulation was carried out and compared with the experimental result for the purpose of verifying the obtained flow characteristics. Finally, a glass lens press simulation in progressive GMP process was carried out and we could forecast the shape of deformed glass lenses and residual stresses contribution in the structure of deformed glass lenses after forming

  19. Binary eutectic clusters and glass formation in ideal glass-forming liquids

    Lu, Z. P.; Shen, J.; Xing, D. W.; Sun, J. F.; Liu, C. T.

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, a physical concept of binary eutectic clusters in 'ideal' glass-forming liquids is proposed based on the characteristics of most well-known bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The authors approach also includes the treatment of binary eutectic clusters as basic units, which leads to the development of a simple but reliable method for designing BMGs more efficiently and effectively in these unique glass-forming liquids. As an example, bulk glass formers with superior glass-forming ability in the Zr-Ni-Cu-Al and Zr-Fe-Cu-Al systems were identified with the use of the strategy

  20. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  1. Application of ceramic and glass materials in nuclear power plants

    Hamnabard, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and glass are high temperature materials that can be used in many fields of application in nuclear industries. First, it is known that nuclear fuel UO 2 is a ceramic material. Also, ability to absorb neutrons without forming long lived radio-nuclides make the non-oxide ceramics attractive as an absorbent for neutron radiation arising in nuclear power plants. Glass-ceramic materials are a new type of ceramic that produced by the controlled nucleation and crystallization of glass, and have several advantages such as very low or null porosity, uniformity of microstructure, high chemical resistance etc. over conventional powder processed ceramics. These ceramic materials are synthesized in different systems based on their properties and applications. In nuclear industries, those are resistant to leaching and radiation damage for thousands of years, Such as glass-ceramics designed for radioactive waste immobilization and machinable glass-ceramics are used. This article introduces requirements of different glass and ceramic materials used in nuclear power plants and have been focused on developments in properties and application of them

  2. Cordierite Glass-Ceramics for Dielectric Materials

    Siti Mazatul Azwa Saiyed Mohd Nurddin; Selamat, Malek; Ismail, Abdullah

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this project is to examine the potential of using Malaysian silica sand deposit as SiO2 raw material in producing cordierite glass-ceramics (2MgO-2Al2O3-5SiO2) for dielectric materials. Upgraded silica sands from Terengganu and ex-mining land in Perak were used in the test-works. The glass batch of the present work has a composition of 45.00% SiO2, 24.00% Al2O3, 15.00% MgO and 8.50% TiO2 as nucleation agent. From the differential thermal analysis results, the crystallization temperature was found to start around 900 deg. C. The glass samples were heat-treated at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results showed glass-ceramics from Terengganu samples containing mainly cordierite and minor β-quartz crystals. However, glass-ceramics from ex-mining land samples contained mainly α-quartz and minor cordierite crystals. Glass-ceramics with different crystal phases exhibit different mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties. Based on the test works, both silica sand deposits, can be potentially used to produce dielectric material component

  3. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  4. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na_2O-B_2O_3-SiO_2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. In this paper, five new glasses with ~20 mass% Na_2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. Finally, these improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.

  5. Immobilization of transuranic sludge in glass-ceramic materials

    Welch, J.M.; Schuman, R.P.; Flinn, J.E.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effectiveness of glass-ceramic waste forms, particularly iron-enriched basalt, for immobilizing transuranic waste sludges from the Rocky Flats plant operations. Two sludges were used in the study - one was nonradioactive and the other contained approx. 2200 dps/mg of 241 Am. The glass-ceramic waste forms were produced from laboratory-scale melting operations with subsequent controlled cooling. The waste forms were examined to assess the microstructures which resulted from systematically varied compositions and controlled cooling sequences. Leach tests in deionized water were performed on small monolithic specimens of the various glass-ceramic materials. The test results showed a rather strong temperature dependence for leach rates. Also, for some of these materials, marked differences in the 241 Am leaching behavior were seen in measurements obtained on acidified versus neutral aliquots of the spent leachates. 8 figures, 12 tables

  6. A new method locating good glass-forming compositions

    Yu, Dechuan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Geng, Yan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Li, Zhengkun [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Liu, Dingming [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Fu, Huameng; Zhu, Zhengwang [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Qi, Yang, E-mail: qiyang@imp.neu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Zhang, Haifeng, E-mail: hfzhang@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A new method was proposed to pinpoint the compositions with good glass forming ability (GFA) by combining atomic clusters and mixing entropy. The clusters were confirmed by analyzing competing crystalline phases. The method was applied to the Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloy system. A series of glass formers with diameter up to 20 mm were quickly detected in this system. The good glass formers were located only after trying 5 compositions around the calculated composition. The method was also effective in other multi-component systems. This method might provide a new way to understand glass formation and to quickly pinpoint compositions with high GFA. - Highlights: • A new method was proposed to quickly design glass formers with high glass forming ability. • The method of designing pentabasic Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloys was applied. • A series of new Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with critical diameter of 20 mm were discovered.

  7. A new method locating good glass-forming compositions

    Yu, Dechuan; Geng, Yan; Li, Zhengkun; Liu, Dingming; Fu, Huameng; Zhu, Zhengwang; Qi, Yang; Zhang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    A new method was proposed to pinpoint the compositions with good glass forming ability (GFA) by combining atomic clusters and mixing entropy. The clusters were confirmed by analyzing competing crystalline phases. The method was applied to the Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloy system. A series of glass formers with diameter up to 20 mm were quickly detected in this system. The good glass formers were located only after trying 5 compositions around the calculated composition. The method was also effective in other multi-component systems. This method might provide a new way to understand glass formation and to quickly pinpoint compositions with high GFA. - Highlights: • A new method was proposed to quickly design glass formers with high glass forming ability. • The method of designing pentabasic Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloys was applied. • A series of new Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with critical diameter of 20 mm were discovered

  8. Producing glass-ceramics from waste materials

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Rawlings, R.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    An overview is given of recent research at the Department of Materials of Imperial College, London, UK, concerning the production of useful glass-ceramic products from industrial waste materials. The new work, using controlled crystallisation to improve the properties of vitrified products, could help to solve the problem of what to do with increasing amounts of slag, fly ash and combustion dust. The results show, that it is possible to produce new materials with interesting magnetic and constructive properties.

  9. Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass

    Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials

  10. Bulk metallic glasses: A new class of engineering materials

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    been discovered. Glass-forming ability depends on various factors like enthalpy ... The determination of a glass transition temperature in ... Rao (1980) has postulated that an alloy with the smallest possible molar volume is most prone to glass ...

  11. Discontinuities of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses with Different Glass Forming Ability

    Hurakova, Maria; Csach, Kornel; Miskuf, Jozef; Jurikova, Alena; Demcak, Stefan; Ocelik, Vaclav; Hosson, Jeff Th. M. De

    The metallic ribbons Fe40Ni40B20, Cu47Ti35Zr11Ni6Si1 and Zr65Cu17.5Ni10Al7.5 with different microhardness and glass forming ability were studied at different loading rates from 0.05 to 100 mN/s. We describe in details the differences in elemental discontinuities on the loading curves for the studied alloys. It was found that the discontinuities began at a certain local deformation independently on the macroscopic mechanical properties of a ribbon. More developed discontinuities at higher deformations are created for the materials with lower microhardness and so lower strength.

  12. Glass forms for immobilization of Hanford wastes

    Schulz, W.W.; Dressen, A.L.; Hobbick, C.W.; Babad, H.

    1975-03-01

    Approximately 140 million liters of solid salt cake (mainly NaNO 3 ), produced by evaporation of aged alkaline high-level liquid wastes, will be stored in underground tanks when the present Hanford Waste Management Program is completed in the early 1980's. At this time also, large volumes of various other solid radioactive wastes (sludges, excavated Pu-contaminated soil, and doubly encapsulated 137 CsCl and 90 SrF 2 ) will be stored on the Hanford Reservation. All these solid wastes can be converted to immobile silicate and aluminosilicate glasses of low water leachability by melting them at 1100 0 to 1400 0 C with appropriate amounts of basalt (or sand) and other glass-formers such as B 2 O 3 or CaO. Reviewed in this paper are formulations and other melt conditions used successfully in batch tests to make glasses from actual and synthetic wastes; leachability and other properties of these glasses show them to be satisfactory vehicles for immobilization of the Hanford wastes. (U.S.)

  13. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-09-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference nuclear waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. The evaluation was conducted as part of the Second Generation HLW Technology Subtask of the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to investigate possible alternatives to B-Si glass as second-generation waste forms. While vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass, severe crystallization or devitrification leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is the procedure with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the potential performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, the processing method would have to cool the material rapidly to retain its vitreous structure

  14. Are the dynamics of silicate glasses and glass-forming liquids embedded in their elastic properties?

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    According to the elastic theory of the glass transition, the dynamics of glasses and glass-forming liquids are controlled by the evolution of shear modulus. In particular, the elastic shoving model expresses dynamics in terms of an activation energy required to shove aside the surrounding atoms......, which is determined by the shear modulus. First, we here present an in situ high-temperature Brillouin spectroscopy test of the shoving model near the glass transition of eight aluminosilicate glass-forming systems. We find that the measured viscosity data agree qualitatively with the measured...... temperature dependence of shear moduli, as predicted by the shoving model. However, the model systematically underpredicts the values of fragility. Second, we also present a thorough test of the shoving model for predicting the low temperature dynamics of an aluminosilicate glass system. This is done...

  15. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  16. Crystallization dynamics in glass-forming systems

    Cullinan, Timothy Edward [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Crystallization under far-from-equilibrium conditions is investigated for two different scenarios: crystallization of the metallic glass alloy Cu50Zr50 and solidification of a transparent organic compound, o-terphenyl. For Cu50Zr50, crystallization kinetics are quanti ed through a new procedure that directly fits thermal analysis data to the commonly utilized JMAK model. The phase evolution during crystallization is quantified through in-situ measurements (HEXRD, DSC) and ex-situ microstructural analysis (TEM, HRTEM). The influence of chemical partitioning, diffusion, and crystallographic orientation on this sequence are examined. For o-terphenyl, the relationship between crystal growth velocity and interface undercooling is systematically studied via directional solidification.

  17. Glass-Forming Ability of Soda Lime Borate Liquids

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the composition dependence of glass-forming ability (GFA) of a series of iron-containing soda lime borate liquids by substituting Na2O for B2O3. We have characterized GFA by measuring the glass stability against crystallization using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC......). The results show that the GFA decreases when substituting Na2O for B2O3. Moreover, we find that there is no direct link between the kinetic fragility and GFA for the soda lime borate series studied herein. We have also discovered and clarified a striking thermal history dependence of the glass stability...

  18. Characterization study of industrial waste glass as starting material ...

    In present study, an industrial waste glass was characterized and the potential to assess as starting material in development of bioactive materials was investigated. A waste glass collected from the two different glass industry was grounded to fine powder. The samples were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ...

  19. Local dynamics and deformation of glass-forming polymers : modelling and atomistic simulations

    Vorselaars, B.

    2008-01-01

    The research described in the present thesis is about glassy phenomena and mechanical properties in vitrifiable polymer materials. Glasses are solid materials, but, in contrast to crystals, the structure is disordered. Polymers are macromolecular chains formed by covalently linking a very large

  20. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    Tait, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129 I, 85 Kr and 14 C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  1. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-01-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases

  2. COMPARISON OF BIOACTIVITY IN VITRO OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC MATERIALS DURING SOAKING IN SBF AND DMEM MEDIUM

    GABRIELA LUTIŠANOVÁ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the surface reactivity of two sets of glasses and glass ceramic materials belonging to the Li2O–SiO2–CaO–P2O5–CaF2 system. The in vitro bioactivity of coatings was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM soaking test in static regime for up to 28 days at 36.5°C in microincubator. The surface structure changes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA methods. The functional groups of the silicate and phosphates were identified by infrared spectroscopy (IR. The crystal phases of the glasses and glass ceramics were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The results suggest the bioactivity behavior for all compositions of glasses as well as glass ceramic samples after 28 days in the SBF and DMEM medium. The surface characterization and in vitro tests revealed a few variations in the reactivity of the different glasses and glass ceramic samples in their pristine form. The best results show the samples of glass and glass ceramic samples with higher content of fluorapatite (FA. The use of the acellular culture medium DMEM resulted in a delay at the start of precipitation.

  3. Glass-forming liquids: one or more "order" parameters"

    Bailey, Nicholas; Christensen, Tage Emil; Jakobsen, Bo

    2008-01-01

    We first summarize the classical arguments that the vast majority of glass-forming liquids require more than one ‘order' parameter for their description. Critiques against this conventional wisdom are then presented, and it is argued that the matter deserves to be reconsidered in the light...... that a description with a single "order" parameter applies to a good approximation whenever thermal equilibrium fluctuations of fundamental variables like energy and pressure are strongly correlated. Results from computer simulations showing that this is the case for a number of simple glass-forming liquids, as well...

  4. Bulk glass formation and crystallization in zirconium based bulk metallic glass forming alloys

    Savalia, R.T.; Neogy, S.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures of Zr based metallic glasses produced in bulk form have been described in the as-cast condition and after crystallization. Various microscopic techniques have been used to characterize the microstructures. The microstructure in the as-cast condition was found to contain isolated crystals and crystalline aggregates embedded in the amorphous matrix. Quenched-in nuclei of crystalline phases were found to be present in fully amorphous regions. These glasses after crystallization gave rise to nanocrystalline solids. (author)

  5. Direct conversion of plutonium-containing materials to borosilicate glass for storage or disposal

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

    1995-01-01

    A new process, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), has been invented for the direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, and residue into borosilicate glass. The glass should be acceptable for either the long-term storage or disposition of plutonium. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into homogeneous glass (1) simplifies safeguards and security; (2) creates a stable chemical form that meets health, safety, and environmental concerns; (3) provides an easy storage form; (4) may lower storage costs; and (5) allows for future disposition options. In the GMODS process, mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids containing plutonium are fed directly into a glass melter where they are directly converted to glass. Conventional glass melters can accept materials only in oxide form; thus, it is its ability to accept materials in multiple chemical forms that makes GMODS a unique glass making process. Initial proof-of-principle experiments have converted cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, and other materials to glass. Significant technical uncertainties remain because of the early nature of process development

  6. High level waste forms: glass marbles and thermal spray coatings

    Treat, R.L.; Oma, K.H.; Slate, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    A process that converts high-level waste to glass marbles and then coats the marbles has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The process consists of a joule-heated glass melter, a marble-making device based on a patent issued to Corning Glass Works, and a coating system that includes a plasma spray coater and a marble tumbler. The process was developed under the Alternative Waste Forms Program which strived to improve upon monolithic glass for immobilizing high-level wastes. Coated glass marbles were found to be more leach-resistant, and the marbles, before coating were found to be very homogeneous, highly impact resistant, and conductive to encapsulation in a metal matric for improved heat transfer and containment. Marbles are also ideally suited for quality assurance and recycling. However, the marble process is more complex, and marbles require a larger number of canisters for waste containment and have a higher surface area than do glass monoliths

  7. Copper oxide content dependence of crystallization behavior, glass forming ability, glass stability and fragility of lithium borate glasses

    Soliman, A.A.; Kashif, I.

    2010-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been employed to investigate the copper oxide content dependence of the glass transition temperatures data, activation energy for the glass transition E t , glass stability GS, fragility index Fi, the glass-forming ability (GFA) and crystallization behavior of {(100-x) mol% Li 2 B 4 O 7 -x mol% CuO} glass samples, where x=0-40 mol% CuO. From the dependence of the glass transition temperature T g on the heating rate β, the fragility, F i , and the activation energy, E t , have been calculated. It is seen that F i and E t are attained their minimum values at 0 x -T g , SCL region and the GS. The GFA has been investigated on the basis of Hruby parameter K H , which is a strong indicator of GFA, and the relaxation time. Results of GFA are in good agreement with the fragility index, F i , calculations indicating that {90Li 2 B 4 O 7 .10CuO} is the best glass former. The stronger glass forming ability has decreasing the fragility index. XRD result indicates that no fully amorphous samples but a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases are formed in the samples containing x>25 mol% CuO and below it composed of glassy phase. Increasing the CuO content above 25 mol% helps the crystallization process, and thus promotes a distinct SCL region. XRD suggests the presence of micro-crystallites of remaining residual amorphous matrix by increasing the CuO content.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-μm iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-μm ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 μm, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs

  9. Glass-ceramics as building materials

    Rincón, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics are materials composed as any ceramic material by several crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous or vitreous matrix, but their manufacture process implies the controlled devitrification or nucleation and growth of phases from an original glass. The original shape of the original glass molded by conventional methods is carried out by using pressing and sintering followed by crystallization steps. By both processing routes are obtained transparent and/or opaque materials, with or without colours, which after adequate control and design of composition and microstructure have numerous domestic and architectonic applications. They can be used as pavements or wall coatings and in various decorative elements. In fact, their use is very extensive in east-European, American and Asian (Japan countries in constructions for covering large surfaces. The greater advantage of the glass-ceramic process is that due to the own process of vitrification allows the incorporation in their structure of a wide range of compositions from mining and industrial residues, such as red muds, ashes, fangos, scraps... which they can in this way not only be inertizated, but furthermore it be converted without risk for the environment into products useful in construction applications, offering to the architect and to the decorator a new range of "eco-materials" with multiple complementary possibilities of the already existing architectural materials in the market.

    Los productos o materiales vitrocerámicos se componen, como cualquier material de tipo cerámico, de una o varias fases cristalinas embebidas en una matriz amorfa o vítrea, pero cuyo proceso de fabricación implica la desvitrificación o nucleación y cristalización controlada de un vidrio original o de partida. En el proceso de obtención de estos materiales se puede conservar la forma original conferida al vidrio de partida por los métodos convencionales de moldeado de vidrios

  10. Transparent form-active system with structural glass

    Nikolaou, M.S.N.; Veer, F.A.; Eigenraam, P.

    2015-01-01

    Free-form transparent wide-span spatial structures which have being constructed so far, are based on the concept of three sets of components, the structural components, usually steel elements to ensure both compressive and tensional capacity; the glass cladding elements for expressing transparency;

  11. Thermodynamic and relative approach to compute glass-forming

    This study deals with the evaluation of glass-forming ability (GFA) of oxides and is a critical reading of Sun and Rawson thermodynamic approach to quantify this aptitude. Both approaches are adequate but ambiguous regarding the behaviour of some oxides (tendency to amorphization or crystallization). Indeed, ZrO2 and ...

  12. Thermodynamic and relative approach to compute glass-forming ...

    models) characteristic: the isobaric heat capacity (Cp) of oxides, and execute a mathematical treatment of oxides thermodynamic data. We note this coefficient as thermodynamical relative glass-forming ability (ThRGFA) and for- mulate a model to compute it. Computed values of 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th period metal oxides ...

  13. Undercooling Limits and Thermophysical Properties in Glass Forming Alloys

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ohsaka, Kenichi; Spjut, R. Erik

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this program is to produce deeply undercooled metallic liquids and to identify factors that limit undercooling and glass formation. The main research objectives are: (1) Investigating undercooling limits in glass-forming alloys and identifying factors that affect undercooling; (2) Measuring thermophysical properties and investigating the validity of the classical nucleation theory and other existing theories in the extreme undercooled states; and (3) To investigate the limits of electrostatic levitation technology in the ground base and to identify thermophysical parameters that might require reduced-g environment.

  14. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 ∼ 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature (∼ 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms

  15. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... between 750 and 850°C. We investigated the influence of milling time, particle size, foaming and oxidizing agent concentrations, temperature and time on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. Only moderate foaming was observed in carbon containing samples, while the addition...... of the oxidizing agent greatly improved the foaming quality. The results showed that the amount of oxygen available from the glass is not sufficient to combust all of the added carbon, therefore, additional oxygen was supplied via manganese reduction. In general, a minimum in the foam glass density was observed...

  16. Development and testing of matrices for the encapsulation of glass and ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Wald, J.W.; Brite, D.W.; Gurwell, W.E.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Bunnell, L.R.; Gray, W.J.; Blair, H.T.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    This report details the results of research on the matrix encapsulation of high level wastes at PML over the past few years. The demonstrations and tests described were designed to illustrate how the waste materials are effected when encapsulated in an inert matrix. Candidate materials evaluated for potential use as matrices for encapslation of pelletized ceramics or glass marbles were categorized into four groups: metals, glasses, ceramics, and graphite. Two processing techniques, casting and hot pressing, were investigated as the most promising methods of formation or densification of the matrices. The major results reported deal with the development aspects. However, chemical durability tests (leach tests) of the matrix materials themselves and matrix-waste form composites are also reported. Matrix waste forms can provide a low porosity, waste-free barrier resulting in increased leach protection, higher impact strength and improved thermal conductivity compared to unencapsulated glass or ceramic waste materials. Glass marbles encapsulated in a lead matrix offer the most significant improvement in waste form stability of all combinations evaluated. This form represents a readily demonstrable process that provides high thermal conductivity, mechanical shock resistance, radiation shielding and increased chemical durability through both a chemical passivation mechanism and as a physical barrier. Other durable matrix waste forms evaluated, applicable primarily to ceramic pellets, involved hot-pressed titanium or TiO 2 materials. In the processing of these forms, near 100% dense matrices were obtained. The matrix materials had excellent compatibility with the waste materials and superior potential chemical durability. Cracking of the hot-pressed ceramic matrix forms, in general, prevented the realization of their optimum properties

  17. Measuring the Thermophysical and Structural Properties of Glass-Forming and Quasicrystal-Forming Liquids

    Hyers, Robert W.; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Rogers, Jan R.; Gangopadhyay, Anup K.; Kelton, Ken F.

    2006-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of glass-forming and quasicrystal-forming alloys show many interesting features in the undercooled liquid range. Some of the features in the thermophysical property curves are expected to reflect changes in the structure and coordination of the liquid. These measurements require containerless processing such as electrostatic levitation to access the undercooled liquid regime. An overview of the state of the art in measuring the thermophysical properties and structure of undercooled liquid glass-forming and quasicrystal-forming alloys will be presented, along with the status of current measurements.

  18. Development and testing of a glass waste form for the immobilization of plutonium

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Hanchar, J.M.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.; Wolf, S.F.; Finch, R.J.; Bates, J.K.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Dingwell, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    The United States has declared about 50 metric tons of weapons-grade Pu surplus to national security needs. The President has directed that this Pu be placed in a form that provides a high degree of proliferation resistance in which the surplus Pu is both unattractive and inaccessible for use by others [I]. Three alternatives are being evaluated for the disposal 2048 of this material: (1) use of the Pu as a fuel source for commercial reactors; (2) immobilization, where Pu is fixed in a glass or ceramic matrix that also contains or is surrounded by highly radioactive material; and (3) deep bore hole, where Pu is emplaced at depths of several kilometers. The immobilization alternative is being directed by the staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The staff at ANL are assisting by developing a glass for the immobilization of Pu and in the corrosion testing of glass and ceramic material prepared both at ANL and at other DOE laboratories. As part of this program, we have developed an ATS glass into which 5-7 wt percent Pu has been dissolved. The ATS glass was engineered to accommodate high Pu loading and to be durable under conditions likely to accelerate glass reactions in the geological environment during long-term storage

  19. Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high-level nuclear waste

    Harker, A.B.; Flintoff, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms have been consolidated from simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant wastes by hot isostatic pressing calcined waste and chemical additives by 1000 0 C or less. The ceramic forms can contain over 70 wt% waste with densities ranging from 3.5 to 3.85 g/cm 3 , depending upon the formulation. Major phases are CaF 2 , CaZrTi 207 , CaTiO 3 , monoclinic ZrO 2 , and amorphous intergranular material. The relative fraction of the phases is a function of the chemical additives (TiO 2 , CaO, and SiO 2 ) and consolidation temperature. Zirconolite, the major actinide host, makes the ceramic forms extremely leach resistant for the actinide simulant U 238 . The amorphous phase controls the leach performance for Sr and Cs which is improved by the addition of SiO 2 . Glass-ceramic forms were also consolidated by HIP at waste loadings of 30 to 70 wt% with densities of 2.73 to 3.1 g/cm 3 using Exxon 127 borosilicate glass frit. The glass-ceramic forms contain crystalline CaF 2 , Al 203 , and ZrSi 04 (zircon) in a glass matrix. Natural mineral zircon is a stable host for 4+ valent actinides. 17 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  20. Shear viscosity of glass-forming melts in the liquid-glass transition region

    Sanditov, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to interpreting the hole-activation model of a viscous flow of glass-forming liquids is proposed. This model underlies the development of the concept on the exponential temperature dependence of the free energy of activation of a flow within the range of the liquid-glass transition in complete agreement with available experimental data. The 'formation of a fluctuation hole' in high-heat glass-forming melts is considered as a small-scale low-activation local deformation of a structural network, i.e., the quasi-lattice necessary for the switching of the valence bond, which is the main elementary event of viscous flow of glasses and their melts. In this sense, the hole formation is a conditioned process. A drastic increase in the activation free energy of viscous flow in the liquid-glass transition region is explained by a structural transformation that is reduced to a limiting local elastic deformation of the structural network, which, in turn, originates from the excitation (critical displacement) of a bridging atom like the oxygen atom in the Si-O-Si bridge. At elevated temperatures, as a rule, a necessary amount of excited bridging atoms (locally deformed regions of the structural network) always exists, and the activation free energy of viscous flow is almost independent of temperature. The hole-activation model is closely connected with a number of well-known models describing the viscous flow of glass-forming liquids (the Avramov-Milchev, Nemilov, Ojovan, and other models).

  1. Synthesis and devitrification of high glass-forming ability bulk metallic glasses.

    Huang, Hong.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, literature on the production, microstructures and properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) has been reviewed with particular reference to glass forming ability (GFA) and alloys of the Fe-Zr-B and Zr-based BMG systems. The experimental procedures used in the research are presented and the results for the amorphous Fe80Zr12B8 ribbon and the Zr57Ti5Al10Cu20Ni8, Zr57Nb5Al10Cu20Ni8, Zr53Nb2Al8Cu30Ni7 BMGs are given and discussed. Wedge-shaped ingots of the Zr-based BMGs were produ...

  2. Mesomorphic glass nanocomposites made of metal alkanoates and nanoparticles as emerging nonlinear-optical materials

    Garbovskiy, Y.; Klimusheva, G.; Mirnaya, T.

    2016-09-01

    Mesomorphic metal alkanoates is very promising yet overlooked class of nonlinear-optical materials. Metal alkanoates can exhibit a broad variety of condensed states of matter including solid crystals, plastic crystals, lyotropic and thermotropic ionic liquid crystals, liquids, mesomorphic glasses, and Langmuir-Blodgett films. Glass-forming properties of metal alkanoates combined with their use as nano-reactors and anisotropic host open up simple and efficient way to design various photonic nanomaterials. Despite very interesting physics, the experimental data on optical and nonlinearoptical properties of such materials are scarce. The goal of the present paper is to fill the gap by discussing recent advances in the field of photonic materials made of metal alkanoates, organic dyes, and nanoparticles. Optical and nonlinear-optical properties of the following materials are reviewed: (i) mesomorphic glass doped with organic dyes; (ii) smectic glass composed of cobalt alkanoates; (iii) semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in a glassy host; (iv) metal nanoparticles - glass (the cobalt octanoate) nanocomposites.

  3. Glass composite waste forms for iodine confined in bismuth-embedded SBA-15

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Yim, Man-Sung

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to stabilize bismuth-embedded SBA-15 that captured iodine gas by fabrication of monolithic waste forms. The iodine containing waste was mixed with Bi2O3 (a stabilizing additive) and low-temperature sintering glass followed by pelletizing and the sintering process to produce glass composite materials. Iodine volatility during the sintering process was significantly affected by the ratio of Bi2O3 and the glass composition. It was confirmed that BiI3, the main iodine phase within bismuth-embedded SBA-15, was effectively transformed to the mixed phases of Bi5O7I and BiOI. The initial leaching rates of iodine from the glass composite waste forms ranged 10-3-10-2 g/m2 day, showing the stability of the iodine phases encapsulated by the glassy networks. It was also observed that common groundwater anions (e.g., chloride, carbonate, sulfite, and fluoride) elevated the iodine leaching rate by anion exchange reactions. The present results suggest that the glass composite waste form of bismuth-embedded SBA-15 could be a candidate material for stable storage of 129I.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material---ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 glasses

    Wald, J.W.

    1988-03-01

    Materials Characterization Center glasses ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 are designed to simulate high-level waste glasses that are likely to result from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The three Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) are borosilicate glasses based upon the MCC-76-68 glass composition. One radioisotope was added to form each ATM. The radioisotopes added to form ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 were 241 Am, 237 Np, and 239 Pu, respectively. Each of the ATM lots was produced in a nominal lot size of 450 g from feed stock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1200/degree/C in a platinum crucible. Each ATM was then cast into bars. Analyzed compositions of these glasses are listed. The nonradioactive elements were analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), and the radioisotope analyses were done by alpha energy analysis. Results are discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Tests with ceramic waste form materials made by pressureless consolidation

    Lewis, M. A.; Hash, M. C.; Hebden, A. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2002-01-01

    A multiphase waste form referred to as the ceramic waste form (CWF) will be used to immobilize radioactively contaminated salt wastes recovered after the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. The CWF is made by first occluding salt in zeolite and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass. A variety of surrogate CWF materials were made using pressureless consolidation (PC) methods for comparison with CWF consolidated using a hot isostatic press (HIP) method and to study the effects of glass/zeolite batching ratio and processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. The data summarized in this report will also be used to support qualification of the PC CWF for disposal in the proposed federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The phase composition and microstructure of HIP CWF and PC CWF are essentially identical: both are composed of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). The primary difference is that PC CWF materials have higher porosities than HIP CWFs. The product consistency test (PCT) that was initially developed to monitor homogeneous glass waste forms was used to measure the chemical durabilities of the CWF materials. Series of replicate tests with several PC CWF materials indicate that the PCT can be conducted with the same precision with CWF materials as with borosilicate glasses. Short-term (7-day) PCTs were used to evaluate the repeatability of making the PC CWF and the effects of the glass/zeolite mass ratio, process temperature, and processing time on the chemical durability. Long-term (up to 1 year) PCTs were used to compare the durabilities of HIP and PC CWFs and to estimate the apparent solubility limit for the PC CWF that is needed for modeling. The PC and HIP CWF materials had similar disabilities, based on the release of silicon in long

  6. A new parameter to evaluate the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    Suo, Z.Y.; Qiu, K.Q.; Li, Q.F.; You, J.H.; Ren, Y.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Develop a new criterion, i.e., Q=((T g +T x )/T l ).(ΔE/ΔH). → The reliability and benefits of the new criterion have been demonstrated in a wide range of BMG alloys. → It corresponds well with the critical diameter of BMGs investigated up to now. - Abstract: Based on the consideration of the liquid phase stability, the resistance to crystallization and the glass transition enthalpy, a new criterion Q, defined as ((T g + T x )/T l ).(ΔE/ΔH), where the T g , T x , T l , ΔE and ΔH are the glass transition temperature, the onset crystallization temperature, the liquidus temperature, the crystalline enthalpy and the fusion enthalpy, respectively, has been proposed for evaluating the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses. The new criterion Q exhibits better correlation with the maximum cross section thickness (D m ) for glass formation compared with γ (=T x /(T l + T g )), T rg (=T g /T l ) and ΔT x (=T x - T g ) respectively. The available data from literatures and experiments have confirmed the effectiveness of the newly developed criterion.

  7. Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Uranium and Plutonium Residues Wastes - 13164

    Stewart, Martin W.A.; Moricca, Sam A.; Zhang, Yingjie; Day, R. Arthur; Begg, Bruce D.; Scales, Charlie R.; Maddrell, Ewan R.; Hobbs, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    A program of work has been undertaken to treat plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield. These have arisen from past fuel development work and are highly variable in both physical and chemical composition. The principal radiological elements present are U and Pu, with small amounts of Th. The waste packages contain Pu in amounts that are too low to be economically recycled as fuel and too high to be disposed of as lower level Pu contaminated material. NNL and ANSTO have developed full-ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms in which hot-isostatic pressing is used as the consolidation step to safely immobilize the waste into a form suitable for long-term disposition. We discuss development work on the glass-ceramic developed for impure waste streams, in particular the effect of variations in the waste feed chemistry glass-ceramic. The waste chemistry was categorized into actinides, impurity cations, glass formers and anions. Variations of the relative amounts of these on the properties and chemistry of the waste form were investigated and the waste form was found to be largely unaffected by these changes. This work mainly discusses the initial trials with Th and U. Later trials with larger variations and work with Pu-doped samples further confirmed the flexibility of the glass-ceramic. (authors)

  8. Radiation effects in glass waste forms for high-level waste and plutonium disposal

    Weber, W.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A key challenge in the permanent disposal of high-level waste (HLW), plutonium residues/scraps, and excess weapons plutonium in glass waste forms is the development of predictive models of long-term performance that are based on a sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Radiation effects from β-decay and α-decay can impact the performance of glasses for HLW and Pu disposition through the interactions of the α-particles, β-particles, recoil nuclei, and γ-rays with the atoms in the glass. Recently, a scientific panel convened under the auspices of the DOE Council on Materials Science to assess the current state of understanding, identify important scientific issues, and recommend directions for research in the area of radiation effects in glasses for HLW and Pu disposition. The overall finding of the panel was that there is a critical lack of systematic understanding on radiation effects in glasses at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The current state of understanding on radiation effects in glass waste forms and critical scientific issues are presented

  9. Examining porous bio-active glass as a potential osteo-odonto-keratoprosthetic skirt material.

    Huhtinen, Reeta; Sandeman, Susan; Rose, Susanna; Fok, Elsie; Howell, Carol; Fröberg, Linda; Moritz, Niko; Hupa, Leena; Lloyd, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Bio-active glass has been developed for use as a bone substitute with strong osteo-inductive capacity and the ability to form strong bonds with soft and hard tissue. The ability of this material to enhance tissue in-growth suggests its potential use as a substitute for the dental laminate of an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A preliminary in vitro investigation of porous bio-active glass as an OOKP skirt material was carried out. Porous glass structures were manufactured from bio-active glasses 1-98 and 28-04 containing varying oxide formulation (1-98, 28-04) and particle size range (250-315 μm for 1-98 and 28-04a, 315-500 μm for 28-04b). Dissolution of the porous glass structure and its effect on pH was measured. Structural 2D and 3D analysis of porous structures were performed. Cell culture experiments were carried out to study keratocyte adhesion and the inflammatory response induced by the porous glass materials. The dissolution results suggested that the porous structure made out of 1-98 dissolves faster than the structures made from glass 28-04. pH experiments showed that the dissolution of the porous glass increased the pH of the surrounding solution. The cell culture results showed that keratocytes adhered onto the surface of each of the porous glass structures, but cell adhesion and spreading was greatest for the 98a bio-glass. Cytokine production by all porous glass samples was similar to that of the negative control indicating that the glasses do not induce a cytokine driven inflammatory response. Cell culture results support the potential use of synthetic porous bio-glass as an OOKP skirt material in terms of limited inflammatory potential and capacity to induce and support tissue ingrowth.

  10. Physical stability of drugs after storage above and below the glass transition temperature: Relationship to glass-forming ability.

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Alzghoul, Ahmad; Mahlin, Denny; Bergström, Christel A S

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous materials are inherently unstable and tend to crystallize upon storage. In this study, we investigated the extent to which the physical stability and inherent crystallization tendency of drugs are related to their glass-forming ability (GFA), the glass transition temperature (Tg) and thermodynamic factors. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to produce the amorphous state of 52 drugs [18 compounds crystallized upon heating (Class II) and 34 remained in the amorphous state (Class III)] and to perform in situ storage for the amorphous material for 12h at temperatures 20°C above or below the Tg. A computational model based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was developed to predict the structure-property relationships. All drugs maintained their Class when stored at 20°C below the Tg. Fourteen of the Class II compounds crystallized when stored above the Tg whereas all except one of the Class III compounds remained amorphous. These results were only related to the glass-forming ability and no relationship to e.g. thermodynamic factors was found. The experimental data were used for computational modeling and a classification model was developed that correctly predicted the physical stability above the Tg. The use of a large dataset revealed that molecular features related to aromaticity and π-π interactions reduce the inherent physical stability of amorphous drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Heavy metal oxide glasses as gamma rays shielding material

    Kaur, Preet; Singh, Devinder; Singh, Tejbir

    2016-01-01

    The gamma rays shielding parameters for heavy metal oxide glasses and concrete samples are comparable. However, the transparent nature of glasses provides additional feature to visualize inside the shielding material. Hence, different researchers had contributed in computing/measuring different shielding parameters for different configurations of heavy metal oxide glass systems. In the present work, a detailed study on different heavy metal (_5_6Ba, _6_4Gd, _8_2Pb, _8_3Bi) oxide glasses has been presented on the basis of different gamma rays shielding parameters as reported by different researchers in the recent years. It has been observed that among the selected heavy metal oxide glass systems, Bismuth based glasses provide better gamma rays shielding. Hence, Bismuth based glasses can be better substitute to concrete walls at nuclear reactor sites and nuclear labs.

  12. Heavy metal oxide glasses as gamma rays shielding material

    Kaur, Preet; Singh, Devinder; Singh, Tejbir, E-mail: dr.tejbir@gmail.com

    2016-10-15

    The gamma rays shielding parameters for heavy metal oxide glasses and concrete samples are comparable. However, the transparent nature of glasses provides additional feature to visualize inside the shielding material. Hence, different researchers had contributed in computing/measuring different shielding parameters for different configurations of heavy metal oxide glass systems. In the present work, a detailed study on different heavy metal ({sub 56}Ba, {sub 64}Gd, {sub 82}Pb, {sub 83}Bi) oxide glasses has been presented on the basis of different gamma rays shielding parameters as reported by different researchers in the recent years. It has been observed that among the selected heavy metal oxide glass systems, Bismuth based glasses provide better gamma rays shielding. Hence, Bismuth based glasses can be better substitute to concrete walls at nuclear reactor sites and nuclear labs.

  13. Nano-Micro Materials Enabled Thermoelectricity From Window Glasses

    Inayat, Salman Bin

    2012-11-03

    With growing world population and decreasing fossil fuel reserves we need to explore and utilize variety of renewable and clean energy sources to meet the imminent challenge of energy crisis. Solar energy is considered as the leading promising alternate energy source with the pertinent challenge of off sunshine period and uneven worldwide distribution of usable sun light. Although thermoelectricity is considered as a reasonable energy harvester from wasted heat, its mass scale usage is yet to be developed. By transforming window glasses into generators of thermoelectricity, this doctoral work explores engineering aspects of using the temperature gradient between the hot outdoor heated by the sun and the relatively cold indoor of a building for mass scale energy generation. In order to utilize the two counter temperature environments simultaneously, variety of techniques, including: a) insertion of basic metals like copper and nickel wire, b) sputtering of thermoelectric films on side walls of individual glass strips to form the thickness depth of the glass on subsequent curing of the strips, and c) embedding nano-manufactured thermoelectric pillars, have been implemented for innovative integration of thermoelectric materials into window glasses. The practical demonstration of thermoelectric windows has been validated using a finite element model to predict the behavior of thermoelectric window under variety of varying conditions. MEMS based characterization platform has been fabricated for thermoelectric characterization of thin films employing van der Pauw and four probe modules. Enhancement of thermoelectric properties of the nano- manufactured pillars due to nano-structuring, achieved through mechanical alloying of micro-sized thermoelectric powders, has been explored. Modulation of thermoelectric properties of the nano-structured thermoelectric pillars by addition of sulfur to nano-powder matrix has also been investigated in detail. Using the best possible p

  14. Preparation and characterization of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate

    Pilarczyk, Wirginia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Zr-based BMGs in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. • Many techniques have been used to characterize the structure of Zr 55 Cu 30 Ni 5 Al 10 alloy. • The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory GFA. • The studies reveal that tested as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. - Abstract: Zr-based bulk metallic glasses present an interesting combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. During the last decade, intensive progress has been made and a number of applications have been suggested for these materials. In order to successfully apply these materials, it is necessary to accurately characterize their structure, thermal stability and other properties accurately. The aim of the presented work is the manufacturing, examination of the structure of selected Zr-based bulk metallic alloys and confirmation of an amorphous structure using X-ray analysis, microscopic observation and thermal analysis. In this work, the Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. Designed scientific station for casting zirconium based amorphous alloys in the form of plates and rods with selected dimensions is in our university a comprehensive method for achieving amorphous materials which enables us to maintain repeatability of as-cast samples with the amorphous structure and the assumed dimensions range. The diffraction pattern and exothermic reaction as well as the fracture surface morphology reveal that studied as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory glass-forming ability in form of studied plate. These obtained values can suggest that studied alloys are suitable materials for further planned practical application at welding process. The success of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses production in form of plate with obtained sizes is important for future

  15. Characterization of low concentration uranium glass working materials

    Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wimpenny, J. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leever, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-22

    A series of uranium-doped silicate glasses were created at (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) LLNL, to be used as working reference material analogs for low uranium concentration research. Specifically, the aim of this effort was the generation of well-characterized glasses spanning a range of concentrations and compositions, and of sufficient homogeneity in uranium concentration and isotopic composition, for instrumentation research and development purposes. While the glasses produced here are not intended to replace or become standard materials for uranium concentration or uranium isotopic composition, it is hoped that they will help fill a current gap, providing low-level uranium glasses sufficient for methods development and method comparisons within the limitations of the produced glass suite. Glasses are available for research use by request.

  16. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  17. Relating structural parameters to leachability in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    Frank, S. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice parameters for a crystalline material can be obtained by several methods, notably by analyzing x-ray powder diffraction patterns. By utilizing a computer program to fit a pattern, one can follow the evolution or subtle changes in a structure of a crystalline species in different environments. This work involves such a study for an essential component of the ceramic waste form that is under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Zeolite 4A and zeolite 5A are used to produce two different types of waste forms: a glass-bonded sodalite and a glass-bonded zeolite, respectively. Changes in structure during production of the waste forms are discussed. Specific salt-loadings in the sodalite waste form are related to relative peak intensities of certain reflections in the XRD patterns. Structural parameters for the final waste forms will also be given and related to leachability under standard conditions

  18. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-12 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material ATM-12 is a borosilicate glass that incorporates elements typical of high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The composition has been adjusted to match that predicted for HLW type 76-68 glass at an age of 300 y. Radioactive constituents contained in this glass include depleted uranium, 99 Tc, 237 Np, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. The glass was produced by the MCC at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). ATM-12 glass ws produced from July to November of 1984 at the request of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigations (NNWSI) Program and is the third in a series of glasses produced for NNWSI. Most of the glass produced was in the form of cast bars; special castings and crushed material were also produced. Three kilograms of ATM-12 glass were produced from a feedstock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1150 0 C in a platinum crucible, and formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars and the special casting shapes requested by NNWSI. Bars of ATM-12 were nominally 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm, with an average mass of 111 g each. Nineteen bars and 37 special castings were made. ATM-12 glass has been provided to the NNWSI Program, in the form of bars, crushed powder and special castings. As of August 1985 approximately 590 g of ATM-12 is available for distribution. Requests for materials or services related to this glass should be directed to the Materials Characterization Center Program Office, PNL

  19. Glass composite waste forms for iodine confined in bismuth-embedded SBA-15

    Yang, Jae Hwan [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to stabilize bismuth-embedded SBA-15 that captured iodine gas by fabrication of monolithic waste forms. The iodine containing waste was mixed with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} (a stabilizing additive) and low-temperature sintering glass followed by pelletizing and the sintering process to produce glass composite materials. Iodine volatility during the sintering process was significantly affected by the ratio of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the glass composition. It was confirmed that BiI{sub 3}, the main iodine phase within bismuth-embedded SBA-15, was effectively transformed to the mixed phases of Bi{sub 5}O{sub 7}I and BiOI. The initial leaching rates of iodine from the glass composite waste forms ranged 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2} day, showing the stability of the iodine phases encapsulated by the glassy networks. It was also observed that common groundwater anions (e.g., chloride, carbonate, sulfite, and fluoride) elevated the iodine leaching rate by anion exchange reactions. The present results suggest that the glass composite waste form of bismuth-embedded SBA-15 could be a candidate material for stable storage of {sup 129}I. - Highlights: • Glass composite waste forms were developed to stabilize iodine confined in Bi-embedded SBA-15. • BiI{sub 3} within Bi-embedded SBA-15 was transformed to BiOI and Bi{sub 5}O{sub 7}I during sintering process. • Iodine volatility was significantly affected by glass composition and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive. • Iodine leaching rates were 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2} day due to the stable iodine phases encapsulated by glassy networks. • Glass composite waste form of Bi-embedded SBA-15 is expected to be a candidate material for stable storage of {sup 129}I.

  20. Zr-Cu-Ni-Al bulk metallic glasses with superhigh glass-forming ability

    Sun, Y.J.; Qu, D.D.; Huang, Y.J.; Liss, K.-D.; Wei, X.S.; Xing, D.W.; Shen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Zr-Cu-Ni-Al quaternary amorphous alloy compositions with varying glass-forming ability are developed by an efficient method of proportional mixing of binary eutectics. The critical diameter of the glassy sample is improved from 6 mm for Zr 53 Cu 18.7 Ni 12 Al 16.3 to 14 mm for Zr 50.7 Cu 28 Ni 9 Al 12.3 by straightforwardly adjusting the eutectic unit's coefficients. The drastic improvement in GFA is attributed to balancing the chemical affinities of the Zr, Cu, Ni and Al components in the melt prior to solidification which makes the precipitation of competing crystalline phases more difficult. As the glass-forming ability increases, the concentration of Cu in the alloys exhibits a same trend. Based on synchrotron radiation high-energy X-ray diffraction analysis and Miracle's structural model, it is envisioned that the substitution of additional Cu atoms for Zr atoms in the investigated alloys stabilizes the efficient cluster packing structure of the amorphous alloys, leading to the pronounced increase in their glass-forming ability

  1. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  2. Index change of chalcogenide materials from precision glass molding processes

    Deegan, J.; Walsh, K.; Lindberg, G.; Benson, R.; Gibson, D.; Bayya, S.; Sanghera, J.; Stover, E.

    2015-05-01

    With the increase in demand for infrared optics for thermal applications and the use of glass molding of chalcogenide materials to support these higher volume optical designs, an investigation of changes to the optical properties of these materials is required. Typical precision glass molding requires specific thermal conditions for proper lens molding of any type of optical glass. With these conditions a change (reduction) of optical index occurs after molding of all oxide glass types and it is presumed that a similar behavior will happen with chalcogenide based materials. We will discuss the effects of a typical molding thermal cycle for use with commercially and newly developed chalcogenide materials and show results of index variation from nominally established material data.

  3. Glass forming ability and mechanical properties of Zr50Cu42Al8 bulk metallic glass

    Xia, L; Chan, K C; Wang, G; Liu, L

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report that Zr 50 Cu 42 Al 8 bulk metallic glass (BMG) exhibits excellent glass forming ability and mechanical properties. Zr 50 Cu 42 Al 8 glassy rods with a diameter of 3 mm were prepared using conventional copper mould suction casting. The glassy rod exhibits a modulus of about 115 GPa and a fracture strength of about 2 GPa, and, as compared with other large-scale BMGs, it has excellent room-temperature plasticity of up to 20% under compression. The fracture mechanism of the rod was investigated by microstructural investigations, and it was found that the large plasticity of the as-cast rod is closely related to the in situ formation of nano-crystalline particles embedded in the amorphous matrix.

  4. Strongly nonlinear optical glass fibers from noncentrosymmetric phase-change chalcogenide materials.

    Chung, In; Jang, Joon I; Malliakas, Christos D; Ketterson, John B; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2010-01-13

    We report that the one-dimensional polar selenophosphate compounds APSe(6) (A = K, Rb), which show crystal-glass phase-change behavior, exhibit strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response in both crystal and glassy forms. The crystalline materials are type-I phase-matchable with SHG coefficients chi((2)) of 151.3 and 149.4 pm V(-1) for K(+) and Rb(+) salts, respectively, which is the highest among phase-matchable nonlinear optical (NLO) materials with band gaps over 1.0 eV. The glass of APSe(6) exhibits comparable SHG intensities to the top infrared NLO material AgGaSe(2) without any poling treatments. APSe(6) exhibit excellent mid-IR transparency. We demonstrate that starting from noncentrosymmetric phase-change materials such as APSe(6) (A = K, Rb), we can obtain optical glass fibers with strong, intrinsic, and temporally stable second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) response. The as-prepared glass fibers exhibit SHG and difference frequency generation (DFG) responses over a wide range of wavelengths. Raman spectroscopy and pair distribution function (PDF) analyses provide further understanding of the local structure in amorphous state of KPSe(6) bulk glass and glass fiber. We propose that this approach can be widely applied to prepare permanent NLO glass from materials that undergo a phase-change process.

  5. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  6. Direct vitrification of plutonium-containing materials (PCM`s) with the glass material oxidation and dissolution system (GMODS)

    Forsberg, C.W. Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Haas, P.A.; Malling, G.F.; Elam, K.; Ott, L.

    1995-10-30

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess PCMs from nuclear weapons and associated production facilities. Consequently, the US government has undertaken studies to determine how best to manage and dispose of this excess material. The issues include (a) ensurance of domestic health, environment, and safety in handling, storage, and disposition, (b) international arms control agreements with Russia and other countries, and (c) economics. One major set of options is to convert the PCMs into glass for storage or disposal. The chemically inert characteristics of glasses make them a desirable chemical form for storage or disposal of radioactive materials. A glass may contain only plutonium, or it may contain plutonium along with other radioactive materials and nonradioactive materials. GMODS is a new process for the direct conversion of PCMs (i.e., plutonium metal, scrap, and residues) to glass. The plutonium content of these materials varies from a fraction of a percent to pure plutonium. GMODS has the capability to also convert other metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass, destroy organics, and convert chloride-containing materials into a low-chloride glass and a secondary clean chloride salt strewn. This report is the initial study of GMODS for vitrification of PCMs as input to ongoing studies of plutonium management options. Several tasks were completed: initial analysis of process thermodynamics, initial flowsheet analysis, identification of equipment options, proof-of-principle experiments, and identification of uncertainties.

  7. New gadolinium based glasses for gamma-rays shielding materials

    Kaewjang, S.; Maghanemi, U.; Kothan, S.; Kim, H.J.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd 2 O 3 based glasses have been fabricated and investigated radiation shielding properties between 223 and 662 keV. • Density of the glass increases with increasing of Gd 2 O 3. • All the glasses of Gd 2 O 3 compositions studied had been shown lower HVL than X-rays shielding window. • Prepared glasses to be utilized as radiation shielding material with Pb-free advantage. • This work is the first to reports on radiation shielding properties of Gd 2 O 3 based glass matrices. - Abstract: In this work, Gd 2 O 3 based glasses in compositions (80−x)B 2 O 3 -10SiO 2 -10CaO-xGd 2 O 3 (where x = 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 mol%) have been fabricated and investigated for their radiation shielding, physical and optical properties. The density of the glass was found to increase with the increasing of Gd 2 O 3 concentration. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ m ), effective atomic number (Z eff ) and effective electron densities (N e ) of the glasses were found to increase with the increasing of Gd 2 O 3 concentration and also with the decreasing of photon energy from 223 to 662 keV. The glasses of all Gd 2 O 3 compositions studied have been shown with lower HVL values in comparison to an X-rays shielding window, ordinary concrete and commercial window; indicating their potential as radiation shielding materials with Pb-free advantage. Optical spectra of the glasses in the present study had been shown with light transparency; an advantage when used as radiation shielding materials

  8. New gadolinium based glasses for gamma-rays shielding materials

    Kaewjang, S.; Maghanemi, U.; Kothan, S. [Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chang Mai University, Chang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Limkitjaroenporn, P. [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: mink110@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses have been fabricated and investigated radiation shielding properties between 223 and 662 keV. • Density of the glass increases with increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3.} • All the glasses of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions studied had been shown lower HVL than X-rays shielding window. • Prepared glasses to be utilized as radiation shielding material with Pb-free advantage. • This work is the first to reports on radiation shielding properties of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glass matrices. - Abstract: In this work, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses in compositions (80−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-10SiO{sub 2}-10CaO-xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x = 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 mol%) have been fabricated and investigated for their radiation shielding, physical and optical properties. The density of the glass was found to increase with the increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ{sub m}), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and effective electron densities (N{sub e}) of the glasses were found to increase with the increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration and also with the decreasing of photon energy from 223 to 662 keV. The glasses of all Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions studied have been shown with lower HVL values in comparison to an X-rays shielding window, ordinary concrete and commercial window; indicating their potential as radiation shielding materials with Pb-free advantage. Optical spectra of the glasses in the present study had been shown with light transparency; an advantage when used as radiation shielding materials.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-9 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-9 glass is designed to be representative of glass to be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. ATM-9 glass contains all of the major components of the DWPF glass and corresponds to a waste loading of 29 wt %. The feedstock material for this glass was supplied by Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC, as SRL-165 Black Frit to which was added Ba, Cs, Md, Nd, Zr, as well as 99 Tc, depleted U, 237 Np, 239+240 Pu, and 243 Am. The glass was produced under reducing conditions by the addition of 0.7 wt % graphite during the final melting process. Three kilograms of the glass were produced from April to May of 1984. On final melting, the glass was formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars of two sizes: 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm and 1.3 x 1.3 x 10 cm. Seventeen bars of each size were made. The analyzed composition of ATM-9 glass is listed. Examination by optical microscopy of a single transverse section from one bar showed random porosity estimated at 0.36 vol % with nominal pore diameters ranging from approx. 5 μm to 200 μm. Only one distinct second phase was observed and it was at a low concentraction level in the glass matrix. The phase appeared as spherical metallic particles. X-ray diffraction analysis of this same sample did not show any diffraction peaks from crystalline components, indicating that the glass contained less than 5 wt % of crystalline devitrification products. The even shading on the radiograph exposure indicated a generally uniform distribution of radioactivity throughout the glass matrix, with no distinct high-concentration regions

  10. Fragility correlates thermodynamic and kinetic properties of glass forming liquids

    Reddy, C.Narayana [Maharani’s Science College for Women, Bangalore 560001 (India); Viswanatha, R.; Chethana, B.K. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Gowda, V.C.Veeranna [Government First Grade College, Jayanagara, Bangalore 560070 (India); Rao, K.J., E-mail: kalyajrao@yahoo.co.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The suggested new fragility parameter correlates viscosity and configurational entropy. - Highlights: • A new fragility function, F=ΔT/ΔC{sub p}×C{sub p}{sup l}/T{sub g} has been proposed. • A three parameter viscosity function using the new F reproduces Angell fragility plot. • A new ΔC{sub p} function is derived which directly relates Adam–Gibbs function with the fragility based viscosity function. - Abstract: In our earlier communication we proposed a simple fragility determining function, ([NBO]/V{sub m}{sup 3}T{sub g}), which we have now used to analyze several glass systems using available thermal data. A comparison with similar fragility determining function, ΔC{sub p}/C{sub p}{sup l}, introduced by Chryssikos et al. in their investigation of lithium borate glasses has also been performed and found to be more convenient quantity for discussing fragilities. We now propose a new function which uses both ΔC{sub p} and ΔT and which gives a numerical fragility parameter, F whose value lies between 0 and 1 for glass forming liquids. F can be calculated through the use of measured thermal parameters ΔC{sub p}, C{sub p}{sup l}, T{sub g} and T{sub m}. Use of the new fragility values in reduced viscosity equation reproduces the whole range of viscosity curves of the Angell plot. The reduced viscosity equation can be directly compared with the Adam–Gibbs viscosity equation and a heat capacity function can be formulated which reproduces satisfactorily the ΔC{sub p} versus ln(T{sub r}) curves and hence the configurational entropy.

  11. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass-based materials for structural and functional applications.

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna; Bernardo, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass-based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass-ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica-rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron-rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass-based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste-derived glasses into glass-ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low-cost alternative for glass-ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up-to-date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste-derived, glass-based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes

  13. Valorization of sugarcane bagasse ash: producing glass-ceramic materials.

    Teixeira, S R; Magalhães, R S; Arenales, A; Souza, A E; Romero, M; Rincón, J M

    2014-02-15

    Some aluminosilicates, for example mullite and wollastonite, are very important in the ceramic and construction industries. The most significant glass-ceramic for building applications has wollastonite as the main crystal phase. In this work we report on the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) to produce glass-ceramics with silicates as the major crystalline phases. The glasses (frits) were prepared by mixing ash, limestone (calcium and magnesium carbonates) and potassium carbonate as the fluxing agent. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the chemical composition of the glasses and their crystallization was assessed by using thermal analysis (DTA/DSC/TGA) and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that glass-ceramic material can be produced with wollastonite as the major phase, at a temperature lower than 900 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Glass as a waste form for the immobilization of plutonium

    Bates, J.K.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several alternatives for disposal of surplus plutonium are being considered. One method is incorporating Pu into glass and in this paper we discuss the development and corrosion behavior of an alkali-tin-silicate glass and update results in testing Pu doped Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference glasses. The alkali-tin-silicate glass was engineered to accommodate a high Pu loading and to be durable under conditions likely to accelerate glass reaction. The glass dissolves about 7 wt% Pu together with the neutron absorber Gd, and under test conditions expected to accelerate the glass reaction with water, is resistant to corrosion. The Pu and the Gd are released from the glass at nearly the same rate in static corrosion tests in water, and are not segregated into surface alteration phases when the glass is reacted in water vapor. Similar results for the behavior of Pu and Gd are found for the DWPF reference glasses, although the long-term rate of reaction for the reference glasses is more rapid than for the alkali-tin-silicate glass

  15. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids.

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-06-09

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids.

  16. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ustuendag, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Kim, C.P. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States); Brown, D.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendc second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite.

  17. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.Y.; Ustuendag, E.; Kim, C.P.; Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendritic second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite

  18. Photon Interaction Studies with Some Glasses and Building Materials

    Singh, Harvinder; Singh, Kulwant; Sharma, Gopi; Nathuram, R.; Sahota, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of some shielding materials, namely, Bakelite, black cement, white cement, plaster of paris, and concrete were determined at 356-, 511-, 662-, 1173-, and 1332-keV energies, and those of glasses containing oxides of B, Cd, Pb, and Bi were determined only at 662 keV using a narrow beam transmission method. These coefficients of glasses were then used to determine their interaction cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical values. It has been proven that glasses have a potential application as a transparent radiation shielding

  19. Production of sodalite waste forms by addition of glass

    Pereira, C.

    1995-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel can be treated in a molten salt electrorefiner for conversion into metal and mineral waste forms for geologic disposal. Sodalite is one of the mineral waste forms under study. Fission products in the molten salt are ion-exchanged into zeolite A, which is converted to sodalite and consolidated. Sodalite can be formed directly from mixtures of salt and zeolite A at temperatures above 975 K; however, nepheline is usually produced as a secondary phase. Addition of small amounts of glass frit to the mixture reduced nepheline formation significantly. Loss of fission products was not observed for reaction below 1000 K. Hot-pressing of the sodalite powders yielded dense pellets (∼2.3 g/cm 3 ) without any loss of fission product species. Normalized release rates were below 1 g/m 2 ·day for pre-washed samples in 28-day leach tests based on standard MCC-1 tests but increased with the presence of free salt on the sodalite

  20. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Cast bulk metallic glass alloys: prospects as wear materials

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Shiflet, Gary J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are single phase materials with unusual physical and mechanical properties. One intriguing area of possible use is as a wear material. Usually, pure metals and single phase dilute alloys do not perform well in tribological conditions. When the metal or alloy is lightweight, it is usually soft leading to galling in sliding situations. For the harder metals and alloys, their density is usually high, so there is an energy penalty when using these materials in wear situations. However, bulk metallic glasses at the same density are usually harder than corresponding metals and dilute single phase alloys, and so could offer better wear resistance. This work will discuss preliminary wear results for metallic glasses with densities in the range of 4.5 to 7.9 g/cc. The wear behavior of these materials will be compared to similar metals and alloys.

  2. Glass-crystalline materials for active waste incorporation

    Kulichenko, V.V.; Krylova, N.V.; Vlasov, V.I.; Polyakov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the possibility and conditions for using glass-crystalline materials for the incorporation of radionuclides. Materials of a cast pyroxene type that are obtained by smelting calcined wastes with acid blast furnace slags are described. A study was also made of materials of a basalt type prepared from wastes with and without alkali metal salt. Changes in the structure and properties of materials in the process of storage at different temperatures have been studied

  3. Fracture toughness measurements on a glass bonded sodalite high-level waste form

    DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O'Holleran, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment of metallic spent nuclear fuel produces two high-level waste streams; cladding hulls and chloride salt. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream. The waste form consists of 75 Vol.% crystalline sodalite (containing the salt) with 25 Vol.% of an ''intergranular'' glassy phase. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on representative samples of this material using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confirmed by post-indentation polishing of a test sample. Young's modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and Young's modulus values are reported, along with results from scanning electron microscopy studies

  4. Basaltic glasses from Iceland and the deep sea: Natural analogues to borosilicate nuclear waste-form glass

    Jercinovic, M.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The report provides a detailed analysis of the alteration process and products for natural basaltic glasses. Information of specific applicability to the JSS project include: * The identification of typical alteration products which should be expected during the long-term corrosion process of low-silica glasses. The leached layers contain a relatively high proportion of crystalline phases, mostly in the form of smectite-type clays. Channels through the layer provide immediate access of solutions to the fresh glass/alteration layer interface. Thus, glasses are not 'protected' from further corrosion by the surface layer. * Corrosion proceeds with two rates - an initial rate in silica-undersaturated environments and a long-term rate in silica-saturated environments. This demonstrates that there is no unexpected change in corrosion rate over long periods of time. The long-term corrosion rate is consistent with that of borosilicate glasses. * Precipitation of silica-containing phases can result in increased alteration of the glass as manifested by greater alteration layer thicknesses. This emphasizes the importance of being able to predict which phases form during the reaction sequence. * For natural basaltic glasses the flow rate of water and surface area of exposed glass are critical parameters in minimizing glass alteration over long periods of time. The long-term stability of basalt glasses is enhanced when silica concentrations in solution are increased. In summary, there is considerable agreement between corrosion phenomena observed for borosilicate glasses in the laboratory and those observed for natural basalt glasses of great age. (With 121 refs.) (authors)

  5. Material interactions relating to long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste glass

    Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    This review paper systematizes the additional interactions that materials in a geologic repository will impose on the borosilicate glass waste form-groundwater interactions. These materials are the steel canister that holds the glass, the steel overpack over the canister, backfill materials that may be used, and last, the repository host rock. The repository geologies reviewed are tuff, salt, basalt, and granite. The interactions emphasized are those appropriate to conditions expected after repository closure, e.g., oxic vs anoxic conditions. Whenever possible, the effect of radiation from the waste form on the interaction(s) is examined. The interactions are evaluated based on their effect on the release and speciation of various elements including radionuclides from the glass. Repository relevant interactions testing that requires further study before long-term predictions can be made are noted. 62 refs

  6. Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass Standard Reference Material. Revision 1

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Crawford, C.L.; Pickett, M.A.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Primary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCI). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers.

  7. New insight on glass-forming ability and designing Cu-based bulk metallic glasses: The solidification range perspective

    Wu, Jili; Pan, Ye; Li, Xingzhou; Wang, Xianfei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The equation, T rg = T g /T l , was rotationally modified to T rg = κ(T m /T l ) + C/T l . • The newly generalized equation suggests a way for describing glass-forming ability. • Several new Cu-based bulk metallic glasses were discovered by solidification range. - Abstract: In this paper, a new equation was rationally generalized from the reduced glass transition temperature. This equation indicates that solidification range can be used for describing glass-forming ability, which can be calculated with the aid of computational thermodynamic approach. Based on this scenario, several new Cu-based bulk metallic glasses in the ternary Cu–Zr–Ti alloy system were discovered. The as-cast samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electronic microscopy. The results indicate that as-cast samples have monolithic amorphous nature. Thermal analysis validates that the smaller solidification range is closely related to the higher glass-forming ability, which is contributed to the effect of solidification time on the formation of bulk metallic glasses. This work also suggests that solidus can influence glass formation

  8. Materials interactions relating to long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste glass

    Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    In the geologic disposal of nuclear waste glass, the glass will eventually interact with groundwater in the repository system. Interactions can also occur between the glass and other waste package materials that are present. These include the steel canister that holds the glass, the metal overpack over the canister, backfill materials that may be used, and the repository host rock. This review paper systematizes the additional interactions that materials in the waste package will impose on the borosilicate glass waste form-groundwater interactions. The repository geologies reviewed are tuff, salt, basalt, and granite. The interactions emphasized are those appropriate to conditions expected after repository closure, e.g. oxic vs anoxic conditions. Whenever possible, the effect of radiation from the waste form on the interactions is examined. The interactions are evaluated based on their effect on the release and speciation of various elements including radionuclides from the glass. It is noted when further tests of repository interactions are needed before long-term predictions can be made. 63 references, 1 table

  9. Development of glass/glass-ceramics materials and devices and their micro-structural studies

    Goswami, Madhumita; Sarkar, Arjun; Shingarvelan, Shobha; Kumar, Rakesh; Ananathanarayan, Arvind; Shrikhande, V.K.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Materials and devices based on glass and glass-ceramics (GCs) find applications in various high pressure and vacuum applications. We have prepared different glasses/glass-ceramics with requisite thermal expansion coefficient, electrical, vacuum and wetting characteristics to fabricate hermetic seals with different metals/alloys as well as components for these applications. Some of these are, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -B 2O3 (BS) for matched type of seal fabricated with Kovar alloy, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-BaO-PbO(LS) for fabrication of compressive type seals with stainless steel and SS 446 alloys, P 2 O 5 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -BaO-PbO(NAP) for fabrication of matched type of seal with relatively low melting metals/alloys like AI/Cu-Be and Li 2 O-ZnO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (LZS) and Lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics to fabricate matched and compression types feedtroughs/conductivity probes Magnesium aluminium silicate (MAS) machinable glass-ceramics is another development for high voltage and ultra high vacuum applications. Micro-structural studies have been carried out on these materials to understand the mechanism of their behaviour and have also been deployed in various systems and plants in DAE. (author)

  10. Using 20-million-year-old amber to test the super-Arrhenius behaviour of glass-forming systems

    Zhao, Jing; Simon, Sindee L.; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2013-04-01

    Fossil amber offers the opportunity to investigate the dynamics of glass-forming materials far below the nominal glass transition temperature. This is important in the context of classical theory, as well as some new theories that challenge the idea of an ‘ideal’ glass transition. Here we report results from calorimetric and stress relaxation experiments using a 20-million-year-old Dominican amber. By performing the stress relaxation experiments in a step-wise fashion, we measured the relaxation time at each temperature and, above the fictive temperature of this 20-million-year-old glass, this is an upper bound to the equilibrium relaxation time. The results deviate dramatically from the expectation of classical theory and are consistent with some modern ideas, in which the diverging timescale signature of complex fluids disappears below the glass transition temperature.

  11. Preparation and characterization of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate

    Pilarczyk, Wirginia, E-mail: wirginia.pilarczyk@polsl.pl

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Zr-based BMGs in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. • Many techniques have been used to characterize the structure of Zr{sub 55}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 5}Al{sub 10} alloy. • The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory GFA. • The studies reveal that tested as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. - Abstract: Zr-based bulk metallic glasses present an interesting combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. During the last decade, intensive progress has been made and a number of applications have been suggested for these materials. In order to successfully apply these materials, it is necessary to accurately characterize their structure, thermal stability and other properties accurately. The aim of the presented work is the manufacturing, examination of the structure of selected Zr-based bulk metallic alloys and confirmation of an amorphous structure using X-ray analysis, microscopic observation and thermal analysis. In this work, the Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. Designed scientific station for casting zirconium based amorphous alloys in the form of plates and rods with selected dimensions is in our university a comprehensive method for achieving amorphous materials which enables us to maintain repeatability of as-cast samples with the amorphous structure and the assumed dimensions range. The diffraction pattern and exothermic reaction as well as the fracture surface morphology reveal that studied as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory glass-forming ability in form of studied plate. These obtained values can suggest that studied alloys are suitable materials for further planned practical application at welding process. The success of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses production in form of plate with obtained sizes is

  12. A new basaltic glass microanalytical reference material for multiple techniques

    Wilson, Steve; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been producing reference materials since the 1950s. Over 50 materials have been developed to cover bulk rock, sediment, and soils for the geological community. These materials are used globally in geochemistry, environmental, and analytical laboratories that perform bulk chemistry and/or microanalysis for instrument calibration and quality assurance testing. To answer the growing demand for higher spatial resolution and sensitivity, there is a need to create a new generation of microanalytical reference materials suitable for a variety of techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As such, the microanalytical reference material (MRM) needs to be stable under the beam, be homogeneous at scales of better than 10–25 micrometers for the major to ultra-trace element level, and contain all of the analytes (elements or isotopes) of interest. Previous development of basaltic glasses intended for LA-ICP-MS has resulted in a synthetic basaltic matrix series of glasses (USGS GS-series) and a natural basalt series of glasses (BCR-1G, BHVO-2G, and NKT-1G). These materials have been useful for the LA-ICP-MS community but were not originally intended for use by the electron or ion beam community. A material developed from start to finish with intended use in multiple microanalytical instruments would be useful for inter-laboratory and inter-instrument platform comparisons. This article summarizes the experiments undertaken to produce a basalt glass reference material suitable for distribution as a multiple-technique round robin material. The goal of the analytical work presented here is to demonstrate that the elemental homogeneity of the new glass is acceptable for its use as a reference material. Because the round robin exercise is still underway, only

  13. Waste vitrification: prediction of acceptable compositions in a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system

    Gilliam, T.M.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    A model is presented based upon calculated bridging oxygens which allows the prediction of the region of acceptable glass compositions for a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system containing mixed waste. The model can be used to guide glass formulation studies (e.g., treatability studies) or assess the applicability of vitrification to candidate waste streams

  14. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  15. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to grout and glass

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT ampersand E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT ampersand E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the

  16. Metastability and thermophysical properties of metallic bulk glass forming alloys

    Wunderlich, R.K.; Fecht, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The absence of crystallization over a wide time/temperature window can be used to produce bulk metallic glass by relatively slow cooling of the melt. For a number of alloys, including several multicomponent Zr-based alloys, the relevant thermodynamic and thermomechanical properties of the metastable glassy and undercooled liquid states have been measured below and above the glass transition temperature. These measurements include specific heat, viscosity, volume, and elastic properties as a function of temperature. As a result, it becomes obvious that the maximum undercooling for these alloys is given by an isentropic condition before an enthalpic or isochoric instability is reached. Alternatively, these glasses can also be produced by mechanical alloying, thus replacing the thermal disorder by static disorder and resulting in the same thermodynamic glass state. During heating through the undercooled liquid, a nanoscale phase separation occurs for most glasses as a precursor of crystallization

  17. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO{sub 2} fuel reprocessing waste

    Tait, J C

    1993-05-01

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of {sup 129}I, {sup 85}Kr and {sup 14}C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. Transparent phosphosilicate glasses containing crystals formed during cooling of melts

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; He, W.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of P2O5-SiO2 substitution on spontaneous crystallization of SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5- Na2O-MgO melts during cooling was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and rotation viscometry. Results show that addition of P2O5 leads...... to amorphous phase separation (APS), i.e., phosphate- and silicate-rich phases. It is due to the tendency of Mg2+ to form [MgO4] linking with [SiO4]. Molar substitution of P2O5 for SiO2 enhances the network polymerization of silicate-rich phase in the melts, and thereby the spontaneous crystallization of cubic...... Na2MgSiO4 is also enhanced during cooling of the melts. In addition, the sizes of the local crystalline and separated glassy domains are smaller than the wavelength of the visible light, and this leads to the transparency of the obtained glasses containing crystals....

  19. Candidate Low-Temperature Glass Waste Forms for Technetium-99 Recovered from Hanford Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Concentrate

    Ding, Mei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rim, Jung Ho [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chamberlin, Rebecca M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Alternative treatment and disposition options may exist for technetium-99 (99Tc) in secondary liquid waste from the Hanford Direct-Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) process. One approach includes development of an alternate glass waste form that is suitable for on-site disposition of technetium, including salts and other species recovered by ion exchange or precipitation from the EMF evaporator concentrate. By recovering the Tc content from the stream, and not recycling the treated concentrate, the DFLAW process can potentially be operated in a more efficient manner that lowers the cost to the Department of Energy. This report provides a survey of candidate glass formulations and glass-making processes that can potentially incorporate technetium at temperatures <700 °C to avoid volatilization. Three candidate technetium feed streams are considered: (1) dilute sodium pertechnetate loaded on a non-elutable ion exchange resin; (2) dilute sodium-bearing aqueous eluent from ion exchange recovery of pertechnetate, or (3) technetium(IV) oxide precipitate containing Sn and Cr solids in an aqueous slurry. From the technical literature, promising candidate glasses are identified based on their processing temperatures and chemical durability data. The suitability and technical risk of three low-temperature glass processing routes (vitrification, encapsulation by sintering into a glass composite material, and sol-gel chemical condensation) for the three waste streams was assessed, based on available low-temperature glass data. For a subset of candidate glasses, their long-term thermodynamic behavior with exposure to water and oxygen was modeled using Geochemist’s Workbench, with and without addition of reducing stannous ion. For further evaluation and development, encapsulation of precipitated TcO2/Sn/Cr in a glass composite material based on lead-free sealing glasses is recommended as a high priority. Vitrification of pertechnetate in aqueous anion exchange eluent solution

  20. Research of mountain rocks of Georgia for using in glass materials industry

    Gabunia, L.; Gabunia, N.; Jakhva, N.; Napetvaridze, Ts.; Alibegashvili, M.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents the results of the research of mountain rocks of Georgia in various peaces of basalts, andesite, andesite-basalt porphyry and trachite deposits in order to be used in the industry of fiber, glass-crystal materials and fasade decorative tiles. The prospects of basalt and andesite-basalt porphyry use in the industry of fiber materials in the form of monocomponents has been stated. The technology of obtaining of wear resistant, chemically stable and colored glass-crystal on the basis of andesit and trachyte, has been worked out and approved in industry. (author)

  1. Glass forming in La2O3-TiO2-ZrO2 ternary system by containerless processing

    Kaneko, Masashi; Kentei Yu, Yu; Kumar, Vijaya; Masuno, Atsunobu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Odawara, Osamu; Yoda, Shinichi

    The containerless processing is an appropriate method to create new glasses, because it sup-presses nucleation at the boundary between liquid and crucible during solidification and it enables molten samples to be solidified without crystallization. Recently, we have succeeded in forming BaTi2 O5 glass in the bulk state by using an aerodynamic levitation furnace. BaTi2 O5 glass includes no traditional glass network former and it possesses high electric permittivity [1, 2]. From the point of view of optical application, BaTi2 O5 glass has high refractive indices over 2.1. BaTi2 O5 glass, however, vitrify only in a small sphere, and it crystallize when its diameter exceed 1.5 mm. In order to synthesize new titanate oxide glasses which possess higher refractive indices and larger diameter than BaTi2 O5 , La and Zr can be used as substitutive components. When Ba is replaced with La, refractive indices are expected to increase because of the heavier element. The addition of a third element is thought to be effective for enhance-ment of glass formation ability and Zr can be a candidate because Ti and Zr are homologous. In this research, we have succeeded in forming new bulk glass in La2 O3 -TiO2 -ZrO2 ternary system by means of the aerodynamic levitation furnace. We investigated the glass forming region, thermal properties and optical properties of La2 O3 -TiO2 -ZrO2 glass. Glass transition temperature, crystallization temperature, density, refractive indices and transmittance spectra were varied depending on the chemical composition. Reference [1] J. Yu et al, "Fabrication of BaTi2O5 Glass-Ceramics with Unusual Dielectric Properties during Crystallization", Chem-istry of Materials, 18 (2006) 2169-2173. [2] J. Yu et al., "Comprehensive Structural Study of Glassy and Metastable Crystalline BaTi2O5", Chemistry of Materials, 21 (2009) 259-263.

  2. Insight on the glass-forming ability of Al–Y–Ni–Ce bulk metallic glass

    Chen, Shih-Fan, E-mail: sfchen@ntut.edu.tw [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chih-Yuan, E-mail: chen6563@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chia-Hung [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Adding 1 at.% cerium to Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5} alloy causes glass transition. • A large ΔT{sub x} indicates that (Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5}){sub 99}Ce{sub 1} is possibly a ductile amorphous alloy. • Ce is effective in improving the thermal stability of the Al–Y–Ni amorphous alloy. • The hardness of the crystallized cerium-bearing alloy was as high as 593 Hv. - Abstract: In the present study, the role of Ce in the thermal stability and glass forming ability (GFA) of (Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5}){sub 99}Ce{sub 1} alloy ribbons produced by a single roller melt-spinning process has been investigated in an attempt to understand the influences of multiple RE elements in an Al–TM–RE (TM: transition metal, RE: rear earth metal) alloy system. Only the (Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5}){sub 99}Ce{sub 1} alloy ribbon showed a glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) at 483.2 K, and its ΔT{sub x} value was 41.3 K. Crystallization occurred in the temperature range of 500–750 K in three exothermic reaction stages. The peak temperature for these reactions shifted toward higher temperatures at higher heating rates. XRD and SEM analysis of annealed samples revealed that nano-sized Al particles precipitated within the amorphous matrix during the first exothermic reaction. The maximum hardness was obtained for both non-cerium and cerium addition alloys after crystallization in the 550–660 K region due to numerous nano-sized precipitates randomly and homogeneously distributed in the amorphous matrix. Moreover, from observation of the fracture surface, it is found that the fracture mode transforms from ductile to brittle when the sample is annealed at a higher crystallization temperature, at which brittle intermetallic compounds appear.

  3. Unusual glass-forming ability induced by changes in the local atomic structure in Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    Kim, Y C; Chang, H J; Kim, D H; Kim, W T; Cha, P R

    2007-01-01

    The effect of partial replacement of Cu by Be in Ti 50 Cu 32 Ni 15 Sn 3 alloy on the thermal properties, structure, and forming ability of an amorphous phase were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 alloy shows enhanced glass-forming ability, enabling one to fabricate a fully amorphous bulk metallic glass sample 2 mm in diameter by injection casting. With the replacement, the supercooled liquid region ΔT x (= T x -T g , where T x is the crystallization temperature and T g is the glass transition temperature) decreased from 73 to 45 K and the reduced glass transition temperature T rg (= T g /T 1 , where T 1 is the liquidus temperature) increased from 0.53 to 0.57. The amorphous Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 phase showed a formation of short-range-ordered clusters 1-2 nm in size, which is attributed to the strong interaction between Ti and Be. The results show that ΔT x can be used as a thermal parameter reflecting the glass-forming ability of the alloy only when the phase formed during crystallization is the same as the phase competing with the glass transition during solidification

  4. PREFACE: International Seminar on Science and Technology of Glass Materials (ISSTGM-2009)

    Veeraiah, N.

    2009-07-01

    The progress of the human race is linked with the development of new materials and also the values they acquired in the course of time. Though the art of glass forming has been known from Egyptian civilization, the understanding and use of these glasses for technological applications only became possible once the structural aspects were revealed by the inspiring theories proposed by William H Zachariasen. Glass and glass ceramics have become the essential materials for modern technology. The applications of these materials are wide and cover areas such as optical communication, laser host, innovative architecture, bio-medical, automobile and space technology. As we master the technology, we must also learn to use it judiciously and for the overall development of all in this global village. The International Seminar on Science and Technology of Glass Materials (ISSTGM-2009) is organized to bring together scientists, academia and industry in order to discuss various aspects of the technology and to inspire young scholars to take up fruitful research. Various topics such as glass formation and glass-ceramics, glass structure, applications of glass and glass ceramics in nuclear waste management, radiation dosimetry, electronics and information technology, biotechnological applications, bulk metallic glasses, glasses containing nano-particles, hybrid glasses, novel glasses and applications in photonics, Non-linear optics and energy generation were discussed. In this volume, 59 research articles covering 18 invited talks, 10 oral presentations and 31 poster presentations are included. We hope these will serve as a valuable resource to all the scientists and scholars working with glass materials. Acharya Nagarjuna University, established in 1976, is named after the great Buddhist preceptor and philosopher, Acharya Nagarjuna, who founded a university on the banks of river Krishna some centuries ago. The University is situated between Vijayawada and Guntur, the famous

  5. Devitrification behavior and glass-forming ability of Cu-Zr-Ag alloys

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wei; Inoue, Akihisa

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an influence of Ag addition on the glass-forming ability and devitrification behavior of Cu-Zr glassy alloys on heating. The crystallization kinetics and structure changes in Cu 45 Zr 45 Ag 10 and Cu 35 Zr 45 Ag 20 glassy alloys on heating were studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning and isothermal calorimetry methods. Based on the results obtained one can assume that the improvement of the glass-forming ability of the Cu-Zr alloys by the addition of Ag is connected with a particular crystallization mechanism and a higher reduced glass-transition temperature of the Cu 45 Zr 45 Ag 10 ternary alloy compared to the binary Cu 55 Zr 45 counterpart. As observed in the present work crystallization of the Cu-Zr-Ag alloys is found to cause embitterment of the samples and should be avoided as these alloys are considered to be used as structural materials. The Cu 35 Zr 45 Ag 20 alloy shows possible submicron-scale phase separation upon annealing

  6. Composition Range and Glass Forming Ability of Ternary Ca-Mg-Cu Bulk Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    Senkov, O. N; Scott, J. M; Miracle, D. B

    2006-01-01

    .... The maximum thickness at which an alloy remains fully amorphous, glass transition temperature, crystallization temperature, temperature interval of the super-cooled region, solidus and liquidus...

  7. The first Polish conference: Special glasses and amorphous materials. Introduction

    1993-01-01

    The present issue brings a collection of papers submitted to the 1. Polish Conference on special glasses and amorphous materials, held on June 1993 at the University of Mining and Metallurgy in Cracow. It was a survey of the research topics and attainments of the research teams working in this referring to the nature of the glassy state of the matter and the relation between glasses and other amorphous materials, properties of these materials as well as modern methods of their synthesis both at low and high temperatures. Some of the results presented at the Conference have already found application in industry. Here belong, among others, the works on optic fibres. Several new materials which have been recently elaborated may also find interesting and new practical application. (author)

  8. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  9. Exploring high-strength glass-ceramic materials for upcycling of industrial wastes

    Back, Gu-Seul; Park, Hyun Seo; Seo, Sung Mo; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-11-01

    To promote the recycling of industrial waste and to develop value-added products using these resources, the possibility of manufacturing glass-ceramic materials of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 system has been investigated by various heat treatment processes. Glass-ceramic materials with six different chemical compositions were prepared using steel industry slags and power plant waste by melting, casting and heat treatment. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that diopside and anorthite were the primary phases in the samples. The anorthite phase was formed in SiO2-rich material (at least 43 wt%). In CaO-rich material, the gehlenite phase was formed. By the differential scanning calorimetry analyses, it was found that the glass transition point was in the range of 973-1023 K, and the crystallization temperature was in the range of 1123-1223 K. The crystallization temperature increased as the content of Fe2O3 decreased. By the multi-step heat treatment process, the formation of the anorthite phase was enhanced. Using FactSage, the ratio of various phases was calculated as a function of temperature. The viscosities and the latent heats for the samples with various compositions were also calculated by FactSage. The optimal compositions for glass-ceramics materials were discussed in terms of their compressive strength, and micro-hardness.

  10. Materials analyses of ceramics for glass furnace recuperators

    Weber, G.W.; Tennery, V.J.

    1979-11-01

    The use of waste heat recuperation systems offers significant promise for meaningful energy conservation in the process heat industries. This report details the analysis of candidate ceramic recuperator materials exposed to simulated industrial glass furnace hot flue gas environments. Several candidate structural ceramic materials including various types of silicon carbide, several grades of alumina, mullite, cordierite, and silicon nitride were exposed to high-temperature flue gas atmospheres from specially constructed day tank furnaces. Furnace charging, operation, and batch composition were selected to closely simulate industrial practice. Material samples were exposed in flues both with and without glass batch in the furnace for times up to 116 d at temperatures from 1150 to 1550/sup 0/C (2100 to 2800/sup 0/F). Exposed materials were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence to identify material degradation mechanisms. The materials observations were summarized as: Silicon carbide exhibited enhanced corrosion at lower temperatures (1150/sup 0/C) when alkalies were deposited on the carbide from the flue gas and less corrosion at higher temperatures (1550/sup 0/C) when alkalies were not deposited on the carbide; alumina corrosion depended strongly upon purity and density and alumina contents less than 99.8% were unsatisfactory above 1400/sup 0/C; and mullite and cordierite are generally unacceptable for application in soda-lime glass melting environments at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/C.

  11. Structural behavior of window laminated glass plies using new interlayer materials

    Mostafa El-Shami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In most cases for the structural design of architectural glazing systems under a wide range of environmental conditions, the designers follow procedures provided by model building codes to design window glass. These codes commonly use design charts to determine design strength based on nominal glass thickness and aspect ratio. Glass plies are the principal components of laminated glass (LG where a thin ply of elastomeric material Polyvinyl butyral (PVB is used to bond glass plies (normally two plies to form the LG. Because of the reduction in LG design strength by most building codes and design guidelines, designers avoid architectural LG applications, other than for safety consideration. In this research a higher order mathematical model based on Mindlin plate theory is presented. LG was modeled using finite element methodology with new interlayer (NI. It consists of two plies of PVB with a hard ply of film material in between. In the FEM, properties of PVB/film material can be easily controlled regardless of their thicknesses. The finite element model (FEM was extended to account the design recommendations of ASTM (2012 to develop the design charts for LG with NI. The current FEM was verified and used to study the stresses transformation through NI. Design charts for samples of LG with NI were developed and presented. It has been found that using NI enhances the total behavior of LG and reflects on the design charts for this type of interlayer material.

  12. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.(1) The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste

  13. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste

  14. Glass forming ability: Miedema approach to (Zr, Ti, Hf)-(Cu, Ni) binary and ternary alloys

    Basu, Joysurya [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, 191 Auditorium Road, University of Connecticut, Storrs 06269, CT (United States)], E-mail: jbasu@engr.uconn.edu; Murty, B.S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Ranganathan, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2008-10-06

    Miedema's approach has been useful in determining the glass forming composition range for a particular alloy system. The concept of mixing enthalpy and mismatch entropy can be used in order to quantify Inoue's criteria of bulk metallic glass formation. In the present study, glass forming composition range has been determined for different binary and ternary (Zr, Ti, Hf)-(Cu, Ni) alloys based on the mixing enthalpy and mismatch entropy calculations. Though copper and nickel appear next to each other in the periodic table, the glass forming ability of the copper and nickel bearing alloys is different. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that the glass forming behaviour of Zr and Hf is similar, whereas it is different from that of Ti. The smaller atomic size of Ti and the difference in the heat of mixing of Ti, Zr, Hf with Cu and Ni leads to the observed changes in the glass forming behaviour. Enthalpy contour plots can be used to distinguish the glass forming compositions on the basis of the increasing negative enthalpy of the composition. This method reveals the high glass forming ability of binary Zr-Cu, Hf-Cu, Hf-Ni systems over a narrow composition range.

  15. Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation

    Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations

  16. Glass-bonded iodosodalite waste form for immobilization of 129I

    Chong, Saehwa; Peterson, Jacob A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tabada, Diana; Wall, Donald; Corkhill, Claire L.; McCloy, John S.

    2018-06-01

    Immobilization of radioiodine is an important requirement for current and future nuclear fuel cycles. Iodosodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6I2] was synthesized hydrothermally from metakaolin, NaI, and NaOH. Dried unwashed sodalite powders were used to synthesize glass-bonded iodosodalite waste forms (glass composite materials) by heating pressed pellets at 650, 750, or 850 °C with two types of sodium borosilicate glass binders. These heat-treated specimens were characterized with X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, thermal analysis, porosity and density measurements, neutron activation analysis, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For the best waste form produced (pellets mixed with 10 mass% of glass binder and heat-treated at 750 °C), the maximum possible elemental iodine loading was 19.8 mass%, but only ∼8-9 mass% waste loading of iodine was retained in the waste form after thermal processing. Other pellets with higher iodine retention either contained higher porosity or were incompletely sintered. ASTM C1308 and C1285 (product consistency test, PCT) experiments were performed to understand chemical durability under diffusive and static conditions. The C1308 test resulted in significantly higher normalized loss compared to the C1285 test, most likely because of the strong effect of neutral pH solution renewal and prevention of ion saturation in solution. Both experiments indicated that release rates of Na and Si were higher than for Al and I, probably due to a poorly durable Na-Si-O phase from the glass bonding matrix or from initial sodalite synthesis; however the C1308 test result indicated that congruent dissolution of iodosodalite occurred. The average release rates of iodine obtained from C1308 were 0.17 and 1.29 g m-2 d-1 for 80 or 8 m-1, respectively, and the C1285 analysis gave a value of 2 × 10-5 g m-2 d-1, which is comparable to or better than the durability of

  17. Atomistic approach to predict the glass-forming ability in Zr–Cu–Al ternary metallic glasses

    Yu, C.Y. [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Liu, X.J. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, G.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Niu, X.R. [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Liu, C.T., E-mail: chainliu@cityu.edu.hk [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • An atomistic approach has been developed to predict the glass forming ability (GFA) in Zr–Cu–Al ternary alloy system. • Both of the thermodynamic and structure-dependent kinetic effects to glass formation have been taken into account. • The first-principles calculation and molecular dynamics simulation have been performed. • The approach predicts the best glass former in the model Zr–Cu–Al alloy system. • The predicted GFA is consistent with various experimental results. - Abstract: Prediction of composition-dependent glass-forming ability (GFA) remains to be a key scientific challenge in the metallic-glass community, especially in multi-component alloy systems. In the present study, we apply an atomistic approach to predict the trend of GFA effectively in the Zr–Cu–Al ternary alloy system from alloy compositions alone. This approach is derived from the first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. By considering of both the thermodynamic and atomic-structure induced kinetic effects, the predicted GFA trend from this approach shows an excellent agreement with experimental data available in this alloy system, manifesting its capability of seeking metallic glasses with superior GFA in ternary alloy systems.

  18. Method of making nanostructured glass-ceramic waste forms

    Gao, Huizhen; Wang, Yifeng; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2012-12-18

    A method of rendering hazardous materials less dangerous comprising trapping the hazardous material in nanopores of a nanoporous composite material, reacting the trapped hazardous material to render it less volatile/soluble, sealing the trapped hazardous material, and vitrifying the nanoporous material containing the less volatile/soluble hazardous material.

  19. Anomalies in the Thermophysical Properties of Undercooled Glass-Forming Alloys

    Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Kelton, Kenneth F.; Gangopadhyay, Anup

    2008-01-01

    The surface tension, viscosity, and density of several bulk metallic glass-forming alloys have been measured using noncontact techniques in the electrostatic levitation facility (ESL) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. All three properties show unexpected behavior in the undercooled regime. Similar deviations were previously observed in titanium-based quasicrystal-forming alloys,but the deviations in the properties of the glass-forming alloys are much more pronounced. New results for anomalous thermophysical properties in undercooled glass-forming alloys will be presented and discussed.

  20. Basic study on intelligent materialization of glass; Glass no intelligent ko zairyoka ni kansuru kenkyu

    NONE

    1997-10-31

    This is the report No. 98 issued by the Inorganic Material Research Institute. An intelligent material is a substance and/or material which responds intelligently to environmental conditions and exhibits functions. One of the features of amorphous materials including amorphous glass is a large freedom in chemical composition. These materials maintain order in short distance, but have as a whole the turbulent and specific atom orientation. Therefore, high tolerability in selecting the composition, and diverse synthesizing methods are available. A wide range of utilization may be conceived, such as introduction of the state of electrons having different valences in a structure, and the diverse chemical combinations. Patterns of existence of polyhedrons having different orientations, and how they are connected correlate closely with an external environment. Intelligent materials have high freedom against change in the external environment and are suitable to exhibit intelligent functions. Setting heat and light as the external conditions, attempts have been made on search and creation of intelligent materials based on state change induced by interactions between the two factors. Fundamental studies have been made on synthesis of different environment responding glasses and films, and on factors and phenomena for exhibition of the intelligence. 62 refs., 91 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. A thermodynamic approach towards glass-forming ability of ...

    A quantitative measure of the stability of a glass as compared to its corresponding crystalline state can be obtained by calculating ... The thermal stability of various alloy compositions is studied by ... corrosion resistance and attractive soft magnetic behaviour.1,2 .... The value of R2 determines the relationship between GFA.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-11 glass

    Wald, J.W.; Daniel, J.L.

    1986-08-01

    ATM-11 glass is designed to be representative of defense high-level waste glasses that will be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. It is representative of a 300-year-old nuclear waste glass and was intended as a conservative compromise between 10-year-old waste and 1000-year-old waste. The feedstock material for this glass was supplied by Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC, as SRL-165 black frit to which was added Ba, Cs, Mo, Nd, Ni, Pd, Rb, Ru, Sr, Te, Y, and Zr, as well as 241 Am, 237 Np, /sup 239+240/Pu, 151 Sm, 99 Tc, and depleted U. The glass was melted under the reducing conditions that resulted from the addition of 0.7 wt% graphite during the final melting process. Nearly 3 kg of ATM-11 glass were produced from a feedstock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1250 0 C in Denver Fire Clay crucibles. After final melting, the glass was formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm nominal size. Twenty-six bars were cast with a nominal weight of about 100 g each. The analyzed composition of ATM-11 glass is tabulated. Examination of a single transverse section from one bar by reflected light microscopy showed random porosity estimated at 0.4 vol% with nominal pore diameters ranging from ∼5 μm to 175 μm. A distinct randomly distributed second phase was observed at a very low concentration in the glass matrix as agglomerated, metallic-like clusters. One form of the aggregates contained mainly a high concentration of iron, while a second form had regions of high nickel concentration, and of high palladium concentration. All aggregates also contained a low concentration of technetium and/or ruthenium. An autoradiograph of the sample provided an indication of the total radionuclide ditribution. X-ray diffraction analysis of this same sample indicates that the glass probably contained 5 wt% crystalline material

  3. Dense and porous glass and glass ceramics from natural and waste raw materials

    Marangoni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of the herewith presented research activities was to develop innovative processes and materials for building applications adapted to the needs of Saudi Arabia according to the information exchanged with the partners from KACST (King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology). The research activity focused on the development of a wide range of ceramic components via sinter-crystallization of glasses produced from waste (fly ash, slag, sludge) with or without the addition of vit...

  4. Enhanced glass forming ability and refrigerant capacity of a Gd55Ni22Mn3Al20 bulk metallic glass

    Xia, L.; Chan, K.C.; Tang, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new Gd 55 Ni 22 Mn 3 Al 20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was synthesized by minor Mn addition. → The BMG has enhanced glass forming ability and excellent refrigerant capacity (RC). → The RC of the BMG reaches a high value of 825 J kg -1 under a field of 3979 kA/m. → Its excellent RC is related to its large effective magnetic moment. - Abstract: In this work, a small amount of Mn was added to a Gd 55 Ni 25 Al 20 glass forming alloy, as a replacement for Ni, and a Gd 55 Ni 22 Mn 3 Al 20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was obtained by suction casting. Its glass forming ability (GFA) was characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and its magnetic properties were measured using a magnetic property measurement system. It is found that the minor Mn addition can significantly improve both the GFA and the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the alloy. The refrigerant capacity (RC) of the BMG can reach a high value of 825 J kg -1 under a field of 3979 kA/m, which is about 29% larger than that of a Gd 55 Ni 25 Al 20 BMG. The effect of the minor Mn addition on the GFA and MCE of the BMG was investigated in the study.

  5. Use of sugar-cane bagasse ash to produce glass-ceramic material in the system Ca O-SiO2-Na2O

    Teixeira, S.R.; Santos, G.T.A.; Magalhaes, R.S.; Rincon, J.Ma.; Romero, M.; Carvalho, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bottom ash was used as raw material to obtain glass which was crystallized to form glass-ceramic material. The characterization of the ash shows that it consists mainly of crystalline materials, predominantly quartz, with oxides of iron, potassium and aluminum as minor elements. The glass was obtained from the mixing of ash with calcium and sodium carbonates. The glass and the glass-ceramic were examined using differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD and DTA data show that Wollastonita is the only crystalline phase present in the material crystallized at 1050 deg C. Part of the glass was synthesized at this temperature for one hour, resulting in a green/brown hard material glass-ceramic. The images of SEM show morphology of spherilithic growth indicating volumetric crystallization mechanism. (author)

  6. Osteoconductive properties of two different bioactive glass forms (powder and fiber) combined with collagen

    Magri, Angela Maria Paiva; Fernandes, Kelly Rossetti; Ueno, Fabio Roberto; Kido, Hueliton Wilian; da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Braga, Francisco José Correa; Granito, Renata Neves; Gabbai-Armelin, Paulo Roberto; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2017-11-01

    Bioactive Glasses (BG) is a group of synthetic silica-based materials with the unique ability to bond to living bone and can be used in bone repair. Although the osteogenic potential of BG, this material may have not present sufficient osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties to allow bone regeneration, especially in compromised situations. In order to overcome this limitation, it was proposed the combination the BG in two forms (powder and fiber) combined with collagen type I (COL-1). The aim of this study was to evaluate the BG/COL-based materials in terms of morphological characteristics, physicochemical features and mineralization. Additionally, the second objective was to investigate and compare the osteoconductive properties of two different bioactive glass forms (powder and fiber) enriched or not with collagen using a tibial bone defect model in rats. For this, four different formulations (BG powder - BGp, BG powder enriched with collagen - BGp/Col, BG fibers - BGf and BGp fibers enriched with collagen - BGf/Col) were developed. The physicochemical and morphological modifications were analyzed by SEM, FTIR, calcium assay and pH measurement. For in vivo evaluations, histopathology, morphometrical and immunohistochemistry were performed in a tibial defect in rats. The FTIR analysis indicated that BGp and BGf maintained the characteristic peaks for this class of material. Furthermore, the calcium assay showed an increased Ca uptake in the BG fibers. The pH measurements revealed that BGp (with or without collagen) presented higher pH values compared to BGf. In addition, the histological analysis demonstrated no inflammation for all groups at the site of the injury, besides a faster material degradation and higher bone ingrowth for groups with collagen. The immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated Runx-2 and Rank-L expression for all the groups. Those findings support that BGp with collagen can be a promising alternative for treating fracture of difficult

  7. Characterization of Glass Fiber Separator Material for Lithium Batteries

    Subbarao, S.; Frank, H.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization studies were carried out on a glass fiber paper that is currently employed as a separator material for some LiSOCl2 primary cells. The material is of the non-woven type made from microfilaments of E-type glass and contains an ethyl acrylate binder. Results from extraction studies and tensile testing revealed that the binder content and tensile strength of the paper were significantly less than values specified by the manufacturer. Scanning electron micrographs revealed the presence of clusters of impurities many of which were high in iron content. Results of emission spectroscopy revealed high overall levels of iron and leaching, followed by atomic absorption measurements, revealed that essentially all of this iron is soluble in SOCl2.

  8. Ion-exchange properties of zeolite/glass hybrid materials

    Taira, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Kohei; Fukushima, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid materials were prepared from ground glass powder and various zeolites such as A-type, mordenite, X-type, and Y-type zeolites, and their ion removal effect was investigated. The hybrid materials of A-type, Y-type, and mordenite zeolites showed similar Sr"2"+ removal rates from aqueous solutions. The removal rate of Sr"2"+ ions increased as the amount of zeolite in the hybrid materials increased. Compared with other hybrid materials, the hybrid materials of X-type zeolite showed higher Sr"2"+ removal rates, especially for zeolite content greater than 25%. As the amount of X-type zeolite in the hybrid materials increased, the Sr"2"+ removal rate increased greatly, with a 100% removal rate when the content of X-type zeolite exceeded 62.5%. (author)

  9. Distinct atomic structures of the Ni-Nb metallic glasses formed by ion beam mixing

    Tai, K. P.; Wang, L. T.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-01-01

    Four Ni-Nb metallic glasses are obtained by ion beam mixing and their compositions are measured to be Ni 77 Nb 23 , Ni 55 Nb 45 , Ni 31 Nb 69 , and Ni 15 Nb 85 , respectively, suggesting that a composition range of 23-85 at. % of Nb is favored for metallic glass formation in the Ni-Nb system. Interestingly, diffraction analyses show that the structure of the Nb-based Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glass is distinctly different from the structure of the Nb-based Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass, as the respective amorphous halos are located at 2θ≅38 and 39 deg. To explore an atomic scale description of the Ni-Nb metallic glasses, an n-body Ni-Nb potential is first constructed with an aid of the ab initio calculations and then applied to perform the molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation results determine not only the intrinsic glass forming range of the Ni-Nb system to be within 20-85 at. % of Nb, but also the exact atomic positions in the Ni-Nb metallic glasses. Through a statistical analysis of the determined atomic positions, a new dominant local packing unit is found in the Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass, i.e., an icositetrahedron with a coordination number to be around 14, while in Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glasses, the dominant local packing unit is an icosahedron with a coordination number to be around 12, which has been reported for the other metallic glasses. In fact, with increasing the irradiation dose, the Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glasses are formed through an intermediate state of face-centered-cubic-solid solution, whereas the Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass is through an intermediate state of body-centered-cubic-solid solution, suggesting that the structures of the constituent metals play an important role in governing the structural characteristics of the resultant metallic glasses

  10. Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs

  11. Advancing Material Models for Automotive Forming Simulations

    Vegter, H.; An, Y.; Horn, C.H.L.J. ten; Atzema, E.H.; Roelofsen, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations in automotive industry need more advanced material models to achieve highly reliable forming and springback predictions. Conventional material models implemented in the FEM-simulation models are not capable to describe the plastic material behaviour during monotonic strain paths with sufficient accuracy. Recently, ESI and Corus co-operate on the implementation of an advanced material model in the FEM-code PAMSTAMP 2G. This applies to the strain hardening model, the influence of strain rate, and the description of the yield locus in these models. A subsequent challenge is the description of the material after a change of strain path.The use of advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry requires a description of plastic material behaviour of multiphase steels. The simplest variant is dual phase steel consisting of a ferritic and a martensitic phase. Multiphase materials also contain a bainitic phase in addition to the ferritic and martensitic phase. More physical descriptions of strain hardening than simple fitted Ludwik/Nadai curves are necessary.Methods to predict plastic behaviour of single-phase materials use a simple dislocation interaction model based on the formed cells structures only. At Corus, a new method is proposed to predict plastic behaviour of multiphase materials have to take hard phases into account, which deform less easily. The resulting deformation gradients create geometrically necessary dislocations. Additional micro-structural information such as morphology and size of hard phase particles or grains is necessary to derive the strain hardening models for this type of materials.Measurements available from the Numisheet benchmarks allow these models to be validated. At Corus, additional measured values are available from cross-die tests. This laboratory test can attain critical deformations by large variations in blank size and processing conditions. The tests are a powerful tool in optimising forming simulations prior

  12. Continuous spray forming of functionally gradient materials

    McKechnie, T.N.; Richardson, E.H.

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at Plasma Processes Inc. have produced a Functional Gradient Material (FGM) through advanced vacuum plasma spray processing for high heat flux applications. Outlined in this paper are the manufacturing methods used to develop a four component functional gradient material of copper, tungsten, boron, and boron nitride. The FGM was formed with continuous gradients and integral cooling channels eliminating bondlines and providing direct heat transfer from the high temperature exposed surface to a cooling medium. Metallurgical and x-ray diffraction analyses of the materials formed through innovative VPS (vacuum plasma spray) processing are also presented. Applications for this functional gradient structural material range from fusion reactor plasma facing components to missile nose cones to boilers

  13. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model

  14. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-07-13

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model.

  15. Supercooled dynamics of glass-forming liquids and polymers under hydrostatic pressure

    Roland, C M [Naval Research Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Code 6120, Washington, DC 20375-5342 (United States); Hensel-Bielowka, S [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Paluch, M [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Casalini, R [Naval Research Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Code 6120, Washington, DC 20375-5342 (United States); Chemistry Department, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2005-06-01

    An intriguing problem in condensed matter physics is understanding the glass transition, in particular the dynamics in the equilibrium liquid close to vitrification. Recent advances have been made by using hydrostatic pressure as an experimental variable. These results are reviewed, with an emphasis in the insight provided into the mechanisms underlying the relaxation properties of glass-forming liquids and polymers.

  16. AN ALTERNATIVE HOST MATRIX BASED ON IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES FOR THE VITRIFICATION OF SPECIALIZED WASTE FORMS

    Day, Delbert D.

    2000-01-01

    As mentioned above, the overall goal of this research project was to collect the scientific information essential to develop iron phosphate glass based nuclear wasteforms. The specific objectives of the project were: (1) Investigate the structure of binary iron phosphate glasses and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand atomic arrangements and nature of the bonding. Establish structure-property relationships. Determine the compositions and melting conditions which optimize the critical properties of the base glass. (2) Understand the structure of iron phosphate wasteforms and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Investigate how the waste elements are bonded and coordinated within the glass structure. Establish structure-property relationships for the waste glasses. Determine the compositions and melting atmosphere for which the critical properties of the waste forms would be optimum. (3) Determine the role(s) played by the valence states of iron ions and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand the different roles of iron(II) and iron(III) ions in determining the critical properties of the base glass and the waste forms. Investigate how the iron valence and its significance depend on the composition and melting atmosphere. (4) Investigate glass forming and crystallization processes of the iron phosphate glasses and their waste forms: Understand the dependence of the glass forming and crystallization characteristics on overall glass composition and valence states of iron ions. Identify the products of devitrification and investigate the critical properties of these crystalline compounds which may adversely affect the chemical and physical properties of the waste forms

  17. Predicting glass-forming compositions in the Al-La and Al-La-Ni systems

    Gargarella, P.; de Oliveira, M.F.; Kiminami, C.S.; Pauly, S.; Kuehn, U.; Bolfarini, C.; Botta, W.J.; Eckert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The glass-forming ability of the Al-La and Al-La-Ni systems was studied using the λ* and the λ.Δe criteria. → Both criteria predicted with just 1% at. of error the best glass-former verified so far in the Al-La system. → Four new glass-former compositions could be predicted in the Al-La-Ni system using the λ.Δe criterion. → The best glass-former reported so far in the Al-La-Ni system was found. - Abstract: In this work, a criterion considering the topological instability (λ) and the differences in the electronegativity of the constituent elements (Δe) was applied to the Al-La and Al-Ni-La systems in order to predict the best glass-forming compositions. The results were compared with literature data and with our own experimental data for the Al-La-Ni system. The alloy described in the literature as the best glass former in the Al-La system is located near the point with local maximum for the λ.Δe criterion. A good agreement was found between the predictions of the λ.Δe criterion and literature data in the Al-La-Ni system, with the region of the best glass-forming ability (GFA) and largest supercooled liquid region (ΔT x ) coinciding with the best compositional region for amorphization indicated by the λ.Δe criterion. Four new glassy compositions were found in the Al-La-Ni system, with the best predicted composition presenting the best glass-forming ability observed so far for this system. Although the λ.Δe criterion needs further refinements for completely describe the glass-forming ability in the Al-La and Al-La-Ni systems, the results demonstrated that this criterion is a good tool to predict new glass-forming compositions.

  18. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased

  19. A hazardous waste from secondary aluminium metallurgy as a new raw material for calcium aluminate glasses.

    López-Delgado, Aurora; Tayibi, Hanan; Pérez, Carlos; Alguacil, Francisco José; López, Félix Antonio

    2009-06-15

    A solid waste coming from the secondary aluminium industry was successfully vitrified in the ternary CaO-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2) system at 1500 degrees C. This waste is a complex material which is considered hazardous because of its behaviour in the presence of water or moisture. In these conditions, the dust can generate gases such as H(2), NH(3), CH(4), H(2)S, along with heat and potential aluminothermy. Only silica sand and calcium carbonate were added as external raw materials to complete the glasses formula. Different nominal compositions of glasses, with Al(2)O(3) ranging between 20% and 54%, were studied to determine the glass forming area. The glasses obtained allow the immobilisation of up to 75% of waste in a multicomponent oxide system in which all the components of the waste are incorporated. The microhardness Hv values varied between 6.05 and 6.62GPa and the linear thermal expansion coefficient, alpha, varied between (62 and 139)x10(-7)K(-1). Several glasses showed a high hydrolytic resistance in deionised water at 98 degrees C.

  20. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waal's forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have

  1. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  2. Infrared and Raman investigation of rare-earth phosphate glasses for potential use as radioactive waste forms

    Morgan, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    This project was designed to investigate the properties of the rare-earth phosphate glass systems CeO 2 -P 2 O 5 and Pr 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 for potential use as radioactive waste glasses. The glass-forming region and optimum processing parameters of these glass systems were investigated. The structure of the host glasses and glassed loaded with simulated waste elements was investigated using Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Because of the radical differences in the spectra of the molybdenum-loaded glasses, the structure of the MoO 3 -P 2 O 5 glass system was also investigated. 29 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Early stage crystallization kinetics in metallic glass-forming alloys

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Heterogeneous nucleation may precede the homogeneous one in an alloy. • High kinetic constants and the nucleation rate at the initial stage. • Metallic glasses have heterogeneous nucleation sites which saturate later. -- Abstract: The crystallization kinetics and structural changes of a few metallic glassy alloys were monitored using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning and isothermal calorimetry methods. Microstructural observations were used to estimate the nucleation and growth rates. A clear comparison of the differences in the crystallization kinetics in the metallic glassy samples is observed at the early and later crystallization stages

  4. Effect of Nb on glass forming ability and plasticity of (Ti-Cu)-based bulk metallic glasses

    Suo, Z.Y.; Qiu, K.Q.; Li, Q.F.; Ren, Y.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2010-01-01

    A Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 bulk metallic glass has been developed by Nb partial substitution for Zr in Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 11 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 alloy. The glass forming ability Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 alloy has been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry. Partial Nb substitutes for Zr promote the glass forming ability. Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG with diameter of 3 mm can be fabricated by Cu-mold injection casting method. The glass forming ability of Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 alloy is enhanced by stabilizing the undercooled liquid against crystallization. The plastic strain up to 2.5% was obtained for Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG compared to 0.15% for Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 11 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 BMG, which demonstrates that small amount of Nb addition can have a dramatic effect on plasticity enhancement in Ti-Cu-based BMG. The intersection and branching of the shear bands are observed. The plastic strain of the Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG can be improved by the generation of nanocrystalline particles, which lead to multiple shear bands.

  5. Correlation between relaxations and plastic deformation, and elastic model of flow in metallic glasses and glass-forming liquids

    Wang Weihua

    2011-01-01

    We study the similarity and correlations between relaxations and plastic deformation in metallic glasses (MGs) and MG-forming liquids. It is shown that the microscope plastic events, the initiation and formation of shear bands, and the mechanical yield in MGs where the atomic sites are topologically unstable induced by applied stress, can be treated as the glass to supercooled liquid state transition induced by external shear stress. On the other hand, the glass transition, the primary and secondary relaxations, plastic deformation and yield can be attributed to the free volume increase induced flow, and the flow can be modeled as the activated hopping between the inherent states in the potential energy landscape. We then propose an extended elastic model to describe the flow based on the energy landscape theory. That is, the flow activation energy density is linear proportional to the instantaneous elastic moduli, and the activation energy density ρ E is determined to be a simple expression of ρ E =(10/11)G+(1/11)K. The model indicates that both shear and bulk moduli are critical parameters accounting for both the homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows in MGs and MG-forming liquids. The elastic model is experimentally certified. We show that the elastic perspectives offers a simple scenario for the flow in MGs and MG-forming liquids and are suggestive for understanding the glass transition, plastic deformation, and nature and characteristics of MGs

  6. Glass-Forming Ability and Early Crystallization Kinetics of Novel Cu-Zr-Al-Co Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Xiaoliang Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG composites ductilized by a shape memory B2 CuZr phase have attracted great attention owing to their outstanding mechanical properties. However, the B2 CuZr phase for most CuZr-based glass-forming compositions is only stable at very high temperatures, leading to the uncontrollable formation of B2 crystals during quenching. In this work, by introducing Co (i.e., 4, 5, and 6 at. % and 10 at. % Al into CuZr-based alloys, the relatively good glass-forming ability (GFA of CuZr-based alloys still can be achieved. Meanwhile, the B2 phase can be successfully stabilized to lower temperatures than the final temperatures of crystallization upon heating CuZr-based BMGs. Unlike previous reported CuZr-based BMGs, the primary crystallization products upon heating are mainly B2 CuZr crystals but not CuZr2 and Cu10Zr7 crystals. Furthermore, the primary precipitates during solidification are still dominated by B2 crystals, whose percolation threshold is detected to lie between 10 ± 2 vol. % and 31 ± 2 vol. %. The crystallization kinetics underlying the precipitation of B2 crystals was also investigated. Our results show that the present glass-forming composites are promising candidates for the fabrication of ductile CuZr-based BMG composites.

  7. Solution exchange corrosion testing with the glass-zeolite ceramic waste form in demineralized water at 900C

    Simpson, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    A ceramic waste form of glass-bonded zeolite is being developed for the long-term disposition of fission products and transuranic elements in wastes from the U.S. Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. Solution exchange corrosion tests were performed on the ceramic waste form and its potential base constituents of glass, zeolite 5A, and sodalite as part of an effort to qualify the ceramic waste form for acceptance into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. Solution exchange tests were performed at 90 C by replacing 80 to 90% of the leachate with fresh demineralized water after set time intervals. The results from these tests provide information about corrosion mechanisms and the ability of the ceramic waste form and its constituent materials to retain waste components. The results from solution exchange tests indicate that radionuclides will be preferentially retained in the zeolites without the glass matrix and in the ceramic waste form, with respect to cations like Li, K, and Na. Release results have been compared for simulated waste from candidate ceramic waste forms with zeolite 5A and its constituent materials to determine the corrosion behavior of each component

  8. Density and glass forming ability in amorphous atomic alloys: The role of the particle softness

    Douglass, Ian; Hudson, Toby; Harrowell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A key property of glass forming alloys, the anomalously small volume difference with respect to the crystal, is shown to arise as a direct consequence of the soft repulsive potentials between metals. This feature of the inter-atomic potential is demonstrated to be responsible for a significant component of the glass forming ability of alloys due to the decrease in the enthalpy of fusion and the associated depression of the freezing point.

  9. Density and glass forming ability in amorphous atomic alloys: The role of the particle softness

    Douglass, Ian; Hudson, Toby; Harrowell, Peter [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-04-14

    A key property of glass forming alloys, the anomalously small volume difference with respect to the crystal, is shown to arise as a direct consequence of the soft repulsive potentials between metals. This feature of the inter-atomic potential is demonstrated to be responsible for a significant component of the glass forming ability of alloys due to the decrease in the enthalpy of fusion and the associated depression of the freezing point.

  10. Development of iodine waste forms using low-temperature sintering glass

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Rademacher, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will describe our recent work on the use of low temperature-sintering glass powders mixed with either AgI or AgI-zeolite to produce a stable waste form. Radioactive iodine ( 129 I, half-life of 1.6 x 10 7 years) is generated in the nuclear fuel cycle and is of particular concern due to its extremely long half-life and its effects on human health. As part of the DOE/NE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the separation of 129 I from spent fuel during fuel reprocessing is being studied. In the spent fuel reprocessing scheme under consideration, the iodine is released in gaseous form and collected using Ag-loaded zeolites, to form AgI. Although AgI has extremely low solubility in water, it has a relatively high vapor pressure at moderate temperatures (>550 C), thus limiting the thermal processing. Because of this, immobilization using borosilicate glass is not feasible. Therefore, a bismuth oxide-based glasses are being studied due to the low solubility of bismuth oxide in aqueous solution at pH > 7. These waste forms were processed at 500 C, where AgI volatility is low but the glass powder is able to first densify by viscous sintering and then crystallize. Since the glass is not melted, a more chemically stable glass can be used. The AgI-glass mixture was found to have high iodine leach resistance in these initial studies.

  11. Diffusion in confinement as a microscopic relaxation mechanism in glass-forming liquids

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Using quasielastic neutron scattering, we compare dynamics in single-element liquids, glass-forming selenium and non glass-forming gallium. There is a single jump-diffusion process in gallium, whereas in selenium there is also a faster, spatially localized process. The fast and slow processes describe β- and α-relaxation, respectively. We then analyze an archetypical glass-former, glycerol, to show that the two-component fit, with β- and α-relaxations explicitly separated, yields the correct value for the translational diffusion coefficient and provides information on the spatial localization of the β-relaxation that is not experimentally accessible otherwise.

  12. Effect of high pressure on the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming liquids

    Paluch, M; Grzybowska, K; Grzybowski, A [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, ulica Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2007-05-23

    A glass is usually formed by cooling a liquid at a rate sufficient to avoid crystallization. In the vicinity of the glass transition the structural relaxation time increases with lowering temperature in a non-Arrhenius fashion and the structural relaxation function reveals a non-Debye behaviour. However, liquid can be also vitrified by keeping it at a constant temperature and increasing the pressure. This pressure-induced transition to the glassy state is also accompanied by dramatic changes in the relaxation dynamics. Herein we discuss the behaviour of the structural relaxation times of glass-forming liquids and polymer melts under high pressure.

  13. Effect of high pressure on the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming liquids

    Paluch, M; Grzybowska, K; Grzybowski, A

    2007-01-01

    A glass is usually formed by cooling a liquid at a rate sufficient to avoid crystallization. In the vicinity of the glass transition the structural relaxation time increases with lowering temperature in a non-Arrhenius fashion and the structural relaxation function reveals a non-Debye behaviour. However, liquid can be also vitrified by keeping it at a constant temperature and increasing the pressure. This pressure-induced transition to the glassy state is also accompanied by dramatic changes in the relaxation dynamics. Herein we discuss the behaviour of the structural relaxation times of glass-forming liquids and polymer melts under high pressure

  14. Marginal leakage of two newer glass-ionomer-based sealant materials assessed using micro-CT.

    Chen, X.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Fan, M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test newer glass-ionomer-based materials as sealant materials. One glass-ionomer sealant was light-cured to obtain an early setting reaction. The null-hypothesis tested was: there is no difference in marginal leakage of sealants produced with high-viscosity glass-ionomer, with and

  15. Investigating the atomic level influencing factors of glass forming ability in NiAl and CuZr metallic glasses

    Sedighi, Sina; Kirk, Donald Walter; Singh, Chandra Veer, E-mail: chandraveer.singh@utoronto.ca; Thorpe, Steven John [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Room 140, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2015-09-21

    Bulk metallic glasses are a relatively new class of amorphous metal alloy which possess unique mechanical and magnetic properties. The specific concentrations and combinations of alloy elements needed to prevent crystallization during melt quenching remains poorly understood. A correlation between atomic properties that can explain some of the previously identified glass forming ability (GFA) anomalies of the NiAl and CuZr systems has been identified, with these findings likely extensible to other transition metal–transition metal and transition metal–metalloid (TM–M) alloy classes as a whole. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation methods are utilized to study thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural properties of equiatomic CuZr and NiAl metallic glasses in an attempt to further understand the underlying connections between glass forming ability, nature of atomic level bonding, short and medium range ordering, and the evolution of structure and relaxation properties in the disordered phase. The anomalous breakdown of the fragility parameter as a useful GFA indicator in TM–M alloy systems is addressed through an in-depth investigation of bulk stiffness properties and the evolution of (pseudo)Gruneisen parameters over the quench domain, with the efficacy of other common glass forming ability indicators similarly being analyzed through direct computation in respective CuZr and NiAl systems. Comparison of fractional liquid-crystal density differences in the two systems revealed 2-3 times higher values for the NiAl system, providing further support for its efficacy as a general purpose GFA indicator.

  16. Corrosion behaviors of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and its constituents

    Lewis, M. A.; Ebert, W. L.; Morss, L.

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic waste form (CWF) of glass bonded sodalite is being developed as a waste form for the long-term immobilization of fission products and transuranic elements from the U.S. Department of Energy's activities on spent nuclear fuel conditioning. A durable waste form was prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. During HIP the zeolite is converted to sodalite, and the resultant CWF is been completed for durations of up to 182 days. Four dissolution modes were identified: dissolution of free salt, dissolution of the aluminosilicate matrix of sodalite and the accompanying dissolution of occluded salt, dissolution of the boroaluminosilicate matrix of the glass, and ion exchange. Synergies inherent to the CWF were identified by comparing the results of the tests with pure glass and sodalite with those of the composite CWF

  17. Thermal forming of glass microsheets for x-ray telescope mirror segments

    Jimenez-Garate, M.A.; Hailey, C.J.; Craig, W.W.

    2003-01-01

    envisioned for future x-ray observatories. The glass microsheets are shaped into mirror segments at high temperature by use of a guiding mandrel, without polishing. We determine the physical properties and mechanisms that elucidate the formation process and that are crucial to improve surface quality. We......We describe a technology to mass-produce ultrathin mirror substrates for x-ray telescopes of near Wolter-I geometry. Thermal glass forming is a low-cost method to produce high-throughput, spaceborne x-ray mirrors for the 0.1-200-keV energy band. These substrates can provide the collecting area...... develop a viscodynamic model for the glass strain as the forming proceeds to find the conditions for repeatability. Thermal forming preserves the x-ray reflectance and scattering properties of the raw glass. The imaging resolution is driven by a large wavelength figure. We discuss the sources of figure...

  18. Material interactions between system components and glass product melts in a ceramic melter

    Knitter, R.

    1989-07-01

    The interactions of the ceramic and metallic components of a ceramic melter for the vitrification of High Active Waste were investigated with simulated glass product melts in static crucible tests at 1000 0 C and 1150 0 C. Corrosion of the fusion-cast Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 - and Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 -Cr 2 O 3 -refractories (ER 1711 and ER 2161) is characterized by homogeneous chemical dissolution and diffusion through the glass matrix of the refractory. The resulting boundary compositions lead to characteristic modification and formation of phases, not only inside the refractory but also in the glass melt. The attack of the electrode material, a Ni-Cr-Fe-alloy Inconel 690, by the glass melt takes place via grain boundaries and leads to the oxidation of Cr and growth of Cr 2 O 3 -crystals at the boundary layer. Noble metals, added to the glass melt can form solid solutions with the alloy with varying compositions. (orig.) [de

  19. Ductile Bulk Aluminum-Based Alloy with Good Glass-Forming Ability and High Strength

    Long-Chao, Zhuo; Shu-Jie, Pang; Hui, Wang; Tao, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Based on a new approach for designing glassy alloy compositions, bulk Al-based alloys with good glass-forming ability (GFA) are synthesized. The cast Al 86 Si 0.5 Ni 4.06 Co 2.94 Y 6 Sc 0.5 rod with a diameter of 1 mm shows almost fully amorphous structure besides about 5% fcc-Al nucleated in the center of the rod. The bulk alloy with high Al concentration exhibits an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.18 GPa and maximum strength of 1.27 GPa as well as an obvious plastic strain of about 2.4% during compressive deformation. This light Al-based alloy with good GFA and mechanical properties is promising as a new high specific strength material with good deformability. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  20. Revealing the Link between Structural Relaxation and Dynamic Heterogeneity in Glass-Forming Liquids.

    Wang, Lijin; Xu, Ning; Wang, W H; Guan, Pengfei

    2018-03-23

    Despite the use of glasses for thousands of years, the nature of the glass transition is still mysterious. On approaching the glass transition, the growth of dynamic heterogeneity has long been thought to play a key role in explaining the abrupt slowdown of structural relaxation. However, it still remains elusive whether there is an underlying link between structural relaxation and dynamic heterogeneity. Here, we unravel the link by introducing a characteristic time scale hiding behind an identical dynamic heterogeneity for various model glass-forming liquids. We find that the time scale corresponds to the kinetic fragility of liquids. Moreover, it leads to scaling collapse of both the structural relaxation time and dynamic heterogeneity for all liquids studied, together with a characteristic temperature associated with the same dynamic heterogeneity. Our findings imply that studying the glass transition from the viewpoint of dynamic heterogeneity is more informative than expected.

  1. Revealing the Link between Structural Relaxation and Dynamic Heterogeneity in Glass-Forming Liquids

    Wang, Lijin; Xu, Ning; Wang, W. H.; Guan, Pengfei

    2018-03-01

    Despite the use of glasses for thousands of years, the nature of the glass transition is still mysterious. On approaching the glass transition, the growth of dynamic heterogeneity has long been thought to play a key role in explaining the abrupt slowdown of structural relaxation. However, it still remains elusive whether there is an underlying link between structural relaxation and dynamic heterogeneity. Here, we unravel the link by introducing a characteristic time scale hiding behind an identical dynamic heterogeneity for various model glass-forming liquids. We find that the time scale corresponds to the kinetic fragility of liquids. Moreover, it leads to scaling collapse of both the structural relaxation time and dynamic heterogeneity for all liquids studied, together with a characteristic temperature associated with the same dynamic heterogeneity. Our findings imply that studying the glass transition from the viewpoint of dynamic heterogeneity is more informative than expected.

  2. Preparation and characterization of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses in plate form

    Lavorato, G.C.; Fiore, G.; Castellero, A.; Baricco, M.; Moya, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous alloys with composition (at%) Fe 48 Cr 15 Mo 14 C 15 B 6 Gd 2 (alloy A) and Fe 48 Cr 15 Mo 14 C 15 B 6 Y 2 (alloy B) were prepared either using pure elements (A and B1) and a commercial AISI430 steel as a base material (B2). When prepared from pure elements both alloys (A and B1) could be cast in plate form with a fixed thickness of 2 mm and variable lengths between 10 and 20 mm by means of copper-mold injection in air atmosphere. In the case of alloy B2, prepared using commercial grade raw materials, rods of 2 mm diameter were obtained. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy observations confirmed that an amorphous structure was obtained in all the as-cast samples. A minor fraction of crystalline phases (oxides and carbides) was detected on the as-cast surface. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed a glass transition temperature at 856 K for alloy A and 841 K for alloy B1, and an onset crystallization temperature of 887 K for alloy A and 885 K for alloy B1. In the case of alloy B2 a slightly different crystallization sequence was observed. Values of hardness (∼13 GPa) and the Young modulus (∼180 GPa) were measured by nanoindentation for both the alloys. The effects of adverse casting conditions (such as air atmosphere, non-conventional injection copper mold casting and partial replacement of pure elements with commercial grade raw materials) on the glass formation and properties of the alloy are discussed.

  3. Preparation and characterization of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses in plate form

    Lavorato, G.C. [INTECIN (FIUBA-CONICET), Paseo Colon 850, Capital Federal (Argentina); Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy); Fiore, G.; Castellero, A.; Baricco, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy); Moya, J.A., E-mail: jmoya.fi.uba@gmail.com [IESIING, Facultad de Ingenieria e Informatica, UCASAL, Salta (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    Amorphous alloys with composition (at%) Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Gd{sub 2} (alloy A) and Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Y{sub 2} (alloy B) were prepared either using pure elements (A and B1) and a commercial AISI430 steel as a base material (B2). When prepared from pure elements both alloys (A and B1) could be cast in plate form with a fixed thickness of 2 mm and variable lengths between 10 and 20 mm by means of copper-mold injection in air atmosphere. In the case of alloy B2, prepared using commercial grade raw materials, rods of 2 mm diameter were obtained. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy observations confirmed that an amorphous structure was obtained in all the as-cast samples. A minor fraction of crystalline phases (oxides and carbides) was detected on the as-cast surface. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed a glass transition temperature at 856 K for alloy A and 841 K for alloy B1, and an onset crystallization temperature of 887 K for alloy A and 885 K for alloy B1. In the case of alloy B2 a slightly different crystallization sequence was observed. Values of hardness ({approx}13 GPa) and the Young modulus ({approx}180 GPa) were measured by nanoindentation for both the alloys. The effects of adverse casting conditions (such as air atmosphere, non-conventional injection copper mold casting and partial replacement of pure elements with commercial grade raw materials) on the glass formation and properties of the alloy are discussed.

  4. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    This investigation concerns borosilicate glass leaching mechanisms and the evolution of alteration layer under electron beam irradiation. A simple glass doped with rare earth elements was selected in order to access mechanistic and structural information and better evaluate the effects of irradiation. It was fully leached in initially pure water at 90 °C and at high glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V = 20 000 m{sup −1}) in static conditions. Under these conditions, the system quickly reaches the residual alteration rate regime. A small particle size fraction (2–5 μm) was sampled in order to obtain a fairly homogeneous altered material enabling the use of bulk characterization methods. External irradiations with 10 MeV electrons up to a dose of 10 MGy were performed either before or after leaching, to investigate respectively the effect of initial glass irradiation on its alteration behavior and the irradiation stability of the alteration layer. Glass dissolution rate was analyzed by regular leachate samplings and the alteration layer structure was characterized by Raman, luminescence (continuous or time-resolved), and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that the small initial glass evolutions under irradiation did not induce any modification of the leaching kinetic nor of the structure of the alteration layer. The alteration process seemed to “smooth over” the created defects. Otherwise, the alteration layer and initial glass appeared to have different behaviors under irradiation. No Eu{sup 3+} reduction was detected in the alteration layer after irradiation and the defect creation efficiency was much lower than for initial glass. This can possibly be explained by the protective role of pore water contained in the altered material (∼20%). Moreover, a slight depolymerization of the silicon network of the altered glass under irradiation with electrons was evidenced, whereas in the initial glass it typically

  5. Dynamical heterogeneity in a glass-forming ideal gas.

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Das, Chinmay; Frenkel, Daan

    2008-07-01

    We conduct a numerical study of the dynamical behavior of a system of three-dimensional "crosses," particles that consist of three mutually perpendicular line segments of length sigma rigidly joined at their midpoints. In an earlier study [W. van Ketel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 135703 (2005)] we showed that this model has the structural properties of an ideal gas, yet the dynamical properties of a strong glass former. In the present paper we report an extensive study of the dynamical heterogeneities that appear in this system in the regime where glassy behavior sets in. On the one hand, we find that the propensity of a particle to diffuse is determined by the structure of its local environment. The local density around mobile particles is significantly less than the average density, but there is little clustering of mobile particles, and the clusters observed tend to be small. On the other hand, dynamical susceptibility results indicate that a large dynamical length scale develops even at moderate densities. This suggests that propensity and other mobility measures are an incomplete measure of the dynamical length scales in this system.

  6. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO 2 , 20 mass % Na 2 O, 10 mass % Al 2 O 3 , 8 mass % B 2 O 3 , and 1.5 mass % K 2 O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  7. Transport properties of glass-forming liquids suggest that dynamic crossover temperature is as important as the glass transition temperature.

    Mallamace, Francesco; Branca, Caterina; Corsaro, Carmelo; Leone, Nancy; Spooren, Jeroen; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-12-28

    It is becoming common practice to partition glass-forming liquids into two classes based on the dependence of the shear viscosity η on temperature T. In an Arrhenius plot, ln η vs 1/T, a strong liquid shows linear behavior whereas a fragile liquid exhibits an upward curvature [super-Arrhenius (SA) behavior], a situation customarily described by using the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law. Here we analyze existing data of the transport coefficients of 84 glass-forming liquids. We show the data are consistent, on decreasing temperature, with the onset of a well-defined dynamical crossover η(×), where η(×) has the same value, η(×) ≈ 10(3) Poise, for all 84 liquids. The crossover temperature, T(×), located well above the calorimetric glass transition temperature T(g), marks significant variations in the system thermodynamics, evidenced by the change of the SA-like T dependence above T(×) to Arrhenius behavior below T(×). We also show that below T(×) the familiar Stokes-Einstein relation D/T ∼ η(-1) breaks down and is replaced by a fractional form D/T ∼ η(-ζ), with ζ ≈ 0.85.

  8. High Dielectric Low Loss Transparent Glass Material Based Dielectric Resonator Antenna with Wide Bandwidth Operation

    Mehmood, Arshad; Zheng, Yuliang; Braun, Hubertus; Hovhannisyan, Martun; Letz, Martin; Jakoby, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of new high permittivity and low loss glass material for antennas. This glass material is transparent. A very simple rectangular dielectric resonator antenna is designed first with a simple microstrip feeding line. In order to widen the bandwidth, the feed of the design is modified by forming a T-shaped feeding. This new design enhanced the bandwidth range to cover the WLAN 5 GHz band completely. The dielectric resonator antenna cut into precise dimensions is placed on the modified microstrip feed line. The design is simple and easy to manufacture and also very compact in size of only 36 × 28 mm. A -10 dB impedance bandwidth of 18% has been achieved, which covers the frequency range from 5.15 GHz to 5.95 GHz. Simulations of the measured return loss and radiation patterns are presented and discussed.

  9. Linking Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Glass-Forming Systems

    Mauro, John C.; Guo, Xiaoju; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    , we show that the nonequilibrium glassy dynamics are intimately connected with the equilibrium liquid dynamics. This is accomplished by deriving a new functional form for the thermal history dependence of nonequilibrium viscosity, which is validated against experimental measurements of industrial...

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the ternary Cu50Ti25Zr25 bulk glass forming alloy

    Celtek M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure and thermodynamic properties of a ternary Cu50Ti25Zr25 metallic glass forming alloy in solid-liquid to glass phases were studied using molecular dynamics (MD method based on tight-binding (TB potentials. An atomic description of the melting, glass formation and crystallization process has been analyzed using different heating and cooling rates. The computed Glass Forming Ability (GFA parameters are in good agreement with experimental data. The structure analysis of the Cu50Ti25Zr25 based on molecular dynamics simulation will be also presented and compared with available MD results. We have also discussed the crystallization transition with two different interatomic potentials used in this work

  11. Glass Forming Ability of Amorphous Drugs Investigated by Continuous Cooling and Isothermal Transformation.

    Blaabjerg, Lasse I; Lindenberg, Eleanor; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas

    2016-09-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the glass forming ability of 12 different drugs by the determination of continuous cooling and isothermal transformation diagrams in order to elucidate if an inherent differentiation between the drugs with respect to their the glass forming ability can be made. Continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) and time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams of the drugs were developed in order to predict the critical cooling rate necessary to convert the drug from the melt into an amorphous form. While TTT diagrams overestimated the actual critical cooling rate, they allowed an inherent differentiation of glass forming ability for the investigated drugs into drugs that are extremely difficult to amorphize (>750 °C/min), drugs that require modest cooling rates (>10 °C/min), and drugs that can be made amorphous even at very slow cooling rates (>2 °C/min). Thus, the glass forming ability can be predicted by the use of TTT diagrams. In contrast to TTT diagrams, CCT diagrams may not be suitable for small organic molecules due to poor separation of exothermic events, which makes it difficult to determine the zone of recrystallization. In conclusion, this study shows that glass forming ability of drugs can be predicted by TTT diagrams.

  12. Molecular modeling of polycarbonate materials: Glass transition and mechanical properties

    Palczynski, Karol; Wilke, Andreas; Paeschke, Manfred; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Linking the experimentally accessible macroscopic properties of thermoplastic polymers to their microscopic static and dynamic properties is a key requirement for targeted material design. Classical molecular dynamics simulations enable us to study the structural and dynamic behavior of molecules on microscopic scales, and statistical physics provides a framework for relating these properties to the macroscopic properties. We take a first step toward creating an automated workflow for the theoretical prediction of thermoplastic material properties by developing an expeditious method for parameterizing a simple yet surprisingly powerful coarse-grained bisphenol-A polycarbonate model which goes beyond previous coarse-grained models and successfully reproduces the thermal expansion behavior, the glass transition temperature as a function of the molecular weight, and several elastic properties.

  13. Metallic glasses: viable tool materials for the production of surface microstructures in amorphous polymers by micro-hot-embossing

    Henann, David L; Srivastava, Vikas; Taylor, Hayden K; Hale, Melinda R; Hardt, David E; Anand, Lallit

    2009-01-01

    Metallic glasses possess unique mechanical properties which make them attractive materials for fabricating components for a variety of applications. For example, the commercial Zr-based metallic glasses possess high tensile strengths (≈2.0 GPa), good fracture toughnesses (≈10–50 MPa√m) and good wear and corrosion resistances. A particularly important characteristic of metallic glasses is their intrinsic homogeneity to the nanoscale because of the absence of grain boundaries. This characteristic, coupled with their unique mechanical properties, makes them ideal materials for fabricating micron-scale components, or high-aspect-ratio micro-patterned surfaces, which may in turn be used as dies for the hot-embossing of polymeric microfluidic devices. In this paper we consider a commercially available Zr-based metallic glass which has a glass transition temperature of T g ≈ 350 °C and describe the thermoplastic forming of a tool made from this material, which has the (negative) microchannel pattern for a simple microfluidic device. This tool was successfully used to produce the microchannel pattern by micro-hot-embossing of the amorphous polymers poly(methyl methacrylate) (T g ≈ 115 °C) and Zeonex-690R (T g ≈ 136 °C) above their glass transition temperatures. The metallic glass tool was found to be very robust, and it was used to produce hundreds of high-fidelity micron-scale embossed patterns without degradation or failure

  14. Effect of different glass and zeolite A compositions on the leach resistance of ceramic waste forms

    Lewis, M.A.; Hash, M.; Glandorf, D.

    1996-01-01

    A ceramic waste form is being developed for waste generated during electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste is generated when fission products are removed from the electrolyte, LiCl-KCl eutectic. The waste form is a composite fabricated by hot isostatic pressing a mixture of glass frit and zeolite occluded with fission products and salt. Normalized release rate is less than 1 g/m 2 d for all elements in MCC-1 leach test run for 28 days in deionized water at 90 C. This leach resistance is comparable to that of early Savannah River glasses. We are investigating how leach resistance is affected by changes in cationic form of zeolite and in glass composition. Composites were made with 3 forms of zeolite A and 6 glasses. We used 3-day ASTM C1220-92 (formerly MCC-1) leach tests to screen samples for development purposes only. The leach test results show that the glass composites of zeolites 5A and 4A retain fission products equally well. Loss of Cs is small (0.1-0.5 wt%), while the loss of divalent and trivalent fission products is one or more orders of magnitude smaller. Composites of 5A retain chloride ion better in these short-term screens than 4A and 3A. The more leach resistant composites were made with durable glasses rich in silica and poor in alkaline earth oxides. XRD show that a salt phase was absent in the leach resistant composites of 5A and the better glasses but was present in the other composites with poorer leach performance. Thus, absence of salt phase corresponds to improved leach resistance. Interactions between zeolite and glass depend on composition of both

  15. A comparative study of ibuprofen and ketoprofen glass-forming liquids by molecular dynamics simulations

    Ottou Abe, M. T.; Correia, N. T.; Ndjaka, J. M. B.; Affouard, F.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, structural and dynamical properties of ibuprofen and ketoprofen glass-forming liquids have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular mobility of both materials is analyzed with respect to the different inter-molecular linear/cyclic hydrogen bonding associations. For ibuprofen, the dominant organization is found to be composed of small hydrogen bonding aggregates corresponding to cyclic dimers through the carboxyl group. For ketoprofen, the propensity of cyclic dimers is significantly reduced by the formation of hydrogen bonds with the ketone oxygen of the molecule altering the hydrogen bond (HB) associating structures that can be formed and thus molecular dynamics. The issue of the presence/absence of the peculiar low frequency Debye-type process in dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) data in these materials is addressed. Results obtained from simulations confirm that the Debye process originates from the internal cis-trans conversion of the —COOH carboxyl group. It is shown that the specific intermolecular HB structures associated to a given profen control the main dynamical features of this conversion, in particular its separation from the α-process, which make it detectable or not from DRS. For ibuprofen, the possible role of the —CCCO torsion motion, more "local" than the —COOH motion since it is less influenced by the intermolecular HBs, is suggested in the microscopic origin of the quite intense secondary γ-relaxation process detected from DRS.

  16. Characterization and durability testing of a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    Johnson, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded ceramic waste form for encapsulating the fission products and transuranics from the conditioning of metallic reactor fuel. This waste form is currently being scaled to the multi-kilogram size for encapsulation of actual high level waste. This paper will present characterization and durability testing of the ceramic waste form. An emphasis on results from application of glass durability tests such as the Product Consistency Test and characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The information presented is based on a suite of tests utilized for assessing product quality during scale-up and parametric testing

  17. Structural origin of fractional Stokes-Einstein relation in glass-forming liquids.

    Pan, Shaopeng; Wu, Z W; Wang, W H; Li, M Z; Xu, Limei

    2017-01-06

    In many glass-forming liquids, fractional Stokes-Einstein relation (SER) is observed above the glass transition temperature. However, the origin of such phenomenon remains elusive. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the break- down of SER and the onset of fractional SER in a model of metallic glass-forming liquid. We find that SER breaks down when the size of the largest cluster consisting of trapped atoms starts to increase sharply at which the largest cluster spans half of the simulations box along one direction, and the fractional SER starts to follows when the largest cluster percolates the entire system and forms 3-dimentional network structures. Further analysis based on the percolation theory also confirms that percolation occurs at the onset of the fractional SER. Our results directly link the breakdown of the SER with structure inhomogeneity and onset of the fraction SER with percolation of largest clusters, thus provide a possible picture for the break- down of SER and onset of fractional SER in glass-forming liquids, which is is important for the understanding of the dynamic properties in glass-forming liquids.

  18. Atomic Scale Investigation of Structural Properties and Glass Forming Ability of Ti100- x Al x Metallic Glasses

    Tahiri, M.; Hasnaoui, A.; Sbiaai, K.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study Ti-Al metallic glasses (MGs) using the embedded atom method (EAM) potential to model the atomic interaction with different compositions. The results showed evidence of the metallic glass formation induced by the split occurring in the second peak of the radial distribution function (RDF) curves implying both Ti and Al atoms. The common neighbor analysis (CNA) method confirmed the presence of the icosahedral clusters with a maximum amount observed for an alloy with 75 pct of Al. Analysis of coordination numbers (CNs) indicated that the total CNs are nearly unchanged in these systems. Finally, Voronoi tessellation analyses (VTA) showed a higher value of the number of icosahedral units at Ti25Al75 composition. This specific composition represents a nearby peritectic point localized at a low melting point in the Ti-Al binary phase diagram. The glass forming ability (GFA) becomes important when the fraction of Al increases by forming and connecting "icosahedral-like" clusters (12-coordinated and 13-coordinated ) and by playing a main role in the structure stability of the Ti-Al MGs.

  19. Atomic Scale Investigation of Structural Properties and Glass Forming Ability of Ti100-x Al x Metallic Glasses

    Tahiri, M.; Hasnaoui, A.; Sbiaai, K.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study Ti-Al metallic glasses (MGs) using the embedded atom method (EAM) potential to model the atomic interaction with different compositions. The results showed evidence of the metallic glass formation induced by the split occurring in the second peak of the radial distribution function (RDF) curves implying both Ti and Al atoms. The common neighbor analysis (CNA) method confirmed the presence of the icosahedral clusters with a maximum amount observed for an alloy with 75 pct of Al. Analysis of coordination numbers (CNs) indicated that the total CNs are nearly unchanged in these systems. Finally, Voronoi tessellation analyses (VTA) showed a higher value of the number of icosahedral units at Ti25Al75 composition. This specific composition represents a nearby peritectic point localized at a low melting point in the Ti-Al binary phase diagram. The glass forming ability (GFA) becomes important when the fraction of Al increases by forming and connecting "icosahedral-like" clusters (12-coordinated and 13-coordinated ) and by playing a main role in the structure stability of the Ti-Al MGs.

  20. Influence of minor alloying additions on the glass-forming ability of Mg-Ni-La bulk metallic glasses

    Gonzalez, S.; Figueroa, I.A.; Todd, I.

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses of Mg 60 Ni 23.6 Y x La (16.4-x) and Mg 65 Ni 20 Y x LaMM (15-x) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 at.% have been produced by injection casting. For the La-containing alloy a maximum amorphous diameter of 4 mm for x = 0.5 and 0.75 was obtained. The LaMM-containing alloy showed a maximum amorphous diameter of 2 mm for x = 0 and 0.25 but decreased to 1 mm with further Y additions. The glass-forming ability of the Mg 60 Ni 23.6 La 16.4 alloy decreased when La is partially substituted by small amounts of small atoms (Si or B) or by large atoms (Y and Si).

  1. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials. Final Report

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate 'real' waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  2. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-04-21

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate “real” waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  3. Characterization of surface properties of glass vials used as primary packaging material for parenterals.

    Ditter, Dominique; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Roehl, Holger; Wahl, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Nieto, Alejandra; Allmendinger, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    The appropriate selection of adequate primary packaging, such as the glass vial, rubber stopper, and crimp cap for parenteral products is of high importance to ensure product stability, microbiological quality (integrity) during storage as well as patient safety. A number of issues can arise when inadequate vial material is chosen, and sole compliance to hydrolytic class I is sometimes not sufficient when choosing a glass vial. Using an appropriate pre-treatment, such as surface modification or coating of the inner vial surface after the vial forming process the glass container quality is often improved and interactions of the formulation with the surface of glass may be minimized. This study aimed to characterize the inner surface of different type I glass vials (Exp33, Exp51, Siliconized, TopLyo™ and Type I plus®) at the nanoscale level. All vials were investigated topographically by colorimetric staining and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Glass composition of the surface was studied by Time-of-Flight - Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the inner surface was assessed by dye tests and surface energy measurements. All containers were studied unprocessed, as received from the vendor, i.e. in unwashed and non-depyrogenized condition. Clear differences were found between the different vial types studied. Especially glass vials without further surface modifications, like Exp33 and Exp51 vials, showed significant (I) vial-to-vial variations within one vial lot as well as (II) variations along the vertical axis of a single vial when studying topography and chemical composition. In addition, differences and heterogeneity in surface energy were found within a given tranche (circumferential direction) of Exp51 as well as Type I plus® vials. Most consistent quality was achieved with TopLyo™ vials. The present comprehensive characterization of surface properties of the

  4. Comparison of glass surfaces as a countertop material to existing surfaces

    Turo, Laura A.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-09-01

    Gleen Glass, a small production glass company that creates countertops, was selected for the Technology Assistance Program through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Gleen Glass was seeking material property analysis comparing glass as a countertop material to current surfaces (i.e. marble, granite and engineered stone). With samples provided from Gleen Glass, testing was done on granite, marble, and 3 different glass surfaces ('Journey,' 'Pebble,' and 'Gleen'). Results showed the glass surfaces have a lower density, lower water absorption, and are stronger in compressive and flexural tests as compared to granite and marble. Thermal shock tests showed the glass failed when objects with a high thermal mass are placed directly on them, whereas marble and granite did not fracture under these conditions.

  5. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  6. Determination of the Structure of Vitrified Hydroceramic/CBC Waste Form Glasses Manufactured from DOE Reprocessing Waste

    Scheetz, B.E.; White, W. B.; Chesleigh, M.; Portanova, A.; Olanrewaju, J.

    2005-01-01

    The selection of a glass-making option for the solidification of nuclear waste has dominated DOE waste form programs since the early 1980's. Both West Valley and Savannah River are routinely manufacturing glass logs from the high level waste inventory in tank sludges. However, for some wastes, direct conversion to glass is clearly not the optimum strategy for immobilization. INEEL, for example, has approximately 4400 m 3 of calcined high level waste with an activity that produces approximately 45 watts/m 3 , a rather low concentration of radioactive constituents. For these wastes, there is value in seeking alternatives to glass. An alternative approach has been developed and the efficacy of the process demonstrated that offers a significant savings in both human health and safety exposures and also a lower cost relative to the vitrification option. The alternative approach utilizes the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the highly alkaline waste with the addition of aluminosilicate admixtures in the appropriate proportions to form zeolites. The process is one in which a chemically bonded ceramic is produced. The driving force for reaction is derived from the chemical system itself at very modest temperatures and yet forms predominantly crystalline phases. Because the chemically bonded ceramic requires an aqueous medium to serve as a vehicle for the chemical reaction, the proposed zeolite-containing waste form can more adequately be described as a hydroceramic. The hydrated crystalline materials are then subject to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which partially melts the material to form a glass ceramic. The scientific advantages of the hydroceramic/CBC approach are: (1) Low temperature processing; (2) High waste loading and thus only modest volumetric bulking from the addition of admixtures; (3) Ability to immobilize sodium; (4) Ability to handle low levels of nitrate (2-3% NO 3 - ); (5) The flexibility of a vitrifiable waste; and (6) A process that is based on an

  7. Comprehension and modelling of chromia-forming alloys corrosion mechanisms in nuclear glasses

    Schmucker, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear wastes management consists in the confinement of the radioactive wastes in a glass matrix. This is made by inductive melting in a hot crucible at an operating temperature around 1150 C. These crucibles are constituted of nickel based superalloys with high chromium content. They are submitted to a harsh corrosion by the molten glass, eventually leading to their replacement. The protection of the crucible against corrosion is best provided by the establishment of a protective chromium oxide layer at the surface of the alloy. A binary chromia-forming alloy (Ni-30Cr) is studied in this work. Three different binary and ternary glass compositions are chosen in order to understand the influence of the glass basicity and glass viscosity on the corrosion kinetics. Besides, the de-correlation of the formation and dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer allows the modelling of the overall oxide growth in the molten glass. For that purpose, the oxide formation kinetics in molten glass media is assimilated to the oxidation kinetics of the alloy in gaseous media with oxygen partial pressure that are representative of the redox properties of the glasses. Studies of the oxidation kinetics and of the diffusion mechanisms have shown that the oxidation kinetics is independent on the oxygen pressure in the range of 10"-"1"3 up to 10"-"3 atm O_2 at 1150 C. The present work has shown that the dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer is governed by the diffusion of Cr(III) in the glass melt. This dissolution kinetics has been evaluated from the diffusion coefficient and the solubility limit of Cr(III) in the glass. Finally, the overall growth kinetics of the Cr_2O_3 layer in the glass has been successfully modelled for each glass, thanks to the knowledge of (i) the solubility limit of Cr(III), (ii) its diffusion coefficient in the glasses and (iii) the oxidation kinetics of the alloy. The presented model also allows quantifying the influence of each of these parameters on the

  8. GLASS FORMATION AND PROPERTIES OF CORDIERITE COMPOSITIONS FROM TALC-BASED NATURAL RAW MATERIALS WITH BORON OXIDE ADDITION

    Esin GÜNAY

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the glass forming behaviour of cordierite compositions in MAS (MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system with added B2O3 content up to 3% were studied by melting the natural raw materials such as; talc, kaolin, alumina and boric acid as the source of MgO, SiO2, Al2O3 and B2O3 respectively. XRD analysis revealed the glass formation. Optical properties of the glasses were measured using UV-VIS spectrophotometer and structural changes were monitored by using FT-IR spectrometer. Physical properties such as density, colour, thermal expansion coefficients and hardness were measured according to the standard test methods. Glasses with a green colour were produced and this was attributed to the Fe content in the glass up to 0.5% coming from talc and kaolin. The addition of B2O3 to the glasses increased the glass transition temperatures (Tg values and reduced the thermal expansion coefficient values of the glasses from 5.2226 to 5.0072ºCx10-6, for MAS-T-0 and MAS-T-3, respectively.

  9. Economic comparison of crystalline ceramic and glass waste forms for HLW disposal

    McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-05-01

    A titanate-based, crystalline ceramic produced by hot isostatic pressing has been proposed as a potentially more stable and improved waste form for high-level nuclear waste disposal compared to the currently favored borosilicate glass waste form. This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate the relative costs for disposal of high-level waste from a 70,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The entire waste management system, including waste processing and encapsulation, transportation, and final repository disposal, was included in this analysis. The repository concept is based on the current basalt waste isolation project (BWIP) reference design. A range of design basis alternatives is considered to determine if this would influence the relative economics of the two waste forms. A thermal analysis procedure was utilized to define optimum canister sizes to assure that each waste form was compared under favorable conditions. Repository costs are found to favor the borosilicate glass waste form while transportation costs greatly favor the crystalline ceramic waste form. The determining component in the cost comparison is the waste processing cost, which strongly favors the borosilicate glass process because of its relative simplicity. A net cost advantage on the order of 12% to 15% on a waste management system basis is indicated for the glass waste form

  10. Characterization of surface layers formed under natural environmental conditions on medieval glass from Siponto (Southern Italy)

    Genga, Alessandra; Siciliano, Maria; Fama, Lia; Filippo, Emanuela; Siciliano, Tiziana; Mangone, Annarosa; Traini, Angela; Laganara, Caterina

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a low-vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) was used to investigate the alteration processes that occur on silica-soda-lime glass exposed to soil materials and dated from XI to second half of XIII sec. The chemical data were collected for altered glass gel and fresh glass. In order to study the influence of chemical composition on weathering process, 16 glasses have been selected on the basis of the chemical characterization and on the basis of the different corrosion processes present on the fragments. Six selected samples had been produced with the use of natron as fluxer and 10 samples with the use of plant ash as fluxer. The analysed pieces come from Siponto excavations (Foggia, Italy) and they include feet and rims of chalices, fragments of lamps and of globular bottles

  11. Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications

    Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

  12. Effects of partitioned enthalpy of mixing on glass-forming ability

    Song, Wen-Xiong; Zhao, Shi-Jin, E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-04-14

    We explore the inherent reason at atomic level for the glass-forming ability of alloys by molecular simulation, in which the effect of partitioned enthalpy of mixing is studied. Based on Morse potential, we divide the enthalpy of mixing into three parts: the chemical part (Δ E{sub nn}), strain part (Δ E{sub strain}), and non-bond part (Δ E{sub nnn}). We find that a large negative Δ E{sub nn} value represents strong AB chemical bonding in AB alloy and is the driving force to form a local ordered structure, meanwhile the transformed local ordered structure needs to satisfy the condition (Δ E{sub nn}/2 + Δ E{sub strain}) < 0 to be stabilized. Understanding the chemical and strain parts of enthalpy of mixing is helpful to design a new metallic glass with a good glass forming ability. Moreover, two types of metallic glasses (i.e., “strain dominant” and “chemical dominant”) are classified according to the relative importance between chemical effect and strain effect, which enriches our knowledge of the forming mechanism of metallic glass. Finally, a soft sphere model is established, different from the common hard sphere model.

  13. A slow atomic diffusion process in high-entropy glass-forming metallic melts

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Krishnan, Rithin P.; Embs, Jan P.; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2018-04-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been used to study atomic relaxation processes in high-entropy glass-forming metallic melts with different glass-forming ability (GFA). The momentum transfer dependence of mean relaxation time shows a highly collective atomic transport process in the alloy melts with the highest and lowest GFA. However, a jump diffusion process is the long-range atomic transport process in the intermediate GFA alloy melt. Nevertheless, atomic mobility close to the melting temperature of these alloy melts is quite similar, and the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient exhibits a non-Arrhenius behavior. The atomic mobility in these high-entropy melts is much slower than that of the best glass-forming melts at their respective melting temperatures.

  14. Infrared spectroscopy study of structural changes in glass-forming salol.

    Baran, J; Davydova, N A

    2010-03-01

    We report the investigation of glass-forming salol upon different courses of the temperature changes from liquid to glass state and back using FT-IR spectroscopy measurements in the wide spectral and temperature ranges. The formation of the ordered clusters in supercooled liquid salol has been observed at 250 K. When the temperature is decreased further to 11 K these ordered clusters become an element of the glass structure. With increasing temperature to 270 K through the glass transition noticeable evolutions of the IR spectrum occurs up till the ordered clusters are developed into crystal. So produced crystal melts in the temperature range 300-310 K, that corresponds to the melting temperature of the metastable phase (Tmelt=302 K) . Thus, the crystalline structure of the ordered clusters corresponds to the structure of metastable phase and is monoclinic.

  15. Studies of glass waste form performance at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Banba, Tsunetaka; Kamizono, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Shinichi; Tashiro, Shingo

    1989-08-01

    The recent studies of glass waste form performance at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute can be classified into the following three categories; (1) Study on the volatilization of radionuclides from the waste glass, which is necessary to estimate the safety in relation to operation of a storage facility. (2) Study on the radiation (alpha-radiation) effects which have relation to the long-term stability of the waste glass. (3) Study on the leaching behavior of actinides under the repository conditions, which is necessary to predict the long-term release rate of radionuclides from the waste glass. In the present report, the recent results corresponding to the above categories are described. (author)

  16. Light fireproof insulating plate-formed material

    Plum, B.A.; Juhl, L.F.

    1981-02-23

    Light fireproof insulating plates were produced by pressure processing of a mixture of rice-husk ashes with pearlite aluminium phosphate and glass wool. The corn size of pearlite is 0-5 mm., of rice-husk ashes 0-5 mm. and the fiber length of fibrous additive is about 25 mm.

  17. Changes in glass formation and glass forming ability of Nd2Fe14B by the addition of TiC

    Branagan, D.J.; Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA; McCallum, R.W.; Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA

    1996-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of a stoichiometric Nd 2 Fe 14 B alloy modified with TiC additions was studied. Structural, magnetic, and thermal measurements of as-quenched melt-spun ribbons indicate increasing enhancement of GFA with increasing amounts of TiC addition. The limit of the glass formation range and the amount of glass formed at a particular cooling rate also increased with TiC addition. Enhanced GFA was concurrent with changes in the intrinsic properties of the glass. The crystallization temperature, as well as the transformation rate of crystallization, was raised by TiC addition. The intrinsic magnetic properties of the glass were changed with reductions in saturation magnetization and Curie temperature T c with increasing amounts of TiC addition. The intrinsic glass changes were related to changes in the local short range order of the glass and are consistent with a reduction in free volume and an increased packing efficiency. These changes in local structure of the glass increase the glass stability, which means that less undercooling is needed to prevent crystallization. Thus, at a particular cooling rate, a higher percentage of glass will be formed and the GFA is increased. (orig.)

  18. Thermomechanical and calorimetric behaviours of supported glass-forming films: A study based on thermodynamics with internal variables

    Lion, Alexander; Engelhard, Marco; Johlitz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the temperature-dependent response behaviour of thin thermoviscoelastic films which are deposited on relative stiff but thermally deformable substrates it is important to consider the lateral geometric constraints. They are generated by differences in the thermal expansion properties between the substrate and the film and provoke internal stresses. Since glass-forming materials exhibit distinct temperature history-dependent thermal expansion and calorimetric properties, primarily in the vicinity of the glass transition, the situation is rather complicated. In this article, a recently developed three-dimensional model of thermodynamics with internal variables is applied and adapted to simulate this type of behaviour. Explicit relations are obtained for the specific heat of the film, the normal strain and the lateral stresses. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the magnitude of the internal stress at temperatures below the glass transition depends strongly on the cooling rate. It is also shown that the specific heat of the supported film is principally different from the isobaric specific heat of the bulk material: the glassy limit of the specific heat of the film is reduced but the glass transition temperature is almost uninfluenced. The simulated behaviour is in accordance with experimental observations from literature. - Highlights: ► For the specific heat, stress and strain of the film, explicit equations were derived. ► The constraints of the substrate reduce the glassy limit of specific heat of the film. ► Glass transition temperatures of free bulk material and supported film are equal. ► Simulations are in good agreement with experimental observations from literature.

  19. Thermomechanical and calorimetric behaviours of supported glass-forming films: A study based on thermodynamics with internal variables

    Lion, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.lion@unibw.de; Engelhard, Marco; Johlitz, Michael

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand the temperature-dependent response behaviour of thin thermoviscoelastic films which are deposited on relative stiff but thermally deformable substrates it is important to consider the lateral geometric constraints. They are generated by differences in the thermal expansion properties between the substrate and the film and provoke internal stresses. Since glass-forming materials exhibit distinct temperature history-dependent thermal expansion and calorimetric properties, primarily in the vicinity of the glass transition, the situation is rather complicated. In this article, a recently developed three-dimensional model of thermodynamics with internal variables is applied and adapted to simulate this type of behaviour. Explicit relations are obtained for the specific heat of the film, the normal strain and the lateral stresses. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the magnitude of the internal stress at temperatures below the glass transition depends strongly on the cooling rate. It is also shown that the specific heat of the supported film is principally different from the isobaric specific heat of the bulk material: the glassy limit of the specific heat of the film is reduced but the glass transition temperature is almost uninfluenced. The simulated behaviour is in accordance with experimental observations from literature. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the specific heat, stress and strain of the film, explicit equations were derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The constraints of the substrate reduce the glassy limit of specific heat of the film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glass transition temperatures of free bulk material and supported film are equal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulations are in good agreement with experimental observations from literature.

  20. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  1. Chemical durability of glass and glass-ceramic materials, developed in laboratory scale, from industrial oil shale residue. Preliminary results

    Araujo Fonseca, M.V. de; Souza Santos, P. de

    1990-01-01

    Industrial developments frequently drive to the natural resources extinction. The recycling era has come out a long time ago and it has been evident that great part of industrial work's problems are related to the pollution and the raw materials extinction. These problems should be solved, with advantages, through industrial residues recycling. This study deals with glass and glass-ceramics materials obtained from oil shale (Irati Formation-Sao Mateus do Sul-Parana State) industrialization residues. The reached results show that a controled devitrification of retorted oil shale glass improves its performance related to chemical attack. The crystallinity caracterization of the oil shales glass-ceramic was made through X-ray diffraction. (author) [pt

  2. Nano-materials Enabled Thermoelectricity from Window Glasses

    Inayat, Salman Bin

    2012-11-13

    With a projection of nearly doubling up the world population by 2050, we need wide variety of renewable and clean energy sources to meet the increased energy demand. Solar energy is considered as the leading promising alternate energy source with the pertinent challenge of off sunshine period and uneven worldwide distribution of usable sun light. Although thermoelectricity is considered as a reasonable renewable energy from wasted heat, its mass scale usage is yet to be developed. Here we show, large scale integration of nano-manufactured pellets of thermoelectric nano-materials, embedded into window glasses to generate thermoelectricity using the temperature difference between hot outside and cool inside. For the first time, this work offers an opportunity to potentially generate 304 watts of usable power from 9 m2 window at a 206C temperature gradient. If a natural temperature gradient exists, this can serve as a sustainable energy source for green building technology.

  3. Measurements of the Poisson ratio and fragility of glass-forming liquids

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye

    Recently much attention has been given to models and phenomenology of glass-forming liquids that correlates fast and slow degrees of freedom . In particular the Poisson ratio has been correlated with fragility. We present data on shear - and bulk modulus obtained by the techniques...... of the piezoelectric transducers PBG and PSG on a number of glass-forming liquids. Hereby the Poisson ratio can be found. Furthermore the PSG also gives the temperature dependence of shear viscosity and thereby the fragility. The validity of the conjectured relation is discussed...

  4. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation: Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements

  5. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation:Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-02-28

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements.

  6. Radiation damage in natural materials: implications for radioactive waste forms

    Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term effect of radiation damage on waste forms, either crystalline or glass, is a factor in the evaluation of the integrity of waste disposal mediums. Natural analogs, such as metamict minerals, provide one approach for the evaluaton of radiation damage effects that might be observed in crystalline waste forms, such as supercalcine or synroc. Metamict minerals are a special class of amorphous materials which were initially crystalline. Although the mechanism for the loss of crystallinity in these minerals (mostly actinide-containing oxides and silicates) is not clearly understood, damage caused by alpha particles and recoil nuclei is critical to the metamictization process. The study of metamict minerals allows the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly changes in physical and chemical properties such as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. In addition, structures susceptible to metamictization share some common properties: (1) complex compositions; (2) some degree of covalent bonding, instead of being ionic close-packed MO/sub x/ structures; and (3) channels or interstitial voids which may accommodate displaced atoms or absorbed water. On the basis of these empirical criteria, minerals such as pollucite, sodalite, nepheline and leucite warrant careful scrutiny as potential waste form phases. Phases with the monazite or fluorite structures are excellent candidates

  7. Understanding the glass-forming ability of active pharmaceutical ingredients for designing supersaturating dosage forms.

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Usui, Toshinori; Hattori, Mitsunari

    2012-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions have great potential for enhancing oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs. Crystallization behavior during storage and after exposure to aqueous media must be examined in detail for designing stable and effective amorphous formulations, and it is significantly affected by the intrinsic properties of an amorphous drug. Many attempts have been made to correlate various thermodynamic parameters of pharmaceutical glasses with their crystallization behavior; however, variations in model drugs that could be used for such investigation has been limited because the amorphous characteristics of drugs possessing a high crystallization tendency are difficult to evaluate. In this study, high-speed differential scanning calorimetry, which could inhibit their crystallization using high cooling rates up to 2000°C/s, was employed for assessing such drugs. The thermodynamic parameters of the glasses, including glass transition temperature (T(g)) and fragility, were obtained to show that their crystallization tendency cannot be explained simply by the parameters, although there have been general thought that fragility may be correlated with crystallization tendency. Also investigated was correlation between the thermodynamic parameters and crystallization tendency upon contact with water, which influences in vivo efficacy of amorphous formulations. T(g) was correlated well with the crystallization tendency upon contact with water. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Extracting energy and structure properties of glass-forming liquids from structural relaxation time.

    Wang, Lianwen

    2012-04-18

    A comprehensive examination of the kinetic liquid model (Wang et al 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 455104) is carried out by fitting the structural relaxation time of 26 different glass-forming liquids in a wide temperature range, including most of the well-studied materials. Careful analysis of the compiled reported data reveals that experimental inaccuracies should not be overlooked in any 'benchmark test' of relating theories or models (e.g. in Lunkenheimer et al 2010 Phys. Rev. E 81 051504). The procedure, accuracy, ability, and efficiency of the kinetic liquid model are discussed in detail and in comparison with other available fitting methods. In general, the kinetic liquid model could be verified by 17 of the 26 compiled data sets and can serve as a meaningful approximative method for analyzing these liquids. Nonetheless, further experimental examinations in a wide temperature range are needed and are called for. Through fitting, the microscopic details of these liquids are extracted, namely, the enthalpy, entropy, and cooperativity in structural relaxation, which may facilitate further quantitative analysis to both the liquidus and glassy states of these materials.

  9. Anomalous Crystallization as a Signature of the Fragile-to-Strong Transition in Metallic Glass-Forming Liquids

    Yang, X.N.; Zhou, C.; Sun, Q.J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the fragile-to-strong (F−S) transition of metallic glass-forming liquids (MGFLs) by measuring the thermal response during annealing and dynamic heating of La55Al25Ni5Cu15 glass ribbons fabricated at different cooling rates. We find that the glasses fabricated in the intermediate regime o...

  10. Solvent dynamics in a glass-forming liquid from 300 K to 3 K : What photon echoes can teach us

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2007-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the optical non-linear response of dye molecules dissolved in a glass-forming liquid over a temperature range that includes the glass transition is investigated. Cooling down to temperatures below the glass transition dramatically slows the diffusive motion of the

  11. A unified in vitro evaluation for apatite-forming ability of bioactive glasses and their variants.

    Maçon, Anthony L B; Kim, Taek B; Valliant, Esther M; Goetschius, Kathryn; Brow, Richard K; Day, Delbert E; Hoppe, Alexander; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kokubo, Tadashi; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Vallet-Regí, Maria; Arcos, Daniel; Fraile, Leandro; Salinas, Antonio J; Teixeira, Alexandra V; Vueva, Yuliya; Almeida, Rui M; Miola, Marta; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Verné, Enrica; Höland, Wolfram; Jones, Julian R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and validate a new unified method for testing dissolution rates of bioactive glasses and their variants, and the formation of calcium phosphate layer formation on their surface, which is an indicator of bioactivity. At present, comparison in the literature is difficult as many groups use different testing protocols. An ISO standard covers the use of simulated body fluid on standard shape materials but it does not take into account that bioactive glasses can have very different specific surface areas, as for glass powders. Validation of the proposed modified test was through round robin testing and comparison to the ISO standard where appropriate. The proposed test uses fixed mass per solution volume ratio and agitated solution. The round robin study showed differences in hydroxyapatite nucleation on glasses of different composition and between glasses of the same composition but different particle size. The results were reproducible between research facilities. Researchers should use this method when testing new glasses, or their variants, to enable comparison between the literature in the future.

  12. Experimental Study on the Comparison of the Material Properties of Glass Wool Used as Building Materials

    Kyoung-Woo KIM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Artificial mineral fibers such as glass wool or stone wool are commonly used in building walls, ceilings and floors as a major insulation material for buildings. Among the material properties of building materials, thermal conductivity, the sound absorption coefficient, compressibility, and dynamic stiffness are regarded as important performance requirements since they directly affect the thermal and acoustic properties of the building. This study measured the changes of the thermal and acoustical performances of glass wool that was actually installed for a long time to the outer wall of a building as an insulation material through a comparison with recently produced glass wool. The results showed that the measured thermal conductivities of the old and the new specimens both rise with an increase of temperature, showing quite similar results in both specimens over temperature ranges of (0 – 20 ºC. The noise reduction coefficient decreased by 0.1 in the old specimen and the difference of the compressibilities in both specimens was shown to be 7.32 mm. The dynamic stiffness of the old specimen was found to be 1.28 MN/m3 higher than that of the new specimen.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3714

  13. Secondary phases formed during nuclear waste glass-water interactions: Thermodynamic and derived properties

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1992-08-01

    The thermodynamic properties of secondary phases observed to form during nuclear waste glass-water interactions are of particular interest as it is with the application of these properties together with the thermodynamic properties of other solid phases, fluid phases, and aqueous species that one may predict the environmental consequences of introducing radionuclides contained in the glass into groundwater at a high-level nuclear waste repository. The validation of these predicted consequences can be obtained from laboratory experiments and field observations at natural analogue sites. The purpose of this report is to update and expand the previous compilation (McKenzie, 1991) of thermodynamic data retrieved from the literature and/or estimated for secondary phases observed to form (and candidate phases from observed chemical compositions) during nuclear waste glass-water interactions. In addition, this report includes provisionally recommended thermodynamic data of secondary phases

  14. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    Wei, Shuai; Stolpe, Moritz; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-01-01

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T g . The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure

  15. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    Wei, Shuai, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Stolpe, Moritz, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Evenson, Zach [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), 51170 Köln (Germany); Bednarcik, Jozef [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kruzic, Jamie J. [Material Science, School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  16. Cold crucible induction melter studies for making glass ceramic waste forms: A feasibility assessment

    Crum, Jarrod; Maio, Vince; McCloy, John; Scott, Clark; Riley, Brian; Benefiel, Brad; Vienna, John; Archibald, Kip; Rodriguez, Carmen; Rutledge, Veronica; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joe; Olszta, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being developed to immobilize fission products, separated from used nuclear fuel by aqueous reprocessing, into a stable waste form suitable for disposal in a geological repository. This work documents the glass ceramic formulation at bench scale and for a scaled melter test performed in a pilot-scale (∼1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). Melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling were measured on a small set of compositions to select a formulation for melter testing. Property measurements also identified a temperature range for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form. Bench scale and melter run results successfully demonstrate the processability of the glass ceramic using the CCIM melter technology

  17. Mineralogy and thermodynamic properties of magnesium phyllosilicates formed during the alteration of a simplified nuclear glass

    Debure, Mathieu, E-mail: m.debure@brgm.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); MINES-ParisTech, PSL Research University, Centre de Géosciences, 77305 Fontainebleau (France); De Windt, Laurent [MINES-ParisTech, PSL Research University, Centre de Géosciences, 77305 Fontainebleau (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Vieillard, Philippe [IC2MP-CNRS-UMR 7285, 5 Ave. Albert Turpain TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 09 (France)

    2016-07-15

    The precipitation of crystallized magnesium phyllosilicates generally sustains the alteration rate of nuclear waste containment glass. However, glass alteration slows down to a residual rate as soon as Mg disappears from the solution. The identification of the phyllosilicates formed is therefore crucial for modeling the long-term behavior of nuclear glass. This study deals with batch alteration of the simplified nuclear glass ISG in presence of magnesium, and the characterization of the secondary phases. Morphological, chemical and structural analyses (MET, EDX, XRD) were performed to determine the nature and structure of the precipitated phases identified as trioctahedral smectites. Analyses conducted on the secondary phases proved the presence of Al, Na and Ca in the Mg-phyllosilicate phases. Such elements had been suspected but never quantitatively measured. The experimental results were then used to determine the thermodynamic solubility constants for each precipitated secondary phase at various temperatures. The calculated values were consistent with those available for sodium and magnesium saponites in the existing thermodynamic databases. - Highlights: • The international simple glass dissolution rate increases in presence of magnesium. • Mg added in solution combines with Si from glass to yield trioctahedral smectites. • Their calculated logK are close to smectite thermodynamic constants reported in databases. • It confirms assumptions on Mg-silicates phases made in previous geochemical modeling.

  18. Fluctuations in an Inorganic Glass Forming System Capable of Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation

    Bogdanov, V.; Maksimov, L.; Anan'ev, A.; Nemilov, S.; Rusan, V.

    2012-08-01

    Rayleigh and Mandel'shtam-Brillouin scattering (RMBS) spectroscopy and high temperature ultrasonic study (HTUS) are applied to PbO-Al2O3-B2O3 glass forming system characterized by over liquidus miscibility gap. Temperature dependences of ultrasonic velocity of glass melts were measured in 600-1200°C range. "Frozen-in" density fluctuations in two phase glasses were estimated from HTUS data by Macedo-Shroeder formulation. Landau-Placzek ratios were found from RMBS spectra of single phase glasses at room temperature. Results of RMBS and HTUS were compared with well-known SAXS data. It was found that contribution of "frozen-in" density fluctuations into light scattering by two-phase glasses is much smaller than the scattering on particles of the second glassy phase causing opalescence of the glasses. Abnormal "water-like" growth of ultrasonic velocity with melt temperature can be explained by coexistence of two types of packaging of structural elements.

  19. Study of the confined solutions properties: case of gel formed during nuclear glass alteration

    Matar-Briman, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the thermodynamic properties, the structure and the dynamics of confined solutions in model gels and in a gel coming from glass alteration. The first step was to determine the structure and the dynamics of pure confined water in porous materials by using nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering. Meso-porous silica was elaborated and grafted by sol-gel route to decrease the pore sizes from 2.7 to 2 nm and to modify pore surfaces to have Si-OH, Zr-OH and Al-OH. The second step involved determining the dynamics of water in leachate confined in the model gels and in the gel of altered glass by using neutron scattering. In the model gels and at a 10 -12 -10 -9 second timescale, two kinds of waters were highlighted: first, an interfacial water linked to the pore surfaces and second, a free water in the pore core. Their ratio depends on the pore size and pore surface composition. Whatever the pore surface, when the pore size decreases the free water ratio in the pore center also decreases. For pores smaller than 2.3 nm and pore surfaces with Zr-OH or Al-OH surfaces, water is strongly linked to the surface and few water molecules are mobile. This is due to the ability of alumina and zirconia to immobilize water molecules through chemical coordination bonds stronger than the physical bonds established between silica and water. The result also highlight that pore surface composition could be the predominant parameter affecting the fixed proton content. Moreover, the mobility of water confined in a leachate is not modified. The study of the water dynamics in a gel formed during alteration of glass constituted of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO, and having a porosity between 2 and 7 nm showed the same behavior as water confined in pores presenting an Al-OH surface. (author) [fr

  20. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan and Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g} / T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g} / T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max} / T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  1. Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials

    2016-05-24

    selected physical properties of nine contemporary and recently-marketed glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and four resin-modified glass-ionomer cement {RMGIC...stainless steel molds. Testing was completed on a universal testing machine unt il failure. Knoop Hardness was obtained using fai led fracture toughness...address caries, function, biocompatibility, and minimal environmental impact. 2·3 Glass-ionomer cements were invented and developed by Wilson and Kent

  2. Beating Homogeneous Nucleation and Tuning Atomic Ordering in Glass-Forming Metals by Nanocalorimetry.

    Zhao, Bingge; Yang, Bin; Abyzov, Alexander S; Schmelzer, Jürn W P; Rodríguez-Viejo, Javier; Zhai, Qijie; Schick, Christoph; Gao, Yulai

    2017-12-13

    In this paper, the amorphous Ce 68 Al 10 Cu 20 Co 2 (atom %) alloy was in situ prepared by nanocalorimetry. The high cooling and heating rates accessible with this technique facilitate the suppression of crystallization on cooling and the identification of homogeneous nucleation. Different from the generally accepted notion that metallic glasses form just by avoiding crystallization, the role of nucleation and growth in the crystallization behavior of amorphous alloys is specified, allowing an access to the ideal metallic glass free of nuclei. Local atomic configurations are fundamentally significant to unravel the glass forming ability (GFA) and phase transitions in metallic glasses. For this reason, isothermal annealing near T g from 0.001 s to 25,000 s following quenching becomes the strategy to tune local atomic configurations and facilitate an amorphous alloy, a mixed glassy-nanocrystalline state, and a crystalline sample successively. On the basis of the evolution of crystallization enthalpy and overall latent heat on reheating, we quantify the underlying mechanism for the isothermal nucleation and crystallization of amorphous alloys. With Johnson-Mehl-Avrami method, it is demonstrated that the coexistence of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation contributes to the isothermal crystallization of glass. Heterogeneous rather than homogeneous nucleation dominates the isothermal crystallization of the undercooled liquid. For the mixed glassy-nanocrystalline structure, an extraordinary kinetic stability of the residual glass is validated, which is ascribed to the denser packed interface between amorphous phase and ordered nanocrystals. Tailoring the amorphous structure by nanocalorimetry permits new insights into unraveling GFA and the mechanism that correlates local atomic configurations and phase transitions in metallic glasses.

  3. Phenomenological description of internal friction spectra in glass-forming and glassy systems

    Lomovskij, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Dissipative events in different by chemical nature glass-forming systems, including B 2 O 3 , are studied. It is established from the spectra of internal friction of these systems that the maxima of the energy dissipation of the external power impact are positioned both in the area of viscous flow metastable structural liquid state and in the area of solid elastic state

  4. Glass forming ability of amorphous drugs investigated by continuous cooling- and isothermal transformation

    Blaabjerg, Lasse Ingerslev; Lindenberg, Eleanor; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    /min). Thus, the glass forming ability can be predicted by the use of TTT diagrams. In contrast to TTT diagrams, CCT diagrams may not be suitable for small organic molecules due to poor separation of exothermic events, which makes it difficult to determine the zone of recrystallization. In conclusion...

  5. Exploring the Origin of Fragile-to-Strong Transition in Some Glass-Forming Liquids

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Hu, L. N.

    2014-01-01

    , topological and thermodynamic changes causing this transition. The theory for describing the transition has not been fully established. In this paper, we summarize our current understanding of the fragile-to-strong transition in some glass-forming liquids basedon our two published papers and recent...

  6. Plan for glass waste form testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    Aines, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of glass waste form testing is to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from breached glass waste containers. This information will be used to qualify glass waste forms with respect to the release requirements. It will be the basis of the source term from glass waste for repository performance assessment modeling. This information will also serve as part of the source term in the calculation of cumulative releases after 100,000 years in the site evaluation process. It will also serve as part of the source term input for calculation of cumulative releases to the accessible environment for 10,000 years after disposal, to determine compliance with EPA regulations. This investigation will provide data to resolve information needs. Information about the waste forms which is provided by the producer will be accumulated and evaluated; the waste form will be tested, properties determined, and mechanisms of degradation determined; and models providing long-term evaluation of release rates designed and tested. 23 refs

  7. Local elastic expansion model for viscous-flow activation energies of glass-forming molecular liquids

    Dyre, Jeppe; Olsen, Niels Boye; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1996-01-01

    A model for the viscosity of glass-forming molecular liquids is proposed in which a "flow event" requires a local volume increase. The activation energy for a flow event is identified with the work done in shoving aside the surrounding liquid; this work is proportional to the high-frequency shear...

  8. Chalcogenide glasses as optical and ion-conducting materials. Kogaku oyobi ion dendo zairyo toshite no chalcogenide glass

    Toge, N.; Minami, T. (Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Nonoxide glasses whose main constituent are chalcogen elements like S, Se, or Te etc. show a lot of various properties, for instance, high infrared transmittancy and semi-conductivity which are already well known. Additionally, the optical properties change a lot along with the phase transition's happening between crystal and noncrystal under comparative low temperature. Further, it is also observed that the glasses containing proper cation appear high ion-conductivity. This paper supplies a brief reviews of chalcogenide glasses used as materials for infrared fiber, phase transition optical memory and superionic conductor, wherein the former two have already on the stage of utilization, particularly the realization of a rewritable optical memory is possible by using chalcogenide glasses film, and ion-conductor is in the phase to have shown the possibility of high conductivity while the development thereof is being expected. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Apatite and sodalite based glass-bonded waste forms for immobilization of 129I and mixed halide radioactive wastes

    Goel, Ashutosh [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McCloy, John S. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-12-30

    The goal of the project was to utilize the knowledge accumulated by the team, in working with minerals for chloride wastes and biological apatites, toward the development of advanced waste forms for immobilizing 129I and mixed-halide wastes. Based on our knowledge, experience, and thorough literature review, we had selected two minerals with different crystal structures and potential for high chemical durability, sodalite and CaP/PbV-apatite, to form the basis of this project. The focus of the proposed effort was towards: (i) low temperature synthesis of proposed minerals (iodine containing sodalite and apatite) leading to the development of monolithic waste forms, (ii) development of a fundamental understanding of the atomic-scale to meso-scale mechanisms of radionuclide incorporation in them, and (iii) understanding of the mechanism of their chemical corrosion, alteration mechanism, and rates. The proposed work was divided into four broad sections. deliverables. 1. Synthesis of materials 2. Materials structural and thermal characterization 3. Design of glass compositions and synthesis glass-bonded minerals, and 4. Chemical durability testing of materials.

  10. Entropic vs. elastic models of fragility of glass-forming liquids: Two sides of the same coin?

    Sen, Sabyasachi

    2012-10-01

    The two most influential atomistic models that have been proposed in the literature to explain the temperature dependent activation energy of viscous flow of a glass-forming liquid, i.e., its fragility, are the configurational entropy model of Adam and Gibbs [J. Chem. Phys. 43, 139 (1965), 10.1063/1.1696442] and the elastic "shoving" model of Dyre et al. [J. Non-Cryst. Solids 352, 4635 (2006), 10.1016/j.jnoncrysol.2006.02.173]. Here we demonstrate a qualitative equivalence between these two models starting from the well-established general relationships between the interatomic potentials, elastic constants, structural rearrangement, and entropy in amorphous materials. The unification of these two models provides important predictions that are consistent with experimental observations and shed new light into the problem of glass transition.

  11. Forty years of the Hrubý glass-forming coefficient via DTA when comparing other criteria in relation to the glass stability and vitrification ability

    Kozmidis-Petrovic, A.; Šesták, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 2 (2012), 997-1004 ISSN 1388-6150 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : glass transition * Hrubý criterion * glass -forming ability * DTA/DSC Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.982, year: 2012

  12. PREFACE: Dynamic crossover phenomena in water and other glass-forming liquids Dynamic crossover phenomena in water and other glass-forming liquids

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2012-02-01

    This special section has been inspired by the workshop on Dynamic Crossover Phenomena in Water and Other Glass-Forming Liquids, held during November 11-13, 2010 at Pensione Bencistà, Fiesole, Italy, a well-preserved 14th century Italian villa tucked high in the hills overlooking Florence. The meeting, an assembly of world renowned scientists, was organized as a special occasion to celebrate the 75th birthday of Professor Sow-Hsin Chen of MIT, a pioneer in several aspects of complex fluids and soft matter physics. The workshop covered a large variety of experimental and theoretical research topics of current interest related to dynamic crossover phenomena in water and, more generally, in other glass-forming liquids. The 30 invited speakers/lecturers and approximately 60 participants were a select group of prominent physicists and chemists from the USA, Europe, Asia and Mexico, who are actively working in the field. Some highlights of this special issue include the following works. Professor Yamaguchi's group and their collaborators present a neutron spin echo study of the coherent intermediate scattering function of heavy water confined in cylindrical pores of MCM-41-C10 silica material in the temperature range 190-298 K. They clearly show that a fragile-to-strong (FTS) dynamic crossover occurs at about 225 K. They attribute the FTS dynamic crossover to the formation of a tetrahedral-like structure, which is preserved in the bulk-like water confined to the central part of the cylindrical pores. Mamontov and Kolesnikov et al study the collective excitations in an aqueous solution of lithium chloride over a temperature range of 205-270 K using neutron and x-ray Rayleigh-Brillouin (coherent) scattering. They detect both the low-frequency and the high-frequency sounds known to exist in pure bulk water above the melting temperature. They also perform neutron (incoherent) and x-ray (coherent) elastic intensity scan measurements. Clear evidence of the crossover in the

  13. Characterization of raw materials to obtain the mass for white ware, using waste glass

    Cavalcanti, M.S.L.; Porto, V.S.; Meneses, R.L; Albuquerque, A.V.; Guedes, B.F.R.; Morais, C.R.S.; Santana, L.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem faced in the post modern society is the huge amount of glass, accumulated in landfills cities. The glass material is one hundred percent recyclable and has the property to act as fluxes as well as feldspar. Given this premise, this study aimed to characterize materials - raw materials and waste glass regional plan for development of ceramic bodies with the similar behavior produced industrially, using shards of glass to partially replace the feldspar. The materials - raw materials used were clay, ball clay, kaolin, quartz, feldspar and shard of glass, being characterized by the techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, differential thermal analysis vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared region, the Ray-Diffraction X and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the waste had higher rates of vitreous oxides fluxes and similar. (author)

  14. Materials Characterisation of Glass/epoxy Composites - Focusing on Process Conditions

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Lyckegaard, Anders; Jensen, Erik Appel

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the behaviour of fibre reinforced polymer composites taking the process conditions into account involves advanced modelling techniques and an extensive materials characterisation. The materials characterisation of a chopped strand mat glass/epoxy composite has been the focus...

  15. Effect of Si addition on glass-forming ability and mechanical properties of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass

    Malekan, M.; Shabestari, S.G.; Zhang, W.; Seyedein, S.H.; Gholamipour, R.; Makino, A.; Inoue, A.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy has a surprising GFA, and the glassy rods with diameter of 10 mm have been produced in this research. It has not been reported that the Cu-based glassy rods (Cu ≥ 50 at.%) to be produced with the critical diameter greater than 10 mm. The novelty of this research is that the glass formation has been improved and the critical diameter increased to 12 mm for the alloy having x = 1 with the addition of Si. Different criteria are used to evaluate the influence of Si content on the GFA, and the possible mechanisms involved in the achievement of this GFA are also discussed. - Abstract: The effect of Si addition on the glass-forming ability (GFA) and mechanical properties of (Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 ) 100-x Si x (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 at.%) alloys were investigated. The GFA of Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy is improved by addition of a small amount of Si, and the critical diameter for glass formation increases from 10 mm for the alloy with x = 0-12 mm for the alloy with x = 1 when prepared using copper mold casting. Different criteria are used to evaluate the influence of Si content on the GFA, and the possible mechanisms involved in the achievement of this GFA are also discussed. In the uniaxial compression, the bulk glassy alloys exhibit a limited plastic strain of less than 1%, but the compressive fracture strength and Young's modulus were obtained in high values of 1969-2129 MPa and 101-144 GPa, respectively. Fracture surface and shear bands of samples were studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  16. Effect of similar elements on improving glass-forming ability of La-Ce-based alloys

    Zhang Tao; Li Ran; Pang Shujie

    2009-01-01

    To date the effect of unlike component elements on glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys have been studied extensively, and it is generally recognized that the main consisting elements of the alloys with high GFA usually have large difference in atomic size and atomic interaction (large negative heat of mixing) among them. In our recent work, a series of rare earth metal-based alloy compositions with superior GFA were found through the approach of coexistence of similar constituent elements. The quinary (La 0.5 Ce 0.5 ) 65 Al 10 (Co 0.6 Cu 0.4 ) 25 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in a rod form with a diameter up to 32 mm was synthesized by tilt-pour casting, for which the glass-forming ability is significantly higher than that for ternary Ln-Al-TM alloys (Ln = La or Ce; TM = Co or Cu) with critical diameters for glass-formation of several millimeters. We suggest that the strong frustration of crystallization by utilizing the coexistence of La-Ce and Co-Cu to complicate competing crystalline phases is helpful to construct BMG component with superior GFA. The results of our present work indicate that similar elements (elements with similar atomic size and chemical properties) have significant effect on GFA of alloys.

  17. Disposal costs for SRP high-level wastes in borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Rozsa, R.B.; Campbell, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose of this document is to compare and contrast the overall burial costs of the glass and ceramic waste forms, including processing, storage, transportation, packaging, and emplacement in a repository. Amount of waste will require approximately 10,300 standard (24 in. i.d. x 9-5/6 ft length) canisters of waste glass, each containing about 3260 lb of waste at 28% waste loading. The ceramic waste form requires about one-third the above number of standard canisters. Approximately $2.5 billion is required to process and dispose of this waste, and the total cost is independent of waste form (glass or ceramic). The major cost items (about 80% of the total cost) for all cases are capital and operating expenses. The capital and 20-year operating costs for the processing facility are the same order of magnitude, and their sum ranges from about one-half of the total for the reference glass case to two-thirds of the total for the ceramic cases

  18. Designing antimicrobial bioactive glass materials with embedded metal ions synthesized by the sol–gel method

    Palza, Humberto, E-mail: hpalza@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Biotecnología, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Escobar, Blanca; Bejarano, Julian [Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Biotecnología, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Bravo, Denisse [Departamento de Patología, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Diaz-Dosque, Mario [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas y Comunitarias, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Perez, Javier [Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Biotecnología, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Bioactive glasses (SiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–CaO) having tailored concentrations of different biocide metal ions (copper or silver) were produced by the sol–gel method. All the particles release phosphorous ions when immersed in water and simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, a surface layer of polycrystalline hydroxy-carbonate apatite was formed on the particle surfaces after 10 day immersion in SBF as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing the bioactive materials. Samples with embedded either copper or silver ions were able to further release the biocide ions with a release rate that depends on the metal embedded and the dissolution medium: water or SBF. This biocide ion release from the samples explains the antimicrobial effect of our active particles against Escherichia coli DH5α ampicillin-resistant (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive) as determined by the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) method. The antimicrobial behavior of the particles depends on the bacteria and the biocide ion used. Noteworthy, although samples with copper are able to release more metal ion than samples with silver, they present higher MBC showing the high effect of silver against these bacteria. - Highlights: • Copper and silver act as antimicrobial additives in bioactive glass materials. • Silver is more toxic than copper ions in these bioactive materials. • Sol–gel method allows the synthesis of antimicrobial bioactive materials.

  19. Designing antimicrobial bioactive glass materials with embedded metal ions synthesized by the sol–gel method

    Palza, Humberto; Escobar, Blanca; Bejarano, Julian; Bravo, Denisse; Diaz-Dosque, Mario; Perez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive glasses (SiO 2 –P 2 O 5 –CaO) having tailored concentrations of different biocide metal ions (copper or silver) were produced by the sol–gel method. All the particles release phosphorous ions when immersed in water and simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, a surface layer of polycrystalline hydroxy-carbonate apatite was formed on the particle surfaces after 10 day immersion in SBF as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing the bioactive materials. Samples with embedded either copper or silver ions were able to further release the biocide ions with a release rate that depends on the metal embedded and the dissolution medium: water or SBF. This biocide ion release from the samples explains the antimicrobial effect of our active particles against Escherichia coli DH5α ampicillin-resistant (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive) as determined by the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) method. The antimicrobial behavior of the particles depends on the bacteria and the biocide ion used. Noteworthy, although samples with copper are able to release more metal ion than samples with silver, they present higher MBC showing the high effect of silver against these bacteria. - Highlights: • Copper and silver act as antimicrobial additives in bioactive glass materials. • Silver is more toxic than copper ions in these bioactive materials. • Sol–gel method allows the synthesis of antimicrobial bioactive materials

  20. Influence of citric acid on the surface texture of glass ionomer restorative materials

    Reddy, Dappili Swami Ranga; Kumar, Ramachandran Anil; Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Duraivel, Dasarathan; Indra, Rajamani

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study determined the effectiveness of G-coat plus surface protective agent over petroleum jelly on the surface texture of conventional Glass ionomer restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Three chemically cured conventional glass ionomer restorative materials type II, type IX and ketac molar were evaluated in this study. Sixty specimens were made for each restorative material. They were divided into two groups of thirty specimens each. Of the sixty specimens, thirty were...

  1. Porous glasses as a host of luminescent materials, their applications and site selective determination

    Reisfeld, Renata, E-mail: renata.reisfeld@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Jasinska, Bozena [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Skłodowsskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Levchenko, Viktoria [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Gorgol, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Skłodowsskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Saraidarov, Tsiala; Popov, Inna [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Antropova, Tatiana [I. V. Grebenshchikov Institute of the Chemistry of Silicates, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nab. Makarova, 2, Liter B, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, Ewa [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, W. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    The site selective distribution of pore sizes in pure porous glasses and glasses doped by a luminescent colorant is determined by luminescent spectroscopy, SEM, SAXS and PALS. The potential applications of the studied materials as environmental and biological sensors are outlined. We suggest how luminescent porous glasses doped by complexes of Gd can act as solid scintillators in tracing elementary particles like neutrino. - Highlights: • Porous glasses are a medium for large number of luminescent materials. • Size distribution of empty and filled pores is studied. • The validity of data obtained by different methods is analyzed.

  2. Study on the leach mechanism of 90-19/U glass form in underground water of disposal site

    Sheng Jiawei; Luo Shanggeng; Tang Baolong

    1996-01-01

    The leach behavior of 90-19/U glass form in underground water (UW) of disposal site and in the deionized water (DIW) is studied. The total mass losses of glass form and the normalized element mass losses of B, Li and Si in UW are presented and compared to DIW. It is found that the ions in UW affect the leach behavior of 90-19/U glass. At the beginning of the reaction the reaction rate of the glass is smaller in UW than in DIW due to the low glass dissolution affinity in UW which is defined as (1-c/K). The rate determining step of leach reaction of 90-19/U glass in UW during the entire reaction period is the ion-exchange reaction. The apparent activation energy of glass reaction in UW is 51.6 kJ/mol

  3. The correlation between fragility, density, and atomic interaction in glass-forming liquids

    Wang, Lijin; Guan, Pengfei, E-mail: pguan@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100193 (China); Wang, W. H. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-07-21

    The fragility that controls the temperature-dependent viscous properties of liquids as the glass transition is approached, in various glass-forming liquids with different softness of the repulsive part of atomic interactions at different densities, is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. We show that the landscape of fragility in purely repulsive systems can be separated into three regions denoted as R{sub I,} R{sub II}, and R{sub III}, respectively, with qualitatively disparate dynamic behaviors: R{sub I} which can be described by “softness makes strong glasses,” R{sub II} where fragility is independent of softness and can only be tuned by density, and R{sub III} with constant fragility, suggesting that density plays an unexpected role for understanding the repulsive softness dependence of fragility. What is more important is that we unify the long-standing inconsistence with respect to the repulsive softness dependence of fragility by observing that a glass former can be tuned more fragile if nonperturbative attraction is added into it. Moreover, we find that the vastly dissimilar influences of attractive interaction on fragility could be estimated from the structural properties of related zero-temperature glasses.

  4. The correlation between fragility, density, and atomic interaction in glass-forming liquids

    Wang, Lijin; Guan, Pengfei; Wang, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fragility that controls the temperature-dependent viscous properties of liquids as the glass transition is approached, in various glass-forming liquids with different softness of the repulsive part of atomic interactions at different densities, is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. We show that the landscape of fragility in purely repulsive systems can be separated into three regions denoted as R I, R II , and R III , respectively, with qualitatively disparate dynamic behaviors: R I which can be described by “softness makes strong glasses,” R II where fragility is independent of softness and can only be tuned by density, and R III with constant fragility, suggesting that density plays an unexpected role for understanding the repulsive softness dependence of fragility. What is more important is that we unify the long-standing inconsistence with respect to the repulsive softness dependence of fragility by observing that a glass former can be tuned more fragile if nonperturbative attraction is added into it. Moreover, we find that the vastly dissimilar influences of attractive interaction on fragility could be estimated from the structural properties of related zero-temperature glasses.

  5. Machine Learning Approach for Prediction and Understanding of Glass-Forming Ability.

    Sun, Y T; Bai, H Y; Li, M Z; Wang, W H

    2017-07-20

    The prediction of the glass-forming ability (GFA) by varying the composition of alloys is a challenging problem in glass physics, as well as a problem for industry, with enormous financial ramifications. Although different empirical guides for the prediction of GFA were established over decades, a comprehensive model or approach that is able to deal with as many variables as possible simultaneously for efficiently predicting good glass formers is still highly desirable. Here, by applying the support vector classification method, we develop models for predicting the GFA of binary metallic alloys from random compositions. The effect of different input descriptors on GFA were evaluated, and the best prediction model was selected, which shows that the information related to liquidus temperatures plays a key role in the GFA of alloys. On the basis of this model, good glass formers can be predicted with high efficiency. The prediction efficiency can be further enhanced by improving larger database and refined input descriptor selection. Our findings suggest that machine learning is very powerful and efficient and has great potential for discovering new metallic glasses with good GFA.

  6. The correlation between fragility, density, and atomic interaction in glass-forming liquids.

    Wang, Lijin; Guan, Pengfei; Wang, W H

    2016-07-21

    The fragility that controls the temperature-dependent viscous properties of liquids as the glass transition is approached, in various glass-forming liquids with different softness of the repulsive part of atomic interactions at different densities, is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. We show that the landscape of fragility in purely repulsive systems can be separated into three regions denoted as RI, RII, and RIII, respectively, with qualitatively disparate dynamic behaviors: RI which can be described by "softness makes strong glasses," RII where fragility is independent of softness and can only be tuned by density, and RIII with constant fragility, suggesting that density plays an unexpected role for understanding the repulsive softness dependence of fragility. What is more important is that we unify the long-standing inconsistence with respect to the repulsive softness dependence of fragility by observing that a glass former can be tuned more fragile if nonperturbative attraction is added into it. Moreover, we find that the vastly dissimilar influences of attractive interaction on fragility could be estimated from the structural properties of related zero-temperature glasses.

  7. The glass-forming ability of model metal-metalloid alloys

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Shattuck, Mark D. [Department of Physics and Benjamin Levich Institute, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); O’Hern, Corey S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are amorphous alloys with desirable mechanical properties and processing capabilities. To date, the design of new BMGs has largely employed empirical rules and trial-and-error experimental approaches. Ab initio computational methods are currently prohibitively slow to be practically used in searching the vast space of possible atomic combinations for bulk glass formers. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained, anisotropic potential, which mimics interatomic covalent bonding, to measure the critical cooling rates for metal-metalloid alloys as a function of the atomic size ratio σ{sub S}/σ{sub L} and number fraction x{sub S} of the metalloid species. We show that the regime in the space of σ{sub S}/σ{sub L} and x{sub S} where well-mixed, optimal glass formers occur for patchy and LJ particle mixtures, coincides with that for experimentally observed metal-metalloid glass formers. Thus, our simple computational model provides the capability to perform combinatorial searches to identify novel glass-forming alloys.

  8. Length scales in glass-forming liquids and related systems: a review

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    The central problem in the study of glass-forming liquids and other glassy systems is the understanding of the complex structural relaxation and rapid growth of relaxation times seen on approaching the glass transition. A central conceptual question is whether one can identify one or more growing length scale(s) associated with this behavior. Given the diversity of molecular glass-formers and a vast body of experimental, computational and theoretical work addressing glassy behavior, a number of ideas and observations pertaining to growing length scales have been presented over the past few decades, but there is as yet no consensus view on this question. In this review, we will summarize the salient results and the state of our understanding of length scales associated with dynamical slow down. After a review of slow dynamics and the glass transition, pertinent theories of the glass transition will be summarized and a survey of ideas relating to length scales in glassy systems will be presented. A number of studies have focused on the emergence of preferred packing arrangements and discussed their role in glassy dynamics. More recently, a central object of attention has been the study of spatially correlated, heterogeneous dynamics and the associated length scale, studied in computer simulations and theoretical analysis such as inhomogeneous mode coupling theory. A number of static length scales have been proposed and studied recently, such as the mosaic length scale discussed in the random first-order transition theory and the related point-to-set correlation length. We will discuss these, elaborating on key results, along with a critical appraisal of the state of the art. Finally we will discuss length scales in driven soft matter, granular fluids and amorphous solids, and give a brief description of length scales in aging systems. Possible relations of these length scales with those in glass-forming liquids will be discussed. (review article)

  9. Electron microprobe analysis (WDS EPMA) of Zhamanshin glass reveals the impactor and a common role of accretion in the origin of splash-form impact glass

    Vetvicka, I; Frank, J; Drtina, J

    2010-01-01

    Impact glass samples collected during expeditions to the Zhamashin and Lonar craters were subjected to a morphology survey and compared to Wabar, Henbury and Darwin impact glasses to reveal that the accretion of fibres and spherules is not exclusive for irghizites but occurs in other splash form glasses over the world. WDS EPMA and LA-ICP-MS assays of Zhamanshin and Lonar glasses enabled the definition of akmurynites as Zhamanshin glass of specific morphology, chemistry and absence of extraterrestrial contamination. However, extraterrestrial contamination in irghizites was verified and further WDS EPMA analyses led to the conclusion that the Zhamanshin crater had been formed by the impact of a primitive achondrite of Lodran chemistry.

  10. Materials interactions test methods to measure radionuclide release from waste forms under repository-relevant conditions

    Strickert, R.G.; Erikson, R.L.; Shade, J.W.

    1984-10-01

    At the request of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, the Materials Characterization Center has collected and developed a set of procedures into a waste form compliance test method (MCC-14.4). The purpose of the test is to measure the steady-state concentrations of specified radionuclides in solutions contacting a waste form material. The test method uses a crushed waste form and basalt material suspended in a synthetic basalt groundwater and agitated for up to three months at 150 0 C under anoxic conditions. Elemental and radioisotopic analyses are made on filtered and unfiltered aliquots of the solution. Replicate experiments are performed and simultaneous tests are conducted with an approved test material (ATM) to help ensure precise and reliable data for the actual waste form material. Various features of the test method, equipment, and test conditions are reviewed. Experimental testing using actinide-doped borosilicate glasses are also discussed. 9 references, 2 tables

  11. The effect of casting conditions on the biaxial flexural strength of glass-ceramic materials.

    Johnson, A; Shareef, M Y; Walsh, J M; Hatton, P V; van Noort, R; Hill, R G

    1998-11-01

    To assess the effect of mould and glass casting temperatures on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of two different types of castable glass-ceramic, using existing laboratory equipment and techniques. Two castable glass-ceramic materials were evaluated. One glass (LG3) is based on SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-CaO-CaF2, and is similar in composition to glasses used in the manufacture of glass-ionomer cements. The other glass (SG3) is based on SiO2-K2O-Na2O-CaO-CaF2, and is a canasite-based material. Both materials were used to produce discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness using the same lost-wax casting process as used for metal castings. Mould temperatures of between 500 degrees C and 1000 degrees C and glass casting temperatures of between 1100 degrees C and 1450 degrees C were evaluated. The cast discs were cerammed and the biaxial flexural strength determined with a Lloyd 2000 R tester. A significant difference was found for the BFS in the range of mould temperatures evaluated, with the optimum investment mould temperature being 590 degrees C for LG3 and 610 degrees C for SG3 (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.019, respectively). No significant differences were seen between any of the glass casting temperatures evaluated. The mould temperature for castable glass-ceramic materials produced using the lost-wax casting process can have a significant effect on BFS. The optimum mould temperature may differ slightly depending on the type of material being used. The glass casting temperature of these materials does not appear to have a significant effect on BFS.

  12. High-performance GFRP materials with glass fibre prepregs; Hochleistungs-Faserverbundwerkstoffe aus UD-Gelegeprepregs

    Prause, J.P. [Schichtstoff-Technik, Arnsberg (Germany); Schroeder, K.F. [Wissenschaftliche Verlagsanstalt, Mettmann (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The US 3M Company is the producer of the 'Scotchply' glass fibre prepreg which results in materials that can withstand higher dynamic loads than conventional glass fibre reinforced plastics. The new materials are used, e.g., for leaf spring construction. The fatigue characteristics of GFRP leaf springs were discussed at the DGM 'Verbundwerkstoffe und Werkstoffverbunde' conference at Kaiserslauter in September 1997. This contribution presents tools for the engineer for calculation of leaf springs in consideration of the expected loads. [German] Bereits frueher konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass mit Glasgarngelegen verstaerkte Kunststoffe dynamisch hoeher beansprucht werden koennen als gleichartige Konstruktionen mit Glasgewebeverstaerkung. Dieser Vorteil wird in der industriellen Praxis genutzt, um den breiten Einsatzbereich von Blattfedern aus Stahl durch solche aus Faserverbundwerkstoffen zu erweitern. Mit Glasfasern verstaerkte Kunststoffe (GFK) sind seit Jahren Stand der Technik. Die Verarbeitung als Gelegeprepreg hat sich oekonomisch und oekologisch als eine guenstige Technologie bewaehrt. Die Prepregs werden im Wickelverfahren in die endgueltige Form gebracht oder zu Platten verpresst, aus denen die gewuenschten Werkstuecke mechanisch herausgearbeitet werden. Eine ideale Ausnutzung aller in UD-Gelegen vorgegebenen Eigenschaften ist die Form der Blattfeder. Werkstoff und Geometrie koennen optimal an die Belastung angepasst werden. Ueber die Ermuedungsfestigkeit von GFK-Blattfedern wurde waehrend der Vortragstagung der DGM 'Verbundwerkstoffe und Werkstoffverbunde' im September 1997 in Kaiserslautern eingehend berichtet. Mit dieser Veroeffentlichung soll dem Ingenieur eine Hilfe gegeben werden, solche Blattfedern entsprechend der spaeteren Beanspruchung zu berechnen. (orig.)

  13. An alternative host matrix based on iron phosphate glasses for the vitrification of specialized nuclear waste forms. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    Day, D.E.; Marasinghe, K.; Ray, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Objectives of this project are to: (1) investigate the glass composition and processing conditions that yield optimum properties for iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying radioactive waste, (2) determine the atomic structure of iron phosphate glasses and the structure-property relationships, (3) determine how the physical and structural properties of iron phosphate glasses are affected by the addition of simulated high level nuclear waste components, and (4) investigate the process and products of devitrification of iron phosphate waste forms. The glass forming ability of about 125 iron phosphate melts has been investigated in different oxidizing to reducing atmospheres using various iron oxide raw materials such as Fe 2 O 3 , FeO, Fe 3 O 4 , and FeC 2 O 4 2H 2 O. The chemical durability, redox equilibria between Fe(II) and Fe(III), crystallization behavior and structural features for these glasses and their crystalline forms have been investigated using a variety of techniques including Mossbauer spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA/TGA), and X-ray and neutron diffraction.'

  14. Glasses

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  15. Durability, mechanical, and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high level waste

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1990-01-01

    The high-level liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is routinely solidified into granular calcined high-level waste (HLW) and stored onsite. Research is being conducted at the ICPP on methods of immobilizing the HLW, including developing a durable glass-ceramic form which has the potential to significantly reduce the final waste volume by up to 60% compared to a glass form. Simulated, pilot plant, non-radioactive, calcines similar to the composition of the calcined HLW and glass forming additives are used to produce experimental glass-ceramic forms. The objective of the research reported in this paper is to study the impact of ground calcine particle size on durability and mechanical and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms

  16. The role of the dynamic crossover temperature and the arrest in glass-forming fluids.

    Mallamace, F; Corsaro, C; Stanley, H E; Chen, S-H

    2011-09-01

    We discuss the role of the dynamic glass-forming fragile-to-strong crossover (FSC) in supercooled liquids. In the FSC, significant dynamic changes such as the decoupling (the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation) of homologous transport parameters, e.g., the density relaxation time τ and the viscosity η, occur at a characteristic temperature T(c). We study the FSC using a scaling law approach. In particular, we use both forms of the mode-coupling theory (MCT): the original (ideal) and the extended form, which explicitly describes energy hopping processes. We demonstrate that T(c) plays the most important physical role in understanding dynamic arrest processes.

  17. Radiographic testing of glass fiber reinforced plastic materials

    Babylas, E.

    1976-01-01

    The microradiography of glass fiber reinforced polymers allowed to obtain informations on the growth of defects during molding. A relation was established between microstructure and routine radiography. The conditions needed for obtaining good quality radiograms are analyzed [fr

  18. Effects of Cu substitution for Fe on the glass-forming ability and soft magnetic properties for Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    Dou, Lintao; Liu, Haishun; Hou, Long; Xue, Lin; Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Yucheng; Chang, Chuntao

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Cu substitution for Fe on the glass-forming ability (GFA) and soft magnetic properties for Fe 72−x Cu x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are investigated. It is found that the investigated BMGs exhibit large GFA as well as excellent soft magnetic properties, and proper substitution of Fe by Cu improves the saturation magnetization, coercive force, and effective permeability without obvious deterioration of the GFA. - Highlights: • Fully glassy rods of Fe 72−x Cu x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 BMGs were produced above 1 mm in diameter. • Investigated BMGs exhibit large glass-forming ability and excellent soft magnetic properties. • Proper Cu substitution improves magnetic properties without obvious deterioration of glass-forming ability

  19. Exotic Optical Fibers and Glasses: Innovative Material Processing Opportunities in Earth's Orbit.

    Cozmuta, Ioana; Rasky, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Exotic optical fibers and glasses are the platform material for photonics applications, primarily due to their superior signal transmission (speed, low attenuation), with extending bandwidth deep into the infrared, exceeding that of silica fibers. Gravitational effects (convection sedimentation) have a direct impact on the phase diagram of these materials and influence melting properties, crystallization temperatures, and viscosity of the elemental mix during the manufacturing process. Such factors constitute limits to the yield, transmission quality, and strength and value of these fibers; they also constrain the range of applications. Manufacturing in a gravity-free environment such as the Earth's Orbit also helps with other aspects of the fabrication process (i.e., improved form factor of the manufacturing unit, sustainability). In this article, revolutionary developments in the field of photonics over the past decade merge with the paradigm shift in the privatization of government-owned capabilities supporting a more diverse infrastructure (parabolic, suborbital, orbital), reduced price, and increased frequency to access space and the microgravity environment. With the increased dependence on data (demand, bandwidth, efficiency), space and the microgravity environment provide opportunities for optimized performance of these exotic optical fibers and glasses underlying the development of enabling technologies to meet future data demand. Existing terrestrial markets (Internet, telecommunications, market transactions) and emerging space markets (on-orbit satellite servicing, space manufacturing, space resources, space communications, etc.) seem to converge, and this innovative material processing opportunity of exotic optical fibers and glasses might just be that "killer app": technologically competitive, economically viable, and with the ability to close the business case.

  20. Gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer factor of some oxide glass shielding materials

    Waly, El-Sayed A.; Fusco, Michael A.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    The variation in dosimetric parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer factor, exposure buildup factor, and the photon mean free path for different oxide glasses for the incident gamma energy range 0.015–15 MeV has been studied using MicroShield code. It has been inferred that the addition of PbO and Bi 2 O 3 improves the gamma ray shielding properties. Thus, the effect of chemical composition on these parameters is investigated in the form of six different glass compositions, which are compared with specialty concrete for nuclear radiation shielding. The composition termed ‘Glass 6’ in this paper has the highest mass attenuation and the smallest half value layer and may have potential applications in radiation shielding. An example dry storage cask utilizing an additional layer of Glass 6 as an intermediate shielding layer, simulated in MicroShield, is capable of reducing the exposure rate at the cask surface by over 20 orders of magnitude compared to the case without a glass layer. Based on this study, Glass 6 shows promise as a gamma-ray shielding material, particularly for dry cask storage.

  1. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  2. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  3. Performance of borosilicate glass, Synroc and spent fuel as nuclear waste forms

    Lutze, W.; Grambow, B.; Ewing, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Presently, there are three prominent waste forms under consideration for the disposal of high-level waste: Borosilicate glass and Synroc for high-level radioactive waste from fuel reprocessing and spent fuel as the waste form for non-reprocessed fuel. Using the present experimental data base, one may compare the performance of these three waste forms under repository relevant conditions. In low water flow regimes and at temperatures less than 100 degree C, the fractional release rates of all three waste forms are low, on the order of 10-7/d or less and may decrease with time. Under these conditions the three waste forms behave similarly. At elevated temperatures or in high flow regimes, the durability of borosilicate glass will be much less than that of Synroc, and thus, for certain disposal schemes (e.g., deep burial) Synroc is preferable. All predictions of the long-term behavior are based on the extrapolation of short term experimental data, we point out that appropriate and useful natural analogues are available for each of these waste forms and should be used in the performance assessment of each waste form's long-term behavior. 14 refs

  4. Liquidus Temperature of SrO-Al2O3-SiO2 Glass-Forming Compositions

    Abel, Brett M.; Morgan, James M.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-01-01

    . In the composition range of interest for industrial glasses, Tliq tends to decrease with increasing strontium-to-alumina ratio. We find that cristobalite, mullite, and slawsonite are the dominant devitrification phases for the compositions with high SiO2, SiO2+Al2O3, and SrO contents, respectively. By comparison...... with the phase diagrams for CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 systems, we have found that for the highest [RO]/[Al2O3] ratios, Tliq exhibits a minimum value for R = Ca. Based on the phase diagram established here, the composition of glass materials, for example, for liquid crystal display substrates, belonging...... to the SrO-Al2O3-SiO2 family may be designed with a more exact control of the glass-forming ability by avoiding the regions of high liquidus temperature....

  5. Method of forming aluminum oxynitride material and bodies formed by such methods

    Bakas, Michael P [Ammon, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16

    Methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering green bodies comprising aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material therein. Such green bodies may comprise aluminum, oxygen, and nitrogen in addition to the aluminum orthophosphate. For example, the green bodies may include a mixture of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material. Additional methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering a green body including a sacrificial material therein, using the sacrificial material to form pores in the green body during sintering, and infiltrating the pores formed in the green body with a liquid infiltrant during sintering. Bodies are formed using such methods.

  6. Effect of additional materials on the properties of glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ashes.

    Cheng, T W

    2004-07-01

    There are 21 Metro-waste incinerators in Taiwan under construction and are expected to be finished at year 2003. It is estimated that these incinerators will produce about two million tons of incinerator ash. In order to reduce the volume and eliminate contamination problems, high temperature molten technology studies have been conducted. The purpose of this research was that of trying to control the chemical composition of the glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ash, in order to improve the characteristics of the glass-ceramic. The experimental results showed that the additional materials, Mg(OH)2 and waste glass cullet, can change glass-ceramic phases from gehlenite to augite, pigeonite, and diopside. The physical, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the glass-ceramic also showed much better characteristics than prepared glass-ceramic using incinerator fly ash alone.

  7. High ion-exchange properties of hybrid materials from X-type zeolite and ground glass powder

    Taira, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Kohei

    2017-10-01

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates with a homogeneous distribution of micropores with a superior cation-exchange capacity. Because they have especially excellent selective exchange properties, a considerable number of studies have been conducted on treating water containing radioisotopes using the zeolites. When using artificial zeolites, they have inferior sinterability; in addition, it is quite hard for them to remove from polluted liquid since these artificial zeolites are principally synthesized as a form of powder, which is a disadvantage. In this study, hybrid materials were prepared from X-type zeolite and waste glass powder. Their ion-removal effect and mechanical strength were investigated. The zeolite and waste glass were ground in an agate mortar in several ratios. 0.5 g of the mixture was pressure-molded into pellets having a diameter of 7 mm. These pellets were slowly heated at the speed of 240°C/h to 700°C and maintained at 700°C for 2 h. The removal rate of Sr2+ ions increased as the amount of X-type zeolite in the hybrid materials increased; the former increased up to 100% when the content of latter exceeded 50%. The mechanical strength increased by increasing the amount of glass in the hybrid materials. This is attributed to the fact that the glass powder acts as a binder that improves the densification and consequently the mechanical strength of the hybrid materials.

  8. Thermodynamic and topological instability approaches for forecasting glass-forming ability in the ternary Al-Ni-Y system

    Oliveira, M.F. de; Aliaga, L.C.R.; Bolfarini, C.; Botta, W.J.; Kiminami, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic approach to predict bulk glass-forming compositions in binary metallic systems was recently proposed. In this approach, the parameter γ* = ΔH amor /(ΔH inter - ΔH amor ) indicates the glass-forming ability (GFA) from the standpoint of the driving force to form different competing phases, and ΔH amor and ΔH inter are the enthalpies for glass and intermetallic formation, respectively. Good glass-forming compositions should have a large negative enthalpy for glass formation and a very small difference for intermetallic formation, thus making the glassy phase easily reachable even under low cooling rates. The γ* parameter showed a good correlation with GFA experimental data in the Ni-Nb binary system. In this work, a simple extension of the γ* parameter is applied in the ternary Al-Ni-Y system. The calculated γ* isocontours in the ternary diagram are compared with experimental results of glass formation in that system. Despite some misfitting, the best glass formers are found quite close to the highest γ* values, leading to the conclusion that this thermodynamic approach can be extended to ternary systems, serving as a useful tool for the development of new glass-forming compositions. Finally the thermodynamic approach is compared with the topological instability criteria used to predict the thermal behavior of glassy Al alloys

  9. Hydrotalcite formed by alteration of R7T7 nuclear waste glass and basaltic glass in salt brine at 190 degrees C

    Abdelouas, A.; Crovisier, J.L.; Lutze, W.; Mueller, R.; Bernotat, W.

    1994-01-01

    The R7T7 and synthetic basaltic glasses were submitted to corrosion in a saline MgCl 2 dominated solution at 190 degrees C. For both glasses, the early alteration product is a hydrotalcite-like compound in which HPO 4 2- , SO 4 2- and Cl - substitutes to CO 3 2- . The measured d 003 spacing is 7.68 angstrom for the hydrotalcite formed from R7T7 glass and 7.62 angstrom for the hydrotalcite formed from basaltic glass which reflect the high aluminium content. Chemical microanalyses show that the hydrotalcite is subsequently covered by a silica-rich gel which evolves into saponite after few months

  10. Liquid -to-glass transition in bulk glass-forming Cu55-xZr45Agx alloys using molecular dynamic simulations

    Celtek M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results from molecular dynamics (MD studies concerning the microscopic structure of the ternary, bulk metallic glass-forming Cu55-x Zr45Agx (x=0,10,20 alloys using tight-binding potentials. Understanding of the nature of Glass Forming Ability (GFA of studied alloys, GFA parameters, glass transition temperature (T-g, melting temperature (T-m, reduced glass transition temperature (T-g/T-m, the supercooled liquid region and other parameters were simulated and compared with experiments. The computed pair distribution functions reproduce well experimental x-ray data of Inoue and co-workers. Structure analysis of the Cu-Zr-Ag alloy based on MD simulation will be also presented

  11. The fundamental structural factor in determining the glass-forming ability and mechanical behavior in the Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    Sha, Z.D.; Feng, Y.P.; Li, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A weak but significant hump in trend of the coordinate number and density was observed, respectively. → Our findings indicate our simulation is more accurate to describe the atomic structure of Cu-Zr MGs. The composition-structure-properties correlation was established. → And the effective structural unit for this correlation is the Cu-centered full icosahedra. - Abstract: Using the large-scale atomic/molecular massively parallel simulator, the quantitative composition-structure-properties (including glass-forming ability (GFA) and mechanical behavior) correlations in the Cu-Zr metallic glasses were established. The atomic-level origin of these correlations was tracked down. It was found that the Cu-centered full icosahedron is the microscopic factor that fundamentally influences both GFA and mechanical behavior. Our findings have implications for understanding the nature, forming ability and properties of metallic glasses, and for searching novel metallic glasses with unique functional properties.

  12. Barium-borate-flyash glasses: As radiation shielding materials

    Singh, Sukhpal; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Devinder; Thind, Kulwant Singh; Mudahar, Gurmel S.

    2008-01-01

    The attenuation coefficients of barium-borate-flyash glasses have been measured for γ-ray photon energies of 356, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using narrow beam transmission geometry. The photon beam was highly collimated and overall scatter acceptance angle was less than 3 o . Our results have an uncertainty of less than 3%. These coefficients were then used to obtain the values of mean free path (mfp), effective atomic number and electron density. Good agreements have been observed between experimental and theoretical values of these parameters. From the studies of the obtained results it is reported here that from the shielding point of view the barium-borate-flyash glasses are better shields to γ-radiations in comparison to the standard radiation shielding concretes and also to the ordinary barium-borate glasses

  13. Forming of protective nanostructure coatings on metals and glasses and their properties investigation

    Deshkovskaya, A.; Lynkov, L.; Nagibarov, A.; Glybin, V.; Richter, E.; Pham, M.

    2013-01-01

    Transparent heat-resistant coatings of 10-30 nm thickness described by (ZrO 2 ) x •(Y 2 O 3 ) y composition are formed on the surface of metals and glasses by thermolysis technique. Produced coatings possess high adhesive strength, high corrosive and abrasive resistance. Nanocrystalline formations are revealed on samples surface, with quantity of these formations depending on basic solution concentration, formed layers number and thermal treatment mode. Ion-beam modification of obtained coatings under mixing mode enables said properties enhancing owing to zirconium oxiboride formation at substrate-coating interface as a result of ion-beam synthesis. (authors)

  14. Radiation-Induced Fluidity and Glass-Liquid Transition in Irradiated Amorphous Materials

    Ojovan, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fluidity behaviour of continuously irradiated glasses using the Congruent Bond Lattice model in which broken bonds 'configurons' facilitate the flow. Irradiation breaks the bonds creating configurons which at high concentrations provide the transition of material from the glassy to liquid state. An explicit equation of viscosity has been derived which gives results in agreement with experimental data. This equation provides correct viscosity data for non-irradiated materials and shows a significant increase of fluidity in radiation fields. It demonstrates a decrease of activation energy of flow for irradiated glasses. A simple equation for glass-transition temperature was also obtained which shows that irradiated glasses have lower glass transition temperatures and are readily transformed from glassy to liquid state e.g. fluidized in strong radiation fields. (authors)

  15. Research of glass fibre used in the electromagnetic wave shielding and absorption composite material

    Xu, M.; Jia, F.; Bao, H. Q.; Cui, K.; Zhang, F.

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic shielding and absorption composite material plays an important role in the defence and economic field. Comparing with other filler, Glass fibre and its processed product—metal-coated glass fibre can greatly reduce the material's weight and costs, while it still remains the high strength and the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. In this paper, the electromagnetic absorption mechanism and the reflection mechanism have been investigated as a whole, and the shielding effectiveness of the double-layer glass fibre composite material is mainly focused. The relationship between the shielding effectiveness and the filled glass fibre as well as its metal-coated product's parameters has also been studied. From the subsequent coaxial flange and anechoic chamber analysis, it can be confirmed that the peak electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of this double-layer material can reach -78dB while the bandwidth is from 2GHz to 18GHz.

  16. Accuracy of a selection criterion for glass forming ability in the Ni–Nb–Zr system

    Déo, L.P.; Oliveira, M.F. de

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied a selection in the Ni–Nb–Zr system to find alloys with high GFA. • We used the thermal parameter γ m to evaluate the GFA of alloys. • The correlation between the γ m parameter and R c in the studied system is poor. • The effect of oxygen impurity reduced dramatically the GFA of alloys. • Unknown intermetallic compounds reduced the accuracy of the criterion. - Abstract: Several theories have been developed and applied in metallic systems in order to find the best stoichiometries with high glass forming ability; however there is no universal theory to predict the glass forming ability in metallic systems. Recently a selection criterion was applied in the Zr–Ni–Cu system and it was found some correlation between experimental and theoretical data. This criterion correlates critical cooling rate for glass formation with topological instability of stable crystalline structures; average work function difference and average electron density difference among the constituent elements of the alloy. In the present work, this criterion was applied in the Ni–Nb–Zr system. It was investigated the influence of factors not considered in the calculation and on the accuracy of the criterion, such as unknown intermetallic compounds and oxygen contamination. Bulk amorphous specimens were produced by injection casting. The amorphous nature was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry; oxygen contamination was quantified by the inert gas fusion method

  17. Probing heterogeneous dynamics from spatial density correlation in glass-forming liquids.

    Li, Yan-Wei; Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-12-01

    We numerically investigate the connection between spatial density correlation and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. We demonstrate that the cluster size defined by the spatial aggregation of densely packed particles (DPPs) can better capture the difference between the dynamics of the Lennard-Jones glass model and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen truncation model than the commonly used pair correlation functions. More interestingly, we compare the mobility of DPPs and loosely packed particles, and we find that high local density correlates well with slow dynamics in systems with relatively hard repulsive interactions but links to mobile ones in the system with soft repulsive interactions at one relaxation time scale. Our results show clear evidence that the above model dependence behavior stems from the hopping motion of DPPs at the end of the caging stage due to the compressive nature of soft repulsive spheres, which activates the dynamics of DPPs in the α relaxation stage.

  18. Oriented color centres being formed in anisotropic action of optical radiation on sodium-silicate glass

    Barinova, N.A.; Glebov, L.B.; Dokuchaev, V.G.; Savel'ev, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of anisotropy of absorption of hole colour centres appearing in sodium-silicate glass due to anisotropic action of UV radiation. In case of such action in the field of long-wave edge of their fundamental absorption oriented hole colour centres occurs with maximum of absorption bands to 2.0, 2.8, 4.1 eV. Principal direction of hole colour centres orientation in this case coincides with orientation of ionized glass matrix centres. Orientation of such kind is connected with selective ionization of disorderedly oriented centres forming edge of fundamental absorption. Value of guided dichroism of colour centres absorption is determined by hole migration

  19. Communication: High pressure specific heat spectroscopy reveals simple relaxation behavior of glass forming molecular liquid

    Roed, Lisa Anita; Niss, Kristine; Jakobsen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The frequency dependent specific heat has been measured under pressure for the molecular glass forming liquid 5-polyphenyl-4-ether in the viscous regime close to the glass transition. The temperature and pressure dependences of the characteristic time scale associated with the specific heat...... is compared to the equivalent time scale from dielectric spectroscopy performed under identical conditions. It is shown that the ratio between the two time scales is independent of both temperature and pressure. This observation is non-trivial and demonstrates the existence of specially simple molecular...... liquids in which different physical relaxation processes are both as function of temperature and pressure/density governed by the same underlying “inner clock.” Furthermore, the results are discussed in terms of the recent conjecture that van der Waals liquids, like the measuredliquid, comply...

  20. Fragility of superheated melts and glass-forming ability in Pr-based alloys

    Meng, Q.G.; Zhou, J.K.; Zheng, H.X.; Li, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic viscosity (η) of superheated melts, thermal properties (T x , T m , T L ) and X-ray diffraction analysis on the Pr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG) are reported and discussed. A new refined concept, the superheated fragility defined as M' = E S δ x /k B , has been developed based on common solidification theory and the Arrhenius equation. The interrelationship between this kind of fragility and the glass-forming ability (GFA) is elaborated on and evaluated in Pr-based BMG and Al-based amorphous ribbon alloys. Using viscosity data of superheated melts, it is shown, theoretically and experimentally, that the fragility parameter M' may be used as a GFA indicator for metallic alloys

  1. Utilization of recycled glass as aggregate in controlled low-strength material (CLSM)

    Ohlheiser, T.R. [Western Mobile Denver Aggregate Div., CO (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Incoming glass from curbside recycling programs is successfully being utilized as aggregate replacements. The colored glass that can not be used by local bottle manufacturers is crushed to a {1/2} in. (12.5 mm) material and used in various construction projects. The most successful use of processed glass aggregate (PGA) to date, has been in replacing up to 100% of the aggregate in controlled low-strength material (CLSM). It has proven to be successful and has gained acceptance by contractors in the Boulder, Colorado area.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of disordered materials from network glasses to phase-change memory alloys

    Massobrio, Carlo; Bernasconi, Marco; Salmon, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    This book is a unique reference work in the area of atomic-scale simulation of glasses. For the first time, a highly selected panel of about 20 researchers provides, in a single book, their views, methodologies and applications on the use of molecular dynamics as a tool to describe glassy materials. The book covers a wide range of systems covering ""traditional"" network glasses, such as chalcogenides and oxides, as well as glasses for applications in the area of phase change materials. The novelty of this work is the interplay between molecular dynamics methods (both at the classical and firs

  3. Microscopic Theory of Coupled Slow Activated Dynamics in Glass-Forming Binary Mixtures.

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2018-04-05

    The Elastically Collective Nonlinear Langevin Equation theory for one-component viscous liquids and suspensions is generalized to treat coupled slow activated relaxation and diffusion in glass-forming binary sphere mixtures of any composition, size ratio, and interparticle interactions. A trajectory-level dynamical coupling parameter concept is introduced to construct two coupled dynamic free energy functions for the smaller penetrant and larger matrix particle. A two-step dynamical picture is proposed where the first-step process involves matrix-facilitated penetrant hopping quantified in a self-consistent manner based on a temporal coincidence condition. After penetrants dynamically equilibrate, the effectively one-component matrix particle dynamics is controlled by a new dynamic free energy (second-step process). Depending on the time scales associated with the first- and second-step processes, as well as the extent of matrix-correlated facilitation, distinct physical scenarios are predicted. The theory is implemented for purely hard-core interactions, and addresses the glass transition based on variable kinetic criteria, penetrant-matrix coupled activated relaxation, self-diffusion of both species, dynamic fragility, and shear elasticity. Testable predictions are made. Motivated by the analytic ultralocal limit idea derived for pure hard sphere fluids, we identify structure-thermodynamics-dynamics relationships. As a case study for molecule-polymer thermal mixtures, the chemically matched fully miscible polystyrene-toluene system is quantitatively studied based on a predictive mapping scheme. The resulting no-adjustable-parameter results for toluene diffusivity and the mixture glass transition temperature are in good agreement with experiment. The theory provides a foundation to treat diverse dynamical problems in glass-forming mixtures, including suspensions of colloids and nanoparticles, polymer-molecule liquids, and polymer nanocomposites.

  4. New composite glass materials for non linear optical applications

    Menke, Y.; Ferraris, M.; Corbari, C.

    2004-01-01

    Metal nanocluster composite glasses were prepared via evaporation of a thin gold layer followed by diffusion. The effect of the deposition conditions, resulting in different evaporated gold thicknesses, and the influence of diffusion temperature and time have been studied. Resonance enhancement o...

  5. Plasmonic Glasses and Films Based on Alternative Inexpensive Materials for Blocking Infrared Radiation.

    V Besteiro, Lucas; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Wang, Zhiming; Rosei, Federico; Govorov, Alexander O

    2018-04-16

    The need for energy-saving materials is pressing. This Letter reports on the design of energy-saving glasses and films based on plasmonic nanocrystals that efficiently block infrared radiation. Designing such plasmonic composite glasses is nontrivial and requires taking full advantage of both material and geometrical properties of the nanoparticles. We compute the performance of solar plasmonic glasses incorporating a transparent matrix and specially shaped nanocrystals. This performance depends on the shape and material of such nanocrystals. Glasses designed with plasmonic nanoshells are shown to exhibit overall better performances as compared to nanorods and nanocups. Simultaneously, scalable synthesis of plasmonic nanoshells and nanocups is technologically feasible using gas-phase fabrication methods. The computational simulations were performed for noble metals (gold and silver) as well as for alternative plasmonic materials (aluminum, copper, and titanium nitride). Inexpensive plasmonic materials (silver, copper, aluminum, and titanium nitride) show an overall good performance in terms of the commonly used figures of merit of industrial glass windows. Together with numerical data for specific materials, this study includes a set of general rules for designing efficient plasmonic IR-blocking media. The plasmonic glasses proposed herein are good candidates for the creation of cheap optical media, to be used in energy-saving windows in warm climates' housing or temperature-sensitive infrastructure.

  6. Comparison of SRP high-level waste disposal costs for borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    McDonell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation of costs for the immobilization and repository disposal of SRP high-level wastes indicates that the borosilicate glass waste form is less costly than the crystalline ceramic waste form. The wastes were assumed immobilized as glass with 28% waste loading in 10,300 reference 24-in.-diameter canisters or as crystalline ceramic with 65% waste loading in either 3400 24-in.-diameter canisters or 5900 18-in.-diameter canisters. After an interim period of onsite storage, the canisters would be transported to the federal repository for burial. Total costs in undiscounted 1981 dollars of the waste disposal operations, excluding salt processing for which costs are not yet well defined, were about $2500 million for the borosilicate glass form in reference 24-in.-diameter canisters, compared to about $2900 million for the crystalline ceramic form in 24-in.-diameter canisters and about $3100 million for the crystalline ceramic form in 18-in.-diameter canisters. No large differences in salt processing costs for the borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic forms are expected. Discounting to present values, because of a projected 2-year delay in startup of the DWPF for the crystalline ceramic form, preserved the overall cost advantage of the borosilicate glass form. The waste immobilization operations for the glass form were much less costly than for the crystalline ceramic form. The waste disposal operations, in contrast, were less costly for the crystalline ceramic form, due to fewer canisters requiring disposal; however, this advantage was not sufficient to offset the higher development and processing costs of the crystalline ceramic form. Changes in proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations to permit lower cost repository packages for defense high-level wastes would decrease the waste disposal costs of the more numerous borosilicate glass forms relative to the crystalline ceramic forms

  7. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar

  8. Bismuth silicate glass containing heavy metal oxide as a promising radiation shielding material

    Elalaily, Nagia A.; Abou-Hussien, Eman M.; Saad, Ebtisam A.

    2016-12-01

    Optical and FTIR spectroscopic measurements and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties have been utilized to investigate and characterize the given compositions of binary bismuth silicate glasses. In this work, it is aimed to study the possibility of using the prepared bismuth silicate glasses as a good shielding material for γ-rays in which adding bismuth oxide to silicate glasses causes distinguish increase in its density by an order of magnitude ranging from one to two more than mono divalent oxides. The good thermal stability and high density of the bismuth-based silicate glass encourage many studies to be undertaken to understand its radiation shielding efficiency. For this purpose a glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO2 was prepared using the melting-annealing technique. In addition the effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass, such as PbO, BaO or SrO, were also studied. EPR measurements show that the prepared glasses have good stability when exposed to γ-irradiation. The changes in the FTIR spectra due to the presence of metal oxides were referred to the different housing positions and physical properties of the respective divalent Sr2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ ions. Calculations of optical band gap energies were presented for some selected glasses from the UV data to support the probability of using these glasses as a gamma radiation shielding material. The results showed stability of both optical and magnetic spectra of the studied glasses toward gamma irradiation, which validates their irradiation shielding behavior and suitability as the radiation shielding candidate materials.

  9. Waste glass as eco-friendly replacement material in construction products

    Sharma, Gayatri; Sharma, Anu

    2018-05-01

    Atpresent time the biggest issue is increasing urban population, industrialization and development all over the world. The quantity of the raw materials of construction products like cement, concrete etc is gradually depleting. This is important because if we don't find the alternative material to accomplish need of this industry, with every year it will put pressure on natural resources which are limited in quantity. This major issue can be solved by partial replacing with waste glass of different construction products. This paper gives an overview of the current growth and recycling situation of waste glass and point out the direction for the proper use of waste glass as replacement of construction material. These will not only help in the reuse of waste glass but also create eco-friendly environment.

  10. Effect of Polymer Form and its Consolidation on Mechanical Properties and Quality of Glass/PBT Composites

    Durai Prabhakaran, R. T.; Pillai, Saju; Charca, Samuel; Oshkovr, Simin Ataollahi; Knudsen, Hans; Andersen, Tom Løgstrup; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Lilholt, Hans

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of the processing in determining the mechanical properties of glass fibre reinforced polybutylene terephthalate composites (Glass/PBT). Unidirectional (UD) composite laminates were manufactured by the vacuum consolidation technique using three different material systems included in this study; Glass/CBT (CBT160 powder based resin), Glass/PBT (prepreg tapes), and Glass/PBT (commingled yarns). The different types of thermoplastic polymer resin systems used for the manufacturing of the composite UD laminate dictate the differences in final mechanical properties which were evaluated by through compression, flexural and short beam transverse bending tests. Microscopy was used to evaluate the quality of the processed laminates, and fractography was used to characterize the observed failure modes. The study provides an improved understanding of the relationships between processing methods, resin characteristics, and mechanical performance of thermoplastic resin composite materials.

  11. Density-driven structural transformations in network forming glasses: a high-pressure neutron diffraction study of GeO2 glass up to 17.5 GPa

    Salmon, Philip S; Drewitt, James W E; Whittaker, Dean A J; Zeidler, Anita; Wezka, Kamil; Bull, Craig L; Tucker, Matthew G; Wilding, Martin C; Guthrie, Malcolm; Marrocchelli, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The structure of GeO 2 glass was investigated at pressures up to 17.5(5) GPa using in situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction with a Paris-Edinburgh press employing sintered diamond anvils. A new methodology and data correction procedure were developed, enabling a reliable measurement of structure factors that are largely free from diamond Bragg peaks. Calibration curves, which are important for neutron diffraction work on disordered materials, were constructed for pressure as a function of applied load for both single and double toroid anvil geometries. The diffraction data are compared to new molecular-dynamics simulations made using transferrable interaction potentials that include dipole-polarization effects. The results, when taken together with those from other experimental methods, are consistent with four densification mechanisms. The first, at pressures up to ≃ 5 GPa, is associated with a reorganization of GeO 4 units. The second, extending over the range from ≃ 5 to 10 GPa, corresponds to a regime where GeO 4 units are replaced predominantly by GeO 5 units. In the third, as the pressure increases beyond ∼10 GPa, appreciable concentrations of GeO 6 units begin to form and there is a decrease in the rate of change of the intermediate-range order as measured by the pressure dependence of the position of the first sharp diffraction peak. In the fourth, at about 30 GPa, the transformation to a predominantly octahedral glass is achieved and further densification proceeds via compression of the Ge-O bonds. The observed changes in the measured diffraction patterns for GeO 2 occur at similar dimensionless number densities to those found for SiO 2 , indicating similar densification mechanisms for both glasses. This implies a regime from about 15 to 24 GPa where SiO 4 units are replaced predominantly by SiO 5 units, and a regime beyond ∼24 GPa where appreciable concentrations of SiO 6 units begin to form.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-8 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material ATM-8 is a borosilicate glass that incorporates elements typical of high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuel. Its composition is based upon the simulated HLW glass type 76-68 (Mendel, J.E. et al., 1977, Annual Report of the Characteristics of High-Level Waste Glasses, BNWL-2252, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington), to which depleted uranium, technetium-99, neptunium-237 and plutonium-239 have been added at moderate to low levels. The glass was requested by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. It was produced by the MCC at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute. ATM-8 glass was produced in April of 1984, and is the second in a series of testing materials for NNWSI. This report discusses its fabrication (starting materials, batch and glass preparation, measurement and testing equipment, other equipment, procedures, identification system and materials availability and storage, and characterization (bulk density) measurements, chemical analysis, microscopic examination, and x-ray diffraction analysis. 4 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  13. Icosahedral binary clusters of glass-forming Lennard-Jones binary alloy

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2007-01-01

    It is widely believed that the local icosahedral structure is related to the formation of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Specifically the existence of 13-atom icosahedral cluster in undercooled liquid is imagined to play a key role to initiate the glass formation as the seed of amorphous structure or to block the nucleation of regular crystal as the impurity. The existence of 13-atom icosahedral clusters in one-component liquids was predicted more than half a century ago by Frank from his total energy calculation for isolated clusters. In BMG alloys, however, the situation is less clear. In this report, we present the lowest-energy structures of 13-atom Lennard-Jones binary cluster calculated from the modified space-fixed genetic algorithm. We study, in particular, the artificial Lennard-Jones potential designed by Kob and Andersen [W. Kob, H.C. Andersen, Phys. Rev. E 51 (1995) 4626] that is known to form BMG. Curiously, the lowest-energy structures of 13-atom cluster are non-icosahedral for almost all compositions. Our result suggests that the existence of the icosahedral cluster is not a necessary condition but only a sufficient condition for glass formation

  14. Effects of waste content of glass waste forms on Savannah River high-level waste disposal costs

    McDonell, W.R.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of the waste content of glass waste forms of Savannah River high-level waste disposal costs are evaluated by their impact on the number of waste canisters produced. Changes in waste content affect onsite Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) costs as well as offsite shipping and repository emplacement charges. A nominal 1% increase over the 28 wt % waste loading of DWPF glass would reduce disposal costs by about $50 million for Savannah River wastes generated to the year 2000. Waste form modifications under current study include adjustments of glass frit content to compensate for added salt decontamination residues and increased sludge loadings in the DWPF glass. Projected cost reductions demonstrate significant incentives for continued optimization of the glass waste loadings. 13 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Role of string-like collective atomic motion on diffusion and structural relaxation in glass forming Cu-Zr alloys

    Zhang, Hao [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Zhong, Cheng; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Jiang, Jian-Zhong, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jack.douglas@nist.gov [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Zhejiang University and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Douglas, Jack F., E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jack.douglas@nist.gov [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Zhang, Dongxian [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-04-28

    We investigate Cu-Zr liquid alloys using molecular dynamics simulation and well-accepted embedded atom method potentials over a wide range of chemical composition and temperature as model metallic glass-forming (GF) liquids. As with other types of GF materials, the dynamics of these complex liquids are characterized by “dynamic heterogeneity” in the form of transient polymeric clusters of highly mobile atoms that are composed in turn of atomic clusters exhibiting string-like cooperative motion. In accordance with the string model of relaxation, an extension of the Adam-Gibbs (AG) model, changes in the activation free energy ΔG{sub a} with temperature of both the Cu and Zr diffusion coefficients D, and the alpha structural relaxation time τ{sub α} can be described to a good approximation by changes in the average string length, L. In particular, we confirm that the strings are a concrete realization of the abstract “cooperatively rearranging regions” of AG. We also find coexisting clusters of relatively “immobile” atoms that exhibit predominantly icosahedral local packing rather than the low symmetry packing of “mobile” atoms. These two distinct types of dynamic heterogeneity are then associated with different fluid structural states. Glass-forming liquids are thus analogous to polycrystalline materials where the icosahedrally packed regions correspond to crystal grains, and the strings reside in the relatively disordered grain boundary-like regions exterior to these locally well-ordered regions. A dynamic equilibrium between localized (“immobile”) and wandering (“mobile”) particles exists in the liquid so that the dynamic heterogeneity can be considered to be type of self-assembly process. We also characterize changes in the local atomic free volume in the course of string-like atomic motion to better understand the initiation and propagation of these fluid excitations.

  16. Use of sugar-cane bagasse ash to produce glass-ceramic material in the system Ca O-SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O; Utilizacao de cinza de bagaco de cana para produzir material vitro-ceramico do sistema SiO{sub 2}-CaO-Na{sub 2}O

    Teixeira, S.R.; Santos, G.T.A.; Magalhaes, R.S., E-mail: rainho@fct.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista (DFQB/FCT/UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia; Rincon, J.Ma.; Romero, M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (IETCC/CSIC), Madri (Spain). Inst. de Ciencias de la Construccion Eduardo Torroja; Carvalho, C.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FEIS/UNESP), Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia

    2009-07-01

    A bottom ash was used as raw material to obtain glass which was crystallized to form glass-ceramic material. The characterization of the ash shows that it consists mainly of crystalline materials, predominantly quartz, with oxides of iron, potassium and aluminum as minor elements. The glass was obtained from the mixing of ash with calcium and sodium carbonates. The glass and the glass-ceramic were examined using differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD and DTA data show that Wollastonita is the only crystalline phase present in the material crystallized at 1050 deg C. Part of the glass was synthesized at this temperature for one hour, resulting in a green/brown hard material glass-ceramic. The images of SEM show morphology of spherilithic growth indicating volumetric crystallization mechanism. (author)

  17. Cerium, uranium, and plutonium behavior in glass-bonded sodalite, a ceramic nuclear waste form

    Lewis, M. A.; Lexa, D.; Morss, L. R.; Richmann, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    Glass-bonded sodalite is being developed as a ceramic waste form (CWF) to immobilize radioactive fission products, actinides, and salt residues from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The CWF consists of about 75 mass % sodalite, 25 mass % glass, and small amounts of other phases. This paper presents some results and interpretation of physical measurements to characterize the CWF structure, and dissolution tests to measure the release of matrix components and radionuclides from the waste form. Tests have been carried out with specimens of the CWF that contain rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste form. Parallel tests have been carried out on specimens that have uranium or plutonium as well as the rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste forms; in these specimens UCl 3 forms UO 2 and PuCl 3 forms PuO 2 . The normalized releases of rare earths in dissolution tests were found to be much lower than those of matrix elements (B, Si, Al, Na). When there is no uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is two to ten times lower than the release of the other rare earths. The low release of cerium may be due to its tetravalent state in uranium-free CWF. However, when there is uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is similar to that of the other rare earths. This trivalent behavior of cerium is attributed to charge transfer or covalent interactions among cerium, uranium, and oxygen in (U,Ce)O 2

  18. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  19. Chemical reactivity of precursor materials during synthesis of glasses used for conditioning high-level radioactive waste: Experiments and models

    Monteiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The glass used to store high-level radioactive waste is produced by reaction of a solid waste residue and a glassy precursor (glass frit). The waste residue is first dried and calcined (to lose water and nitrogen respectively), then mixed with the glass frit to enable vitrification at high temperature. In order to obtain a good quality glass of constant composition upon cooling, the chemical reactions between the solid precursors must be complete while in the liquid state, to enable incorporation of the radioactive elements into the glassy matrix. The physical and chemical conditions during glass synthesis (e.g. temperature, relative proportions of frit and calcine, amount of radioactive charge) are typically empirically adjusted to obtain a satisfactory final product. The aim of this work is to provide new insights into the chemical and physical interactions that take place during vitrification and to provide data for a mathematical model that has been developed to simulate the chemical reactions. The consequences of the different chemical reactions that involve solid, liquid and gaseous phases are described (thermal effects, changes in crystal morphology and composition, variations in melt properties and structure). In a first series of experiments, a simplified analogue of the calcine (NaNO 3 -Al 2 O 3 ± MoO 3 /Nd 2 O 3 ) has been studied. In a second series of experiments, the simplified calcines have been reacted with a simplified glass frit (SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) at high temperature. The results show that crystallization of the calcine may take place before interaction with the glass frit, but that the reactivity with the glass at high temperature is a function of the nature and stoichiometry of the crystalline phases which form at low temperature. The results also highlight how the mixing of the starting materials, the physical properties of the frit (viscosity, glass transition temperature) and the Na 2 O/Al 2 O 3 of the calcine but also its

  20. Y and Er minor addition effect on glass forming ability of a Ni–Nb–Zr alloy

    Deo, L.P.; Oliveira, M.F. de

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A theoretical selection criterion to predict the GFA was used for Ni–Nb–Zr–RE alloys. • The prediction agrees very well with thermal parameter gm used to evaluate experimentally the GFA. • RE doped alloys showed higher GFA than the base alloy. • Y and Er elements showed similar effects to improve the GFA of the base alloy. - Abstract: Since the discovering of amorphous alloys in 1960, the actual causes of why some alloys can be easily formed into glasses while others cannot, are not clearly known, thus there is no universal theory to predict the glass forming ability in metallic systems. It is well known that the minor amount addition of proper rare-earth elements can greatly enhance the glass forming ability of some glass-forming alloys. In the present study, a selection criterion was successfully used to predict the glass forming ability improvement of Ni 67.3 Nb 28.4 Zr 4.3 alloy with minor additions of Y or Er. The actual glass forming ability of the base alloy and rare-earth doped alloys were evaluated by the thermal parameter γ m and the results agree very well with the tendency predicted by the calculation. The amorphous nature of alloys was mainly analyzed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. This work also presents a brief and complementary consideration about oxygen contamination quantified by the inert gas fusion method

  1. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  2. Use of glass-ceramic materials for the fixation of radioactive wastes

    Minaev, A.A.; Oziraner, S.N.; Prokhorova, N.P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of the crystallization of phosphate and silicate glasses. It was shown that temperature and time of storage influence considerably the crystallization of glasses and that crystallization very often increases their rates of leaching to a great extent. However, there are glasses in which crystallization does not result in leaching rate increase. It seems reasonable to use these materials for the fixation of radioactive wastes. The main reasons for the increase in the leaching rate during crystallization are the formation of porosity and soluble crystal phases

  3. Design and Analysis of Drive Shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a Composite Material

    Karthikeyan, P.; Gobinath, R.; Kumar, L. Ajith; Jenish, D. Xavier

    2017-05-01

    In automobile industry drive shaft is one of the most important components to transmit power form the engine to rear wheel through the differential gear. Generally steel drive shaft is used in automobile industry, nowadays they are more interested to replace steel drive shaft with that of composite drive shaft. The overall objective of this paper is to analyze the composite drive shaft using to find out the best replacement for conventional steel drive shaft. The uses of advanced composite materials such as Kevlar, Graphite, Carbon and Glass with proper resins ware resulted in remarkable achievements in automobile industry because of its greater specific strength and specific modulus, improved fatigue and corrosion resistances and reduction in energy requirements due to reduction in weight as compared to steel shaft. This paper is to presents, the modeling and analysis of drive shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a composite material and to find best replacement for conventional steel drive shafts with an Kevlar/epoxy or Glass/Epoxy resin composite drive shaft. Modeling is done using CATIA software and Analysis is carried out by using ANSYS 10.0 software for easy understanding. The composite drive shaft reduces the weight by 81.67 % for Kevlar/Epoxy and 72.66% for Glass/Epoxy when compared with conventional steel drive shaft.

  4. Improvement of corrosion resistance in NaOH solution and glass forming ability of as-cast Mg-based bulk metallic glasses by microalloying

    Peng Hao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influences of the addition of Ag on the glass forming ability (GFA and corrosion behavior were investigated in the Mg-Ni-based alloy system by X-ray diffraction (XRD and electrochemical polarization in 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Results shows that the GFA of the Mg-Ni-based BMGs can be improved dramatically by the addition of an appropriate amount of Ag; and the addition element Ag can improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass. The large difference in atomic size and large negative mixing enthalpy in alloy system can contribute to the high GFA. The addition element Ag improves the forming speed and the stability of the passive film, which is helpful to decrease the passivation current density and to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass.

  5. Characterization of the alteration products formed at the surface of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO glasses using ERDA and RBS techniques

    Gavarini, S.; Trocellier, P.; Matzen, G.

    2004-01-01

    Leaching tests have been performed on LnYSiAlO glasses (Ln = La or Ce) that are considered as potential matrices for the specific immobilization of minor actinides. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) performed on leached samples indicated a superficial hydration of LaYSiAlO glass of about 100-150 nm. This hydrated layer is (Al, Y)-enriched according to SEM-EDS analysis, suggesting the formation of hydroxide (or hydroxycarbonates) compounds including these two elements. This process leads to a very efficient passivation of the material due to the low solubility of Al and Y hydroxides (and hydroxycarbonates) species in near neutral media, even when the solution is rapidly replenished is dynamic leaching experiments. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry elemental mapping revealed very localized and significantly Y-enriched deposits at the surface of the sample after leaching. This could be the sign of heterogeneities already present on the pristine glass. These may be correlated with the weak solubility of yttrium (and rare earth) elements in silicate matrices (Y + Ln initial content in the glass ∼11 at.%). In the case of CeYSiAlO glass, a thin layer was formed on the solid after leaching. The simulation of the corresponding RBS spectra showed a surface (Y, Ce)-enrichment and (Al, Si)-depletion in both cases. This could be explained by the oxidation of trivalent cerium initially present in the glass structure during leaching. This might be explained by the low solubility of Ce(IV)-compounds (CeO 2 and/or Ce(OH) 4 ) in solution leading to an enrichment of this element at the glass/solution interface, to form a mixture of amorphous CeO 2 and Y(OH) 3 , as confirmed by XPS and XRD experiments

  6. Thermomechanical Properties of Sb2O3-TeO2-V2O5 Glassy Systems: Thermal Stability, Glass Forming Tendency and Vickers Hardness

    Souri, Dariush; Torkashvand, Ziba

    2017-04-01

    Three-component 40TeO2-(60- x)V2O5- xSb2O3 glasses with 0 ≤ x ≤ 10 (in mol.%) were obtained by the rapid melt-quenching method. These glasses were studied with respect to some mechanical properties with the goal of obtaining information about their structure. The Vickers hardness test was employed to obtain Vickers micro-hardness ( H V) at two different loads, which was within the range of 13.187-17.557 GPa for a typical 0.1 HV (0.9807 N) load. In addition, theoretical micro-hardness ( H) was investigated and compared with experimental H V, showing the elevating trend with increase of Sb2O3 content, as for H V. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was employed within the range of 150-500°C at heating rates of φ = 3 K/min, 6 K/min, 9 K/min, 10 K/min, and 13 K/min. In this work, thermal stability ( T s = T cr - T x) and glass forming tendency ( K gl) were measured and reported for these glasses to determine the relationship between the chemical composition and the thermal stability, in order to interpret the structure of glass. Generally, from the ascertained outputs [analysis of mechanical data, titration study, the values of reduced fraction of vanadium ions ( C V) and oxygen molar volume ( V_{{O}}^{*} )], it was found that the micro-hardness had an increasing trend with increasing the Sb2O3 content. Among the studied glasses, the sample with x = 8 had a higher average micro-hardness value, the highest average thermal stability and glass forming tendency with respect to the other samples, which makes it a useful material (owning very good resistance against thermal attacks) for device manufacturing.

  7. Glass-ionomer cements as restorative and preventive materials.

    Ngo, Hien

    2010-07-01

    This article focuses on glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and its role in the clinical management of caries. It begins with a brief description of GIC, the mechanism of fluoride release and ion exchange, the interaction between GIC and the external environment, and finally the ion exchange between GIC and the tooth at the internal interface. The importance of GIC, as a tool, in caries management, in minimal intervention dentistry (MI), and Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) also will be highlighted. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Properties of New Glass Ionomer Restorative Materials Marketed for Stress Bearing Areas

    2018-03-22

    REPORT TYPE 22/03/2018 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prope1iies of New Glass-Ionomer Restorative Materials Marketed for Stress -Bearing Areas 6...Adobe Professional 7 .0 INTRODUCTION Equia Forte is a new GIC which is marketed for posterior stress bearing restorations due to its newer...research on this and other newer glass ionomer systems being indicated for use in class II posterior stress - bearing preparations. OBJECTIVE The

  9. Crossover to potential energy landscape dominated dynamics in a model glass-forming liquid

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sastry, S.; Dyre, Jeppe

    2000-01-01

    An equilibrated model glass-forming liquid is studied by mapping successive configurations produced by molecular dynamics simulation onto a time series of inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy). Using this "inherent dynamics" approach we find direct numerical evidence for the ......An equilibrated model glass-forming liquid is studied by mapping successive configurations produced by molecular dynamics simulation onto a time series of inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy). Using this "inherent dynamics" approach we find direct numerical evidence...... for the long held view that below a crossover temperature, Tx, the liquid's dynamics can be separated into (i) vibrations around inherent structures and (ii) transitions between inherent structures [M. Goldstein, J. Chem. Phys. 51, 3728 (1969)], i.e., the dynamics become "dominated" by the potential energy...... landscape. In agreement with previous proposals, we find that Tx is within the vicinity of the mode-coupling critical temperature Tc. We further find that near Tx, transitions between inherent structures occur via cooperative, stringlike rearrangements of groups of particles moving distances substantially...

  10. Collective dynamics of glass-forming polymers at intermediate length scales

    Colmenero, J.; Alvarez, F.; Arbe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep understanding of the complex dynamics taking place in glass-forming systems could potentially be gained by exploiting the information provided by the collective response monitored by coherent neutron scattering. We have revisited the question of the characterization of the collective response of polyisobutylene at intermediate length scales observed by neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments. The model, generalized for sub-linear diffusion - as it is the case of glass-forming polymers - has been successfully applied by using the information on the total self-motions available from MD-simulations properly validated by direct comparison with experimental results. From the fits of the coherent NSE data, the collective time at Q → 0 has been extracted that agrees very well with compiled results from different experimental techniques directly accessing such relaxation time. We show that a unique temperature dependence governs both, the Q → 0 and Q → ∞ asymptotic characteristic times. The generalized model also gives account for the modulation of the apparent activation energy of the collective times with the static structure factor. It mainly results from changes of the short-range order at inter-molecular length scales

  11. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  12. Mechanical strength evaluation of the glass base material in the JRR-3 neutron guide tube

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    The lifetime of the thermal neutron guide tube installed JRR-3 was investigated after 6 years from their first installation. And it was confirmed that a crack had been piercing into the glass base material of the side plate of the neutron guide tube. The cause of the crack was estimated as a static fatigue of the guide tube where an inside of the tube had been evacuated and stressed as well as an embrittlement of the glass base material by gamma ray irradiation. In this report, we evaluate the mechanical strength of the glass base material and estimate the time when the base material gets fatigue fracture. Furthermore, we evaluate a lifetime of the neutron guide tube and confirm the validity of update timing in 2000 and 2001 when the thermal neutron guide tubes T1 and T2 were exchanged into those using the super mirror. (author)

  13. Effect of Polymer Form and its Consolidation on Mechanical Properties and Quality of Glass/PBT Composites

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Pillai, Saju; Charca, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    different material systems included in this study; Glass/CBT (CBT160 powder based resin), Glass/PBT (prepreg tapes), and Glass/PBT (commingled yarns). The different types of thermoplastic polymer resin systems used for the manufacturing of the composite UD laminate dictate the differences in final......The aim of this study was to understand the role of the processing in determining the mechanical properties of glass fibre reinforced polybutylene terephthalate composites (Glass/PBT). Unidirectional (UD) composite laminates were manufactured by the vacuum consolidation technique using three...... mechanical properties which were evaluated by through compression, flexural and short beam transverse bending tests. Microscopy was used to evaluate the quality of the processed laminates, and fractography was used to characterize the observed failure modes. The study provides an improved understanding...

  14. Roles of Co element in Fe-based bulk metallic glasses utilizing industrial FeB alloy as raw material

    Shouyuan Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses were fabricated by a conventional copper mold casting method using a kind of Fe-B industrial raw alloy. It is found that Fe-B-Y-Nb bulk metallic glass with 3 at% of Co addition possesses the best glass forming ability, thermal stability, hardness, magnetic property and anti-corrosion property. The hardness test result indicates a synchronically trend with glass-forming ability parameters. The excellent glass-forming ability and a combination of good mechanical and functional properties suggest that the alloys in this work might be good candidates for commercial use.

  15. Influence of citric acid on the surface texture of glass ionomer restorative materials.

    Reddy, Dappili Swami Ranga; Kumar, Ramachandran Anil; Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Duraivel, Dasarathan; Indra, Rajamani

    2014-09-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of G-coat plus surface protective agent over petroleum jelly on the surface texture of conventional Glass ionomer restorative materials. Three chemically cured conventional glass ionomer restorative materials type II, type IX and ketac molar were evaluated in this study. Sixty specimens were made for each restorative material. They were divided into two groups of thirty specimens each. Of the sixty specimens, thirty were coated with G-coat plus (a nano-filler coating) and the rest with petroleum jelly. Thirty samples of both protective coating agents were randomly divided into six groups of five specimens and conditioned in citric acid solutions of differing pH (pH 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7). Each specimen was kept in citric acid for three hours a day, and the rest of time stored in salivary substitute. This procedure was repeated for 8 days. After conditioning, the surface roughness (Ra, μm) of each specimen was measured using a surface profilometer (Taylor & Habson, UK). Data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test at a significance level of 0.05. The surface textures of all the tested glass ionomer restorative materials protected with G-coat plus were not significantly affected by acids at low pH. The surface textures of all the tested glass ionomer restorative materials protected with petroleum jelly coating were significantly affected by acids at low pH. The effects of pH on the surface texture of glass ionomer restoratives are material dependent. Among all the materials tested the surface texture of Type II GIC (Group I) revealed marked deterioration when conditioned in solutions of low pH and was statistically significant. Hence, a protective coating either with G-coat plus or with light polymerized low viscosity unfilled resin adhesives is mandatory for all the glass ionomer restorations to increase the wear resistance of the restorative materials.

  16. Glass forming ability of Al–Ni–La alloys with Si addition

    Yi, J.J.; Xiong, X.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Inoue, A. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); WPI-Advanced Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kong, L.T. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, J.F., E-mail: jfli@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-25

    (Al{sub 85.5}Ni{sub 9.5}La{sub 5}){sub 100−x}Si{sub x}, (Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 9}La{sub 5}){sub 100−x}Si{sub x}, (Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 9.5}La{sub 4.5}){sub 100−x}Si{sub x}, (Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 10}La{sub 4}){sub 100−x}Si{sub x} and (Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 10.5}La{sub 3.5}){sub 100−x}Si{sub x} alloys, where x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0, were cast under the same suction casting conditions into a wedge-shaped copper mold for investigating the effect of Si addition on the glass-forming ability (GFA). The GFA of the Al–Ni–La base alloys, except for the optimal glass former (Al{sub 85.5}Ni{sub 9.5}La{sub 5}), is enhanced when a proper content of Si is added. The largest content of Si up to which GFA can be enhanced changes in the following order of the base alloys: Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 9}La{sub 5}, Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 9.5}La{sub 4.5}, Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 10}La{sub 4} and Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 10.5}La{sub 3.5}. The enhancement of GFA due to Si addition becomes more significant as the La content decreases. This is presumably because more free Al atoms are present in the base alloy. - Highlights: • 0.2–2.0 at. % Si was added to each ternary base alloy. • Wedge-shaped samples were suction cast to obtain the glass-forming ability (GFA). • The GFA of the ternary non-optimal glass formers can be enhanced by Si addition. • The number of free-Al atoms dominates the best Si addition.

  17. Glass forming ability of Al–Ni–La alloys with Si addition

    Yi, J.J.; Xiong, X.Z.; Inoue, A.; Kong, L.T.; Li, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    (Al_8_5_._5Ni_9_._5La_5)_1_0_0_−_xSi_x, (Al_8_6Ni_9La_5)_1_0_0_−_xSi_x, (Al_8_6Ni_9_._5La_4_._5)_1_0_0_−_xSi_x, (Al_8_6Ni_1_0La_4)_1_0_0_−_xSi_x and (Al_8_6Ni_1_0_._5La_3_._5)_1_0_0_−_xSi_x alloys, where x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0, were cast under the same suction casting conditions into a wedge-shaped copper mold for investigating the effect of Si addition on the glass-forming ability (GFA). The GFA of the Al–Ni–La base alloys, except for the optimal glass former (Al_8_5_._5Ni_9_._5La_5), is enhanced when a proper content of Si is added. The largest content of Si up to which GFA can be enhanced changes in the following order of the base alloys: Al_8_6Ni_9La_5, Al_8_6Ni_9_._5La_4_._5, Al_8_6Ni_1_0La_4 and Al_8_6Ni_1_0_._5La_3_._5. The enhancement of GFA due to Si addition becomes more significant as the La content decreases. This is presumably because more free Al atoms are present in the base alloy. - Highlights: • 0.2–2.0 at. % Si was added to each ternary base alloy. • Wedge-shaped samples were suction cast to obtain the glass-forming ability (GFA). • The GFA of the ternary non-optimal glass formers can be enhanced by Si addition. • The number of free-Al atoms dominates the best Si addition.

  18. Method of forming capsules containing a precise amount of material

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Maya, J.

    1986-06-24

    A method of forming a sealed capsule containing a submilligram quantity of mercury or the like, the capsule being constructed from a hollow glass tube, by placing a globule or droplet of the mercury in the tube. The tube is then evacuated and sealed and is subsequently heated so as to vaporize the mercury and fill the tube therewith. The tube is then separated into separate sealed capsules by heating spaced locations along the tube with a coiled heating wire means to cause collapse spaced locations there along and thus enable separation of the tube into said capsules. 7 figs.

  19. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state.

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-21

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ∼20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  20. Thermodynamics of the Gd/sub 63.2/Co/sub 36.8/ glass-forming eutectic

    Baricco, M.; Antonione, C.; Battezzati, L.

    1987-01-01

    In the last years a tendency has consolidated to investigate the properties of the liquid phase in relation to amorphization. The thermodynamic properties of glass-forming liquids show some remarkable similarities and provide a unifying picture for the understanding of glass formation. In particular the specific heat difference between liquid and crystal phases, C/sub P/, seem always positive thus enabling the liquid entropy to approach that of the solid on under-cooling towards the glass transition temperature, T/sub g/. The enthalpy of mixing in glass-forming alloys is strongly negative and depends on temperature giving rise to an excess specific heat. As the liquid and crystalline pure elements have similar specific heat and the Newmann-Kopp law is usually obeyed by solid alloys, the excess specific heat can be assimilated to G. This last quantity, therefore, determines the trend of the thermodynamic properties in the undercooling regime and ultimately the glass-forming tendency of the liquid systems. Specific heat data are available for some liquid alloys but only a few of them refer to glass-forming systems. Typical examples are Au/sub 77/Ge/sub 13.6/Si/sub 9.4/ among metal-metalloid and Mg/sub 85.5/Cu/sub 14.5/ among metal-metal systems. The authors present here a complete determination of the thermodynamic properties of the Gd/sub 63.2/Co/sub 36.8/ eutectic as an example for anthanide transition metal glass-formers. This alloy is low melting so that its liquid state is accessible by differential scanning calorimetry. It forms glasses readily by means of liquid quenching

  1. Glass-bonded iodosodalite waste form for immobilization of 129 I

    Chong, Saehwa; Peterson, Jacob A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tabada, Diana; Wall, Donald; Corkhill, Claire L.; McCloy, John S.

    2018-06-01

    Immobilization of radioiodine (e.g., 129I, 131I) is an important need for current and future nuclear fuel cycles. For the current work, iodosodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6I2] was synthesized hydrothermally from metakaolin, NaI, and NaOH. Following hydrothermal treatment, dried unwashed powders were used to make glass-bonded iodosodalite waste forms by heating pressed pellets at 650, 750, or 850 °C with two different types of sodium borosilicate glass binders, i.e., NBS-4 and SA-800. These heat-treated specimens were characterized with X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, thermal analysis, porosity and density measurements, neutron activation analysis, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The pellets mixed with 10 mass% of NBS-4 or SA-800 and heat-treated at 750 °C contained relatively high percentage iodine retention (~44-47 % of the maximum iodine loading) with relatively low porosities, while other pellets with higher percentages iodine retention either contained higher porosity or were not completely sintered. ASTM C1308 chemical durability tests of monolithic specimens showed a large initial release of Na, Al, Si, and I on the first day, possibly from water-soluble salt crystals or non-durable amorphous phases. Release rates of Na and Si were higher than for Al and I, probably due to a poorly durable Na-Si-O phase from the glass bonding matrix. The cumulative normalized release of iodine was 12.5 g m-2 for the first 10 1-d exchanges, suggestive of coherent dissolution. The average release rate from 10-24 days during the 7-d exchange intervals was 0.2336 g m-2 d-1.

  2. Effect of Ga substitution on the crystallization behaviour and glass forming ability of Zr-Al-Cu-Ni alloys

    Singh, Devinder; Yadav, T.P.; Mandal, R.K.; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N.

    2010-01-01

    The crystallization behaviour of melt spun Zr 69.5 Al 7.5-x Ga x Cu 12 Ni 11 (x = 0-7.5; in at.%) metallic glasses has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC traces showed changes in crystallization behaviour with substitution of Ga. Formation of single nano-quasicrystalline phase by controlled crystallization of glasses has been found only for 0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5. Further increase of Ga content gives rise to formation of the quasicrystals together with Zr 2 Cu type crystalline phase. In addition to this, the substitution of Ga influences the size and shape of nano-quasicrystals. The glass forming abilities (GFAs) of these metallic glasses were assessed by the recognition of glass forming ability indicators, i.e. reduced glass transition temperature (T rg ) and supercooled liquid region (ΔT x ). The glass transition temperature (T g ) has been observed for all the melt spun ribbons.

  3. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  4. Combined PIXE and SEM study of the behaviour of trace elements in gel formed around implant coated with bioactive glass

    Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J. L.; Barbotteau, Y.; Brun, V.; Moretto, Ph.

    2002-05-01

    Bioactive glasses are used as coating biomaterials to facilitate anchorage of metallic prostheses implanted into the body. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of gel formed in contact with alloys and BVA and BVH bioactive glasses implanted. Cylinders of metallic implants composed by Ti, Al and V, are coated with bioactive glass. Three sheep were implanted for different time length: 3, 6 and 12 months in the femoral epiphysis. Results obtained with particle induced X-ray emission and scanning electron microscopy show that BVA coating induces a better contact between the metallic implant and bone. On the other hand, BVH coating prevents corrosion from the metallic implant.

  5. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material

    Felisberto, R.; Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  6. Application of the final flotation waste for obtaining the glass-ceramic materials

    Cocić Mira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the investigation of the final flotation waste (FFW, originating from the RTB Bor Company (Serbia, as the main component for the production of glass-ceramic materials. The glass-ceramics was synthesized by the sintering of FFW, mixtures of FFW with basalt (10%, 20%, and 40%, and mixtures of FFW with tuff (20% and 40%. The sintering was conducted at the different temperatures and with the different time duration in order to find the optimal composition and conditions for crystallization. The increase of temperature, from 1100 to 1480°C, and sintering time, from 4 to 6h resulted in a higher content of hematite crystal in the obtained glass-ceramic (up to 44%. The glass-ceramics sintered from pure FFW (1080°C/36h has good mechanical properties, such as high propagation speed (4500 m/s and hardness (10800 MPa, as well as very good thermal stability. The glass-ceramics obtained from mixtures shows weaker mechanical properties compared to that obtained from pure FFW. The mixtures of FFW with tuff have a significantly lower bulk density compared to other obtained glass-ceramics. Our results indicate that FFW can be applied as a basis for obtaining the construction materials. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 176010: Composition, genesis, application, and contribution to the environmental sustainability

  7. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing.

  8. Comparative consideration and design of a security depot for high radioactive glass-enclosed materials

    Jaroni, U.

    1985-01-01

    From the beginning of 1990 the COGEMA shall supply glass-enclosed high radioactive waste of the reprocessing of German fuel elements back to the Federal Republic of Germany. As to this time the final waste storage in the salt stock of Gorleben will not be available the glass cannisters have to be deposited above ground. First a comparison is made out of a number of proposed storage concepts for the deposition of HAW-glass blocks. The safety technical behaviour of the facility is considered. On the basis of the gained results a new facility design is presented, which can take 450 glass cannisters in a discoid built up cast-steel vessel and makes possible the utilization of the resulting radioactive heat of dissociation. During the development of this concept besides a compact, reasonable method of building and the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage the aspect of high security against release of radioactive materials was emphasized. (orig.) [de

  9. A simple criterion to predict the glass forming ability of metallic alloys

    Falcao de Oliveira, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    A new and simple criterion with which to quantitatively predict the glass forming ability (GFA) of metallic alloys is proposed. It was found that the critical cooling rate for glass formation (R C ) correlates well with a proper combination of two factors, the minimum topological instability (λ min ) and the Δh parameter, which depends on the average work function difference (Δφ) and the average electron density difference (Δn ws 1/3 ) among the constituent elements of the alloy. A correlation coefficient (R 2 ) of 0.76 was found between R c and the new criterion for 68 alloys in 30 different metallic systems. The new criterion and the Uhlmann's approach were used to estimate the critical amorphous thickness (Z C ) of alloys in the Cu-Zr system. The new criterion underestimated R C in the Cu-Zr system, producing predicted Z C values larger than those observed experimentally. However, when considering a scale factor, a remarkable similarity was observed between the predicted and the experimental behavior of the GFA in the binary Cu-Zr. When using the same scale factor and performing the calculation for the ternary Zr-Cu-Al, good agreement was found between the predicted and the actual best GFA region, as well as between the expected and the observed critical amorphous thickness.

  10. Phase selection and microstructure in directional solidification of glass forming Pd-Si-Cu alloys

    Huo, Yang

    Phase selection and microstructure formation during the rapid solidification of alloy melts has been a topic of substantial interest over the last several decades, attributed mainly to the access to novel structures involving metastable crystalline and non-crystalline phases. In this work, Bridgeman type directional solidification was conducted in Pd-Si-Cu glass forming system to study such cooling rate dependent phase transition and microstructure formation. The equilibrium state for Pd-Si-Cu ternary system was investigated through three different works. First of all, phase stabilities for Pd-Si binary system was accessed with respects of first-principles and experiments, showing Pd5Si, Pd9Si2, Pd3Si and Pd 2Si phase are stable all way to zero Kevin while PdSi phase is a high temperature stable phase, and Pd2Si phase with Fe2P is a non-stoichiometry phase. A thermodynamic database was developed for Pd-Si system. Second, crystal structures for compounds with ternary compositions were studied by XRD, SEM and TEM, showing ordered and disordered B2/bcc phases are stable in Pd-rich part. At last, based on many phase equilibria and phase transitions data, a comprehensive thermodynamic discrption for Pd-Si-Cu ternary system was first time to be developed, from which different phase diagrams and driving force for kinetics can be calculated. Phase selection and microstructure formation in directional solidification of the best glass forming composition, Pd 77.5Si16.5Cu6, in this system with growth velocities from 0.005 to 7.5mm/s was systematically studied and the solidification pathways at different conditions were interpreted from thermodynamic simulation. The results show that for growth velocities are smaller than 0.1mm/s Pd 3Si phase is primary phase and Pd9Si2 phase is secondary phase, the difficulty for Pd9Si2 phase nucleation gives rise to the formation of two different eutectic structure. For growth velocities between 0.4 and 1mm/s, instead of Pd3Si phase, Pd9Si2

  11. Effect of Yttrium Addition on Glass-Forming Ability and Magnetic Properties of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb Bulk Metallic Glass

    Teruo Bitoh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The glass-forming ability (GFA and the magnetic properties of the [(Fe0.5Co0.50.75B0.20Si0.05]96Nb4−xYx bulk metallic glasses (BMGs have been studied. The partial replacement of Nb by Y improves the thermal stability of the glass against crystallization. The saturation mass magnetization (σs exhibits a maximum around 2 at. % Y, and the value of σs of the alloy with 2 at. % Y is 6.5% larger than that of the Y-free alloy. The coercivity shows a tendency to decrease with increasing Y content. These results indicate that the partial replacement of Nb by Y in the Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb BMGs is useful to simultaneous achievement of high GFA, high σs, and good soft magnetic properties.

  12. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  13. Effects of Nb addition on icosahedral quasicrystalline phase formation and glass-forming ability of Zr--Ni--Cu--Al metallic glasses

    Fan, Cang; Li, Chunfei; Inoue, Akihisa; Haas, Volker

    2001-01-01

    This work shows that the crystallization process of Zr--Ni--Cu--Al metallic glass is greatly influenced by adding Nb as an alloying element. Based on the results of the differential scanning calorimetry experiments for metallic glasses Zr 69-x Nb x Ni 10 Cu 12 Al 9 (x=0--15at.%), the crystallization process takes place through two individual stages. For Zr 69 Ni 10 Cu 12 Al 9 (x=0), metastable hexagonal ω-Zr and a small fraction of tetragonal Zr 2 Cu are precipitated upon completion of the first exothermic reaction. Contrary to this alloy, the precipitation of a nanoquasicrystalline phase is detected when 5--10 at.% Nb is added. Furthermore, the crystallization temperature T x , supercooled liquid region ΔT x and reduced temperature T g /T L (T g is the glass transition temperature, T L the liquidus temperature) increase with increasing Nb content. These results indicate that adding Nb content to Zr--Ni--Cu--Al metallic glasses not only induces quasicrystalline phase formation, but also enhances glass-forming ability. Copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  14. Fixation by ion exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    Litovitz, T.A.; Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    A process for disposing of toxic materials such as radioactive waste comprises reacting a porous silicate glass or silica gel, having interconnected pores and alkali metal cations. Group 1b metal cations and/or ammonium cation bonded to silicon through divalent oxygen linkages on the internal surfaces of said pores, with a toxic material containing toxic cations as well as non-cationic portions. The toxic cations are capable of displacing the alkali metal cations, Group 1b metal cations and/or ammonium cations to provide a distribution of internal silicon-bonded toxic cation oxide groups within the pores of the glass or silica gel. (author)

  15. Casting of organic glass by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers at low temperature. II. Optical strain of remaining stress type

    Okubo, H.; Yoshii, F.; Kaetsu, I.; Honda, S.

    1978-01-01

    Previously it was found that casting could be carried out efficiently without strain formation by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers. Two types of strain were observed in casting: thermal stream type, which was studied previously, and remained stress type. In this report, the effect of various factors on the formation of remaining stress-type strain in radiation-induced casting polymerization was studied. It was found that the molecular weight of prepolymer did not affect strain formation, while prepolymer concentration and viscosity of the system had a serious influence on strain formation. It could be deduced that this type of strain formed as a result of remaining inner stress due to poor relaxation of the shrinking stress. It was realized that less volume shrinkage of glass-forming monomers accompanying casting polymerization reduced the strain formation of this type in radiation-induced casting polymerization at low temperatures

  16. Simple Theory for the Dynamics of Mean-Field-Like Models of Glass-Forming Fluids

    Szamel, Grzegorz

    2017-10-01

    We propose a simple theory for the dynamics of model glass-forming fluids, which should be solvable using a mean-field-like approach. The theory is based on transparent physical assumptions, which can be tested in computer simulations. The theory predicts an ergodicity-breaking transition that is identical to the so-called dynamic transition predicted within the replica approach. Thus, it can provide the missing dynamic component of the random first order transition framework. In the large-dimensional limit the theory reproduces the result of a recent exact calculation of Maimbourg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 015902 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.015902]. Our approach provides an alternative, physically motivated derivation of this result.

  17. The Monte Carlo dynamics of a binary Lennard-Jones glass-forming mixture

    Berthier, L; Kob, W

    2007-01-01

    We use a standard Monte Carlo algorithm to study the slow dynamics of a binary Lennard-Jones glass-forming mixture at low temperature. We find that the Monte Carlo approach is by far the most efficient way to simulate a stochastic dynamics since the relaxation is about 10 times faster than in Brownian dynamics and about 30 times faster than in stochastic dynamics. Moreover, the average dynamical behaviour of the system is in quantitative agreement with that obtained using Newtonian dynamics, apart from at very short times where thermal vibrations are suppressed. We show, however, that dynamic fluctuations quantified by four-point dynamic susceptibilities do retain a dependence on the microscopic dynamics, as recently predicted theoretically

  18. Crystal phases of a glass-forming Lennard-Jones mixture

    Fernandez, Julian R.; Harrowell, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We compare the potential energy at zero temperature of a range of crystal structures for a glass-forming binary mixture of Lennard-Jones particles. The lowest-energy ordered state consists of coexisting phases of a single component face centered cubic structure and an equimolar cesium chloride structure. An infinite number of layered crystal structures are identified with energies close to this ground state. We demonstrate that the finite size increase of the energy of the coexisting crystal with incoherent interfaces is sufficient to destabilize this ordered phase in simulations of typical size. Two specific local coordination structures are identified as of possible structural significance in the amorphous state. We observe rapid crystal growth in the equimolar mixture

  19. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers

    Yoshida, M.; Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate of a monomeric system on the porosity and activity of an immobilized enzyme prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperatures has been studied. Slow cooling gave the same effect on porosity of the polymer as decreasing the monomer concentration. A glass-forming solvent such as diethylene glycol was added to water to study the effect of the supercooling tendency of the solvent. Addition of diethylene glycol decreased porosity and also enzymic activity. Water was replaced by the miscible solvent p-dioxane and the immiscible solvent n-decane in order to clarify the effect of solvent. p-Dioxane had a similar effect to water on the relation between the monomer concentration, porosity and activity. On the other hand, polymer prepared from the system containing n-decane showed different immobilization properties owing to the presence of independent pores in the matrix. (author)

  20. A Comparative Study of the Behaviour of Five Dense Glass Materials Under Shock Loading Conditions

    Radford, Darren D.; Proud, William G.; Field, John E.

    2001-06-01

    Previous work at the Cavendish Laboratory on the properties of glasses under shock loading has demonstrated that the material response is highly dependent upon the composition of the glass. The shock response of glass materials with an open structure, such as borosilicate, exhibits a ramping behaviour in the longitudinal stress histories due to structural collapse. Glass materials with a “filled” microstructure, as in the case of Type-D, Extra Dense Flint (DEDF) do not exhibit a ramping behaviour and behave in a manner similar to polycrystalline ceramics [1]. The current investigation compares the behaviour of five such glasses (SF15, DEDF, LACA, SF57 and DEDF-927210) under shock loading conditions. It is observed that slight changes in material composition can have a large affect on the inelastic behaviour. Principal Hugoniot and shear strength data are presented for all of the materials for pressures ranging from 2 to 14 GPa. Evidence of the so-called failure-front [2] is presented via lateral stress histories measured using manganin stress gauges and confirmed with high-speed photography. 1. Bourne, N.K., Millett, J.C.F., and Field, J.E., “On the strength of shocked glasses” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 455 (1999) 1275-1282 2. Brar, N.S., “Failure Waves in Glass and Ceramics Under Shock Compression”, in "Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 1999", ed. M.D. Furnish, L.C. Chhabildas, and R.S. Hixson, American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, New York, (1999) 601-606

  1. The slag from ELCOGAS IGCC thermal power plant as raw material for the synthesis of glass-ceramic materials. Part 2: Synthesis and characterization of the glass-ceramic materials

    Aineto, M.; Acosta, A.; Rincon, J.M.A.; Romero, M. [University of Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    There are here reported the result of the second phase of the investigation on the melting behavior of the slag and the process followed to synthesize glass-ceramic materials using this slag as raw component. Starting from a vitrifying mixture based on slag, glass cullet and precipitated calcium carbonate coming from sugar refining, we have obtained the parent glass named ECSCP, which exhibit a surface tendency of crystallization. Pressed specimens of 40 mm diameter and 7 mm height were conformed with the powdered ECSCP glass. The specimens were heat treated for crystalline phases development at temperatures between 800 and 1100{sup o}C during time intervals from 5 to 60 minutes. A series of wollastonite-anorthite-gehlenite glass-ceramics has been synthesized of different characteristics depending on the time and temperature of devitrification.

  2. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  3. Glass transition temperature of hard chairside reline materials after post-polymerisation treatments.

    Urban, Vanessa M; Machado, Ana L; Alves, Marinês O; Maciel, Adeilton P; Vergani, Carlos E; Leite, Edson R

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of post-polymerisation treatments on the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of five hard chairside reline materials (Duraliner II-D, Kooliner-K, New Truliner-N, Ufi Gel hard-U and Tokuso Rebase Fast-T). Specimens (10 x 10 x 1 mm) were made following the manufacturers' instructions and divided into three groups (n = 5). Control group specimens were left untreated. Specimens from the microwave group were irradiated with pre-determined power/time combinations, and specimens from the water-bath group were immersed in hot water at 55 degrees C for 10 min. Glass transition ( degrees C) was performed by differential scanning calorimetry. Data were analysed using anova, followed by post hoc Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). Both post-polymerisation treatments promoted a significant (p glass transition of material Kooliner, with the effect being more pronounced for microwave irradiation.

  4. Mechanical properties of lunar materials under anhydrous, hard vacuum conditions: applications of lunar glass structural components

    Blacic, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Lunar materials and derivatives such as glass may possess very high tensile strengths compared to equivalent materials on earth because of the absence of hydrolytic weakening processes on the moon and in the hard vacuum of free space. Hydrolyzation of Si-O bonds at crack tips or dislocations reduces the strength of silicates by about an order of magnitude in earth environments. However, lunar materials are extremely anhydrous and hydrolytic weakening will be suppressed in free space. Thus, the geomechanical properties of the moon and engineering properties of lunar silicate materials in space environments will be very different than equivalent materials under earth conditions where the action of water cannot be conveniently avoided. Possible substitution of lunar glass for structural metals in a variety of space engineering applications enhances the economic utilization of the moon. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  5. Characteristics of borosilicate waste glass form for high-level radioactive waste

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Jong Won; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-03-01

    Basic data, required for the design and the performance assessment of a repository of HLW, suchas the chemical composition and the characteristics of the borosilicate waste glass have been identified according to the burn-ups of spent PWR fuels. The diemnsion of waste canister is 430mm in diameter and 1135mm in length, and the canister should hold less than 2kwatts of heat from their decay of radionuclides contained in the HLW. Based on the reprocessing of 5 years-cooled spent fuel, one canister could hold about 11.5wt.% and 10.8wt.% of oxidized HLW corresponding to their burn-ups of 45,000MWD/MTU and 55,000MWD/MTU, respectively. These waste forms have been recommanded as the reference waste forms of HLW. The characteristics of these wastes as a function of decay time been evaluated. However, after a specific waste form and a specific site for the disposal would be selected, the characteristics of the waste should be reevaluated under the consideration of solidification period, loaded waste, storage condition and duration, site circumstances for the repository system and its performance assessment.

  6. Estimates of radionuclide release from glass waste forms in a tuff repository and the effects on regulatory compliance

    Aines, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    This paper discusses preliminary estimates of the release of radionuclides from waste packages containing glass-based waste forms under the expected conditions at Yucca Mountain. These estimates can be used to evaluate the contribution of waste package performance toward meeting repository regulatory restrictions on radionuclide release. Glass waste will be held in double stainless steel canisters. After failure of the container sometime after the 300 to 1000 year containment period, the open headspace in these cans will provide the only area where standing water can accumulate and react with the glass. A maximum release rate of 0.177 g/m 2 x year or 1.3 grams per year was obtained. Normalized loss of 1.3 grams per year corresponds to 0.08 parts in 100,000 per year of the 1660 kg reference weight of DWPF glass

  7. Beyond packing of hard spheres: The effects of core softness, non-additivity, intermediate-range repulsion, and many-body interactions on the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    Zhang, Kai; Fan, Meng; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Shattuck, Mark D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics and Benjamin Levich Institute, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); O’Hern, Corey S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    When a liquid is cooled well below its melting temperature at a rate that exceeds the critical cooling rate R{sub c}, the crystalline state is bypassed and a metastable, amorphous glassy state forms instead. R{sub c} (or the corresponding critical casting thickness d{sub c}) characterizes the glass-forming ability (GFA) of each material. While silica is an excellent glass-former with small R{sub c} < 10{sup −2} K/s, pure metals and most alloys are typically poor glass-formers with large R{sub c} > 10{sup 10} K/s. Only in the past thirty years have bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) been identified with R{sub c} approaching that for silica. Recent simulations have shown that simple, hard-sphere models are able to identify the atomic size ratio and number fraction regime where BMGs exist with critical cooling rates more than 13 orders of magnitude smaller than those for pure metals. However, there are a number of other features of interatomic potentials beyond hard-core interactions. How do these other features affect the glass-forming ability of BMGs? In this manuscript, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine how variations in the softness and non-additivity of the repulsive core and form of the interatomic pair potential at intermediate distances affect the GFA of binary alloys. These variations in the interatomic pair potential allow us to introduce geometric frustration and change the crystal phases that compete with glass formation. We also investigate the effect of tuning the strength of the many-body interactions from zero to the full embedded atom model on the GFA for pure metals. We then employ the full embedded atom model for binary BMGs and show that hard-core interactions play the dominant role in setting the GFA of alloys, while other features of the interatomic potential only change the GFA by one to two orders of magnitude. Despite their perturbative effect, understanding the detailed form of the intermetallic potential is important for

  8. Composite glass ceramics - a promising material for aviation

    М. В. Дмитрієв

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the technical and technological characteristics of the composite ceramic as a material for electrical and structural parts in aircraft. The economic and technological advantages compared to ceramic pottery and proposed options for development of production in Ukraine

  9. Dematerialization of the Ruins : Glass as a Promising Restorative Material for the Consolidation of Historic Structures

    Barou, L.; Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Veer, F.A.; Nijsse, R.; Louter, Christian; Bos, Freek; Belis, Jan; Veer, Fred; Nijsse, Rob

    This research investigates the potential of glass as a new design tool to highlight and safeguard our historic structures. Current restoration and conservation treatments with traditional materials bear the risk of conjecture between the original and new elements, whereas the high consolidation

  10. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  11. Effect of component substitution on the atomic dynamics in glass-forming binary metallic melts

    Nowak, B.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Voigtmann, Th.; Evenson, Z.; Hansen, T. C.; Meyer, A.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the substitution of early transition metals (Zr, Hf, and Nb) in Ni-based binary glass-forming metallic melts and the impact on structural and dynamical properties by using a combination of neutron scattering, electrostatic levitation (ESL), and isotopic substitution. The self-diffusion coefficients measured by quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) identify a sluggish diffusion as well as an increased activation energy by almost a factor of 2 for Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr36Ni64 . This finding can be explained by the locally higher packing density of Hf atoms in Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr atoms in Zr36Ni64 , which has been derived from interatomic distances by analyzing the measured partial structure factors. Furthermore, QENS measurements of liquid Hf35Ni65 prepared with 60Ni , which has a vanishing incoherent scattering cross section, have demonstrated that self-diffusion of Hf is slowed down compared to the concentration weighted self-diffusion of Hf and Ni. This implies a dynamical decoupling between larger Hf and smaller Ni atoms, which can be related to a saturation effect of unequal atomic nearest-neighbor pairs, that was observed recently for Ni-rich compositions in Zr-Ni metallic melts. In order to establish a structure-dynamics relation, measured partial structure factors have been used as an input for mode-coupling theory (MCT) of the glass transition to calculate self-diffusion coefficients for the different atomic components. Remarkably, MCT can reproduce the increased activation energy for Hf35Ni65 as well as the dynamical decoupling between Hf and Ni atoms.

  12. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  13. Development of Composite Materials Under Ecological Aspects as Recycling Concept For Borosilicate Glass Containing Iron Slags

    Khalil, T.K.; Bossert, J.; Aly, H.F.; Bossert, J.

    1999-01-01

    Composite concept in materials science can be conveniently applied in the waste treatment technology to construct specific t ailor made c omposite materials, in which at least one of the phases is built by the waste material. In this work the applicability of this concept for the fixation and recycling of slags wastes is done, whereby different mixtures of blast furnace slags are mixed with two different borosilicate glasses, which serve as matrix material. Thermal behaviour of the produced compacts were studied. Both melting and powder technology are applied for the fabrication of dense products. The microstructure of sintered samples is investigated by electron microscopy. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness are determined by a Vickers technique. An improvement of the fracture toughness of more than 50% over the value for the original glass VG 98 is achieved by slag addition

  14. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials.

    Gorni, Giulio; Velázquez, Jose J; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-30

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF₄ glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO₂ precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  15. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    Giulio Gorni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  16. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    Gorni, Giulio; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications. PMID:29385706

  17. Structural predictor for nonlinear sheared dynamics in simple glass-forming liquids.

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S; Tanaka, Hajime

    2018-01-02

    Glass-forming liquids subjected to sufficiently strong shear universally exhibit striking nonlinear behavior; for example, a power-law decrease of the viscosity with increasing shear rate. This phenomenon has attracted considerable attention over the years from both fundamental and applicational viewpoints. However, the out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear nature of sheared fluids have made theoretical understanding of this phenomenon very challenging and thus slower to progress. We find here that the structural relaxation time as a function of the two-body excess entropy, calculated for the extensional axis of the shear flow, collapses onto the corresponding equilibrium curve for a wide range of pair potentials ranging from harsh repulsive to soft and finite. This two-body excess entropy collapse provides a powerful approach to predicting the dynamics of nonequilibrium liquids from their equilibrium counterparts. Furthermore, the two-body excess entropy scaling suggests that sheared dynamics is controlled purely by the liquid structure captured in the form of the two-body excess entropy along the extensional direction, shedding light on the perplexing mechanism behind shear thinning.

  18. Structural predictor for nonlinear sheared dynamics in simple glass-forming liquids

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Tanaka, Hajime

    2018-01-01

    Glass-forming liquids subjected to sufficiently strong shear universally exhibit striking nonlinear behavior; for example, a power-law decrease of the viscosity with increasing shear rate. This phenomenon has attracted considerable attention over the years from both fundamental and applicational viewpoints. However, the out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear nature of sheared fluids have made theoretical understanding of this phenomenon very challenging and thus slower to progress. We find here that the structural relaxation time as a function of the two-body excess entropy, calculated for the extensional axis of the shear flow, collapses onto the corresponding equilibrium curve for a wide range of pair potentials ranging from harsh repulsive to soft and finite. This two-body excess entropy collapse provides a powerful approach to predicting the dynamics of nonequilibrium liquids from their equilibrium counterparts. Furthermore, the two-body excess entropy scaling suggests that sheared dynamics is controlled purely by the liquid structure captured in the form of the two-body excess entropy along the extensional direction, shedding light on the perplexing mechanism behind shear thinning.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Edelman , Irina; Ivanova , Oxana; Ivantsov , Ruslan; Velikanov , D.; Zabluda , V.; Zubavichus , Y.; Veligzhanin , A.; Zaikovskiy , V.; Stepanov , S.; Artemenko , Alla; Curély , Jacques; Kliava , Janis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge struct...

  20. Recent advances on glass-forming systems driven far from equilibrium. Special issue marking the completion of the Research Unit FOR 1394 `Nonlinear response to probe vitrification'

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the frontier questions in Statistical Physics and Materials Science. Highly cooperative structural processes develop in glass-forming melts exhibiting relaxational dynamics which is spread out over many decades in time. While considerable progress has been made in recent decades towards understanding dynamical slowing-down in quiescent systems, the interplay of glassy dynamics with external fields reveals a wealth of novel phenomena yet to be explored. This special issue focuses on recent results obtained by the Research Unit FOR 1394 `Nonlinear response to probe vitrification' which was funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). In the projects of the research unit, strong external fields were used in order to gain insights into the complex structural and transport phenomena at the glass transition under far-from-equilibrium conditions. This aimed inter alia to test theories of the glass transition developed for quiescent systems by pushing them beyond their original regime. Combining experimental, simulational, and theoretical efforts, the eight projects within the FOR 1394 measured and determined aspects of the nonlinear response of supercooled metallic, polymeric, and silica melts, of colloidal dispersions, and of ionic liquids. Applied fields included electric and mechanic fields, and forced active probing (`micro-rheology'), where a single probe is forced through the glass-forming host. Nonlinear stress-strain and force-velocity relations as well as nonlinear dielectric susceptibilities and conductivities were observed. While the physical manipulation of melts and glasses is interesting in its own right, especially technologically, the investigations performed by the FOR 1394 suggest to use the response to strong homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields as technique to explore on the microscopic level the cooperative mechanisms in dense melts of strongly interacting constituents. Questions considered concern the

  1. Cesium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution of Analytical Reference Glass-1 in Both Powder and Shard Form

    Coleman, C.J.; Spencer, W.A.

    1998-04-01

    CsOH has been shown to be an effective and convenient dissolution reagent for Analytical Reference Glass-1 (ARG-1). This glass standard was prepared from nonradioactive DWPF Start-up Glass. Therefore, its composition is similar to DWPF product glass and many of the glass matrices prepared at SRTC.The principal advantage of the CsOH fusion dissolution is that the reagent does not add the alkali metals Li, Na, and K usually needed by SRS customers. Commercially available CsOH is quite pure so that alkali metals can be measured accurately, often without blank corrections. CsOH fusions provide a single dissolution method for applicable glass to replace multiple dissolution schemes used by most laboratories. For example, SRTC glass samples are most commonly dissolved with a Na 2 O 2 -NaOH fusion (ref.1) and a microwave- assisted acid dissolution with HNO 3 -HF-H 3 BO 3 -HCl (ref.2). Othe laboratories use fusion methods based on KOH, LiBO 2 , and Na 2 CO 3 CsOH fusion approach reduces by half not only the work in the dissolution laboratory, but also in the spectroscopy laboratories that must analyze each solution.Experiments also revealed that glass shards or pellets are rapidly attacked if the flux temperature is raised considerably above the glass softening point. The softening point of ARG-1 glass is near 650 degrees C. Fusions performed at 750 degrees C provided complete dissolutions and accurate elemental analyses of shards. Successful dissolution of glass shards was demonstrated with CsOH, Na 2 O 2 , NaOH, KOH, and RbOH. Ability to dissolve glass shards is of considerable practical importance. Crushing glass to a fine powder is a slow and tedious task, especially for radioactive glasses dissolved in shielded cells. CsOH fusion of glass powder or shards is a convenient, cost-effective dissolution scheme applicable in SRTC, the DWPF, and the commercial glass industry

  2. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Origin of the Enhanced Glass-Forming Ability Induced by Microalloying Y in the ZrCuAl Alloy

    Gu-Qing Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the structural origin of the enhanced glass-forming ability induced by microalloying Y in a ZrCuAl multicomponent system is studied by performing synchrotron radiation experiments combined with simulations. It is revealed that the addition of Y leads to the optimization of local structures, including: (1 more Zr-centered and Y-centered icosahedral-like clusters occur in the microstructure; (2 the atomic packing efficiency inside clusters and the regularity of clusters are both enhanced. These structural optimizations help to stabilize the amorphous structure in the ZrCuAlY system, and lead to a high glass-forming ability (GFA. The present work provides an understanding of GFAs in multicomponent alloys and will shed light on the development of more metallic glasses with high GFAs.

  4. Strong composition-dependence on glass-forming ability in Ni-(Ti,Zr)-Si pseudo-ternary alloys

    Yang, H.; Wang, J.Q.; Li, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The glass formation in Ni-(Ti,Zr)-Si pseudo-ternary alloys was studied. For suction casting, by carefully adjusting the alloy composition and studying the microstructure changes, the best glass-forming alloy with a 2 mm diameter is pinpointed in a narrow composition region of 57.5-58.5 at.% Ni, 36.5-38.5 at.% (Ti + Zr) and 5-5.5 at.% Si. The main competing crystalline phases, identified by XRD and SEM, were Ni 10 (Zr,Ti) 7 , Ni(Ti,Zr) and an unidentified Si-containing phase. Our results indicate a clear need for monitoring the microstructure change in the cross section of the ingots to locate the best glass-forming alloys

  5. Mean-coordination number dependence of the fragility in Ge-Se-In glass-forming liquids

    Saffarini, G.; Saiter, A.; Garda, M.R.; Saiter, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements have been performed on elemental Se as well as on Ge x Se 94- x In 6 (x=4, 8, and 11 at%) and on Ge y Se 88- y In 12 (y=5, 7, and 9 at%) chalcogenide glasses. From the cooling rate dependence of the fictive temperature, the apparent activation energies, Δh*, and the fragility indices, m, as defined in the strong-fragile glass-forming liquid concept, are determined. It is found that, in Ge-Se-In system, there is an evolution from strong (m=67) to fragile (m=116) glass-forming liquids. The dependence of 'm' on the mean-coordination number, Z, is also obtained. This dependence is rationalized by assuming that, in this glassy alloy system, there is a tendency for the formation of In 2 Se 3 clusters

  6. Crystal growth nucleation and Fermi energy equalization of intrinsic spherical nuclei in glass-forming melts

    Robert F Tournier

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy saving resulting from the equalization of Fermi energies of a crystal and its melt is added to the Gibbs free-energy change ΔG2ls associated with a crystal formation in glass-forming melts. This negative contribution being a fraction ε ls(T of the fusion heat is created by the electrostatic potential energy −U0 resulting from the electron transfer from the crystal to the melt and is maximum at the melting temperature Tm in agreement with a thermodynamics constraint. The homogeneous nucleation critical temperature T2, the nucleation critical barrier ΔG2ls*/kBT and the critical radius R*2ls are determined as functions of εls(T. In bulk metallic glass forming melts, εls(T and T2 only depend on the free-volume disappearance temperature T0l, and εls(Tm is larger than 1 (T0l>Tm/3; in conventional undercooled melts εls(Tm is smaller than 1 (T0l>Tm/3. Unmelted intrinsic crystals act as growth nuclei reducing ΔG2ls*/kBT and the nucleation time. The temperature-time transformation diagrams of Mg65Y10 Cu25, Zr41.2Ti13.8 Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, Pd43Cu27 Ni10P20, Fe83B17 and Ni melts are predicted using classic nucleation models including time lags in transient nucleation, by varying the intrinsic nucleus contribution to the reduction of ΔG2ls*/kBT. The energy-saving coefficient ε nm(T of an unmelted crystal of radius Rnm is reduced when Rnm LtR*2ls; εnm is quantified and corresponds to the first energy level of one s-electron moving in vacuum in the same spherical attractive potential −U0 despite the fact that the charge screening is built by many-body effects.

  7. Resolving glass transition in Te-based phase-change materials by modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    Chen, Yimin; Mu, Sen; Wang, Guoxiang; Shen, Xiang; Wang, Junqiang; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua; Wang, Rongping

    2017-10-01

    Glass transitions of Te-based phase-change materials (PCMs) were studied by modulated differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that both Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe are marginal glass formers with ΔT (= T x - T g) less than 2.1 °C when the heating rate is below 3 °C min-1. The fragilities of Ge2Sb2Te5 and GeTe can be estimated as 46.0 and 39.7, respectively, around the glass transition temperature, implying that a fragile-to-strong transition would be presented in such Te-based PCMs. The above results provide direct experimental evidence to support the investigation of crystallization kinetics in supercooled liquid PCMs.

  8. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on sodium borosilicate glass interacted with thermally oxidized aluminides formed on alloy 690

    Yusufali, C.; Dutta, R.S.; Dey, G.K.; Kshirsagar, R.J.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally oxidized aluminides formed on Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates were subjected to interaction with sodium borosilicate melt (used as matrices for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste) at 1248 K for 192 hours. After the interaction, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis of glass samples indicated the incorporation of Al in the glass network. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of glass specimens revealed modified glass structure. (author)

  9. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  10. Retrospective Analysis of NIST Standard Reference Material 1450, Fibrous Glass Board, for Thermal Insulation Measurements

    Zarr, Robert R; Heckert, N Alan; Leigh, Stefan D

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity data acquired previously for the establishment of Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1450, Fibrous Glass Board, as well as subsequent renewals 1450a, 1450b, 1450c, and 1450d, are re-analyzed collectively and as individual data sets. Additional data sets for proto-1450 material lots are also included in the analysis. The data cover 36 years of activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in developing and providing thermal insulation SRMs, specifically high-density molded fibrous-glass board, to the public. Collectively, the data sets cover two nominal thicknesses of 13 mm and 25 mm, bulk densities from 60 kg·m−3 to 180 kg·m−3, and mean temperatures from 100 K to 340 K. The analysis repetitively fits six models to the individual data sets. The most general form of the nested set of multilinear models used is given in the following equation: λ(ρ,T)=a0+a1ρ+a2T+a3T3+a4e−(T−a5a6)2where λ(ρ,T) is the predicted thermal conductivity (W·m−1·K−1), ρ is the bulk density (kg·m−3), T is the mean temperature (K) and ai (for i = 1, 2, … 6) are the regression coefficients. The least squares fit results for each model across all data sets are analyzed using both graphical and analytic techniques. The prevailing generic model for the majority of data sets is the bilinear model in ρ and T. λ(ρ,T)=a0+a1ρ+a2T One data set supports the inclusion of a cubic temperature term and two data sets with low-temperature data support the inclusion of an exponential term in T to improve the model predictions. Physical interpretations of the model function terms are described. Recommendations for future renewals of SRM 1450 are provided. An Addendum provides historical background on the origin of this SRM and the influence of the SRM on external measurement programs. PMID:26601034

  11. Kissinger method applied to the crystallization of glass-forming liquids: Regimes revealed by ultra-fast-heating calorimetry

    Orava, J., E-mail: jo316@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Greer, A.L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • Study of ultra-fast DSC applied to the crystallization of glass-forming liquids. • Numerical modeling of DSC traces at heating rates exceeding 10 orders of magnitude. • Identification of three regimes in Kissinger plots. • Elucidation of the effect of liquid fragility on the Kissinger method. • Modeling to study the regime in which crystal growth is thermodynamically limited. - Abstract: Numerical simulation of DSC traces is used to study the validity and limitations of the Kissinger method for determining the temperature dependence of the crystal-growth rate on continuous heating of glasses from the glass transition to the melting temperature. A particular interest is to use the wide range of heating rates accessible with ultra-fast DSC to study systems such as the chalcogenide Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} for which fast crystallization is of practical interest in phase-change memory. Kissinger plots are found to show three regimes: (i) at low heating rates the plot is straight, (ii) at medium heating rates the plot is curved as expected from the liquid fragility, and (iii) at the highest heating rates the crystallization rate is thermodynamically limited, and the plot has curvature of the opposite sign. The relative importance of these regimes is identified for different glass-forming systems, considered in terms of the liquid fragility and the reduced glass-transition temperature. The extraction of quantitative information on fundamental crystallization kinetics from Kissinger plots is discussed.

  12. Kissinger method applied to the crystallization of glass-forming liquids: Regimes revealed by ultra-fast-heating calorimetry

    Orava, J.; Greer, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of ultra-fast DSC applied to the crystallization of glass-forming liquids. • Numerical modeling of DSC traces at heating rates exceeding 10 orders of magnitude. • Identification of three regimes in Kissinger plots. • Elucidation of the effect of liquid fragility on the Kissinger method. • Modeling to study the regime in which crystal growth is thermodynamically limited. - Abstract: Numerical simulation of DSC traces is used to study the validity and limitations of the Kissinger method for determining the temperature dependence of the crystal-growth rate on continuous heating of glasses from the glass transition to the melting temperature. A particular interest is to use the wide range of heating rates accessible with ultra-fast DSC to study systems such as the chalcogenide Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 for which fast crystallization is of practical interest in phase-change memory. Kissinger plots are found to show three regimes: (i) at low heating rates the plot is straight, (ii) at medium heating rates the plot is curved as expected from the liquid fragility, and (iii) at the highest heating rates the crystallization rate is thermodynamically limited, and the plot has curvature of the opposite sign. The relative importance of these regimes is identified for different glass-forming systems, considered in terms of the liquid fragility and the reduced glass-transition temperature. The extraction of quantitative information on fundamental crystallization kinetics from Kissinger plots is discussed

  13. Applications of High Energy Ion Beam Techniques in Environmental Science: Investigation Associated with Glass and Ceramic Waste Forms

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V; Zhang, Yanwen

    2006-02-01

    High energy ion beam capabilities including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) have been very effectively used in environmental science to investigate the ion exchange mechanisms in glass waste forms and the effects of irradiation in glass and ceramic waste forms in the past. In this study, RBS and NRA along with SIMNRA simulations were used to monitor the Na depletion and D and 18O uptake in alumina silicate glasses, respectively, after the glass coupons were exposed to aqueous solution. These results show that the formation of a reaction layer and an establishment of a region where diffusion limited ion exchange occur in these glasses during exposure to silica-saturated solutions. Different regions including reaction and diffusion regions were identified on the basis of the depth distributions of these elements. In the case of ceramics, damage accumulation was studied as a function of ion dose at different irradiation temperatures. A sigmoidal dependence of relative disorder on the ion dose was observed. The defect dechanneling factors were calculated for two irradiated regions in SrTiO? using the critical angles determined from the angular yield curves. The dependence of defect dechanneling parameter on the incident energy was investigated and it was observed that the generated defects are mostly interstitial atoms and amorphous clusters. Thermal recovery experiments were performed to study the damage recovery processes up to a maximum temperature of 870 K.

  14. Effects of container material on PCT leach test results for high-level nuclear waste glasses

    Xing, S.B.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    A glass-based waste form used for the immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes should exhibit good resistance to aqueous corrosion since typically this is the primary process by which radionucleides could be released into the environment upon failure of other barriers. In the USA, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) provides a set of requirements to ensure the consistency of the waste forms produced and specifies the Product Consistency Test (PCT) as a measure of relative chemical durability. While the PCT procedure permits usage of both Teflon and stainless steel vessels for testing of simulated development glasses, Teflon is not permitted for testing of production glasses due to radiative degradation. The results presented in this paper indicate that there are very significant differences between tests conducted in the two types of vessels due to the well-known permeability of Teflon to atmospheric carbon dioxide which results in lowering of the solution pH and a consequent reduction in the leach rate of silicate glasses. A wide range of nuclear waste glass compositions was subjected to the PCT procedure using both Teflon and stainless steel vessels. The magnitude of the effect (up to a factor of four for B, Na, Li concentrations) depends strongly on glass composition, therefore the isolated checks performed previously were inconclusive. The permeability to CO, of two types of Teflon vessels specified in the PCT procedure was directly measured using buffer solutions: ingress of CO, is linear in time, strongly pH-dependent, and was as high as 100 ppm after 7 days. In actual PCT tests in Teflon vessels, the total CO, content was 560 ppm after 87 days and 1930 ppm after one year

  15. Glass melter materials technical options for the French vitrification process and operations experience authors

    Bonniaud, R.; Roznad, L.; Demay, R.

    1986-09-01

    The French vitrification process for solidifying high-level radioactive waste which has been under industrial application since 1978, is mentioned briefly. This technique involves glass melting at 1,150 deg.C, using an induction heated metallic vessel. The molten glass pouring is controlled by a thermal gate, which is also heated by induction. Two types of vessel are in use. Both are remotely removable and disposable to permit replacement at regular intervals. The technical criteria (the materials used have to meet) are described. The behaviour of the materials has been investigated using the industrial experience gained in the AVM facility during 8 years of operation, as well as with operation of a prototype for the new vitrification facilities under construction at La Hague. A short description of the use of these materials is also presented

  16. Growing correlation length on cooling below the onset of caging in a simulated glass-forming liquid

    Lačević, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We present a calculation of a fourth-order, time-dependent density correlation function that measures higher-order spatiotemporal correlations of the density of a liquid. From molecular dynamics simulations of a glass-forming Lennard-Jones liquid, we find that the characteristic length scale...... of the dynamics of the liquid in the alpha-relaxation regime....

  17. AC Calorimetry and Thermophysical Properties of Bulk Glass-Forming Metallic Liquids

    Johnson, William L.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-physical properties of two bulk metallic glass forming alloys, Ti34Zr11Cu47Ni8 (VIT 101) and Zr57Nb5Ni12.6Al10CU15.4 (VIT 106), were investigated in the stable and undercooled melt. Our investigation focused on measurements of the specific heat in the stable and undercooled liquid using the method of AC modulation calorimetry. The VIT 106 exhibited a maximum undercooling of 140 K in free radiative cooling. Specific heat measurements could be performed in stable melt down to an undercooling of 80 K. Analysis of the specific heat data indicate an anomaly near the equilibrium liquidus temperature. This anomaly is also observed in y the temperature dependencies of the external relaxation time, the specific volume, and the surface tension; it is tentatively attributed to a phase separation in the liquid state. The VIT 101 specimen exhibited a small undercooling of about 50 K. Specific heat measurements were performed in the stable and undercooled melt. These various results will be combined with ground based work such as the measurement of T-T-T curves in the electrostatic levitator and low temperature viscosity and specific heat measurements for modeling the nucleation kinetics of these alloys.

  18. High density liquid structure enhancement in glass forming aqueous solution of LiCl

    Camisasca, G.; De Marzio, M.; Rovere, M.; Gallo, P.

    2018-06-01

    We investigate using molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical and structural properties of LiCl:6H2O aqueous solution upon supercooling. This ionic solution is a glass forming liquid of relevant interest in connection with the study of the anomalies of supercooled water. The LiCl:6H2O solution is easily supercooled and the liquid state can be maintained over a large decreasing temperature range. We performed simulations from ambient to 200 K in order to investigate how the presence of the salt modifies the behavior of supercooled water. The study of the relaxation time of the self-density correlation function shows that the system follows the prediction of the mode coupling theory and behaves like a fragile liquid in all the range explored. The analysis of the changes in the water structure induced by the salt shows that while the salt preserves the water hydrogen bonds in the system, it strongly affects the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network. Following the interpretation of the anomalies of water in terms of a two-state model, the modifications of the oxygen radial distribution function and the angular distribution function of the hydrogen bonds in water indicate that LiCl has the role of enhancing the high density liquid component of water with respect to the low density component. This is in agreement with recent experiments on aqueous ionic solutions.

  19. Connection between fragility, mean-squared displacement and shear modulus in two van der Waals bonded glass-forming liquids

    Hansen, Henriette Wase; Frick, Bernhard; Hecksher, Tina

    2017-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the high-frequency shear modulus measured in the kHz range is compared with the mean-squared displacement measured in the nanosecond range for the two van der Waals bonded glass-forming liquids cumene and 5-polyphenyl ether. This provides an experimental test for the...... for the assumption connecting two versions of the shoving model for the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the relaxation time in glass formers. The two versions of the model are also tested directly and both are shown to work well for these liquids....

  20. Radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming systems. VII. Polymerization in supercooled state under high pressure

    Kaetsu, I.; Yoshii, F.; Watanabe, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate under high pressure was studied. The glass transition temperature of these monomers was heightened by increased pressure. The temperature dependence of polymerizability showed a characteristic relation, similar to those in supercooled-phase polymerization under normal pressure, that had a maximum at T/sub ν/ which shifted to higher levels of temperature as well as to T/sub g/ under high pressure. Polymerizability in the supercooled state also increased under increased pressure

  1. Designing new biocompatible glass-forming Ti75-x Zr10 Nbx Si15 (x = 0, 15) alloys: corrosion, passivity, and apatite formation.

    Abdi, Somayeh; Oswald, Steffen; Gostin, Petre Flaviu; Helth, Arne; Sort, Jordi; Baró, Maria Dolors; Calin, Mariana; Schultz, Ludwig; Eckert, Jürgen; Gebert, Annett

    2016-01-01

    Glass-forming Ti-based alloys are considered as potential new materials for implant applications. Ti75 Zr10 Si15 and Ti60 Zr10 Nb15 Si15 alloys (free of cytotoxic elements) can be produced as melt-spun ribbons with glassy matrix and embedded single β-type nanocrystals. The corrosion and passivation behavior of these alloys in their homogenized melt-spun states have been investigated in Ringer solution at 37°C in comparison to their cast multiphase crystalline counterparts and to cp-Ti and β-type Ti-40Nb. All tested materials showed very low corrosion rates as expressed in corrosion current densities icorr  alloys passive states in a wide potential range. This corresponds to low passive current densities ipass  = 2 ± 1 µA/cm(2) based on the growth of oxide films with thickness d alloys is beneficial for stable surface passivity. The addition of Nb does not only improve the glass-forming ability and the mechanical properties but also supports a high pitting resistance even at extreme anodic polarization up to 4V versus SCE were oxide thickness values of d ∼35 nm are reached. With regard to the corrosion properties, the Nb-containing nearly single-phase glassy alloy can compete with the β-type Ti-40Nb alloy. SBF tests confirmed the ability for formation of hydroxyapatite on the melt-spun alloy surfaces. All these properties recommend the new glass-forming alloys for application as wear- and corrosion-resistant coating materials for implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Studies and implementation of glass-crystal materials as the ecological shells and coatings for storage and disposal of radioactive and toxic wastes

    Iskakov, T.; Ibraev, Yu.; Garifulin, V.

    1996-01-01

    The ground space and missile systems designed to launch the modern rockets have the launching constructions. These construction are equipped with protection systems for construction units, which are undergoing by high temperature gas dynamic impact. Protective materials are featuring with a high strength, and stability regarding to high temperatures and heat impact. Such materials were obtained in glass-crystal class. Institute for Special Material Science Research has synthesized the glass-crystal materials with high thermal stability, strength, which are also stable regarding to chemical, biological, radioactive, gas dynamic, etc. impacts. The developed materials in form of plates were successfully tested in launching constructions at Baikonur space system. This material is valid for heat protective coatings, constructions of rocket-space system, plates used in airstrips and grounds for aircraft with vertical take-off and landing. These materials were studied to obtain the super strength, wearing-proof, chemically stable and radiation stable materials to be designed for ecological shells on their base. It was established that some types of glass-crystal materials have the properties, which are valid for application as ecological shells

  3. Glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of some binary and ternary Ni-based glassy alloys

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Louzguina-Luzgina, Larissa V.; Xie Guoqiang; Li Song; Zhang Wei; Inoue, Akihisa

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current paper is to study the influence of Ti, V, Nb, Al, Sn and Pd additions on the glass-forming ability, formation of a supercooled liquid region and a devitrification process of some Ni-Zr glassy alloys as well as to compare the results with those obtained for similar Cu-based alloys studied earlier. The Ni-based glassy alloys were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, differential scanning and isothermal calorimetries. Although the studied Ni-based alloys showed high values of the reduced glass-transition temperature of about 0.6, their glass-forming ability is quite low. This fact may be explained by low stability of the supercooled liquid against crystallization and formation of the equilibrium intermetallic compounds with a high growth rate compared to those observed in similar Cu-based alloys studied earlier. Relatively low thermal conductivity of Ni-based alloys is also found to be another factor limiting their glass-forming ability

  4. Glass fiber sensors for detecting special nuclear materials at portal and monitor stations

    Hull, C.D.; Seymour, R.; Crawford, T.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Safeguards and Security Systems LLC (NucSafe) participated in the Illicit Trafficking Radiation Assessment Program (ITRAP) recently conducted by the Austrian Research Center, Seibersdorf (ARCS) for IAEA, INTERPOL, and the World Customs Organization (IAEA, in press). This presentation reviews ITRAP test results of NucSafe instrumentation. NucSafe produces stationary, mobile, and hand-held systems that use neutron and gamma ray sensors to detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Neutron sensors are comprised of scintillating glass fibers (trade name 'PUMA' for Pu Materials Analysis), which provide several advantages over 3 He and 10 BF 3 tubes. PUMA 6 Li glass fiber sensors offer greater neutron sensitivity and dynamic counting range with significantly less microphonic susceptibility than tubes, while eliminating transport and operational hazards. PUMA sensors also cost less per active area than gas tubes, which is important since rapid neutron detection at passenger, freight, and vehicle portals require large sensor areas to provide the required sensitivity

  5. Study of the environment and optical properties of Ti3+ ions formed under ionizing irradiations in oxide glasses

    Lombard, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    We studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), by EPR simulation, by Raman spectroscopy and by photoluminescence the Ti 3+ ions formed under β-irradiation from 3, 37 * 10 5 to 1, 68 * 10 9 Gy in SiO 2 - Na 2 O - TiO 2 and SiO 2 - Al 2 0 3 - B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O - TiO 2 glasses. We demonstrate the existence of three different Ti 3+ sites in silicate glasses and three other Ti 3+ sites in alumino-borosilicate glasses. One of theses sites is common to both kind of glasses. Moreover, we associate theses sites to three different titanium environment: (VI)Ti 3+ (octahedral), (V)Ti 3+ square pyramid and may be (V)Ti 3+ trigonal bi - pyramid. The existence of theses sites is determined by the total integrated dose and by the [Na]/[Ti] ratio. We propose a definition of this ratio in the special case of SiO 2 - Al 2 O 3 - B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O - TiO 2 glasses. Last, under 266 nm excitation, we observe at room temperature an emission band at 500 nm attributed to Ti 4+ ions. Under a 532 nm excitation, we observe an emission band at 590 nm with a short lifetime (hundred of ns) attributed either to Ti 3+ ions or to an irradiation defect formed near a Ti 4+ ion. Our study demonstrate that is possible to control by the chemical composition and the integrated dose the Ti 3+ environment and the emission properties of this ion in an oxide glass. (author)

  6. Electronic-structure origin of the glass-forming ability and magnetic properties in Fe–RE–B–Nb bulk metallic glasses

    Li, J.W.; Estévez, D.; Jiang, K.M.; Yang, W.M.; Man, Q.K.; Chang, C.T.; Wang, X.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Relation between GFA and electronic structure of RE doped BMGs is investigated. • Tm enhances RE–B bonds and decreases the density of states near the Fermi level. • Magnetic properties of the alloys are related to the electronic structure of RE. - Abstract: (Fe 0.71 RE 0.05 B 0.24 ) 96 Nb 4 (RE = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were found exhibiting excellent glass-forming ability (GFA) with critical diameters ranging from 3.5 to 6.5 mm, and high compressive fracture strength larger than 4300 MPa. Moreover, they displayed good soft-magnetic properties with saturation magnetic flux density of 0.71–0.87 T, coercive force of 1.23–39.76 A/m and effective permeability of 1500–12,740 at 1 kHz. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to clarify the origin of the excellent GFA from the viewpoint of electronic structure. It was found that the Tm doped alloy displayed unique electronic structure including the deepest core-level binding energy, the most numerous RE–B bonds and the minimum density of states near the Fermi level, making this alloy the best glass former. The various trends noticed in the magnetic properties were ascribed mainly to the differences in the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic moment of RE elements

  7. Thermoplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses for precision robotics components, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demand for novel manufacturing methods for space systems brings unique properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) into the spotlight. In addition to superior...

  8. In Situ Wire Drawing of Phosphate Glass in Polymer Matrices for Material Extrusion 3D Printing

    J. Gilberto Siqueiros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A strategy to increase the amount of materials available for additive manufacturing platforms such as material extrusion 3D printing (ME3DP is the creation of printable thermoplastic composites. Potential limiters to the incorporation of filler materials into a thermoplastic resin include agglomeration of the filler materials, which can compromise the mechanical properties of the material system and a static morphology of the filler material. A potential solution to these issues is the use of filler materials with low glass transition temperatures allowing for a change in morphology during the extrusion process. Here, we successfully demonstrate the drawing of phosphate glass particles into a wire-like morphology within two polymeric systems: (1 a rubberized acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS blend and (2 polylactic acid (PLA. After applying a normalization process to account for the effect of air gap within the 3D printed test specimens, an enhancement in the mechanical properties was demonstrated where an increase in strength was as high as 21% over baseline specimens. Scanning electron microanalysis was used to characterize the fracture surface and wire drawing efficacy. Factors affecting the ability to achieve wire drawing such as polymer viscosity and print temperature are also highlighted.

  9. Using optical spectroscopy to characterize the material of a 16th c. stained glass window

    Ceglia, A.; Meulebroeck, W.; Wouters, H.; Baert, K.; Nys, K.; Terryn, H.; Thienpont, H.

    In this paper we studied the transmittance spectra of a collection of several glass samples taken from a 16th century stained window of the Church of Our Lady in Bruges, Belgium. We recorded the optical spectra for all the samples in the region between 350 and 1600 nm. The goal of our research was to reveal information about the composition of the glass artifacts in a fast and non-destructive way. Analysis of the optical spectra allowed us in the first place to identify the type of colorants that were used. It was possible to recognize metal ions, such as Fe2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Mn3+, Cr3+ and Cu2+. Also colors made of metal nanoparticles, such as silver and copper colloids were successfully identified. The recognition of the coloring agents is of particular interest in dating the glass pieces. This is because some colorants were only used in certain periods. Green glass colored by chromium was produced only after the mid 19th century onwards. Our study showed that 3 of the 10 pieces were colored by this element and they originate as such from a later period. A second conclusion refers to the applied fluxing agent. By analyzing the spectral position of the first cobalt absorption band, we were able to classify the glass pieces as potash based (used in medieval times) or soda-based (used in modern times) and therefore to classify them as original or as restoration material. From the 10 blue colored samples, 7 of them were recognized as original material. Finally, for the naturally colored parts the analysis of the spectra allowed us to group them based on cobalt impurities.

  10. Análise da dureza de um novo material restaurador para ART: Glass Carbomer

    Célia Maria Condeixa de França LOPES

    Full Text Available Resumo Objetivo Este estudo avaliou a microdureza de dois materiais ionoméricos – Glass Carbomer (GC-GCP Dental e Riva Light Cure (RL-SDI ‒ em combinação com quatro unidades fotopolimerizadoras (Carbo LED lamp, GCP-Dental; Demi LED curing light, Kerr; Poli Wireless, Kavo; Radii Plus, SDI. Material e método Foram confeccionados 80 corpos de prova seguindo a orientação dos fabricantes, sendo 40 para cada material ionomérico e, para cada 10 corpos de prova, uma das unidades fotopolimerizadoras foi utilizada. Após sete dias de armazenamento em água destilada e temperatura ambiente, os 80 corpos de prova foram submetidos ao teste de microdureza Vickers (microdurômetro HMV 2T. Cinco indentações foram realizadas em cada corpo de prova (centro, extremidades direita e esquerda, e superior e inferior. O ensaio foi realizado sob uma carga de 100 gramas, com tempo de penetração de dez segundos. Resultado Independentemente da unidade fotopolimerizadora, o Riva Light Cure (RL-SDI apresentou menor microdureza que o material Glass Carbomer (GC-GCP-Dental. A microdureza do Glass Carbomer (GC-GCP-Dental foi influenciada pelo tipo de unidade fotopolimerizadora utilizada como fonte de calor. A análise de variância e o Teste de Tuckey (p<0,05 mostraram que a interação dos fatores ‘material’ vs. ‘unidade fotopolimerizadora’ (p<0,001 e os fatores principais ‘material’ (p<0,001 e ‘unidade fotopolimerizadora’ (p=0,002 foram estatisticamente significantes. Conclusão O material ionomérico Glass Cabomer (GCP- Dental apresentou valor de microdureza significativamente superior quando comparado com o cimento de ionômero de vidro modificado por resina Riva Light Cure (SDI, independentemente da unidade fotopolimerizadora utilizada.

  11. Moisture disturbance when measuring boron content in wet glass fibre materials with thermal neutron transmission method

    Zhang Zhiping; Liu Shengkang; Zhang Yongjie

    2001-01-01

    The theoretical calculation and experimental study on the moisture disturbance in the boron content measurement of wet glass fibre materials using the thermal neutron transmission method were reported. The relevant formula of the moisture disturbance was derived. For samples with a mass of 16 g, it was found that a moisture variation of 1% (mass percent) would result in a deviation of 0.28% (mass percent) in the measurement of boron contents

  12. Contribution of electron microscopy to the study of alteration layers formed on the surface of glasses

    Crovisier, J.L.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the whole process of glass corrosion in aqueous solutions, the analysis of the reagent must be completed by a study of the actual alteration layers on the glass surface. Transmission electron microscopy on ultramicrotomic thin sections turns out to be a most suitable tool to achieve this. It enables to supplement the conventional methods of surface investigation, such as A.E.S., ESCA, IRRS, SIMS. Two examples are given. The first deals with a (SiO 2 -CaO-Na 2 O-P 2 O 5 )- glass leached in a buffer solution of tris-hydromethyl-aminomethane at 40 0 C. The major feature is ion exchange within a residual porous glass, followed by the precipitation of hydroxyapatite. In the second example, a basaltic glass is altered in sea-water at 50 0 C. The glass constituents are dissolved simultaneously and the alteration layer is a precipitate of crystalline and amorphous phases which have reached their saturation level [fr

  13. Glass-ceramic nuclear waste forms obtained by crystallization of SiO 2-Al 2O 3-CaO-ZrO 2-TiO 2 glasses containing lanthanides (Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, Yb) and actinides (Th): Study of the crystallization from the surface

    Loiseau, P.; Caurant, D.

    2010-07-01

    Glass-ceramic materials containing zirconolite (nominally CaZrTi 2O 7) crystals in their bulk can be envisaged as potential waste forms for minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) and Pu immobilization. In this study such matrices are synthesized by crystallization of SiO 2-Al 2O 3-CaO-ZrO 2-TiO 2 glasses containing lanthanides (Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, Yb) and actinides (Th) as surrogates. A thin partially crystallized layer containing titanite and anorthite (nominally CaTiSiO 5 and CaAl 2Si 2O 8, respectively) growing from glass surface is also observed. The effect of the nature and concentration of surrogates on the structure, the microstructure and the composition of the crystals formed in the surface layer is presented in this paper. Titanite is the only crystalline phase able to significantly incorporate trivalent lanthanides whereas ThO 2 precipitates in the layer. The crystal growth thermal treatment duration (2-300 h) at high temperature (1050-1200 °C) is shown to strongly affect glass-ceramics microstructure. For the system studied in this paper, it appears that zirconolite is not thermodynamically stable in comparison with titanite growing form glass surface. Nevertheless, for kinetic reasons, such transformation (i.e. zirconolite disappearance to the benefit of titanite) is not expected to occur during interim storage and disposal of the glass-ceramic waste forms because their temperature will never exceed a few hundred degrees.

  14. Barium and calcium borate glasses as shielding materials for x rays and gamma rays

    Singh, H.; Singh, K.; Sharma, G.

    2003-01-01

    Values of the gamma-ray, mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number have been determined experimentally for xBaO.(1-x) B2O3 (x=0.24, 0.30, 0.34,0.40 and 0.44) and xCaO. (I-x)B2O3 (x=0.30 and 0.40) glasses at photon energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV It is pointed out tha...... that these glasses are potential radiation shielding materials. The specific volume of the glasses has been derived from density measurements and studied as a function of composition.......Values of the gamma-ray, mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number have been determined experimentally for xBaO.(1-x) B2O3 (x=0.24, 0.30, 0.34,0.40 and 0.44) and xCaO. (I-x)B2O3 (x=0.30 and 0.40) glasses at photon energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV It is pointed out...

  15. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Obtaining a glass-ceramic material from a steel slag mixed with glass cullet; Obtencion de un material vitroceramico a partir de una escoria de aceria mezclada con vidrio de desecho

    Oziel Mendez Guerrero, D.; Alicia Vazquez Mendez, B.; Alvarez Mendez, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the qualitative, quantitative and thermal characterization of a steel slag and glass cullet of high generation rate in northern Mexico were made in order to use these wastes as raw materials in the production of glass ceramics. The particle size was controlled at sizes = 75 micrometers and the major components of the slag were located in a phase equilibrium diagram for proposing a reaction temperature that leaded to the starting glass. Later, heat treatments were performed to obtain the glass ceramics. The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis coupled with thermal gravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA), reflected light optical microscopy (RLOM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Subsequently, Vickers microhardness and chemical resistance tests were performed, which enabled us to propose an application of the glass ceramics. (Author) 18 refs.

  17. Electrochromic Glasses.

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  18. Biocidal Energetic Materials for the Destruction of Spore Forming Bacteria

    2015-07-01

    agent (GA). During a reaction the GA generates nucleation sites that promote the formation of bubbles. As the reaction wave passes, the gas pockets...studies have shown iodine producing reactive materials are effective against spore forming bacteria, but are sensitive to the relative humidity in the...testing environment. Results from tests run in relative high humidity environments show a decreased ability of iodine to effectively neutralize

  19. Material forming apparatus using a directed droplet stream

    Holcomb, David E.; Viswanathan, Srinath; Blue, Craig A.; Wilgen, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for rapidly forming precision metallic and intermetallic alloy net shape parts directly from liquid metal droplets. A directed droplet deposition apparatus includes a crucible with an orifice for producing a jet of material, a jet destabilizer, a charging structure, a deflector system, and an impact zone. The systems and methods provide advantages in that fully dense, microstructurally controlled parts can be fabricated at moderate cost.

  20. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  1. Effect of P addition on glass forming ability and soft magnetic properties of melt-spun FeSiBCuC alloy ribbons

    Xu, J.; Yang, Y.Z.; Li, W.; Chen, X.C.; Xie, Z.W.

    2016-01-01

    The dependency of phosphorous content on the glass forming ability, thermal stability and soft magnetic properties of Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 14−x P x Cu 0.5 C 0.1 (x=0,1,2,3,4) alloys was investigated. The experimental results showed that the substitution of B by P increased the glass forming ability in this alloy system. The Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 10 P 4 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 alloy shows a fully amorphous character. Thermal stability of melt-spun ribbons increases and temperature interval between the first and second crystallization peaks enlarges with the increase of P content. And the saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) shows a slight increase with the increase of P content. The Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 11 P 3 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high Bs about 200.6 emu/g. The Bs of fully amorphous alloy Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 10 P 4 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 drops dramatically to 172.1 emu/g, which is lower than that of other nanocrystallines. Low material cost and excellent soft magnetic properties make the FeSiBPCuC alloys promise soft magnetic materials for industrial applications. - Highlights: • Partial substituting B by P helps to improve the glass forming ability of the alloy. • The addition of P content reduces the thermal stability and improves heat treatment temperature region for these alloys. • The Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 11 P 3 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high saturation magnetic density of 200.6 emu/g.

  2. Production and Characterization of Glass-Ceramic Materials for Potential Use in Dental Applications: Thermal and Mechanical Properties, Microstructure, and In Vitro Bioactivity

    Francesco Baino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multicomponent silicate glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives were prepared and tested for potential applications in dentistry. The glasses were produced via a melting-quenching process, ground and sieved to obtain fine-grained powders that were pressed in the form of small cylinders and thermally treated to obtain sintered glass-ceramic samples. X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out on the materials before and after sintering to detect the presence of crystalline phases. Thermal analyses, mechanical characterizations (assessment of bending strength, Young’s modulus, Vickers hardness, fracture toughness, and in vitro bioactivity tests in simulated body fluid were performed. On the basis of the acquired results, different potential applications in the dental field were discussed for the proposed glass-ceramics. The use of such materials can be suggested for either restorative dentistry or dental implantology, mainly depending on their peculiar bioactive and mechanical properties. At the end of the work, the feasibility of a novel full-ceramic bilayered implant was explored and discussed. This implant, comprising a highly bioactive layer expected to promote osteointegration and another one mimicking the features of tooth enamel, can have an interesting potential for whole tooth substitution.

  3. Omni-directional selective shielding material based on amorphous glass coated microwires.

    Ababei, G; Chiriac, H; David, V; Dafinescu, V; Nica, I

    2012-01-01

    The shielding effectiveness of the omni-directional selective shielding material based on CoFe-glass coated amorphous wires in 0.8 GHz-3 GHz microwave frequency range is investigated. The measurements were done in a controlled medium using a TEM cell and in the free space using horn antennas, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite shielding material can be developed with desired shielding effectiveness and selective absorption of the microwave frequency range by controlling the number of the layers and the length of microwires.

  4. Applicability test of glass lining material for high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid in thermochemical water-splitting IS process

    Iwatsuki, Jin; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A key issue for realizing the thermochemical IS process for hydrogen production is the selection of materials for working with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid. Glass lining material is a promising candidate, which is composed of steel having good strength and glass having good corrosion resistance. Since the applicability of glass lining material depends strongly on the service condition, corrosion tests using glass used in glass lining material and heat cycle tests using glass lining piping were carried out to examine the possibility of using the glass lining material with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid. It was confirmed that the glass lining materials exhibited sufficient corrosion resistance and heat resistance in high-temperature sulfuric acid of the IS process. (author)

  5. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S.; Mayberry, J.

    1994-04-01

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  6. Calculation of glass forming ranges in Al-Ni-RE (Ce, La, Y) ternary alloys and their sub-binaries based on Miedema's model

    Sun, S.P.; Yi, D.Q.; Liu, H.Q.; Zang, B.; Jiang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → A method based on semi-empirical Miedema's and Toop's model for predicting glass forming range of ternary alloy system has been systematically described. → The method is superior to conventional models by considering the effect of the thermodynamic asymmetric component when dealing with a ternary alloy system. → The glass forming ranges of Al-Ni-RE (Al-Ni-Ce, Al-Ni-Y and Al-Ni-La) systems and their sub-binaries have been successfully calculated. → The present calculations using the method are in well agreement with experiments. → This model is especially useful for predicting the glass forming range of ternary alloy system because the calculations do not require experimental data. - Abstract: A method based on the semi-empirical Miedema's and Toop's model for calculating the glass forming range of a ternary alloy system was systematically described. The method is superior to conventional models by considering the effect of the thermodynamic asymmetric component when dealing with a ternary alloy system. Using this method, the glass forming ranges of Al-Ni-RE (Ce, La, Y) systems and their sub-binaries were successfully predicted. The mixing enthalpy and mismatch entropy were calculated, and their effects on the glass forming abilities of Al-Ni-RE (Ce, La, Y) systems were also discussed. The glass forming abilities of Al-Ni-Ce, Al-Ni-La and Al-Ni-Y are found to be close. The calculated glass forming ranges agree with experiments well. Meanwhile, the enthalpy change from amorphous phase to solid solution in the glass forming ranges was calculated, and the results suggest that those alloys close to the Ni-RE sub-binary system have higher glass forming abilities.

  7. Characterising the thermoforming behaviour of glass fibre textile reinforced thermoplastic composite materials

    Kuhtz, M.; Maron, B.; Hornig, A.; Müller, M.; Langkamp, A.; Gude, M.

    2018-05-01

    Textile reinforced thermoplastic composites are predestined for highly automated medium- and high-volume production processes. The presented work focusses on experimental studies of different types of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene (GF-PP) semi-finished thermoplastic textiles to characterise the forming behaviour. The main deformation modes fabric shear, tension, thought-thickness compression and bending are investigated with special emphasis on the impact of the textile structure, the deformation temperature and rate dependency. The understanding of the fundamental forming behaviour is required to allow FEM based assessment and improvement of thermoforming process chains.

  8. Glass forming tendencies of chalcogenides of the system (As2Se3)sub(1-x):(T12Se)sub(x)

    Majid, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    In this paper glass forming capabilities of chalcogenide glasses based on As 2 Se 3 with T1 2 Se concentrations are discussed. The studies were made using the differential thermal analysis (DTA) technique. These studies show that the glass forming tendency of As 2 Se 3 decreases as the concentrations of T1 2 Se molecules are increased. Also these studies show that with addition of T1 2 Se, the glass transition temperature Tsub(g) of As 2 Se 3 decreases, suggesting a tendency for weaker bonding and hence less stability of T1-rich compositions. (author)

  9. White emission materials from glass doped with rare Earth ions: A review

    Yasaka, P.; Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: mink110@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Physics Program, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, 73000 (Thailand)

    2016-03-11

    Solid State Lighting (SSL) based devices are predicted to play a crucial role in the coming years. Development of W-LED, which have an edge over traditional lighting sources due to their compact size, higher reliability, shock resistance, interesting design possibilities, higher transparency and an extremely long lifetime. Over the fifteen trivalent lanthanide ions, Dy{sup 3+} ions doped glasses are most appropriate for white light generation because of the fact that it exhibits two intense emission bands corresponds to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} (magnetic dipole) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} (electric dipole) transitions at around 480-500 nm and 580-600 nm pertaining to blue and yellow regions respectively. In this work, the developments of Dy3+ doped in several glass structures for white emitting materials application have reviewed. Properties of Dy{sup 3+} doped in glasses were discussed for use as a solid state lighting materials application.

  10. Structural evolution during fragile-to-strong transition in CuZr(Al) glass-forming liquids

    Zhou, C.; Hu, L.N.; Sun, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we show experimental evidence for the dynamic fragile-to-strong (F-S) transition in a series of CuZr(Al) glass-forming liquids (GFLs). A detailed analysis of the dynamics of 98 glass-forming liquids indicates that the F-S transition occurs around Tf-s ≈ 1.36 Tg. Using...... the hyperquenching-annealing-x-ray scattering approach, we have observed a three-stage evolution pattern of medium-range ordering (MRO) structures during the F-S transition, indicating a dramatic change of the MRO clusters around Tf-s upon cooling. The F-S transition in CuZr(Al) GFLs is attributed to the competition...... among the MRO clusters composed of different locally ordering configurations. A phenomenological scenario has been proposed to explain the structural evolution from the fragile to the strong phase in the CuZr(Al) GFLs....

  11. Study of parameters of heat treatment in obtaining glass ceramic materials with addition of the industrial waste

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Martins, G.J.M.; Riella, H.G.; Matsinhe, Jonas; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The production of materials from crystallization of glass, called glass ceramic, have proved interesting by the possibility of development of different microstructures, with reduced grain size and the presence of residual amorphous phase in different quantities. The method that uses the differential thermal analysis (DTA) provides research on the material properties over a wide temperature range, it's widely applied to crystallization processes of glass ceramic materials. Within this context, this paper aims to study the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in glass ceramic materials in the system SiO 2 - Al 2 O 3 -Li 2 O, obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ash as source of aluminosilicates, through the technique of differential thermal analysis. (author)

  12. Fixation by ion exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.; Litovitz, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A process is reported for reacting a porous silicate or borosilicate glass or silica gel with alkali metal cations, Group lb cations and/or ammonium cations bonded to the silicon through divalent oxygen linkages on the internal surfaces of the pores. Ion exchange of the cations with toxic or radioactive cations was possible resulting in a distribution of internal silicon-bonded toxic cation oxide groups within the pores of the glass or silica gel. The ion exchange reaction may be done successfully with acidic, neutral or alkaline pH solutions. The aim of the immobilization is for permanent storage of hazardous materials such as Hg 2+ , Hg + , Cd 2+ , Tl + , Pb 2+ and radioactive cations

  13. Effective thermal conductivity of glass-fiber board and blanket standard reference materials

    Smith, D.R.; Hust, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter reports on measurements of effective thermal conductivity performed on a series of specimens of glass-fiber board and glass-fiber blanket. Explains that measurements of thermal conductivity were conducted as a function of temperature from 85 to 360 K, of temperature difference with T=10 to 100 K, of bulk density from 11 to 148 kg/m 3 and for nitrogen, argon, and helium inter-fiber fill gases at pressures from atmospheric to high vacuum. Analyzes and compares results with values from the published literature and National Bureau of Standards (NBS) certification data for similar material. Gives polynomial expressions for the functional relation between conductivity, temperature, and density for board and for blanket

  14. Characterization of fly ash, slag and glass hull for the obtaining of vitreous materials

    Ayala Valderrama, D. M.; Gómez Cuaspud, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    This article presents the structural and thermal characterization of fly ash, the waste from blast furnace slag and the glass hull, generated as common residues in industry, which cannot be recycled easily or destroyed in a simple and fast way. In the particular case of fly ash, at present are being used as a lightweight aggregate in the production of cement, concrete and additive in the production of glass and glass ceramics. As far as the slag and hull, are being used as additives for the asphalt and concretes, however its use still is restricted, reason why its use in alternative ways are necessary. Initially the chemical composition of residues was established, determining that the fly ashes contains SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 oxides; 90% of the total composition, was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. As minor constituents, small percentages of Mg, P, S, K, Na and Ti were found. For the slag case, the phases of Fe3O4, Ca3Mg (SiO2)4 and Ca(MgAl)(Si,Al)2O6 were identified, observing the presence of amorphous phase higher than 94% of the total phase of the system. Meanwhile, the glass hull sample showed a higher percentage of 95% amorphicity, mainly identifying a weak signal associated with silicon oxide SiO2. The thermal analyses of the samples, exhibit a decrease in mass for samples between 25-1000°C was observed, which can be attributed to different physical-chemical events that occur in the materials. The heat flow for each sample is related with the removal of the water retained by the physisorption processes around 92-110°C in all cases. With this previous characterization of the precursors, a sample was composed using 70% fly ash, 10% slag and 20% of glass hull was composed and treated at 1200°C/1.5 hours, obtaining a dense black glassy material for potential applications in field of the glass ceramics.

  15. Microstructural Control via Copious Nucleation Manipulated by In Situ Formed Nucleants: Large-Sized and Ductile Metallic Glass Composites.

    Song, Wenli; Wu, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiongjun; Chen, Houwen; Guo, Zhenxi; Lu, Zhaoping

    2016-10-01

    A novel strategy to control the precipitation behavior of the austenitic phase, and to obtain large-sized, transformation-induced, plasticity-reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites, with good tensile properties, is proposed. By inducing heterogeneous nucleation of the transformable reinforcement via potent nucleants formed in situ, the characteristics of the austenitic phase are well manipulated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  17. Potential energy landscape signatures of slow dynamics in glass forming liquids

    Sastry, S.; Debenedetti, P. G.; Stillinger, F. H.

    1999-01-01

    We study the properties of local potential energy minima (‘inherent structures’) sampled by liquids at low temperatures as an approach to elucidating the mechanisms of the observed dynamical slowing down observed as the glass transition temperature is approached. This onset of slow dynamics...

  18. Volume and enthalpy recovery of glass-forming polymers and the predictions controlled by internal energy

    Říha, Pavel; Slobodian, P.; Kubát, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2009), s. 59-71 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : a-PMMA * Glass transition * Aging * Cooperative relaxation model Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  19. Enhanced 99 Tc retention in glass waste form using Tc(IV)-incorporated Fe minerals

    Um, Wooyong; Luksic, Steven A.; Wang, Guohui; Saslow, Sarah; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Bowden, Mark E.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    Technetium (99Tc) immobilization by doping into iron oxide mineral phases may alleviate the problems with Tc volatility during vitrification of nuclear waste. Reduced Tc, Tc(IV), substitutes for Fe(III) in the crystal structure by a process of Tc reduction from Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) followed by co-precipitation of Fe oxide minerals. Two Tc-incorporated Fe minerals (Tc-goethite and Tc-magnetite/maghemite) were prepared and tested for Tc retention in glass melt samples at temperatures between 600 – 1,000 oC. After being cooled, the solid glass specimens prepared at different temperatures were analyzed for Tc oxidation state using Tc K-edge XANES. In most samples, Tc was partially oxidized from Tc(IV) to Tc(VII) as the melt temperature increased. However, Tc retention in glass melt samples prepared using Tc-incorporated Fe minerals were moderately higher than in glass prepared using KTcO4 because of limited and delayed Tc volatilization.

  20. Potash - a key raw material of glass batch for Bohemian glasses from 14th-17th centuries?

    Cílová, Z.; Woitsch, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 2 (2012), s. 371-380 ISSN 0305-4403 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB900580701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : Wood ash * Potash * Medieval glass * Chemical composition * Glass batch * archaeological experiment * Reconstruction of technology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 1.889, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440311003505

  1. Comparison of silicone and spin-on glass packaging materials for light-emitting diode encapsulation

    Chang, Liann-Be; Pan, Ke-Wei; Yen, Chia-Yi [Department of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Jeng, Ming-Jer, E-mail: mjjeng@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering and Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Te; Hu, Sung-Cheng; Kuo, Yang-Kuao [Chemical Systems Research Division, Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology Armaments Bureau, MND, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    Traditional white light light-emitting diode (LED) encapsulation is performed by mixed phosphors and silicone coating on LED die. However, this encapsulation with silicone coating incurs overheated temperatures and yellowing problem. Therefore, this work attempts to replace silicone paste by using spin-on-glass (SOG) materials. Experimental results indicate that although initial brightness of SOG-based packaging is lower than that of silicone packaging, its light attenuation is significantly lower than that of silicone for a long lighting time. After the LED power is turned on for 12 h, the brightness of LED with silicone and SOG material packaging decreases from 84 to 48 lm and 73 to 59 lm, respectively. Therefore, SOG material provides an alternative packaging solution for high power LED lighting applications. - Highlights: • Spin-on-glass (SOG) material was used to replace silicone coating for LED packaging. • Initial brightness of SOG packaging is lower than that of silicone packaging. • Over time, light attenuation in SOG is much lower than that in silicone. • Color rendering index and brightness of LED packaging was optimized by Taguchi method.

  2. Material Recover and Waste Form Development--2016 Accomplishments

    Todd, Terry A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vienna, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Paviet, Patricia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Material Recovery and Waste Form Development (MRWFD) Campaign under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress (April 2010). This MRWFD accomplishments report summarizes the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within MRWFD in Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. Each section of the report contains an overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the FY. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities but primarily focuses on the many technical accomplishments of FY 2016. The campaign continued to use an engineering-driven, science-based approach to maintain relevance and focus.

  3. Fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM glass-ceramic materials used for single-tooth implant crowns.

    Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sahin, Erdal; Gürbüz, Riza; Akça, Kivanç

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM in-office monoceramic materials with single-tooth implant-supported crowns in functional area. A metal experimental model with a dental implant was designed to receive in-office CAD/CAM-generated monoceramic crowns. Laterally positioned axial dynamic loading of 300 N at 2 Hz was applied to implant-supported crowns machined from 2 different glass materials for 100,000 cycle. Failures in terms of fracture, crack formation, and chipping were macroscopically recorded and microscopically evaluated. Four of 10 aluminasilicate glass-ceramic crowns fractured at early loading cycles, the rest completed loading with a visible crack formation. Crack formation was recorded for 2 of 10 leucite glass-ceramic crowns. Others completed test without visible damage but fractured upon removal. Lack in chemical adhesion between titanium abutment and dental cement likely reduces the fatigue resistance of machinable glass-ceramic materials. However, relatively better fractural strength of leucite glass-ceramics could be taken into consideration. Accordingly, progress on developmental changes in filler composition of glass-ceramics may be promising. Machinable glass-ceramics do not possess sufficient fatigue resistance for single-tooth implant crowns in functional area.

  4. A new Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni-Si-Sn bulk amorphous alloy with high glass-forming ability

    Huang, Y.J.; Shen, J.; Sun, J.F.; Yu, X.B.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Sn substitution for Cu on the glass-forming ability was investigated in Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 42.5-x Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn x (x = 0, 1, 3, 5, 7) alloys by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. The alloy containing 5% Sn shows the highest glass-forming ability (GFA) among the Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni-Si-Sn system. Fully amorphous rod sample with diameters up to 6 mm could be successfully fabricated by the copper mold casting Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 37.5 Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn 5 alloy. The activation energies for glass transition and crystallization for Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 37.5 Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn 5 amorphous alloy are both larger than those values for the Sn-free alloy. The enhancement in GFA and thermal stability after the partial replacement of Cu by Sn may be contributed to the strong atomic bonding nature between Ti and Sn and the increasing of atomic packing density. The amorphous Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 37.5 Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn 5 alloy also possesses superior mechanical properties

  5. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics

    N. Sareen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that methylglyoxal forms light-absorbing secondary organic material in aqueous ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate solutions mimicking tropospheric aerosol particles. The kinetics were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The results suggest that the bimolecular reaction of methylglyoxal with an ammonium or hydronium ion is the rate-limiting step for the formation of light-absorbing species, with kNH4+II=5×10−6 M−1 min−1 and kH3O+II≤10−3 M−1 min−1. Evidence of aldol condensation products and oligomeric species up to 759 amu was found using chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS. Tentative identifications of carbon-nitrogen species and a sulfur-containing compound were also made using Aerosol-CIMS. Aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal, with and without inorganic salts, exhibit significant surface tension depression. These observations add to the growing body of evidence that dicarbonyl compounds may form secondary organic material in the aerosol aqueous phase, and that secondary organic aerosol formation via heterogeneous processes may affect seed aerosol properties.

  6. Experimental evidence for excess entropy discontinuities in glass-forming solutions.

    Lienhard, Daniel M; Zobrist, Bernhard; Zuend, Andreas; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas

    2012-02-21

    Glass transition temperatures T(g) are investigated in aqueous binary and multi-component solutions consisting of citric acid, calcium nitrate (Ca(NO(3))(2)), malonic acid, raffinose, and ammonium bisulfate (NH(4)HSO(4)) using a differential scanning calorimeter. Based on measured glass transition temperatures of binary aqueous mixtures and fitted binary coefficients, the T(g) of multi-component systems can be predicted using mixing rules. However, the experimentally observed T(g) in multi-component solutions show considerable deviations from two theoretical approaches considered. The deviations from these predictions are explained in terms of the molar excess mixing entropy difference between the supercooled liquid and glassy state at T(g). The multi-component mixtures involve contributions to these excess mixing entropies that the mixing rules do not take into account. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  7. Matt waste from glass separated collection: an eco-sustainable addition for new building materials.

    Bignozzi, M C; Saccani, A; Sandrolini, F

    2009-01-01

    Matt waste (MW), a by-product of purification processes of cullet derived from separated glass waste collection, has been studied as filler for self-compacting concrete and as an addition for newly blended cement. Properties of self-compacting concrete compared to reference samples are reported. They include characteristics at the fresh and hardened states, and the compressive strength and porosity of mortar samples that were formulated with increasing amounts of MW to be used as cement replacement (up to 50wt.%). The effects of matt waste are discussed with respect to the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the resulting new materials.

  8. Determination of optimum mixing time for raw materials with the tracer method in the glass industry

    Gallyas, M; Gemesi, J; Kurinka, J

    1983-02-01

    The authors explain how the optimum mixing time for the raw materials for glass manufacture can be determined with the aid of the radioactive tracer method. Basing themselves on measurements, they indicate the change in the degree of mixing of the individual components (soda (Na-24), sodium sulphate, coke (La-140) and bone meal (P-32) as a function of mixing time. The optimum degree of mixing and mixing time for dry and for wet mixing are determined. Finally, data for determining the permissible storage time of the mixture are given.

  9. Optical and morphological characterizations of pyronin dye-poly (vinyl alcohol) thin films formed on glass substrates

    Meral, Kadem; Arik, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of pyronin dye mixed with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) on glass substrate were prepared by using spin-coating technique. The optical and morphological properties of the thin films were studied by UV-Vis., steady-state fluorescence spectroscopies and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thin films on glass substrate were fabricated at various [PVA]/[dye] (P/D) ratios. Hence, the monomeric and H-aggregates thin films of pyronin dye mixed with PVA were formed as a function of the dye and PVA concentration. It was determined that while the monomeric thin films showed strong fluorescence, the formation of H-aggregates in the thin film caused to decreasing the fluorescence intensity. AFM studies demonstrated that the morphology of the thin film was drastically varied with changing the optical property of the thin film such as monomeric and H-aggregates thin films.

  10. Optical and morphological characterizations of pyronin dye-poly (vinyl alcohol) thin films formed on glass substrates

    Meral, Kadem, E-mail: kademm@atauni.edu.tr; Arik, Mustafa, E-mail: marik@tatauni.edu.tr; Onganer, Yavuz, E-mail: yonganer@atauni.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Thin films of pyronin dye mixed with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) on glass substrate were prepared by using spin-coating technique. The optical and morphological properties of the thin films were studied by UV-Vis., steady-state fluorescence spectroscopies and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thin films on glass substrate were fabricated at various [PVA]/[dye] (P/D) ratios. Hence, the monomeric and H-aggregates thin films of pyronin dye mixed with PVA were formed as a function of the dye and PVA concentration. It was determined that while the monomeric thin films showed strong fluorescence, the formation of H-aggregates in the thin film caused to decreasing the fluorescence intensity. AFM studies demonstrated that the morphology of the thin film was drastically varied with changing the optical property of the thin film such as monomeric and H-aggregates thin films.

  11. Forming artificial soils from waste materials for mine site rehabilitation

    Yellishetty, Mohan; Wong, Vanessa; Taylor, Michael; Li, Johnson

    2014-05-01

    Surface mining activities often produce large volumes of solid wastes which invariably requires the removal of significant quantities of waste rock (overburden). As mines expand, larger volumes of waste rock need to be moved which also require extensive areas for their safe disposal and containment. The erosion of these dumps may result in landform instability, which in turn may result in exposure of contaminants such as trace metals, elevated sediment delivery in adjacent waterways, and the subsequent degradation of downstream water quality. The management of solid waste materials from industrial operations is also a key component for a sustainable economy. For example, in addition to overburden, coal mines produce large amounts of waste in the form of fly ash while sewage treatment plants require disposal of large amounts of compost. Similarly, paper mills produce large volumes of alkaline rejected wood chip waste which is usually disposed of in landfill. These materials, therefore, presents a challenge in their use, and re-use in the rehabilitation of mine sites and provides a number of opportunities for innovative waste disposal. The combination of solid wastes sourced from mines, which are frequently nutrient poor and acidic, with nutrient-rich composted material produced from sewage treatment and alkaline wood chip waste has the potential to lead to a soil suitable for mine rehabilitation and successful seed germination and plant growth. This paper presents findings from two pilot projects which investigated the potential of artificial soils to support plant growth for mine site rehabilitation. We found that pH increased in all the artificial soil mixtures and were able to support plant establishment. Plant growth was greatest in those soils with the greatest proportion of compost due to the higher nutrient content. These pot trials suggest that the use of different waste streams to form an artificial soil can potentially be used in mine site rehabilitation

  12. Conventional methods fail to measure cp(omega) of glass-forming liquids

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    thermal-wave method does not measure the isobaric frequency-dependent specific heat cp(omega). This method rather measures a "longitudinal" frequency-dependent specific heat, a quantity defined and detailed here that is in between cp(omega) and cV(omega). This result means that no reliable wide......-frequency measurements of cp(omega) on liquids approaching the calorimetric glass transition exist. We briefly discuss consequences for experiment....

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A. [NRC ' Kurchatov Institute,' 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zaikovskiy, V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Stepanov, S. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artemenko, A. [ICMCB, UPR CNRS 9048, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Curely, J.; Kliava, J. [LOMA, UMR 5798 Universite Bordeaux 1-CNRS, 33405 Talence cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe{sup 3+} ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by 'direct' techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe 3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by “direct” techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-10-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by "direct" techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization studies.

  16. Numerical Forming Simulations and Optimisation in Advanced Materials

    Huetink, J.; Boogaard, A. H. van den; Geijselears, H. J. M.; Meinders, T.

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of new materials as high strength steels, metastable steels and fibre reinforced composites, the need for advanced physically valid constitutive models arises. In finite deformation problems constitutive relations are commonly formulated in terms the Cauchy stress as a function of the elastic Finger tensor and an objective rate of the Cauchy stress as a function of the rate of deformation tensor. For isotropic materials models this is rather straightforward, but for anisotropic material models, including elastic anisotropy as well as plastic anisotropy, this may lead to confusing formulations. It will be shown that it is more convenient to define the constitutive relations in terms of invariant tensors referred to the deformed metric. Experimental results are presented that show new combinations of strain rate and strain path sensitivity. An adaptive through- thickness integration scheme for plate elements is developed, which improves the accuracy of spring back prediction at minimal costs. A procedure is described to automatically compensate the CAD tool shape numerically to obtain the desired product shape. Forming processes need to be optimized for cost saving and product improvement. Until recently, a trial-and-error process in the factory primarily did this optimization. An optimisation strategy is proposed that assists an engineer to model an optimization problem that suits his needs, including an efficient algorithm for solving the problem

  17. Changing the Tendency of Glass-Forming Liquid To Crystallize by Moving Along Different Isolines in the T-p Phase Diagram

    Adrjanowicz, Karolina; Koperwas, Kajetan; Tarnacka, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystallization and glass-forming tendencies of molecular liquids is of great scientific and practical importance. In the present work, we show that a lot can be learned regarding this process by introducing temperature and pressure as thermodynamic control variables. For the glass...

  18. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garino, Terry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Croes, Kenneth James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  19. Aging of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation in the glass-forming liquids sorbitol and xylitol

    Yardimci, Hasan; Leheny, Robert L.

    2006-06-01

    Employing frequency-dependent dielectric susceptibility we characterize the aging in two supercooled liquids, sorbitol and xylitol, below their calorimetric glass transition temperatures. In addition to the alpha relaxation that tracks the structural dynamics, the susceptibility of both liquids possesses a secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation at higher frequencies. Following a quench through the glass transition, the susceptibility slowly approaches the equilibrium behavior. For both liquids, the magnitude of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation displays a dependence on the time since the quench, or aging time, that is quantitatively very similar to the age dependence of the alpha peak frequency. The Johari-Goldstein relaxation time remains constant during aging for sorbitol while it decreases slightly with age for xylitol. Hence, one cannot sensibly assign a fictive temperature to the Johari-Goldstein relaxation. This behavior contrasts with that of liquids lacking distinct Johari-Goldstein peaks for which the excess wing of the alpha peak tracks the main part of the peak during aging, enabling the assignment of a single fictive temperature to the entire spectrum. The aging behavior of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation time further calls into question the possibility that the relaxation time possesses stronger temperature dependence in equilibrium than is observed in the out-of-equilibrium state below the glass transition.

  20. Local dynamics of glass-forming polystyrene thin films from atomistic simulation

    Zhou, Yuxing; Milner, Scott

    Despite a wide technological application ranging from protective coatings to organic solar cells, there still no consensus on the mechanism for the glass transition in polymer thin films a manifestation of the infamous glass problem under confinement. Many experimental and computational studies have observed a large deviation of nanoscale dynamical properties in thin films from the corresponding properties in bulk. In this work, we perform extensive united-atom simulations on atactic polystyrene free-standing thin films near the glass transition temperature and focus on the effect of free surface on the local dynamics. We study the segmental dynamics as a function of distance from the surface for different temperatures, from which relaxation time and thereby local Tg is obtained for each layer. We find the dynamics near free surface is not only enhanced but becomes less strongly temperature dependent as Tg is approached compared to the bulk. We find an increasing length scale associated with mobility propagation from the free surface as temperature decreases, but no correlation between local structure and enhanced relaxation rates near the surface, consistent with studies on bead-spring chains.

  1. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Some Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses and Their Glass Derivatives

    Abo Hussein, E.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses containing bismuth oxide have attracted considerable attention, although it is non-conventional glass forming oxide, but it has wide applications. In this work, it is aimed to prove that bismuth silicate glass can act as a good shielding material for γ- rays. For this purpose glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO_2 was prepared using melting-annealing technique. Also effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass such as PbO, BaO or SrO were also studied. The formed glasses were also heat treated at 450 degree C for 4 hours to give the corresponding heat treated glasses. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that the prepared glasses and heat treated glasses have very good stability when exposed to γ- irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using these glasses as gamma ray shielding materials. Many properties have been investigated, such as density to understand the structural properties, also mechanical properties were verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing their durability in both acidic and basic solutions. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass and heat treated glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 553 K, which proved that these glasses have very low conductivity even at high temperature. The formed phases of heat treated glass or glass ceramic samples were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also studying the structure of glasses and heat treated glasses before and after irradiation was investigated by the Infrared transmitting spectra. Calculations of optical band gap energies were demonstrated for some selected glasses and heat treated glasses from the data of UV optical absorption spectra to support the probability of using these bismuth silicate glasses for gamma radiation shielding processing.

  2. New glass material oxidation and dissolution system facility: Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other material to high-level-waste glass. Storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials programmatic environmental impact statement data report: Predecisional draft

    Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. It has been recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so that they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This SNF standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. This report provides for the PEIS the necessary input data on a new method for the disposition of SFMs: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptunium, americium, and 233 U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal. The primary form of this SNF is Hanford-N SNF with preirradiation uranium enrichments between 0.95 and 1.08%. The final product is a plutonium, low-enriched-uranium, HLW, borosilicate glass for disposition in a geological repository. The proposed conversion process is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which is a new process. The initial analysis of the GMODS process indicates that a MODS facility for this application would be similar in size and environmental impact to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site. Because of this, the detailed information available on DWPF was used as the basis for much of the GMODS input into the SFMs PEIS

  3. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Use of rice rusk ash and spent catalyst as a source of raw material for the production and characterization of soda-lime silicate glasses destined for packaging

    Araujo, Mariana Silva de

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the use of two industrial solid wastes (ISW), generated in large quantities in Brazil, were presented in production of soda-lime silicate glasses destined for packaging. The evaluated wastes were rice husk ash (RHA) and the spent catalyst at the Petrochemical Fluid Catalytic Cracking units (ECAT), both may be classified as a class II solid waste according to NBR 10.004. This new proposal for the allocation of such wastes is an alternative to current provisions, seeking not only to minimize environmental impacts, but also enrich them as raw materials. For the samples production, besides ISW were used melting oxide (Na 2 CO 3 ) and stabilizer oxide (CaO).The results demonstrate that both can be used in their raw form (without treatment) replacing important raw materials, sources of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 , essential for glass formation. The samples obtained presented amber color due to the presence of nickel (Ni² + ion) from ECAT and 18% of optical transmittance. They also showed a good homogeneity, i.e., absence of bubbles and striae and 1,33 x 10 -8 g/cm²·day of hydrolytic resistance according to ISO695-1984. Thus, the obtained glass is suitable for applications requiring low light transmittance such as colored glasses containers in general, which does not require perfect visibility and transparency. The incorporation in the final composition was approximately 78% in mass. (author)

  5. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2 laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO 2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO 2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310 -6 /K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on

  6. Delamination R-curve as a material property of unidirectional glass/epoxy composites

    Shokrieh, M.M.; Heidari-Rarani, M.; Ayatollahi, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The R-curve behavior of a unidirectional laminate as a material property is investigated. → Effect of initial crack length and thickness on R-curve is experimentally shown. → A mathematical relation is proposed to model the R-curve behavior of any unidirectional laminated composite. -- Abstract: It is still questionable to think of delamination resistance of a double cantilever beam (DCB) as a material property independent of the specimen size and geometry. In this research, the effects of initial crack length and DCB specimen thickness on the mode I delamination resistance curve (R-curve) behavior of different unidirectional glass/epoxy DCB specimens are experimentally investigated. It is observed that the magnitudes of initiation and propagation delamination toughness (G Ic-init and G Ic-prop ) as well as the fiber bridging length are constant in a specific range of the initial crack length to the DCB specimen thickness ratios of 8.5 0 /h < 19. Finally, a mathematical relationship is proposed for prediction of mode I delamination behavior (from the initiation to propagation) of E-glass/epoxy DCB specimens.

  7. Entrapment of 137Cs vapour generated during vitrification and casting of cesium borosilicate glass by inorganic materials

    Ram, Ramu; Gandhi, Shyamala; Dash, A.; Varma, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    Efficiency of different inorganic materials like zirconium antimonate (ZrA), ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP), synthetic zeolites, activated charcoal, glass wool etc, towards the entrapment of 137 Cs vapour escaping during vitrification and casting of cesium borosilicate glass required for the preparation of 137 Cs sources for medical and industrial applications have been determined. The recovery of entrapped cesium using dilute acids for subsequent recycling has also been explored. (author)

  8. Development of rare earth regenerator materials in fine wire form

    Wong, T.; Seuntjens, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The use of rare earth metals, both in the pure and alloyed state, have been examined for use as regenerators in cryocooler applications and as the working material in active magnetic refrigerators. In both applications there is a requirement for the rare earth material to have a constant and uniform cross section, an average size on the order of 50-200 microns in diameter, and low levels of impurities. Existing powder production methods have drawbacks such as oxygen contamination, non-uniform size, inconsistent cross sections, and low production yields. A novel approach for the production of rare earth metals and alloys in fine wire form has been developed. This is accomplished by assembling a copperjacket and niobium barrier around a RE ingot, extruding the assembly, and reducing it with standard wire drawing practices. Strand anneals are utilized between drawing passes when necessary in order to recrystallize the RE core and restore ductility. The copperjacket is removed by chemical means at final size, leaving the Nb barrier in place as a protective coating. This process has been applied to gadolinium, dysprosium and a GdDy alloy

  9. Material Recovery and Waste Form Development FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    Todd, Terry Allen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Material Recovery and Waste Form Development (MRWFD) Campaign under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The FY 2015 Accomplishments Report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within the MRWFD Campaign in FY-14. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but primarily focuses on the many technical accomplishments made during FY-15. The campaign continued to utilize an engineering driven-science-based approach to maintain relevance and focus. There was increased emphasis on development of technologies that support near-term applications that are relevant to the current once-through fuel cycle.

  10. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  11. GRC: Composite material from an inorganic matrix reinforced with AR glass fibres

    Comino Almenara, P. I.

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the historical background of Cem-FIL. Alkali Resistant Glass Fibre, as well as the composite characteristics of the element they generate: GRC. The most important advantages and properties of this type of Composite Material are also detailed.

    En este artículo se detallan cuáles son las bases históricas de las Fibras de Vidrio Álcali-Resistentes Cem-FIL así como las características del elemento compuesto que ellas generan: GRC. En este documento también se pueden encontrar indicaciones sobre las principales ventajas y propiedades de este tipo de Material Compuesto.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Microhybrid Composite and Glass lonomer Restorative Material in Permanent Teeth.

    Kharma, Khalil; Zogheib, Tatiana; Bhandi, Shilpa; Mehanna, Carina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clinically compare glass ionomer cement (GIC) with microhybrid composite resin used in class I cavities on permanent teeth over a period of 9 months. A total of 40 teeth with class I cavities were divided into two groups (n = 20) and restored with GIC (EQUIA; GC) and microhybrid resin composite (Amelogen Plus; Ultradent). Restorations were evaluated at ×4.5 magnification using the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria every 3 months. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test (a material handling, adaptation, and marginal staining. The results of this clinical study showed that GIC (EQUIA; GC) can be used for the restoration of permanent teeth and may be more appropriate for certain clinical situations than the resin composite material. EQUIA (GIC) is a viable alternative to resin composite in restoring class I cavities in permanent teeth.

  13. Materials by design: An experimental and computational investigation on the microanatomy arrangement of porous metallic glasses

    Sarac, Baran; Klusemann, Benjamin; Xiao, Tao; Bargmann, Swantje

    2014-01-01

    The correlation of a material’s structure with its properties is one of the important unresolved issues in materials science research. This paper discusses a novel experimental and computational approach by which the influence of the pores on the mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) can be systematically and quantitatively analyzed. The experimental stage involves the fabrication of a template whose pore configurations are pre-determined by computer-aided design tools, and replication of the designed patterns with BMGs. Quasi-static mechanical characterization of these complex microstructures is conducted under uniaxial tension and in-plane compression. For the numerical simulations, a non-local gradient-enhanced continuum mechanical model is established, using thermodynamic principles and periodic boundary conditions. The combination of the experimental and numerical results has identified the importance of the pore configuration, overall porosity and diameter to the spacing ratio of the pores to attain optimized material properties

  14. Three-dimensional contraction and mechanical properties of glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy materials at cryogenic temperature

    Hamelin, J.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper three-dimensional thermal contraction and mechanical properties of glass-cloth reinforced epoxy laminates are reported. The results are shown to depend on the material density (and thus on the glass content). They cover both commercially available products and other materials of higher density recently developed with the aim of getting a thermal contraction of same amplitude as that of the superconductor, specially in the direction orthogonal to the plane of laminations. The feasibility of this last type of structural material was investigated along a R and D programme involved with the 'TORE II' project, a tokamak machine proposed for plasma physics experiments by the Euratom-CEA Association

  15. Study of the Effect of Reinforced Glass Fibers on Fatigue Properties for Composite Materials

    Mohamed G. Hamad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This  research  included  the  study of  the effect  of  reinforced  glass fibers  on  fatigue  properties  for composite materials. Polyester  resin  is used  as  connective  material(matrix in two types  of  glass  fibers  for reinforced. The  first  type  is regular  glass fibers  (woven  roving with the  directional(0-90, the second  is  glass  fibers  with  the  random  direction. The first type is the panels with regular reinforced (0-90, and with number of layer (1,2.The  second  type  is  the  panels with random  reinforced  and  with  number  of  layers (1,2. The  results  and  the  laboratory  examinations  for  the samples  reinforce  with  fibers  have  manifested (0-90  that there  is  a decrease  in the number  of  cycles  to the  fatigue  limit  when  the  number  of  reinforce  layers  have  increased . And  an elasticity of this  type  of  samples  are decreased  by  increasing  the number  of  reinforced  layers  with  fiber  .We  find  the  random  reinforced  number  of  fatigue  cycles  for the samples  with  two  layers  of  random  reinforced  are  decreased  more  than the samples  with  one  layer of random  reinforced .

  16. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-1 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Materials Characterization Center Approved Testing Material ATM-1 is a borosilicate glass that incorporates nonradioactive constituents and uranium to represent high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuel. Its composition is based upon the simulated HLW glass type 76-68 to which depleted uranium has been added as UO 2 . Three separate lots of ATM-1 glass have been fabricated, designated ATM-1a, ATM-1b, and ATM-1c. Limited analyses and microstructural evaluations were conducted on each type. Each lot of ATM-1 glass was produced from a feedstock melted in an air atmosphere at between 1150 to 1200 0 C and cast into stress annealed rectangular bars. Bars of ATM-1a were nominally 1.3 x 1.3 x 7.6 cm (approx.36 g each), bars of ATM-1b were nominally 2 x 2.5 x 17.5 cm (approx.190 g each) and bars of ATM-1c were nominally 1.9 x 1.9 x 15 cm (approx.170 g each). Thirteen bars of ATM-1a, 14 bars of ATM-1b, and 6 bars of ATM-1c were produced. Twelve random samples from each of lots ATM-1a, ATM-1b, and ATM-1c were analyzed. The concentrations (except for U and Cs) were obtained by Inductively-Coupled Argon Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy analysis. Cesium analysis was performed by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, while uranium was analyzed by Pulsed Laser Fluorometry. X-ray diffraction analysis of four samples indicated that lot ATM-1a had no detectable crystalline phases (<3 wt %), while ATM-1b and ATM-1c contained approx.3 to 5 wt % iron-chrome spinel crystals. These concentrations of secondary spinel component are not considered uncommon. Scanning electron microscopy examination of fracture surfaces revealed only a random, apparently crystalline, second phase (1-10 μm diam) and a random distribution of small voids or bubbles (approx.1 μm nominal diam)

  17. Dynamical, structural and chemical heterogeneities in a binary metallic glass-forming liquid

    Puosi, F.; Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2018-04-01

    As it approaches the glass transition, particle motion in liquids becomes highly heterogeneous and regions with virtually no mobility coexist with liquid-like domains. This complex dynamic is believed to be responsible for different phenomena including non-exponential relaxation and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. Understanding the relationships between dynamical heterogeneities and local structure in metallic liquids and glasses is a major scientific challenge. Here we use classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the atomic dynamics and microscopic structure of Cu50Zr50 alloy in the supercooling regime. Dynamical heterogeneities are identified via an isoconfigurational analysis. We demonstrate the transition from isolated to clustering low mobility with decreasing temperature. These slow clusters, whose sizes grow upon cooling, are also associated with concentration fluctuations, characterized by a Zr-enriched phase, with a composition CuZr2 . In addition, a structural analysis of slow clusters based on Voronoi tessellation evidences an increase with respect of the bulk system of the fraction of Cu atoms having a local icosahedral order. These results are in agreement with the consolidated scenario of the relevant role played by icosahedral order in the dynamic slowing-down in supercooled metal alloys.

  18. Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass

    Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and 233 U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal

  19. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    Wentworth, S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  20. Mineralogical textural and compositional data on the alteration of basaltic glass from Kilauea, Hawaii to 300 degrees C: Insights to the corrosion of a borosilicate glass waste-form

    Smith, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Mineralogical, textural and compositional data accompanying greenschist facies metamorphism (to 300 degrees C) of basalts of the East Rift Zone (ERZ), Kilauea, Hawaii may be evaluated relative to published and experimental results for the surface corrosion of borosilicate glass. The ERZ alteration sequence is dominated by intermittent palagonite, interlayered smectite-chlorite, chlorite, and actinolite-epidote-anhydrite. Alteration is best developed in fractures and vesicles where surface reaction layers root on the glass matrix forming rinds in excess of 100 microns thick. Fractures control fluid circulation and the alteration sequence. Proximal to the glass surface, palagonite, Fe-Ti oxides and clays replace fresh glass as the surface reaction layer migrates inwards; away from the surface, amphibole, anhydrite, quartz and calcite crystallize from hydrothermal fluids in contact with the glass. The texture and composition of basaltic glass surfaces are similar to those of a SRL-165 glass leached statically for sixty days at 150 degrees C. While the ERZ reservoir is a complex open system, conservative comparisons between the alteration of ERZ and synthetic borosilicate glass are warranted. 31 refs., 2 figs