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Sample records for glass fiber-reinforced polymers

  1. The usage of carbon fiber reinforcement polymer and glass fiber reinforcement polymer for retrofit technology building

    Tarigan, Johannes; Meka, Randi; Nursyamsi

    2018-03-01

    Fiber Reinforcement Polymer has been used as a material technology since the 1970s in Europe. Fiber Reinforcement Polymer can reinforce the structure externally, and used in many types of buildings like beams, columns, and slabs. It has high tensile strength. Fiber Reinforcement Polymer also has high rigidity and strength. The profile of Fiber Reinforcement Polymer is thin and light, installation is simple to conduct. One of Fiber Reinforcement Polymer material is Carbon Fiber Reinforcement Polymer and Glass Fiber Reinforcement Polymer. These materials is tested when it is installed on concrete cylinders, to obtain the comparison of compressive strength CFRP and GFRP. The dimension of concrete is diameter of 15 cm and height of 30 cm. It is amounted to 15 and divided into three groups. The test is performed until it collapsed to obtain maximum load. The results of research using CFRP and GFRP have shown the significant enhancement in compressive strength. CFRP can increase the compressive strength of 26.89%, and GFRP of 14.89%. For the comparison of two materials, CFRP is more strengthening than GFRP regarding increasing compressive strength. The usage of CFRP and GFRP can increase the loading capacity.

  2. Effects of moisture on glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    performance of wind turbine blades over their lifetime. Here, environmental moisture conditions were simulated by immersing glass fiber-reinforced polymer specimens in salt water for a period of up to 8 years. The mechanical properties of specimens were analyzed before and after immersion to evaluate...

  3. Recycled Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Incorporated in Mortar for Improved Mechanical Performance

    2017-12-11

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) recycled from retired wind turbines was implemented in mortar as a volumetric replacement of sand during the two phases of this study. In Phase I, the mechanically refined GFRP particle sizes were sieved for four...

  4. Health monitoring of precast bridge deck panels reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars.

    2012-03-01

    The present research project investigates monitoring concrete precast panels for bridge decks that are reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars. Due to the lack of long term research on concrete members reinforced with GFRP bars, lo...

  5. Flexural strength using Steel Plate, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) on reinforced concrete beam in building technology

    Tarigan, Johannes; Patra, Fadel Muhammad; Sitorus, Torang

    2018-03-01

    Reinforced concrete structures are very commonly used in buildings because they are cheaper than the steel structures. But in reality, many concrete structures are damaged, so there are several ways to overcome this problem, by providing reinforcement with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) and reinforcement with steel plates. Each type of reinforcements has its advantages and disadvantages. In this study, researchers discuss the comparison between flexural strength of reinforced concrete beam using steel plates and Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP). In this case, the researchers use Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) as external reinforcements. The dimension of the beams is 15 x 25 cm with the length of 320 cm. Based on the analytical results, the strength of the beam with CFRP is 1.991 times its initial, GFRP is 1.877 times while with the steel plate is 1.646 times. Based on test results, the strength of the beam with CFRP is 1.444 times its initial, GFRP is 1.333 times while the steel plate is 1.167 times. Based on these test results, the authors conclude that beam with CFRP is the best choice for external reinforcement in building technology than the others.

  6. Study on vibration alleviating properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer concrete through orthogonal tests

    Bai Wenfeng; Zhang Jianhua; Yan Peng; Wang Xinli

    2009-01-01

    Polymer concrete (PC), because of its good vibration alleviating properties, is a proper material for elementary machine parts in high-precision machine tools. Glass fiber was applied in PC to improve its mechanical properties, and the material obtained is called glass fiber reinforced polymer concrete (GFRPC). The best parameter to estimate the vibration alleviating property is damping ratio. Orthogonal tests were carried out to prepare GFRPC specimens with different component proportions. Damping ratio of the GFRPC specimens was measured. The effect of the factors considered in the experiments on damping ratio of GFRPC was studied. Results of the tests show that granite proportion plays the most important role in determining damping ratio of GFRPC, then flexibilizer dosage and glass fiber length, while epoxy resin dosage and glass fiber dosage play a comparatively less important part. Detailed descriptions were made about how the considered factors affect damping ratio of GFRPC in this paper

  7. Intra-Laminar Fracture Toughness of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer By Using Theory, Experimentation and FEA

    Firojkhan, Pathan; Tanpure, Kshitijit; Dawale, Ajinkya; Patil, Shital

    2018-04-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are widely use in aerospace, marine, auto-mobile and civil engineering applications because of their high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, corrosion resistance and potentially high durability. The purpose of this research is to experimentally investigate the mechanical and fracture properties of glass-fiber reinforced polyester composite material, 450 g/m 2 randomly distributed glass-fiber mat also known as woven strand mat with polyester resin as a matrix. The samples have been produced by the conventional hand layup process and the specimens were prepared as per the ASTM standards. The tensile test was performed on the composite specimens using Universal testing machine (UTM) which are used for the finite element simulation of composite Layered fracture model. The mechanical properties were evaluated from the stress vs. strain curve obtained from the test result. Later, fracture tests were performed on the CT specimen. In case of CT specimen the load vs. Displacement plot obtained from the experimental results was used to determine the fracture properties of the composite. The failure load of CT specimen using FEA is simulated which gives the Stress intensity factor by using FEA. Good agreement between the FEA and experimental results was observed.

  8. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  9. Measurement and analysis of thrust force in drilling sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Ramesh, M.; Gopinath, A.

    2017-05-01

    Drilling of composite materials is difficult when compared to the conventional materials because of its in-homogeneous nature. The force developed during drilling play a major role in the surface quality of the hole and minimizing the damages around the surface. This paper focuses the effect of drilling parameters on thrust force in drilling of sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates. The quadratic response models are developed by using response surface methodology (RSM) to predict the influence of cutting parameters on thrust force. The adequacy of the models is checked by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis is carried out to analyze the quality of the drilled surface. From the results, it is found that, the feed rate is the most influencing parameter followed by spindle speed and the drill diameter is the least influencing parameter on the thrust force.

  10. Studies on fabrication of glass fiber reinforced composites using polymer blends

    Patel, R. H.; Kachhia, P. H.; Patel, S. N.; Rathod, S. T.; Valand, J. K.

    2018-05-01

    Glass fiber reinforced PVC/NBR composites have been fabricated via hot compression moulding process. PVC is brittle in nature and thus lower thermal stability. Therefore, to improve the toughness of PVC, NBR was incorporated in certain proportions. As both are polar and thus they are compatible. To improve the strength property further, these blends were used to fabricate glass fiber reinforced composites. SEM micrograph shows good wettability of the blend with glass fibers resulting in proper bonding which increase the strength of the composites.

  11. PERBAIKAN KEKUATAN DAN DAKTILITAS KOLOM BETON BERTULANG YANG MENDAPAT BEBAN GEMPA MENGGUNAKAN GLASS FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER

    Parmo Parmo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Repairing the Strength and Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Column That Got Earthquake using Gla­ss Fiber Reinforced Polymer. This study aims to identify the additional strength and ductility of reinforced concrete columns af­ter being re­­­­tro­fitted using glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP and got the brunt of the earth­quake. This study uses two objects tested columns, which are being tested for three times. Each column size is 350 x 350 x 1100 mm with f'c = 20.34 MPa and fy = 549.94 MPa. The tes­t­ing is performed by giving a constant axial load of 748 kN and cyclic lateral load using con­trol displacement method in order to simulate the brunt of earth­quake. The results show an in­crea­se in lateral capacity of co­lumn by 43.96%. Re­tro­­fitting the column with GFRP has a duc­tile property, which is shown by the increase of the displacement ductility by 129.14% and curvature ductility by 118.27%.   Penelitian ini ber­tujuan untuk mengetahui penambahan kekuatan dan dak­ti­li­­­­tas kolom beton bertulang se­telah diretrofit menggunakan glass fiber reinforced po­ly­­­mer (GFRP dan mendapat be­ban gempa. Penelitian ini menggunakan benda ­uji dua buah kolom dengan tiga kali pengujian. Masing-masing ukuran kolom 350 x 350 x 1100 mm dengan f’c = 20,34 MPa dan fy = 549,94 MPa. Pengujian dilakukan de­ngan memberikan beban ak­sial konstan 748 kN dan beban lateral siklik yang meng­gu­nakan metode di­splacemet con­trol untuk mensimulasikan beban gempa. Hasil pe­ne­­­litian menunjukkan pe­ningkatan kapasitas lateral pada kolom sebesar 43,96%. Retrofit kolom dengan GFRP bersifat dak­tail yang ditunjukkan dengan meningkatnya daktilitas per­pindahan sebesar 129,14% dan dak­­­tilitas kurvatur se­besar 118,27%.

  12. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  13. Experimental Investigation on the Durability of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites Containing Nanocomposite

    Weiwen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoclay layers incorporated into polymer/clay nanocomposites can inhibit the harmful penetration of water and chemicals into the material, and thus the durability of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP composites should be enhanced by using polymer/clay nanocomposite as the matrix material. In this study, 1.5 wt% vinyl ester (VE/organoclay and 2 wt% epoxy (EP/organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by an in situ polymerization method. The dispersion states of clay in the nanocomposites were studied by performing XRD analysis. GFRP composites were then fabricated with the prepared 1.5 wt% VE/clay and 2.0 wt% EP/clay nanocomposites to investigate the effects of a nanocomposite matrix on the durability of GFRP composites. The durability of the two kinds of GFRP composites was characterized by monitoring tensile properties following degradation of GFRP specimens aged in water and alkaline solution at 60°C, and SEM was employed to study fracture behaviors of aged GFRP composites under tension. The results show that tensile properties of the two types of GFRP composites with and without clay degrade significantly with aging time. However, the GFRP composites with nanoclay show a lower degradation rate compared with those without nanoclay, supporting the aforementioned hypothesis. And the modification of EP/GFRP enhanced the durability more effectively.

  14. Double-Sided Terahertz Imaging of Multilayered Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Przemyslaw Lopato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymer matrix composites (PMC play important roles in modern industry. Increasing the number of such structures in aerospace, construction, and automotive applications enforces continuous monitoring of their condition. Nondestructive inspection of layered composite materials is much more complicated process than evaluation of homogenous, (mostly metallic structures. Several nondestructive methods are utilized in this case (ultrasonics, shearography, tap testing, acoustic emission, digital radiography, infrared imaging but none of them gives full description of evaluated structures. Thus, further development of NDT techniques should be studied. A pulsed terahertz method seems to be a good candidate for layered PMC inspection. It is based on picosecond electromagnetic pulses interacting with the evaluated structure. Differences of dielectric parameters enables detection of a particular layer in a layered material. In the case of multilayered structures, only layers close to surface can be detected. The response of deeper ones is averaged because of multiple reflections. In this paper a novel inspection procedure with a data processing algorithm is introduced. It is based on a double-sided measurement, acquired signal deconvolution, and data combining. In order to verify the application of the algorithm stress-subjected glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP was evaluated. The obtained results enabled detection and detailed analysis of delaminations introduced by stress treatment and proved the applicability of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Shear Strengthening of RC Beams Using Sprayed Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer

    Sayed Mohamad Soleimani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of externally bonded sprayed glass fiber reinforced polymer (Sprayed GFRP in shear strengthening of RC beams under quasi-static loading is investigated. Different techniques were utilized to enhance the bond between concrete and Sprayed GFRP, involving the use of through bolts and nuts paired with concrete surface preparation through sandblasting and through the use of a pneumatic chisel prior to Sprayed GFRP application. It was found that roughening the concrete surface using a pneumatic chisel and using through bolts and nuts were the most effective techniques. Also, Sprayed GFRP applied on 3 sides (U-shaped was found to be more effective than 2-sided Sprayed GFRP in shear strengthening. Sprayed GFRP increased the shear load-carrying capacity and energy absorption capacities of RC beams. It was found that the load-carrying capacity of strengthened RC beams was related to an effective strain of applied Sprayed GFRP. This strain was related to Sprayed GFRP configuration and the technique used to enhance the concrete-FRP bond. Finally, an equation was proposed to calculate the contribution of Sprayed GFRP in the shear strength of an RC beam.

  16. Joining of aluminum sheet and glass fiber reinforced polymer using extruded pins

    Conte, Romina; Buhl, Johannes; Ambrogio, Giuseppina; Bambach, Markus

    2018-05-01

    The present contribution proposes a new approach for joining sheet metal and fiber reinforced composites. The joining process draws upon a Friction Stir Forming (FSF) process, which is performed on the metal sheet to produce slender pins. These pins are used to pierce through the composite. Joining is complete by forming a locking head out of the part if the pin sticks out of the composite. Pins of different diameters and lengths were produced from EN AW-1050 material, which were joined to glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6. The strength of the joint has been experimentally tested in order to understand the effect of the process temperature on the pins strength and therefore on the joining. The results demonstrate the feasibility of this new technique, which uses no excess material.

  17. Radiographic testing of glass fiber reinforced plastic materials

    Babylas, E.

    1976-01-01

    The microradiography of glass fiber reinforced polymers allowed to obtain informations on the growth of defects during molding. A relation was established between microstructure and routine radiography. The conditions needed for obtaining good quality radiograms are analyzed [fr

  18. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  19. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  20. Diagnostics of glass fiber reinforced polymers and comparative analysis of their fabrication techniques with the use of acoustic emission

    Bashkov, O. V.; Bryansky, A. A.; Panin, S. V.; Zaikov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    Strength properties of the glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) fabricated by vacuum and vacuum autoclave molding techniques were analyzed. Measurements of porosity of the GFRP parts manufactured by various molding techniques were conducted with the help of optical microscopy. On the basis of experimental data obtained by means of acoustic emission hardware/software setup, the technique for running diagnostics and forecasting the bearing capacity of polymeric composite materials based on the result of three-point bending tests has been developed. The operation principle of the technique is underlined by the evaluation of the power function index change which takes place on the dependence of the total acoustic emission counts versus the loading stress.

  1. Effect of severely thermal shocked MWCNT enhanced glass fiber reinforced polymer composite: An emphasis on tensile and thermal responses

    Mahato, K. K.; Fulmali, A. O.; Kattaguri, R.; Dutta, K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2018-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are exposed to diverse changing environmental temperatures during their in-service period. Current investigation is aimed to investigate the influence of thermal-shock exposure on the mechanical behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) enhanced glass fiber reinforced polymeric (GFRP) composites. The samples were exposed to +70°C for 36 hrs followed by further exposure to ‑ 60°C for the similar interval of time. Tensile tests were conducted in order to evaluate the results of thermal-shock on the mechanical behavior of the neat and conditioned samples at 1 mm/min loading rate. The polymer phase i.e. epoxy was modified with various MWCNT content. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was raised by 15.11 % with increase in the 0.1 % MWCNT content GFRP as related to the thermal-shocked neat GFRP conditioned samples. The possible reason may be attributed to the variation in the coefficients of thermal expansion at the time of conditioning. Also, upto some extent the pre-existing residual stresses allows uniform distribution of stress and hence the reason in enhanced mechanical properties of GFRP and MWCNT filled composites. In order to access the modifications in the glass transition temperature (Tg) due to the addition of MWCNT in GFRP composite and also due to the thermal shock temperature modulated differential scanning calorimeter (TMDSC) measurements are carried out. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was carried out to identify different modes of failures and strengthening morphology in the composites.

  2. Quantitative radiographic analysis of fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    Baidya, K P; Ramakrishna, S; Rahman, M; Ritchie, A

    2001-01-01

    X-ray radiographic examination of the bone fracture healing process is a widely used method in the treatment and management of patients. Medical devices made of metallic alloys reportedly produce considerable artifacts that make the interpretation of radiographs difficult. Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials have been proposed to replace metallic alloys in certain medical devices because of their radiolucency, light weight, and tailorable mechanical properties. The primary objective of this paper is to provide a comparable radiographic analysis of different fiber reinforced polymer composites that are considered suitable for biomedical applications. Composite materials investigated consist of glass, aramid (Kevlar-29), and carbon reinforcement fibers, and epoxy and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) matrices. The total mass attenuation coefficient of each material was measured using clinical X-rays (50 kev). The carbon fiber reinforced composites were found to be more radiolucent than the glass and kevlar fiber reinforced composites.

  3. Study on mechanical properties of fly ash impregnated glass fiber reinforced polymer composites using mixture design analysis

    Satheesh Raja, R.; Manisekar, K.; Manikandan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FRP with and without fly ash filler were prepared. • Mechanical properties of composites were analyzed. • Mixture Design Method was used to model the system. • Experimental and mathematical model results were compared. - Abstract: This paper describes the mechanical behavior of fly ash impregnated E-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite (GFRP). Initially the proportion of fiber and resin were optimized from the analysis of the mechanical properties of the GFRP. It is observed that the 30 wt% of E-glass in the GFRP without filler material yields better results. Then, based on the optimized value of resin content, the varying percentage of E-glass and fly ash was added to fabricate the hybrid composites. Results obtained in this study were mathematically evaluated using Mixture Design Method. Predictions show that 10 wt% addition of fly ash with fiber improves the mechanical properties of the composites. The fly ash impregnated GFRP yields significant improvement in mechanical strength compared to the GFRP without filler material. The surface morphologies of the fractured specimens were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemical composition and surface morphology of the fly ash is analyzed by using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning Electron Microscope

  4. Fiber reinforced polymer bridge decks : [technical summary].

    2011-01-01

    A number of researchers have addressed the use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) deck as a replacement solution for deteriorated bridge decks made of traditional materials. The use of new, advanced materials such as FRP is advantageous when the bridg...

  5. Evaluating the mechanical properties of E-Glass fiber/carbon fiber reinforced interpenetrating polymer networks

    G. Suresh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of vinyl ester and polyurethane interpenetrating polymer networks were prepared by changing the component ratios of VER (Vinyl ester and PU (Polyurethane and the polymerization process was confirmed with Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. IPN (Inter Penetrating Polymer Network - VER/PU reinforced Glass and carbon fiber composite laminates were made using the Hand lay up technique. The Mechanical properties of the E-glass and carbon fiber specimens were compared from tests including Tensile, Compressive, Flexural, ILSS (Inter Laminar Shear Strength, Impact & Head Deflection Test (HDT. The IPN Reinforced Carbon fiber specimen showed better results in all the tests than E-Glass fibre reinforced IPN laminate with same thickness of the specimen, according to ASTM standards. It was found that the combination of 60%VER and 40%PU IPN exhibits better impact strength and maximum elongation at break, but at the slight expense of mechanical properties such as tensile, compressive, flexural, ILSS properties. The morphology of the unreinforced and reinforced composites was analyzed with help of scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot recreational yachts

    Dave (Dae-Wook Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composite materials offer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP composites is presented. Fabrication techniques investigated during this study are hand lay-up (HL, vacuum infusion (VI, and hybrid (HL + VI processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results.

  7. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot) recreational yachts

    Kim, Dave (dea-wook); Hennigan, Daniel John; Beavers, Kevin Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Polymer composite materialsoffer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet) in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with a lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic(GFRP) composites is presented. Fabrication techniques used in this study are hand lay-up (HL), vacuum infusion (VI), and hybrid (HL+VI) processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results

  8. Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP Bars for Enhancing the Flexural Performance of RC Beams Using Side-NSM Technique

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (RC structures require strengthening for numerous factors, such as increased load, modification of the structural systems, structural upgrade or errors in the design and construction stages. The side near-surface mounted (SNSM strengthening technique with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP bars is a relatively new emerging technique for enhancing the flexural capacities of existing RC elements. Nine RC rectangular beams were flexurally strengthened with this technique and tested under four-point bending loads until failure. The main goal of this study is to optimize the structural capacity of the RC beams by varying the amount of strengthening reinforcement and bond length. The experimental test results showed that strengthening with SNSM GFRP bars significantly enhanced the flexural responses of the specimens compared with the control specimen. The first cracking and ultimate loads, energy absorption capacities, ductility and stiffness were remarkably enhanced by the SNSM technique. It was also confirmed that the bond length of the strengthened reinforcement greatly influences the energy absorption capacities, ductility and stiffness. The effect of the bond length on these properties is more significant compared to the amount of strengthening reinforcement.

  9. "Brick-and-Mortar" Nanostructured Interphase for Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites.

    De Luca, Francois; Sernicola, Giorgio; Shaffer, Milo S P; Bismarck, Alexander

    2018-02-28

    The fiber-matrix interface plays a critical role in determining composite mechanical properties. While a strong interface tends to provide high strength, a weak interface enables extensive debonding, leading to a high degree of energy absorption. Balancing these conflicting requirements by engineering composite interfaces to improve strength and toughness simultaneously still remains a great challenge. Here, a nanostructured fiber coating was realized to manifest the critical characteristics of natural nacre, at a reduced length scale, consistent with the surface curvature of fibers. The new interphase contains a high proportion (∼90 wt %) of well-aligned inorganic platelets embedded in a polymer; the window of suitable platelet dimensions is very narrow, with an optimized platelet width and thickness of about 130 and 13 nm, respectively. An anisotropic, nanostructured coating was uniformly and conformally deposited onto a large number of 9 μm diameter glass fibers, simultaneously, using self-limiting layer-by-layer assembly (LbL); this parallel approach demonstrates a promising strategy to exploit LbL methods at scale. The resulting nanocomposite interphase, primarily loaded in shear, provides new mechanisms for stress dissipation and plastic deformation. The energy released by fiber breakage in tension appear to spread and dissipate within the nanostructured interphase, accompanied by stable fiber slippage, while the interfacial strength was improved up to 30%.

  10. Radiation modification of glass fiber - reinforced plastics

    Allayarov, S.R.; Smirnov, Yu.N.; Lesnichaya, V.A.; Ol'khov, Yu.A.; Belov, G.P.; Dixon, D.A.; Kispert, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    Modification of glass fiber - reinforced plastics (GFRPs) by gamma-irradiation has been researched to receipt of polymeric composite materials. They were produced by the film - technology method and the cheapest thermoplastics (polythene, polyamide were used as polymeric matrixes for their manufacture. GFRPs were irradiated with Co 60 gamma-rays from a Gammatok-100 source in air and in vacuum. The strength properties of GFRPs and initial polymeric matrixes were investigated before and after radiolysis. Molecular - topological structure of the polymeric matrixes were tested by the method of thermomechanical spectroscopy. The strength properties of GFRPs depend on a parity of speeds of structural (physical) and chemical modification of the polymeric matrixes. These two processes proceed simultaneously. The structural modification includes physical transformation of polymers at preservation of their chemical structure. Covalent bonds between various macromolecules or between macromolecules and surface of fiberglasses are formed at the chemical modification of polymeric matrixes induced by radiation. Action of ionizing radiation on the used polymeric matrix results to its structurization (polythene) or to destruction (polyamide). Increasing of durability of GFRPs containing polythene is caused by formation of the optimum molecular topological structure of the polymeric matrix. (authors)

  11. Improvement of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites by poling treatment

    Oh, S M; Hwang, H Y

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new non-destructive method has been proposed for damage monitoring of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials using the piezoelectric characteristics of a polymeric matrix. Several studies of the piezoelectric properties of unidirectional glass fiber epoxy composites and damage monitoring of double-cantilever beams have supported the claim that the piezoelectric method is feasible and powerful enough to monitor the damage of glass fiber epoxy composites. Generally, conventional piezoelectric materials have higher piezoelectric characteristics through poling treatment. In this work, we investigated the change of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites before and after poling treatment. The piezoelectric constants (d 33 ) of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites increased by more than 400%. Also, x-ray diffraction tests revealed that poling treatment changed the degree of crystallinity of the epoxy matrix, and this led to the improvement of the piezoelectric characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. (paper)

  12. Machining of glass fiber reinforced polyamide

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The machinability of a 30 wt% glass fiber reinforced polyamide (PA was investigated by means of drilling tests. A disk was cut from an extruded rod and drilled on the flat surface: thrust was acquired during drilling at different drilling speed, feed rate and drill diameter. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and indentation were used to characterize PA so as to evaluate the intrinsic lack of homogeneity of the extruded material. In conclusion, it was observed that the chip formation mechanism affects the thrust dependence on the machining parameters. A traditional modeling approach is able to predict thrust only in presence of a continuous chip. In some conditions, thrust increases as drilling speed increases and feed rate decreases; this evidence suggests not to consider the general scientific approach which deals the machining of plastics in analogy with metals. Moreover, the thrust can be significantly affected by the workpiece fabrication effect, as well as by the machining parameters; therefore, the fabrication effect is not negligible in the definition of an optimum for the machining process.

  13. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    Several advantages, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness, superior corrosion resistance, and high fatigue and impact resistance, among others, make FRPs an attractive alternative to conventional construction materials for use in developing new structures as well as rehabilitating in-service infrastructure. As the number of infrastructure applications using FRPs grows, the need for the development of a uniform Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) approach, including design procedures and examples, has become paramount. Step-by-step design procedures and easy-to-use design formulas are necessary to assure the quality and safety of FRP structural systems by reducing the possibility of design and construction errors. Since 2008, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in coordination with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), has overseen the development of the Pre-Standard for Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) of Pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Structures using probability-based limit states design. The fifth chapter of the pre-standard focuses on the design of members in flexure and shear under different failure modes, where the current failure load prediction models proposed within have been shown to be highly inaccurate based on experimental data and evaluation performed by researchers at the West Virginia University Constructed Facilities Center. A new prediction model for determining the critical flexural load capacity of pultruded GFRP square and rectangular box beams is presented within. This model shows that the type of failure can be related to threshold values of the beam span-to-depth ratio (L/h) and total flange width-to-thickness ratio (bf /t), resulting in three governing modes of failure: local buckling failure in the compression flange (4 ≤ L/h < 6), combined strain failure at the web-flange junction (6 ≤ L/h ≤ 10), and bending failure in the tension flange (10 < L/h ≤ 42

  14. Mechanical Property Evaluation of Palm/Glass Sandwiched Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite in Comparison with few natural composites

    Raja Dhas, J. Edwin; Pradeep, P.

    2017-10-01

    Natural fibers available plenty can be used as reinforcements in development of eco friendly polymer composites. The less utilized palm leaf stalk fibers sandwiched with artificial glass fibers was researched in this work to have a better reinforcement in preparing a green composite. The commercially available polyester resin blend with coconut shell filler in nano form was used as matrix to sandwich these composites. Naturally available Fibers of palm leaf stalk, coconut leaf stalk, raffia and oil palm were extracted and treated with potassium permanganate solution which enhances the properties. For experimentation four different plates were fabricated using these fibers adopting hand lay-up method. These sandwiched composite plates are further machined to obtain ASTM standards Specimens which are mechanically tested as per standards. Experimental results reveal that the alkali treated palm leaf stalk fiber based polymer composite shows appreciable results than the others. Hence the developed composite can be recommended for fabrication of automobile parts.

  15. Development and performance evaluation of fiber reinforced polymer bridge.

    2014-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) have become more popular construction materials in the last decade due to the reduction of : material costs. The installation and performance evaluation of the first FRP-wrapped balsa wood bridge in Louisiana is descri...

  16. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Taj, S.; Khan, S.; Munawar, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibers have been used to reinforce materials for over 3,000 years. More recently they have been employed in combination with plastics. Many types of natural fi fibers have been investigated for use in plastics including Flax, hemp, jute, straw, wood fiber, rice husks, wheat, barley, oats, rye, cane (sugar and bamboo), grass reeds, kenaf, ramie, oil palm empty fruit bunch, sisal, coir, water hyacinth, pennywort, kapok, paper-mulberry, raphia, banana fiber, pineapple leaf fiber and papyrus. Natural fibers have the advantage that they are renewable resources and have marketing appeal. The Asian markets have been using natural fibers for many years e.g., jute is a common reinforcement in India. Natural fibers are increasingly used in automotive and packaging materials. Pakistan is an agricultural country and it is the main stay of Pakistan's economy. Thousands of tons of different crops are produced but most of their wastes do not have any useful utilization. Agricultural wastes include wheat husk, rice husk, and their straw, hemp fiber and shells of various dry fruits. These agricultural wastes can be used to prepare fiber reinforced polymer composites for commercial use. This report examines the different types of fibers available and the current status of research. Many references to the latest work on properties, processing and application have been cited in this review. (author)

  17. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  18. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M

    2003-07-15

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix.

  19. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix

  20. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  1. Environmental Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Fasteners in Wood

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the durability of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) nails in treated wood. The FRP nails were exposed to four conditions: (1) accelerated weathering, consisting of exposure to ultraviolet light and condensation; (2) 100% relative humidity (RH); (3) being driven into untreated wood and exposed to 100% RH; and (4) being driven into wood treated with...

  2. Investigation of mechanical properties of kenaf, hemp and E-glass fiber reinforced composites

    Dinesh, Veena; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.; Chari, V. Srinivasa

    2018-04-01

    Recently the use of fiber reinforced polymer composite in the automobile, aerospace overwhelming designing sectors has increased tremendously due to the ecological issues and health hazard possessed by the synthetic fiber during disposal and manufacturing. The paper presents tensile strength, flexural strength and hardness of kenaf-E glass-kenaf, hemp-E glass-hemp and kenaf-E glass-hemp fiber reinforced polyester composites. The composite plates are shaped according to the standard geometry and uni-axially loaded in order to investigate the tensile responses of each combination. In addition to the physical and mechanical properties, processing methods and application of kenaf and hemp fiber composites is also discussed.

  3. Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    Marinela Bărbuţă

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer concrete is a composite material realized with resin and aggregates. In the present study the epoxy resin was used for binding the aggregates. In the composition were introduced near the fly ash, used as filler, the cellulose fibers. The mechanical characteristics such as compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength of polymer concrete with fibers were investigated. The fiber percentage was constant, the epoxy resin and the filler dosages were varied. The cellulose fiber had not improved the mechanical characteristics of the polymer concrete in comparison to that of polymer concrete without cellulose fibers.

  4. On Healable Polymers and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Nielsen, Christian Eric

    Polymeric materials capable of healing damage would be valuable in structural applications where access for repair is limited. Approaches to creating such materials are reviewed, with the present work focusing on polymers with thermally reversible covalent cross-links. These special cross-links are Diels-Alder (DA) adducts, which can be separated and re-formed, enabling healing of mechanical damage at the molecular level. Several DA-based polymers, including 2MEP4FS, are mechanically and thermally characterized. The polymerization reaction of 2MEP4FS is modeled and the number of established DA adducts is associated with the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The models are applied to concentric cylinder rotational measurements of 2MEP4FS prepolymer at room and elevated temperatures to describe the viscosity as a function of time, temperature, and conversion. Mechanical damage including cracks and scratches are imparted in cured polymer samples and subsequently healed. Damage due to high temperature thermal degradation is observed to not be reversible. The ability to repair damage without flowing polymer chains makes DA-based healable polymers particularly well-suited for crack healing. The double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) fracture test is investigated as a useful method of creating and incrementally growing cracks in a sample. The effect of sample geometry on the fracture behavior is experimentally and computationally studied. Computational and empirical models are developed to estimate critical stress intensity factors from DCDC results. Glass and carbon fiber-reinforced composites are fabricated with 2MEP4FS as the matrix material. A prepreg process is developed that uses temperature to control the polymerization rate of the monomers and produce homogeneous prepolymer for integration with a layer of unidirectional fiber. Multiple prepreg layers are laminated to form multi-layered cross-ply healable composites, which are characterized in

  5. Self-healing in single and multiple fiber(s reinforced polymer composites

    Woldesenbet E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available You Polymer composites have been attractive medium to introduce the autonomic healing concept into modern day engineering materials. To date, there has been significant research in self-healing polymeric materials including several studies specifically in fiber reinforced polymers. Even though several methods have been suggested in autonomic healing materials, the concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents has garnered wide attention by the scientific community. A self-healing fiber reinforced polymer composite has been developed. Tensile tests are carried out on specimens that are fabricated by using the following components: hollow and solid glass fibers, healing agent, catalysts, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a polymer resin matrix. The test results have demonstrated that single fiber polymer composites and multiple fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with healing agents and catalysts have provided 90.7% and 76.55% restoration of the original tensile strength, respectively. Incorporation of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the healing medium of the single fiber polymer composite has provided additional efficiency. Healing is found to be localized, allowing multiple healing in the presence of several cracks.

  6. Fatigue resistance and stiffness of glass fiber-reinforced urethane dimethacrylate composite.

    Narva, Katja K; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-02-01

    Retentive properties of cast metal clasps decrease over time because of metal fatigue. Novel fiber-reinforced composite materials are purported to have increased fatigue resistance compared with metals and may offer a solution to the problem of metal fatigue. The aim of this study was to investigate the fatigue resistance and stiffness of E-glass fiber-reinforced composite. Twelve cylindrical fiber-reinforced composite test cylinders (2 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length) were made from light-polymerized urethane dimethacrylate monomer with unidirectional, single-stranded, polymer preimpregnated E-glass fiber reinforcement. Six cylinders were stored in dry conditions and 6 in distilled water for 30 days before testing. Fatigue resistance was measured by a constant-deflection fatigue test with 1 mm of deflection across a specimen span of 11 mm for a maximum of 150,000 loading cycles. The resistance of the cylinder against deflection was measured (N) and the mean values of the force were compared by 1-way analysis of variance (alpha = .05). The flexural modulus (GPa) was calculated for the dry and water-stored cylinders for the first loading cycle. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess the distribution of the fibers, and the volume percent of fibers and polymer were assessed by combustion analysis. The test cylinders did not fracture due to fatigue following 150,000 loading cycles. Flexural modulus at the first loading cycle was 18.9 (+/- 2.9) GPa and 17.5 (+/- 1.7) GPa for the dry and water-stored cylinders, respectively. The mean force required to cause the first 1-mm deflection was 33.5 (+/- 5.2) N and 37.7 (+/- 3.6) N for the dry and water stored cylinders, respectively; however, the differences were not significant. After 150,000 cycles the mean force to cause 1-mm deflection was significantly reduced to 23.4 (+/- 8.5) N and 13.1 (+/- 3.5) N, respectively (P fiber- and polymer-rich areas within the specimens and indicated that individual fibers were

  7. Interlaminar Toughening of Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    Bian, Dakai

    . Additionally, chemical reaction induced phase separation, concentration of polystyrene, and various curing temperatures are used to evaluate their effects on diffusion and precipitation. These effects were directly investigated by performing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The diffusivity and curing kinetics experiments are performed to quantify the diffusivity coefficient of epoxy, hardener and thermoplastics, as well as the reaction rate constant of curing epoxy at various temperatures. Finally, mechanical testing and fracture surface imaging were used to quantify the improvements and characterize the toughening mechanism. Further improvement on delamination resistance was studied through the synergistic effect of combining different modification methods without the interleaf. Polysulfone molecules are end-capped with epoxide groups. Fiber surface is functionalized with amino groups to generate micro-mechanical interlocks. The interaction between two individual modifications chemically links the modified semi-interpenetration networks to the improved interfacial strength between fiber and epoxy to. The impact of the additive on the crosslinking density was examined through glass transition temperatures, and the chemical modification was characterized by Raman spectroscopy. Mode I and II fracture tests were performed to quantify the improvement of delamination resistance under pure opening and shear loads. The mechanism of synergistic effect was explained based on the fracture surface morphology and the interactions between the modification methods.

  8. [A maxillary premolar reconstruction with a glass fiber reinforced post].

    Viţalariu, Anca Mihaela; Antohe, Magda; Bahrim, Delia; Tatarciuc, Monica

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 37 years old female patient who needed a reconstruction of an endodontic treated' second maxillary premolar. The patient presented large areas of occlusal abrasion caused by bruxism, therefore the solution consisted of a reconstruction with a non-metallic post reinforced with glass fibers. In such cases, the excessive occlusal forces developed by bruxism can produce a radicular fracture if the tooth would be reconstructed with a rigid metallic post. The glass-fiber reinforced post has some important qualities, which render it more suitable in most clinical cases: it is easy to use; has the ability to bond with restorative resins; decreases the risk of tooth fracture and provides better esthetics.

  9. Glass fiber reinforced concrete for terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    Maxwell, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete (GRC) as a low-cost structural substrate for terrestrial solar cell arrays is discussed. The properties and fabrication of glass-reinforced concrete structures are considered, and a preliminary design for a laminated solar cell assembly built on a GRC substrate is presented. A total cost for such a photovoltaic module, composed of a Korad acrylic plastic film front cover, an aluminum foil back cover, an ethylene/vinyl acetate pottant/adhesive and a cotton fabric electrical isolator in addition to the GRC substrate, of $9.42/sq m is projected, which is less than the $11.00/sq m cost goal set by the Department of Energy. Preliminary evaluations are concluded to have shown the design capabilities and cost effectiveness of GRC; however, its potential for automated mass production has yet to be evaluated.

  10. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  11. State-of-Practice on the Dynamic Response of Structures Strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRPs)

    2015-07-01

    entitled “Design guidelines for blast strengthening of concrete and masonry structures using Fiber - Reinforced Polymer (FRP).” Seismic provision...2 Reinforced Concrete Fiber Reinforced Polymers are frequently used to retrofit and repair reinforced concrete structures. Most of the work...tested 72 laboratory-size beams (3-in. by 3-in. cross-section and 30–in. long) of unreinforced and nylon fiber reinforced light-weight concrete that

  12. The dispersion of SWCNTs treated by coupling and dispersing agents in fiber reinforced polymer composities

    Duan, Yuexin; Yuan, Lu; Zhao, Yan; Guan, Fengxia

    2007-07-01

    It is an obstacle issue for Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applied in fiber reinforced polymer composites that CNTs is dispersed in nano-level, particularly for single-wall Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this paper, SWCNTs were treated by the coupling agent like volan and dispersing agent as BYK to improve the dispersion in the Glass Fiber/Epoxy composites. The result of dispersion of SWCNTs in composites was observed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) of these kinds of composites with treated and untreated SWCNTs were obtained by Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA). Moreover, the bending properties of these composites were tested.

  13. Can Plant-Based Natural Flax Replace Basalt and E-Glass for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Tubular Energy Absorbers? A Comparative Study on Quasi-Static Axial Crushing

    Libo Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Using plant-based natural fibers to substitute glass fibers as reinforcement of composite materials is of particular interest due to their economic, technical, and environmental significance. One potential application of plant-based natural fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composites is in automotive engineering as crushable energy absorbers. Current study experimentally investigated and compared the energy absorption efficiency of plant-based natural flax, mineral-based basalt, and glass FRP (GFRP composite tubular energy absorbers subjected to quasi-static axial crushing. The effects of number of flax fabric layer, the use of foam filler and the type of fiber materials on the crashworthiness characteristics, and energy absorption capacities were discussed. In addition, the failure mechanisms of the hollow and foam-filled flax, basalt, and GFRP tubes in quasi-static axial crushing were analyzed and compared. The test results showed that the energy absorption capabilities of both hollow and foam-filled energy absorbers made of flax were superior to the corresponding energy absorbers made of basalt and were close to energy absorbers made of glass. This study, therefore, indicated that flax fiber has the great potential to be suitable replacement of basalt and glass fibers for crushable energy absorber application.

  14. Modelling of the glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution in the compounding of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    Kloke, P.; Herken, T.; Schöppner, V.; Rudloff, J.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Walther, Dridger, A.

    2014-05-01

    The use of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for the production of highly stressed parts in the plastics processing industry has experienced an enormous boom in the last few years. The reasons for this are primarily the improvements to the stiffness and strength properties brought about by fiber reinforcement. These positive characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced polymers are governed predominantly by the mean glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution. It is not enough to describe the properties of a plastics component solely as a function of the mean glass fiber length [1]. For this reason, a mathematical-physical model has been developed for describing the glass fiber length distribution in compounding. With this model, it is possible on the one hand to optimize processes for the production of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, and, on the other, to obtain information on the final distribution, on the basis of which much more detailed statements can be made about the subsequent properties of the molded part. Based on experimental tests, it was shown that this model is able to accurately describe the change in glass fiber length distribution in compounding.

  15. Physicochemical properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber reinforced resin composite.

    Huang, Qiting; Qin, Wei; Garoushi, Sufyan; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2018-01-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate several physicochemical properties of an experimental discontinuous S2-glass fiber-reinforced resin composite. The experimental composite was prepared by mixing 10 wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers with 27.5 wt% of resin matrix and 62.5 wt% of particulate fillers. Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), fracture toughness (FT), work of fracture (WOF), double bond conversion (DC), Vickers hardness, volume shrinkage (VS) and fiber length distribution were determined. These were compared with two commercial resin composites. The experimental composite showed the highest FS, WOF and FT compared with two control composites. The DC of the experimental composite was comparable with controls. No significant difference was observed in VS between the three tested composites. The use of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with polymer matrix and particulate fillers yielded improved physical properties and substantial improvement was associated with the use of S2-glass fiber.

  16. Effect of Different Fillers on Adhesive Wear Properties of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composites

    E. Feyzullahoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites are used for different aims as substitute of traditional materials such as metals; due to their improved strength at small specific weight. The fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite material consists of polymeric matrix and reinforcing material. Polymeric materials are commonly reinforced with synthetic fibers such as glass and carbon. The glass fiber reinforced polyester (GFRP composites are used with different filler materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different filler materials on adhesive wear behavior of GFRP. In this experimental study; polymetilmetacrilat (PMMA, Glass beads (GB and Glass sand (GS were used as filling material in GFRP composite samples. The adhesive wear behaviors of samples were carried out using ball on disc type tribometer. The friction force and coefficient of friction were measured during the test. The volume loss and wear rate values of samples were calculated according to test results. Barcol hardness values of samples were measured. The densities of samples were measured. Results show that the wear resistance of GB filled GFRP composite samples was much more than non-filled and PMMA filled GFRP composite samples.

  17. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  18. Performance of Sprayed Fiber Reinforced Polymer Strengthened Timber Beams

    S. Talukdar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to investigate the use of Sprayed Fiber Reinforced Polymer (SFRP for retrofit of timber beams. A total of 10-full scale specimens were tested. Two different timber preservatives and two different bonding agents were investigated. Strengthening was characterized using load deflection diagrams. Results indicate that it is possible to enhance load-carrying capacity and energy absorption characteristics using the technique of SFRP. Of the two types of preservatives investigated, the technique appears to be more effective for the case of creosote-treated specimens, where up to a 51% improvement in load-carrying capacity and a 460% increase in the energy absorption capacity were noted. Effectiveness of the bonding agent used was dependent on the type of preservative the specimen had been treated with.

  19. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  20. Impact properties of aluminium - glass fiber reinforced plastics sandwich panels

    Mathivanan Periasamy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium - glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP sandwich panels are hybrid laminates consisting of GFRP bonded with thin aluminum sheets on either side. Such sandwich materials are increasingly used in airplane and automobile structures. Laminates with varying aluminium thickness fractions, fiber volume fractions and orientation in the layers of GFRP were fabricated by hand lay up method and evaluated for their impact performance by conducting drop weight tests under low velocity impacts. The impact energy required for initiating a crack in the outer aluminium layer as well as the energy required for perforation was recorded. The impact load-time history was also recorded to understand the failure behavior. The damage depth and the damage area were measured to evaluate the impact resistance. Optical photography and scanning electron micrographs were taken to visualize the crack and the damage zone. The bidirectional cross-ply hybrid laminate (CPHL has been found to exhibit better impact performance and damage resistance than the unidirectional hybrid laminate (UDHL. Increase in aluminium thickness fraction (Al tf and fiber volume fraction (Vf resulted in an increase in the impact energy required for cracking and perforation. On an overall basis, the sandwich panels exhibited better impact performance than the monolithic aluminium.

  1. Monitoring Poisson's ratio of glass fiber reinforced composites as damage index using biaxial Fiber Bragg Grating sensors

    Yılmaz, Çağatay; Yilmaz, Cagatay; Akalın, Çağdaş; Akalin, Cagdas; Kocaman, Esat Selim; Suleman, A.; Yıldız, Mehmet; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Damage accumulation in Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composites is monitored based on Poisson's ratio measurements for three different fiber stacking sequences subjected to both quasi-static and quasi-static cyclic tensile loadings. The sensor systems utilized include a dual-extensometer, a biaxial strain gage and a novel embedded-biaxial Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor. These sensors are used concurrently to measure biaxial strain whereby the evolution of Poisson's ratio as a functi...

  2. Repair of impact damaged utility poles with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP), phase II.

    2015-06-01

    Vehicle collisions with steel or aluminum utility poles are common occurrences that yield substantial but often repairable : damage. This project investigates the use of a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite system for in situ repair that : mini...

  3. Rapid replacement of Tangier Island bridges including lightweight and durable fiber-reinforced polymer deck systems.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite cellular deck systems were used as new bridge decks on two replacement bridges on Tangier Island, Virginia. The most important characteristics of this application were reduced self-weight and increased durabil...

  4. Polyurethane foam infill for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bridge deck panels.

    2014-05-01

    Although still in their infancy, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bridges have shown great promise in eliminating corrosion : concerns and meeting (or exceeding) FHWAs goal of 100-year life spans for bridges. While FRP bridges are cost-effective in ...

  5. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Grids for Shear and End Zone Reinforcement in Bridge Beams

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel reduces life spans of bridges throughout the United States; therefore, using non-corroding carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement is seen as a way to increase service life. The use of CFRP as the flexural ...

  6. Repair of reinforced concrete beams using carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    Karzad Abdul Saboor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is part of an ongoing research on the behaviour of Reinforced Concrete (RC beams retrofitted with Externally Bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (EB-CFRP. A total of 5 large-scale rectangular beams, previously damaged due to shear loading, were repaired and strengthened with EB-CFRP and tested in this study. The major cracks of the damaged beams were injected with epoxy and the beams were wrapped with 2 layers of EB-CFRP discrete strips with 100mm width and 150mm center to center spacing. The beams were instrumented and tested to failure under three points loading in simply supported configuration. The measured test parameters were the beams deflection, maximum load, and the strain in the FRP strips. The failure mode was also observed. The results showed that applying EB-FRP strips increased the shear strength significantly relative to the original shear capacity of the beam. The results demonstrate that the application of EB-FRP strips used in this study is an effective repair method that can be used to repair and strengthen damaged beams.

  7. A Review on Artificial Aging Behaviors of Fiber Reinforced Polymer-matrix Composites

    Meng Jiangyan; Wang Yunying

    2016-01-01

    As is known, factors in climate environment such as hygrothermal effect and UV may have a negative effect on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced polymer-matrix composites, resulting in their strength and stiffness degraded. In this review, we summarize all the recent studies on the artificial climate aging, hygrothermal aging, and thermal-oxidation aging of fiber reinforced polymer-matrix composites, as well as their artificial accelerated aging and natural aging. In addition, studi...

  8. State-of-the-art of fiber-reinforced polymers in additive manufacturing technologies

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have received a lot of attention in recent years for their use in multiple materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers. The aim of this review article is to analyze the technology of fiber-reinforced polymers and its implementation with additive...... manufacturing. This article reviews recent developments, ideas, and state-of-the-art technologies in this field. Moreover, it gives an overview of the materials currently available for fiber-reinforced material technology....

  9. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats reve...

  10. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  11. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  12. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... to different levels of internal stresses. The mechanical properties, static strength and fatigue life time, are measured in three different directions of the material, i.e. the fiber direction, 0°, the 30° off axis direction, and the 90° direction transverse to the fiber direction. It is experimentally...... demonstrated that the resulting residual stresses barely influences the quasi-static mechanical properties of reinforced glass-fiber composites. It is found that the fatigue performance in the 0° direction is significantly influenced by the internal stresses, whereas the fatigue performance in the off axes...

  13. Mechanical and abrasive wear characterization of bidirectional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite materials

    Siddhartha,; Gupta, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated. ► Three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed. ► Results are validated against existing microscopic models of Lancaster and Wang. ► Tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases. ► Chopped glass fiber composites are found better in abrasive wear situations. -- Abstract: Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated in five different (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35) wt% in an epoxy resin matrix. The mechanical characterization of these composites is performed. The three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. Abrasive wear characteristics of these composites are successfully analysed using Taguchi’s experimental design scheme and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results obtained from these experiments are also validated against existing microscopic models of Ratner-Lancaster and Wang. It is observed that quite good linear relationships is held between specific wear rate and reciprocal of ultimate strength and strain at tensile fracture of these composites which is an indicative that the experimental results are in fair agreement with these existing models. Out of all composites fabricated it is found that tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases because of interface strength enhancement. Chopped glass fiber reinforced composites are observed to perform better than bi-directional glass fiber reinforced composites under abrasive wear situations. The morphology of worn composite specimens has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand about dominant wear mechanisms.

  14. MICROWAVE INDUCED DEGRADATION OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED POLYESTER FOR FIBER AND RESIN RECOVERY

    Ucar, Hülya; Nielsen, Rudi Pankratz; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    A solvolysis process to depolymerize the resin in glass fiber reinforced composites and recover the glass fibers has been investigated using microwave induced irradiation. The depolymerization was carried out in HNO3 with concentrations in the range of 1M-7M and in KOH with concentrations ranging...

  15. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  16. Contribution to the improved ultrasonic testing of glass fiber-reinforced polymers based on analytic modeling; Beitrag zur Verbesserung der Ultraschallpruefung glasfaserverstaerkter Polymere auf der Grundlage analytischer Modellierung

    Gripp, S.

    2001-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of acoustic anisotropic materials like fiber composites has been evaluated. Modelling enabled predictions about wave deflection, direction of wave propagation, and refractive angle of ultrasonic waves in these media. Thus, measurements could be carried out using unidirectional glass-fiber composites.

  17. Mechanical characterization and structural analysis of recycled fiber-reinforced-polymer resin-transfer-molded beams

    Tan, Eugene Wie Loon

    1999-09-01

    The present investigation was focussed on the mechanical characterization and structural analysis of resin-transfer-molded beams containing recycled fiber-reinforced polymers. The beams were structurally reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers. The reinforcing filler materials consisted entirely of recycled fiber-reinforced polymer wastes (trim and overspray). The principal resin was a 100-percent dicyclo-pentadiene unsaturated polyester specially formulated with very low viscosity for resin transfer molding. Variations of the resin transfer molding technique were employed to produce specimens for material characterization. The basic materials that constituted the structural beams, continuous-glass-fiber-reinforced, recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled unsaturated polyesters, were fully characterized in axial and transverse compression and tension, and inplane and interlaminar shear, to ascertain their strengths, ultimate strains, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios. Experimentally determined mechanical properties of the recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled materials from the present investigation were superior to those of unsaturated polyester polymer concretes and Portland cement concretes. Mechanical testing and finite element analyses of flexure (1 x 1 x 20 in) and beam (2 x 4 x 40 in) specimens were conducted. These structurally-reinforced specimens were tested and analyzed in four-point, third-point flexure to determine their ultimate loads, maximum fiber stresses and mid-span deflections. The experimentally determined load capacities of these specimens were compared to those of equivalent steel-reinforced Portland cement concrete beams computed using reinforced concrete theory. Mechanics of materials beam theory was utilized to predict the ultimate loads and mid-span deflections of the flexure and beam specimens. However, these predictions proved to be severely inadequate. Finite element (fracture propagation

  18. Ultrasound enhanced 50 Hz plasma treatment of glass-fiber-reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Singh, Shailendra Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50Hz dielectric barrier discharge at a peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonic irradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency...

  19. Gliding arc surface treatment of glass-fiber-reinforced polyester enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Drews, Joanna Maria

    2011-01-01

    . The efficiency of such a plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure can be further improved by ultrasonic irradiation onto the surface during the treatment. In the present work glass fiber reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using an atmospheric pressure gliding arc with and without ultrasonic...

  20. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    Yudhanto, Arief; Lubineau, Gilles; Wafai, Husam; Mulle, Matthieu; Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah; Yaldiz, R.; Verghese, N.

    2016-01-01

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact

  1. Development of Composite Made of HDPE and Fiber Reinforced Polymer Dust

    Muhamad Noor Izwan Ishak; Ismail Mustapha; Mohd Reusmazran Yusof; Yusof Abdullah; Nor Pai'za Mohamad Hasan; Mohamad Ridzuan Ahamad; Md Fakarudin Ab Rahman; Hafizal Yazid; Ainul Mardhiah Terry; Airwan Affandi Mahmood; Nurliyana Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Composite of High Density Polyethylene and Fiber Reinforced Polymer Dust (HDPE/ FRPD) were prepared by melt mixing technique. The blend was mixed and compression molded by hydraulic press at 150 degree Celsius. Effect of blend ratio on mechanical properties of the developed composite was determined. Tensile properties of the blends found to show decreasing trend with addition of FRPD. While impact strength and hardness properties showed promising result. Reuse of ' Fiber Reinforced Polymer ' dust can be improved by the present invention. (author)

  2. Alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced high strength concrete in simulated aggressive environment

    Kwan, W.H.; Cheah, C.B.; Ramli, M.; Chang, K.Y.

    2018-01-01

    The durability of the alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) in three simulated aggresive environments, namely tropical climate, cyclic air and seawater and seawater immersion was investigated. Durability examinations include chloride diffusion, gas permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy examination (SEM). The fiber content is in the range of 0.6 % to 2.4 %. Results reveal that the specimen containing highest AR glass fiber content suffered severe strength loss in seawater environment and relatively milder strength loss under cyclic conditions. The permeability property was found to be more inferior with the increase in the fiber content of the concrete. This suggests that the AR glass fiber is not suitable for use as the fiber reinforcement in concrete is exposed to seawater. However, in both the tropical climate and cyclic wetting and drying, the incorporation of AR glass fiber prevents a drastic increase in permeability. [es

  3. Online Structural-Health Monitoring of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics Using Different Carbon Allotropes in the Interphase

    Michael Thomas Müller

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available An electromechanical response behavior is realized by nanostructuring the glass fiber interphase with different highly electrically conductive carbon allotropes like carbon nanotubes (CNT, graphene nanoplatelets (GNP, or conductive carbon black (CB. The operational capability of these multifunctional glass fibers for an online structural-health monitoring is demonstrated in endless glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene. The electromechanical response behavior, during a static or dynamic three-point bending test of various carbon modifications, shows qualitative differences in the signal quality and sensitivity due to the different aspect ratios of the nanoparticles and the associated electrically conductive network densities in the interphase. Depending on the embedding position within the glass fiber-reinforced composite compression, shear and tension loadings of the fibers can be distinguished by different characteristics of the corresponding electrical signal. The occurrence of irreversible signal changes during the dynamic loading can be attributed to filler reorientation processes caused by polymer creeping or by destruction of electrically conductive paths by cracks in the glass fiber interphase.

  4. CO2-laser-assisted processing of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Schares, Richard Ludwig; Stimpfl, Joffrey

    2013-02-01

    To fully exploit the potential of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (FRTC) and to achieve a broad industrial application, automated manufacturing systems are crucial. Investigations at Fraunhofer IPT have proven that the use of laser system technology in processing FRTC allows to achieve high throughput, quality, flexibility, reproducibility and out-of-autoclave processing simultaneously. As 90% of the FRP in Europe1 are glass fiber-reinforced a high impact can be achieved by introducing laser-assisted processing with all its benefits to glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTC). Fraunhofer IPT has developed the diode laser-assisted tape placement (laying and winding) to process carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTC) for years. However, this technology cannot be transferred unchanged to process milky transparent GFRTC prepregs (preimpregnated fibers). Due to the short wavelength (approx. 980 nm) and therefore high transmission less than 20% of the diode laser energy is absorbed as heat into non-colored GFRTC prepregs. Hence, the use of a different wave length, e.g. CO2-laser (10.6 μm) with more than 90% laser absorption, is required to allow the full potential of laser-assisted processing of GFRTC. Also the absorption of CO2-laser radiation at the surface compared to volume absorption of diode laser radiation is beneficial for the interlaminar joining of GFRTC. Fraunhofer IPT is currently developing and investigating the CO2-laser-assisted tape placement including new system, beam guiding, process and monitoring technology to enable a resource and energy efficient mass production of GFRP composites, e.g. pipes, tanks, masts. The successful processing of non-colored glass fiber-reinforced Polypropylene (PP) and Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS) has already been proven.

  5. Laser surface treatment for enhanced titanium to carbon fiber-reinforced polymer adhesion

    Palavra, Armin; Coelho, Bruno N.; de Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Lima, Milton S. F.; Carvalho, Sheila M.; Costa, Adilson R.

    The adhesion between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) and titanium parts can be improved by laser surface texturing before gluing them together. Here, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was employed before bonding of the textured surfaces using an epoxy paste adhesive. To investigate the influence of the

  6. Applications of Fiber-Reinforced Polymers in Additive Manufacturing

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies are these years entering the market of functional final parts. Initial research has been performed targeting the integration of fibers into additive manufactured plastic composites. Major advantages, among others, are for example increased tensile strength...... and Young's modulus. Key challenges in the field, as of now, are proper fiber placement, fiber seizing, an increased knowledge in the used materials and how they are applied into engineering solutions through proper control of the additive manufacturing process. The aim of this research is the improved...... understanding of fiber-reinforcement in additive manufacturing in terms of production and application. Vat polymerization and material extrusion techniques for composite additive manufacturing were investigated with respect of increasing adhesion between the matrix material and the fibers. Process optimization...

  7. Mechanical interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) rebar in tensile loading

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a preliminary study of the composite interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) rebar. The main topic of this paper will focus on the interaction of the two materials (ECC and GFRP) during axial loading......, particularly in post cracking phase of the concrete matrix. The experimental program carried out in this study examined composite behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading of the specimens in the elastic and inelastic deformation phases. The stiffness development of the composite during loading was evaluated...

  8. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    Marioli-Riga Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  9. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Nets for Strengthening Lava Stone Masonries in Historical Buildings

    Santi Maria Cascone

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The strengthening of masonries is a crucial step in building restoration works because of its relevance, mostly with regard to the improvement of building seismic behavior. Current building technologies are based on the use of steel nets which are incorporated into cement plasters. The use of steel has a number of contraindications that can be solved by using composite materials such as glass fiber nets, which have high mechanical characteristics and lightness, elasticity, corrosion resistance, and compatibility with lime plaster. Building interventions, that take into account the application of glass fiber nets, are very sustainable from several points of view, e.g., material production, in situ works, economic cost and durability. In Italy, several experiments have been carried out in situ with the aim of testing the mechanical characteristics of masonries which have been treated with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP nets. This paper deals with a series of in situ tests carried out during the restoration works of an important historical building located in Catania (Sicily, Italy. The results achieved are largely positive.

  10. LABORATORY EVALUATION ON PERFORMANCE OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTIC MORTAR PIPE CULVERTS

    Huawang Shi; Lianyu Wei

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigated the performance and behaviour of glass fiber reinforced plastic mortar (FRPM) pipes under different loading conditions. FRPM pipes with inner diameter of 1500 mm were prefabricated in factory. Mechanics performance testing (ring and axial compressive strength and elastic modulus), stiffness and fatigue test were carried out in laboratory. Ring stiffness test provided pipe stiffness (PS) which is a function of geometry and material type of pipe through parallel plate lo...

  11. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P engineering potential.

  12. Measurement of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer drilled

    Pascual Víctor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, fiber-reinforced materials are more widely used because of their good mechanical properties. It is usual to join pieces of these materials through screws and rivets, for which it is necessary to make a hole in the piece, usually by drilling. One of the problems of use CFRP resides in the appearance of defects due to the machining. The main defect to be taken into account is the delamination. Delamination implies poor tolerance when assembling parts, reducing the structural integrity of the part, and areas with high wear, as a series of stresses arise when mounting the screws. Much has been published about delamination and the factors that influence its appearance, so we are not going to focus on it. The present study aims to quantify and measure the defects associated with the drilling of compounds reinforced with carbon fibers, in relation to the cutting parameters used in each case. For this purpose, an optical measurement system and a posterior digital image processing will be used through Deltec Vision software.

  13. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    Fenu Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF was finally evaluated.

  14. Bioactive Glass Fiber Reinforced Starch-Polycaprolactone Composite for Bone Applications

    Jukola, H.; Nikkola, L.; Tukiainen, M.; Kellomaeki, M.; Ashammakhi, N.; Gomes, M. E.; Reis, R. L.; Chiellini, F.; Chiellini, E.

    2008-01-01

    For bone regeneration and repair, combinations of different materials are often needed. Biodegradable polymers are often combined with osteoconductive materials, such as bioactive glass (BaG), which can also improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize BaG fiber-reinforced starch-poly-ε-caprolactone (SPCL) composite. Sheets of SPCL (30/70 wt%) were produced using single-screw extrusion. They were then cut and compression molded in layers with BaG fibers to form composite structures of different combinations. Thermal, mechanical, and degradation properties of the composites were studied. The actual amount of BaG in the composites was determined using combustion tests. A strong endothermic peak indicating melting at about 56 deg. C was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) showed that thermal decomposition of SPCL started at 325 deg. C with the decomposition of starch and continued at 400 deg. C with the degradation of polycaprolactone (PCL). Initial mechanical properties of the reinforced composites were at least 50% better than the properties of the non-reinforced composites. However, the mechanical properties of the composites after two weeks of hydrolysis were comparable to those of the non-reinforced samples. During the six weeks' hydrolysis the mass of the composites had decreased only by about 5%. The amount of glass in the composites remained the same for the six-week period of hydrolysis. In conclusion, it is possible to enhance the initial mechanical properties of SPCL by reinforcing it with BaG fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the composites are only sufficient for use as filler material and they need to be further improved to allow long-lasting bone applications

  15. Bioactive Glass Fiber Reinforced Starch-Polycaprolactone Composite for Bone Applications

    Jukola, H.; Nikkola, L.; Gomes, M. E.; Chiellini, F.; Tukiainen, M.; Kellomäki, M.; Chiellini, E.; Reis, R. L.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    For bone regeneration and repair, combinations of different materials are often needed. Biodegradable polymers are often combined with osteoconductive materials, such as bioactive glass (BaG), which can also improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize BaG fiber-reinforced starch-poly-ɛ-caprolactone (SPCL) composite. Sheets of SPCL (30/70 wt%) were produced using single-screw extrusion. They were then cut and compression molded in layers with BaG fibers to form composite structures of different combinations. Thermal, mechanical, and degradation properties of the composites were studied. The actual amount of BaG in the composites was determined using combustion tests. A strong endothermic peak indicating melting at about 56 °C was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) showed that thermal decomposition of SPCL started at 325 °C with the decomposition of starch and continued at 400 °C with the degradation of polycaprolactone (PCL). Initial mechanical properties of the reinforced composites were at least 50% better than the properties of the non-reinforced composites. However, the mechanical properties of the composites after two weeks of hydrolysis were comparable to those of the non-reinforced samples. During the six weeks' hydrolysis the mass of the composites had decreased only by about 5%. The amount of glass in the composites remained the same for the six-week period of hydrolysis. In conclusion, it is possible to enhance the initial mechanical properties of SPCL by reinforcing it with BaG fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the composites are only sufficient for use as filler material and they need to be further improved to allow long-lasting bone applications.

  16. Glass fiber -reinforced plastic tapered poles for transmission and distribution lines: development and experimental study

    Ibrahim, S.; Burachysnsky, V.; Polyzois, D.

    1999-01-01

    A research project to develop lightweight poles for use in power transmission and distribution lines and involving the use of glass fiber-reinforced plastic using the filament winding process is described. Twelve full scale specimen poles were designed, fabricated and subjected to cantilever bending to test failure modes. The test parameters included fiber orientation, ratio of longitudinal-to-circumferential fiber, and the number of layers. Results showed that local buckling was the most dominant failure mode, attributable to the high radius-to-thickness ratio of the specimen poles. Overall, however, these fiber-reinforced plastic poles compared favourably to wooden poles in carrying capacity with significant weight reduction. Lateral displacement at ultimate loads did not exceed the acceptable limit of 10 per cent of the specimen free length. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  17. Tribological properties of solid lubricants filled glass fiber reinforced polyamide 6 composites

    Li, Du-Xin; You, Yi-Lan; Deng, Xin; Li, Wen-Juan; Xie, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The tribological properties of GF/PA6 improved by the incorporation of PTFE. ► PTFE and UHMWPE exhibited a synergism effect on reducing friction coefficient. ► Solid lubricants enlarged the range of applied velocity for GF/PA6 composite. - Abstract: The main purpose of this paper is to further optimize the tribological properties of the glass fiber reinforced PA6 (GF/PA6,15/85 by weight) for high performance friction materials using single or combinative solid lubricants such as Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE), ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and the combination of both of them. Various polymer blends, where GF/PA6 acts as the polymer matrix and solid lubricants as the dispersed phase were prepared by injection molding. The tribological properties of these materials and the synergism as a result of the incorporation of both PTFE and UHMWPE were investigated. The results showed that, at a load of 40 N and a velocity of 200 rpm, PTFE was effective in improving the tribological capabilities of matrix material. On the contrary, UHMWPE was not conductive to maintain the structure integrity of GF/PA6 composite and harmful to the friction and wear properties. The combination of PTFE and UHMWPE showed synergism on further reducing the friction coefficient of the composites filled with either PTFE or UHMWPE only. Effects of load and velocity on tribological behavior were also discussed. To further understand the wear mechanism, the worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy

  18. Warpage Analysis of Electroplated Cu Films on Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Packaging Substrates

    Cheolgyu Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a warpage analysis method that predicts the warpage behavior of electroplated Cu films on glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP packaging substrates. The analysis method is performed using the following sequence: fabricate specimens for scanning 3D contours, transform 3D data into curvatures, compute the built-in stress of the film using a stress-curvature analytic model, and verify it through comparisons of the finite element method (FEM simulations with the measured data. The curvature is used to describe the deflection and warpage modes and orientations of the specimen. Two primary factors that affect the warpage behavior of the electroplated Cu film on FRP substrate specimens are investigated. The first factor is the built-in stress in a Cu film that explains the room temperature warpage of the specimen under no thermal process. The second factor is the misfit of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE between the Cu and FRP layer, which is a dominant factor during the temperature change. The calculated residual stress, and predicted curvatures using FEM simulation throughout the reflow process temperature range between 25 and 180 °C are proven to be accurate by the comparison of the FEM simulations and experiment measurements.

  19. Experimental investigation of span length for flexural test of fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates

    Akhil Mehndiratta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing and evaluation of mechanical properties for FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymer composite parts play a significant role to qualify it for the end use. Among the mechanical properties, the flexural strength is significant and vital as it may vary with specimen depth, temperature and the test span length. The flexural strength varies for different materials with varying the test span length hence the current work aims to find an optimum span length to test flexural strength for the specimens made of Glass (7781, EC9756 and Carbon (HTA7, G801 prepreg materials. Experiments are conducted as per the ASTM Standard D 790 for flexural test by varying the span lengths to understand the behavior of the flexural strength and flexural modulus. The experimental data were compared with those obtained from the finite element program software Altair Hyper works 14.0. The results indicate that flexural modulus increases with the span length to a point and then it decreases. Thereby, an optimum span length can be obtained for testing flexural strength, which will be useful to the designers and the composite manufacturers to accomplish better standard testing procedures.

  20. Experimental and analytical investigation of reinforced high strength concrete continuous beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer

    Akbarzadeh, H.; Maghsoudi, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon and glass fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP and GFRP) are two materials suitable for strengthening the reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Although many in situ RC beams are of continuous constructions, there has been very limited research on the behavior of such beams with externally applied FRP laminate. In addition, most design guidelines were developed for simply supported beams with external FRP laminates. This paper presents an experimental program conducted to study the flexural behavior and redistribution in moment of reinforced high strength concrete (RHSC) continuous beams strengthened with CFRP and GFRP sheets. Test results showed that with increasing the number of CFRP sheet layers, the ultimate strength increases, while the ductility, moment redistribution, and ultimate strain of CFRP sheet decrease. Also, by using the GFRP sheet in strengthening the continuous beam reduced loss in ductility and moment redistribution but it did not significantly increase ultimate strength of beam. The moment enhancement ratio of the strengthened continuous beams was significantly higher than the ultimate load enhancement ratio in the same beam. An analytical model for moment-curvature and load capacity are developed and used for the tested continuous beams in current and other similar studies. The stress-strain curves of concrete, steel and FRP were considered as integrity model. Stress-strain model of concrete is extended from Oztekin et al.'s model by modifying the ultimate strain. Also, new parameters of equivalent stress block are obtained for flexural calculation of RHSC beams. Good agreement between experiment and prediction values is achieved.

  1. Dielectric studies of Graphene and Glass Fiber reinforced composites

    Praveen, D.; Shashi Kumar, M. E.; Pramod, R.

    2018-02-01

    Graphene and E-glass fibres are one of the key materials used currently due to their unique chemical and mechanical properties. Lately graphene has attracted many researchers across academic fraternity as it can yield better properties with lesser reinforcement percentages. The current research emphasizes on the development of graphene-based nanocomposites and its investigation on dielectric applications. The composites were fabricated by adding graphene reinforcements from 1%-3% by weight using conventional Hand-lay process. A thorough investigation was carried out to determine the dielectric behaviour of the nano-composites using impedance analyser according to ASTM standards. The dielectric measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 300K to 400K in a step of 20K. The current research proposes the material for application in capacitor industry as the sample of 2.5% weight fraction showed highest value of K with 14 at 26.1 Hz and 403K.

  2. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  3. Buckling Resistance of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Infill Panel Subjected to Elevated Temperatures

    Viriyavudh Sim; Woo Young Jung

    2017-01-01

    Performance of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) sandwich infill panel system under diagonal compression was studied by means of numerical analysis. Furthermore, the variation of temperature was considered to affect the mechanical properties of BFRP, since their composition was based on polymeric material. Moreover, commercial finite element analysis platform ABAQUS was used to model and analyze this infill panel system. Consequently, results of the analyses show that the overall perform...

  4. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Properties in Glass Fiber Reinforced with Aluminium

    Irudaya raja, S. Joseph; Vinod Kumar, T.; Sridhar, R.; Vivek, P.

    2017-03-01

    A test method of a Guarded heat flow meter are used to measure the thermal conductivity of glass fiber and filled with a aluminum powder epoxy composites using an instrument in accordance with ASTM. This experimental study reveals that the incorporation of aluminum and glass fiber reinforced results in enhancement of thermal conductivity of epoxy resin and thereby improves its heat transfer capability. Fiber metal laminates are good candidates for advanced automobile structural applications due to their high categorical mechanical and thermal properties. The most consequential factor in manufacturing of these laminates is the adhesive bonding between aluminum and FRP layers. Here several glass-fiber reinforced aluminum were laminates with different proportion of bonding adhesion were been manufactured. It was observed that the damage size is more preponderant in laminates with poor interfacial adhesion compared to that of laminates with vigorous adhesion between aluminum and glass layers numerically calculated ones and it is found that the values obtained for various composite models using experimental testing method.

  5. Determination of mechanical properties of some glass fiber reinforced plastics suitable to Wind Turbine Blade construction

    Steigmann, R.; Savin, A.; Goanta, V.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Leitoiu, B.; Iftimie, N.; Stanciu, M. D.; Curtu, I.

    2016-08-01

    The control of wind turbine's components is very rigorous, while the tower and gearbox have more possibility for revision and repairing, the rotor blades, once they are deteriorated, the defects can rapidly propagate, producing failure, and the damages can affect large regions around the wind turbine. This paper presents the test results, performed on glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) suitable to construction of wind turbine blades (WTB). The Young modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, ultimate stress have been determined using tensile and shear tests. Using Dynamical Mechanical Analysis (DMA), the activation energy for transitions that appear in polyester matrix as well as the complex elastic modulus can be determined, function of temperature.

  6. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  7. Fabrication and physical properties of glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for non-metal-clasp dentures.

    Nagakura, Manamu; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2017-11-01

    Recently, non-metal-clasp dentures (NMCDs) made from thermoplastic resins such as polyamide, polyester, polycarbonate, and polypropylene have been used as removable partial dentures (RPDs). However, the use of such RPDs can seriously affect various tissues because of their low rigidity. In this study, we fabricated high-rigidity glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTPs) for use in RPDs, and examined their physical properties such as apparent density, dynamic hardness, and flexural properties. GFRTPs made from E-glass fibers and polypropylene were fabricated using an injection-molding. The effects of the fiber content on the GFRTP properties were examined using glass-fiber contents of 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mass%. Commercially available denture base materials and NMCD materials were used as controls. The experimental densities of GFRTPs with various fiber contents agreed with the theoretical densities. Dynamic micro-indentation tests confirmed that the fiber content does not affect the GFRTP surface properties such as dynamic hardness and elastic modulus, because most of the reinforcing glass fibers are embedded in the polypropylene. The flexural strength increased from 55.8 to 217.6 MPa with increasing glass-fiber content from 0 to 50 mass%. The flexural modulus increased from 1.75 to 7.42 GPa with increasing glass-fiber content from 0 to 50 mass%, that is, the flexural strength and modulus of GFRTP with a fiber content of 50 mass% were 3.9 and 4.2 times, respectively, those of unreinforced polypropylene. These results suggest that fiber reinforcement has beneficial effects, and GFRTPs can be used in NMCDs because their physical properties are better than those of controls. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2254-2260, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The use of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene for performance enhancement in continuous glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene composites

    Rijsdijk, H.A.; Contant, M.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.; Miravete, A.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of maleic anhydride-modified polypropylene (m-PP) on static mech. properties of continuous glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites was studied. M-PP was added to the PP homopolymer to improve the adhesion between the matrix and the glass fiber. Three-point bending tests

  9. Quantification of defects depth in glass fiber reinforced plastic plate by infrared lock-in thermography

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Man Yong [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The increasing use of composite materials in various industries has evidenced the need for development of more effective nondestructive evaluation methodologies in order to reduce rejected parts and to optimize production cost. Infrared thermography is a noncontact, fast and reliable non-destructive evaluation technique that has received vast and growing attention for diagnostic and monitoring in the recent years. This paper describes the quantitative analysis of artificial defects in Glass fiber reinforced plastic plate by using Lockin infrared thermography. The experimental analysis was performed at several excitation frequencies to investigate the sample ranging from 2.946 Hz down to 0.019 Hz and the effects of each excitation frequency on defect detachability. The four point method was used in post processing of every pixel of thermal images using the MATLAB programming language. The relationship between the phase contrast with defects depth and area was examined. Finally, phase contrast method was used to calculate the defects depth considering the thermal diffusivity of the material being inspected and the excitation frequency for which the defect becomes visible. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of Lock-in infrared thermography as a powerful measurement technique for the inspection of Glass fiber reinforced plastic structures.

  10. 2.45 GHz Microwave Processing and Its Influence on Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    Zaremba, Swen

    2018-01-01

    During the production of fiber-reinforced composite materials, liquid resin is introduced into the fiber material and cured, i.e., hardened. An elevated temperature is needed for this curing. Microwave curing of composites has been investigated for some time, but it has mostly been done using small domestic or laboratory equipment. However, no investigation has been carried out using an industrial-sized chamber-microwave for glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP). Here, we show that microwave curing produces laminates of the same quality as oven-cured ones. The study shows that, if the process is done right, GFRP samples can be produced with an industrial scale microwave. Even if not fully cured, microwave samples show a glass transition temperature measured with DMA (Tg-DMA) that is comparable to the Tg-DMA according to the proposed cure cycle on the data sheet. Specific microwave-cured configurations show better inter-laminar shear strength than oven specimens. The results show that microwave-based heat introduction can be a beneficial curing method for GFRP laminates. A microwave-optimized process is faster and leads to better mechanical properties. PMID:29783684

  11. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  12. Fundamental studies of low velocity impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    Bowles, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T/sub G/ and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. Linear polymers, which contain no active groups for cross-linking, do not toughen composites because the fiber-matrix interfacial bond is not of sufficient strength to prevent interfacial failure from occurring. Toughness must be built into the basic polymer backbone and cross-linking structure

  13. Degradation of glass-fiber reinforced plastics by low temperature irradiation

    Nishijima, S.; Nishiura, T.; Ueno, S.; Tsukazaki, Y.; Okada, T.; Okada, T.M.; Miyata, K.; Kodaka, H.

    1998-01-01

    Low-temperature irradiation effects of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) have been investigated in terms of mechanical properties such as interlaminar shear strength and creep, in order to obtain the selection standard of insulating materials of superconducting magnets used for fusion reactor. It was revealed that the degradation of interlaminar shear strength was strongly dependent of characteristics of matrix and/or glass/epoxy interface. Especially, the research has been carried out towards the creep behaviour of epoxy which is the matrix of GFRP, by both experimental and simulation method. It was suggested that the synergistic effects was observed in creep test. From the molecular dynamics simulation it was found that the cage effects was the one of the main reason of the stress effects of creep behavior under irradiation. (author)

  14. Dynamic compressive properties and failure mechanism of glass fiber reinforced silica hydrogel

    Yang Jie; Li Shukui; Yan Lili; Huo Dongmei; Wang Fuchi

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic compressive properties of glass fiber reinforced silica (GFRS) hydrogel were investigated using a spilt Hopkinson pressure bar. Failure mechanism of GFRS hydrogel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Result showed that dynamic compressive stresses were much higher than the quasi-static compressive stresses at the same strain. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the strain rate with same sample dimensions. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the sample basal area at same strain rate. Dynamic compressive failure strain was small. At high strain rates, glass fibers broke down and separated from the matrix, pores shrank rapidly. Failure resulted from the increase of lateral tensile stress in hydrogel under dynamic compression.

  15. Microwave detection of delaminations between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite and hardened cement paste

    Hughes, D.; Kazemi, M.; Marler, K.; Zoughi, R.; Myers, J.; Nanni, A.

    2002-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used for the rehabilitation of concrete structures. Detection and characterization of delaminations between an FRP composite and a concrete surface are of paramount importance. Consequently, the development of a one sided, non-contact, real time and rapid nondestructive testing (NDT) technique for this purpose is of great interest. Near-field microwave NDT techniques, using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes, have shown great potential for detecting delaminations in layered composite structures such as these. The results of some theoretical and experimental investigations on a specially prepared cement paste specimen are presented here.

  16. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide.

    Kim, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Won; Seo, Tae-Il

    2013-05-10

    Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this study, the mechanical characteristic analysis of the glass-reinforced plastic worm wheel, according to the contents of glass fiber, is performed by analytic and experimental methods. In the case of the glass fiber-reinforced resin, the orientation and contents of glass fibers can influence the mechanical properties. For the characteristic prediction of plastic worm wheel, computer-aided engineering (CAE) analysis processes such as structural and injection molding analysis were executed with the polyamide resin reinforcement glass fiber (25 wt %, 50 wt %). The injection mold for fabricating the prototype plastic worm wheel was designed and made to reflect the CAE analysis results. Finally, the durability of prototype plastic worm wheel fabricated by the injection molding process was evaluated by the experimental method and the characteristics according to the glass fiber contents.

  17. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites from acrylic polymer matrices: Interfacial adhesion and physical properties

    H. Kishi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic polymers have high potential as matrix polymers for carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers (CFRTP due to their superior mechanical properties and the fact that they can be fabricated at relatively low temperatures. We focused on improving the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers (CFs and acrylic polymers using several functional monomers for co-polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA. The copolymerized acrylic matrices showed good adhesion to the CF surfaces. In particular, an acrylic copolymer with acrylamide (AAm showed high interfacial adhesive strength with CFs compared to pure PMMA, and a hydroxyethyl acrylamide (HEAA copolymer containing both amide and hydroxyl groups showed high flexural strength of the CFRTP. A 3 mol% HEAA-copolymerized CFRTP achieved a flexural strength almost twice that of pure PMMA matrix CFRTP, and equivalent to that of an epoxy matrix CFRP.

  18. Polymer matrix of fiber-reinforced composites: Changes in the semi-interpenetrating polymer network during the shelf life.

    Khan, Aftab A; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Al-Shehri, Abdullah M; Säilynoja, Eija; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2018-02-01

    This laboratory study was aimed to characterize semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) prepregs that had been stored for up to two years before curing. Resin impregnated prepregs of everStick C&B (StickTech-GC, Turku, Finland) glass FRC were stored at 4°C for various lengths of time, i.e., two-weeks, 6-months and 2-years. Five samples from each time group were prepared with a light initiated free radical polymerization method, which were embedded to its long axis in self-curing acrylic. The nanoindentation readings on the top surface toward the core of the sample were made for five test groups, which were named as "stage 1-5". To evaluate the nanohardness and modulus of elasticity of the polymer matrix, a total of 4 slices (100µm each) were cut from stage 1 to stage 5. Differences in nanohardness values were evaluated with analysis of variance (ANOVA), and regression model was used to develop contributing effect of the material's different stages to the total variability in the nanomechanical properties. Additional chemical and thermal characterization of the polymer matrix structure of FRC was carried out. It was hypothesized that time of storage may have an influence on the semi-IPN polymer structure of the cured FRC. The two-way ANOVA test revealed that the storage time had no significant effect on the nanohardness of FRC (p = 0.374). However, a highly significant difference in nanohardness values was observed between the different stages of FRC (Pprepregs might be due to phase-segregation of components of semi-IPN structure of FRC prepregs before their use. This may have an influence to the surface bonding properties of the cured FRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Review on Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite and Its Applications

    Layth Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are getting attention from researchers and academician to utilize in polymer composites due to their ecofriendly nature and sustainability. The aim of this review article is to provide a comprehensive review of the foremost appropriate as well as widely used natural fiber reinforced polymer composites (NFPCs and their applications. In addition, it presents summary of various surface treatments applied to natural fibers and their effect on NFPCs properties. The properties of NFPCs vary with fiber type and fiber source as well as fiber structure. The effects of various chemical treatments on the mechanical and thermal properties of natural fibers reinforcements thermosetting and thermoplastics composites were studied. A number of drawbacks of NFPCs like higher water absorption, inferior fire resistance, and lower mechanical properties limited its applications. Impacts of chemical treatment on the water absorption, tribology, viscoelastic behavior, relaxation behavior, energy absorption flames retardancy, and biodegradability properties of NFPCs were also highlighted. The applications of NFPCs in automobile and construction industry and other applications are demonstrated. It concluded that chemical treatment of the natural fiber improved adhesion between the fiber surface and the polymer matrix which ultimately enhanced physicomechanical and thermochemical properties of the NFPCs.

  20. Grout compactness monitoring of concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tube using electromechanical impedance

    Shi, Yaokun; Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Song, Gangbing

    2018-05-01

    The concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tube (CFFT) is a type of structural element widely used in corrosive environments. Poor grout compactness results in incomplete contact or even no contact between the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube and the concrete grout, which reduces the load bearing capacity of a CFFT. The monitoring of grout compactness for CFFTs is important. The piezoceramic-based electromechanical impedance (EMI) method has emerged as an efficient and low-cost structural health monitoring technique. This paper presents a feasibility study using the EMI method to monitor grout compactness of CFFTs. In this research, CFFT specimens with different levels of compactness (empty, 1/5, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, and full compactness) were prepared and subjected to EMI measurement by using four piezoceramic patches that were bonded circumferentially along the outer surface of the CFFT. To analyze the correlation between grout compactness and EMI signatures, a compactness index (CI) was proposed based on the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). The experimental results show that the changes in admittance signatures are able to determine the grout compactness qualitatively. The proposed CI is able to effectively identify the compactness of the CFFT, and provides location information of the incomplete concrete infill.

  1. Low Velocity Impact Behavior of Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Shishevan, Farzin Azimpour; Akbulut, Hamid; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this research, we studied low velocity impact response of homogenous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) composites and then compared the impact key parameters with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) homogenous composites. BFRPs and CFRPs were fabricated by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. Fabricated composites included 60% fiber and 40% epoxy matrix. Basalt and carbon fibers used as reinforcement materials were weaved in 2/2 twill textile tip in the structures of BFRP and CFRP composites. We also utilized the energy profile method to determine penetration and perforation threshold energies. The low velocity impact tests were carried out in 30, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 J energy magnitudes, and impact response of BFRPs was investigated by related force-deflection, force-time, deflection-time and absorbed energy-time graphics. The related impact key parameters such as maximum contact force, absorbed energy, deflection and duration time were compared with CFRPs for various impact energy levels. As a result, due to the higher toughness of basalt fibers, a better low velocity impact performance of BFRP than that of CFRP was observed. The effects of fabrication parameters, such as curing process, were studied on the low velocity impact behavior of BFRP. The results of tested new fabricated materials show that the change of fabrication process and curing conditions improves the impact behavior of BFRPs up to 13%.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  3. LABORATORY EVALUATION ON PERFORMANCE OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTIC MORTAR PIPE CULVERTS

    Huawang Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the performance and behaviour of glass fiber reinforced plastic mortar (FRPM pipes under different loading conditions. FRPM pipes with inner diameter of 1500 mm were prefabricated in factory. Mechanics performance testing (ring and axial compressive strength and elastic modulus, stiffness and fatigue test were carried out in laboratory. Ring stiffness test provided pipe stiffness (PS which is a function of geometry and material type of pipe through parallel plate loading test (PPLT. The fatigue test and micro-structure measure method were used to evaluate the durability effects of FRPM under repeated compression load. Results indicated that FRPM pipes had better mechanic performances as the road culverts under soils. It may be helpful for the design and construction of FRPM culverts.

  4. Flexural properties of polyethylene, glass and carbon fiber-reinforced resin composites for prosthetic frameworks.

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    High flexural properties are needed for fixed partial denture or implant prosthesis to resist susceptibility to failures caused by occlusal overload. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the effects of four different kinds of fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Polyethylene fiber, glass fiber and two types of carbon fibers were used for reinforcement. Seven groups of specimens, 2 × 2 × 25 mm, were prepared (n = 10 per group). Four groups of resin composite specimens were reinforced with polyethylene, glass or one type of carbon fiber. The remaining three groups served as controls, with each group comprising one brand of resin composite without any fiber. After 24-h water storage in 37°C distilled water, the flexural properties of each specimen were examined with static three-point flexural test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Compared to the control without any fiber, glass and carbon fibers significantly increased the flexural strength (p glass fiber (p glass fibers (p > 0.05). Fibers could, therefore, improve the flexural properties of resin composite and carbon fibers in longitudinal form yielded the better effects for reinforcement.

  5. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  6. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  7. Experimental analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened in bending with carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    M. M. VIEIRA

    Full Text Available The use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP has been widely used for the reinforcement of concrete structures due to its practicality and versatility in application, low weight, high tensile strength and corrosion resistance. Some construction companies use CFRP in flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams, but without anchor systems. Therefore, the aim of this study is analyze, through an experimental program, the structural behavior of reinforced concrete beams flexural strengthened by CFRP without anchor fibers, varying steel reinforcement and the amount of carbon fibers reinforcement layers. Thus, two groups of reinforced concrete beams were produced with the same geometric feature but with different steel reinforcement. Each group had five beams: one that is not reinforced with CFRP (reference and other reinforced with two, three, four and five layers of carbon fibers. Beams were designed using a computational routine developed in MAPLE software and subsequently tested in 4-point points flexural test up to collapse. Experimental tests have confirmed the effectiveness of the reinforcement, ratifying that beams collapse at higher loads and lower deformation as the amount of fibers in the reinforcing layers increased. However, the increase in the number of layers did not provide a significant increase in the performance of strengthened beams, indicating that it was not possible to take full advantage of strengthening applied due to the occurrence of premature failure mode in the strengthened beams for pullout of the cover that could have been avoided through the use of a suitable anchoring system for CFRP.

  8. Standard Guide for Identification of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composite Materials in Databases

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide establishes essential and desirable data elements for fiber-reinforced composite materials for two purposes: to establish the material identification component of data-reporting requirements for test reporting and to provide information for the design of material property databases. 1.1.1 This guide is the first part of a two-part modular approach. The first part serves to identify the material and the second part serves to describe testing procedures and variables and to record results. 1.1.2 For mechanical testing, the related document is Guide E 1434. The interaction of this guide with Guide E 1434 is emphasized by the common numbering of data elements. Data Elements A1 through G13 are included in this guide, and numbering of data elements in Guide E 1434 begins with H1 for the next data element block. This guide is most commonly used in combination with a guide for reporting the test procedures and results such as Guide E 1434. 1.2 These guidelines are specific to fiber-reinforced polyme...

  9. Preparation, mechanical, and in vitro properties of glass fiber-reinforced polycarbonate composites for orthodontic application.

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Inami, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2015-05-01

    Generally, orthodontic treatment uses metallic wires made from stainless steel, cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy, β-titanium alloy, and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) alloy. However, these wires are not esthetically pleasing and may induce allergic or toxic reactions. To correct these issues, in the present study we developed glass-fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) orthodontic wires made from polycarbonate and E-glass fiber by using pultrusion. After fabricating these GFRP round wires with a diameter of 0.45 mm (0.018 inch), we examined their mechanical and in vitro properties. To investigate how the glass-fiber diameter affected their physical properties, we prepared GFRP wires of varying diameters (7 and 13 µm). Both the GFRP with 13-µm fibers (GFRP-13) and GFRP with 7 µm fibers (GFRP-7) were more transparent than the metallic orthodontic wires. Flexural strengths of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 690.3 ± 99.2 and 938.1 ± 95.0 MPa, respectively; flexural moduli of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 25.4 ± 4.9 and 34.7 ± 7.7 GPa, respectively. These flexural properties of the GFRP wires were nearly equivalent to those of available Ni-Ti wires. GFRP-7 had better flexural properties than GFRP-13, indicating that the flexural properties of GFRP increase with decreasing fiber diameter. Using thermocycling, we found no significant change in the flexural properties of the GFRPs after 600 or 1,200 cycles. Using a cytotoxicity detection kit, we found that the glass fiber and polycarbonate components comprising the GFRP were not cytotoxic within the limitations of this study. We expect this metal-free GFRP wire composed of polycarbonate and glass fiber to be useful as an esthetically pleasing alternative to current metallic orthodontic wire. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Electrical impedance spectroscopy for measuring the impedance response of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite laminates

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2017-02-16

    Techniques that monitor the change in the electrical properties of materials are promising for both non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs). However, achieving reliable monitoring using these techniques requires an in-depth understanding of the impedance response of these materials when subjected to an alternating electrical excitation, information that is only partially available in the literature. In this work, we investigate the electrical impedance spectroscopy response at various frequencies of laminates chosen to be representative of classical layups employed in composite structures. We clarify the relationship between the frequency of the electrical current, the conductivity of the surface ply and the probing depth for different CFRP configurations for more efficient electrical signal-based inspections. We also investigate the effect of the amplitude of the input signal.

  11. Laser absorption of carbon fiber reinforced polymer with randomly distributed carbon fibers

    Hu, Jun; Xu, Hebing; Li, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Laser processing of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a non-traditional machining method which has many prospective applications. The laser absorption characteristics of CFRP are analyzed in this paper. A ray tracing model describing the interaction of the laser spot with CFRP is established. The material model contains randomly distributed carbon fibers which are generated using an improved carbon fiber placement method. It was found that CFRP has good laser absorption due to multiple reflections of the light rays in the material’s microstructure. The randomly distributed carbon fibers make the absorptivity of the light rays change randomly in the laser spot. Meanwhile, the average absorptivity fluctuation is obvious during movement of the laser. The experimental measurements agree well with the values predicted by the ray tracing model.

  12. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer with Shredded Fibers: Quasi-Isotropic Material Properties and Antenna Performance

    Gerald Artner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminate, with the top layer consisting of shredded fibers, is proposed and manufactured. The shredded fibers are aligned randomly on the surface to achieve a more isotropic conductivity, as is desired in antenna applications. Moreover, fiber shreds can be recycled from carbon fiber composites. Conductivity, permittivity, and permeability are obtained with the Nicolson-Ross-Weir method from material samples measured inside rectangular waveguides in the frequency range of 4 to 6 GHz. The decrease in material anisotropy results in negligible influence on antennas. This is shown by measuring the proposed CFRP as ground plane material for both a narrowband wire monopole antenna for 5.9 GHz and an ultrawideband conical monopole antenna for 1–10 GHz. For comparison, all measurements are repeated with a twill-weave CFRP.

  13. Strength Analysis of the Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer Impeller Based on Fluid Solid Coupling Method

    Jinbao Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer material impeller is designed for the centrifugal pump to deliver corrosive, toxic, and abrasive media in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The pressure-velocity coupling fields in the pump are obtained from the CFD simulation. The stress distribution of the impeller couple caused by the flow water pressure and rotation centrifugal force of the blade is analyzed using one-way fluid-solid coupling method. Results show that the strength of the impeller can meet the requirement of the centrifugal pumps, and the largest stress occurred around the blades root on a pressure side of blade surface. Due to the existence of stress concentration at the blades root, the fatigue limit of the impeller would be reduced greatly. In the further structure optimal design, the blade root should be strengthened.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Jin Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  15. Mechanical and Electrochemical Performance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer in Oxygen Evolution Environment

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP is recognized as a promising anode material to prevent steel corrosion in reinforced concrete. However, the electrochemical performance of CFRP itself is unclear. This paper focuses on the understanding of electrochemical and mechanical properties of CFRP in an oxygen evolution environment by conducting accelerated polarization tests. Different amounts of current density were applied in polarization tests with various test durations, and feeding voltage and potential were measured. Afterwards, tensile tests were carried out to investigate the failure modes for the post-polarization CFRP specimens. Results show that CFRP specimens had two typical tensile-failure modes and had a stable anodic performance in an oxygen evolution environment. As such, CFRP can be potentially used as an anode material for impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP of reinforced concrete structures, besides the fact that CFRP can strengthen the structural properties of reinforced concrete.

  16. Improved Bond Equations for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars in Concrete.

    Pour, Sadaf Moallemi; Alam, M Shahria; Milani, Abbas S

    2016-08-30

    This paper explores a set of new equations to predict the bond strength between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar and concrete. The proposed equations are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis and existing experimental results in the literature. Namely, the most effective parameters on bond behavior of FRP concrete were first identified by applying a factorial analysis on a part of the available database. Then the database that contains 250 pullout tests were divided into four groups based on the concrete compressive strength and the rebar surface. Afterward, nonlinear regression analysis was performed for each study group in order to determine the bond equations. The results show that the proposed equations can predict bond strengths more accurately compared to the other previously reported models.

  17. Durability of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymers under varying environmental conditions

    El-Sadani, R.A.M.G

    2008-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) materials were adopted by the aerospace and marine industries, not only for their lightweight and high strength characteristics but also due to their tough and durable nature . As the engineering community has become more familiar with the performance advantages of these materials, new applications have been investigated and implemented. Researches and design guidelines concluded that externally bonded FRP to concrete elements could efficiently increase the capacity of RC elements. Long-term exposure to harsh environments deteriorates concrete and the need for repair and rehabilitation is evident. In order to accept these FRP materials, they must be evaluated for durability in harsh environments. An experimental program was conducted at the materials laboratory- faculty of engineering-Ain Shams university to study the durability of RC beams strengthened with FRP sheets and to compare them with un strengthened beams.The effect of gamma rays on FRP materials and concrete specimens bonded to FRP sheets were also investigated.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    Ngo, Andrew C. Y.; Goh, Henry K. H.; Lin, Karen K.; Liew, W. H.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are increasingly used in aerospace applications due to its superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Adhesive bonding is commonly used to join the composite parts since it is capable of joining incompatible or dissimilar components. However, insufficient adhesive or contamination in the adhesive bonds might occur and pose as threats to the integrity of the plane during service. It is thus important to look for suitable nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques to detect and characterize the sub-surface defects within the CFRP composites. Some of the common NDT techniques include ultrasonic techniques and thermography. In this work, we report the use of the abovementioned techniques for improved interpretation of the results.

  19. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  20. Study on the influence of design parameters on the damping property of glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Nanda, B. K.

    2018-04-01

    Fiber reinforced composites are widely used in industrial applications due to their high strength, light weight and ease in manufacturing. In applications such as automotive, aerospace and structural parts, the components are subjected to unwanted vibrations which reduce their service life, accuracy as well as increases noise. Therefore, it is essential to avoid the detrimental effects of vibrations by enhancing their damping characteristics. The current research deals with estimating the damping properties of Glass fiber reinforced epoxy (GFRE) composites. Processing of the GFRE composites is carried out using hand-lay technique. Various design parameters such as number of glass fiber layers, orientation of fibers and weight ratio are varied while manufacturing GFRE composites. The effects of variation of these design parameters on damping property of GFRE composites are studied extensively.

  1. Fluid flow analysis of E-glass fiber reinforced pipe joints in oil and gas industry

    Bobba, Sujith; Leman, Z.; Zainuddin, E. S.; Sapuan, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Glass Fiber reinforced composites have become increasingly important over the past few years and now they are the first choice materials for fabricating pipes with low weight in combination with high strength and stiffness. In Oil And Gas Industry, The Pipelines transporting heavy crude oil are subjected to variable pressure waves causing fluctuating stress levels in the pipes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using solid works flow stimulation software to study the effects of these pressure waves on some specified joints in the pipes. Depending on the type of heavy crude oil being used, the flow behavior indicated a considerable degree of stress levels in certain connecting joints, causing the joints to become weak over a prolonged period of use. This research proposes a new perspective that is still required to be developed regarding the change of the pipe material, fiber winding angle in those specified joints and finally implementing cad wind technology to check the output result of the stress levels so that the life of the pipes can be optimized.

  2. Flexural creep of coated SiC-fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic composites

    Sun, E.Y.

    1995-01-01

    This study reports the flexural creep behavior of a fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic and associated changes in microstructure. SiC fibers were coated with a dual layer of SiC/BN to provide a weak interface that was stable at high temperatures. Flexural creep, creep-rupture, and creep-strain recovery experiments were conducted on composite material and barium-magnesium aluminosilicate matrix from 1,000 to 1,200 C. Below 1,130 C, creep rates were extremely low (∼10 -9 s -1 ), preventing accurate measurement of the stress dependence. Above 1,130 C, creep rates were in the 10 -8 s -1 range. The creep-rupture strength of the composite at 1,100 C was about 75--80% of the fast fracture strength. Creep-strain recovery experiments showed recovery of up to 90% under prolonged unloading. Experimental creep results from the composite and the matrix were compared, and microstructural observations by TEM were employed to assess the effectiveness of the fiber coatings and to determine the mechanism(s) of creep deformation and damage

  3. Micromechanical modeling of short glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastics-Isotropic damage of pseudograins

    Kammoun, S.; Brassart, L.; Doghri, I.; Delannay, L.; Robert, G.

    2011-01-01

    A micromechanical damage modeling approach is presented to predict the overall elasto-plastic behavior and damage evolution in short fiber reinforced composite materials. The practical use of the approach is for injection molded thermoplastic parts reinforced with short glass fibers. The modeling is proceeded as follows. The representative volume element is decomposed into a set of pseudograins, the damage of which affects progressively the overall stiffness and strength up to total failure. Each pseudograin is a two-phase composite with aligned inclusions having same aspect ratio. A two-step mean-field homogenization procedure is adopted. In the first step, the pseudograins are homogenized individually according to the Mori-Tanaka scheme. The second step consists in a self-consistent homogenization of homogenized pseudograins. An isotropic damage model is applied at the pseudograin level. The model is implemented as a UMAT in the finite element code ABAQUS. Model is shown to reproduce the strength and the anisotropy (Lankford coefficient) during uniaxial tensile tests on samples cut under different directions relative to the injection flow direction.

  4. Terahertz and Thermal Testing of Glass-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Impact Damages

    T. Chady

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies on glass-fiber reinforced composites, due to their growing popularity and high diversity of industrial applications, are becoming an increasingly popular branch of the nondestructive testing. Mentioned composites are used, among other applications, in wind turbine blades and are exposed to various kinds of damages. The equipment reliability requirements force the development of accurate methods of their health monitoring. In this paper we present the study of composite samples with impact damages, using three methods: terahertz time domain inspection, active thermography with convective excitation, and active thermography with microwave excitation. The results of discrete Fourier transform of obtained time sequences of signals will be presented as well as some image processing of resulting amplitude and phase images. Proposed experimental methods combined with harmonic analysis are efficient tool of defects detection and allowed to detect flaws in examined specimens. Reader may find it interesting that in spite of differences in nature of applied experimental methods, one technique of signal processing (harmonic analysis gave adequate and comparable results in each case.

  5. Study on an Improved Phosphate Cement Binder for the Development of Fiber-Reinforced Inorganic Polymer Composites

    Zhu Ding

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC has been proven to be a very good repair material for deteriorated concrete structures. It has excellent adhesion performance, leading to high bonding strength with old concrete substrates. This paper presents an experimental study into the properties of MPC binder as the matrix of carbon fiber sheets to form fiber-reinforced inorganic polymer (FRIP composites. The physical and mechanical performance of the fresh mixed and the hardened MPC paste, the bond strength of carbon fiber sheets in the MPC matrix, the tensile strength of the carbon FRIP composites and the microstructure of the MPC matrix and fiber-reinforced MPC composites were investigated. The test results showed that the improved MPC binder is well suited for developing FRIP composites, which can be a promising alternative to externally-bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP composites for the strengthening of concrete structures. Through the present study, an in-depth understanding of the behavior of fiber-reinforced inorganic MPC composites has been achieved.

  6. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  7. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  8. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  9. The Impact Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Review

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced composites are widely used instead of traditional materials in various technological applications. Therefore, by considering the extensive applications of these materials, a proper knowledge of their impact behavior (from low- to high-velocity as well as their static behavior is necessary. In order to study the effects of strain rates on the behavior of these materials, special testing machines are needed. Most of the research efforts in this feld are focused on application of real loading and gripping boundary conditions on the testing specimens. In this paper, a detailed review of different types of impact testing techniques and the strain rate dependence of mechanical and strength properties of polymer composite materials  are presented. In this respect, an attempt is made to present and summarize the methods of impact tests and the strain rate effects on the tensile, compressive, shear and bending properties of the fber-reinforced polymer composite materials. Moreover, a classifcation of the state-of-the-art of the testing techniques to characterize composite material properties in a wide range of strain rates are also given.

  10. Optimizing the Flexural Strength of Beams Reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bars Using Back-Propagation Neural Networks

    Bahman O. Taha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced concrete with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars (carbon, aramid, basalt and glass is used in places where a high ratio of strength to weight is required and corrosion is not acceptable. Behavior of structural members using (FRP bars is hard to be modeled using traditional methods because of the high non-linearity relationship among factors influencing the strength of structural members. Back-propagation neural network is a very effective method for modeling such complicated relationships. In this paper, back-propagation neural network is used for modeling the flexural behavior of beams reinforced with (FRP bars. 101 samples of beams reinforced with fiber bars were collected from literatures. Five important factors are taken in consideration for predicting the strength of beams. Two models of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP are created, first with single-hidden layer and the second with two-hidden layers. The two-hidden layer model showed better accuracy ratio than the single-hidden layer model. Parametric study has been done for two-hidden layer model only. Equations are derived to be used instead of the model and the importance of input factors is determined. Results showed that the neural network is successful in modeling the behavior of concrete beams reinforced with different types of (FRP bars.

  11. Low Cost Resin for Self-Healing High Temperature Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past few decades, the manufacturing processes and our knowledge base for predicting the bulk mechanical response of fiber reinforced composite materials has...

  12. Bond Behavior of Wet-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Concrete Interface Subjected to Moisture

    Yiyan Lu; Tao Zhu; Shan Li; Zhenzhen Liu

    2018-01-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials to strengthen concrete structures has become popular in coastal regions with high humidity levels. However, many concrete structures in these places remain wet as a result of tides and wave-splashing, so they cannot be completely dried before repair. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the effects of moisture on the initial and long-term bond behavior between CFRP and wet concrete. This research assesses the effects of mo...

  13. Aerogel to simulate delamination and porosity defects in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Juarez, Peter; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2018-04-01

    Representative defect standards are essential for the validation and calibration of new and existing inspection techniques. However, commonly used methods of simulating delaminations in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites do not accurately represent the behavior of the real-world defects for several widely-used NDE techniques. For instance, it is common practice to create a delamination standard by inserting Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in between ply layers. However, PTFE can transmit more ultrasonic energy than actual delaminations, leading to an unrealistic representation of the defect inspection. PTFE can also deform/wrinkle during the curing process and has a thermal effusivity two orders of magnitude higher than air (almost equal to that of a CFRP). It is therefore not effective in simulating a delamination for thermography. Currently there is also no standard practice for producing or representing a known porosity in composites. This paper presents a novel method of creating delamination and porosity standards using aerogel. Insertion of thin sheets of solid aerogel between ply layers during layup is shown to produce air-gap-like delaminations creating realistic ultrasonic and thermographic inspection responses. Furthermore, it is shown that depositing controlled amounts of aerogel powder can represent porosity. Micrograph data verifies the structural integrity of the aerogel through the composite curing process. This paper presents data from multiple NDE methods, including X-ray computed tomography, immersion ultrasound, and flash thermography to the effectiveness of aerogel as a delamination and porosity simulant.

  14. Self-monitoring fiber reinforced polymer strengthening system for civil engineering infrastructures

    Jiang, Guoliang; Dawood, Mina; Peters, Kara; Rizkalla, Sami

    2008-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) materials are currently used for strengthening civil engineering infrastructures. The strengthening system is dependant on the bond characteristics of the FRP to the external surface of the structure to be effective in resisting the applied loads. This paper presents an innovative self-monitoring FRP strengthening system. The system consists of two components which can be embedded in FRP materials to monitor the global and local behavior of the strengthened structure respectively. The first component of the system is designed to evaluate the applied load acting on a structure based on elongation of the FRP layer along the entire span of the structure. Success of the global system has been demonstrated using a full-scale prestressed concrete bridge girder which was loaded up to failure. The test results indicate that this type of sensor can be used to accurately determine the load prior to failure within 15 percent of the measured value. The second sensor component consists of fiber Bragg grating sensors. The sensors were used to monitor the behavior of steel double-lap shear splices tested under tensile loading up to failure. The measurements were used to identify abnormal structural behavior such as epoxy cracking and FRP debonding. Test results were also compared to numerical values obtained from a three dimensional shear-lag model which was developed to predict the sensor response.

  15. Modeling and optimization for rotary ultrasonic face milling of carbon fiber reinforced polymers

    Amin Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP have got paramount importance in aerospace, and other industries due to their attractive properties of high specific strength, high specific stiffness, high corrosion resistance, and low thermal expansion. However, due to their properties like heterogeneity, anisotropy, and low heat dissipation, the issues in machining like excessive cutting forces and high surface roughness have found. In this research, a cutting force model has developed for rotary ultrasonic face milling of CFRP composites. The experimental machining was carried out on CFRP-T700. From the analysis, it has found that experimental and simulation values of cutting forces have variation/ error below than 10% in the most of the groups of parameters. However, the error found higher in few cases, due to heterogeneity, anisotropy and some other properties of these materials. The formula for contact area of the abrasive core tool improved and an overlapping cutting allowance has applied the first time. The optimal combination of parameters has investigated for cutting force and surface roughness. The developed cutting force model then further validated with pilot experiments and found the same results. So, the model developed in this paper is robust and can be applied to predict cutting force and optimization.

  16. Self-diagnosis of structures strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer sheets

    Wu, Z. S.; Yang, C. Q.; Harada, T.; Ye, L. P.

    2005-06-01

    The correlation of mechanical and electrical properties of concrete beams strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (HCFRP) sheets is studied in this paper. Two types of concrete beams, with and without reinforcing bars, are strengthened with externally bonded HCFRP sheets, which have a self-structural health monitoring function due to the electrical conduction and piezoresistivity of carbon fibers. Parameters investigated include the volume fractions and types of carbon fibers. According to the investigation, it is found that the hybridization of uniaxial HCFRP sheets with several different types of carbon fibers is a viable method for enhancing the mechanical properties and obtaining a built-in damage detection function for concrete structures. The changes in electrical resistance during low strain ranges before the rupture of carbon fibers are generally smaller than 1%. Nevertheless, after the gradual ruptures of carbon fibers, the electrical resistance increases remarkably with the strain in a step-wise manner. For the specimens without reinforcing bars, the electrical behaviors are not stable, especially during the low strain ranges. However, the electrical behaviors of the specimens with reinforcing bars are relatively stable, and the whole range of self-sensing function of the HCFRP-strengthened RC structures has realized the conceptual design of the HCFRP sensing models and is confirmed by the experimental investigations. The relationships between the strain/load and the change in electrical resistance show the potential self-monitoring capacity of HCFRP reinforcements used for strengthening concrete structures.

  17. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection. PMID:28772485

  18. AE analysis of delamination crack propagation in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer materials

    Yoon, Sang Jae; Arakawa, Kazuo [Kyushu University, kasuga (Japan); Chen, Dingding [National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Han, Seung Wook; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Delamination fracture behavior was investigated using acoustic emission (AE) analysis on carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) samples manufactured using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). CFRP plate was fabricated using unidirectional carbon fiber fabric with a lay-up of six plies [+30/-30]6 , and a Teflon film was inserted as a starter crack. Test pieces were sectioned from the inlet and vent of the mold, and packed between two rectangular epoxy plates to load using a universal testing machine. The AE signals were monitored during tensile loading using two sensors. The average tensile load of the inlet specimens was slightly larger than that of the vent specimens; however, the data exhibited significant scattering due to non-uniform resin distribution, and there was no statistically significant different between the strength of the samples sectioned from the inlet or outlet of the mold. Each of the specimens exhibited similar AE characteristics, regardless of whether they were from the inlet or vent of the mold. Four kinds of damage mechanism were observed: micro-cracking, fiber-resin matrix debonding, fiber pull-out, and fiber failure; and three stages of the crack propagation process were identified.

  19. The concept of sustainable prefab modular housing made of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)

    Setyowati, E.; Pandelaki, E. E.

    2018-03-01

    This research aims to formulate the concept of public housing based on research results on natural fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material which has been done in the road map of research. Research output is the public housing design and specifications of FRP made of water hyacinths and coconut fiber. Method used is descriptive review of the concept based on references and material test which consists of density, water absorption, modulus of rupture (MOR), tensile strength, absorption coefficient and Sound Transmission Loss (STL). The entire tests of material were carried out in the laboratory of materials and construction, while the acoustic tests carried out using the impedance tubes method. The test results concluded that the FRP material may have a density between 0.2481 – 0.2777 g/cm3, the absorption coefficient is average of 0.450 – 0.900, the Modulus of Elasticity is between 4061 – 15193 kg/cm2, while the average of sound transmission loss is 52 – 59 dB. Furthermore, that the concept of public housing must be able to be the embryo of the concept of environment-friendly and low emissions housing.

  20. Hysteretic Behavior of Tubular Steel Braces Having Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforcement Around End Net Sections

    Cem Haydaroğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental investigation into the seismic retrofit of tubular steel braces using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP members. CFRP retrofitting of net sections for compact tubes are proposed for delaying potential local net section failure. A total of almost full-scale three (TB-1, TB-2, and TB-3 compact steel tubular specimens were designed per AISC specifications, constructed, and cyclically tested to fracture. Retrofitted braces, when compared to the reference specimen, developed fuller hysteretic curves. Increase in cumulative hysteretic energy dissipation and the elongation in fracture life in the specimen retrofitted with CFRP plates and CFRP sheet wraps at net sections are observed during testing. This resulted in a maximum of 82.5% more dissipated energy for compact tube specimens. Also, this retrofit provided a longer experimental fracture life (maximum 59% more. Due to fracture initiation during the last cycles, significant reductions in strength and stiffness have been obtained. No significant change (maximum 10% in the brace stiffness was observed, which could be desirable in seismic retrofit applications. Pushover analysis per FEMA 356 for the bare specimen shows that FEMA does not represent actual brace behavior in the compression side although pushover and experimental results are in good agreement in the tension side.

  1. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  2. Flexural Strength of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Repaired Cracked Rectangular Hollow Section Steel Beams

    Tao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flexural behavior of rectangular hollow section (RHS steel beams with initial crack strengthened externally with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP plates was studied. Eight specimens were tested under three-point loading to failure. The experimental program included three beams as control specimens and five beams strengthened with CFRP plates with or without prestressing. The load deflection curves were graphed and failure patterns were observed. The yield loads and ultimate loads with or without repairing were compared together with the strain distributions of the CFRP plate. It was concluded that yield loads of cracked beams could be enhanced with repairing. Meanwhile, the ultimate loads were increased to some extent. The effect of repair became significant with the increase of the initial crack depth. The failure patterns of the repaired specimens were similar to those of the control ones. Mechanical clamping at the CFRP plate ends was necessary to avoid premature peeling between the CFRP plate and the steel beam. The stress levels in CFRP plates were relatively low during the tests. The use of prestressing could improve the utilization efficiency of CFRP plates. It could be concluded that the patching repair could be used to restore the load bearing capacity of the deficient steel beams.

  3. Mechanical and physical properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical properties and quality of fiber/matrix adhesion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based materials, reinforced with carbon-graphite (CG) fibers that are able to remain in a plastic state until polymerization, were examined. Tubes of cleaned braided CG fibers were treated with a sizing resin. Two resin mixtures, resin A and resin B, stable in the fluid state and containing different cross-linking agents, were reinforced with CG fiber loadings of 24, 36, and 47 wt% (20, 29, and 38 vol.%). In addition, resin B was reinforced with 58 wt% (47 vol.%). After heat-polymerization, flexural strength and modulus were evaluated, both dry and after water storage. Coefficient of thermal expansion, longitudinally and in the transverse direction of the specimens, was determined. Adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were similar for both fiber composites. With increased fiber loading, flexural properties increased. For 47 wt% fibers in polymer A the flexural strength was 547.7 (28.12) MPa and for polymer B 563.3 (89.24) MPa when water saturated. Linear coefficient of thermal expansion was for 47 wt% CG fiber-reinforced polymers; -2.5 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 longitudinally and 62.4 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 in the transverse direction of the specimens. SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix. More porosity was observed with fiber loading of 58 wt%. The fiber treatment and the developed resin matrices resulted in good adhesion between CG fibers and matrix. The properties observed indicate a potential for implant-retained prostheses.

  4. Retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames using glass fiber reinforced plastic laminates

    Hakam, Zeyad Hamed-Ramzy

    2000-11-01

    This study focuses on the retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames subjected to in-plane lateral loads using glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates that are epoxy-bonded to the exterior faces of the infill walls. An extensive experimental investigation using one-third scale modeling was conducted and consisted of two phases. In the first phase, 64 assemblages, half of which were retrofitted, were tested under various combined in-plane loading conditions similar to those which different regions of a typical infill wall are subjected to. In the second phase, one bare and four masonry-infilled steel frames representative of a typical single-story, single-bay panel were tested under diagonal loading to study the overall behavior and the infill-frame interaction. The relative infill-to-frame stiffness was varied as a test parameter by using two different steel frame sections. The laminates altered the failure modes of the masonry assemblages and reduced the variability and anisotropic nature of the masonry. For the prisms which failed due to shear and/or mortar joint slip, significant strength increases were observed. For those exhibiting compression failure modes, a marginal increase in strength resulted. Retrofitting the infilled frames resulted in an average increase in initial stiffness of two-fold compared to the unretrofitted infilled frames, and seemed independent of the relative infill-to-frame stiffness. However, the increase in the load-carrying capacity of the retrofitted frames compared to the unretrofitted counterparts was higher for those with the larger relative infill-to-frame stiffness parameter. Unlike the unretrofitted infill walls, the retrofitted panels demonstrated almost identical failure modes that were characterized as "strictly comer crushing" in the vicinity of the loaded comers whereas no signs of distress were evident throughout the remainder of the infill. The laminates also maintained the structural integrity of

  5. A glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass cranioplasty implant: A case study of an early development stage implant removed due to a late infection.

    Posti, Jussi P; Piitulainen, Jaakko M; Hupa, Leena; Fagerlund, Susanne; Frantzén, Janek; Aitasalo, Kalle M J; Vuorinen, Ville; Serlo, Willy; Syrjänen, Stina; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-03-01

    This case study describes the properties of an early development stage bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite calvarial implant with histology that has been in function for two years and three months. The patient is a 33-year old woman with a history of substance abuse, who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury later unsuccessfully treated with an autologous bone flap and a custom-made porous polyethylene implant. She was thereafter treated with developmental stage glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass implant. After two years and three months, the implant was removed due to an implant site infection. The implant was analyzed histologically, mechanically, and in terms of chemistry and dissolution of bioactive glass. Mechanical integrity of the load bearing fiber-reinforced composite part of the implant was not affected by the in vivo period. Bioactive glass particles demonstrated surface layers of hydroxyapatite like mineral and dissolution, and related increase of pH was considerably less after two and three months period than that for fresh bioactive glass. There was a difference in the histology of the tissues inside the implant areas near to the margin of the implant that absorbed blood during implant installation surgery, showed fibrous tissue with blood vessels, osteoblasts, collagenous fibers with osteoid formation, and tiny clusters of more mature hard tissue. In the center of the implant, where there was less absorbed blood, only fibrous tissue was observed. This finding is in line with the combined positron emission tomography - computed tomography examination with (18F)-fluoride marker, which demonstrated activity of the mineralizing bone by osteoblasts especially at the area near to the margin of the implant 10 months after implantation. Based on these promising reactions found in the bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite implant that has been implanted for two years and three months, calvarial

  6. Effect of fiber content on flexural properties of glass fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 prepared by injection molding.

    Nagakura, Manamu; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2017-07-26

    The use of non-metal clasp denture (NMCD) materials may seriously affect the remaining tissues because of the low rigidity of NMCD materials such as polyamides. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-rigidity glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GFRTP) composed of E-glass fiber and polyamide-6 for NMCDs using an injection molding. The reinforcing effects of fiber on the flexural properties of GFRTPs were investigated using glass fiber content ranging from 0 to 50 mass%. Three-point bending tests indicated that the flexural strength and elastic modulus of a GFRTP with a fiber content of 50 mass% were 5.4 and 4.7 times higher than those of unreinforced polyamide-6, respectively. The result showed that the physical characteristics of GFRTPs were greatly improved by increasing the fiber content, and the beneficial effects of fiber reinforcement were evident. The findings suggest that the injection-molded GFRTPs are adaptable to NMCDs because of their excellent mechanical properties.

  7. Flexure and impact properties of glass fiber reinforced nylon 6-polypropylene composites

    Kusaseh, N. M.; Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Ismail, N. M.; Hamedon, Z.; Azhari, A.; Iqbal, A. K. M. A.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, polymer composites are rapidly developing and replacing the metals or alloys in numerous engineering applications. These polymer composites are the topic of interests in industrial applications such as automotive and aerospace industries. In the present research study, glass fiber (GF) reinforced nylon 6 (PA6)-polypropylene (PP) composite specimens were prepared successfully using injection molding process. Test specimens of five different compositions such as, 70%PA6+30%PP, 65%PA6+30%PP+5%GF, 60%PA6+30%PP+10%GF, 55%PA6+30%PP+15%GF and 50%PA6+30%PP+20%GF were prepared. In the experiments, flexure and impact tests were carried out. The obtained results revealed that flexure and impact properties of the polymer composites were significantly influenced by the glass fiber content. Results showed that flexural strength is low for pure polymer blend and flexural strength of GF reinforced composite increases gradually with the increase in glass fiber content. Test results also revealed that the impact strength of 70%PA6+30%PP is the highest and 55%PA6+30%PP+15%GF composite shows moderate impact strength. On the other hand, 50%PA6+30%PP+20%GF composite shows low toughness or reduced impact strength.

  8. Proposed Methodology for Design of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Spike Anchors into Reinforced Concrete

    MacFarlane, Eric Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-26

    The included methodology, calculations, and drawings support design of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) spike anchors for securing U-wrap CFRP onto reinforced concrete Tbeams. This content pertains to an installation in one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s facilities. The anchors are part of a seismic rehabilitation to the subject facility. The information contained here is for information purposes only. The reader is encouraged to verify all equations, details, and methodology prior to usage in future projects. However, development of the content contained here complied with Los Alamos National Laboratory’s NQA-1 quality assurance program for nuclear structures. Furthermore, the formulations and details came from the referenced published literature. This literature represents the current state of the art for FRP anchor design. Construction personnel tested the subject anchor design to the required demand level demonstrated in the calculation. The testing demonstrated the ability of the anchors noted to carry loads in excess of 15 kips in direct tension. The anchors were not tested to failure in part because of the hazards associated with testing large-capacity tensile systems to failure. The calculation, methodology, and drawing originator was Eric MacFarlane of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Office of Seismic Hazards and Risk Mitigation (OSHRM). The checker for all components was Mike Salmon of the LANL OSHRM. The independent reviewers of all components were Insung Kim and Loring Wyllie of Degenkolb Engineers. Note that Insung Kim contributed to the initial formulations in the calculations that pertained directly to his Doctoral research.

  9. Mass optimization of a small pressure vessel using metal/FRP (fiber reinforced polymers) hybrid structures

    Nisar, J.A.; Abdullah, A.N.; Iqbal, N.

    2004-01-01

    In hybrid pressure vessels, composite (Fiber) is wound over a metallic liner (Steel/Aluminum) in hoop direction. In this concept of hybrid pressure vessel structure, metallic liner takes all the axial loads and fiber reinforced polymers (FRP/sub s/) takes load in circumferential (Hoop) direction. Hybrid structures combine the relatively high shear stiffness and ductility of metal alloy with high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue properties of FRP/sub s/. The relatively simple methods for producing hybrid structures circumvent the need for the complex and expensive equipment that is used for advanced composites processing. This paper presents an efficient way of designing a hybrid pressure vessel where prime concern is weight reduction over an equivalent aluminum structure and investigates various methodologies regarding combinations of metals and FRP/sub s/ for optimization of a given pressure vessel. For this purpose we adopted two different methods of simulation one is computer simulation using ANSYS and other is experimental verification by hydrostatic testing of manufactured pressure vessel. Two different pressure vessels one with aluminum liner and other with steel liner were fabricated. Kevlar 49/epoxy was wrapped around the liners in hoop direction. Both the pressure vessels were put into hydrostatic test. Strains were measured during the test and then converted into corresponding stresses. Results of hydrostatic test were quite in favor of the ANSYS results. In this way we have successfully designed, manufactured and tested the Hybrid pressure vessel saving almost 40% weight in case of aluminum liner and 43.6% in case of steel liner. (author)

  10. In situ corrosion monitoring of PC structures with distributed hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer sensors

    Yang, C. Q.; Wu, Z. S.

    2007-08-01

    Firstly, the fabrication and sensing properties of hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer (HCFRP) composite sensors are addressed. In order to provide a distributed sensing manner, the HCFRP sensors were divided into multi-zones with electrodes, and each zone was regarded as a separate sensor. Secondly, their application is studied to monitor the steel corrosion of prestressed concrete (PC) beams. The HCFRP sensors with different gauge lengths were mounted on a PC tendon, steel bar and embedded in tensile and compressive sides of the PC beam. The experiment was carried out under an electric accelerated corrosion and a constant load of about 54 kN. The results reveal that the corrosion of the PC tendon can be monitored through measuring the electrical resistance (ER) change of the HCFRP sensors. For the sensors embedded in tensile side of the PC beam, their ER increases as the corrosion progresses, whereas for the sensors embedded in compressive side, their ER decreases with corrosion time. Moreover, the strains due to the corrosion can be obtained based on the ER change and calibration curves of HCFRP sensors. The strains measured with traditional strain gauges agree with the strains calculated from the ER changes of HCFRP sensors. The electrical behavior of the zones where the corrosion was performed is much different from those of the other zones. In these zones, either there exist jumps in ER, or the ER increases with a much larger rate than those of the other zones. Distributed corrosion monitoring for PC structures is thus demonstrated with the application of HCFRP sensors through a proper installation of multi-electrodes.

  11. Surface characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymers by picosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Palmieri, Frank; Connell, John; Yost, William; Fitz-Gerald, James

    2018-02-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials requires reliable monitoring and detection of surface contaminants as part of a vigorous quality control process to assure robust and durable bonded structures. Surface treatment and effective monitoring prior to bonding are essential in order to obtain a surface which is free from contaminants that may lead to inferior bond quality. In this study, the focus is to advance the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique by using pulse energies below 100 μJ (μLIBS) for the detection of low levels of silicone contaminants in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Various CFRP surface conditions were investigated by LIBS using ∼10 ps, 355 nm laser pulses with pulse energies below 30 μJ. Time-resolved analysis was conducted to optimize the gate delay and gate width for the detection of the C I emission line at 247.9 nm to monitor the epoxy resin matrix of CFRP composites and the Si I emission line at 288.2 nm for detection of silicone contaminants in CFRP. To study the surface sensitivity to silicone contamination, CFRP surfaces were coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the active ingredient in many mold release agents. The presence of PDMS was studied by inspecting the Si I emission lines at 251.6 nm and 288.2 nm. The measured PDMS areal densities ranged from 0.15 to 2 μg/cm2. LIBS measurements were performed before and after laser surface ablation. The results demonstrate the successful detection of PDMS thin layers on CFRP using picosecond μLIBS.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Delamination in Drilling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Tang, Wenliang; Chen, Yan; Yang, Haojun; Wang, Hua; Yao, Qiwei

    2018-03-01

    Drilling of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a challenging task in modern manufacturing sector and machining induced delamination is one of the major problems affecting assembly precision. In this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) finite element model is developed to study the chip formation and entrance delamination in drilling of CFRP composites on the microscopic level. Fiber phase, matrix phase and equivalent homogeneous phase in the multi-phase model have different constitutive behaviors, respectively. A comparative drilling test, in which the cement carbide drill and unidirectional CFRP laminate are employed, is conducted to validate the proposedmodel in terms of the delamination and the similar changing trend is obtained. Microscopic mechanism of entrance delamination together with the chip formation process at four special fiber cutting angles (0°, 45°, 90° and 135°) is investigated. Moreover, the peeling force is also predicted. The results show that the delamination occurrence and the chip formation are both strongly dependent on the fiber cutting angle. The length of entrance delamination rises with increasing fiber cutting angles. Negligible delamination at 0° is attributed to the compression by the minor flank face. For 45° and 90°, the delamination resulted from the mode III fracture. At 135°, serious delamination which is driven by the mode I and III fractures is more inclined to occur and the peeling force reaches its maximum. Such numerical models can help understand the mechanism of hole entrance delamination further and provide guidance for the damage-free drilling of CFRP.

  13. Review of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforced Material in Concrete Structure

    Ayuddin Ayuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP is a material that is lightweight, strong, anti-magnetic and corrosion resistant. This material can be used as an option to replace the steel material in concrete construction or as material to improve the strength of existing construction. CFRP is quite easy to be attached to the concrete structure and proved economically used as a material for repairing damaged structures and increase the resilience of structural beams, columns, bridges and other parts of the structure against earthquakes. CFRP materials can be shaped sheet to be attached to the concrete surface. Another reason is due to the use of CFRP has a higher ultimate strength and lower weight compared to steel reinforcement so that the handling is significantly easier. Through this paper suggests that CFRP materials can be applied to concrete structures, especially on concrete columns. Through the results of experiments conducted proved that the concrete columns externally wrapped with CFRP materials can increase the strength. This treatment is obtained after testing experiments on 130 mm diameter column with a height of 700 mm with concentric loading method to collapse. The experimental results indicate that a column is wrapped externally with CFRP materials can achieve a load capacity of 250 kN compared to the concrete columns externally without CFRP material which only reached 150 kN. If the column is given internally reinforcing steel and given externally CFRP materials can reach 270 kN. It shows that CFRP materials can be used for concrete structures can even replace reinforcing steel that has been widely used in building construction in Indonesia.

  14. A Testing Platform for Durability Studies of Polymers and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Composites under Concurrent Hygrothermo-mechanical Stimuli

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus. PMID:25548950

  15. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-12-11

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus.

  16. Mechanical characterization of glass fiber (woven roving/chopped strand mat E-glass fiber) reinforced polyester composites

    Bhaskar, V. Vijaya; Srinivas, Kolla

    2017-07-01

    Polymer reinforced composites have been replacing most of the engineering material and their applications become more and more day by day. Polymer composites have been analyzing from past thirty five years for their betterment for adapting more applications. This paper aims at the mechanical properties of polyester reinforced with glass fiber composites. The glass fiber is reinforced with polyester in two forms viz Woven Rovings (WRG) and Chopped Strand Mat (CSMG) E-glass fibers. The composites are fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the composites are cut as per ASTM Standard sizes for corresponding tests like flexural, compression and impact tests, so that flexural strength, compression strength, impact strength and inter laminar shear stress(ILSS) of polymer matrix composites are analyzed. From the tests and further calculations, the polyester composites reinforced with Chopped Strand Mat glass fiber have shown better performance against flexural load, compression load and impact load than that of Woven Roving glass fiber.

  17. Influence of Cutting Temperature on the Tensile Strength of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Jérémy Delahaigue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering specifications. Laminates made of carbon fibers are very abrasive and cause rapid tool wear, and require high cutting temperatures. This creates damage to the epoxy matrix, whose glass-transition temperature is often recognized to be about 180 °C. This study aims to highlight the influence of the cutting temperature generated by tool wear on the surface finish and mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests. Trimming operations were performed on a quasi-isotropic 24-ply carbon/epoxy laminate, of 3.6 mm thickness, with a 6 flutes diamond-coated (CVD cutter. The test specimens of 6 mm and 12 mm wide were obtained by trimming. The reduced width of the coupons allowed amplification of the effect of defects on the measured properties by increasing the proportion of coupon cross-section occupied by the defects. A new tool and a tool in an advanced state of wear were used to generate different cutting temperatures. Results showed a cutting temperature of 300 °C for the new tool and 475 °C for the worn tool. The analysis revealed that the specimens machined with the new tool have no thermal damage and the cut is clean. The plies oriented at −45° presented the worst surface finish according to the failure mode of the fiber. For the worn tool, the surface was degraded and the matrix was carbonized. After cutting, observations showed a degraded resin spread on the machined surface, which reduced the surface roughness and hid the cutting defects. In support of these observations, the tensile tests showed no variation of the mechanical properties for the 12 mm-wide specimens, but did show a 10% loss in mechanical properties for the 6 mm

  18. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  19. The Modeling of Ultimate Bearing Capacity of Fiber Reinforced Polymer and Its acidic/alkaline Corrosion Mechanism Analysis

    Qin Liping

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the overall property of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP was researched. It is currently widely used in all areas, mainly in civil engineering. The huge need of this material drives the research of its mechanical property and corrosion mechanism. It is proven that the FRP can significantly strengthen the whole structure due to the support of fiber. And by applying osmosis hypothesis into the explanation of corrosion of FRP, we concluded that its corrosion rate is much slower than common materials, like steel. Generally, based on these conclusions, FRP is suitable for most of the facilities in civil engineering.

  20. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material.

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-07-24

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  1. Mechanical characterization of SiC particulate & E-glass fiber reinforced Al 3003 hybrid metal matrix composites

    Narayana, K. S. Lakshmi; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    Metal matrix composites constitute a class of low cost high quality materials which offer high performance for various industrial applications. The orientation of this research is towards the study of mechanical properties of as cast silicon carbide (SiC) particulates and Short E-Glass fibers reinforced Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). The Hybrid metal matrix composite is developed by reinforcing SiC particulates of 100 microns and short E-Glass fibers of 2-3 mm length with Al 3003 in different compositions. The vortex method of stir casting was employed, in which the reinforcements were introduced into the vortex created by the molten metal by means of mechanical stirrer. The mechanical properties of the prepared metal matrix composites were analyzed. From the studies it was noticed that an improvement in mechanical properties of the reinforced alloys compared to unreinforced alloys.

  2. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  3. The Impact Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Review

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh; Majid Jamal Omidi

    2012-01-01

    Fiber reinforced composites are widely used instead of traditional materials in various technological applications. Therefore, by considering the extensive applications of these materials, a proper knowledge of their impact behavior (from low- to high-velocity) as well as their static behavior is necessary. In order to study the effects of strain rates on the behavior of these materials, special testing machines are needed. Most of the research efforts in this feld are focused on application ...

  4. An experimental study of mechanical behavior of natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    Ratna, Sanatan; Misra, Sheelam

    2018-05-01

    Fibre-reinforced polymer composites have played a dominant role for a long time in a variety of applications for their high specific strength and modulus. The fibre which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural. Past studies show that only synthetic fibres such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fibre reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fibre-reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of horse hair, an animal fibre abundantly available in India. Animal fibres are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheaper than mineral fibre. The present work describes the development and characterization of a new set of animal fiber based polymer composites consisting of horse hair as reinforcement and epoxy resin. The newly developed composites are characterized with respect to their mechanical characteristics. Experiments are carried out to study the effect of fibre length on mechanical behavior of these epoxy based polymer composites. Composite made form horse hair can be used as a potential reinforcing material for many structural and non-structural applications. This work can be further extended to study other aspects of such composites like effect of fiber content, loading pattern, fibre treatment on mechanical behavior of horse hair based polymer horse hair.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of porosity and its effect on mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Bhat, M. R.; Binoy, M. P.; Surya, N. M.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Engelbart, R. W.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, an attempt is made to induce porosity of varied levels in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based polymer composite laminates fabricated using prepregs by varying the fabrication parameters such as applied vacuum, autoclave pressure and curing temperature. Different NDE tools have been utilized to evaluate the porosity content and correlate with measurable parameters of different NDE techniques. Primarily, ultrasonic imaging and real time digital X-ray imaging have been tried to obtain a measurable parameter which can represent or reflect the amount of porosity contained in the composite laminate. Also, effect of varied porosity content on mechanical properties of the CFRP composite materials is investigated through a series of experimental investigations. The outcome of the experimental approach has yielded interesting and encouraging trend as a first step towards developing an NDE tool for quantification of effect of varied porosity in the polymer composite materials.

  6. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    Nayana Anasane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each, depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round, with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05. Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group ( P < 0.001 (88.77 MPa, with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours ( P < 0.001. Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins.

  7. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  8. Mechanical Properties of Natural Jute Fabric/Jute Mat Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Hybrid Composites

    Elsayed A. Elbadry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycled needle punched jute fiber mats as a first natural fiber reinforcement system and these jute mats used as a core needle punched with recycled jute fabric cloths as skin layers as a second natural fiber reinforcement system were used for unsaturated polyester matrix composites via modifying the hand lay-up technique with resin preimpregnation into the jute fiber in vacuum. The effect of skin jute fabric on the tensile and bending properties of jute mat composites was investigated for different fiber weight contents. Moreover, the notch sensitivity of these composites was also compared by using the characteristic distance do calculated by Finite Element Method (FEM. The results showed that the tensile and flexural properties of jute mat composites increased by increasing the fiber weight content and by adding the jute fabric as skin layers. On the other hand, by adding the skins, the characteristic distance decreased and, therefore, the notch sensitivity of the composites increased. The fracture behavior investigated by SEM showed that extensive fiber pull-out mechanism was revealed at the tension side of jute mat composites under the bending load and by adding the jute cloth, the failure mode of jute mat was changed to fiber bridge mechanism.

  9. PENGGUNAAN CARBON FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER SEBAGAI PERKUATAN KOLOM BETON BERTULANG AKIBAT BEBAN SIKLIK UNTUK MENINGKATKAN DAKTILITAS PERPINDAHAN STRUKTUR

    Karmila Achmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP as a concrete column re­inforcement in order to improve the structure displacement ductility caused by a cyclic load. The aim of this research is to improve the displacement ductility of a column specimen by giving CFRP strengthener (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Two full-scale specimens are used, C-1 (original column and C-1C (column with CFRP strengthener 1 layer. The tests on C-1 and C-1C are respectively shown on the following results: Pmax is 278.9 kN and 432.2 kN, dmax is 53.24 mm and 96.46 mm, and Mmax is 328.04 kNm and 509.63 kNm. The displacement ductility of C-1 are 6.70, 6.11 and 5.44, and the displacement ductility of C-1C are 11.02, 12.75, and 11.89. The percentages of the increase of displacement ductility in column C-1C compared to C-1 are 64.48%, 108.74% and 118.68%  respectivelyfor plastic hinge zone, half high of the column effectiveness and as high as the column effectiveness.   Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan daktilitas perpindahan pada spe­simen kolom yang diberi perkuatan CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Ada dua spesimen kolom skala penuh yang digunakan, yaitu C-1 (kolom original dan C-1C (kolom dengan perkuatan CFRP 1 lapis. Hasil penelitian untuk masing-masing C-1 dan C-1C adalah Pmax sebesar 278,9 kN dan 432,2 kN, dmax sebesar 53,24 mm dan 96,46 mm, serta Mmax sebesar 328,04 kNm dan 509,63 kNm. Hasil daktilitas perpindahan untuk C-1 adalah 6,70; 6,11 dan 5,44, sedang C-1C adalah 11,02; 12,75 dan 11,89. Peningkatan persentase daktilitas per­pindahan kolom C-1C terhadap C-1 adalah 64,48%, 108,74% dan 118,68% masing-masing untuk zona sendi plastis, setengah tinggi efektif kolom dan setinggi efektif kolom.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Abutments: Resin-Bonded Glass Fiber-Reinforced Versus Titanium.

    Bassi, Mirko Andreasi; Bedini, Rosells; Pecci, Raffaela; Ioppolo, Pietro; Laritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The clinical success and longevity of endosseous implants, after their prosthetic finalization, mainly depends on mechanical factors. Excessive mechanical stress has been shown to cause initial bone loss around implants in the presence of a rigid implant-prosthetic connection. The implant abutments are manufactured with high elastic modulus materials such as titanium, steel, precious alloys, or esthetic ceramics. These materials do not absorb any type of shock from the chewing loads or ensure protection of the bone-implant interface, especially when the esthetic restorative material is ceramic rather than composite resin. The mechanical resistance to cyclical load was evaluated in a tooth-colored fiber-reinforced abutment prototype (TCFRA) and compared to that of a similarly shaped titanium abutment (TA). Eight TCFRAs and eight TAs were adhesively cemented on as many titanium implants. The swinging the two types of abutments showed during the application of sinusoidal load was also analyzed. In the TA group, fracture and deformation occurred in 12.5% of samples, while debonding occurred in 62.5%. In the TCFRA group, only debonding was present, in 37.5% of samples. In comparison to the TAs, the TCFRAs exhibited greater swinging during the application of sinusoidal load. In the TA group extrusion prevailed, whereas in the TCFRA group intrusion was more frequent. TCFRA demonstrated a greater elasticity than did TAs to the flexural load, absorbing part of the transversal load applied on the fixture during the chewing function and thus reducing the stress on the bone-implant interface.

  11. Mechanical properties of resin glass fiber-reinforced abutment in comparison to titanium abutment

    Andreasi Bassi, Mirko; Bedini, Rossella; Pecci, Raffella; Ioppolo, Pietro; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: So far, definitive implant abutments have been performed with high elastic modulus materials, which prevented any type of shock absorption of the chewing loads and as a consequence, the protection of the bone-fixture interface. This is particularly the case when the esthetic restorative material chosen is ceramic rather than composite resin. The adoption of an anisotropic abutment, characterized by an elastic deformability, could allow decreasing the impulse of chewing forces transmitted to the crestal bone. Materials and Methods: According to research protocol, the mechanical resistance to cyclical load was evaluated in a tooth-colored fiber-reinforced abutment (TCFRA) prototype and compared to that of a titanium abutment (TA), thus eight TCFRAs and eight TAs were adhesively cemented on as many titanium implants. The swinging that the two types of abutments showed during the application of sinusoidal load was also analyzed. Results: In the TA group, both fracture and deformation occurred in 12.5% of samples while debonding 62.5%. In the TCFRA group, only debonding was present in 37.5% of samples. In comparison to the TAs, the TCFRAs exhibited a greater swinging during the application of sinusoidal load. In the TA group, the extrusion prevailed, whereas in the TCFRA group, the intrusion was more frequent. Conclusion: The greater elasticity of TCFRA to the flexural load allows absorbing part of the transversal load applied on the fixture during the chewing function, thus reducing the stress on the bone-implant interface. PMID:26229266

  12. Modeling and Measurement of Sustained Loading and Temperature-Dependent Deformation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bonded to Concrete.

    Jeong, Yoseok; Lee, Jaeha; Kim, WooSeok

    2015-01-29

    This paper aims at presenting the effects of short-term sustained load and temperature on time-dependent deformation of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bonded to concrete and pull-off strength at room temperature after the sustained loading period. The approach involves experimental and numerical analysis. Single-lap shear specimens were used to evaluate temperature and short-term sustained loading effects on time-dependent behavior under sustained loading and debonding behavior under pull-off loading after a sustained loading period. The numerical model was parameterized with experiments on the concrete, FRP, and epoxy. Good correlation was seen between the numerical results and single-lap shear experiments. Sensitivity studies shed light on the influence of temperature, epoxy modulus, and epoxy thickness on the redistribution of interfacial shear stress during sustained loading. This investigation confirms the hypothesis that interfacial stress redistribution can occur due to sustained load and elevated temperature and its effect can be significant.

  13. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  14. A new type of smart basalt fiber-reinforced polymer bars as both reinforcements and sensors for civil engineering application

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Shen, Sheng

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, a new type of smart basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) bar is developed and their sensing performance is investigated by using the Brillouin scattering-based distributed fiber optic sensing technique. The industrial manufacturing process is first addressed, followed by an experimental study on the strain, temperature and fundamental mechanical properties of the BFRP bars. The results confirm the superior sensing properties, in particular the measuring accuracy, repeatability and linearity through comparing with bare optical fibers. Results on the mechanical properties show stable elastic modulus and high ultimate strength. Therefore, the smart BFRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as strengthening and upgrading structures. Moreover the coefficient of thermal expansion for smart BFRP bars is similar to the value for concrete.

  15. A new type of smart basalt fiber-reinforced polymer bars as both reinforcements and sensors for civil engineering application

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Shen, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of smart basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) bar is developed and their sensing performance is investigated by using the Brillouin scattering-based distributed fiber optic sensing technique. The industrial manufacturing process is first addressed, followed by an experimental study on the strain, temperature and fundamental mechanical properties of the BFRP bars. The results confirm the superior sensing properties, in particular the measuring accuracy, repeatability and linearity through comparing with bare optical fibers. Results on the mechanical properties show stable elastic modulus and high ultimate strength. Therefore, the smart BFRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as strengthening and upgrading structures. Moreover the coefficient of thermal expansion for smart BFRP bars is similar to the value for concrete

  16. Effect of oil palm empty fruit bunches fibers reinforced polymer recycled

    Hermawan, B.; Nikmatin, S.; Sudaryanto; Alatas, H.; Sukaryo, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research is to process the OPEFB to become fiber with various sizes which will be used as a filler of polymer matrix recycled acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Molecular analysis and mechanical test have been done to understand the influence of fiber size toward material capability to receive outer deformation. Single screw extruder formed a biocomposites granular continued with injection moulding to shaped test pieces. Maleic anhydride was added as coupling agent between filler and matrix. Filler concentration were 10 and 20% in fiber size respectively with constant additif. Two kind of fiber glass (10%) were used as comparator. In order to analyze the results of the mechanical test Fisher least significant difference (LSD) in ANOVA method was performed (-with α=0,05-).

  17. RETROVIT KOLOM PENDEK BETON BERTULANG PERSEGI DENGAN PERKUATAN EKSTERNAL CARBON FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER DI BAWAH PENGARUH PEMBEBANAN SIKLIK

    Agus Sulistiawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrofit of non-slender square concrete column with an external strength­ener of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP under the influence of cyclic load. The purpose of this study is to know the increase of strength and ductility of a column structure element that has an initial damage, then it is fixed and strengthened by CFRP external strengthening. The column structure element is tested by giving a constant axial load and varying the cyclic load using a displacement control. In this research, two specimens t are used, C-1 column (original column and C-1RC column (retrofit column. The results of the study show that (1 the effectiveness of the C-1CR’s restraint and moment of force are increased by 1.58 times and 52.78% compared to the C-1’s ones, and (2 the installation of CFRP reinforcement increases the strength in accepting lateral load by 52.15% and decreases of ductility by 52.12%.   Tujuan penelitian ini mengetahui peningkatan kekuatan dan daktilitas ele­men struktur kolom yang mengalami kerusakan awal, kemudian diperbaiki, dan diperkuat dengan perkuatan eksternal carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP. Pengujian ter­hadap elemen struktur kolom dilakukan dengan memberikan beban aksial yang konstan dan memvariasikan beban siklik dengan kontrol perpindahan. Dalam penelitian ini digunakan dua spesimen yaitu kolom C-1 (kolom original dan kolom C-1RC (kolom retrofit. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan (1 efektifitas pengekangan C-1CR meningkat 1,58 kali dan kekuatan terhadap momen meningkat sebesar 52,78% dibanding kolom C-1, dan (2  pemasangan perkuatan CFRP memberikan peningkatan kekuatan dalam menerima beban lateral sebesar 52,15% dan penurunan daktilitas sebesar -52,12%.

  18. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (poptimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  19. EFFECT OF GAMMA RAY IRRADIATION ON INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS AT 77 K

    Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Izumi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    It is known that an organic material is damaged by gamma ray irradiation, and the strength after irradiation has dependence on the gamma ray dose. These issues are important not only to make global understanding of electric insulating performance of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) under irradiation condition but also to develop new insulation materials. This paper presents the dependence of fracture mode and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) on the material and the gamma ray irradiation effect on the fracture mode and the ILSS. 6 mm radius loading nose and supports were used to prompt ILS fracture for a short beam test. A 2.5 mm thick small specimen machined out of a 13 mm thick G-10CR GFRP plate (sliced specimen) showed lower ILSS and translaminar shear (TLS) fracture, although the same size specimen prepared from a 2.5 mm G-10CR GFRP plate (non-sliced specimen) showed ILS fracture and the higher ILSS. Both type of specimens showed the degradation of ILSS after gamma ray irradiation. The fracture mode of the non-sliced specimen changed from ILS to TLS fracture and no bending fracture was observed. The resistance to shear deformation of glass cloth/epoxy laminate structure would be damaged by the irradiation

  20. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2016-03-08

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact-prone automotive structures. However, basic mechanical properties and corresponding damage of IPP and GFIPP at different rates, which are of keen interest in the material development stage and numerical tool validation, have not been reported. Here, we applied monotonic and cyclic tensile loads to IPP and GFIPP at different strain rates (0.001/s, 0.01/s and 0.1/s) to study the mechanical properties, failure modes and the damage parameters. We used monotonic and cyclic tests to obtain mechanical properties and define damage parameters, respectively. We also used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to visualize the failure mode. We found that IPP generally exhibits brittle fracture (with relatively low failure strain of 2.69-3.74%) and viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior. GFIPP [90]8 is generally insensitive to strain rate due to localized damage initiation mostly in the matrix phase leading to catastrophic transverse failure. In contrast, GFIPP [±45]s is sensitive to the strain rate as indicated by the change in shear modulus, shear strength and failure mode.

  1. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric behavior of banana–glass hybrid fiber reinforced polyester composites.

    Pothan, LA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites of glass and banana fiber (obtained from the pseudo stem of Musa sapientum) in polyester matrix, are subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis over a range of temperature and three different frequencies. The effect of temperature...

  2. Development of high radiation-resistant glass fiber reinforced plastics with cyanate-based resin for superconducting magnet systems

    Idesaki, Akira, E-mail: idesaki.akira@qst.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Watanuki 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nakamoto, Tatsushi [Cryogenic Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimada, Akihiko [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Watanuki 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Iio, Masami; Sasaki, Kenichi; Sugano, Michinaka [Cryogenic Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Makida, Yasuhiro [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ogitsu, Toru [Cryogenic Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • GFRPs for superconducting magnet systems were developed. • Cyanate-based resins were used for GFRPs as matrices. • Radiation resistance was evaluated based on gas evolution and mechanical properties. • GFRP with bismaleimide-triazine resin exhibited excellent radiation resistance. - Abstract: Glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) with cyanate ester resin/epoxy resin, bismaleimide resin/epoxy resin, and bismaleimide-triazine resin as matrices were developed for the superconducting magnet systems used in high intensity accelerators. The radiation resistance of these GFRPs was evaluated based on their gas evolution and changes in their mechanical properties after gamma-ray irradiation with dose of 100 MGy in vacuum at ambient temperature. After irradiation, a small amount of gas was evolved from all of the GFRPs, and a slight decrease in mechanical properties was observed compared with the conventional epoxy resin-GFRP, G10. Among the GFRPs, the smallest amount of gas (6 × 10{sup −5} mol/g) was evolved from the GFRP with the bismaleimide-triazine resin, which also retained more than 88% of its flexural strength after 100 MGy irradiation; this GFRP is thus considered the most promising material for superconducting magnet systems.

  3. Interface enhancement of glass fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites with flame-synthesized carbon nanotubes and its enhancing mechanism.

    Liao, Lingmin; Wang, Xiao; Fang, Pengfei; Liew, Kim Meow; Pan, Chunxu

    2011-02-01

    Interface enhancement with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provides a promising approach for improving shock strength and toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites. The effects of incorporating flame-synthesized CNTs (F-CNTs) into GFRP were studied, including on hand lay-up preparation, microstructural characterization, mechanical properties, fracture morphologies, and theoretical calculation. The experimental results showed that: (1) the impact strength of the GFRP modified by F-CNTs increased by more than 15% over that of the GFRP modified by CNTs from chemical vapor deposition; and (2) with the F-CNT enhancement, no interfacial debonding was observed at the interface between the fiber and resin matrix on the GFRP fracture surface, which indicated strong adhesive strength between them. The theoretical calculation revealed that the intrinsic characteristics of the F-CNTs, including lower crystallinity with a large number of defects and chemical functional groups on the surface, promoted their surface activity and dispersibility at the interface, which improved the interfacial bond strength of GFRP.

  4. Investigation of mechanical properties of hemp/glass fiber reinforced nano clay hybrid composites

    Unki, Hanamantappa Ningappa; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    Over the last twenty to thirty years composite materials have been used in engineering field. Composite materials possess high strength, high strength to weight ratio due to these facts composite materials are becoming popular among researchers and scientists. The major proportion of engineering materials consists of composite materials. Composite materials are used in vast applications ranging from day-to-day household articles to highly sophisticated applications. In this paper an attempt is made to prepare three different composite materials using e-glass and Hemp. In this present investigation hybrid composite of Hemp, Glass fiber and Nano clay will be prepared by Hand-layup technique. The glass fiber used in this present investigation is E-glass fiber bi-directional: 90˚ orientation. The composite samples will be made in the form of a Laminates. The wt% of nanoclay added in the preparation of sample is 20 gm constant. The fabricated composite Laminate will be cut into corresponding profiles as per ASTM standards for Mechanical Testing. The effect of addition of Nano clay and variation of Hemp/glass fibers will be studied. In the present work, a new Hybrid composite is developed in which Hemp, E glass fibers is reinforced with epoxy resin and with Nano clay.

  5. The effect of silanated and impregnated fiber on the tensile strength of E-glass fiber reinforced composite retainer

    Niswati Fathmah Rosyida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fiber reinforced composite (FRC is can be used in dentistry as an orthodontic retainer. FRC  still has a limitations because of to  a weak bonding between fibers and matrix. Purpose: This research was aimed to evaluate the effect of silane as coupling agent and fiber impregnation on the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Methods: The samples of this research were classified into two groups each of which consisted of three subgroups, namely the impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane and the non-impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane. The tensile strength was measured by a universal testing machine. The averages of the tensile strength in all groups then were compared by using Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney post hoc tests. Results: The averages of the tensile strength (MPa in the impregnated fiber group can be known as follow; original impregnated fiber (26.60±0.51, 1x addition of silane (43.38±4.42, and 2x addition of silane (36.22±7.23. The averages of tensile strength (MPa in the non-impregnated fiber group can also be known as follow; original non-impregnated fiber (29.38±1.08, 1x addition of silane (29.38±1.08, 2x addition of silane (12.48±2.37. Kruskal Wallis test showed that there was a significant difference between the impregnated fiber group and the non-impregnated fiber group (p<0.05. Based on the results of post hoc test, it is also known that the addition of silane in the impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the increasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC (p<0.05, while the addition of silane in the non-impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the decreasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the addition of silane in the non-silanated fiber group can increase the tensile strength of E-glass FRC, but the addition of silane in the silanated fiber group can

  6. Abrasion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Waste-Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Roller-compacted Concrete

    Yildizel, S. A.; Timur, O.; Ozturk, A. U.

    2018-05-01

    The potential use of waste glass fibers in roller-compacted concrete (RCC) was investigated with the aim to improve its performance and reduce environmental effects. The research was focused on the abrasion resistance and compressive and flexural strengths of the reinforced concrete relative to those of reference mixes without fibers. The freeze-thaw resistance of RCC mixes was also examined. It was found that the use of waste glass fibers at a rate of 2 % increased the abrasion resistance of the RCC mixes considerably.

  7. Interlaminar/interfiber failure of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced composites used for wind turbine blades

    Leong, Martin Klitgaard; Overgaard, Lars C. T.; M. Daniel,, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    A unidirectional glass fiber/epoxy composite was characterized under multi-axial loading by testing off-axis specimens under uniaxial tension and compression at various angles relative to the fiber direction. Iosipescu shear tests were performed with both symmetric and asymmetric specimens. Tests...

  8. Semiempirical Methodology for Estimating the Service Life of Concrete Deck Panels Strengthened with Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Eon-Kyoung Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deterioration of concrete bridge decks affects their durability, safety, and function. It is therefore necessary to conduct structural rehabilitation of damaged concrete decks by strengthening them with fiber-reinforced polymer. Of the recent studies on the strengthened structures, most have focused on static behavior; only a few studies have investigated fatigue behavior. Accurate analysis of fatigue in concrete deck performance requires a more realistic simulated moving load. This study developed a theoretical live-load model to reflect the effect of moving vehicle loads, based on a statistical approach to the measurement of real traffic loads over various time periods in Korea. It assessed the fatigue life and strengthening effect of bridge decks strengthened with either carbon fiber sheets or grid carbon fiber polymer plastic using probabilistic and reliability analyses. It used extrapolations and simulations to derive maximum load effects for time periods ranging from 1 day to 75 years. Limited fatigue tests were conducted and probabilistic and reliability analyses were carried out on the strengthened concrete bridge deck specimens to predict the extended fatigue life. Analysis results indicated that strengthened concrete decks provide sufficient resistance against increasing truck loads during the service life of a bridge.

  9. Multiscale probabilistic modeling of a crack bridge in glass fiber reinforced concrete

    Rypla R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces a probabilistic approach to simulating the crack bridging effects of chopped glass strands in cement-based matrices and compares it to a discrete rigid body spring network model with semi-discrete representation of the chopped strands. The glass strands exhibit random features at various scales, which are taken into account by both models. Fiber strength and interface stress are considered as random variables at the scale of a single fiber bundle while the orientation and position of individual bundles with respect to a crack plane are considered as random variables at the crack bridge scale. At the scale of the whole composite domain, the distribution of fibers and the resulting number of crack-bridging fibers is considered. All the above random effects contribute to the variability of the crack bridge performance and result in size-dependent behavior of a multiply cracked composite.

  10. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide

    Kim, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Won; Seo, Tae-Il

    2013-01-01

    Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this stud...

  11. Optimization for Tribological Properties of Glass Fiber-Reinforced PTFE Composites with Grey Relational Analysis

    Firojkhan Pathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most recent history shows that polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE is widely used as antifrictional materials in industry for wide speed range. A high antifriction property of PTFE makes it suitable for dry friction bearing. Main disadvantage of using PTFE is its high wear rate, so extensive research had been carried out to improve the wear resistance with addition of filler material. This study focuses on four input parameters load, sliding speed, sliding distance, and percentage of glass fiber as a filler material. Taguchi method was used for experimentation; each parameter is having 3 levels with L27 orthogonal array. Grey relational analysis is used to convert multiple response parameters, namely, wear and coefficient of friction, into single grey relation grade. The optimal input parameters were selected based on the S/N ratio. It was observed that load 3 kg, sliding speed 5.1836 m/s (900 rpm, sliding distance 2 km, and 15% of glass fiber are optimal input parameters for PTFE without significantly affecting the wear rate and coefficient of friction.

  12. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad, E-mail: engr.hammad.aziz03@gmail.com; Omar, Nor Sharifah [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  13. Microstructural aspects in steel fiber reinforced acrylic emulsion polymer modified concrete

    Hazimmah, Dayang; Ayob, Afizah; Sie Yee, Lau; Chee Cung, Wong

    2018-03-01

    Scanning electron microscope observations of polymer-free and polymer-modified cements have shown that the polymer particles are partitioned between the inside of hydrates and the surface of anhydrous cement grains. For optimum dosage of acrylic emulsion polymer with 2.5%, the C-S-H gel in this structure is finer and more acicular. Some polymer adheres or deposit on the surface of the C-S-H gel. The presence of acrylic emulsion polymer confines the ionic diffusion so that the Ca(OH)2 crystallized locally to form fine crystals. The void in the structures seems to be smaller but no polymer films appears to be bridging the walls of pores although many polymer bonds or C-S-H spread into the pore spaces. In addition to porosity reduction, acrylic emulsion polymer modified the hydration products in the steel fiber -matrix ITZ. The hydration product C-S-H appeared as a needle like shape. The needle-shaped C-S-H increases and gradually formed the gel, with needles growing into the pore space. The phenomenon is more obvious as curing age increased.

  14. Microstructural aspects in steel fiber reinforced acrylic emulsion polymer modified concrete

    Hazimmah Dayang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscope observations of polymer-free and polymer-modified cements have shown that the polymer particles are partitioned between the inside of hydrates and the surface of anhydrous cement grains. For optimum dosage of acrylic emulsion polymer with 2.5%, the C-S-H gel in this structure is finer and more acicular. Some polymer adheres or deposit on the surface of the C-S-H gel. The presence of acrylic emulsion polymer confines the ionic diffusion so that the Ca(OH2 crystallized locally to form fine crystals. The void in the structures seems to be smaller but no polymer films appears to be bridging the walls of pores although many polymer bonds or C-S-H spread into the pore spaces. In addition to porosity reduction, acrylic emulsion polymer modified the hydration products in the steel fiber –matrix ITZ. The hydration product C-S-H appeared as a needle like shape. The needle-shaped C-S-H increases and gradually formed the gel, with needles growing into the pore space. The phenomenon is more obvious as curing age increased.

  15. Weather ability studies of phenolic resin coated woods and glass fiber reinforced laminates

    Munir, A.; Hussain, R.; Rizvi, M.H.; Ahmed, F.

    1997-01-01

    Phenolic resins have made a major breakthrough in the field of high technology in 80's. These are now active participants of h igh tech' areas ranging from electronics, computers, communication, outer space, aerospace, advanced materials, bio materials and technology. A phenol - formaldehyde (1:1.5) resin having resin content of 70% synthesized in the laboratory has been applied for wood coating and reinforcing glass fiber. The weatherability and solvent resistance of these items have been studied and results discussed keeping in view the envisaged application for structural materials and chemical equipment. The toxic materials released during contact with solvents for chemical applications and during degradation general have been monitored. The results are discussed with reference to environmental pollution due to these resins and their composites under different conditions. (authors)

  16. Glass fiber reinforced polyester in the works of Tous and Fargas

    D. Hernández Falagán

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The architects Enric Tous (1925; t 1952 and Josep Maria Fargas (1926-2011, t 1952 achieved remarkable success during the 1960s and 1970s thanks to their commitment to technical experimentation and exploration of new construction systems. Among their most significant contributions is the incorporation of polyester reinforced with glass fiber as a material applied to solutions of light facades. This article tracks the origin, context, and results they obtained with this material. We propose an approach to the GRC material through the experience developed by the architects, analyzing the characteristics and specific implications of the systems proposed in their projects. Through this reading, the industrial initiative implemented by Tous and Fargas is put into value, and the key aspects that limited the progression of the construction system are detected.

  17. Effect of implant design and bioactive glass coating on biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite implants.

    Ballo, Ahmed M; Akca, Eralp; Ozen, Tuncer; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Närhi, Timo

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of implant design and bioactive glass (BAG) coating on the response of bone to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants. Three different FRC implant types were manufactured for the study: non-threaded implants with a BAG coating; threaded implants with a BAG coating; and threaded implants with a grit-blasted surface. Thirty-six implants (six implants for each group per time point) were installed in the tibiae of six pigs. After an implantation period of 4 and 12 wk, the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), push-out testing, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Micro-CT demonstrated that the screw-threads and implant structure remained undamaged during the installation. The threaded FRC/BAG implants had the highest bone volume after 12 wk of implantation. The push-out strengths of the threaded FRC/BAG implants after 4 and 12 wk (463°N and 676°N, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the threaded FRC implants (416°N and 549°N, respectively) and the nonthreaded FRC/BAG implants (219°N and 430°N, respectively). Statistically significant correlation was found between bone volume and push-out strength values. This study showed that osseointegrated FRC implants can withstand the static loading up to failure without fracture, and that the addition of BAG significantly improves the push-out strength of FRC implants. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. Influence of Hygrothermal Aging on Poisson’s Ratio of Thin Injection-Molded Short Glass Fiber-Reinforced PA6

    Thomas Illing; Heinrich Gotzig; Marcus Schoßig; Christian Bierögel; Wolfgang Grellmann

    2016-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging of short glass fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 materials (PA6 GF) represents a major problem, especially in thin-walled components, such as in the automotive sector. In this study, therefore, the thickness and the glass fiber content of PA6 GF materials were varied and the materials were exposed to hygrothermal aging. The temperature and relative humidity were selected in the range from −40 °C up to 85 °C, and from 10% up to 85% relative humidity (RH). In the dry-as-molded...

  19. Deformation behavior of carbon-fiber reinforced shape-memory-polymer composites used for deployable structures (Conference Presentation)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Li, Fengfeng; Pan, Chengtong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a new type of smart material, they perform large reversible deformation with a certain external stimulus (e.g., heat and electricity). The properties (e.g., stiffness, strength and other mechanically static or quasi-static load-bearing capacity) are primarily considered for conventional resin-based composite materials which are mainly used for structural materials. By contrast, the mechanical actuating performance with finite deformation is considered for the shape memory polymers and their composites which can be used for both structural materials and functional materials. For shape memory polymers and their composites, the performance of active deformation is expected to further promote the development in smart active deformation structures, such as deployable space structures and morphing wing aircraft. The shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) are also one type of High Strain Composite (HSC). The space deployable structures based on carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) show great prospects. Considering the problems that SMPCs are difficult to meet the practical applications in space deployable structures in the recent ten years, this paper aims to research the mechanics of deformation, actuation and failure of SMPCs. In the overall view of the shape memory polymer material's nonlinearity (nonlinearity and stress softening in the process of pre-deformation and recovery, relaxation in storage process, irreversible deformation), by the multiple verifications among theory, finite element and experiments, one obtains the deformation and actuation mechanism for the process of "pre-deformation, energy storage and actuation" and its non-fracture constraint domain. Then, the parameters of SMPCs will be optimized. Theoretical analysis is realized by the strain energy function, additionally considering the interaction strain energy between the fiber and the matrix. For the common resin-based or soft

  20. Bond-Slip Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bar in Concrete Subjected to Simulated Marine Environment: Effects of BFRP Bar Size, Corrosion Age, and Concrete Strength

    Yongmin Yang; Zhaoheng Li; Tongsheng Zhang; Jiangxiong Wei; Qijun Yu

    2017-01-01

    Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) bars have bright potential application in concrete structures subjected to marine environment due to their superior corrosion resistance. Available literatures mainly focused on the mechanical properties of BFRP concrete structures, while the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars, which is a key factor influencing the safety and service life of ocean concrete structures, has not been clarified yet. In this paper, effects of BFRP bars size, corrosion age, and c...

  1. Active vortex generator deployed on demand by size independent actuation of shape memory alloy wires integrated in fiber reinforced polymers

    Hübler, M.; Nissle, S.; Gurka, M.; Wassenaar, J.

    2016-04-01

    Static vortex generators (VGs) are installed on different aircraft types. They generate vortices and interfuse the slow boundary layer with the fast moving air above. Due to this energizing, a flow separation of the boundary layer can be suppressed at high angles of attack. However the VGs cause a permanently increased drag over the whole flight cycle reducing the cruise efficiency. This drawback is currently limiting the use of VGs. New active VGs, deployed only on demand at low speed, can help to overcome this contradiction. Active hybrid structures, combining the actuation of shape memory alloys (SMA) with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) on the materials level, provide an actuation principle with high lightweight potential and minimum space requirements. Being one of the first applications of active hybrid structures from SMA and FRP, these active vortex generators help to demonstrate the advantages of this new technology. A new design approach and experimental results of active VGs are presented based on the application of unique design tools and advanced manufacturing approaches for these active hybrid structures. The experimental investigation of the actuation focuses on the deflection potential and the dynamic response. Benchmark performance data such as a weight of 1.5g and a maximum thickness of only 1.8mm per vortex generator finally ensure a simple integration in the wing structure.

  2. Development of a self-stressing NiTiNb shape memory alloy (SMA)/fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch

    El-Tahan, M; Dawood, M; Song, G

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a self-stressing patch using a combination of shape memory alloys (SMAs) and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Prestressed carbon FRP patches are emerging as a promising alternative to traditional methods to repair cracked steel structures and civil infrastructure. However, prestressing these patches typically requires heavy and complex fixtures, which is impractical in many applications. This paper presents a new approach in which the prestressing force is applied by restraining the shape memory effect of NiTiNb SMA wires. The wires are subsequently embedded in an FRP overlay patch. This method overcomes the practical challenges associated with conventional prestressing. This paper presents the conceptual development of the self-stressing patch with the support of experimental observations. The bond between the SMA wires and the FRP is evaluated using pull-out tests. The paper concludes with an experimental study that evaluates the patch response during activation subsequent monotonic tensile loading. The results demonstrate that the self-stressing patch with NiTiNb SMA is capable of generating a significant prestressing force with minimal tool and labor requirements. (paper)

  3. Experimental Study of Concrete-filled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Tube with Internal Reinforcement under Axially Loading

    Wenbin SUN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparing with the circular concrete columns confined with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP wrap or tube, the rectilinear confined columns were reported much less. Due to the non-uniform distribution of confining pressure in the rectilinear confined columns, the FRP confinement effectiveness was significant reduced. This paper presents findings of an experimental program where nine prefabricated rectangular cross-section CFRP tubes with CFRP integrated crossties filled concrete to form concrete-filled FRP tube (CFFT short columns and three plain concrete control specimens were tested. All specimens were axially loaded until failure. The rest results showed that the stress-strain curves of CFFTs consisted of two distinct branches, an ascending branch before the concrete peak stress was reaches and a second branch that terminated when the tube ruptured, and that the CFFTs with integrated crossties experienced most uniform confinement pressure distribution. Test research also found that the stress-strain curves of CFFTs indicated an increase in ductility. These demonstrate that this confinement system can produce higher lateral confinement stiffness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6035

  4. ASCE application guide for recommended practice for fiber-reinforced polymer products for overhead utility line structures

    Gnandt, E. [T and D High Voltage Consulting, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The participants to the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) prepared an application guide to provide guidelines to utilities and manufacturers on topics ranging from design to manufacture, testing and installation of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) products. The intent was also to help utilities with a possible replacement material for wood, steel and pre-stressed concrete. FRP products are constructed from fiber and resin and offer several advantages such as light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio, low maintenance, dimensional stability, resistance to rot, corrosion, chemicals and pest damage. FRP products can be used for lighting poles, ladders and grating, transformer pads, pole line hardware and crossarms, and other applications. There are five structural configurations: (1) cantilevered structures (single pole), (2) guyed structures, framed structures (H-Frame), (4) a combination of (1), (2), and (3), and (5) lattice structures (transmission class). The author listed some of the initial considerations: physical characteristics, guying and grounding, deflection and load testing, attached items, and durability to name only a few. The materials and manufacturing processes were briefly explained, namely the pultrusion method, the filament winding method, and the centrifugal casting method. Design loads considerations are discussed, as are performance-based criteria such as mechanical, coating durability and electrical. Quality control, assembly erection and storage, and in-service considerations are also discussed. The author concluded the presentation with a section dealing with field inspections. figs.

  5. Coupling of a structural analysis and flow simulation for short-fiber-reinforced polymers: property prediction and transfer of results

    Kröner, C.; Altenbach, H.; Naumenko, K.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the basic theories of interfaces able to transfer the results of an injection molding analyis of fiber-reinforced polymers, performed by using the commercial computer code Moldflow, to the structural analysis program ABAQUS. The elastic constants of the materials, such as Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio, which depend on both the fiber content and the degree of fiber orientation, were calculated not by the usual method of "orientation averaging," but with the help of linear functions fitted to experimental data. The calculation and transfer of all needed data, such as material properties, geometry, directions of anisotropy, and so on, is performed by an interface developed. The interface is suit able for midplane elements in Moldflow. It calculates and transfers to ABAQUS all data necessary for the use of shell elements. In addition, a method is described how a nonlinear orthotropic behavior can be modeled starting from the generalized Hooke's law. It is also shown how such a model can be implemented in ABAQUS by means of a material subroutine. The results obtained according to this subroutine are compared with those based on an orthotropic, linear, elastic simulation.

  6. The Effect of Thermooxidative Aging on the Durability of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy

    Amin Khajeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin-skinned organic matrix composites within aeronautical structures are subjected to thermooxidative aging during their service life, leading to reductions in their durability. In this paper, a durability evaluation of fiberglass epoxy prepreg is performed on the original composite thickness before and after 800 h isothermal aging at 82°C. The characterization of both aged and unaged composites comprised tensile tests, DMA, FTIR, weight loss measurements, SEM, and DSC. The tensile strength and modulus of the composites increased after being exposed to pronounced aging conditions, whereas a decrease was observed in the toughness. DMA results revealed that the glass transition temperature and rubbery state modulus increased as a result of the thermooxidative aging. FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated the formation of carbonyl compounds due to oxidation of the chemical structure of the resin. SEM observations indicated the existence of minor superficial cracking and poor fiber-matrix adhesion after aging. In addition, a minor mass change was observed from mass loss monitoring methods. The overall findings suggest that postcuring and physical aging enhanced the brittleness of the resin, leading to a significant decline in the useful structural life of the thin-skinned composite.

  7. Micromechanical analysis of a hybrid composite—effect of boron carbide particles on the elastic properties of basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite

    Krishna Golla, Sai; Prasanthi, P.

    2016-11-01

    A fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is an important material for structural application. The diversified application of FRP composites has become the center of attention for interdisciplinary research. However, improvements in the mechanical properties of this class of materials are still under research for different applications. The reinforcement of inorganic particles in a composite improves its structural properties due to their high stiffness. The present research work is focused on the prediction of the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites where continuous fibers are reinforced in a micro boron carbide particle mixed polypropylene matrix. The effectiveness of the addition of 30 wt. % of boron carbide (B4C) particle contributions regarding the longitudinal and transverse properties of the basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite at various fiber volume fractions is examined by finite element analysis (FEA). The experimental approach is the best way to determine the properties of the composite but it is expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the finite element method (FEM) and analytical methods are the viable methods for the determination of the composite properties. The FEM results were obtained by adopting a micromechanics approach with the support of FEM. Assuming a uniform distribution of reinforcement and considering one unit-cell of the whole array, the properties of the composite materials are determined. The predicted elastic properties from FEA are compared with the analytical results. The results suggest that B4C particles are a good reinforcement for the enhancement of the transverse properties of basalt fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  8. Weathering effects on tensile and stress rupture strength of glass fiber reinforced vinylester and epoxy thermoset pipes

    Nizamuddin, Syed

    Glass fiber reinforced vinylester (GFRE) and epoxy (GFRE) pipes have been used for more than three decades to mitigate corrosion problems in oil fields, chemical and industrial plants. In these services, both GFRV and GFRE pipes are exposed to various environmental conditions. Long-term mechanical durability of these pipes after exposure to environmental conditions, which include natural weathering exposure to seasonal temperature variation, sea water, humidity and other corrosive fluids like crude oil, should be well known. Although extensive research has been undertaken, several major issues pertaining to the performance of these pipes under a number of environmental conditions still remain unresolved. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of natural weathering, combined natural weathering with seawater and crude oil exposure, for time periods ranging from 3 to 36 months respectively, on the tensile and stress rupture behavior of GFRV and GFRE pipes. Ring specimens are machined from GFRV and GFRE pipes and tested before and after exposure to different weathering conditions prevalent in the eastern region (Dhahran) of Saudi Arabia and present under service conditions. The natural weathering and combined natural weathering with crude oil exposure of GFRV specimens revealed increased tensile strength even after 36 months of exposure when compared with that of the as received samples. However, the combined natural weathering with seawater exposure of GFRV samples revealed better tensile behavior till 24 months of exposure, and after 36 months their tensile strength was seen to be below that of the as received GFRV samples. The stress rupture behavior of natural weather exposed GFRV samples showed an improvement after 12 months of exposure and it decreased after 24 and 36 months of exposure when compared with the as received GFRV samples. The combined natural weathering with crude oil and seawater exposure of GFRV sample revealed improved

  9. Improvement of the Shock Absorption Ability of a Face Guard by Incorporating a Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic and Buffering Space

    Wada, Takahiro; Churei, Hiroshi; Takayanagi, Haruka; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Uo, Motohiro

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shock absorption ability of trial face guards (FGs) incorporating a glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GF) and buffering space. The mechanical properties of 3.2 mm and 1.6 mm thick commercial medical splint materials (Aquaplast, AP) and experimental GF prepared from 1.6 mm thick AP and fiberglass cloth were determined by a three-point bending test. Shock absorption tests were conducted on APs with two different thicknesses and two types of experimental mate...

  10. Anisotropic Dielectric Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites during Microwave Curing

    Zhang, Linglin; Li, Yingguang; Zhou, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Microwave cuing technology is a promising alternative to conventional autoclave curing technology in high efficient and energy saving processing of polymer composites. Dielectric properties of composites are key parameters related to the energy conversion efficiency during the microwave curing process. However, existing methods of dielectric measurement cannot be applied to the microwave curing process. This paper presented an offline test method to solve this problem. Firstly, a kinetics model of the polymer composites under microwave curing was established based on differential scanning calorimetry to describe the whole curing process. Then several specially designed samples of different feature cure degrees were prepared and used to reflect the dielectric properties of the composite during microwave curing. It was demonstrated to be a feasible plan for both test accuracy and efficiency through extensive experimental research. Based on this method, the anisotropic complex permittivity of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite during microwave curing was accurately determined. Statistical results indicated that both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the composite increased at the initial curing stage, peaked at the maximum reaction rate point and decreased finally during the microwave curing process. Corresponding mechanism has also been systematically investigated in this work.

  11. Microstructural characterization of PAN based carbon fiber reinforced nylon 6 polymer composites

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    Microstructural characterization of nylon 6/polyacrolonitrile based carbon fibers (PAN-CFs) of 10 to 40 wt% has been performed by positron lifetime technique (PLT). The positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime (τ3), o-Ps intensity (I3) and fractional free volume (Fv) of nylon 6/PAN-CF composites are correlated with the mechanical properties viz., Tensile strength and Young's modulus. The Fv show negative deviation with the reinforcement of 10 to 40 wt% of PAN-CF from the linear additivity relation. The negative deviation in nylon 6/PAN-CF composite suggests the induced molecular packing due to the chemical interaction between the polymeric chains of nylon 6 and PAN-CF. This is evident from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) studies. The FTIR results suggests that observed negative deviation in PALS results of nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to the induced chemical interaction at N-H-O sites. The improved tensile strength (TS) and Young's modulus (YM) in nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to AS4C (surface treated and epoxy coated) PAN-CF has shown highest adhesion level due to better stress transfer between nylon 6 and PAN-CF.

  12. Structural Foaming at the Nano-, Micro-, and Macro-Scales of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    2012-10-29

    structural porosity at MNM scales could be introduced into the matrix, the carbon fiber reinforcement, and during prepreg lamination processing, without...areas, including fibers. Furthermore, investigate prepreg thickness and resin content effects on the thermomechanical performance of laminated ...Accomplishment 4) 5 Develop constitutive models for nano- foamed and micro- foamed PMC systems from single ply prepreg to multilayer laminated

  13. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study.

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins.

  14. A study on the crushing behavior of basalt fiber reinforced composite structures

    Pandian, A.; Veerasimman, A. P.; Vairavan, M.; Francisco, C.; Sultan, M. T. H.

    2016-10-01

    The crushing behavior and energy absorption capacity of basalt fiber reinforced hollow square structure composites are studied under axial compression. Using the hand layup technique, basalt fiber reinforced composites were fabricated using general purpose (GP) polyester resin with the help of wooden square shaped mould of varying height (100 mm, 150 mm and 200 mm). For comparison, similar specimens of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites were also fabricated and tested. Axial compression load is applied over the top end of the specimen with cross head speed as 2 mm/min using Universal Testing Machine (UTM). From the experimental results, the load-deformation characteristics of both glass fiber and basalt fiber composites were investigated. Crashworthiness and mode of collapse for the composites were determined from load-deformation curve, and they were then compared to each other in terms of their crushing behaviors.

  15. Prospective study on cranioplasty with individual carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) implants produced by means of stereolithography.

    Wurm, Gabriele; Tomancok, Berndt; Holl, Kurt; Trenkler, Johannes

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cranial implants produced by means of 3-dimensional (3D) stereolithography (SL) and template modeling for reconstructions of complex or extensive cranial defects. A series of 41 cranioplasties with individual CFRP implants was performed in 37 patients between April 1996 and November 2002. Only patients with complex and/or large cranial defects were included, most of them having extended scarring or dural calcification and poor quality of the overlying soft-tissue cover after infection or multiple preceding operations. Involvement of frontal sinus, a known risk factor for complications after cranioplasty, was the case in 21 patients (51.2%). A computer-based 3D model of the skull with the bony defect was generated by means of stereolithography after acquisition, evaluation and transfer of the patient's helical computed tomography (CT) data. A wax template of the defect that was used to design the individual prosthesis-shape was invested in dental stone. Then, the cranial implant was fabricated out of CFRP by loosen mold. Reconstruction of defects measuring up to 17 x 9 cm was performed. The intra-operative fit of the implants was excellent in 36 (87.8%), good in 1 (2.4%), and fair in 4 (9.8%) of the cases. Problems of implant fit occurred because of extended scarring and poor quality of soft-tissue cover. Adverse reactions were observed in 5 patients (1 subdural, 1 subcutaneous hematoma, 2 infections, 1 allergic reaction). Excellent contours and a solid stable reconstruction have been maintained in 30 out of 35 remaining plates (mean follow-up 3.6 years). No adverse effects concerning postoperative imaging, the accuracy of electroencephalograms and radiation therapy have been observed. The authors believe that this relatively new technique represents an advance in the management of complex and large cranial defects, but seems less suitable for simple defects because of cost

  16. Cyclic behavior, development, and characteristics of a ductile hybrid fiber-reinforced polymer (DHFRP) for reinforced concrete members

    Hampton, Francis Patrick

    Reinforced concrete (R/C) structures especially pavements and bridge decks that constitute vital elements of the infrastructure of all industrialized societies are deteriorating prematurely. Structural repair and upgrading of these structural elements have become a more economical option for constructed facilities especially in the United States and Canada. One method of retrofitting concrete structures is the use of advanced materials. Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials typically are in the form of fabric sheets or reinforcing bars. While the strength and stiffness of the FRP is high, composites are inherently brittle, with limited or no ductility. Conventional FRP systems cannot currently meet ductility demand, and therefore, may fail in a catastrophic failure mode. The primary goal of this research was to develop an optimized prototype 10-mm diameter DHFRP bar. The behavior of the bar under full load reversals to failure was investigated. However, this bar first needed to be designed and manufactured in the Fibrous Materials Research at Drexel University. Material properties were determined through testing to categorize the strength properties of the DHFRP. Similitude was used to demonstrate the scaling of properties from the original model bars. The four most important properties of the DHFRP bars are sufficient strength and stiffness, significant ductility for plasticity to develop in the R/C section, and sufficient bond strength for the R/C section to develop its full strength. Once these properties were determined the behavior of reinforced concrete members was investigated. This included the testing of prototype-size beams under monotonic loading and model and prototype beam-columns under reverse cyclic loading. These tests confirmed the large ductility exhibited by the DHFRP. Also the energy absorption capacity of the bar was demonstrated by the hysteretic behavior of the beam-columns. Displacement ductility factors in the range of 3

  17. Effects of endodontic post surface treatment, dentin conditioning, and artificial aging on the retention of glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts.

    Albashaireh, Zakereyya S; Ghazal, Muhamad; Kern, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Several post surface treatments with or without the application of a bonding agent have been recommended to improve the bond strength of resin cements to posts. A regimen that produces the maximum bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts has not been verified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of post surface conditioning methods and artificial aging on the retention and microleakage of adhesively luted glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts. Seventy-two endodontically treated single-rooted teeth were prepared for glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts. The posts were submitted to 3 different surface treatments (n=24), including no treatment, etching with phosphoric acid, and airborne-particle abrasion. Subgroups of the posts (n=8) were then allocated for 3 different experimental conditions: no artificial aging, no bonding agent; no artificial aging, bonding agent; or artificial aging, bonding agent. The posts were luted with resin cement (Calibra). Post retention was measured in tension at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. The posts assigned for microleakage investigation were placed in fuchsin dye for 72 hours. The dislodged posts and the post spaces were examined microscopically to evaluate the mode of failure and explore the microleakage. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). The mean (SD) retention values for test groups ranged from 269 (63.8) to 349 (52.2) N. The retention values of the airborne-particle-abrasion group were significantly higher than those of the acidic-treatment and no-treatment groups. The application of bonding agent on the post surface produced no significant influence on retention. The mean retention values after artificial aging were significantly higher than without artificial aging. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated that the failure mode was primarily mixed. Treating the surface of the posts with phosphoric acid for 15 seconds before cementation

  18. Automatic design of the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams using fiber reinforced polymers (FRP - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i2.8318

    Rafael Alves de Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Changing the functions of a building, the presence of some design or construction errors, the incidence of seismic actions and even the updating of design codes may demand the strengthening of certain structures. In the specific case of reinforced concrete structures it is desirable the application of a technique of strengthening which is fast, economic and efficient, in order to provide advantages when an intervention is necessary. The technique of strengthening chosen must provide less disorder as possible as well as the guaranty of safety. Taking into account this scenery, fiber reinforced polymers have been working as a very attractive alternative for rehabilitating in-service structures. In that way, the present study aims at presenting the main properties of this new material as well as the design routines for flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams. Finally, a package-software developed into the MATLAB platform is presented, intending to generate a simple tool for the automatic design using fiber reinforced polymers.

  19. Finite-Element Investigation of the Structural Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP- Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC Decks Slabs in Thompson Bridge

    Lingzhu Zhou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for a sustainable development and improved whole life performance of concrete infrastructure has led to the requirement of more durable and sustainable concrete bridges alongside accurate predictive analysis tools. Using the combination of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC with industrial by-products and fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP, reinforcement is anticipated to address the concerns of high carbon footprint and corrosion in traditional steel-reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a numerical investigation of the structural behavior of basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP-reinforced SCC deck slabs in a real bridge, named Thompson Bridge, constructed in Northern Ireland, U.K. A non-linear finite element (FE model is proposed by using ABAQUS 6.10 in this study, which is aimed at extending the previous investigation of the field test in Thompson Bridge. The results of this field test were used to validate the accuracy of the proposed finite element model. The results showed good agreement between the test results and the numerical results; more importantly, the compressive membrane action (CMA inside the slabs could be well demonstrated by this FE model. Subsequently, a series of parametric studies was conducted to investigate the influence of different parameters on the structural performance of the deck slabs in Thompson Bridge. The results of the analyses are discussed, and conclusions on the behavior of the SCC deck slabs reinforced by BFRP bars are presented.

  20. Effect of short fiber reinforcement on the properties of recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate)/poly(ethylene naphthalate) blends

    Karsli, Nevin Gamze; Yesil, Sertan; Aytac, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Short fiber reinforcement to the r-PET/PEN blend improved to the tensile strength. ► Fiber reinforcement increased the storage modulus of r-PET/PEN blend. ► CF reinforced composite has the highest storage modulus value. - Abstract: In this study, short carbon (CF), glass (GF) and hybrid carbon/glass fiber reinforced recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate)/poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) (r-PET/PEN) blends were prepared by melt mixing method. The mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of composites were investigated by using tensile tests, differential scanning calorimeter, dynamic mechanical analyzer and scanning electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis showed that there is a better interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix for CF reinforced composite. It was found that addition of short fiber reinforcement to the r-PET/PEN blend improved the tensile strength and Young’s modulus values more than the addition of PEN into r-PET. According to DMA analysis, fiber reinforcement increased the storage modulus of composites when compared with r-PET/PEN blend and among them storage modulus of CF reinforced composite was the highest. It was concluded that mechanical properties of r-PET can be enhanced with addition of PEN and more efficiently with short fiber reinforcement

  1. Influence of the Processing Parameters on the Fiber-Matrix-Interphase in Short Glass Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics

    Anna Katharina Sambale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interphase in short fiber thermoplastic composites is defined as a three-dimensional, several hundred nanometers-wide boundary region at the interface of fibers and the polymer matrix, exhibiting altered mechanical properties. This region is of key importance in the context of fiber-matrix adhesion and the associated mechanical strength of the composite material. An interphase formation is caused by morphological, as well as thermomechanical processes during cooling of the plastic melt close to the glass fibers. In this study, significant injection molding processing parameters are varied in order to investigate the influence on the formation of an interphase and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. The geometry of the interphase is determined using nano-tribological techniques. In addition, the influence of the glass fiber sizing on the geometry of the interphase is examined. Tensile tests are used in order to determine the resulting mechanical properties of the produced short fiber composites. It is shown that the interphase width depends on the processing conditions and can be linked to the mechanical properties of the short fiber composite.

  2. Nanoscaled boehmites' modes of action in a polymer and its carbon fiber reinforced plastic under compression load; Wirkungsweisen nanoskaliger Boehmite in einem Polymer und seinem Kohlenstofffaserverbund unter Druckbelastung

    Arlt, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Increasing ecological awareness as well as quality and safety demands, which are present, for instance, in the aerospace and automotive sectors, lead to the need to use more sophisticated and more effective materials. For that purpose, laminates of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), which are manufactured by injection technology, are reinforced with boehmite particles. This doping strengthens the laminates, whose original properties are weaker than prepregs. Besides the shear strength, compression strength and the damage tolerance, the mode of action of the nanoparticles in resin and in CRFP is also analyzed. It thereby reveals that the hydroxyl groups and even more a taurine modification of the boehmites' surface after the elementary polymer morphology. Consequently a new flow and reaction comportment, lower glass transition temperatures and shrinkage, as well as a changed mechanical behavior occur. Due to a structural upgrading of the matrix (higher shear stiffness, reduced residual stress), a better fiber-matrix adhesion, and differing crack paths, the boehmite nanoparticles move the degradation barrier of the material to higher loadings, thus resulting in considerably upgraded new CFRP. (orig.)

  3. Multi-layer porous fiber-reinforced composites for implants: in vitro calcium phosphate formation in the presence of bioactive glass.

    Nganga, Sara; Zhang, Di; Moritz, Niko; Vallittu, Pekka K; Hupa, Leena

    2012-11-01

    Glass-fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs), based on bifunctional methacrylate resin, have recently shown their potential for use as durable cranioplasty, orthopedic and oral implants. In this study we suggest a multi-component sandwich implant structure with (i) outer layers out of porous FRC, which interface the cortical bone, and (ii) inner layers encompassing bioactive glass granules, which interface with the cancellous bone. The capability of Bioglass(®) 45S5 granules (100-250μm) to induce calcium phosphate formation on the surface of the FRC was explored by immersing the porous FRC-Bioglass laminates in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 28d. In both static (agitated) and dynamic conditions, bioactive glass granules induced precipitation of calcium phosphate at the laminate surfaces as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The proposed dynamic flow system is useful for the in vitro simulation of bone-like apatite formation on various new porous implant designs containing bioactive glass and implant material degradation. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of screw holes and gamma sterilization on properties of phosphate glass fiber-reinforced composite bone plates.

    Han, Na; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Harper, Lee; Scotchford, Colin A; Scammell, Brigitte E; Rudd, Chris D

    2013-05-01

    Polymers prepared from polylactic acid (PLA) have found a multitude of uses as medical devices. For a material that degrades, the main advantage is that an implant would not necessitate a second surgical event for removal. In this study, fibers produced from a quaternary phosphate-based glass (PBG) in the system 50P2O5-40CaO-5Na2O-5Fe2O3 were used to reinforce PLA polymer. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of screw holes in a range of PBG-reinforced PLA composites with varying fiber layup and volume fraction. The flexural properties obtained showed that the strength and modulus values increased with increasing fiber volume fraction; from 96 MPa to 320 MPa for strength and between 4 GPa and 24 GPa for modulus. Furthermore, utilizing a larger number of thinner unidirectional (UD) fiber prepreg layers provided a significant increase in mechanical properties, which was attributed to enhanced wet out and thus better fiber dispersion during production. The effect of gamma sterilization via flexural tests showed no statistically significant difference between the sterilized and nonsterilized samples, with the exception of the modulus values for samples with screw holes. Degradation profiles revealed that samples with screw holes degraded faster than those without screw holes due to an increased surface area for the plates with screw holes in PBS up to 30 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed fiber pullout before and after degradation. Compared with various fiber impregnation samples, with 25% volume fraction, 8 thinner unidirectional prepreg stacked samples had the shortest fiber pull-out lengths in comparison to the other samples investigated.

  5. Influence of Thin-Film Adhesives in Pullout Tests Between Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2018-01-01

    Strips of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) were bonded together using multiple thin film adhesives and their mechanical strengths were evaluated under pullout test configuration. Tensile and lap shear tests were conducted to confirm the deformation of SMAs at room temperature and to evaluate the adhesive strength between the NiTi strips and the PMC. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the interfacial bonding after failure. Simple equations on composite tensile elongation were used to fit the experimental data on tensile properties. ABAQUS models were generated to show the effects of enhanced bond strength and the distribution of stress in SMA and PMC. The results revealed that the addition of thin film adhesives increased the average adhesive strength between SMA and PMC while halting the room temperature shape memory effect within the pullout specimen.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of compactness of concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tubes using piezoceramic transducers and time difference of arrival

    Xu, Yang; Luo, Mingzhang; Hei, Chuang; Song, Gangbing

    2018-03-01

    Owing to its light weight and corrosion resistance, the concrete-filled fiber-reinforced polymer tube (CFFT) structure has a broad application prospect; the concrete compactness is key to the strength of CFFTs. To meet the urgent requirement of compactness monitoring of CFFTs, a quantitative method, which uses an array of four equally spaced piezoceramic patches and an ultrasonic time difference of arrival (TDOA) algorithm, is developed. Since the velocity of the ultrasonic wave propagation in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) material is about half of that in concrete material, the compactness condition of CFFT impacts the piezoceramic-induced wave propagation in the CFFT, and differentiates the TDOA for different receivers. An important condition is the half compactness, which can be judged by the Half Compactness Indicator (HCI) based on the TDOAs. To characterize the difference of stress wave propagation durations from the emitter to different receivers, which can be utilized to calculate the concrete infill compactness, the TDOA ratio (TDOAR) is introduced. An innovative algorithm is developed in this paper to estimate the compactness of the CFFT using HCI and TDOAR values. Analytical, numerical, and experimental studies based on a CFFT with seven different states of compactness (empty, 1/10, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 9/10, and full) are carried out in this research. Analyses demonstrate that there is a good agreement among the analytical, numerical, and experimental results of the proposed method, which employs a piezoceramic transducer array and the TDOAR for quantitative estimating the compactness of concrete infill in a CFFT.

  7. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  8. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  9. Effect of rare earth hypophosphite and melamine cyanurate on fire performance of glass-fiber reinforced poly(1,4-butylene terephthalate) composites

    Yang, Wei; Tang, Gang; Song, Lei; Hu, Yuan; Yuen, Richard K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We synthesize and characterize two types of rare earth hypophosphite (REHP). ► REHP and melamine cyanurate are used as flame retardants. ► We prepare fire retarded glass-fiber/poly(1,4-butylene terephthalate) composites. ► The flammability of these composites is significantly reduced. - Abstract: This work mainly deals with a novel flame retardant system for glass-fiber reinforced poly(1,4-butylene terephthalate) (GRPBT) composites using trivalent rare earth hypophosphite (REHP) and melamine cyanurate (MC) through melt blending method. Firstly, two types of REHP, lanthanum hypophosphite and cerium hypophosphite, were synthesized and characterized. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to investigate the thermal decomposition behavior of REHP and flame retardant treated GRPBT composites. Thermal combustion properties were measured using microscale combustion calorimeter. Fire performance was evaluated by limiting oxygen index, Underwriters Laboratories 94 and cone calorimeter. The results showed that the flammability of GRPBT is significantly reduced by the incorporation of the flame retardant mixture. Mechanism analysis revealed that the addition of MC reduces the condensed phase effect of REHP, but improves the flame inhibition in gas phase.

  10. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  11. Seawater infiltration effect on thermal degradation of fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    Ibrahim, Mohd Haziq Izzuddin bin; Hassan, Mohamad Zaki bin; Ibrahim, Ikhwan; Rashidi, Ahmad Hadi Mohamed; Nor, Siti Fadzilah M.; Daud, Mohd Yusof Md

    2018-05-01

    Seawater salinity has been associated with the reduction of polymer structure durability. The aim of this study is to investigate the change in thermal degradation of fiber reinforced epoxy composite due to the presence of seawater. Carbon fiber, carbon/kevlar, fiberglass, and jute that reinforced with epoxy resin was laminated through hand-layup technique. Initially, these specimen was sectioned to 5×5 mm dimension, then immersed in seawater and distilled water at room temperature until it has thoroughly saturated. Following, the thermal degradation analysis using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), the thermic changes due to seawater infiltration was defined. The finding shows that moisture absorption reduces the glass transition temperature (Tg) of fiber reinforced epoxy composite. However, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of seawater infiltrated laminate composite is compareable with distilled water infiltrated laminate composite. The carbon fiber reinfored epoxy has the highest glass transition temperature out of all specimen.

  12. Glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for use in metal-free removable partial dentures: combined effects of fiber loading and pigmentation on color differences and flexural properties.

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Nagakura, Manamu; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2018-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effects of fiber loading and pigmentation on the color differences and flexural properties of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTPs), for use in non-metal clasp dentures (NMCDs). The GFRTPs consisted mainly of E-glass fibers, a polypropylene matrix, and a coloring pigment: the GFRTPs with various fiber loadings (0, 10, and 20mass%) and pigmentations (0, 1, 2, and 4mass%) were fabricated by using an injection molding. The color differences of GFRTPs were measured based on the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) Lab color system, by comparing with a commercially available NMCD. The flexural properties of GFRTPs were evaluated by using a three-point bending test, according to International Standards Organization (ISO) specification number 20795-1. The visible colors of GFRTPs with pigment contents of 2mass% were acceptable for gingival color, and the glass fibers harmonized well with the resins. The ΔE* values of the GFRTPs with pigment contents of 2mass% obtained by using the CIE Lab system were lowest at all fiber loadings. For GFRTPs with fiber contents of 10 and 20mass% at 2mass% pigment content, these GFRTPs surpassed the ISO 20795-1 specification regarding flexural strength (> 60MPa) and modulus (> 1.5GPa). A combination of the results of color difference evaluation and mechanical examination indicates that the GFRTPs with fiber contents of 10 or 20mass%, and with pigment contents of 2mass% have acceptable esthetic appearance and sufficient rigidity for NMCDs. Copyright © 2018 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modification of a Phenolic Resin with Epoxy- and Methacrylate-Functionalized Silica Sols to Improve the Ablation Resistance of Their Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Yu Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized silica sols were obtained by the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPMS, (γ-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPMS and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS. Three different sols were obtained: MPS (derived from MPMS and TEOS, GPS-MPS (derived from GPMS, MPMS and TEOS, and GPSD (derived from GPMS, TEOS and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA. These silica sols were mixed with a phenolic resin (PR. Ethylenediamine was used as a hardener for epoxy-functionalized sols and benzoyl peroxide was used as an initiator of the free-radical polymerization of methacrylate-functionalized silica sols. Glass fiber-reinforced composites were obtained from the neat PR and MPS-PR, GPS-MPS-PR and GPSD-PR. The resulting composites were evaluated as ablation resistant materials in an acetylene-oxygen flame. A large increase in the ablation resistance was observed when the PR was modified by the functionalized silica sols. The ablation resistance of the composites decreased as follows: GPSD-PR > MPS-PR > GPS-MPS-PR > PR.

  14. Effects of Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of CVD SiC Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1996-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC(f)(SCS-6) fiber-reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites containing various volume fractions, approximately 16 to 40 volume %, of fibers were fabricated by hot pressing at 1400 C for 2 h under 27.6 MPa. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase formed, with complete absence of the undesired hexacelsian phase, in the matrix. Room temperature mechanical properties were measured in 3-point flexure. The matrix microcracking stress and the ultimate strength increased with increase in fiber volume fraction, reached maximum values for V(sub f) approximately equal to 0.35, and degraded at higher fiber loadings. This degradation in mechanical properties is related to the change in failure mode, from tensile at lower V(sub f) to interlaminar shear at higher fiber contents. The extent of fiber loading did not have noticeable effect on either fiber-matrix debonding stress, or frictional sliding stress at the interface. The applicability of micromechanical models in predicting the mechanical properties of the composites was also examined. The currently available theoretical models do not appear to be useful in predicting the values of the first matrix cracking stress, and the ultimate strength of the SCS-6/SAS composites.

  15. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves.

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m -2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  16. Statistical and Detailed Analysis on Fiber Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete Containing Admixtures- A State of Art of Review

    Athiyamaan, V.; Mohan Ganesh, G.

    2017-11-01

    Self-Compacting Concrete is one of the special concretes that have ability to flow and consolidate on its own weight, completely fill the formwork even in the presence of dense reinforcement; whilst maintaining its homogeneity throughout the formwork without any requirement for vibration. Researchers all over the world are developing high performance concrete by adding various Fibers, admixtures in different proportions. Various different kinds Fibers like glass, steel, carbon, Poly propylene and aramid Fibers provide improvement in concrete properties like tensile strength, fatigue characteristic, durability, shrinkage, impact, erosion resistance and serviceability of concrete[6]. It includes fundamental study on fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete with admixtures; its rheological properties, mechanical properties and overview study on design methodology statistical approaches regarding optimizing the concrete performances. The study has been classified into seven basic chapters: introduction, phenomenal study on material properties review on self-compacting concrete, overview on fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete containing admixtures, review on design and analysis of experiment; a statistical approach, summary of existing works on FRSCC and statistical modeling, literature review and, conclusion. It is so eminent to know the resent studies that had been done on polymer based binder materials (fly ash, metakaolin, GGBS, etc.), fiber reinforced concrete and SCC; to do an effective research on fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete containing admixtures. The key aim of the study is to sort-out the research gap and to gain a complete knowledge on polymer based Self compacting fiber reinforced concrete.

  17. Toughening Effect of Microscale Particles on the Tensile and Vibration Properties of S-Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Erkliğ, A.; Bulut, M.; Fayzulla, B.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of borax, sewage sludge ash, silicon carbide, and perlite microparticles on the tensile, damping, and vibration characteristics of S-glass/epoxy composite laminates was examined Their damping and vibration properties were evaluated experimentally by using the dynamic modal analysis, identifying the response of the fundamental natural frequency to the type and weight content of the particulates. The results obtained showed that the introduction of specific amounts of such particulates into the matrix of S-glass/epoxy composite noticeably improved its mechanical properties.

  18. Characterization of cure kinetics and physical properties of a high performance, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy prepreg and a novel fluorine-modified, amine-cured commercial epoxy

    Bilyeu, Bryan

    Kinetic equation parameters for the curing reaction of a commercial glass fiber reinforced high performance epoxy prepreg composed of the tetrafunctional epoxy tetraglycidyl 4,4-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM), the tetrafunctional amine curing agent 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) and an ionic initiator/accelerator, are determined by various thermal analysis techniques and the results compared. The reaction is monitored by heat generated determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by high speed DSC when the reaction rate is high. The changes in physical properties indicating increasing conversion are followed by shifts in glass transition temperature determined by DSC, temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC), step scan DSC and high speed DSC, thermomechanical (TMA) and dynamic mechanical (DMA) analysis and thermally stimulated depolarization (TSD). Changes in viscosity, also indicative of degree of conversion, are monitored by DMA. Thermal stability as a function of degree of cure is monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The parameters of the general kinetic equations, including activation energy and rate constant, are explained and used to compare results of various techniques. The utilities of the kinetic descriptions are demonstrated in the construction of a useful time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram and a continuous heating transformation (CHT) diagram for rapid determination of processing parameters in the processing of prepregs. Shrinkage due to both resin consolidation and fiber rearrangement is measured as the linear expansion of the piston on a quartz dilatometry cell using TMA. The shrinkage of prepregs was determined to depend on the curing temperature, pressure applied and the fiber orientation. Chemical modification of an epoxy was done by mixing a fluorinated aromatic amine (aniline) with a standard aliphatic amine as a curing agent for a commercial Diglycidylether of Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy. The resulting cured network

  19. Influence of Coating with Some Natural Based Materials on the Erosion Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    Aseel Basim Abdul Hussein; Emad Saadi AL-Hassani; Reem Alaa Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, composites were prepared by Hand lay-up molding. The composites constituents were epoxy resin as a matrix, 6% volume fractions of glass fibers (G.F) as reinforcement and 3%, 6% volume fractions of preparation natural material (Rice Husk Ash, Carrot Powder, and Sawdust) as filler. Studied the erosion wear behavior and coating by natural wastes (Rice Husk Ash) with epoxy resin after erosion. The results showed the non – reinforced epoxy have lower resistance erosion than n...

  20. Effects of sea water environment on glass fiber reinforced plastic materials used for marine civil engineering constructions

    Garcia-Espinel, J.D.; Castro-Fresno, D.; Parbole Gayo, P.; Ballester-Muñoz, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Seawater environment over composite material that are suitable for civil applications. • Seawater intake is linked to tensile and flexural strength degradation in GFC. • Fatigue performance of glass composites is similar in seawater environment than in air. - Abstract: Glass fiber composites (GFRP) are common in civil engineering projects, but not in marine structures. One reason is that seawater effects degrade GFRP composites mechanical properties and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). Here, influence of seawater environment is studied to determine the best composite materials for marine civil engineer applications, studying the influence of several factors in their mechanical properties. This is to determine safety factors to use in the design of structural calculations for marine applications. Glass/epoxy composites are the safest materials to use in marine civil structures as mechanical properties degradation becomes stabilized after moisture saturation level. UV and water cyclic analysis must be done to determine affection to transversal strength. Only vinylester GFRP has problems with biodegradation. GFRP fatigue performance is not influenced by seawater environment

  1. Field survey and laboratory tests on composite materials case of GRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester tubes for water suply

    Radu Hariga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Moldova land, were made two lines of water adduction, having 6000 m length and 40 m slope, or 1/150 slope. The water supply component tubes were disposed under the plant: The tubes are made of glass – reinforced thermosetting plastics (GRP. After about 180 days of operation, one of the lines showed severe deterioration of the quality pipe components. This paper deals with some laboratory tests in order to detect the failure cases of the pipelines components.

  2. Effect of mixed adhesive joints and tapered plate on stresses in retrofitted beams bonded with a fiber-reinforced polymer plate

    Bouchikhi, A.S.; Megueni, A.; Gouasmi, S.; Boukoulda, F.B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Interface stress distribution in beams reinforced composites jointed by homogeneous adhesive. • The reduction of stresses interfaces by using the tapered plate at edges. • The reduction of stresses interfaces by using the bi-adhesive. • The reduction of stresses interfaces by combining between the tapered plate and the bi-adhesive. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the reduction of interfacial stresses when using bonded laminates in strengthening existing structures. The presence of high interfacial stresses that develop near the end of composite known as edge effect may compromise the résistance to failure of strengthened structure. It is known that the decrease of plate thickness and fitness of adhesive (Young modulus) reduces the stress concentration at plate ends. Another way to tackle the problem is proper design of the plate end shape (tapered plate) and using mixed adhesive joints (MAJs) between the adherents. In this paper, a comprehensive finite element (FE) study has been conducted to investigate the effect of mixed adhesive joints (MAJs) and tapering plate on the interfacial stress distribution in the adhesive layer in retrofitted steel beam with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) plate, This results indicate that using the correct combination of tapering plate at the end and mixed adhesive joints can reduce the magnitude of the interfacial stresses significantly

  3. Machinability study of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer in the longitudinal and transverse direction and optimization of process parameters using PSO–GSA

    K. Shunmugesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composites are widely used in aerospace industry in lieu of its high strength to weight ratio. This study is an attempt to evaluate the machinability of Bi-Directional Carbon Fiber–Epoxy composite and optimize the process parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and drill tool material. Machining trials were carried using drill bits made of high speed steel, TiN and TiAlN at different cutting speeds and feed rates. Output parameters of thrust force and torque were monitored using Kistler multicomponent dynamometer 9257B and vibrations occurring during machining normal to the work surface were measured by a vibration sensor (Dytran 3055B. Linear regression analysis was carried out by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM, to correlate the input and output parameters in drilling of the composite in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The optimization of process parameters were attempted using Genetic Algorithm (GA and Particle Swarm Optimization–Gravitational Search Algorithm (PSO–GSA techniques.

  4. Seismic Retrofitting: Reinforced Concrete (RC shear wall versus Reinforcement of RC element by Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP using PUSHOVER analysis

    Yahya RIYAD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Seismic retrofitting of constructions vulnerable to earthquakes is a current problem of great political and social relevance. During the last sixty years, moderate to severe earthquakes have occurred in Morocco (specifically in Agadir 1960 and Hoceima 2004. Such events have clearly shown the vulnerability of the building stock in particular and of the built environment in general. Hence, it is very much essential to retrofit the vulnerable building to cope up for the next damaging earthquake. In this paper, the focus will be on a comparative study between two techniques of seismic retrofitting, the first one is a reinforcement using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP applied to RC elements by bonding , and the second one is a reinforcement with a shear wall. For this study, we will use a non-linear static analysis -also known as Pushover analysis - on a reinforced concrete structure consisting of beams and columns, and composed from eight storey with a gross area of 240 m², designed conforming to the Moroccan Seismic code[1].

  5. Finite strain anisotropic elasto-plastic model for the simulation of the forming and testing of metal/short fiber reinforced polymer clinch joints at room temperature

    Dean, A.; Rolfes, R.; Behrens, A.; Bouguecha, A.; Hübner, S.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.

    2017-10-01

    There is a strong trend in the automotive industry to reduce car body-, chassis- and power-train mass in order to lower carbon emissions. More wide spread use of lightweight short fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) is a promising approach to attain this goal. This poses the challenge of how to integrate new SFRP components by joining them to traditional sheet metal structures. Recently (1), the clinching technique has been successfully applied as a suitable joining method for dissimilar material such as SFRP and Aluminum. The material pairing PA6GF30 and EN AW 5754 is chosen for this purpose due to their common application in industry. The current contribution presents a verification and validation of a finite strain anisotropic material model for SFRP developed in (2) for the FE simulation of the hybrid clinching process. The finite fiber rotation during forming and separation, and thus the change of the preferential material direction, is represented in this model. Plastic deformations in SFRP are considered in this model via an invariant based non-associated plasticity formulation following the multiplicative decomposition approach of the deformation gradient where the stress-free intermediate configuration is introduced. The model allows for six independent characterization curves. The aforementioned material model allows for a detailed simulation of the forming process as well as a simulative prediction of the shear test strength of the produced joint at room temperature.

  6. A review of the application Acoustic Emission (AE) incorporating mechanical approach to monitor Reinforced concrete (RC) strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) properties under fracture

    Syed Mazlan, S. M. S.; Abdullah, S. R.; Shahidan, S.; Noor, S. R. Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Concrete durability may be affected by so many factors such as chemical attack and weathering action that reduce the performance and the service life of concrete structures. Low durability Reinforced concrete (RC) can be greatly improved by using Fiber Reinforce Polymer (FRP). FRP is a commonly used composite material for repairing and strengthening RC structures. A review on application of Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques of real time monitoring for various mechanical tests for RC strengthened with FRP involving four-point bending, three-point bending and cyclic loading was carried out and discussed in this paper. Correlations between each AE analyses namely b-value, sentry and intensity analysis on damage characterization also been critically reviewed. From the review, AE monitoring involving RC strengthened with FRP using b-value, sentry and intensity analysis are proven to be successful and efficient method in determining damage characterization. However, application of AE analysis using sentry analysis is still limited compared to b-value and intensity analysis in characterizing damages especially for RC strengthened with FRP specimen.

  7. Bond-Slip Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bar in Concrete Subjected to Simulated Marine Environment: Effects of BFRP Bar Size, Corrosion Age, and Concrete Strength

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP bars have bright potential application in concrete structures subjected to marine environment due to their superior corrosion resistance. Available literatures mainly focused on the mechanical properties of BFRP concrete structures, while the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars, which is a key factor influencing the safety and service life of ocean concrete structures, has not been clarified yet. In this paper, effects of BFRP bars size, corrosion age, and concrete strength on the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars in concrete cured in artificial seawater were investigated, and then an improved Bertero, Popov, and Eligehausen (BPE model was employed to describe the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars in concrete. The results indicated that the maximum bond stress and corresponding slip decreased gradually with the increase of corrosion age and size of BFRP bars, and ultimate slip also decreased sharply. The ascending segment of bond-slip curve tends to be more rigid and the descending segment tends to be softer after corrosion. A horizontal end in bond-slip curve indicates that the friction between BFRP bars and concrete decreased sharply.

  8. A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    2012-07-01

    5 Figure 5. (a) (Left) Results showing optimal compaction of an E-glass (similar compaction to S-Glass) laminate at approximately 350...repeatability and a lack in dimensional tolerances versus prepreg composites fabricated in an autoclave. However, recent advancements in process understanding...structure, and while high fvf composite laminates are attainable in autoclave processing, these techniques may not be cost effective (10–15). The out

  9. The LHC Cryomagnet Supports in Glass-Fiber Reinforced Epoxy A Large Scale Industrial Production with High Reproducibility in Performance

    Poncet, A; Trigo, J; Parma, V

    2008-01-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production. The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004. This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance.

  10. THE LHC CRYOMAGNET SUPPORTS IN GLASS-FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY: A LARGE SCALE INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION WITH HIGH REPRODUCIBILITY IN PERFORMANCE

    Poncet, A.; Struik, M.; Parma, V.; Trigo, J.

    2008-01-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production.The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004.This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance

  11. The Effect of Temperature and Nanoclay on the Low Velocity and Ballistic Behavior of Woven Glass-Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Patrin, Lauren

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of nanoclay and temperature on the behavior of woven glass-fabric reinforced epoxy composite under low velocity and ballistic impacts. The materials used in manufacturing the composite were S2 (6181) glass-fibers, epoxy resin (EPON 828), hardener (Epikure 3230), nanoclay and Heloxy 61 modifier. The nanoclay addition was 0%, 1%, 3% and 5% by weight, with respect to the resin. All specimens were manufactured at the City College facilities using vacuum infusion. Tensile tests were conducted to characterize the material and obtain the Young's modulus, ultimate stress, failure strain, Poisson's ratio, shear modulus and shear strength and their variation with nanoclay percentage and temperature. The tests were conducted at room temperature (21°C/70°F), -54°C (-65°F), -20°C (-4°F), 49°C (120°F) and 71°C (160°F). Next composite specimens with 0%, 1%, 3% and 5% nanoclay by weight, with respect to the resin, were subjected to low velocity impact at the previously specified temperatures to determine dynamic force, displacement and energy correlations. The extent of damage was studied using the ultrasound technique. Then ballistic tests were conducted on the nanoclay infused specimens at room temperature to obtain the ballistic limit (V50) and the damage behavior of the composite. The dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) software LS-DYNA was used to model and simulate the results of low velocity impact tests. Good agreement was obtained between experimental and numerical (FEA) results. Analytical analyses were undertaken to compare the results from the tensile experiments. The finite element analysis (FEA) allowed for further analytical comparison of the results. The FEA platform used was LS-DYNA due to its proficient dynamic and damage capabilities in composite materials. The FEA was used to model and simulate the low velocity impacts and compare the results to experiments.

  12. Improvement of the Shock Absorption Ability of a Face Guard by Incorporating a Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic and Buffering Space

    Takahiro Wada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the shock absorption ability of trial face guards (FGs incorporating a glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GF and buffering space. The mechanical properties of 3.2 mm and 1.6 mm thick commercial medical splint materials (Aquaplast, AP and experimental GF prepared from 1.6 mm thick AP and fiberglass cloth were determined by a three-point bending test. Shock absorption tests were conducted on APs with two different thicknesses and two types of experimental materials, both with a bottom material of 1.6 mm thick AP and a buffering space of 30 mm in diameter (APS and with either (i 1.6 mm thick AP (AP-APS or (ii  1.6 mm thick GF (GF-APS covering the APS. The GF exhibited significantly higher flexural strength (64.4 MPa and flexural modulus (7.53 GPa than the commercial specimens. The maximum load of GF-APS was 75% that of 3.2 mm AP, which is widely used clinically. The maximum stress of the GF-APS only could not be determined as its maximum stress is below the limits of the analysis materials used (<0.5 MPa. Incorporating a GF and buffering space would enhance the shock absorption ability; thus, the shock absorption ability increased while the total thickness and weight decreased.

  13. New Fiber Reinforced Waterless Concrete for Extraterrestrial Structural Applications

    Toutanji, H.; Tucker, D.; Ethridge, E.

    2005-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction mate: iii an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water For the purpose of this paper it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, brick and beam elements. Glass fibers produced from regolith were used as a reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of the sulfur concrete. Glass fibers and glass rebar were produced by melting the lunar regolith simulant. Lunar regolith stimulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline 46100 high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600G. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The viability of sulfur concrete as a construction material for extraterrestrial application is presented. The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced sulfur concrete were investigated.

  14. Micromechanisms of damage in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    strength of a composite at the pre-critical load, while the fibers with randomly distributed strengths lead to the higher strength of the composite at post-critical loads. In the case of randomly distributed fiber strengths, the damage growth in fibers seems to be almost independent from the crack length...... in the numerical experiments. The effect of the statistical variability of fiber strengths, viscosity of the polymer matrix as well as the interaction between the damage processes in matrix, fibers and interface are investigated numerically. It is demonstrated that fibers with constant strength ensure higher......Numerical micromechanical investigations of the mechanical behavior and damage evolution of glass fiber reinforced composites are presented. A program code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical unit cell models of composites with damageable elements is developed, and used...

  15. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  16. Fiber reinforced polymer bridge decks.

    2011-01-01

    The overarching goal of this study was to perform a comprehensive evaluation of various issues related to the strength and serviceability : of the FRP deck panels that are available in the industry. Specific objectives were to establish critical limi...

  17. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  18. Carbon fiber reinforced materials - glass fiber reinforced materials

    Krautwald, R

    1980-10-01

    Wind power plants are promising alternative energy systems. The rotor blades are subject to high demands: Long life, light weight, and high stiffness. A GFRP/CFRP combination was chosen for a 316 kW plant, the composite construction is by far superior to the metal construction. Design, fabrication, and testing are described. The plant has a power of 316 kW for a wind velocity of 8.5 m/sec, a rotational speed of 37 min/sup -1/, a rotor diameter of 52 m with a blade length of 25.2 m and a blade mass of 1 t. An experimental component 10.2 m long was constructed and tested with satisfactory results.

  19. Structural Analysis of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Plastic Wind Turbine Blade

    Mengal Ali Nawaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Basalt fiber reinforced plastic (BFRP wind turbine blade was analyzed and compared with Glass fiber reinforced plastic blade (GFRP. Finite element analysis (FEA of blade was carried out using ANSYS. Data for FEA was obtained by using rule of mixture. The shell element in ANSYS was used to simulate the wind turbine blade and to conduct its strength analysis. The structural analysis and comparison of blade deformations proved that BFRP wind turbine blade has better strength compared to GFRP wind turbine blade.

  20. Radiation processing for carbon fiber-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene composite materials

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Morita, Yousuke

    2001-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of the fiber composites with crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a polymer matrix by radiation. The uni-directional carbon fiber-reinforced composites were fabricated with PTFE fine powder impregnation method and then crosslinked by electron beams irradiation under selective conditions. The carbon fiber-reinforced crosslinked PTFE composites show good mechanical properties compared with crosslinked PTFE. The radiation resistance of crosslinked PTFE composites is improved more than that of crosslinked resin without fiber. (author)

  1. Alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced high strength concrete in simulated aggressive environment; Hormigón de altas resistencia reforzado con fibras de vidrio resistentes a alcalis en ambientes agresivos simulados.

    Kwan, W.H.; Cheah, C.B.; Ramli, M.; Chang, K.Y.

    2018-04-01

    The durability of the alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) in three simulated aggresive environments, namely tropical climate, cyclic air and seawater and seawater immersion was investigated. Durability examinations include chloride diffusion, gas permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy examination (SEM). The fiber content is in the range of 0.6 % to 2.4 %. Results reveal that the specimen containing highest AR glass fiber content suffered severe strength loss in seawater environment and relatively milder strength loss under cyclic conditions. The permeability property was found to be more inferior with the increase in the fiber content of the concrete. This suggests that the AR glass fiber is not suitable for use as the fiber reinforcement in concrete is exposed to seawater. However, in both the tropical climate and cyclic wetting and drying, the incorporation of AR glass fiber prevents a drastic increase in permeability. [Spanish] Este trabajo se centra en el estudio de la durabilidad de hormigón reforzado con fibra de vidrio resistente a álcalis (CRFVRA) en tres ambientes agresivos simulados como son, condiciones de clima tropical, ciclos de aire y agua de mar e inmersión marina. Los tests de durabilidad incluyeron la difusión de cloruros, permeabilidad de gas, difracción de rayos X (XRD) y evaluacion por microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM). Los contenidos de fibra evaluados estuvieron en el rango desde 0.6% hasta 2.4%. Los resultados revelan que la muestra que contiene el mayor porcentaje de fibra sufre una severa pérdida de resistencia en condiciones de agua de mar, y una menor disminución de resistencia bajo condiciones cíclicas. Su permeabilidad disminuyó al incrementar el contenido de fibras en el hormigón. Lo anterior sugiere que el refuerzo con fibra resistente a alcalinos no es adecuado para su uso en hormigón en ambiente de agua de mar. Sin embargo, bajo condiciones de clima

  2. Fracture strength of fiber-reinforced surface-retained anterior cantilever restorations

    Oezcan, Mutlu; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; User, Atilla

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the fracture strength of direct anterior cantilever fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) reinforced with 3 types of E-glass fibers preimpregnated with either urethane tetramethacrylate, bisphenol glycidylmethacrylate/polymethyl methacrylate, or

  3. Moisture Absorption/Desorption Effects on Flexural Property of Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polyester Laminates: Three-Point Bending Test and Coupled Hygro-Mechanical Finite Element Analysis

    Xu Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Influence of moisture absorption/desorption on the flexural properties of Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP laminates was experimentally investigated under hot/wet aging environments. To characterize mechanical degradation, three-point bending tests were performed following the ASTM test standard (ASTM D790-10A. The flexural properties of dry (0% Mt/M∞, moisture unsaturated (30% Mt/M∞ and 50% Mt/M∞ and moisture saturated (100% Mt/M∞ specimens at both 20 and 40 °C test temperatures were compared. One cycle of moisture absorption-desorption process was considered in this study to investigate the mechanical degradation scale and the permanent damage of GFRP laminates induced by moisture diffusion. Experimental results confirm that the combination of moisture and temperature effects sincerely deteriorates the flexural properties of GFRP laminates, on both strength and stiffness. Furthermore, the reducing percentage of flexural strength is found much larger than that of E-modulus. Unrecoverable losses of E-modulus (15.0% and flexural strength (16.4% for the GFRP laminates experiencing one cycle of moisture absorption/desorption process are evident at the test temperature of 40 °C, but not for the case of 20 °C test temperature. Moreover, a coupled hygro-mechanical Finite Element (FE model was developed to characterize the mechanical behaviors of GFRP laminates at different moisture absorption/desorption stages, and the modeling method was subsequently validated with flexural test results.

  4. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material joints and...

  5. Hybrid Fiber Layup and Fiber-Reinforced Polymeric Composites Produced Therefrom

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Garrigan, Sean P. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Dietsch, Benjamin A. (Inventor); Cupp, Gary N. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Embodiments of a hybrid fiber layup used to form a fiber-reinforced polymeric composite, and a fiber-reinforced polymeric composite produced therefrom are disclosed. The hybrid fiber layup comprises one or more dry fiber strips and one or more prepreg fiber strips arranged side by side within each layer, wherein the prepreg fiber strips comprise fiber material impregnated with polymer resin and the dry fiber strips comprise fiber material without impregnated polymer resin.

  6. Carbon fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    Jahromi, Saeed G.

    2008-01-01

    Fibers are often used in the manufacture of other materials. For many years, they have been utilized extensively in numerous applications in civil engineering. Fiber-reinforcement refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers is not a new phenomenon, as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began early as 1950. In all industrialized countries today, nearly all concretes used in construction are reinforced. A multitude of fibers and fiber materials are being introduced in the market regularly. The present paper presents characteristics and properties of carbon fiber-reinforced asphalt mixtures, which improve the performance of pavements. To evaluate the effect of fiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without fibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken, applying Marshall Test indirect tensile test, creep test and resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test. Carbon fiber exhibited consistency in results and as such it was observed that the addition of fiber does affect the properties of bituminous mixtures, i.e. an increase in its stability and decrease in the flow value as well as an increase in voids in the mix. Results indicate that fibers have the potential to resist structural distress in pavement, in the wake of growing traffic loads and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon fiber will improve some of the mechanical properties like fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement. (author)

  7. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  8. Study of the compressive behavior of short concrete columns confined by fiber reinforced composite

    Benzaid, Riad; Mesbah, Habib; Chikh, Nasr eddine

    2009-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are very attractive for use in civil engineering applications due to their high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, corrosion resistance, light weight, and potentially high durability. There is a growing interest in the use of FRP for strengthening of concrete structures such as buildings, bridges, chimneys, etc. This is mainly due to their tailorable performance characteristics, ease of application, and low life cycle costs. The present paper deals with the analysis of experimental results, in terms of load carrying capacity and strains, obtained from tests on circular and square prismatic high strength concrete specimens, strengthened with external E-glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP). The parameters considered are the number of composite layers, the corner radius for square shape, and the relation of GFRP confinement with steel reinforcement. All the test specimens were loaded to failure in axial compression and the behavior of the specimens in the axial directions was investigated. The obtained results showed that the efficiency of the confinement was very sensitive to the specimen cross section geometry (circular and square) and the confining stress expressed in the number of the GFRP sheet layers applied. In square cross sections, the stress-strain curve was influenced by the radius to which the corners of the section are rounded off, in order to avoid the breakage of the fibers. (author)

  9. Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Smart Soft Composite Actuators According to Material Composition

    Han, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon [Seoul Nat’l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites, which are made by combining a continuous fiber that acts as reinforcement and a homogeneous polymeric material that acts as a host, are engineering materials with high strength and stiffness and a lightweight structure. In this study, a shape memory alloy(SMA) reinforced composite actuator is presented. This actuator is used to generate large deformations in single lightweight structures and can be used in applications requiring a high degree of adaptability to various external conditions. The proposed actuator consists of numerous individual laminas of the glass-fiber fabric that are embedded in a polymeric matrix. To characterize its deformation behavior, the composition of the actuator was changed by changing the matrix material and the number of the glass-fiber fabric layers. In addition, current of various magnitudes were applied to each actuator to study the effect of the heating of SMA wires on applying current.

  10. Elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    We review recent experimental studies at NBS on the anisotropic elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites. Materials that were studied include: boron-aluminum, boron-epoxy, graphite-epoxy, glass-epoxy, and aramid-epoxy. In all cases, elastic-constant direction dependence could be described by relationships developed for single crystals of homogeneous materials. Elastic stiffness and internal friction were found to vary inversely

  11. Encapsulation of polymer photovoltaic prototypes

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2006-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for the encapsulation of polymer and organic photovoltaic prototypes is presented. The method employs device preparation on glass substrates with subsequent sealing using glass fiber reinforced thermosetting epoxy (prepreg) against a back plate. The method allows...

  12. The restoration of a maxillary central incisor fracture with the original crown fragment using a glass fiber-reinforced post: a clinical report.

    Durkan, Rukiye Kaplan; Ozel, M Birol; Celik, Davut; Bağiş, Bora

    2008-12-01

    This report describes an esthetic, conservative, and economical alternative restoration technique for a fractured central incisor using the patient's own tooth crown piece and a bondable reinforcement glass fiber. Although the long-term durability of this adhesive post core restoration remains unknown, it remains successful after 1 year.

  13. Mechanical performance and thermal stability of glass fiber reinforced silica aerogel composites based on co-precursor method by freeze drying

    Zhou, Ting; Cheng, Xudong; Pan, Yuelei; Li, Congcong; Gong, Lunlun; Zhang, Heping

    2018-04-01

    In order to maintain the integrity, glass fiber (GF) reinforced silica aerogel composites were synthesized using methltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) and water glass co-precursor by freeze drying method. The composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, uniaxial compressive test, three-point bending test, thermal conductivity analysis, contact angle test, TG-DSC analysis. It was found that the molar ratio of MTMS/water glass could significantly affect the properties of composites. The bulk density and thermal conductivity first decreased and then increased with the increasing molar ratio. The composites showed remarkable mechanical strength and flexibility compared with pure silica aerogel. Moreover, when the molar ratio is 1.8, the composites showed high specific surface area (870.9 m2/g), high contact angle (150°), great thermal stability (560 °C) and low thermal conductivity (0.0248 W/m·K). These outstanding properties indicate that GF/aerogels have broad prospects in the field of thermal insulation.

  14. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact.

    Hart, Robert J; Zhupanska, Olesya I

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  15. Synthesis of biodegradable polymer/glass fiber composite by EB irradiation and its biodegradability

    Yoshii, Fumio; Doam Thi The

    2006-01-01

    A composite was synthesized by irradiation of poly (butylene succinate), PBS and glass fiber (GF) in the presence of a polyfunctional monomer, trimethallyl isocyanurate (TMAIC), which accelerates gel formation of the matrix (PBS). The highest gel fraction was achieved at 1% concentration of TMAIC at the dose level of 200 kGy. Mechanical properties of the composites were highly dependent on the gel fraction of the polymer and volume fraction of glass fiber reinforcement in the composite. Optimal conditions to synthesize a PBS/GF composite reaching maximum value of bending strength were 1% TMAIC, 67% fiber volume fraction, and radiation dose of 200 kGy. These synthesized PBS/GF composites can be degraded by enzymes produced by the microorganism population in soil. (author)

  16. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

  17. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Palanivel, Anand; Duruvasalu, Rajesh; Iyyanar, Saranraj; Velumayil, Ramesh, E-mail: p.anand@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering, Vel Tech Dr RR. & Dr. SR University, Avadi, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Veerabathiran, Anbumalar [Mechanical Engineering, Velammal College of Engineering & Technology, Madurai, TN (India)

    2017-07-01

    The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E') recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg) decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E”) and damping peaks (Tan δ) values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity. (author)

  18. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Anand Palanivel

    Full Text Available Abstract The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E’ recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E” and damping peaks (Tan δ values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity.

  19. Mechanics of fiber reinforced materials

    Sun, Huiyu

    This dissertation is dedicated to mechanics of fiber reinforced materials and the woven reinforcement and composed of four parts of research: analytical characterization of the interfaces in laminated composites; micromechanics of braided composites; shear deformation, and Poisson's ratios of woven fabric reinforcements. A new approach to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of interfaces between composite laminae based on a modified laminate theory is proposed. By including an interface as a special lamina termed the "bonding-layer" in the analysis, the mechanical properties of the interfaces are obtained. A numerical illustration is given. For micro-mechanical properties of three-dimensionally braided composite materials, a new method via homogenization theory and incompatible multivariable FEM is developed. Results from the hybrid stress element approach compare more favorably with the experimental data than other existing numerical methods widely used. To evaluate the shearing properties for woven fabrics, a new mechanical model is proposed during the initial slip region. Analytical results show that this model provides better agreement with the experiments for both the initial shear modulus and the slipping angle than the existing models. Finally, another mechanical model for a woven fabric made of extensible yarns is employed to calculate the fabric Poisson's ratios. Theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data. A thorough examination on the influences of various mechanical properties of yarns and structural parameters of fabrics on the Poisson's ratios of a woven fabric is given at the end.

  20. CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING

    Rawls, G.

    2012-10-10

    The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

  1. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites...... in the fiber surface nature and the mechanical interfacial properties between the carbon fiber and epoxy resin matrix of the resulting composites, i.e., the fracture toughness. We suggest that good wetting plays an important role in improving the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and matrices...

  2. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    R. Ananda Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral load reviews are also presented. This review paper is prepared to find out the performance of basalt fibre reinforced polymer BFRP composite retrofitted reinforced cement concrete single end bearing piles.

  3. Optical and mechanical excitation thermography for impact response in basalt-carbon hybrid fiber-reinforced composite laminates

    Zhang, Hai; Sfarra, Stefano; Sarasini, Fabrizio; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Perilli, Stefano; Fernandes, Henrique; Duan, Yuxia; Peeters, Jeroen; Avelidis, Nicholas P; Maldague, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, optical and mechanical excitation thermography were used to investigate basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP), carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) and basalt-carbon fiber hybrid specimens subjected to impact loading. Interestingly, two different hybrid structures including sandwich-like and intercalated stacking sequence were used. Pulsed phase thermography (PPT), principal component thermography (PCT) and partial least squares thermography (PLST) were used to pro...

  4. Long-Term Durability of Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (BFRP Sheets and the Epoxy Resin Matrix under a Wet–Dry Cyclic Condition in a Chloride-Containing Environment

    Zhongyu Lu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP composites are receiving increasing attention as they represent a low-cost green source of raw materials. FRP composites have to face harsh environments, such as chloride ions in coastal marine environments or cold regions with salt deicing. The resistance of FRPs subjected to the above environments is critical for the safe design and application of BFRP composites. In the present paper, the long-term durability of BFRP sheets and the epoxy resin matrix in a wet–dry cyclic environment containing chloride ions was studied. The specimens of the BFRP sheet and epoxy resin matrix were exposed to alternative conditions of 8-h immersion in 3.5% NaCl solution at 40 °C and 16-h drying at 25 °C and 60% relative humidity (RH. The specimens were removed from the exposure chamber at the end of the 180th, 270th and 360th cycles of exposure and were analyzed for degradation with tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and void volume fractions. It was found that the tensile modulus of the BFRP sheet increased by 3.4%, and the tensile strength and ultimate strain decreased by 45% and 65%, respectively, after the 360th cycle of exposure. For the epoxy resin matrix, the tensile strength, tensile modulus and ultimate strain decreased by 27.8%, 3.2% and 64.8% after the 360th cycle of exposure, respectively. The results indicated that the degradation of the BFRP sheet was dominated by the damage of the interface between the basalt fiber and epoxy resin matrix. In addition, salt precipitate accelerated the fiber–matrix interfacial debonding, and hydrolysis of the epoxy resin matrix resulted in many voids, which accelerated the degradation of the BFRP sheet.

  5. Desenvolvimento de PVC reforçado com fibras de vidro longas para fabricação de produtos moldados Long glass fiber reinforcement of PVC molding compounds

    Leandro H. Grizzo

    2011-01-01

    glass fibers' length and reduced the possibility of PVC resins' degradation. 20 w/w% long glass fiber reinforced rigid PVC (LGF/PVC composites were then obtained with twice as high modulus and Charpy's impact strength compared to the unreinforced rigid PVC even with the composites were formulated with a high quantity of plasticizer. As a result, PVC can be used in unrecognized high-performance applications that were not possible before.

  6. Design of Ultra High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete Shells

    Jepsen, Michael S.; Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Damkilde, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Fiber Reinforced Concrete shell. The major challenge in the design phase has been securing sufficient stiffness of the structure while keeping the weight at a minimum. The weight/stiffness issue has been investigated by means of the finite element method, to optimize the structure regarding overall......The paper treats the redesign of the float structure of the Wavestar wave energy converter. Previously it was designed as a glass fiber structure, but due to cost reduction requirements a redesign has been initiated. The new float structure will be designed as a double curved Ultra High Performance...

  7. Determination of hoop direction effective elastic moduli of non-circular profile, fiber reinforced polymer composite sewer liner pipes from lateral ring compression tests

    Czél, Gergely; Takács, Dénes

    2015-01-01

    A new material property determination method is presented for the calculation of effective elastic moduli of non-circular ring specimens cut from filament wound oval profile polymer composite sewer liner pipes. The hoop direction elastic moduli was determined using the test results obtained from ring compression tests, which is a very basic setup, and requires no special equipment. Calculations were executed for many different oval profiles, and diagrams were constructed, from which the cross section dependent C_e_f_f constants can be taken. The new method was validated by the comparison of tests and finite element analysis results. The calculation method and the diagrams are essential design tools for engineers, and a big step forward in sizing non-circular profile liner pipes. - Highlights: • A simple modulus measurement method is presented for non-circular ring specimens. • The evaluation method is validated against a finite element model. • Profile shape dependent constants are presented for a wide range of cross-sections. • A set of charts with the constants are provided to aid design engineers.

  8. Fatigue Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Jun, Zhang; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain basic data of fibre reinforced concrete under fatigue load and to set up a theoretical model based on micromechanics. In this study, the bridging stress in fiber reinforced concrete under cyclic tensile load was investigted in details. The damage...... mechanism of the interface between fiber and matrix was proposed and a rational model given. Finally, the response of a steel fiber reinforced concrete beam under fatigue loading was predicted based on this model and compared with experimental results....

  9. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  10. Lignocellulosic fiber reinforced rubber composites

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural Rubber (NR) is a naturally occurring elastomeric polymer of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene). It can be extracted from latex of only one kind of tree, the Hevea braziliensis. Hevea rubber is produced in many tropical regions of Southeast...

  11. Use of Fiber-Reinforced Cements in Masonry Construction and Structural Rehabilitation

    Ece Erdogmus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforcement in traditional concrete mixes has been extensively studied and has been slowly finding its regular use in practice. In contrast, opportunities for the use of fibers in masonry applications and structural rehabilitation projects (masonry and concrete structures have not been as deeply investigated, where the base matrix may be a weaker cementitious mixture. This paper will summarize the findings of the author’s research over the past 10 years in these particular applications of fiber reinforced cements (FRC. For masonry, considering both mortar and mortar-unit bond characteristics, a 0.5% volume fraction of micro fibers in type N Portland cement lime mortar appear to be a viable recipe for most masonry joint applications both for clay and concrete units. In general, clay units perform better with high water content fiber reinforced mortar (FRM while concrete masonry units (CMUs perform better with drier mixtures, so 130% and 110% flow rates should be targeted, respectively. For earth block masonry applications, fibers’ benefits are observed in improving local damage and water pressure resistance. The FRC retrofit technique proposed for the rehabilitation of reinforced concrete two-way slabs has exceeded expectations in terms of capacity increase for a relatively low cost in comparison to the common but expensive fiber reinforced polymer applications. For all of these applications of fiber-reinforced cements, further research with larger data pools would lead to further optimization of fiber type, size, and amount.

  12. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CANNABIS INDICA FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    Amar Singh Singha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the synthesis of Cannabis indica fiber-reinforced composites using Urea-Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (URF as a novel matrix through compression molding technique. The polycondensation between urea, resorcinol, and formaldehyde in different molar ratios was applied to the synthesis of the URF polymer matrix. A thermosetting matrix based composite, reinforced with lignocellulose from Cannabis indica with different fiber loadings 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% by weight, was obtained. The mechanical properties of randomly oriented intimately mixed fiber particle reinforced composites were determined. Effects of fiber loadings on mechanical properties such as tensile, compressive, flexural strength, and wear resistance were evaluated. Results showed that mechanical properties of URF resin matrix increased considerably when reinforced with particles of Cannabis indica fiber. Thermal (TGA/DTA/DTG and morphological studies (SEM of the resin, fiber and polymer composite thus synthesized were carried out.

  13. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  14. Development of step for light duty truck by using injection molding of long-fiber reinforced thermoplastics; Chosen`i kyoka jushi no shashutsu keisei ni yoru truck yo step no kaihatsu

    Togo, A; Yamamura, H; Yamaguchi, M [Mitsubishi Motor Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshino, K [Kawasaki Steel Corp. Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The new step for light duty truck was developed by injection molding of glass long-fiber reinforced polypropylene. Feature of the step is good surface appearance and no post processings, compared with the conventional one press molded with a glass fiber reinforced polypropylene sheet (Stampable sheet). 3 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced restorative composite with two distinguished fiber length distribution.

    Lassila, Lippo; Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Säilynoja, Eija

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with different length scales on fracture toughness and flexural properties of dental composite. Experimental fiber reinforced composite (Exp-FRC) was prepared by mixing 27wt% of discontinuous E-glass fibers having two different length scales (micrometer and millimeter) with various weight ratios (1:1, 2:1, 1:0 respectively) to the 23wt% of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and then 50wt% of silane treated silica filler were added gradually using high speed mixing machine. As control, commercial FRC and conventional posterior composites were used (everX Posterior, Alert, and Filtek Superme). Fracture toughness, work of fracture, flexural strength, and flexural modulus were determined for each composite material following ISO standards. The specimens (n=6) were dry stored (37°C for 2 days) before they were tested. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the microstructure of the experimental FRC composites. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey׳s test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. ANOVA revealed that experimental composites reinforced with different fiber length scales (hybrid Exp-FRC) had statistically significantly higher mechanical performance of fracture toughness (4.7MPam(1/2)) and flexural strength (155MPa) (plength scales of discontinues fiber fillers (hybrid) with polymer matrix yielded improved mechanical performance compared to commercial FRC and conventional posterior composites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Encapsulation of polymer photovoltaic prototypes

    Krebs, Frederik C. [The Danish Polymer Centre, RISOE National Laboratory, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2006-12-15

    A simple and efficient method for the encapsulation of polymer and organic photovoltaic prototypes is presented. The method employs device preparation on glass substrates with subsequent sealing using glass fiber reinforced thermosetting epoxy (prepreg) against a back plate. The method allows for transporting oxygen and water sensitive devices outside a glove box environment after sealing and enables sharing of devices between research groups such that efficiency and stability can be evaluated in different laboratories. (author)

  17. ZnO Piezoelectric Nanowires for Use in a Self-Powered Structural Health Monitoring Device for Fiber-Reinforced Composites Uploading Attachment Instructions

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new self-powered structural health monitoring (SHM) system for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites by using...

  18. Effect of hybrid fiber reinforcement on the cracking process in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous use of different types of fibers as reinforcement in cementitious matrix composites is typically motivated by the underlying principle of a multi-scale nature of the cracking processes in fiber reinforced cementitious composites. It has been hypothesized that while undergoing...... tensile deformations in the composite, the fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties restrain the propagation and further development of cracking at different scales from the micro- to the macro-scale. The optimized design of the fiber reinforcing systems requires the objective...... materials is carried out by assessing directly their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The efficiency of hybrid fiber reinforcements and the multi-scale nature of cracking processes are discussed based on the experimental results obtained, as well as the micro-mechanisms underlying the contribution...

  19. Dynamics and thermodynamics of polymer glasses.

    Cangialosi, D

    2014-04-16

    The fate of matter when decreasing the temperature at constant pressure is that of passing from gas to liquid and, subsequently, from liquid to crystal. However, a class of materials can exist in an amorphous phase below the melting temperature. On cooling such materials, a glass is formed; that is, a material with the rigidity of a solid but exhibiting no long-range order. The study of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming systems is the subject of continuous research. Within the wide variety of glass formers, an important sub-class is represented by glass forming polymers. The presence of chain connectivity and, in some cases, conformational disorder are unfavourable factors from the point of view of crystallization. Furthermore, many of them, such as amorphous thermoplastics, thermosets and rubbers, are widely employed in many applications. In this review, the peculiarities of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming polymers are discussed, with particular emphasis on those topics currently the subject of debate. In particular, the following aspects will be reviewed in the present work: (i) the connection between the pronounced slowing down of glassy dynamics on cooling towards the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the thermodynamics; and, (ii) the fate of the dynamics and thermodynamics below Tg. Both aspects are reviewed in light of the possible presence of a singularity at a finite temperature with diverging relaxation time and zero configurational entropy. In this context, the specificity of glass-forming polymers is emphasized.

  20. Acoustic emission from fiber reinforced plastic damaged hoop wrapped cylinders

    Akhtar, A.; Kung, D.; Westbrook, D.R.

    2000-03-01

    Metal lined continuous fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) hoop wrapped cylinders with axial cuts to the FRP were modeled mathematically and tested experimentally. Steel lined and aluminum alloy lined glass FRP vessels were subjected to acoustic emission tests (AE) and hydraulic burst tests. The burst pressure decreased monotonically with the length of the axial cut. Acoustic emission increased initially with a decrease in burst pressure, and attained a maximum at an intermediate level of damage to the FRP. However, acoustic emission decreased when the level of damage was higher and the burst pressure was lower. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of the search for an acoustic emission test method to inspect periodically the vessels used for the storage of compressed gaseous fuels on natural gas vehicles (NGV) and hydrogen vehicles.

  1. Degradation behaviour of fiber reinforced plastic under electron beam irradiation

    Sonoda, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Osamu

    1989-01-01

    Various mechanical properties of four kinds of glass fiber-reinforced plastics irradiated with electron beams were examined at three temperatures; room temperature, 123 K and 77 K. Dynamic viscoelastic properties were measured, and fractography by means of scanning electron microscopy was observed in order to clarify degradation behaviour. A considerable decrease in interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) at room temperature was observed above 60 MGy. On the other hand, the three-point bending strength at 77 K and the ILSS at 123 K decreased with increasing irradiation. Fractography reveals that the degradation of the interface layer between matrix resin and fiber plays an important role in the strength reduction at 123 K and 77 K. These findings suggest that the interface between matrix resin and fiber loses its bondability at 123 K arid 77 K after electron beam irradiation. (author)

  2. Effect of combined extrusion parameters on mechanical properties of basalt fiber-reinforced plastics based on polypropylene

    Bashtannik, P. I.; Ovcharenko, V. G.; Boot, Yu. A.

    1997-11-01

    Basalt fibers are efficient reinforcing fillers for polypropylene because they increase both the mechanical and the tribotechnical properties of composites. Basalt fibers can compete with traditional fillers (glass and asbestos fibers) of polypropylene with respect to technological, economic, and toxic properties. The effect of technological parameters of producing polypropylene-based basalt fiber-reinforced plastics (BFRPs) by combined extrusion on their mechanical properties has been investigated. The extrusion temperature was found to be the main parameter determining the mechanical properties of the BFRPs. With temperature growth from 180 to 240°C, the residual length of the basalt fibers in the composite, as well as the adhesive strength of the polymer-fiber system, increased, while the composite defectiveness decreased. The tensile strength and elastic modulus increased from 35 to 42 MPa and 3.2 to 4.2 GPa, respectively. At the same time, the growth in composite solidity led to its higher brittleness. Thus, a higher temperature of extrusion allows us to produce materials which can be subjected to tensile and bending loads, while the materials produced at a lower temperature of extrusion are impact stable. The effect of the gap size between the extruder body and moving disks on the mechanical properties of the BFRPs is less significant than that of temperature. An increase of the gap size from 2 to 8 mm improves the impregnation quality of the fibers, but the extruder productivity diminishes. The possibility of controling the properties of reinforced polypropylene by varying the technological parameters of combined extrusion is shown. The polypropylene-based BFRPs produced by the proposed method surpass the properties of glass and asbestos fiber-reinforced plastics.

  3. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts

    Huu-Duc Nguyen-Tran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6 composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm3 (6.8% by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0% by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm3. The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  4. Fracture resistance of class IV fiber-reinforced composite resin restorations: An in vitro study

    P S Praveen Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of incisal edge fractures (Class IV restored with a Glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted sound maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups. Group I (control contained untreated teeth. Samples in experimental groups II were prepared by cutting the incisal (one-third part of the crown horizontally and was subjected to enamel preparations, then restored with a Glass FRC. Fracture resistance was evaluated as Newton's for samples tested in a Hounsfield universal testing machine. Failure modes were examined microscopically. Results: Mean peak failure load (Newton's observed in Glass Fiber-reinforced Nanocomposite was 863.50 ± 76.12. The experimental group showed similar types of failure modes with the majority occurring as cohesive and mixed type. 58% of the teeth in Glass FRC group fractured below the cementoenamel junction. Conclusion: Using Fiber reinforced composite substructure under conventional composites in Class IV restorations, the fracture resistance of the restored incisal edge could be increased.

  5. Mechanical properties of ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite for socket prosthesis

    Tresna Soemardi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation into the application of natural fiber composite especially ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite for socket prosthesis. The research focuses on the tensile and shear strength from ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite which will be applied as alternative material for socket prosthesis. The research based on American Society for Testing Material (ASTM standard D 3039/D 3039M for tensile strength and ASTM D 4255/D 4255M-83 for shear strength. The ramie fiber applied is a fiber continue 100 % Ne14'S with Epoxy Resin Bakelite EPR 174 as matrix and Epoxy Hardener V-140 as hardener. The sample composite test made by hand lay up method. Multiaxial characteristic from ramie fiber reinforced epoxy composite will be compared with ISO standard for plastic/polymer for health application and refers strength of material application at Prosthetics and Orthotics. The analysis was completed with the mode of the failure and the failure criterion observation by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Based on results of the research could be concluded that ramie fiber reinforced epoxy composite could be developed further as the alternative material for socket prosthesis on Vf 40-50%. Results of the research will be discussed in more detail in this paper.

  6. An Investigation of Fiber Reinforced Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Composites at Room Temperature.

    Ding, Zhu; Li, Yu-Yu; Lu, Can; Liu, Jian

    2018-05-21

    In this study, chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) fiber reinforced composites were made at indoor temperatures. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the CBPC composites were studied. The CBPC matrix of aluminum phosphate binder, metakaolin, and magnesia with different Si/P ratios was prepared. The results show that when the Si/P ratio was 1.2, and magnesia content in the CBPC was 15%, CBPC reached its maximum flexural strength. The fiber reinforced CBPC composites were prepared by mixing short polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or unidirectional continuous carbon fiber sheets. Flexural strength and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined, and the microstructures of specimens were analyzed by scanning electron micrography, X-ray diffraction, and micro X-ray computed tomography. The flexural performance of continuous carbon fiber reinforced CBPC composites was better than that of PVA fiber composites. The elastic modulus, loss modulus, and loss factor of the fiber composites were measured through dynamic mechanical analysis. The results showed that fiber reinforced CBPC composites are an inorganic polymer viscoelastic material with excellent damping properties. The reaction of magnesia and phosphate in the matrix of CBPC formed a different mineral, newberyite, which was beneficial to the development of the CBPC.

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion

    O’Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E. Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A.; Hill, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance. PMID:28773132

  8. A fractal image analysis methodology for heat damage inspection in carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Haridas, Aswin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Prabhathan, P.; Chan, Kelvin; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials in the aerospace industry have far improved the load carrying properties and the design flexibility of aircraft structures. A high strength to weight ratio, low thermal conductivity, and a low thermal expansion coefficient gives it an edge for applications demanding stringent loading conditions. Specifically, this paper focuses on the behavior of CFRP composites under stringent thermal loads. The properties of composites are largely affected by external thermal loads, especially when the loads are beyond the glass temperature, Tg, of the composite. Beyond this, the composites are subject to prominent changes in mechanical and thermal properties which may further lead to material decomposition. Furthermore, thermal damage formation being chaotic, a strict dimension cannot be associated with the formed damage. In this context, this paper focuses on comparing multiple speckle image analysis algorithms to effectively characterize the formed thermal damages on the CFRP specimen. This would provide us with a fast method for quantifying the extent of heat damage in carbon composites, thus reducing the required time for inspection. The image analysis methods used for the comparison include fractal dimensional analysis of the formed speckle pattern and analysis of number and size of various connecting elements in the binary image.

  9. Influence of fiber upon the radiation degradation of fiber-reinforced plastics

    Udagawa, Akira

    1992-01-01

    Influences of fiber upon the radiation degradation of fiber-reinforced plastics were investigated by using 2 MeV electrons. Radiation resistances were evaluated from the three-point bending strength of the fiber laminates which used bisphenol A-type epoxy resin as a matrix. Carbon fiber laminates had higher radiation resistance values than the laminates made of glass fiber. Model laminates using polyethylene as a matrix were prepared in order to examine the differences between carbon fiber and glass fiber filler, the relation between gel fraction and absorbed dose was established. When the polyethylene was filled in the carbon fiber, forming the gel was strikingly delayed. This result suggests that radiation protective action existing in carbon fiber to matrix resin is the main cause of the higher radiation resistance of carbon fiber reinforced plastics. (author)

  10. FLEXURAL TOUGHNESS OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Fehmi ÇİVİCİ

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber concrete is a composite material which has mechanical and physical characteristics unlike plain concrete. One of the important mechanical characteristics of fiber concrete is its energy absorbing capability. This characteristics which is also called toughness, is defined as the total area under the load-deflection curve. A number of composite characteristics such as crack resistance, ductility and impact resistance are related to the energy absorbtion capacity. According to ASTM C 1018 and JSCE SF-4 the calculation of toughness is determined by uniaxial flexural testing. Fiber concrete is often used in plates such as bridge decks, airport pavements, parking areas, subjected to cavitation and erosion. In this paper, toughness has been determined according to ASTM C 1018 and JSCE SF-4 methods by testing beam specimens. Energy absorbing capacities of plain and steel fiber reinforced concrete has been compared by evaluating the results of two methods. Also plain and steel fiber reinforced plate specimens behaviors subjected to biaxial flexure are compared by the loaddeflection curves of each specimen.

  11. Young modulus and internal friction of a fiber-reinforced composite

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Lei, M.; Austin, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    By a kilohertz-frequency resonance method we determined the Young modulus and internal friction of a uniaxially fiber-reinforced composite. The composite comprised glass fibers in an epoxy-resin matrix. We studied three fiber contents: 0, 41, and 49 vol %. The Young modulus fit a linear rule of mixture. The internal friction fit a classical free-damped-oscillator model where one assumes a linear rule of mixture for three quantities: mass, force constant, and mechanical-resistance constant

  12. A fiber-reinforced composite prosthesis restoring a lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report.

    Kurunmäki, Hemmo; Kantola, Rosita; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This clinical report describes the use of a glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) substructure to reinforce the silicone elastomer of a large facial prosthesis. The FRC substructure was shaped into a framework and embedded into the silicone elastomer to form a reinforced facial prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to overcome the disadvantages associated with traditionally fabricated prostheses; namely, delamination of the silicone of the acrylic base, poor marginal adaptation over time, and poor simulation of facial expressions.

  13. On the simulation of kink bands in fiber reinforced composites

    Sørensen, K.D.; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; Jensen, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of kink band formation in fiber reinforced composites are carried out using the commercial finite element program ABAQUS. A smeared-out, plane constitutive model for fiber reinforced materials is implemented as a user subroutine, and effects of fiber misalignment on elastic and plastic...

  14. Study on the Mechanical and Interfacial Property of Injection Molded Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics

    王, 存涛

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been used widely in the land transportation, aerospace, marine structures and characteristically conservative infrastructure construction industries and generally, the interface plays very important role in the properties of FRP materials. Therefore, this research studied the mechanical and interfacial property involved in the non-weld samples, weld samples and adhesive samples of insert moldings. Green composites as one of environment-friendly m...

  15. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  16. Cohesive fracture model for functionally graded fiber reinforced concrete

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery

    2010-01-01

    A simple, effective, and practical constitutive model for cohesive fracture of fiber reinforced concrete is proposed by differentiating the aggregate bridging zone and the fiber bridging zone. The aggregate bridging zone is related to the total fracture energy of plain concrete, while the fiber bridging zone is associated with the difference between the total fracture energy of fiber reinforced concrete and the total fracture energy of plain concrete. The cohesive fracture model is defined by experimental fracture parameters, which are obtained through three-point bending and split tensile tests. As expected, the model describes fracture behavior of plain concrete beams. In addition, it predicts the fracture behavior of either fiber reinforced concrete beams or a combination of plain and fiber reinforced concrete functionally layered in a single beam specimen. The validated model is also applied to investigate continuously, functionally graded fiber reinforced concrete composites.

  17. Micromechanical failure in fiber-reinforced composites

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    Micromechanical failure mechanisms occurring in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites are studied by means of the finite element method as well as experimental testing. This study highlights the effect of micro-scale features such as fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, matrix cracking...... and microvoids on the microscopic and macroscopic mechanical response of composite materials. To this end, first a numerical study is carried out to explore ways to stabilize interfacial crack growth under dominant Mode-I fracture using the cohesive zone model. Consequently, this study suggests a method...... composites. In the first approach, the J2 plasticity model is implemented to model the elasto-plastic behavior of the matrix while in the second strategy the modified Drucker-Prager plasticity model is utilized to account for brittle-like and pressure dependent behavior of an epoxy matrix. In addition...

  18. [Fusion implants of carbon fiber reinforced plastic].

    Früh, H J; Liebetrau, A; Bertagnoli, R

    2002-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are used in the medical field when high mechanical strength, innovative design, and radiolucency (see spinal fusion implants) are needed. During the manufacturing process of the material CFRP carbon fibers are embedded into a resin matrix. This resin material could be thermoset (e.g., epoxy resin EPN/DDS) or thermoplastic (e.g., PEAK). CFRP is biocompatible, radiolucent, and has higher mechanical capabilities compared to other implant materials. This publication demonstrates the manufacturing process of fusion implants made of a thermoset matrix system using a fiber winding process. The material has been used clinically since 1994 for fusion implants of the cervical and lumbar spine. The results of the fusion systems CORNERSTONE-SR C (cervical) and UNION (lumbar) showed no implant-related complications. New implant systems made of this CFRP material are under investigation and are presented.

  19. Investigation of degradation products produced by recycling the solvent during chemical degradation of fiber-reinforced composites

    Ucar, Hülya; Simonsen, Morten Enggrob; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    of the process. In this study, acetone has been used as the organic solvent. To increase the sustainability of the process, the solvent was recycled in eight consecutive batches using new glass fiber-reinforced composites in each recycling. No additional amount of acetone was added, resulting in a reduction...

  20. Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses

    Freed, Karl F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Xu, Wen-Sheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Dudowicz, Jacek B. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Douglas, Jack F. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-04-05

    Glass formation has been central to fabrication technologies since the dawn of civilization. Glasses not only encompass window panes, the insulation in our homes, the optical fibers supplying our cable TV, and vessels for eating and drinking, but they also include a vast array of ‘‘plastic’’ polymeric materials. Glasses find applications in high technology (e.g., producing microelectronic materials, etc., amorphous semiconductors), and recent advances have created ‘‘plastic metallic glasses’’ that are promising for fabricating everyday structural materials. Many commercially relevant systems, such as microemulsions and colloidal suspensions, have complex molecular structures and thus solidify by glass formation. Despite the importance of understanding the fundamental nature of glass formation for the synthesis of new materials, a predictive molecular theory has been lacking. Much of our understanding of glass formation derives from the analysis of experimental data, a process that has uncovered a number of interesting universal behaviors, namely, relations between properties that are independent of molecular details. However, these empirically derived relations and their limitations remain to be understood on the basis of theories, and, more importantly, there is strong need for theories of the explicit variation with molecular system to enable the rational design and tailoring of new materials. We have recently developed the generalized entropy theory, the only analytic, theory that enables describing the dependence of the properties of glass-formation on monomer molecular structures. These properties include the two central quantities of glass formation, the glass transition temperature and the glass fragility parameter, material dependent properties that govern how a material may be processed (e.g., by extrusion, ink jet, molding, etc.) Our recent works, which are further described below, extend the studies of glass formation in polymer systems

  1. Fiber-Reinforced Origamic Robotic Actuator.

    Yi, Juan; Chen, Xiaojiao; Song, Chaoyang; Wang, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    A novel pneumatic soft linear actuator Fiber-reinforced Origamic Robotic Actuator (FORA) is proposed with significant improvements on the popular McKibben-type actuators, offering nearly doubled motion range, substantially improved force profile, and significantly lower actuation pressure. The desirable feature set is made possible by a novel soft origamic chamber that expands radially while contracts axially when pressurized. Combining this new origamic chamber with a reinforcing fiber mesh, FORA generates very high traction force (over 150N) and very large contractile motion (over 50%) at very low input pressure (100 kPa). We developed quasi-static analytical models both to characterize the motion and forces and as guidelines for actuator design. Fabrication of FORA mostly involves consumer-grade three-dimensional (3D) printing. We provide a detailed list of materials and dimensions. Fabricated FORAs were tested on a dedicated platform against commercially available pneumatic artificial muscles from Shadow and Festo to showcase its superior performances and validate the analytical models with very good agreements. Finally, a robotic joint was developed driven by two antagonistic FORAs, to showcase the benefits of the performance improvements. With its simple structure, fully characterized mechanism, easy fabrication procedure, and highly desirable performance, FORA could be easily customized to application requirements and fabricated by anyone with access to a 3D printer. This will pave the way to the wider adaptation and application of soft robotic systems.

  2. CREATION OF MUSIC WITH FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Kato, Hayato; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ogura, Naoyuki; Kitahara, Yukiko; Okamoto, Takahisa

    This research focuses on the Fiber Reinforcement Concrete(FRC) and its performance on musical tones. Thepossibility of future musical instruments made of this concrete is discussed. Recently, the technical properties of FRC had been improved and the different production styles, such as unit weight of binding material and volume of fiber in the structure, hardly affects the results of the acoustics. However, the board thickness in the FRC instruments is directly related with the variety of musical tone. The FRC musical effects were compared with those produced with wood on wind instruments. The sounds were compared with those produced with woodwind instruments. The sound pressure level was affected by the material and it becomes remarkably notorious in the high frequency levels. These differences had great influence on the spectrum analysis of the tone in the wind instruments and the sensory test. The results from the sensory test show dominant performances of brightness, beauty and power in the FRC instruments compared with those made of wood.

  3. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  4. STUDY THE CREEP OF TUBULAR SHAPED FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    Najat J. Saleh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Inpresent work tubular –shaped fiber reinforced composites were manufactured byusing two types of resins ( Epoxy and unsaturated polyester and separatelyreinforced with glass, carbon and kevlar-49 fibers (filament and woven roving,hybrid reinforcement composites of these fibers were also prepared. The fiberswere wet wound on a mandrel using a purposely designed winding machine,developed by modifying an ordinary lathe, in winding angle of 55° for filament. A creep test was made of either the fulltube or specimens taken from it. Creep was found to increase upon reinforcementin accordance to the rule of mixture and mainly decided by the type of singleor hybridized fibers. The creep behavior, showed that the observed strain tendsto appear much faster at higher temperature as compared with that exhibited atroom temperate. The creep rate also found to be depending on fiber type, matrixtype, and the fiber /matrix bonding. The creep energy calculated fromexperimental observations was found to exhibit highest value for hybridizedreinforcement.

  5. Continuous Natural Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Fiber Surface Modification

    Patcharat Wongsriraksa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials are expected to replace inorganic fiber reinforced thermosetting materials. However, in the process of fabricating the composite, it is difficult to impregnate the thermoplastic resin into reinforcement fiber because of the high melt viscosity. Therefore, intermediate material, which allows high impregnation during molding, has been investigated for fabricating continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite by aligning resin fiber alongside reinforcing fiber with braiding technique. This intermediate material has been called “microbraid yarn (MBY.” Moreover, it is well known that the interfacial properties between natural fiber and resin are low; therefore, surface treatment on continuous natural fiber was performed by using polyurethane (PU and flexible epoxy (FLEX to improve the interfacial properties. The effect of surface treatment on the mechanical properties of continuous natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was examined. From these results, it was suggested that surface treatment by PU with low content could produce composites with better mechanical properties.

  6. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior ...

    Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior Teeth: A Case Report. ... investigation will be required to provide additional information on the survival of directly-bonded anterior fixed prosthesis made with FRC systems.

  7. Normal Strength Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Explosive Loading

    Mohammed Alias Yusof; Norazman Norazman; Ariffin Ariffin; Fauzi Mohd Zain; Risby Risby; CP Ng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the behavior of plain reinforced concrete and Normal strength steel fiber reinforced concrete panels (SFRC) subjected to explosive loading. The experiment were performed by the Blast Research Unit Faculty of Engineering, University Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia A total of 8 reinforced concrete panels of 600mm x 600mm x 100mm were tested. The steel fiber reinforced concrete panels incorporated three different volume fraction, 0...

  8. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  9. Buckling behavior of fiber reinforced plastic–metal hybrid-composite beam

    Eksi, Secil; Kapti, Akin O.; Genel, Kenan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a new plastic–metal hybrid-composite tubular beam structure. ► This structure offers innovative design solutions with weight reduction. ► It prevents premature buckling without adding significant weight to the structure. ► The composite interaction gives better mechanical properties to the products. ► Buckling and bending loads of the beam increased 3.2 and 7.6 times, respectively. - Abstract: It is known that the buckling is characterized by a sudden failure of a structural member subjected to high compressive load. In this study, the buckling behavior of the aluminum tubular beam (ATB) was analyzed using finite element (FE) method, and the reinforcing arrangements as well as its combinations were decided for the composite beams based on the FE results. Buckling and bending behaviors of thin-walled ATBs with internal cast polyamide (PA6) and external glass and carbon fiber reinforcement polymers (GFRPs and CFRPs) were investigated systematically. Experimental studies showed that the 219% increase in buckling load and 661% in bending load were obtained with reinforcements. The use of plastics and metal together as a reinforced structure yields better mechanical performance properties such as high resistance to buckling and bending loads, dimensional stability and high energy absorption capacity, including weight reduction. While the thin-walled metallic component provides required strength and stiffness, the plastic component provides the support necessary to prevent premature buckling without adding significant weight to the structure. It is thought that the combination of these materials will offer a promising new focus of attention for designers seeking more appropriate composite beams with high buckling loads beside light weight. The developed plastic–metal hybrid-composite structure is promising especially for critical parts serving as a support member of vehicles for which light weight is a critical design

  10. Strength and lifetime of polymer glasses

    Bartenev, G.M.; Kartasov, E.M.

    1981-03-01

    A kinetic equation of the time-dependence of strength (complete isotherm of lifetime) of polymer glasses at stress values ranging from the limiting stress of the occurence of separation breaks to the critical stress is derived. The curvature of lifetime plots occuring at low and high periods of time in the experiments are considered. The ranges of noncritical state, breaks caused by a thermofluctuation mechanism, a transition range and athermal breaks are discerned. The limitations of applicability of the basic empirical equation of the kinetic theory of the time-dependence of strength are explained. Theoretical equations are suggested for calculating various characteristics of the brittle break, as limiting stress and critical stress, relative critical craze length and coefficient of stress concentration at the craze tip with respect to various geometrical configurations of the craze and its position in the sample. With polymethylmethacrylate as an example in the brittle and quasi-brittle state, as characterized by the transition from the rupture of sets of chemical bonds to individual chemical bonds, the thermofluctuation processes of break in polymer glasses are discussed. The application of the thermofluctuation theory of solids to the quasi-brittle fracture is considered. The growth kinetics of crazes and the corresponding equation of lifetime were found to be described by identical (corresponding) analytical expressions by which the changes of the coefficients of stress concentration in the range of microplastic deformation in front of the growing is covered within a wide region of temperature including the brittle temperature.

  11. Selected Bibliography on Fiber-Reinforced Cement and Concrete. Supplement Number 4.

    1982-08-01

    Building Industry," L’Industria Italiana del Cemento , Vol 50, No. 12, Dec 1980, pp 1135-1144. 19. Bartos, P., "Pullout Failure of Fibres Embedded in Cement...Vol 43, No. 11, Nov 1977, pp 561-564. 21. Bassan, M., "Model of Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concretes Under Impact Stresses," il Cemento , Vol 74, No...Pastes," il Cemento , Vol 75, No. 3, Jul-Sep 1978, pp 277-284. 210. Mills, R. H., "Age-Embrittlement of Glass-Reinforced Concrete Containing Blastfurance

  12. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Andrey E. Krauklis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer–Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  13. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites.

    Krauklis, Andrey E; Gagani, Abedin I; Echtermeyer, Andreas T

    2018-04-11

    Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer-Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  14. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  15. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  16. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    reinforcement systems. The research described in this paper shows that the multi-scale conception of cracking and the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements do not necessarily result in an improved tensile behavior of the composite. Particular material design requirements may nevertheless justify the use of hybrid......- to the macroscale. In this study, the performance of different fiber reinforced cementitious composites is assessed in terms of their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The results obtained from this investigation allow a direct quantitative comparison of the behavior obtained from the different fiber...

  17. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  18. Multi-Objective Patch Optimization with Integrated Kinematic Draping Simulation for Continuous–Discontinuous Fiber-Reinforced Composite Structures

    Benedikt Fengler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous fiber-reinforced polymers (DiCoFRP in combination with local continuous fiber reinforced polymers (CoFRP provide both a high design freedom and high weight-specific mechanical properties. For the optimization of CoFRP patches on complexly shaped DiCoFRP structures, an optimization strategy is needed which considers manufacturing constraints during the optimization procedure. Therefore, a genetic algorithm is combined with a kinematic draping simulation. To determine the optimal patch position with regard to structural performance and overall material consumption, a multi-objective optimization strategy is used. The resulting Pareto front and a corresponding heat-map of the patch position are useful tools for the design engineer to choose the right amount of reinforcement. The proposed patch optimization procedure is applied to two example structures and the effect of different optimization setups is demonstrated.

  19. Hybrid polymer photonic crystal fiber with integrated chalcogenide glass nanofilms

    Markos, Christos; Kubat, Irnis; Bang, Ole

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chalcogenide glasses with polymer photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is a difficult and challenging task due to their different thermo-mechanical material properties. Here we report the first experimental realization of a hybrid polymer-chalcogenide PCF with integrated As2S3 glass...... nanofilms at the inner surface of the air-channels of a poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) PCF. The integrated high refractive index glass films introduce distinct antiresonant transmission bands in the 480-900 nm wavelength region. We demonstrate that the ultra-high Kerr nonlinearity of the chalcogenide glass...

  20. Polymer brushes: a controllable system with adjustable glass transition temperature of fragile glass formers.

    Xie, Shi-Jie; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2014-01-28

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations for coarse-grained polymer brushes in a wide temperature range to investigate the factors that affect the glass transition in these systems. We focus on the influences of free surface, polymer-substrate interaction strength, grafting density, and chain length not only on the change of glass transition temperature Tg, but also the fragility D of the glass former. It is found that the confinement can enhance the dependence of the Tg on the cooling rate as compared to the bulk melt. Our layer-resolved analysis demonstrates that it is possible to control the glass transition temperature Tg of polymer brushes by tuning the polymer-substrate interaction strength, the grafting density, and the chain length. Moreover, we find quantitative differences in the influence range of the substrate and the free surface on the density and dynamics. This stresses the importance of long range cooperative motion in glass formers near the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the string-like cooperative motion analysis demonstrates that there exists a close relation among glass transition temperature Tg, fragility D, and string length ⟨S⟩. The polymer brushes that possess larger string length ⟨S⟩ tend to have relatively higher Tg and smaller D. Our results suggest that confining a fragile glass former through forming polymer brushes changes not only the glass transition temperature Tg, but also the very nature of relaxation process.

  1. Application of Fiber Reinforcement Concrete Technique in Civil ...

    modulus of elasticity, high tensile strength, improved fatigue and impact resistance. Reinforcing the concrete structures with fibers such as polyester is one of the possible ways to provide all the criteria of the durable repair material. This type of reinforcement is called Fiber Reinforcement of Concrete Structures. There is an ...

  2. Coir fiber reinforced polypropylene composite panel for automotive interior applications

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Songklod Jarusombuti; Vallayuth Fueangvivat; Piyawade Bauchongkol; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    In this study, physical, mechanical, and flammability properties of coconut fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) composite panels were evaluated. Four levels of the coir fiber content (40, 50, 60, and 70 % based on the composition by weight) were mixed with the PP powder and a coupling agent, 3 wt % maleic anhydride grafted PP (MAPP) powder. The water resistance and the...

  3. Fatigue life prediction of fiber reinforced concrete under flexural load

    Zhang, Jun; Stang, Henrik; Li, Victor

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical method to predict fatigue behavior in flexure of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) based on the equilibrium of force in the critical cracked section. The model relies on the cyclic bridging law, the so-called stress-crack width relationship under cyclic tensile...

  4. Stress-Strain Relationship of Synthetic Fiber Reinforced Concrete Columns

    Rosidawani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many empirical confinement models for normal and high strength concrete have been developed. Nevertheless, reported studies in the term of confinement of fiber reinforced concrete are limited. Whereas, the use of fiber reinforced concrete in structural elements has become the subject of the research and has indicated positive experiences. Since the stress-strain relationship of concrete in compression is required for analysis of structural members, the study of the stress-strain relationship for synthetic fiber reinforced concrete is substantial. The aim of the study is to examine the capabilities of the various models available in the literature to predict the actual experimental behavior of synthetic fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns. The experimental data used are the results of the circular column specimens with the spiral spacing and the volume fraction of synthetic fiber as the test variables. The axial stress-strain curves from the tests are then compared with the various models of confinement from the literature. The performance index of each model is measured by using the coefficient of variation (COV concept of stress and strain behavior parameter. Among the confinement models, Cusson model shows the closest valid value of the coefficient of variation.

  5. Recent development in blast performance of fiber-reinforced concrete

    Hajek, R.; Foglar, M.; Kohoutkova, A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents an overview of the recent development in blast performance of fiber reinforced concrete. The paper builds on more than ten years’ history of the research in this field by the team of the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague.

  6. Strength and thermal stability of fiber reinforced plastic composites ...

    Therefore, the strength properties and thermal stability of plastic composites reinforced with rattan fibers were investigated in this work. Particles of rattan species (Eremospatha macrocarpa (EM) and Laccosperma secundiflorum (LS)) were blended with High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) to produce fiber reinforced plastic ...

  7. Optimising of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Mix Design | Beddar ...

    Optimising of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Mix Design. ... as a result of the loss of mixture workability that will be translated into a difficult concrete casting in site. ... An experimental study of an optimisation method of fibres in reinforced ...

  8. Single Fibre Pullout from Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Markovich, I.; Van Mier, J.G.M.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid fiber reinforcement can be very efficient for improving the tensile response of the composite. In such materials, fibers of different geometries can act as bridging mechanisms over cracks of different widths. The fiber bridging efficiency depends on the interface properties, which makes

  9. Rotation capacity of self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    Schumacher, P.

    2006-01-01

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) has been used in segmental tunnel linings in the past years. In order to investigate the effect of steel fibers on the rotation capacity of plastic hinges in self-compacting concrete (SCC) the effect of the addition of fibers to SCC in compression, tension and

  10. Single fiber pullout from hybrid fiber reinforced concrete

    Markovich, I.; Van Mier, J.G.M.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid fiber reinforcement can be very efficient for improving the tensile response of the composite. In such materials, fibers of different geometries can act as bridging mechanisms over cracks of different widths. The fiber bridging efficiency depends on the interface properties, which makes

  11. Micro-Mechanical Modeling of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Stang, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) on the micro- the meso- as well as the macro-level, i.e. modeling aspects of fiber-matrix interaction, overall constitutive modeling and structural modeling. Emphasis is placed on the micro- and meso-aspects, however, some basic results on the macro-level are also...

  12. Thermal characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Jin-woo Lee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The material with irregular atomic structures such as polymer material exhibits low thermal conductivity because of the complex structural properties. Even materials with same atomic configurations, thermal conductivity may be different based on their structural properties. It is expected that nanoparticles with conductivity will change non-conductive polymer base materials to electrical conductors, and improve the thermal conductivity even with extremely small filling amount. Nano-composite materials contain nanoparticles with a higher surface ratio which makes the higher interface percentage to the total surface of nanoparticles. Therefore, thermal resistance of the interface becomes a dominating factor determines the effective thermal conductivity in nano-composite materials. Carbon fiber has characteristic of resistance or magnetic induction and Also, Carbon nanotube (CNT has electronic and thermal property. It can be applied for heating system. These characteristic are used as heating composite. In this research, the exothermic characteristics of Carbon fiber reinforced composite added CNT were evaluated depend on CNT length and particle size. It was found that the CNT dispersed in the resin reduces the resistance between the interfaces due to the decrease in the total resistance of the heating element due to the addition of CNTs. It is expected to improve the life and performance of the carbon fiber composite material as a result of the heating element resulting from this paper. Keywords: Carbon Nanotube (CNT, Carbon Fiber Reinforcement Plastic (CFRP, Heater, Exothermic characteristics

  13. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with "6"0Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0–1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite. - Highlights: • The properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite under "6"0Co γ irradiation up to 2.0 MGy were studied. • Basalt fiber can weaken the aging effects of γ irradiation on the resin matrix. • Tensile property of basalt fiber composite remains stable and flexural property has a low degree of attenuation. • Basalt fiber composite is an ideal candidate of structural material for nuclear industry.

  14. Mechanical behavior of chemically treated Jute/Polymer composites

    Murali B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of jute , a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, jute composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Mechanical properties of jute/polymer and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that jute can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites.

  15. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and 6O Co γ-rays up to 1.8 x 1 0 8 Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 x lO 22 m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed

  16. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna (Austria); Tschegg, E.K. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik; Egusa, Shigenori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gerstenberg, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and {sup 6O}Co {gamma}-rays up to 1.8 {times} 1 0{sup 8} Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 {times} lO{sup 22} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed.

  17. Application of Glass Fiber Reinforced Cement in Exhibition Decoration Project

    Wang, Yao

    2018-02-01

    Through the study of GRC material and its application field, the aesthetic characteristics and functional characteristics of GRC materials are demonstrated. The decorative application and technology of GRC material in an art exhibition center are highlighted. The design, application and construction technology of GRC curtain wall and ceiling board in the interior and exterior decoration of art exhibition hall are discussed in detail. The unique advantages of GRC materials in exhibition engineering decoration are fully reflected. In practical design application, the application principle and method are summarized, and an application procedure is formed. The research proves that GRC materials in the art of building decoration engineering has an underrated advantage.

  18. Machinability of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite ...

    This paper deals with the study of machinability of GFRP composite tubes of different fiber orientation angle vary from 300 to 900. Machining studies were carried out on an all geared lathe using three different cutting tools: namely Carbide (K-20), Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) and Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD). Experiments ...

  19. INFLUENCE OF PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCER TO GLASS FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE STIFFNESS

    Witold Rządkowski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The main goal was to determine if transducers based on piezoelectric materials are suitable for strain calculations in thin GFRP specimens. Numerous experimental studies, both physical and numerical, performed by the authors, have shown that there is a huge influence of bonded piezoelectric transducer on the overall stiffness of the measured object. The paper presents tensile test performed on strength machine with Digital Image Correlation strain and deflection observations. Test were compared with FEM models for detailed investigation. The main conclusion is piezoelectric transducers has huge influence on local stiffness of measured object. That is critical especially when they are used as strain sensors, when presence of sensor is influencing to measured results.

  20. Investigating the influence of alkalization on the mechanical and water absorption properties of coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites

    Okikiola Ganiu AGBABIAKA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are products made from renewable agricultural and forestry feedstock, which can include wood, grasses, and crops, as well as wastes and residues. There are two primary ways these fibers are used: to create polymers or as reinforcement and filler. Thermoplastic polymer may be reinforced or filled using natural fibers such as coir, sponge, hemp, flax, or sisal. This paper focused on the influence of alkalization (NaOH treatment on the mechanical and water absorption properties of selected natural fibers (coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites. In this study, coconut and sponge fiber were extracted from its husk by soaking them in water and was dried before it was cut into 10mm length. Those fibers were chemically treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH in a shaking water bath before it was used as reinforcement in polypropylene composite. The reinforced polypropylene composite was produced by dispersing the coconut fibers randomly in the polypropylene before it was fabricated in a compression molding machine where the composite was produced. The fiber content used were; 2%wt, 4%wt, 6%wt, 8%wt and 10%wt. Tensile and flexural properties was observed from universal testing machine while water absorption test was carried out on the samples for seven (7 days. It was observed that the influence of NaOH treatment highly enhanced the Flexural and water absorption properties of sponge fiber reinforced polypropylene composites than coconut fiber reinforced composite samples.

  1. Fracture resistance of metal-free composite crowns-effects of fiber reinforcement, thermal cycling, and cementation technique.

    Lehmann, Franziska; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The improved mechanical properties of contemporary composites have resulted in their extensive use for the restoration of posterior teeth. However, the influence of fiber reinforcement, cementation technique, and physical stress on the fracture resistance of metal-free crowns is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of fiber reinforcement, physical stress, and cementation methods on the fracture resistance of posterior metal-free Sinfony crowns. Ninety-six extracted human third molars received a standardized tooth preparation: 0.5-mm chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 1.3 to 1.5 mm. Sinfony (nonreinforced crowns, n=48) and Sinfony-Vectris (reinforced crowns, n=48) crowns restoring original tooth contour were prepared. Twenty-four specimens of each crown type were cemented, using either glass ionomer cement (GIC) or resin cement. Thirty-two crowns (one third) were stored in humidity for 48 hours. Another third was exposed to 10,000 thermal cycles (TC) between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The remaining third was treated with thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML), consisting of 1.2 million axial loads of 50 N. The artificial crowns were then vertically loaded with a steel sphere until failure occurred. Significant differences in fracture resistance (N) between experimental groups were assessed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha=.05). Fifty percent of the Sinfony and Sinfony-Vectris crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement loosened after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in a significant reduction in the mean fracture resistance for Sinfony crowns cemented with GIC, from 2037 N to 1282 N (P=.004). Additional fatigue produced no further effects. Fiber reinforcement significantly increased fracture resistance, from 1555 N to 2326 N (P=.001). The minimal fracture resistance was above 600 N for all combinations of material, cement and loading. Fracture resistance of metal-free Sinfony crowns was significantly increased by

  2. Fiber orientation interpolation for the multiscale analysis of short fiber reinforced composite parts

    Köbler, Jonathan; Schneider, Matti; Ospald, Felix; Andrä, Heiko; Müller, Ralf

    2018-06-01

    For short fiber reinforced plastic parts the local fiber orientation has a strong influence on the mechanical properties. To enable multiscale computations using surrogate models we advocate a two-step identification strategy. Firstly, for a number of sample orientations an effective model is derived by numerical methods available in the literature. Secondly, to cover a general orientation state, these effective models are interpolated. In this article we develop a novel and effective strategy to carry out this interpolation. Firstly, taking into account symmetry arguments, we reduce the fiber orientation phase space to a triangle in R^2 . For an associated triangulation of this triangle we furnish each node with an surrogate model. Then, we use linear interpolation on the fiber orientation triangle to equip each fiber orientation state with an effective stress. The proposed approach is quite general, and works for any physically nonlinear constitutive law on the micro-scale, as long as surrogate models for single fiber orientation states can be extracted. To demonstrate the capabilities of our scheme we study the viscoelastic creep behavior of short glass fiber reinforced PA66, and use Schapery's collocation method together with FFT-based computational homogenization to derive single orientation state effective models. We discuss the efficient implementation of our method, and present results of a component scale computation on a benchmark component by using ABAQUS ®.

  3. Fiber orientation interpolation for the multiscale analysis of short fiber reinforced composite parts

    Köbler, Jonathan; Schneider, Matti; Ospald, Felix; Andrä, Heiko; Müller, Ralf

    2018-04-01

    For short fiber reinforced plastic parts the local fiber orientation has a strong influence on the mechanical properties. To enable multiscale computations using surrogate models we advocate a two-step identification strategy. Firstly, for a number of sample orientations an effective model is derived by numerical methods available in the literature. Secondly, to cover a general orientation state, these effective models are interpolated. In this article we develop a novel and effective strategy to carry out this interpolation. Firstly, taking into account symmetry arguments, we reduce the fiber orientation phase space to a triangle in R^2 . For an associated triangulation of this triangle we furnish each node with an surrogate model. Then, we use linear interpolation on the fiber orientation triangle to equip each fiber orientation state with an effective stress. The proposed approach is quite general, and works for any physically nonlinear constitutive law on the micro-scale, as long as surrogate models for single fiber orientation states can be extracted. To demonstrate the capabilities of our scheme we study the viscoelastic creep behavior of short glass fiber reinforced PA66, and use Schapery's collocation method together with FFT-based computational homogenization to derive single orientation state effective models. We discuss the efficient implementation of our method, and present results of a component scale computation on a benchmark component by using ABAQUS ®.

  4. Isolation of aramid nanofibers for high strength multiscale fiber reinforced composites

    Lin, Jiajun; Patterson, Brendan A.; Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2018-03-01

    Aramid fibers are famous for their high specific strength and energy absorption properties and have been intensively used for soft body armor and ballistic protection. However, the use of aramid fiber reinforced composites is barely observed in structural applications. Aramid fibers have smooth and inert surfaces that are unable to form robust adhesion to polymeric matrices due to their high crystallinity. Here, a novel method to effectively integrate aramid fibers into composites is developed through utilization of aramid nanofibers. Aramid nanofibers are prepared from macroscale aramid fibers (such as Kevlar®) and isolated through a simple and scalable dissolution method. Prepared aramid nanofibers are dispersible in many polymers due to their improved surface reactivity, meanwhile preserve the conjugated structure and likely the strength of their macroscale counterparts. Simultaneously improved elastic modulus, strength and fracture toughness are observed in aramid nanofiber reinforced epoxy nanocomposites. When integrated in continuous fiber reinforced composites, aramid nanofibers can also enhance interfacial properties by forming hydrogen bonds and π-π coordination to bridge matrix and macroscale fibers. Such multiscale reinforcement by aramid nanofibers and continuous fibers results in strong polymeric composites with robust mechanical properties that are necessary and long desired for structural applications.

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  6. The influence of glass fibers on elongational viscosity studied by means of optical coherence tomography and X-ray computed tomography

    Aigner, M.; Köpplmayr, T.; Lang, C.; Burzic, I.; Miethlinger, J.; Salaberger, D.; Buchsbaum, A.; Leitner, M.; Heise, B.; Schausberger, S. E.; Stifter, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the flow characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced polymers in elongational rheometry. Unlike polymers with geometrically isotropic fillers, glass-fiber-reinforced polymers exhibit flow behavior and rheology that depend heavily on the orientation, the length distribution and the content of the fibers. One of the primary objectives of this study was to determine the effect of fiber orientation, concentration and distribution on the entrance pressure drop by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM), and X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). Both pressure drop and melt flow were analyzed using a special elongation die (Thermo Scientific X-Die [3]) for inline measurements. Samples with a variety of fiber volume fractions, fiber lengths and processing temperatures were measured

  7. The influence of glass fibers on elongational viscosity studied by means of optical coherence tomography and X-ray computed tomography

    Aigner, M.; Salaberger, D.; Buchsbaum, A.; Heise, B.; Schausberger, S. E.; Köpplmayr, T.; Lang, C.; Leitner, M.; Stifter, D.; Burzic, I.; Miethlinger, J.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the flow characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced polymers in elongational rheometry. Unlike polymers with geometrically isotropic fillers, glass-fiber-reinforced polymers exhibit flow behavior and rheology that depend heavily on the orientation, the length distribution and the content of the fibers. One of the primary objectives of this study was to determine the effect of fiber orientation, concentration and distribution on the entrance pressure drop by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM), and X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). Both pressure drop and melt flow were analyzed using a special elongation die (Thermo Scientific X-Die [3]) for inline measurements. Samples with a variety of fiber volume fractions, fiber lengths and processing temperatures were measured.

  8. Effect of Fiber Reinforcement on the Response of Structural Members

    Fischer, Gregor; Li, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a series of investigations on the effect of fiber reinforcement on the response of structural members in direct tension and flexure under reversed cyclic loading conditions. The design approach of the fiber reinforced cementitious composite is based on fracture mechanics...... principles, which will be described in the first part of the paper along with an introduction of the relevant material properties of the resulting engineered cementitious composite (ECC). This class of composites is characterized by strain hardening and multiple cracking properties in uniaxial tension...... and an ultimate tensile strain capacity on the order of several percent. Subsequently, the synergistic effects of composite deformation mechanisms in the ECC and structural members subjected to large shear reversals are identified. Beneficial effects observed in the reinforced ECC structural members as compared...

  9. Electromagnetic configurable architectures for assessment of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    Steigmann Rozina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics are used in most wide domains due their low density, lack of mechanical fatigue phenomena and high strength–to weight ratio. From electromagnetic point of view, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics structure represents an inhomogeneous structure of electric conductive fibers embedded into a dielectric material, thus an electromagnetic configurable architecture can be used to evaluate above mentioned defects. The paper proposes a special sensor, send receiver type and the obtaining of electromagnetic image by post-processing each coil signals in each point of scanning, using a sub-encoding image reconstruction algorithm and super-resolution procedures. The layout of fibers can be detected interrogating only diagonal reception coils.

  10. A Study of Array Direction HDPE Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    Kamsuwan, Trithos

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the effect of array direction HDPE fiber using as the reinforced material in cement mortar. The experimental data were created reference to the efficiency of using HDPE fiber reinforced on the tensile properties of cement mortar with different high drawn ratio of HDPE fibers. The fiber with the different drawn ratio 25x (d25 with E xx), and 35x (d35 with E xx) fiber volume fraction (0%, 1.0%, 1.5%) and fiber length 20 mm. were used to compare between random direction and array direction of HDPE fibers and the stress - strain displacement relationship behavior of HDPE short fiber reinforced cement mortar were investigated. It was found that the array direction with HDPE fibers show more improved in tensile strength and toughness when reinforced in cement mortar.

  11. Elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber reinforced composites - General features

    Datta, Subhendu; Ledbetter, Hassel; Lei, Ming

    The salient features of the elastic properties of uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites are examined by considering the complete set of elastic constants of composites comprising isotropic uniaxial fibers in an isotropic matrix. Such materials exhibit transverse-isotropic symmetry and five independent elastic constants in Voigt notation: C(11), C(33), C(44), C(66), and C(13). These C(ij) constants are calculated over the entire fiber-volume-fraction range 0.0-1.0, using a scattered-plane-wave ensemple-average model. Some practical elastic constants such as the principal Young moduli and the principal Poisson ratios are considered, and the behavior of these constants is discussed. Also presented are the results for the four principal sound velocities used to study uniaxial-fiber-reinforced composites: v(11), v(33), v(12), and v(13).

  12. Steel fiber reinforced concrete subjected to elevated cyclic temperatures

    Yousif, R. A.; Rasheed, H. M.; Muhammad, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    The results from a series of tests on steel fiber reinforced concrete at elevated cyclic temperature are presented. The residual compressive strength and ultimate splitting tensile strength were nadir's on specimen ts with no fibers and with 0.5% and 1% plain steel fibers over a temperature range of 300-700 C. concrete was subjected to one, two or three cycles of heating and cooling. In general the exposure to temperature decreased the strength of concrete, although the number of heating cycles seems only to have a secondary effect. The results also show that the steel fiber reinforced concrete performs better than plain concrete. Two equations were suggested to predict the strength of concrete and the results show good agreement with the experimental values. . (authors). 10 refs., 1 tabs. 3 figs

  13. Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material

    Luo, Xin; Xu, Jin-Yu; Li, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material (BFRPGCM) was prepared. The stress-strain curve has been worked out. The ideal energy-absorbing efficiency has been analyzed and the application prospect has been explored. The results show the following: fiber reinforced cellular material has successively sized pore structures; the stress-strain curve has two stages: elastic stage and yielding plateau stage; the greatest value of the ideal energy-absorbing efficiency of BFRPGCM is 89.11%, which suggests BFRPGCM has excellent energy-absorbing property. Thus, it can be seen that BFRPGCM is easy and simple to make, has high plasticity, low density and excellent energy-absorbing features. So, BFRPGCM is a promising energy-absorbing material used especially in civil defense engineering.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced ...

    68

    Alumina; composites; carbon fiber reinforcement; sol; mechanical properties. 1. Introduction ... The reinforcement was 3D carbon fiber (T300 3k, ex-PAN carbon fiber ... where f(a/H) = 2.9(a/H)1/2 – 4.6(a/H)3/2 + 21.8(a/H)5/2. – 37.6(a/H)7/2 + ...

  15. Performance of Lightweight Natural-Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Hardjasaputra Harianto; Ng Gino; Urgessa Girum; Lesmana Gabriella; Sidharta Steven

    2017-01-01

    Concrete, the most common construction material, has negligible tension capacity. However, a reinforcement material such as natural fibers, can be used to improve the tensile properties of concrete. This paper presents experiments conducted on Super Lightweight Concrete mixed with coconut fibers (SLNFRC). Coconut fibers are regarded as one of the toughest natural fibers to strengthen concrete. Coconut fiber reinforced composites have been considered as a sustainable construction material beca...

  16. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  17. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    Ahmed Ghazy; Mohamed T. Bassuoni; Eugene Maguire; Mark O’Loan

    2016-01-01

    Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the m...

  18. Behaviour of fiber reinforced concrete slabs under impact loading

    Huelsewig, M.; Stilp, A.; Pahl, H.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of steel fiber reinforced concrete slabs under impact loads has been investigated. The results obtained show that fracturing and spallation effects are reduced to a large extend due to the high energy absorption and the increased yield strength of this material. Crater depths are comparable to those obtained using normal concrete targets. Systematic tests using different fiber types and dimensions show that the terminal ballistic behaviour is strongly dependent on these parameters. (orig.) [de

  19. Tensile strength of woven yarn kenaf fiber reinforced polyester composites

    A.E. Ismail; M.A. Che Abdul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the tensile strength of woven kenaf fiber reinforced polyester composites. The as-received yarn kenaf fiber is weaved and then aligned into specific fiber orientations before it is hardened with polyester resin. The composite plates are shaped according to the standard geometry and uni-axially loaded in order to investigate the tensile responses. Two important parameters are studied such as fiber orientations and number of layers. According to the results, it is shown that...

  20. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Mironova, M.; Ivanova, M.; Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-10-01

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro - fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  1. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Mironova, M.; Ivanova, M.; Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro – fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete

  2. Engineering Properties of Treated Natural Hemp Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    Xiangming Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the construction industry has seen a significant rise in the use of natural fibers, for producing building materials. Research has shown that treated hemp fiber-reinforced concrete (THFRC can provide a low-cost building material for residential and low-rise buildings, while achieving sustainable construction and meeting future environmental targets. This study involved enhancing the mechanical properties of hemp fiber-reinforced concrete through the Ca(OH2 solution pretreatment of fibers. Both untreated (UHFRC and treated (THFRC hemp fiber-reinforced concrete were tested containing 15-mm length fiber, at a volume fraction of 1%. From the mechanical strength tests, it was observed that the 28-day tensile and compressive strength of THFRC was 16.9 and 10% higher, respectively, than UHFRC. Based on the critical stress intensity factor (KICs and critical strain energy release rate (GICs, the fracture toughness of THFRC at 28 days was also found to be 7–13% higher than UHFRC. Additionally, based on the determined brittleness number (Q and modulus of elasticity, the THFRC was found to be 11% less brittle and 10.8% more ductile. Furthermore, qualitative analysis supported many of the mechanical strength findings through favorable surface roughness observed on treated fibers and resistance to fiber pull-out.

  3. Experimental study on mix proportion of fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Jia, Yi; Zhao, Renda; Liao, Ping; Li, Fuhai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Shuang

    2017-10-01

    To study the mechanical property of fiber reinforced cementations composites influenced by the fiber length, quartz sand diameter, matrix of water cement ratio, volume fraction of fiber and magnesium acrylate solution. Several 40×40×160 mm standard test specimens, "8" specimens and long "8" specimens and 21 groups of fiber concrete specimens were fabricated. The flexural, compressive and uniaxial tensile strength were tested by using the bending resistance, compression resistance and electronic universal testing machine. The results show that flexural and compressive strength of fiber reinforced cementations composites increases along with the increase of quartz sand diameter, with the growth of the PVA fiber length increases; When the water-binder ratio is 0.25 and powder-binder ratio is 0.3, the PVA fiber content is 1.5% of the mass of cementations materials, there is a phenomenon of strain hardening; The addition of magnesium acrylate solution reduces the tensile strength of PVA fiber reinforced cementations composites, the tensile strength of the specimens in the curing age of 7d is decreased by about 21% and the specimens in curing age of 28d is decreased by more than 50%.

  4. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    Mironova, M., E-mail: mirona@imbm.bas.bg; Ivanova, M., E-mail: magdalena.ivanova@imbm.bas.bg; Naidenov, V., E-mail: valna53@mail.bg [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 4, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Georgiev, I., E-mail: ivan.georgiev@parallel.bas.bg [Institute of Information and Communication Technologies & Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stary, J., E-mail: stary@ugn.cas.cz [Institute of Geonics Czech Academy of Sciences, Studentska str., Ostrava 1768 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-28

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro – fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  5. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  6. Precision hole punching on composite fiber reinforced polymer panels

    Abdullah, A. B.; Zain, M. S. M.; Chan, H. Y.; Samad, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Structural materials, such as composite panels, can only be assembled, and in most cases through the use of fasteners, which are fitted into the drilled holes. However, drilling is costly and time consuming, thus affecting productivity. This research aims to develop an alternative method to drilling. In this paper, the precision of the holes was measured and the effects of the die clearance to the areas around the holes were evaluated. Measurement and evaluation were performed based on the profile of the holes constructed using Alicona IFM, a 3D surface measurement technique. Results showed that punching is a potential alternative to drilling but still requires improvements.

  7. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  8. Field implementation of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) deck panels.

    2017-06-01

    Jeffery S. Volz, S.E., P.E., Ph.D., Kamal H. Khayat, PhD, P.Eng. http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1431-0715, Soo Duck Hwang, Ph.D. http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2178-1531, Hesham Tuwair, Ph.D., Jonathan T. Drury, Amy S. Crone : Although still in their infancy...

  9. Underwater Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Wrap Experimental Project

    2018-01-30

    In 2017, The Maine Department of Transportation in collaboration with the Kenway Corporation and Construction Divers Inc. (CDI), completed a rehabilitation project on the Rices Bridge (#2715) over the York River in York, Maine. The project was to add...

  10. Culvert rehabilitation & invert lining using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites.

    2010-06-01

    As part of the state of Maine bridge funding initiative, MaineDOT has partnered with the University of : Maines AEWC Advanced Structures and Composite Center and the Maine composites industry to : incorporate composite technologies into bridge con...

  11. Mechanical characteristics of low-cost hybrid fiber reinforced polymer.

    2014-07-01

    This report deals with the experimental investigation of using large deformable FRP, 45 oriented fibers, in concrete-filled fiber : tubes (CFFT) under axial cyclic compressive loading. In addition, this report presents finite element modeling (F...

  12. Review of Japanese recommendations on design and construction of different classes of fiber reinforced concrete and application examples

    Uchida, Yuichi; Fischer, Gregor; Hishiki, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The development of concrete and cementitious composites with fiber reinforcement to improve the tensile load-deformation behavior has resulted in three distinct classes of materials. These include conventional Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) with tension softening response, High Performance Fiber...... Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) with strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior, and Ultra High-strength Fiber Reinforced concrete (UFC) with increased tensile strength. The recommendations on the design, production, and application of these classes of fiber reinforced concrete have been...

  13. Study of wear mechanism of chopped fiber reinforced epoxy composite filled with graphite and bronze

    Patil, Nitinchand; Prasad, Krishna

    2018-04-01

    The combined effect of graphite and sintered bronze with a short glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites was investigated in this work. A pin on disc wear test was carried out to study the wear behaviour and mechanism of the composites. The objective of this work is to develop an alternate friction resistance material for the application of sliding bearing. It was observed that the addition of sintered bronze improved mechanical and thermal stability of the composites as bronze has low contact resistance with graphite and has high thermal conductivity. It was observed from the test results that increased volume percentage of graphite and presence of bronze are play significant role in wear mechanism of the composites. It was observed from the scanning electronic microscopes (SEM) that the abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism was prominent in this study. It was also evident from the result that the frictional force remains stable irrespective of the applied normal load.

  14. Determination of the glass transition temperature of cyclodextrin polymers.

    Tabary, Nicolas; Garcia-Fernandez, Maria Jose; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc; Martel, Bernard; Willart, Jean-François

    2016-09-05

    The aim of this work was to determine the main physical characteristics of β-cyclodextrin polymers, well known for improving complexation capacities and providing enhanced and sustained release of a large panel of drugs. Two polymers were investigated: a polymer of β-cyclodextrin (polyβ-CD) and a polymer of partially methylated (DS=0.57) β-cyclodextrin (polyMe-β-CD). The physical characterizations were performed by powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate that these polymers are amorphous and that their glass transition is located above the thermal degradation point of the materials preventing their direct observation and thus their full characterization. We could however estimate the virtual glass transition temperatures by mixing the polymers with different plasticizers (trehalose and mannitol) which decreases Tg sufficiently to make the glass transition observable. Extrapolation to zero plasticizer concentration then yield the following Tg values: Tg (polyMe-β-CD)=317°C±5°C and Tg (polyβ-CD)=418°C±6°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of interfacial properties of basalt fiber reinforced nylon 6 matrix composites with silane coupling agents

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work solution surface treatment was applied for producing basalt fiber reinforced PA6 matrix composites. Beyond scanning electron microscopy, static and dynamic mechanical tests, dynamic mechanical analysis of composites was used for qualifying the interfacial adhesion in a wide temperature range. The loss factor peak height of loss factor is particularly important, because it is in close relationship with the mobility of polymer molecular chain segments and side groups, hence it correlates with the number and strength of primary or secondary bondings established between the matrix and the basalt fibers. It was proven, that the interfacial adhesion between basalt fibers and polyamide can be largely improved by the application of silane coupling agents in the entire usage temperature range of composites. The presence of coupling agents on the surface of basalt fibers was proven by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The best results were obtained by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent.

  16. Depression of Glass Transition Temperatures of Polymer Networks by Diluents

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Karasz, Frank E.; Ellis, Thomas S.

    1983-01-01

    A classical thermodynamic theory is used to derive expressions for the depression of the glass transition temperature Tg of a polymer network by a diluent. The enhanced sensitivity of Tg in cross-linked systems to small amounts of diluent is explained. Predictions of the theory are in satisfactory

  17. Simultaneous Determination of Glass Transition Temperatures of Several Polymers.

    He, Jiang; Liu, Wei; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    A simple and easy optical method is proposed for the determination of glass transition temperature (Tg) of polymers. Tg was determined using the technique of microsphere imaging to monitor the variation of the refractive index of polymer microsphere as a function of temperature. It was demonstrated that the method can eliminate most thermal lag and has sensitivity about six fold higher than the conventional method in Tg determination. So the determined Tg is more accurate and varies less with cooling/heating rate than that obtained by conventional methods. The most attractive character of the method is that it can simultaneously determine the Tg of several polymers in a single experiment, so it can greatly save experimental time and heating energy. The method is not only applicable for polymer microspheres, but also for the materials with arbitrary shapes. Therefore, it is expected to be broadly applied to different fundamental researches and practical applications of polymers.

  18. An Investigation of Interfacial Fatigue in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Yanhua, Chen; Zhifei, Shi

    2005-09-01

    Based on the shear-lag model and the modified degradation formula for coefficient of friction, the interfacial fatigue and debonding for fiber reinforced composites under cyclic loading are studied. The loading condition is chosen as the kind that is the most frequently used in fiber-pull-out experiments. The stress components in the debonded and bonded regions are obtained according to the maximum and minimum applied loading. By the aid of theory of fracture mechanics and Paris formula, the governing equation is solved numerically and the interfacial debonding is simulated. The relationships between the parameters (such as the debond rate, debond length, debond force) and the number of cycles are obtained.

  19. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization...

  20. Advanced rotary engine components utilizing fiber reinforced Mg castings

    Goddard, D.; Whitman, W.; Pumphrey, R.; Lee, C.-M.

    1986-01-01

    Under a two-phase program sponsored by NASA, the technology for producing advanced rotary engine components utilizing graphite fiber-reinforced magnesium alloy casting is being developed. In Phase I, the successful casting of a simulated intermediate housing was demonstrated. In Phase II, the goal is to produce an operating rotor housing. The effort involves generation of a material property data base, optimization of parameters, and development of wear- and corrosion-resistant cast surfaces and surface coatings. Results to date are described.

  1. Elastic properties of rigid fiber-reinforced composites

    Chen, J.; Thorpe, M. F.; Davis, L. C.

    1995-05-01

    We study the elastic properties of rigid fiber-reinforced composites with perfect bonding between fibers and matrix, and also with sliding boundary conditions. In the dilute region, there exists an exact analytical solution. Around the rigidity threshold we find the elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio by decomposing the deformation into a compression mode and a rotation mode. For perfect bonding, both modes are important, whereas only the compression mode is operative for sliding boundary conditions. We employ the digital-image-based method and a finite element analysis to perform computer simulations which confirm our analytical predictions.

  2. Suppression of electromechanical instability in fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomers

    Rui Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The electromechanical instability of dielectric elastomers has been a major challenge for the application of this class of active materials. In this work, we demonstrate that dielectric elastomers filled with soft fiber can suppress the electromechanical instability and achieve large deformation. Specifically, we developed a constitutive model to describe the dielectric and mechanical behaviors of fiber-reinforced elastomers. The model was applied to study the influence of stiffness, nonlinearity properties and the distribution of fiber on the instability of dielectric membrane under an electric field. The results show that there exists an optimal fiber distribution condition to achieve the maximum deformation before failure.

  3. Load sharing in tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal composites

    Clausen, B.; Bourke, Mark A.M.; Brown, Donald W.; Ustuendag, E.

    2006-01-01

    The load sharing in three tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal matrix composites (with fiber volume fractions of 10, 20 and 30%) have been determined using in situ neutron diffraction measurements. The expected iso-strain region was limited in the 20 and 30% composites due to thermal residual stresses. The experimental data have been used to validate the predictions of a unit-cell finite element model. The model was able to accurately predict the measured in situ loading data for all three composites using the same material properties for all calculations

  4. Load sharing in tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal composites

    Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-12, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: clausen@lanl.gov; Bourke, Mark A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MST-8, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, Donald W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MST-8, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ustuendag, E. [California Institute of Technology, Keck Laboratory, M/C 138-78, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The load sharing in three tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal matrix composites (with fiber volume fractions of 10, 20 and 30%) have been determined using in situ neutron diffraction measurements. The expected iso-strain region was limited in the 20 and 30% composites due to thermal residual stresses. The experimental data have been used to validate the predictions of a unit-cell finite element model. The model was able to accurately predict the measured in situ loading data for all three composites using the same material properties for all calculations.

  5. Flexural fatigue behavior of steel fiber reinforced concrete structures

    Chang, G.I.; Chai, W.K.; Park, C.W.; Min, I.K.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis, the fatigue tests are performed on a series of SFRC (steel fiber reinforced concrete) to investigate the fatigue behavior of SFRC varing with the steel fiber contents and the steel fiber aspect ratios. Thirty SFRC beams are used in this test. The relationships between repeated loading cycle and mid-span deflection of the beams are observed under the three-point loading system. From the test results, the effects of the fiber content and the fiber aspect ratio on the concrete fatigue behavior were studied. According to the regression technique, some empirical formulae for predicting the fatigue strength of SFRC beams are also suggested. (author)

  6. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF RANDOMLY DISTRIBUTED SHORT BANANA FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    R. K. Misra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Short banana fiber reinforced composites have been prepared in laboratory to determine mechanical properties. It has been observed that as soon as the percentage of the banana fiber increases slightly there is a tremendous increase in ultimate tensile strength, % of strain and young modulus of elasticity. Reinforcement of banana fibers in epoxy resin increases stiffness and decreases damping properties of the composites. Therefore, 2.468% banana fiber reinforced composite plate stabilizes early as compared to 7.7135 % banana fiber reinforced composite plate but less stiff as compared to 7.7135 % banana fiber reinforced composite plate

  7. Electrochemical corrosion of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic-metal electrode couples in corrosion media

    Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Shcherbakov, A.I.; Chigirinskaya, L.A.; Bandurkin, V.V.; Medova, I.L.; Chukalovskij, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization diagrams, obtained for carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic(cathode)-metallic material(anode) contact couples are analyzed to predict the corrosion behaviour of some technical metals and alloys (carbon steel, stainless steels, brass, aluminium, titanium) in contact with carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic in differen agressive media (H 2 SO 4 , HCl, H 3 PO 4 , NaOH solutions in wide temperature and concentration range, synthetic seawater at 30 and 50 deg C). The predicted behaviour was supported by direct investigation into carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic-titanium and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic-aluminium contact couples at different square ratios. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  8. Basalt woven fiber reinforced vinylester composites: Flexural and electrical properties

    Carmisciano, Salvatore; Rosa, Igor Maria De; Sarasini, Fabrizio; Tamburrano, Alessio; Valente, Marco

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary comparative study of basalt and E-glass woven fabric reinforced composites was performed. The fabrics were characterized by the same weave pattern and the laminates tested by the same fiber volume fraction. Results of the flexural and interlaminar characterization are reported. Basalt fiber composites showed higher flexural modulus and apparent interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) in comparison with E-glass ones but also a lower flexural strength and similar electrical properties. With this fiber volume fraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the fractured surfaces enabled a better understanding both of the failure modes involved and of points of concern. Nevertheless, the results of this study seem promising in view of a full exploitation of basalt fibers as reinforcement in polymer matrix composites (PMCs).

  9. Evaluation of Different Techniques of Active Thermography for Quantification of Artificial Defects in Fiber-Reinforced Composites Using Thermal and Phase Contrast Data Analysis

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Röllig, Mathias; Gower, Michael; Lodeiro, Maria; Baker, Graham; Monte, Christian; Adibekyan, Albert; Gutschwager, Berndt; Knazowicka, Lenka; Blahut, Ales

    2018-05-01

    For assuring the safety and reliability of components and constructions in energy applications made of fiber-reinforced polymers (e.g., blades of wind turbines and tidal power plants, engine chassis, flexible oil and gas pipelines) innovative non-destructive testing methods are required. Within the European project VITCEA complementary methods (shearography, microwave, ultrasonics and thermography) have been further developed and validated. Together with partners from the industry, test specimens have been constructed and selected on-site containing different artificial and natural defect artefacts. As base materials, carbon and glass fibers in different orientations and layering embedded in different matrix materials (epoxy, polyamide) have been considered. In this contribution, the validation of flash and lock-in thermography to these testing problems is presented. Data analysis is based on thermal contrasts and phase evaluation techniques. Experimental data are compared to analytical and numerical models. Among others, the influence of two different types of artificial defects (flat bottom holes and delaminations) with varying diameters and depths and of two different materials (CFRP and GFRP) with unidirectional and quasi-isotropic fiber alignment is discussed.

  10. Diagnostics of Polymer Composite Materials and Analysis of Their Production Technology by Using the Method of Acoustic Emission

    Bashkov, O. V.; Protsenko, A. E.; Bryanskii, A. A.; Romashko, R. V.

    2017-09-01

    The strength properties of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics produced by vacuum and vacuum autoclave molding techniques are studied. Based on acoustic emission data, a method of diagnostic and prediction of the bearing capacity of polymer composite materials by using data from three-point bending tests is developed. The method is based on evaluating changes in the exponent of a power function relating the total acoustic emission to the test stress.

  11. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assesseed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  12. Effect of gamma radiation on the magnetic properties of a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic with a polysulfone matrix

    Rodin, Yu.P.; Arkhipov, A.A.; Korkhov, V.P.; Pudnik, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the present article, the authors report results of a study of the change in the magnetic susceptibility of a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic based on a thermoplastic matrix -- aromatic polysulfone -- in relation to the absorbed dose of γ-radiation. The study results show that the change in the magnetic susceptibility of specimens which have absorbed different doses of gamma radiation correlates with the change in their mechanical properties, thermal behavior, and structural changes. A method is described for measuring susceptibility which can be used successfully to study the structure and properties of polymer materials and composites based on them. 3 refs., 3 figs

  13. 'Vanishing' structural effects of temperature in polymer glasses close to the glass-transition temperature

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Yu, R.S.; Kondo, K.; Yampolskii, Yu. P.; Alentiev, A.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were used for observation of structural effects of temperature in polystyrene (PS), super-cross-linked polystyrene networks (CPS), and in polyimides (PI) below and in the vicinity of glass-transition temperature T g . 'Vanishing' of these structural effects in the repeating cycles of the temperature controlled PAL experiments due to the slow relaxation processes in different conditions and details of chemical structure is demonstrated. Obtained results illustrate complex, dependent on thermal history, inhomogeneous character of the glass structure. In fact, structure of some polymer glasses is changing continuously. Calculations of the number density of free volume holes in these conditions are discussed

  14. Mechanical Properties of Fiber Reinforced Lightweight Concrete Containing Surfactant

    Yoo-Jae Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced aerated lightweight concrete (FALC was developed to reduce concrete's density and to improve its fire resistance, thermal conductivity, and energy absorption. Compression tests were performed to determine basic properties of FALC. The primary independent variables were the types and volume fraction of fibers, and the amount of air in the concrete. Polypropylene and carbon fibers were investigated at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4% volume ratios. The lightweight aggregate used was made of expanded clay. A self-compaction agent was used to reduce the water-cement ratio and keep good workability. A surfactant was also added to introduce air into the concrete. This study provides basic information regarding the mechanical properties of FALC and compares FALC with fiber reinforced lightweight concrete. The properties investigated include the unit weight, uniaxial compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and toughness index. Based on the properties, a stress-strain prediction model was proposed. It was demonstrated that the proposed model accurately predicts the stress-strain behavior of FALC.

  15. Electromechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomer membrane

    Chi Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on its large deformation, light weight, and high energy density, dielectric elastomer (DE has been used as driven muscle in many areas. We design the fiber-reinforced DE membrane by adding fibers in the membrane. The deformation and driven force direction of the membrane can be tuned by changing the fiber arrangements. The actuation in the perpendicular direction of the DE membrane with long fibers first increases and then decreases by the increasing of the fiber spacing in the perpendicular direction. The horizontal actuation of the membrane decreases by decreasing the spacing of short fibers. In the membrane-inflating structure, the radially arranged fibers will break the axisymmetric behavior of the structure. The top area of the inflated balloon without fiber will buckle up when the voltage reaches a certain level. Finite element simulations based on nonlinear field theory are conducted to investigate the effects of fiber arrangement and verify the experimental results. This work can guide the design of fiber-reinforced DE.

  16. Numerical modeling of hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete (hyfrc)

    Hameed, R.; Turatsinze, A.

    2015-01-01

    A model for numerical simulation of mechanical response of concrete reinforced with slipping and non slipping metallic fibers in hybrid form is presented in this paper. Constitutive law used to model plain concrete behaviour is based on plasticity and damage theories, and is capable to determine localized crack opening in three dimensional (3-D) systems. Behaviour law used for slipping metallic fibers is formulated based on effective stress carried by these fibers after when concrete matrix is cracked. A continuous approach is proposed to model the effect of addition of non-slipping metallic fibers in plain concrete. This approach considers the constitutive law of concrete matrix with increased fracture energy in tension obtained experimentally in direct tension tests on Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). To simulate the mechanical behaviour of hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete (HyFRC), proposed approaches to model non-slipping metallic fibers and constitutive law of plain concrete and slipping fibers are used simultaneously without any additive equation. All the parameters used by the proposed model have physical meanings and are determined through experiments or drawn from literature. The model was implemented in Finite Element (FE) Code CASTEM and tested on FRC prismatic notched specimens in flexure. Model prediction showed good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  17. A micromorphic model for steel fiber reinforced concrete.

    Oliver, J; Mora, D F; Huespe, A E; Weyler, R

    2012-10-15

    A new formulation to model the mechanical behavior of high performance fiber reinforced cement composites with arbitrarily oriented short fibers is presented. The formulation can be considered as a two scale approach, in which the macroscopic model, at the structural level, takes into account the mesostructural phenomenon associated with the fiber-matrix interface bond/slip process. This phenomenon is contemplated by including, in the macroscopic description, a micromorphic field representing the relative fiber-cement displacement. Then, the theoretical framework, from which the governing equations of the problem are derived, can be assimilated to a specific case of the material multifield theory. The balance equation derived for this model, connecting the micro stresses with the micromorphic forces, has a physical meaning related with the fiber-matrix bond slip mechanism. Differently to previous procedures in the literature, addressed to model fiber reinforced composites, where this equation has been added as an additional independent ingredient of the methodology, in the present approach it arises as a natural result derived from the multifield theory. Every component of the composite is defined with a specific free energy and constitutive relation. The mixture theory is adopted to define the overall free energy of the composite, which is assumed to be homogeneously constituted, in the sense that every infinitesimal volume is occupied by all the components in a proportion given by the corresponding volume fraction. The numerical model is assessed by means of a selected set of experiments that prove the viability of the present approach.

  18. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    Ahmed Ghazy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the mechanical and durability properties of cement-based systems. Thus, there has been a growing interest in the use of nano-modified fiber-reinforced cementitious composites/mortars (NFRM in repair and rehabilitation applications of concrete structures. The current study investigates various mechanical and durability properties of nano-modified mortar containing different types of fibers (steel, basalt, and hybrid (basalt and polypropylene, in terms of compressive and flexural strengths, toughness, drying shrinkage, penetrability, and resistance to salt-frost scaling. The results highlight the overall effectiveness of the NFRM owing to the synergistic effects of nano-silica and fibers.

  19. Biodegradation of flax fiber reinforced poly lactic acid

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Woven and nonwoven flax fiber reinforced poly lactic acid (PLA biocomposites were prepared with amphiphilic additives as accelerator for biodegradation. The prepared composites were buried in farmland soil for biodegradability studies. Loss in weight of the biodegraded composite samples was determined at different time intervals. The surface morphology of the biodegraded composites was studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results indicated that in presence of mandelic acid, the composites showed accelerated biodegradation with 20–25% loss in weight after 50–60 days. On the other hand, in presence of dicumyl peroxide (as additive, biodegradation of the composites was relatively slow as confirmed by only 5–10% loss in weight even after 80–90 days. This was further confirmed by surface morphology of the biodegraded composites. We have attempted to show that depending on the end uses, we can add different amphiphilic additives for delayed or accelerated biodegradability. This work gives us the idea of biodegradation of materials from natural fiber reinforced PLA composites when discarded carelessly in the environment instead of proper waste disposal site.

  20. The descent into glass formation in polymer fluids.

    Freed, Karl F

    2011-03-15

    Glassy materials have been fundamental to technology since the dawn of civilization and remain so to this day: novel glassy systems are currently being developed for applications in energy storage, electronics, food, drugs, and more. Glass-forming fluids exhibit a universal set of transitions beginning at temperatures often in excess of twice the glass transition temperature T(g) and extending down to T(g), below which relaxation becomes so slow that systems no longer equilibrate on experimental time scales. Despite the technological importance of glasses, no prior theory explains this universal behavior nor describes the huge variations in the properties of glass-forming fluids that result from differences in molecular structure. Not surprisingly, the glass transition is currently regarded by many as the deepest unsolved problem in solid state theory. In this Account, we describe our recently developed theory of glass formation in polymer fluids. Our theory explains the origin of four universal characteristic temperatures of glass formation and their dependence on monomer-monomer van der Waals energies, conformational energies, and pressure and, perhaps most importantly, on molecular details, such as monomer structure, molecular weight, size of side groups, and so forth. The theory also provides a molecular explanation for fragility, a parameter that quantifies the rate of change with temperature of the viscosity and other dynamic mechanical properties at T(g). The fragility reflects the fluid's thermal sensitivity and determines the manner in which glass-formers can be processed, such as by extrusion, casting, or inkjet spotting. Specifically, the theory describes the change in thermodynamic properties and fragility of polymer glasses with variations in the monomer structure, the rigidity of the backbone and side groups, the cohesive energy, and so forth. The dependence of the structural relaxation time at lower temperatures emerges from the theory as the Vogel

  1. Reactive processing of textile-natural fiber reinforced anionic polyamide-6 composites

    Kan, Ze; Chen, Peng; Liu, Zhengying; Feng, Jianmin; Yang, Mingbo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays natural fiber, used in reinforced composites, is widely concerned. However, no natural fiber reinforced reactive thermoplastic polymer grades had been prepared so far. Through our studies, it was demonstrated that there was a severe retardation and discoloration occurred in the reactive processing between anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) and natural fiber, which result in incomplete polymerization when put together. In order to solve the problem, two methods were adopted in this paper, which are fiber pretreatment and usage of a new-style initiator called caprolactam magnesium bromide. The former is to remove sizing agent and impurities on the surface of fiber, and the latter is to weaken the side reactions between APA-6 and natural fiber by the nature of its lower reactivity and weaker alkaline. In cooperation with both methods, the severe retardation and discoloration had been improved significantly, so that the polymerization of APA-6 in natural fiber was occurred smoothly. Following textile-natural fiber reinforced APA-6 composites with an average thickness of 2.5 mm and a fiber volume content of 50% was prepared by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The soxhlet extraction, dilute solution viscometry and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements respectively suggested the degree of conversion, viscosity-average molar mass and crystallization of composites was up to 94%, 11.3×104 and 50%. Remarkable improvement of mechanical properties were achieved through dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and three-point bending test. Favorable interfacial adhesion and wettability were revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Therefore, all of the above good performance make this new-style and environmentally friendly composites have broad application prospects

  2. Reactive processing of textile-natural fiber reinforced anionic polyamide-6 composites

    Kan, Ze; Chen, Peng; Liu, Zhengying; Feng, Jianmin; Yang, Mingbo

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays natural fiber, used in reinforced composites, is widely concerned. However, no natural fiber reinforced reactive thermoplastic polymer grades had been prepared so far. Through our studies, it was demonstrated that there was a severe retardation and discoloration occurred in the reactive processing between anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) and natural fiber, which result in incomplete polymerization when put together. In order to solve the problem, two methods were adopted in this paper, which are fiber pretreatment and usage of a new-style initiator called caprolactam magnesium bromide. The former is to remove sizing agent and impurities on the surface of fiber, and the latter is to weaken the side reactions between APA-6 and natural fiber by the nature of its lower reactivity and weaker alkaline. In cooperation with both methods, the severe retardation and discoloration had been improved significantly, so that the polymerization of APA-6 in natural fiber was occurred smoothly. Following textile-natural fiber reinforced APA-6 composites with an average thickness of 2.5 mm and a fiber volume content of 50% was prepared by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The soxhlet extraction, dilute solution viscometry and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements respectively suggested the degree of conversion, viscosity-average molar mass and crystallization of composites was up to 94%, 11.3×104 and 50%. Remarkable improvement of mechanical properties were achieved through dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and three-point bending test. Favorable interfacial adhesion and wettability were revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Therefore, all of the above good performance make this new-style and environmentally friendly composites have broad application prospects.

  3. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene.

    Naveh, Naum; Shepelev, Olga; Kenig, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG) after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs) enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called "stacked" graphene (SG). This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  4. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene

    Naum Naveh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called “stacked” graphene (SG. This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  5. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  6. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang [Composites Research Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Gyeongnam, 642–831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-18

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  7. Numerical investigation of friction joint between Basalt Fiber Reinforced Composites and aluminum

    Costache, Andrei; Berggreen, Christian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2016-01-01

    and stiffer flexible risers, which would be well suited for ultra deep water applications. This paper develops a new finite element model used for evaluating the efficiency of anchoring flat unidirectional fiber reinforced tendons in a mechanical grip. It consists two flat grips with the fiber reinforced...

  8. Preliminary Study on Impact Resistances of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Applied Nuclear Power Plants

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Kim, Young Jin; Jeon, Se Jin

    2013-01-01

    Studies to improve the impact resistance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application ratio, are in progress. Authors assessed first the impact resistance of concrete walls depending upon fiber types and missile impact velocities. The safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes have been accomplished for normal concrete and fiber reinforced concretes in this study. Studies on the safety assessments on the nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes are ongoing actively. As a step of evaluating the applicability of fiber reinforced concrete in means of ensuring more structural safety of the nuclear power plants against impact, the impact resistance for the 1% steel and 2% polyamide fiber reinforced concretes have been evaluated. For reactor containment building structures, it seem there is no impact resistance enhancement of fiber reinforced concrete applied to reactor containment building in the cases of impact velocity 150 m/sec considered in this study. However this results from the pre-stressing forces which introduce compressive stresses in concrete wall and dome section of reactor containment building. Nonetheless there may be benefits to apply fiber reinforced concrete to nuclear power plants. For double containment type reactor containment building, the outer structure is a reinforced concrete structure. The impact resistances for non pre-stressed cylindrical reactor containment buildings are enhanced by 23 to 47 % for 2 % polyamide fiber reinforced concretes and 1 % steel fiber reinforced concretes respectively. For other buildings such as auxiliary building, compound building and fuel storage building surrounding the reactor containment building, there are so many reinforced concrete walls which are anticipated some enhancements of impact resistance by using fiber reinforced concretes. And heavier or faster large civil aircraft impacts produce higher

  9. Preliminary Study on Impact Resistances of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Applied Nuclear Power Plants

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Kim, Young Jin; Jeon, Se Jin [Daewoo E and C Co. Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Studies to improve the impact resistance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application ratio, are in progress. Authors assessed first the impact resistance of concrete walls depending upon fiber types and missile impact velocities. The safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes have been accomplished for normal concrete and fiber reinforced concretes in this study. Studies on the safety assessments on the nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crashes are ongoing actively. As a step of evaluating the applicability of fiber reinforced concrete in means of ensuring more structural safety of the nuclear power plants against impact, the impact resistance for the 1% steel and 2% polyamide fiber reinforced concretes have been evaluated. For reactor containment building structures, it seem there is no impact resistance enhancement of fiber reinforced concrete applied to reactor containment building in the cases of impact velocity 150 m/sec considered in this study. However this results from the pre-stressing forces which introduce compressive stresses in concrete wall and dome section of reactor containment building. Nonetheless there may be benefits to apply fiber reinforced concrete to nuclear power plants. For double containment type reactor containment building, the outer structure is a reinforced concrete structure. The impact resistances for non pre-stressed cylindrical reactor containment buildings are enhanced by 23 to 47 % for 2 % polyamide fiber reinforced concretes and 1 % steel fiber reinforced concretes respectively. For other buildings such as auxiliary building, compound building and fuel storage building surrounding the reactor containment building, there are so many reinforced concrete walls which are anticipated some enhancements of impact resistance by using fiber reinforced concretes. And heavier or faster large civil aircraft impacts produce higher

  10. Size-dependent penetrant diffusion in polymer glasses.

    Meng, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Kumar, Sanat K

    2018-05-18

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to understand the underpinning basis of the transport of gas-like solutes in deeply quenched polymeric glasses. As found in previous work, small solutes, with sizes smaller than 0.15 times the chain monomer size, move as might be expected in a medium with large pores. In contrast, the motion of larger solutes is activated and is strongly facilitated by matrix motion. In particular, solute motion is coupled to the local elastic fluctuations of the matrix as characterized by the Debye-Waller factor. While similar ideas have been previously proposed for the viscosity of supercooled liquids above their glass transition, to our knowledge, this is the first illustration of this concept in the context of solute mass transport in deeply quenched polymer glasses.

  11. Steel fiber reinforced concrete behavior, modelling and design

    Singh, Harvinder

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses design aspects of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) members, including the behavior of the SFRC and its modeling. It also examines the effect of various parameters governing the response of SFRC members in detail. Unlike other publications available in the form of guidelines, which mainly describe design methods based on experimental results, it describes the basic concepts and principles of designing structural members using SFRC as a structural material, predominantly subjected to flexure and shear. Although applications to special structures, such as bridges, retaining walls, tanks and silos are not specifically covered, the fundamental design concepts remain the same and can easily be extended to these elements. It introduces the principles and related theories for predicting the role of steel fibers in reinforcing concrete members concisely and logically, and presents various material models to predict the response of SFRC members in detail. These are then gradually extended to d...

  12. Fiber breakage phenomena in long fiber reinforced plastic preparation

    Huang, Chao-Tsai; Tseng, Huan-Chang; Chang, Rong-Yeu; Vlcek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high demand of smart green, the lightweight technologies have become the driving force for the development of automotives and other industries in recent years. Among those technologies, using short and long fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) to replace some metal components can reduce the weight of an automotive significantly. However, the microstructures of fibers inside plastic matrix are too complicated to manage and control during the injection molding through the screw, the runner, the gate, and then into the cavity. This study focuses on the fiber breakage phenomena during the screw plastification. Results show that fiber breakage is strongly dependent on screw design and operation. When the screw geometry changes, the fiber breakage could be larger even with lower compression ratio. (paper)

  13. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  14. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  15. Neutron stress measurement of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite

    Nishida, M.; Hanabusa, T.; Ikeuchi, Y.; Minakawa, N.

    2003-01-01

    Stress measurement methods using neutron and X-ray diffraction were examined by comparing the surface stresses with internal stresses in the continuous tungsten-fiber reinforced copper-matrix composite. Surface stresses were measured by X-ray stress measurement with the sin 2 ψ method. Furthermore, the sin 2 ψ method and the most common triaxal measurement method using Hooke's equation were employed for internal stress measurement by neutron diffraction. On the other hand, microstress distributions developed by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between these two phases were calculated by FEM. The weighted average strains and stresses were compared with the experimental results. The FEM results agreed with the experimental results qualitatively and confirmed the importance of the triaxial stress analysis in the neutron stress measurement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Behavior of fiber reinforced metal laminates at high strain rate

    Newaz, Golam; Sasso, Marco; Amodio, Dario; Mancini, Edoardo

    2018-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Laminate (CARALL) is a good system for energy absorption through plastic deformation in aluminum and micro-cracking in the composite layers. Moreover, CARALL FMLs also provide excellent impact resistance due to the presence of aluminum layer. The focus of this research is to characterize the CARALL behavior under dynamic conditions. High strain rate tests on sheet laminate samples have been carried out by means of direct Split Hopkinson Tension Bar. The sample geometry and the clamping system were optimized by FEM simulations. The clamping system has been designed and optimized in order reduce impedance disturbance due to the fasteners and to avoid the excessive plastic strain outside the gauge region of the samples.

  17. Chairside fabricated fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture

    Sufyan Garoushi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in the materials and techniques for adhesive dentistry have allowed the development of non-invasive or minimally invasive approaches for replacing a missing tooth in those clinical situations when conservation of adjacent teeth is needed. Good mechanical and cosmetic/aesthetic properties of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC, with good bonding properties with composite resin cement and veneering composite are needed in FRC devices. Some recent studies have shown that adhesives of composite resins and luting cements allow diffusion of the adhesives to the FRC framework of the bridges. By this so-called interdiffusion bonding is formed [1]. FRC bridges can be made in dental laboratories or chairside. This article describes a clinical case of chairside (directly made FRC Bridge, which was used according to the principles of minimal invasive approach. Treatment was performed by Professor Vallittu from the University of Turku, Finland.

  18. Health monitoring technology for alumina-fiber-reinforced plastic

    Aoyama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Terai, Motoaki

    1998-01-01

    Formally, we developed new load-support systems that consists of a biconical, alumina-fiber-reinforced plastic (ERP) structure for the superconducting magnet. Safe operation of the superconducting magnet will be jeopardized if the mechanical condition of the load-support system begins to degrade. One of the factors that evaluate the soundness of the superconducting magnet is the stiffness of the load-support system. Here, it is important to know the relation between the degradation of the stiffness and the growth of defects. For this purpose, firstly, a fatigue test of the load-support system was carried out, and the various defects (matrix cracking and delamination of FRP laminates) were observed during this fatigue testing. Finally, we proposed the application of two non-destructive-evaluation (NDE) methods for the health monitoring of alumina/epoxy load-support systems. (author)

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced hierarchical orthogrid stiffened cylinder: Fabrication and testing

    Wu, Hao; Lai, Changlian; Sun, Fangfang; Li, Ming; Ji, Bin; Wei, Weiyi; Liu, Debo; Zhang, Xi; Fan, Hualin

    2018-04-01

    To get strong, stiff and light cylindrical shell, carbon fiber reinforced hierarchical orthogrid stiffened cylinders are designed and fabricated. The cylinder is stiffened by two-scale orthogrid. The primary orthogrid has thick and high ribs and contains several sub-orthogrid cells whose rib is much thinner and lower. The primary orthogrid stiffens the bending rigidity of the cylinder to resist the global instability while the sub-orthogrid stiffens the bending rigidity of the skin enclosed by the primary orthogrid to resist local buckling. The cylinder is fabricated by filament winding method based on a silicone rubber mandrel with hierarchical grooves. Axial compression tests are performed to reveal the failure modes. With hierarchical stiffeners, the cylinder fails at skin fracture and has high specific strength. The cylinder will fail at end crushing if the end of the cylinder is not thickened. Global instability and local buckling are well restricted by the hierarchical stiffeners.

  20. Application of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite to nuclear engineering

    Ishihara, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (C/C composite) is thought to be one of promising structural materials with high temperature resistivity in the nuclear engineering field. In the high temperature gas-cooled reactors with gas outlet temperature maximum around 1000degC, high performance core internal structures, such as control rod sheath, core restraint mechanism, will be expected to achieve by the C/C composite application. Moreover, in the fusion reactors, plasma facing structures having high temperature with high neutron irradiation and particle collision will be expected to achieve by the C/C composite application. In this paper, current research and development studies of the C/C composite application on both reactors are reviewed and vista of the future on the C/C composite application is mentioned. (author)

  1. Robotic inspection of fiber reinforced composites using phased array UT

    Stetson, Jeffrey T.; De Odorico, Walter

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound is the current NDE method of choice to inspect large fiber reinforced airframe structures. Over the last 15 years Cartesian based scanning machines using conventional ultrasound techniques have been employed by all airframe OEMs and their top tier suppliers to perform these inspections. Technical advances in both computing power and commercially available, multi-axis robots now facilitate a new generation of scanning machines. These machines use multiple end effector tools taking full advantage of phased array ultrasound technologies yielding substantial improvements in inspection quality and productivity. This paper outlines the general architecture for these new robotic scanning systems as well as details the variety of ultrasonic techniques available for use with them including advances such as wide area phased array scanning and sound field adaptation for non-flat, non-parallel surfaces.

  2. Tensile strength of woven yarn kenaf fiber reinforced polyester composites

    A.E. Ismail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the tensile strength of woven kenaf fiber reinforced polyester composites. The as-received yarn kenaf fiber is weaved and then aligned into specific fiber orientations before it is hardened with polyester resin. The composite plates are shaped according to the standard geometry and uni-axially loaded in order to investigate the tensile responses. Two important parameters are studied such as fiber orientations and number of layers. According to the results, it is shown that fiber orientations greatly affected the ultimate tensile strength but it is not for modulus of elasticity for both types of layers. It is estimated that the reductions of both ultimate tensile strength and Young’s modulus are in the range of 27.7-30.9% and 2.4-3.7% respectively, if the inclined fibers are used with respect to the principal axis.

  3. Study on Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    He, Dongqing; Wu, Min; Jie, Pengyu

    2017-12-01

    Several common high elastic modulus fibers (steel fibers, basalt fibers, polyvinyl alcohol fibers) and low elastic modulus fibers (polypropylene fiber) are incorporated into the concrete, and its cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength are studied. The test result and analysis demonstrate that single fiber and hybrid fiber will improve the integrity of the concrete at failure. The mechanical properties of hybrid steel fiber-polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete are excellent, and the cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength respectively increase than plain concrete by 6.4%, 3.7%, 11.4%. Doped single basalt fiber or polypropylene fiber and basalt fibers hybrid has little effect on the mechanical properties of concrete. Polyvinyl alcohol fiber and polypropylene fiber hybrid exhibit ‘negative confounding effect’ on concrete, its splitting tensile and flexural strength respectively are reduced by 17.8% and 12.9% than the single-doped polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete.

  4. Corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials

    Ha, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    This experiment has examined the corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials. There were slight changes of weight after the occurring of corrosion based on time and H2SO4 concentration, but in general, the weight increased. It is assumed that this happens due to the basalt fiber precipitate. Prior to the corrosion, friction-wear behavior showed irregular patterns compared to metallic materials, and when it was compared with the behavior after the corrosion, the coefficient of friction was 2 to 3 times greater. The coefficient of friction of all test specimen ranged from 0.1 to 0.2. Such a result has proven that the basalt fiber, similar to the resin rubber, shows regular patterns regardless of time and H2SO4 concentration because of the space made between resins and reinforced materials.

  5. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures

    Elías López-Alba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen and PLA (polylactic acid matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD

  6. Determination of moisture in fiber reinforced composites using pulsed NMR

    Matzkanin, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from hydrogen atoms in two organic matrix composite systems subjected to environmental conditioning at 51.6 C (125 F) and 95% relative humidity were examined. The composites were 8 ply, + or - 45 deg laminates fabricated from SP 250 resin/S2 glass fiber and Reliabond 9350 resin/Kevlar 49 fiber. Free induction decay NMR signals from the composite specimens consisted of a large amplitude, fast decaying component associated with hydrogen in rigid polymer molecules and a lower amplitude, slower decaying component associated with hydrogen in the mobile absorbed moisture molecules. The absorbed moisture NMR signals consists of distinct multiple components which were attributed to moisture in various states of molecular binding. Particularly complex free induction decay signals were observed from Kevlar composite as well as from Kevlar fiber. Good correlation was obtained between the NMR signal amplitude and the dry weight moisture percentage for both composite systems. Results of destructive tensile tests were examined

  7. A nonconjugated radical polymer glass with high electrical conductivity

    Joo, Yongho; Agarkar, Varad; Sung, Seung Hyun; Savoie, Brett M.; Boudouris, Bryan W.

    2018-03-01

    Solid-state conducting polymers usually have highly conjugated macromolecular backbones and require intentional doping in order to achieve high electrical conductivities. Conversely, single-component, charge-neutral macromolecules could be synthetically simpler and have improved processibility and ambient stability. We show that poly(4-glycidyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a nonconjugated radical polymer with a subambient glass transition temperature, underwent rapid solid-state charge transfer reactions and had an electrical conductivity of up to 28 siemens per meter over channel lengths up to 0.6 micrometers. The charge transport through the radical polymer film was enabled with thermal annealing at 80°C, which allowed for the formation of a percolating network of open-shell sites in electronic communication with one another. The electrical conductivity was not enhanced by intentional doping, and thin films of this material showed high optical transparency.

  8. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases

  9. Damage analysis of fiber reinforced resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser

    Wan Hong; Hu Kaiwei; Mu Jingyang; Bai Shuxin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the damage modes of the carbon fiber and the glass fiber reinforced epoxy or bakelite resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser under different power densities were analyzed, and the changes of the microstructure and the tensile strength of the composites were also researched. When the resin matrix composites were radiated at a power density more than 0.1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix would be decomposed and the tensile properties of the radiated samples were lost over 30% while the carbon fiber hardly damaged and the glass fiber melted. When the power density of the laser was raised to 1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix burned violently and the carbon fiber cloth began to split with some carbon fiber being fractured, therefore, the fracture strength of the radiated sample lost over 80%. The higher the power density of radiation was, the more serious the damage of the sample was. It was also found that the difference of the matrixes had little effect on the damage extent of the composites. The influence of the radiation density on the temperature of the radiated surface of the carbon/resin composite was numerically calculated by ANSYS finite element software and the calculation results coincided with the damage mode of the radiated composites. (authors)

  10. Fatigue damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based metallic glassy composite

    Zhang, H. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Z.F. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)]. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn; Wang, Z.G. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qiu, K.Q. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, H.F. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zang, Q.S. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Hu, Z.Q. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2006-02-25

    The fatigue life, damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced metallic glass Zr{sub 41.25}Ti{sub 13.75}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 12.5}Be{sub 22.5} composites are investigated under cyclic push-pull loading. It is found that the fatigue life of the composite increases with increasing the volume fraction of tungsten fibers. Similar to crystalline metals, the regions of crack initiation, propagation and overload fracture can be discerned on the fracture surface of the specimen. Fatigue crack normally initiates in the metallic glass matrix at the outer surface of the composite specimen and propagates predominantly in the matrix. Different crack front profile around the tungsten fibers and fiber pullout demonstrate that fatigue crack may propagate around the fiber, leading to bridging of the crack faces by the unbroken fiber and hence improved fatigue crack-growth resistance. Locally decreased effective stiffness in the region where fiber distribution is sparse may provide preferential crack path in the composite. A proposed model was exercised to elucidate different tungsten fiber fracture morphologies in the fatigue crack propagation and overload fracture regions in the light of Poisson's ratio effect during fatigue loading.

  11. Fatigue damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based metallic glassy composite

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, Z.F.; Wang, Z.G.; Qiu, K.Q.; Zhang, H.F.; Zang, Q.S.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2006-01-01

    The fatigue life, damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced metallic glass Zr 41.25 Ti 13.75 Ni 10 Cu 12.5 Be 22.5 composites are investigated under cyclic push-pull loading. It is found that the fatigue life of the composite increases with increasing the volume fraction of tungsten fibers. Similar to crystalline metals, the regions of crack initiation, propagation and overload fracture can be discerned on the fracture surface of the specimen. Fatigue crack normally initiates in the metallic glass matrix at the outer surface of the composite specimen and propagates predominantly in the matrix. Different crack front profile around the tungsten fibers and fiber pullout demonstrate that fatigue crack may propagate around the fiber, leading to bridging of the crack faces by the unbroken fiber and hence improved fatigue crack-growth resistance. Locally decreased effective stiffness in the region where fiber distribution is sparse may provide preferential crack path in the composite. A proposed model was exercised to elucidate different tungsten fiber fracture morphologies in the fatigue crack propagation and overload fracture regions in the light of Poisson's ratio effect during fatigue loading

  12. Molecular Motion in Polymers: Mechanical Behavior of Polymers Near the Glass-Rubber Transition Temperature.

    Sperling, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature at which the onset of coordinated segmental motion begins is called the glass-rubber transition temperature (Tg). Natural rubber at room temperature is a good example of a material above its Tg. Describes an experiment examining the response of a typical polymer to temperature variations above and below Tg. (Author/JN)

  13. Curaua fiber reinforced high-density polyethylene composites: effect of impact modifier and fiber loading

    Jaqueline Albano de Morais

    Full Text Available Abstract Short fibers are used in thermoplastic composites to increase their tensile and flexural resistance; however, it often decreases impact resistance. Composites with short vegetal fibers are not an exception to this behavior. The purpose of this work is to produce a vegetal fiber reinforced composite with improved tensile and impact resistance in relation to the polymer matrix. We used poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, to recover the impact resistance of high density polyethylene, HDPE, reinforced with Curauá fibers, CF. Blends and composites were processed in a corotating twin screw extruder. The pure polymers, blends and composites were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile mechanical properties and Izod impact resistance. EVA used as impact modifier in the HDPE matrix exhibited a co-continuous phase and in the composites the fibers were homogeneously dispersed. The best combination of mechanical properties, tensile, flexural and impact, were obtained for the formulations of composites with 20 wt. % of CF and 20 to 40 wt. % of EVA. The composite prepared with 20 wt. % EVA and containing 30 wt. % of CF showed impact resistance comparable to pure HDPE and improved tensile and flexural mechanical properties.

  14. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  15. Method for Forming Fiber Reinforced Composite Bodies with Graded Composition and Stress Zones

    Singh, Mrityunjay (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Smialek, James A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A near-net, complex shaped ceramic fiber reinforced silicon carbide based composite bodies with graded compositions and stress zones is disclosed. To provide the composite a fiber preform is first fabricated and an interphase is applied by chemical vapor infiltration, sol-gel or polymer processes. This first body is further infiltrated with a polymer mixture containing carbon, and/or silicon carbide, and additional oxide, carbide, or nitride phases forming a second body. One side of the second body is spray coated or infiltrated with slurries containing high thermal expansion and oxidation resistant. crack sealant phases and the other side of this second body is coated with low expansion phase materials to form a third body. This third body consisting of porous carbonaceous matrix surrounding the previously applied interphase materials, is then infiltrated with molten silicon or molten silicon-refractory metal alloys to form a fourth body. The resulting fourth body comprises dense composites consisting of fibers with the desired interphase which are surrounded by silicon carbide and other second phases materials at the outer and inner surfaces comprising material of silicon, germanium, refractory metal suicides, borides, carbides, oxides, and combinations thereof The resulting composite fourth body has different compositional patterns from one side to the other.

  16. Thermal characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Lee, Jin-woo; Park, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Yun-hae; Riichi-Murakami

    2018-06-01

    The material with irregular atomic structures such as polymer material exhibits low thermal conductivity because of the complex structural properties. Even materials with same atomic configurations, thermal conductivity may be different based on their structural properties. It is expected that nanoparticles with conductivity will change non-conductive polymer base materials to electrical conductors, and improve the thermal conductivity even with extremely small filling amount. Nano-composite materials contain nanoparticles with a higher surface ratio which makes the higher interface percentage to the total surface of nanoparticles. Therefore, thermal resistance of the interface becomes a dominating factor determines the effective thermal conductivity in nano-composite materials. Carbon fiber has characteristic of resistance or magnetic induction and Also, Carbon nanotube (CNT) has electronic and thermal property. It can be applied for heating system. These characteristic are used as heating composite. In this research, the exothermic characteristics of Carbon fiber reinforced composite added CNT were evaluated depend on CNT length and particle size. It was found that the CNT dispersed in the resin reduces the resistance between the interfaces due to the decrease in the total resistance of the heating element due to the addition of CNTs. It is expected to improve the life and performance of the carbon fiber composite material as a result of the heating element resulting from this paper.

  17. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  18. Glass transition temperature of polymer nano-composites with polymer and filler interactions

    Hagita, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroshi; Doi, Masao; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied versatile coarse-grained model (bead spring model) to describe filled polymer nano-composites for coarse-grained (Kremer-Grest model) molecular dynamics simulations. This model consists of long polymers, crosslink, and fillers. We used the hollow structure as the filler to describe rigid spherical fillers with small computing costs. Our filler model consists of surface particles of icosahedra fullerene structure C320 and a repulsive force from the center of the filler is applied to the surface particles in order to make a sphere and rigid. The filler's diameter is 12 times of beads of the polymers. As the first test of our model, we study temperature dependence of volumes of periodic boundary conditions under constant pressures through NPT constant Andersen algorithm. It is found that Glass transition temperature (Tg) decrease with increasing filler's volume fraction for the case of repulsive interaction between polymer and fillers and Tg weakly increase for attractive interaction.

  19. How deformation enhances mobility in a polymer glass

    Lacks, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Recent experiments show that deformation of a polymer glass can lead to orders-of-magnitude enhancement in the atomic level dynamics. To determine why this change in dynamics occurs, we carry out molecular dynamics simulations and energy landscape analyses. The simulations address the coarse-grained polystyrene model of Kremer and co-workers, and the dynamics, as quantified by the van Hove function, are examined as the glass undergoes shear deformation. In agreement with experiment, the simulations find that deformation enhances the atomic mobility. The enhanced mobility is shown to arise from two mechanisms: First, active deformation continually reduces barriers for hopping events, and the importance of this mechanism is modulated by the rate of thermally activated transitions between adjacent energy minima. Second, deformation moves the system to higher-energy regions of the energy landscape, characterized by lower barriers. Both mechanisms enhance the dynamics during deformation, and the second mechanism is also relevant after deformation has ceased.

  20. Design and analysis of coiled fiber reinforced soft pneumatic actuator.

    Singh, Gaurav; Xiao, Chenzhang; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T; Krishnan, Girish

    2018-04-18

    Fiber reinforced elastomeric enclosures (FREEs) are soft pneumatic actuators that can contract and generate forces upon pressurization. Typical engineering applications utilize FREEs in their straight cylindrical configuration and derive actuation displacement and forces from their ends. However, there are several instances in nature, such as an elephant trunk, snakes and grapevine tendrils, where a spiral configuration of muscle systems is used for gripping, thereby establishing a mechanical connection with uniform force distribution. Inspired by these examples, this paper investigates the constricting behavior of a contracting FREE actuator deployed in a spiral or coiled configuration around a cylindrical object. Force balance is used to model the blocked force of the FREE, which is then related to the constriction force using a string model. The modeling and experimental findings reveal an attenuation in the blocked force, and thus the constriction force caused by the coupling of peripheral contact forces acting in the spiral configuration. The usefulness of the coiled FREE configuration is demonstrated in a soft arm orthosis for crutch users that provides a constriction force around the forearm. This design minimizes injury risk by reducing wrist load and improving wrist posture.

  1. Performance of Lightweight Natural-Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Hardjasaputra Harianto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete, the most common construction material, has negligible tension capacity. However, a reinforcement material such as natural fibers, can be used to improve the tensile properties of concrete. This paper presents experiments conducted on Super Lightweight Concrete mixed with coconut fibers (SLNFRC. Coconut fibers are regarded as one of the toughest natural fibers to strengthen concrete. Coconut fiber reinforced composites have been considered as a sustainable construction material because the fibers are derived from waste. These wastes, which are available in large quantities in Asia, have to be extracted from the husk of coconut fruits and must pass a mechanical process before being added to a concrete mixture. The Super Lightweight Concrete was made by mixing concrete paste with foam agent that can reduce the overall weight of concrete up to 60% with compressive strength up to 6 MPa. The Super Lightweight Concrete is intended to be used for non-structural walls, as alternative conventional construction materials such as brick walls. The influence of coconut fibers content in increasing the flexural tensile strength of Super Lightweight Concrete was studied in this research. The fiber content studied include 0%, 0.1%, 0.175%, and 0.25% by weight of cement content. Sixteen specimens of SLNFRC mini beams of 60 mm x 60 mm x 300 mm were tested to failure to investigate their flexural strengths. The optimum percent fibers yielding higher tensile strength was found to be 0.175%

  2. Development of Abaca Fiber-reinforced Foamed Fly Ash Geopolymer

    Janne Pauline S. Ngo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental and economic concerns have led to the need for more sustainable construction materials. The development of foamed geopolymer combines the benefit of reduced environmental footprint and attractive properties of geopolymer technology with foam concrete’s advantages of being lightweight, insulating and energy-saving. In this study, alkali-treated abaca fiber-reinforced geopolymer composites foamed with H2O2 were developed using fly ash as the geopolymer precursor. The effects of abaca fiber loading, foaming agent dosage, and curing temperature on mechanical strength were evaluated using Box-Behken design of experiment with three points replicated. Volumetric weight of samples ranged from 1966 kg/m3 to 2249 kg/m3. Measured compressive strength and flexural ranged from 19.56 MPa to 36.84 MPa, and 2.41 MPa to 6.25 MPa, respectively. Results suggest enhancement of compressive strength by abaca reinforcement and elevated temperature curing. Results, however, indicate a strong interaction between curing temperature and foaming agent dosage, which observably caused the composite’s compressive strength to decline when simultaneously set at high levels. Foaming agent dosage was the only factor detected to significantly affect flexural strength.

  3. Unsaturated and Saturated Permeabilities of Fiber Reinforcement: Critics and Suggestions

    Chung Hae ePARK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In general, permeability measurement results show a strong scattering according to the measurement method, the type of test fluid and the fluid injection condition, even though permeability is regarded as a unique property of porous medium. In particular, the discrepancy between the unsaturated and saturated permeabilities for the same fabric has been widely reported. In the literature, relative permeability has been adopted to model the unsaturated flow. This approach has some limits in the modeling of double-scale porosity medium. We address this issue of permeability measurement by rigorously examining the mass conservation condition. Finally, we identify that the pressure gradient is non-linear with positive curvature in the unsaturated flow and a misinterpretation of pressure gradient is the main reason for the difference between the saturated and unsaturated permeabilities of the same fiber reinforcement. We propose to use a fixed value of permeability and to modify the mass conservation equation if there are air voids which are entrapped inside the fiber tow. Finally, we also suggest some guidelines and future perspectives to obtain more consistent permeability measurement results.

  4. Anomaly detection of microstructural defects in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    Bricker, Stephen; Simmons, J. P.; Przybyla, Craig; Hardie, Russell

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with continuous fiber reinforcements have the potential to enable the next generation of high speed hypersonic vehicles and/or significant improvements in gas turbine engine performance due to their exhibited toughness when subjected to high mechanical loads at extreme temperatures (2200F+). Reinforced fiber composites (RFC) provide increased fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, and strength, though little is known about how stochastic variation and imperfections in the material effect material properties. In this work, tools are developed for quantifying anomalies within the microstructure at several scales. The detection and characterization of anomalous microstructure is a critical step in linking production techniques to properties, as well as in accurate material simulation and property prediction for the integrated computation materials engineering (ICME) of RFC based components. It is desired to find statistical outliers for any number of material characteristics such as fibers, fiber coatings, and pores. Here, fiber orientation, or `velocity', and `velocity' gradient are developed and examined for anomalous behavior. Categorizing anomalous behavior in the CMC is approached by multivariate Gaussian mixture modeling. A Gaussian mixture is employed to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of the features in question, and anomalies are classified by their likelihood of belonging to the statistical normal behavior for that feature.

  5. Flexural Cracking Behavior Of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Ashraf Abdalkader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibers are added to concrete due to its ability to improve the tensile strength and control propagation of cracks in reinforced concrete members. Steel fiber reinforced concrete is made of cement fine water and coarse aggregate in addition to steel fibers. In this experimental work flexural cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams contains different percentage of hooked-end steel fibers with length of 50 mm and equivalent diameter of 0.5 mm was studied. The beams were tested under third-point loading test at 28 days. First cracking load maximum crack width cracks number and load-deflection relations were investigated to evaluate the flexural cracking behavior of concrete beams with 34 MPa target mean strength. Workability wet density compressive and splitting tensile strength were also investigated. The results showed that the flexural crack width is significantly reduced with the addition of steel fibers. Fiber contents of 1.0 resulted in 81 reduction in maximum crack width compared to control concrete without fiber. The results also showed that the first cracking load and maximum load are increased with the addition of steel fibers.

  6. Acoustic emission of fire damaged fiber reinforced concrete

    Mpalaskas, A. C.; Matikas, T. E.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of a fiber-reinforced concrete after extensive thermal damage is studied in this paper. Undulated steel fibers have been used for reinforcement. After being exposed to direct fire action at the temperature of 850°C, specimens were subjected to bending and compression in order to determine the loss of strength and stiffness in comparison to intact specimens and between the two types. The fire damage was assessed using nondestructive evaluation techniques, specifically ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and acoustic emission (AE). Apart from the strong, well known, correlation of UPV to strength (both bending and compressive), AE parameters based mainly on the frequency and duration of the emitted signals after cracking events showed a similar or, in certain cases, better correlation with the mechanical parameters and temperature. This demonstrates the sensitivity of AE to the fracture incidents which eventually lead to failure of the material and it is encouraging for potential in-situ use of the technique, where it could provide indices with additional characterization capability concerning the mechanical performance of concrete after it subjected to fire.

  7. In vitro study of transverse strength of fiber reinforced composites.

    Mosharraf, R; Hashemi, Z; Torkan, S

    2011-01-01

    Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3×2×25 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (Ptransverse strength (Pstudy, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples.

  8. Theory of the tensile actuation of fiber reinforced coiled muscles

    Lamuta, C.; Messelot, S.; Tawfick, S.

    2018-05-01

    There is a strong need for compact artificial muscles capable of applying large contractile strokes and lift heavy weights. Coiled fibers recently emerged as attractive candidates for these purposes, owing to their simple construction and the possibility of their thermal, electrical and chemical actuation. An intuitive theoretical understanding of the mechanics of actuation of these muscles is essential for the enhancement of their performance and can pave the way for the development of new applications and technologies. In this paper, a complete theoretical model for the tensile actuation of fiber reinforced artificial muscles is presented and experimentally validated. The model demonstrates that all muscles made from the same material have a universal behavior, which can be described by a single master curve. It enables the systematic design and understanding of coiled muscles for specific performance owing to a comprehensive mathematical correlation among the geometry, materials properties, and actuation. Carbon fibers (CF)/polydimethylsiloxane coiled muscles are demonstrated as simple to fabricate yet powerful muscles owing to the availability of high strength CF. In addition to showing excellent agreement with the theoretical models, they can be actuated by joule heating or chemical swelling, lift up to 12 600 times their own weight, support up to 60 MPa of mechanical stress, provide tensile strokes higher than 25%, and a specific work up to 758 J kg‑1, the latter is more than 18 times higher than that of natural muscles.

  9. Probabilistic Flexural Fatigue in Plain and Fiber-Reinforced Concrete.

    Ríos, José D; Cifuentes, Héctor; Yu, Rena C; Ruiz, Gonzalo

    2017-07-07

    The objective of this work is two-fold. First, we attempt to fit the experimental data on the flexural fatigue of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete with a probabilistic model (Saucedo, Yu, Medeiros, Zhang and Ruiz, Int. J. Fatigue, 2013, 48, 308-318). This model was validated for compressive fatigue at various loading frequencies, but not for flexural fatigue. Since the model is probabilistic, it is not necessarily related to the specific mechanism of fatigue damage, but rather generically explains the fatigue distribution in concrete (plain or reinforced with fibers) for damage under compression, tension or flexion. In this work, more than 100 series of flexural fatigue tests in the literature are fit with excellent results. Since the distribution of monotonic tests was not available in the majority of cases, a two-step procedure is established to estimate the model parameters based solely on fatigue tests. The coefficient of regression was more than 0.90 except for particular cases where not all tests were strictly performed under the same loading conditions, which confirms the applicability of the model to flexural fatigue data analysis. Moreover, the model parameters are closely related to fatigue performance, which demonstrates the predictive capacity of the model. For instance, the scale parameter is related to flexural strength, which improves with the addition of fibers. Similarly, fiber increases the scattering of fatigue life, which is reflected by the decreasing shape parameter.

  10. Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) for High Rise Construction: Case Studies

    Gharehbaghi, Koorosh; Chenery, Rhea

    2017-12-01

    Due to its material element, Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) could be stronger than traditional Concrete. This is due to FRC internal material compounds and elements. Furthermore, FRC can also significantly improve flexural strength when compared to traditional Concrete. This improvement in flexural strength can be varied depending on the actual fibers used. Although not new, FRC is gradually gaining popularity in the construction industry, in particular for high rise structures. This is due to its flexural strength, especially for high seismic zones, as it will provide a better solution then reinforced Concrete. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the structural importance of FRC for the high rise construction. Although there has been numerous studies and literature in justifying the FRC for general construction; this paper will consider its use specifically for high rise construction. Moreover, this paper will closely investigate eight case studies from Australian and United States as a part of the FRC validation for high rise construction. In doing so, this paper will examine their Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) to determine their overall structural performance.

  11. Effect of Accelerated Aging on Color Change of Direct and Indirect Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

    Masomeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of artificial accelerated aging (AAA on color change of direct and indirect fiber-reinforced composite (FRC restorations.Materials and Methods: Direct (Z250 and indirect (Gradia composite resins were reinforced with glass (GF and polyethylene fibers (PF based on the manufacturers’ instructions. Forty samples were fabricated and divided into eight groups (n=5. Four groups served as experimental groups and the remaining four served as controls. Color change (∆E and color parameters (∆L*, ∆a*, ∆b* were read at baseline and after AAA based on the CIELAB system. Three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis.Results: Significant differences were found in ΔE, ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* among the groups after AAA (P<0.05. Most of the studied samples demonstrated an increase in lightness and a red-yellow shift after AAA.Conclusions: The obtained ∆E values were unacceptable after AAA (∆E≥ 3.3. All indirect samples showed a green-blue shift with a reduction in lightness except for Gradia/PF+ NuliteF.Keywords: Aging; Composite Resins; Color

  12. Design and fabrication hazard stakes golf course polymeric foam material empty bunch (EFB) fiber reinforced

    Zulfahmi; Syam, B.; Wirjosentono, B.

    2018-02-01

    A golf course with obstacles in the forms of water obstacle and lateral water obstacle marked with the stakes which are called golf course obstacle stake in this study. This study focused on the design and fabrication of the golf course obstacle stake with a solid cylindrical geometry using EFB fiber-reinforced polimeric foam composite materials. To obtain the EFB fiber which is free from fat content and other elements, EFB is soaked in the water with 1% (of the watre total volume) NaOH. The model of the mould designed is permanent mould that can be used for the further refabrication process. The mould was designed based on resin-compound paste materials with talc powder plus E-glass fiber to make the mould strong. The composition of polimeric foam materials comprised unsaturated resin Bqtn-Ex 157 (70%), blowing agent (10%), fiber (10%), and catalyst (10%). The process of casting the polimeric foam composit materials into the mould cavity should be at vertical casting position, accurate interval time of material stirring, and periodical casting. To find out the strength value of the golf course obstacle stake product, a model was made and simulated by using the software of Ansys workbench 14.0, an impact loading was given at the height of 400 mm and 460 mm with the variation of golf ball speed (USGA standard) v = 18 m/s, v = 35 m/s, v = 66.2 m/s, v = 70 m/s, and v = 78.2 m/s. The clarification showed that the biggest dynamic explicit loading impact of Fmax = 142.5 N at the height of 460 mm with the maximum golf ball speed of 78.2 m/s did not experience the hysteresis effect and inertia effect. The largest deformation area occurred at the golf ball speed v = 66.2 mm/s, that is 18.029 mm (time: 2.5514e-004) was only concentrated around the sectional area of contact point of impact, meaning that the golf course obstacle stakes made of EFB fiber-reinforced polymeric foam materials have the geometric functional strength that are able to absorb the energy of golf ball

  13. Use of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete in Cold Regions

    2017-12-24

    This report documents and presents the use of steel fiber-reinforced rubberized concrete (SFRRC) in cold regions. Further investigation of SFRRC use was conducted with the wheel tracker rut and freeze-thaw laboratory testing procedures at the Univers...

  14. Assessment of the mechanical properties of sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay using triaxial shear tests.

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  15. Operational factors influence on service life characteristics of structural carbon fiber-reinforced plastic

    Борозенець, Григорій; Павлов, Віктор; Семак, Інна

    2013-01-01

    The nature of strength changing of aircraft structural carbon fiber-reinforced plastic under influence of water saturation after static preloading and mode changing of structural elements forming process pressure is considered.

  16. Cracking and debonding of a thin fiber reinforced concrete overlay : research brief.

    2017-03-01

    Experimental tests found that the tensile interfacial energy : increased with fiber-reinforcement. Also bond tests indicated : that interfacial fracture occurred through the overlay mixture and : was proportional to the number of fibers which interse...

  17. ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Cuenca Asensio, Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Cuenca Asensio, E. (2012). ON SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS MADE OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE [Tesis doctoral no publicada]. Universitat Politècnica de València. doi:10.4995/Thesis/10251/18326. Palancia

  18. Effect of polyester fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties of interim fixed partial dentures

    N. Gopichander

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, polyester fiber reinforcements improved the mechanical properties of heat-polymerized PMMA, cold-polymerized PMMA, and bis-acrylic provisional FPD materials.

  19. Sustainability of fiber reinforced laminate and honeycomb composites in manufacturing industries

    Asmatulu, Eylem; Alonayni, Abdullah; Alamir, Mohammed; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    2018-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites provide a lot of benefits, including strength-to-weight ratio / light weight, superior mechanical properties, low maintenance, prolonged service life, as well as corrosion, fatigue and creep resistance. However, sustainability of the FRP composites have not been studied in detail in terms of long term productions in various industries, such as aerospace, wind energy, automotive and defense. Carbon fibers are relatively expensive because of the energy intensive production systems, and lack of easy production options, which forces many companies to recycle and reuse the FRP composites in the same or different manufacturing industries. This study mainly deals with two important issues, including the disposal of composite wastes generated during the manufacturing of composite parts, and the disposal of the products at the end of their useful life. It is believed that the carbon fibers in the used composites will have still high mechanical strengths to use in different composite manufacturing after its end of life. The major manufacturing costs come from the labor and raw materials, so using the recycled carbon fibers will make sustainable composite productions in other industries. This paper presents the current status and outlook of the FRP composite recycling and re-manufacturing techniques in the same or different industries. A future vision of the FRP composites will be investigated with sustainability point of views. This study will also mention about the sustainability issues in laminate and honeycomb composites, new product design and developments and potential applications in different manufacturing industries.

  20. Residual stress analysis in carbon fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics

    Broda, M.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic residual stress analyses are reported, carried out in long-fiber reinforced SiC ceramics. The laminated C fiber /SiC matrix specimens used were prepared by polymer pyrolysis, and the structural component specimens used are industrial products. Various diffraction methods have been applied for non-destructive evaluation of residual stress fields, so as to completely detect the residual stresses and their distribution in the specimens. The residual stress fields at the surface (μm) have been measured using characteristic X-radiation and applying the sin 2 ψ method as well as the scatter vector method. For residual stress field analysis in the mass volume (cm), neutron diffraction has been applied. The stress fields in the fiber layers (approx. 250μm) have been measured as a function of their location within the laminated composite by using an energy-dispersive method and synchrotron radiation. By means of the systematic, process-accompanying residual stress and phase analyses, conclusions can be drawn as to possible approaches for optimization of fabrication parameters. (orig./CB) [de