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Sample records for glass durability dependence

  1. Am/Cm target glass durability dependence on pH (U). Revision 1

    Daniel, W.E.; Best, D.R.

    1996-03-01

    At the Westinghouse Savannah River Company near Aiken, South Carolina, a process is being developed to safely vitrify all of the highly radioactive americium/curium (Am/Cm) material and a portion of the other fissile actinide materials stored on site. One goal of this campaign is to provide Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the excess Am/Cm so it can be recycled as opposed to simply disposing of it as waste. The vitrification will allow safe transportation of the Am/Cm to Oak Ridge as well as safe storage once it arrives. The Am/Cm Target glass being used in this project has been specifically designed to be extremely durable in aqueous environments while it can be selectively attacked by nitric acid to recover the valuable Am and Cm isotopes. Similar glass compositions could be used for storage and retrieval of other actinides on the WSRC site. Previous reports have presented the time, temperature, and compositional dependence of the Am/Cm glass durability. This paper will show results from a pH study on the Am/Cm Target glass durability. The data indicate that the Am/Cm Target Glass durability decreases as pH decreases from a neutral reading. These findings support the extraction of the valuable isotopes from the glass using nitric acid

  2. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria; FINAL

    Ren, W

    2001-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria

  3. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  4. Durable Glass For Thousands Of Years

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al 3+ rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  5. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  6. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region

  7. The chemical durability of alkali aluminosilicate glasses

    Tait, J.C.; Mandolesi, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    The aqueous durabilities of a series of glasses based on the sodium aluminosilicate system (Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 ) have been studied. The effects of molecular substitution of K 2 O or CaO for Na 2 O, and B 2 O 3 for Al 2 O 3 have been investigated. The temperature dependence of leaching in the Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 system was studied with glasses containing 2 wt percent simulated UO 2 fuel recycle waste. The results confirm that aluminosilicate glasses are more durable than their borosilicate counterparts. The leaching results are explained in terms of glass structure and bonding, and a general leaching mechanism for aluminosilicate glasses is presented

  8. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context

  9. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  10. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  11. Chemical durability of silicoborate glasses

    Nieto, M.I.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Rubio, J.; Fernandez, A.; Oteo, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A general view of the durability in silicoborate glasses is presented with more emphasis on the etching factors (chemical composition, lattice structure, pH...) the techniques used for this study and the experimental results. Likewise, the research presently developed in this area at the Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, is related to the applications. Future research in this field is also mentioned. (author) 15 figs

  12. Evaluation of models of waste glass durability

    Ellison, A.

    1995-01-01

    The main variable under the control of the waste glass producer is the composition of the glass; thus a need exists to establish functional relationships between the composition of a waste glass and measures of processability, product consistency, and durability. Many years of research show that the structure and properties of a glass depend on its composition, so it seems reasonable to assume that there also is relationship between the composition of a waste glass and its resistance to attack by an aqueous solution. Several models have been developed to describe this dependence, and an evaluation their predictive capabilities is the subject of this paper. The objective is to determine whether any of these models describe the ''correct'' functional relationship between composition and corrosion rate. A more thorough treatment of the relationships between glass composition and durability has been presented elsewhere, and the reader is encouraged to consult it for a more detailed discussion. The models examined in this study are the free energy of hydration model, developed at the Savannah River Laboratory, the structural bond strength model, developed at the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America, and the Composition Variation Study, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  13. Surface chemistry and durability of borosilicate glass

    Carroll, S.A.; Bourcier, W.L.; Phillips, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    Important glass-water interactions are poorly understood for borosilicate glass radioactive waste forms. Preliminary results show that glass durability is dependent on reactions occurring at the glass-solution interface. CSG glass (18.2 wt. % Na 2 O, 5.97 wt. % CaO, 11.68 wt. % Al 2 O 3 , 8.43 wt. % B 2 O 3 , and 55.73 wt. % SiO 2 ) dissolution and net surface H + and OH - adsorption are minimal at near neutral pH. In the acid and alkaline pH regions, CSG glass dissolution rates are proportional to [H + ] adsorbed 2 and [OH - ] adsorbed 0.8 , respectively. In contrast, silica gel dissolution and net H + and OH - adsorption are minimal and independent of pH in acid to neutral solutions. In the alkaline pH region, silica gel dissolution is proportional to [OH - ] adsorbed 0.9 adsorbed . Although Na adsorption is significant for CSG glass and silica gel in the alkaline pH regions, it is not clear if it enhances dissolution, or is an artifact of depolymerization of the framework bonds

  14. A structural bond strength model for glass durability

    Feng, Xiangdong; Metzger, T.B.

    1996-01-01

    A glass durability model, structural bond strength (SBS) model was developed to correlate glass durability with its composition. This model assumes that the strengths of the bonds between cations and oxygens and the structural roles of the individual elements in the glass arc the predominant factors controlling the composition dependence of the chemical durability of glasses. The structural roles of oxides in glass are classified as network formers, network breakers, and intermediates. The structural roles of the oxides depend upon glass composition and the redox state of oxides. Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , and B 2 O 3 are assigned as network formers only when there are sufficient alkalis to bind with these oxides. CaO can also improve durability by sharing non-bridging oxygen with alkalis, relieving SiO 2 from alkalis. The percolation phenomenon in glass is also taken into account. The SBS model is applied to correlate the 7-day product consistency test durability of 42 low-level waste glasses with their composition with an R 2 of 0.87, which is better than 0.81 obtained with an eight-coefficient empirical first-order mixture model on the same data set

  15. Chemical durability of glasses containing radioactive fission product waste

    Mendel, J.E.; Ross, W.A.

    1974-04-01

    Measurements made to determine the chemical durability of glasses for disposal of radioactive waste are discussed. The term glass covers materials varying from true glass with only minute quantities of crystallites, such as insoluble RuO 2 , to quasi glass-ceramics which are mostly crystalline. Chemical durability requirements and Soxhlet extractor leach tests are discussed

  16. Thermodynamic model of natural, medieval and nuclear waste glass durability

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability based on hydration of structural units has been applied to natural glass, medieval window glasses, and glasses containing nuclear waste. The relative durability predicted from the calculated thermodynamics correlates directly with the experimentally observed release of structural silicon in the leaching solution in short-term laboratory tests. By choosing natural glasses and ancient glasses whose long-term performance is known, and which bracket the durability of waste glasses, the long-term stability of nuclear waste glasses can be interpolated among these materials. The current Savannah River defense waste glass formulation is as durable as natural basalt from the Hanford Reservation (10 6 years old). The thermodynamic hydration energy is shown to be related to the bond energetics of the glass. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  17. Factors influencing chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    A short summary is given of our studies on the major factors that affect the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses. These factors include glass composition, solution composition, SA/V (ratio of glass surface area to the volume of solution), radiation, and colloidal formation. These investigations have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses and to accumulate.a data base for modeling the long-term durability of waste glass, which will be used in the risk assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This knowledge gained also enhances our ability to formulate optimal waste glass compositions

  18. The effect of compositional parameters on the TCLP and PCT durability of environmental glasses

    Resce, J.L.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between glass composition and the chemical durability of environmental waste glass is very important for both the development of glass formulations and the prediction of glass durability for process control. The development of such a model is extremely difficult for several reasons. Firstly, chemical durability is dependent upon the type of leach test employed; the leach tests themselves being only crude approximations of actual environmental conditions or long term behavior. Secondly, devitrification or crystallinity can also play a major role in durability, but is much more difficult to quantify. Lastly, the development of any one model for all glass types is impractical because of the wide variety of wastestreams, the heterogeneity of the wastestreams, and the large variety of components within each wastestream. Several ongoing efforts have been directed toward this goal, but as yet, no model has been proven acceptable

  19. Preliminary results of durability testing with borosilicate glass compositions

    Adel-Hadadi, M.; Adiga, R.; Barkatt, Aa.

    1987-01-01

    This is a report on the first year of research conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project. One objective is the vitrification of liquid waste generated by previous nuclear fuel reprocessing. This work has been directed principally at the problem of glass composition optimization. This has necessitated the development of a coordinated program of glass production, durability measurements, and processability assessment. A small-scale continuous melter has been constructed for melting uranium and thorium containing glasses and for studying glass processing characteristics. Glass viscosities have been measured over a range of temperatures. A large number of glasses have also been produced in small crucible melts. Glass durability has been assessed using four types of leach tests: MCC-3, MCC-1, IAEA/ISO, and pulsed-flow tests. Extensive data from these tests are reported. The data have led to the design of very durable glasses (comparable to the Savannah River Laboratory Defense Waste Reference Glass) which have the requisite waste loading and processing characteristics. 14 refs., 4 figs., 77 tabs

  20. Chemical durability of simulated nuclear glasses containing water

    Li, H.; Tomozawa, M.

    1995-04-01

    The chemical durability of simulated nuclear waste glasses having different water contents was studied. Results from the product consistency test (PCT) showed that glass dissolution increased with water content in the glass. This trend was not observed during MCC-1 testing. This difference was attributed to the differences in reactions between glass and water. In the PCT, the glass network dissolution controlled the elemental releases, and water in the glass accelerated the reaction rate. On the other hand, alkali ion exchange with hydronium played an important role in the MCC-1. For the latter, the amount of water introduced into a leached layer from ion-exchange was found to be much greater than that of initially incorporated water in the glass. Hence, the initial water content has no effect on glass dissolution as measured by the MCC-1 test

  1. Durability of adhesive glass-metal connections for structural applications

    Van Lancker, B.; Dispersyn, J.; De Corte, W.; Belis, J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of adhesive bonds for structural glass-metal connections in the building envelope has increased in recent years. Despite the multiple advantages compared to more traditional bolted connections, long-term behaviour and durability of the adhesives have to be investigated accurately. Because,

  2. Durability of Mortar Made with Fine Glass Powdered Particles

    Rosemary Bom Conselho Sales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different studies investigate the use of waste glass in Portland cement compounds, either as aggregates or as supplementary cementitious materials. Nevertheless, it seems that there is no consensus about the influence of particle color and size on the behavior of the compounds. This study addresses the influence of cement replacement by 10 and 20% of the colorless and amber soda-lime glass particles sized around 9.5 μm on the performance of Portland cement mortars. Results revealed that the partial replacement of cement could contribute to the production of durable mortars in relation to the inhibition of the alkali-aggregate reaction. This effect was more marked with 20% replacement using amber glass. Samples containing glass microparticles were more resistant to corrosion, in particular those made of colorless glass. The use of colorless and amber glass microparticles promoted a reduction in wear resistance.

  3. From glass structure to its chemical durability

    Angeli, F.

    2009-01-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activities. He more precisely reports studies related to glass structure based on nuclei observed by NMR and present in glasses of interest for nuclear activities. He discusses the influence of chemical composition on structure, and discusses information which can be extracted from network formers (Al, B) and modifiers (Na, Ca), and from oxygen present in the network linkages of oxide glasses. He discusses the different experimental and modelling approaches which enable structural and morphological information to be obtained at a mesoscopic scale. The last part deals with the investigation of the long term behaviour of confinement matrices (glassy matrix for medium-activity wastes, ceramic matrix)

  4. Neural network analysis of nuclear waste glass composition vs durability

    Seibel, C.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the chemical composition of oxide glasses and their physical properties is poorly understood, but it is becoming more important as vitrification (transformation into glass) of high-level nuclear waste becomes the favored method for long-term storage. The vitrified waste will be stored deep in geologic repositories where it must remain intact for at least 10,000 years. A strong resistance to groundwater exposure; i.c. a slow rate of glass dissolution, is of great importance. This project deals specifically with glass samples developed and tested for the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility near West Valley, New York. This facility needs to dispose of approximately 2.2 million liters of high-level radioactive liquid waste currently stored in stainless steel tanks. A self-organizing, artificial neural network was used to analyze the trends in the glass dissolution data for the effects of composition and the resulting durability of borosilicate glasses in an aqueous environment. This durability data can be used to systematically optimize the properties of the complex nuclear glasses and slow the dissolution rate of radionuclides into the environment

  5. Recommendations for Glass Durability Test Criteria

    Strachan, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this short report is to define a set of activities that should lead to a specification for a test that can be used as one of the acceptance criteria and as an indicator of acceptable long-term behavior in contact with water. Since the glass composition is not yet defined and is likely to change as the composition of the waste changes, a strategy for developing criteria for what is acceptable involves a series of tests and modeling activities. The results of these activities lead to a criterion for an acceptable product and the data that are needed to reliably determine the behavior of the glass in the storage environment

  6. Influence of Some Nuclear Waste on The Durability and Mechanical Properties of Borosilicate glass

    El-Alaily, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    Various glass systems have been shown to be suitable for producing waste glass forms that are thermally and mechanically stable and exhibit good chemical durability. In this study borosilicate glass containing sodium oxide and aluminum oxide was prepared as a host for high level nuclear waste. The glass durability when the samples were immersed either in distilled water or ground water at 70 degree was studied. The density, porosity and mechanical properties were also investigated. The effects of exposing the samples immersed in groundwater to gamma rays in the glass durability and all other mentioned properties were also studied. The results showed that immersing the glass in ground water causing a decrease in the glass durability. The exposure of the glass immersed in ground water to the gamma rays increases the durability of the glass. The mechanical properties of the prepared glass were good. Although these properties decrease for the corroded glass but they were still good

  7. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C.H.M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle–glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers’ hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H 2 /N 2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle–glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required

  8. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Meyer, Willem C.H.M. [Necsa, South African Nuclear Energy Corporation, PO Box 582, Pretoria, Gauteng (South Africa); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle–glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers’ hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle–glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

  9. Durability testing with West Valley borosilicate glass composition- Phase II

    Macedo, P.B.; Finger, S.M.; Barkatt, A.A.; Pegg, I.L.; Feng, X.; Freeborn, W.P.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the research performed by the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) during FY 1987 in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) nuclear waste vitrification process. A principal objective of this work is the optimization of the glass composition be used for the vitrification of the liquid high-level waste generated at West Valley during nuclear fuel reprocessing. This report discusses (1) the experimental investigations to optimize the reference glass composition (the current leading candidates are WVCM-50 and ATM-10) for the WVDP vitrification process; (2) the systematic experimental investigation performed to determine the effects of compositional variations in WVCM-50 and WV-205 reference glasses on their viscosity and durability (including initial results of long-term leach tests of WVCM-50 under repository conditions); (3) the development of short-time and predictive leach tests; (4) the development of a process model for the West Valley vitrification process which predicts the range of glass compositions which may be encountered during normal operations and the effects of deviations in process control parameters; and (5) the development of product models for predicting the durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses

  10. Production and remediation of low sludge simulated Purex waste glasses, 2: Effects of sludge oxide additions on glass durability

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Glass produced during the Purex 4 campaigns of the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) and the 774 Research Melter contained a lower fraction of sludge components than targeted by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Purex 4 glass was more durable than the benchmark (EA) glass, but was less durable than most other simulated SRS high-level waste glasses. Further, the measured durability of Purex 4 glass was not as well correlated with the durability predicted from the DWPF process control algorithm, probably because the algorithm was developed to predict the durability of SRS high-level waste glasses with higher sludge content than Purex 4. A melter run, designated Purex 4 Remediation, was performed using the 774 Research Melter to determine if the initial PCCS target composition determined for Purex 4 would produce acceptable glass whose durability could be accurately modeled by the DWPF glass durability algorithm. Reagent grade oxides and carbonates were added to Purex 4 melter feed stock to simulate a higher sludge loading. Each canister of glass produced was sampled and the glass durability was determined by the Product Consistency Test method. This document details the durability data and subsequent analysis

  11. Physical properties and chemical durability of selected zirconia containing silicate glasses

    ELEONÓRA GAŠPÁREKOVÁ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Density, thermal expansion, glass transition temperature, refractive index, molar refractivity and chemical durability of five- and six-component glasses with as weighted composition xNa2O·(15-xK2O·yCaO∙(10-yZnO∙zZrO2∙(75-zSiO2 (x = 0, 7.5, 15; y = 0, 5, 10; z = 5, 7 were measured. The obtained experimental data were merged together with the previous results obtained for analogous glasses with lower zirconia content. The full set of glasses enabled the quantitative statistical estimation of possible mixed-oxide effects. The results of the multilinear regression analysis pointed out the ideal behavior of molar volume and molar refractivity. The strongest influence of mutual oxide interactions was found for chemical durability and glass transition temperature. The regression analysis of compositional dependence of metastable melt thermal expansion coefficient practically failed. The need of property-composition study based on the thermodynamic model was pointed out. Qualitatively the obtained results confirmed those previously obtained for the analogous glasses with zirconia content reaching up to 3 mol. %.

  12. Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs

  13. Durability of glasses from the Hg-doped Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) for the vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is designed and constructed to be a 1/9th scale prototype of the full scale Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. The IDMS facility is the first engineering scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to determine the effects of mercury on the feed preparation process, the off-gas chemistry, glass melting behavior, and glass durability, a three-run mercury (Hg) campaign was conducted. The glasses produced during the Hg campaign were composed of Batch 1 sludge, simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product (PHA) from the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF), and Frit 202. The glasses were produced using the DWPF process/product models for glass durability, viscosity, and liquidus. The durability model indicated that the glasses would all be more durable than the glass qualified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). The glass quality was verified by performing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) which was designed for glass durability testing in the DWPF

  14. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani, E-mail: mfsyazwani86@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, The National University of Malaysia, 43650 Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl–KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (T{sub L}): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability. - Highlights: • We investigated crystallization in borosilicate glasses containing rare earth oxides. • New crystallinity and durability data are shown for glasses proposed in the literature. • Both liquidus temperature and chemical durability increased as the waste loading increased.

  15. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al 2 O 3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  16. Recent results on the effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of DWPF glass

    Bibler, N.E.; Tosten, M.H.; Beam, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of a simulated nuclear waste glass from the Savannah River Site has been carefully investigated. Three large pieces of glass were irradiated with a Co-60 source to three doses up to a maximum dose of 3.1 x 10 10 rad. Internal samples of the large pieces of irradiated and unirradiated glass were leached in deionized water to investigate durability changes and were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate microstructure changes. Leach tests were performed in triplicate at 90 degree C with crushed glass samples in deionized water. A statistical analysis of the results indicated to the 95% confidence level that the radiation did not affect the glass durability. Careful examination by TEM indicated no effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure of the glass although severe damage could be induced by the electron beam from the microscope. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Composition effects on chemical durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses - systematic studies and structural thermodynamic models

    Feng, X.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the primary criteria for the acceptability of nuclear waste glasses are their durability, i.e. chemical resistance to aqueous attack for 10 4 to 10 5 years, and processability, which requires their viscosity at the desired melt temperature to be sufficiently low. Chapter 3 presents the results of systematic composition variation studies around the preliminary reference glass composition WV205 and an atomistic interpretation of the effects of individual oxides. Chapter 4 is concerned with modifications of the Jantzen-Plodinec hydration model which takes into account formation of complex aluminosilicate compounds in the glass. Chapter 5 is devoted to the development and validation of the structural-thermodynamic model for both durability and viscosity. This model assumes the strength of bonds between atoms to be the controlling factor in the composition dependence of these glass properties. The binding strengths are derived from the known heats of formation and the structural roles of constituent oxides. Since the coordination state of various oxides in the glass is temperature dependent and cation size has opposite effects on the two properties, the correlation between melt viscosity and rate of corrosion at low temperature is not simply linear. Chapter 6 surveys the effects of aqueous phase composition on the leach behavior of glasses. These studies provide a comprehensive view of the effects of both glass composition and leachant composition on leaching. The models developed correlate both durability and viscosity with glass composition. A major implication is that these findings can be used in the systematic optimization of the properties of complex oxide glasses

  18. Composition models for the viscosity and chemical durability of West Valley related nuclear waste glasses

    Feng, X.; Saad, E.E.; Freeborn, W.P.; Macedo, P.B.; Pegg, I.L.; Sassoon, R.E.; Barkatt, A.; Finger, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    There are two important criteria that must be satisfied by a nuclear waste glass durability and processability. The chemical composition of the glass must be such that it does not dissolve or erode appreciably faster than the decay of the radioactive materials embedded in it. The second criterion, processability, means that the glass must melt with ease, must be easily pourable, and must not crystallize appreciably. This paper summarizes the development of simple models for predicting the durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses from their composition

  19. Preparation of durable hydrophobic cellulose fabric from water glass and mixed organosilanes

    Shang, Song-Min; Li, Zhengxiong; Xing, Yanjun; Xin, John H.; Tao, Xiao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Durable superhydrophobic cellulose fabric was prepared from water glass and n-octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES) with 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) as crosslinker by sol-gel method. The result showed that the addition of GPTMS could result in a better fixation of silica coating from water glass on cellulose fabric. The silanization of hydrolyzed ODTES at different temperatures and times was studied and optimized. The results showed that silanization time was more important than temperature in forming durable hydrophobic surface. The durability of superhydrophobicity treatment was analyzed by XPS. As a result, the superhydrophobic cotton treated under the optimal condition still remained hydrophobic properties after 50 washing cycles.

  20. Influence of curing conditions on durability of alkali-resistant glass ...

    Glass fibres in concrete material often increase the flexural strength. However, these fibres when in contact with cement are altered by alkali reactions due to the presence of portlandite. This study presents the results of investigation to show the effect of curing conditions on the durability of alkali-resistant glass fibres in ...

  1. Influence of the leaching mode on the durability of a glass for fission product containment

    Nogues, J.L.; Terki, A.

    1984-06-01

    The chemical durability of a glass containing wastes from light water reactor (LWR) has been studied with three different lixiviation modes: ''static'' leach test, ''soxhlet'' test and ''continuous flow'' test. After a description of these tests, the leaching mode influence on the glass durability is reported as obtained from weight loss measurements, analyses of the leaching solutions and surface analyses of the samples. Finally, the corrosion mechanisms of this type of glass are approached and a phenomenological explanation of attack from an aqueous solution is proposed [fr

  2. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Automotive Structural Composite; TOPICAL

    Battiste, R.L.; Corum, J.M.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design criteria for a chopped-glass-fiber reinforced polymeric composite for automotive structural applications. The criteria closely follow the framework of an earlier criteria document for a continuous-strand-mat (CSM) glass-fiber reference composite. Together these design criteria demonstrate a framework that can be adapted for future random-glass-fiber composites for automotive structural applications

  3. Characterization and durability testing of a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    Johnson, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded ceramic waste form for encapsulating the fission products and transuranics from the conditioning of metallic reactor fuel. This waste form is currently being scaled to the multi-kilogram size for encapsulation of actual high level waste. This paper will present characterization and durability testing of the ceramic waste form. An emphasis on results from application of glass durability tests such as the Product Consistency Test and characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The information presented is based on a suite of tests utilized for assessing product quality during scale-up and parametric testing

  4. Effect of lead species on the durability of simulated nuclear waste glass

    Kuchinski, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    It has been shown that the incorporation of lead metal into the corrosion environment reduces the leaching rate of nuclear waste glasses. The present study evaluated the effects of lead metal, oxides, alloys, glasses and soluble species on the corrosion rate of a waste glass. The inherent durability of nuclear waste glasses comes from the about due to the insoluble surface film developed during corrosion. This surface film, enriched with iron, aluminum and calcium acts as a diffusion barrier to further corrosion. Except for PbO 2 , all lead species inhibited glass corrosion due to the formation of a surface film enriched in lead. No corroded glass layer was observed below the lead surface layer. Also, no glass corrosion products were found on the lead surface, except for small amounts of silicon. The transport and deposition of lead on the glass surface appears to be the key factors in preventing glass corrosion. At high glass surface area to volume ratios, the glass corroded considerably at short times since the dissolved lead source could not coat the entire glass surface rapidly enough to prevent continued corrosion. Also, experimental solution values did not agree with thermodynamics model predictions. This suggests that kinetic factors, namely diffusion barriers, are controlling the glass corrosion rate

  5. Hanford enhanced waste glass characterization. Influence of composition on chemical durability

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. B.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a review of the complete high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) data sets for the glasses recently fabricated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and characterized at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The review is from the perspective of relating the chemical durability performance to the compositions of these study glasses, since the characterization work at SRNL focused on chemical analysis and ASTM Product Consistency Test (PCT) performance.

  6. First-order model for durability of Hanford waste glasses as a function of composition

    Hrma, P.; Piepel, G.F.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Two standard chemical durability tests, the static leach test MCC-1 and product consistency test PCT, were conducted on simulated borosilicate glasses that encompass the expected range of compositions to be produced in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). A first-order empirical model was fitted to the data from each test method. The results indicate that glass durability is increased by addition of Al 2 O 3 , moderately increased by addition of ZrO 2 and SiO 2 , and decreased by addition of Li 2 O, Na 2 O, B 2 O 3 , and MgO. Addition of Fe 2 O 3 and CaO produce an indifferent or reducing effect on durability according to the test method. This behavior and a statistically significant lack of fit are attributed to the effects of multiple chemical reactions occurring during glass-water interaction. Liquid-liquid immiscibility is suspected to be responsible for extremely low durability of some glasses

  7. Results of testing the Grambow rate law for use in HWVP glass durability correlations

    Kuhn, W.L.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1996-03-01

    A theory based on Grambow's work on hydration of glass as linear function of solution composition was evaluated. Use of Grambow's linear rate law for correlation of durability with glass composition is not recommended. Dissolution rate of the glass was determined using the rate of release of sodium with an ion selective electrode. This method was tested first applying it to initial dissolution rate of several glasses at several temperatures with zero initial concentration of silicic acid. HW39-2, HW39-4, and SRL-202 from Savannah River were tested; there was significant scatter in the data, with the dissolution rates of HW39 glasses and the SRL glass being comparable within this scatter. The dissolution rate of SRL-202 at 80 C and pH 7 for silicic acid concentrations 0, 25, 50, and 100% saturation, was found to decrease dramatically at only 25% of the saturated silicic acid concentration, which does not conform to the linear theory

  8. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D.; Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses

  9. Structure and Chemical Durability of Lead Crystal Glass.

    Angeli, Frédéric; Jollivet, Patrick; Charpentier, Thibault; Fournier, Maxime; Gin, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    Silicate glasses containing lead, also called lead crystal glasses, are commonly used as food product containers, in particular for alcoholic beverages. Lead's health hazards require major attention, which can first be investigated through the understanding of Pb release mechanisms in solution. The behavior of a commercial crystal glass containing 10.6 mol % of PbO (28.3 wt %) was studied in a reference solution of 4% acetic acid at 22, 40, and 70 °C at early and advanced stages of reaction. High-resolution solid-state 17 O and 29 Si NMR was used to probe the local structure of the pristine and, for the first time, of the altered lead crystal glass. Inserted into the vitreous structure between the network formers as Si-O-Pb bonds, Pb does not form Pb-O-Pb clusters which are expected to be more easily leached. A part of K is located near Pb, forming mixed Si-O-(Pb,K) near the nonbridging oxygens. Pb is always released into the solution following a diffusion-controlled dissolution over various periods of time, at a rate between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude lower than the alkalis (K and Na). The preferential release of alkalis is followed by an in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. Pb is only depleted in the outermost part of the alteration layer. In the remaining part, it stays mainly surrounded by Si in a stable structural configuration similar to that of the pristine glass. A simple model is proposed to estimate the Pb concentration as a function of glass surface, solution volume, temperature, and contact time.

  10. Technical Note: Updated durability/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses

    Piepel, G.F.; Hartley, S.A.; Redgate, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    This technical note presents empirical models developed in FYI 995 to predict durability as functions of glass composition. Models are presented for normalized releases of B, Li, Na, and Si from the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) applied to quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses as well as from the 28-day Materials Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) test applied to quenched glasses. Models are presented for Composition Variation Study (CVS) data from low temperature melter (LTM) studies (Hrma, Piepel, et al. 1994) and high temperature melter (HTM) studies (Vienna et al. 1995). The data used for modeling in this technical note are listed in Appendix A

  11. Complexing Agents and pH Influence on Chemical Durability of Type I Molded Glass Containers.

    Biavati, Alberto; Poncini, Michele; Ferrarini, Arianna; Favaro, Nicola; Scarpa, Martina; Vallotto, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Among the factors that affect the glass surface chemical durability, pH and complexing agents present in aqueous solution have the main role. Glass surface attack can be also related to the delamination issue causing glass particles' appearance in the pharmaceutical preparation. A few methods to check for glass containers delamination propensity and some control guidelines have been proposed. The present study emphasizes the possible synergy between a few complexing agents with pH on borosilicate glass chemical durability.Hydrolytic attack was performed in small-volume 23 mL type I glass containers autoclaved according to the European Pharmacopoeia or United States Pharmacopeia for 1 h at 121 °C, in order to enhance the chemical attack due to time, temperature, and the unfavorable surface/volume ratio. Solutions of 0.048 M or 0.024 M (M/L) of the acids citric, glutaric, acetic, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), together with sodium phosphate with water for comparison, were used for the trials. The pH was adjusted ±0.05 units at fixed values 5.5, 6.6, 7, 7.4, 8, and 9 by LiOH diluted solution.Because silicon is the main glass network former, silicon release into the attack solutions was chosen as the main index of the glass surface attack and analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry. The work was completed by the analysis of the silicon release in the worst attack conditions of molded glass, soda lime type II glass, and tubing borosilicate glass vials to compare different glass compositions and forming technologies. Surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy was finally performed to check for the surface status after the worst chemical attack condition by citric acid. LAY ABSTRACT: Glass, like every packaging material, can have some usage limits, mainly in basic pH solutions. The issue of glass surface degradation particles that appear in vials (delamination) has forced a number of drug product recalls in recent years

  12. Complexing agents and pH influence on chemical durability of type I moulded glass containers.

    Biavati, Alberto; Poncini, Michele; Ferrarini, Arianna; Favaro, Nicola; Scarpa, Martina; Vallotto, Marta

    2017-06-16

    Among the factors that affect the glass surface chemical durability, pH and complexing agents presence in aqueous solution have the main role (1). Glass surface attack can be also related to the delamination issue with glass particles appearance in the pharmaceutical preparation. A few methods to check for glass containers delamination propensity and some control guidelines have been proposed (2,3). The present study emphasizes the possible synergy between a few complexing agents with pH on the borosilicate glass chemical durability. Hydrolytic attack was performed in small volume 23 ml type I glass containers autoclaved according to EP or USP for 1 hour at 121°C, in order to enhance the chemical attack due to time, temperature and the unfavourable surface/volume ratio. 0,048 M or 0.024 M (moles/liter) solutions of the acids citric, glutaric, acetic, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and sodium phosphate with water for comparison, were used for the trials. The pH was adjusted ± 0,05 units at fixed values 5,5-6,6-7-7,4-8-9 by LiOH diluted solution. Since silicon is the main glass network former, silicon release into the attack solutions was chosen as the main index of the glass surface attack and analysed by ICPAES. The work was completed by the analysis of the silicon release in the worst attack conditions, of moulded glass, soda lime type II and tubing borosilicate glass vials to compare different glass compositions and forming technologies. Surface analysis by SEM was finally performed to check for the surface status after the worst chemical attack condition by citric acid. Copyright © 2017, Parenteral Drug Association.

  13. The chemical durability of glasses suitable for the storage of high level radioactive wastes, (1)

    Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo; Kawamoto, Takamichi; Nanbu, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Takao.

    1975-01-01

    To develop the glassy materials suitable for the long-term storage of high level radioactive wastes, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-alumina-silica system has been investigated. The test was carried out by the following three ways, (1) glass-disk immersion method, (2) continuous leach method and (3) method prescribed in JIS-R3502. In the continuous leach method, glass grains were exposed to circulating water at a constant temperature for a week to obtain the leach factor or leach rate. It was found from the experimental results that, as the silica content increased, the melting temperature of the glasses progressively increased and the chemical durability was considerably improved, and that B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O constituents were preferentially dissolved in water leaving relatively insoluble components such as SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 . The rate at which B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O in glass are leached out is governed by three processes, that is, (1) the boundary reaction on the glass surface, (2) the diffusion process through the hydrated layer, and (3) the disintegration of hydrated layer. The first process probably corresponds to the hydration of boric oxides on the glass surface or to the ion exchange between protons in solution and Na + ions in glass, and the second process seems to correspond to the diffusion of protons through the hydrated layer on the glass surface. Although the ratio of [Na-BO 4 ]/[BO 3 ] in the borax-silica glasses was determined to be 0.5 by means of NMR measurement, Na 2 O/B 2 O 3 ratio in leached solution was less than 0.5, indicating that [BO 3 ] groups in glass were more soluble than [Na-BO 4 ] groups. From the viewpoint of appreciation of safety, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-aluminasilica system was rather unsatisfactory, but that of the glasses containing silica in quantities was comparable to the soda-lime silicate sheet glasses. (auth.)

  14. Effects of crystallization on thermal properties and chemical durability of the glasses containing simulated high level radioactive wastes

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the thermodynamic stability of the glasses containing high level radioactive wastes, the conversion to glass-ceramics by the heat-treatment was carried out with two kinds of glasses, and the change of thermal properties and chemical durability by crystallization was investigated. One of the glasses has a composition of SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -ZnO-TiO 2 system, and another one has a composition which could grow the nephelite crystals from Na 2 O in wastes and Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 added as glass-forming materials. Transition and yield points shifted to higher temperatures by the conversion and the glass-ceramics were found to be more stable than the original glasses. The glass-ceramics of the composition of SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -ZnO-TiO 2 showed poor durability, whereas the chemical durability of the glass-ceramics containing nephelite crystals was considerably improved. In the latter case, improvement of the durability is attributable to that some parts of glass are converted to nephelite crystals and the crystals are more durable than glass under most conditions. (auth.)

  15. Development of an ASTM standard glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCT), for high level radioactive waste glass

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The nation's first, and the world's largest, facility to immobilize high-level nuclear waste in durable borosilicate glass has started operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The product specifications on the glass wasteform produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) required extensive characterization of the glass product before actual production began and for continued characterization during production. To aid in this characterization, a glass durability (leach) test was needed that was easily reproducible, could be performed remotely on highly radioactive samples, and could yield results rapidly. Several standard leach tests were examined with a variety of test configurations. Using existing tests as a starting point, the DWPF Product Consistency Test (PCT was developed in which crushed glass samples are exposed to 90 ± 2 degree C deionized water for seven days. Based on extensive testing, including a seven-laboratory round robin and confirmatory testing with radioactive samples, the PCT is very reproducible, yields reliable results rapidly, and can be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples

  16. Investigation of Chemical Durability Mechanisms and Structure of Fluoride Glasses.

    1988-03-01

    Compositions of fluorozirconate glasses (mol%) mnemonic ZrF 4 BaF 2 LaF 3 A1F 3 LiF source ZBLA 57 36 3 4 -- RADC* ZBLA-F 51.16 38.62 5.66 4.56 -- Le Verre ...Fluore4 ZBLAL 51.8 20.0 5.3 3.3 19.6 NRL * Rome Air Development Center, Hanscom AFB, MA (Dr. El Bayoumi) # Le Verre Fluore’ Co., LeMans, France " Naval...Maine, LeMans, France, (with partial support from the French Foreign Office), studied corrosion of UF4 -based fluorides. - Michel Le Toullec - 10/86

  17. Analysis for silicon in solution in high level waste glass durability studies

    Lewis, R.A.; Smart, R.St.C.; Dale, L.S.; Levins, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    In comparative studies of the durability of HLW glasses, the measurement of the dissolution of the silicate network, in terms of both rate and extent, is of prime importance. To achieve this, analytical techniques such as colorimetry, flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry are used. The reliability of these analytical techniques for determination of silicon concentration in dissolution of HLW glasses, is examined. At high concentrations both FAA and ICP are accurate but colorimetry, even with HF pretreatment or NaOH digestion, does not give agreement with ICP. At concentrations below 40 mg l -1 all three methods are reliable. (Auth.)

  18. Chemical durability of borosilicate glasses containing simulated high-level nuclear wastes, 1

    Hara, Shigeo; Terai, Ryohei; Yamanaka, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    The Soxhlet-type leaching test apparatus has been developed to evaluate the chemical durability of some borosilicate glasses containing simulated High-Level nuclear Wastes, HLW. After the leaching over the temperature range of 50 0 -95 0 C, the weight loss of specimens with time was determined on both the samples of blocks and grains, and various components dissolved into water were analyzed by atomic absorption and colorimetry technique. It was found that Soxhlet-type test method was more useful than JIS test method, because the specimens in Soxhlet type apparatus were forced always to react with pure water and the mechanism of leaching could be evaluate accurately. The chemical durability of commercial glasses decreases generally with increasing of alkali contents in glasses. In the case of these borosilicate glasses containing HLW, however, the leachability was apparently independent on the alkali contents because of the complexity of these glass compositions. The variation of leaching rate with temperature suggests that dissolution mechanism changes with temperature. (author)

  19. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide.

    Kim, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Won; Seo, Tae-Il

    2013-05-10

    Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this study, the mechanical characteristic analysis of the glass-reinforced plastic worm wheel, according to the contents of glass fiber, is performed by analytic and experimental methods. In the case of the glass fiber-reinforced resin, the orientation and contents of glass fibers can influence the mechanical properties. For the characteristic prediction of plastic worm wheel, computer-aided engineering (CAE) analysis processes such as structural and injection molding analysis were executed with the polyamide resin reinforcement glass fiber (25 wt %, 50 wt %). The injection mold for fabricating the prototype plastic worm wheel was designed and made to reflect the CAE analysis results. Finally, the durability of prototype plastic worm wheel fabricated by the injection molding process was evaluated by the experimental method and the characteristics according to the glass fiber contents.

  20. First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition

  1. Experimental Investigation on the Durability of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites Containing Nanocomposite

    Weiwen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoclay layers incorporated into polymer/clay nanocomposites can inhibit the harmful penetration of water and chemicals into the material, and thus the durability of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP composites should be enhanced by using polymer/clay nanocomposite as the matrix material. In this study, 1.5 wt% vinyl ester (VE/organoclay and 2 wt% epoxy (EP/organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by an in situ polymerization method. The dispersion states of clay in the nanocomposites were studied by performing XRD analysis. GFRP composites were then fabricated with the prepared 1.5 wt% VE/clay and 2.0 wt% EP/clay nanocomposites to investigate the effects of a nanocomposite matrix on the durability of GFRP composites. The durability of the two kinds of GFRP composites was characterized by monitoring tensile properties following degradation of GFRP specimens aged in water and alkaline solution at 60°C, and SEM was employed to study fracture behaviors of aged GFRP composites under tension. The results show that tensile properties of the two types of GFRP composites with and without clay degrade significantly with aging time. However, the GFRP composites with nanoclay show a lower degradation rate compared with those without nanoclay, supporting the aforementioned hypothesis. And the modification of EP/GFRP enhanced the durability more effectively.

  2. Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as “glass waste forms” by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 ± 2°C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

  3. Chemical durability of lead borosilicate glass matrix under simulated geological conditions

    Yalmali, Vrunda S.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2002-03-01

    The lead borosilicate glass has been developed for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) stored at Trombay. This waste is contains especially high contents of sodium, uranium sulphate and iron. The glasses containing HLW are to be ultimately disposed into deep geological repositories. Long term leach rates under simulated geological conditions need to be evaluated for glass matrix. Studies were taken up to estimate the lead borosilicate glass WTR-62 matrix for chemical durability in presence of synthetic ground water. The leachant selected was based on composition of ground water sample near proposed repository site. In the first phase of these tests, the experiments were conducted for short duration of one and half month. The leaching experiments were conducted in presence of a) distilled water b) synthetic ground water c) synthetic ground water containing granite, bentonite and ferric oxide and d) synthetic ground water containing humic acid at 100 0 C. The leachate samples were analysed by pHmetry , ion chromatography and UV -VIS spectrophotometry. The normalised leach rates for lead borosilicate WTR- 62 glass matrix based on silica, boron and sulphate analyses of leachates were of the order of 10 -3 to 10 -5 gms/cm 2 /day for 45 days test period in presence of synthetic ground water as well as in presence of other materials likely to be present along with synthetic ground water. These rates are comparable to those of sodium borsilicate glass matrices reported in literature. It is known that the leach rates of glass matrix decrease with longer test durations due to formation of leached layer on its surface. The observed leach rates of lead borosilicate WTR- 62 glass matrix for 45 day tests under simulated geological conditions were found to be sufficiently encouraging to take up long term tests for evaluating its performances under repository conditions. (author)

  4. Impact of crystallization on the structure and chemical durability of borosilicate glass

    Nicoleau, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a new approach to help understand the chemical durability of partially crystallized nuclear waste conditioning matrices. Among the studies carried out on nuclear waste deep geological disposal, long term behavior studies have so far been conducted on homogeneous glassy matrices. However, as the crystalline phases may generate modifications in the chemical composition and properties of such matrices, the description and a better understanding of their effects on the chemical durability of waste packages are of primary importance. A protocol to study the durability of heterogeneous model matrices of nuclear interest containing different types of crystalline phases was developed. It is based on a detailed description of the morphology, microstructure and structure of the glassy matrix and crystalline phases, and on the study of various alteration regimes. Three crystal phases that may form when higher concentrations of waste are immobilized in Uranium Oxide type conditioning glasses were studied: alkali and alkaline earth molybdates, rare earth silicates and ruthenium oxide. The results highlight the roles of the composition and the structure of the surrounding glassy matrix as the parameters piloting the alteration kinetics of the partially crystallized glassy matrices. This behavior is identical whatever the nature of the crystalline phases, as long as these phases do not lead to a composition gradient and do not percolate within the glassy matrix. Given these results, a methodology to study partially crystallized matrices with no composition gradient is then suggested. Its key development lies firstly in the evaluation of the behavior of partially crystallized matrices through the experimental study of the residual glassy matrix in various alteration regimes. This methodology may be adapted to the case of new glass formulations with more complex compositions (e.g. highly waste-loaded glass), which may contain crystals formed during cooling

  5. Durability of simulated waste glass: effects of pressure and formation of surface layers

    Wicks, G.G.; Mosley, W.C.; Whitkop, P.G.; Saturday, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    The leaching behavior of simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste glass was studied at elevated pressures and anticipated storage temperatures. An integrated approach, which combined leachate solution analyses with both bulk and surface studies, was used to study the corrosion process. Compositions of leachates were evaluated by colorimetry and atomic absorption. Used in the bulk and surface analyses were optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy spectroscopy, wide-angle x-ray, diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, infrared reflectance spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results from this study show that there is no significant adverse effect of pressure, up to 1500 psi and 90 0 C, on the chemical durability of simulated SPR waste glass leached for one month in deionized water. In addition, the leached glass surface layer was characterized by an adsorbed film rich in minor constituents from the glass. This film remained on the glass surface even after leaching in relatively alkaline solutions at elevated pressures at 90 0 C for one month. The sample surface area to volume of leachant ratios (SA/V) was 10:1 cm -1 and 1:10 cm -1 . The corrosion mechanisms and surface and subsurface layers produced will be discussed along with the potential importance of these results to repository storage

  6. Durability, mechanical, and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high level waste

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1990-01-01

    The high-level liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is routinely solidified into granular calcined high-level waste (HLW) and stored onsite. Research is being conducted at the ICPP on methods of immobilizing the HLW, including developing a durable glass-ceramic form which has the potential to significantly reduce the final waste volume by up to 60% compared to a glass form. Simulated, pilot plant, non-radioactive, calcines similar to the composition of the calcined HLW and glass forming additives are used to produce experimental glass-ceramic forms. The objective of the research reported in this paper is to study the impact of ground calcine particle size on durability and mechanical and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms

  7. Zirconolite glass-ceramics for plutonium immobilization: The effects of processing redox conditions on charge compensation and durability

    Zhang, Yingjie, E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au; Gregg, Daniel J.; Kong, Linggen; Jovanovich, Miodrag; Triani, Gerry

    2017-07-15

    Zirconolite glass-ceramic samples doped with plutonium have been prepared via hot isostatic pressing. The effects of processing redox and plutonium loadings on plutonium valences, the presence of cation vacancies, zirconolite phase compositions, microstructures and durability have been investigated. Either tetravalent or trivalent plutonium ions may be incorporated on the Ca-site of CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} zirconolite with the Ca-site cation vacancies and the incorporation of Al{sup 3+} ions on the Ti-site for charge compensation. Plutonium and gadolinium (as a neutron absorber) are predominantly partitioned in zirconolite phases leading to the formation of chemically durable glass-ceramics suitable for the immobilization of impure plutonium wastes arising from the nuclear fuel cycle. - Highlights: •Plutonium validations of zirconolite glass-ceramics. •Effects of processing redox and plutonium loading. •Zirconolite phase compositions and plutonium valences. •Cation vacancies and chemical durability.

  8. A durable and dependable solution for RTR spent fuel management

    Thomasson, J.

    1999-01-01

    RTR Operators need efficient and cost-effective services for the management of their spent fuel and this, for the full lifetime of their facility. Thanks to the integration of transport, reprocessing and conditioning services, COGEMA provides a cogent solution, with the utmost respect for safety and preservation of the environment, for the short, medium and long terms. As demonstrated in this paper, this option offers the only durable and dependable solution for the RTR spent fuel management, leading to a conditioning for the final residues directly suitable for final disposal. The main advantage of such an option is obviously the significant reduction in terms of volume and radiotoxicity of the ultimate waste when compared to direct disposal of spent fuels. The efficiency of such a solution has been proven, some RTR operators having already trusted COGEMA for the management of their aluminide fuel. With its commitment in R and D activities for the development of a high performance and reprocessable LEU fuels, COGEMA will be able to propose a solution for all types of fuels, HEU and LEU

  9. Standard test method for measuring waste glass or glass ceramic durability by vapor hydration test

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 The vapor hydration test method can be used to study the corrosion of a waste forms such as glasses and glass ceramics upon exposure to water vapor at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alteration phases that form can be used as indicators of those phases that may form under repository conditions. These tests; which allow altering of glass at high surface area to solution volume ratio; provide useful information regarding the alteration phases that are formed, the disposition of radioactive and hazardous components, and the alteration kinetics under the specific test conditions. This information may be used in performance assessment (McGrail et al, 2002 (1) for example). 1.2 This test method must be performed in accordance with all quality assurance requirements for acceptance of the data. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practice...

  10. A Revised Method For Estimating Oxide Basicity Per The Smith Scale With Example Application To Glass Durability

    Reynolds, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous researchers have developed correlations between oxide electronegativity and oxide basicity. The present paper revises those correlations using a newer method of calculating electronegativity of the oxygen anion. Basicity is expressed using the Smith α parameter scale. A linear relation was found between the oxide electronegativity and the Smith α parameter, with an R 2 of 0.92. An example application of this new correlation to the durability of high-level nuclear waste glass is demonstrated. The durability of waste glass was found to be directly proportional to the quantity and basicity of the oxides of tetrahedrally coordinated network forming ions.

  11. Glass–water interaction: Effect of high-valence cations on glass structure and chemical durability

    Hopf, J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, Thibault M.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, Bernard P.; Windisch, Charles F.; Burton, Sarah D.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2016-05-15

    Borosilicate glass is a durable solid, but it dissolves when in contact with aqueous fluids. The dissolution mechanism, which involves a variety of sequential reactions that occur at the solid-fluid interface, has important implications for the corrosion resistance of industrial and nuclear waste glasses. In this study, spectroscopic measurements, dissolution experiments, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the effect of high–valence cations (HVC) on the mechanisms of glass dissolution under dilute and near-saturated conditions. Raman and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the structural changes that occur in glass, specifically network formers (e.g., Al, Si, and B), with the addition of the HVC element hafnium in the Na2O–Al2O3–B2O3–HfO2–SiO2 system (e.g., Na/[Al+B] = 1.0 and HfO2/SiO2 from 0.0 to 0.42). Spectroscopic measurements revealed that increasing hafnium content decreases N4 (tetrahedral boron/total boron) and increases the amount of Si—O—Hf moieties in the glass. Results from flow–through experiments conducted under dilute and near–saturated conditions show a decrease of approximately 100× or more in the dissolution rate over the series from 0 to 20 mol% HfO2. Comparing the average steady-state rates obtained under dilute conditions to the rates obtained for near-saturated conditions reveals a divergence in the magnitude between the average steady state rates measured in these different conditions. The reason for this divergence was investigated more thoroughly using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the divergence in glass dissolution behavior under dilute and near-saturated conditions result from the stronger binding of Si sites that deposit on the surface from the influent when Hf is present in the glass. As a result, the residence time at the glass surface of these newly-formed Si sites is longer in the presence of Hf, which increases the density of anchor sites from which altered layers

  12. The Effect of Thermooxidative Aging on the Durability of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy

    Amin Khajeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin-skinned organic matrix composites within aeronautical structures are subjected to thermooxidative aging during their service life, leading to reductions in their durability. In this paper, a durability evaluation of fiberglass epoxy prepreg is performed on the original composite thickness before and after 800 h isothermal aging at 82°C. The characterization of both aged and unaged composites comprised tensile tests, DMA, FTIR, weight loss measurements, SEM, and DSC. The tensile strength and modulus of the composites increased after being exposed to pronounced aging conditions, whereas a decrease was observed in the toughness. DMA results revealed that the glass transition temperature and rubbery state modulus increased as a result of the thermooxidative aging. FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated the formation of carbonyl compounds due to oxidation of the chemical structure of the resin. SEM observations indicated the existence of minor superficial cracking and poor fiber-matrix adhesion after aging. In addition, a minor mass change was observed from mass loss monitoring methods. The overall findings suggest that postcuring and physical aging enhanced the brittleness of the resin, leading to a significant decline in the useful structural life of the thin-skinned composite.

  13. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  14. Zero photoelastic and water durable ZnO-SnO-P2O5-B2O3 glasses

    Saitoh, Akira; Nakata, Kohei; Tricot, Grégory; Chen, Yuanyuan; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takebe, Hiromichi

    2015-04-01

    We report properties of zero birefringent xZnO-(67-x)SnO-(33-y)P2O5-y B2O3 glasses, within 18.5 ≤ x ≤ 22 and y = 0, 3, and 10 mol. %. These compositions of boro-phosphate glasses provide both zero photoelastic constant (PEC) and improved water durability. x = 19 and y = 3 compositions show minimum PEC of -0.002 × 10-12 Pa-1, which can contribute to candidate material for fiber current sensor devise without lead. The structures of zero photoelastic glasses were investigated by Raman scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Compositions of zero PEC glasses are explained by the empirical model proposed by Zwanziger et al. [Chem. Mater. 19, 286-290 (2007)].

  15. Fabrication of Self-Cleaning and Anti-Icing Durable Surface on Glass.

    Zuo, Zhiping; Liao, Ruijin; Guo, Chao; Zhao, Xuetong; Zhuang, Aoyun; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Ice accumulation on insulators affected the safety of power system and may inflict serious consequences such as insulator flashover accidents and power failure. This article reported a simple method to prepare anti-icing polydimethylsiloxane superhydrophobic surface on glass by utilizing nano-particle filling method. The effect of concentration of silica nanoparticles on superhydrophobicity of the samples was investigated. The wettability, surface morphology and anti-icing property of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface were characterized by corresponding methods. Results show that the as-prepared surface with addition amount of 7 g silica nanoparticles exhibited self-cleaning property and excellent superhydrophobicity with a contact angle of 165.7 ± 2.4° and a sliding angle of 3.8°. It was found that the ice formation was delayed for 29 min at −5 °C. Moreover, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface showed superhydrophobicity in the pH range of 1–13 and exhibited excellent drop impact stability. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surface may be suitable for applications in cold regions owing to its flexibility, durability and anti-icing property.

  16. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications.

  17. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria; FINAL

    Ren, W

    2001-01-01

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications

  18. Low-Li2O Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-01-01

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na 2 O to Li 2 O ratios. The Li 2 O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na 2 O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li 2 O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li 2 O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na 2 O and Li 2 O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na 2 O and Li 2 O mass ratios. The results of the PCT evaluation indicated

  19. High-level waste glass compendium; what it tells us concerning the durability of borosilicate waste glass

    Cunnane, J.C.; Allison, J.

    1993-01-01

    Facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste in the United States are scheduled for startup in the next few years. It is, therefore, appropriate to examine the current scientific basis for understanding the corrosion of high-level waste borosilicate glass for the range of service conditions to which the glass products from these facilities may be exposed. To this end, a document has been prepared which compiles worldwide information on borosilicate waste glass corrosion. Based on the content of this document, the acceptability of canistered waste glass for geological disposal is addressed. Waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository may be due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. The important processes that determine the glass corrosion kinetics under these conditions are discussed based on experimental evidence from laboratory testing. Testing data together with understanding of the long-term corrosion kinetics are used to estimate radionuclide release rates. These rates are discussed in terms of regulatory performance standards

  20. Chemically durable iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying sodium bearing waste (SBW) using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques

    Kim, C.W. E-mail: cheol@umr.edu; Ray, C.S.; Zhu, D.; Day, D.E.; Gombert, D.; Aloy, A.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Karabulut, M

    2003-11-01

    A simulated sodium bearing waste (SBW) was successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses (IPG) at a maximum waste loading of 40 wt% using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques. No sulfate segregation or crystalline phases were detectable in the IPG when examined by SEM and XRD. The IPG wasteforms containing 40 wt% SBW satisfy current DOE requirements for aqueous chemical durability as evaluated from their bulk dissolution rate (D{sub R}), product consistency test, and vapor hydration test. The fluid IPG wasteforms can be melted at a relatively low temperature (1000 deg. C) and for short times (<6 h). These properties combined with a significantly higher waste loading, and the feasibility of CCIM melting offer considerable savings in time, energy, and cost for vitrifying the SBW stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in iron phosphate glasses.

  1. Dependence of Glass Mechanical Properties on Thermal and Pressure History

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauchy, Mathieu

    Predicting the properties of new glasses prior to manufacturing is a topic attracting great industrial and scientific interest. Mechanical properties are currently of particular interest given the increasing demand for stronger, thinner, and more flexible glasses in recent years. However, as a non......-equilibrium material, the structure and properties of glass depend not only on its composition, but also on its thermal and pressure histories. Here we review our recent findings regarding the thermal and pressure history dependence of indentation-derived mechanical properties of oxide glasses....

  2. Chemical durability of glass and glass-ceramic materials, developed in laboratory scale, from industrial oil shale residue. Preliminary results

    Araujo Fonseca, M.V. de; Souza Santos, P. de

    1990-01-01

    Industrial developments frequently drive to the natural resources extinction. The recycling era has come out a long time ago and it has been evident that great part of industrial work's problems are related to the pollution and the raw materials extinction. These problems should be solved, with advantages, through industrial residues recycling. This study deals with glass and glass-ceramics materials obtained from oil shale (Irati Formation-Sao Mateus do Sul-Parana State) industrialization residues. The reached results show that a controled devitrification of retorted oil shale glass improves its performance related to chemical attack. The crystallinity caracterization of the oil shales glass-ceramic was made through X-ray diffraction. (author) [pt

  3. Leaching of glass

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  4. Durability and plasticity of a material under different trajectories cycle loading in dependence on the loading prehistory

    Mozharovskij, N.S.; Bobyr', N.I.

    1979-01-01

    Results of investigations into the durability and plasticity of a material under combined proportional cyclic loading over different trajectories depending upon the values of intensity of preliminary plastic deformation obtained by different loading methods are presented. The effect of loading prehistory type on material plastic properties and its durability are shown

  5. Durability and plasticity of a material under different trajectories cycle loading in dependence on the loading prehistory

    Mozharovskii, N S; Bobyr, N I [Kievskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-12-01

    Results of investigations into the durability and plasticity of a material under combined proportional cyclic loading over different trajectories depending upon the values of intensity of preliminary plastic deformation obtained by different loading methods are presented. The effect of loading prehistory type on material plastic properties and its durability are shown.

  6. Application of ultramicrotome section technique to the characterization of nuclear glass durability

    Nogues, J.L.; Thomassin, J.H.; Touray, J.C.

    1984-06-01

    Surface corrosion four different glasses was studied by electron microscopy. After static leaching at 90 0 C by bidistillate water for 3 months samples are embedded in resin and sections 500 A thick are cut perpendicular to glass surface for examination. Results obtained are discussed in function of chemical composition [fr

  7. Erbium concentration dependent absorbance in tellurite glass

    Sazali, E. S., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Rohani, M. S., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Sahar, M. R., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Arifin, R., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Ghoshal, S. K., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Hamzah, K., E-mail: mdsupar@utm [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Skudai, Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-25

    Enhancing the optical absorption cross-section in topically important rare earth doped tellurite glasses is challenging for photonic devices. Controlled synthesis and detailed characterizations of the optical properties of these glasses are important for the optimization. The influence of varying concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions on the absorbance characteristics of lead tellurite glasses synthesized via melt-quenching technique are investigated. The UV-Vis absorption spectra exhibits six prominent peaks centered at 490, 526, 652, 800, 982 and 1520 nm ascribed to the transitions in erbium ion from the ground state to the excited states {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, respectively. The results are analyzed by means of optical band gap E{sub g} and Urbach energy E{sub u}. The values of the energy band gap are found decreased from 2.82 to 2.51 eV and the Urbach energy increased from 0.15 to 0.24 eV with the increase of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration from 0 to 1.5 mol%. The excellent absorbance of the prepared tellurite glasses makes them suitable for fabricating solid state lasers.

  8. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films.

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T; Lupini, Andrew R; Trejo, Rosa M; Jellison, Gerald E; Ivanov, Ilia N; Pennycook, Stephen J; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Winter, Kyle O; Christen, David K; Hunter, Scott R; Haynes, J Allen

    2013-08-09

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie-Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military.

  9. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Jellison, Gerald E.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hillesheim, Daniel A.; Winter, Kyle O.; Christen, David K.; Hunter, Scott R.; Haynes, J. Allen

    2013-08-01

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie-Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military.

  10. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T; Lupini, Andrew R; Trejo, Rosa M; Jellison, Gerald E; Ivanov, Ilia N; Pennycook, Stephen J; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Winter, Kyle O; Christen, David K; Hunter, Scott R; Allen Haynes, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie–Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military. (paper)

  11. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal properties and chemical durability of glasses of iron and uranium phosphates

    Arboleda Zuluaga, P.A; Rodriguez, D.S; Gonzalez Oliver, C; Rincon Lopez, J.M; Soldera, F

    2012-01-01

    A series of glass compositions including (54,6-73,5P 2 O 5 .14-22Fe 2 O 3.x Na 2 O.2,8-4,25 UO 2 ) %mol. x=0-28,4 were studied in function of sodium oxide content for the thermal properties and chemical durability. By means differential dilatometer measurements was possible establish the variation of Tg, and α Tsoft and analysis of the kinetics of sintering by means of High Temperature Microscopy (MAT) and dilatometric data of pressed pellets. The presence of modifier oxides in the structure of iron phosphate glasses causes slightly onset sintering anticipation in almost 25 o C The chemical durability was estimated performing the named Product Consistency Test (PCT-B) focused on determining the resistance of glasses for nuclear wastes. These glasses exhibit good chemical durability but it is significant impaired by the addition of x≥6wt%Na 2 O. It is aimed to achieve more stable compositions and get glass matrixes able to contain more uranium oxides allowing evaluating the potential application of these iron phosphate glasses for special, industrial and nuclear waste immobilization

  12. From glass structure to its chemical durability; De la structure du verre a sa durabilite chimique

    Angeli, F.

    2009-07-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activities. He more precisely reports studies related to glass structure based on nuclei observed by NMR and present in glasses of interest for nuclear activities. He discusses the influence of chemical composition on structure, and discusses information which can be extracted from network formers (Al, B) and modifiers (Na, Ca), and from oxygen present in the network linkages of oxide glasses. He discusses the different experimental and modelling approaches which enable structural and morphological information to be obtained at a mesoscopic scale. The last part deals with the investigation of the long term behaviour of confinement matrices (glassy matrix for medium-activity wastes, ceramic matrix)

  13. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide

    Kim, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Won; Seo, Tae-Il

    2013-01-01

    Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this stud...

  14. Copper oxide content dependence of crystallization behavior, glass forming ability, glass stability and fragility of lithium borate glasses

    Soliman, A.A.; Kashif, I.

    2010-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been employed to investigate the copper oxide content dependence of the glass transition temperatures data, activation energy for the glass transition E t , glass stability GS, fragility index Fi, the glass-forming ability (GFA) and crystallization behavior of {(100-x) mol% Li 2 B 4 O 7 -x mol% CuO} glass samples, where x=0-40 mol% CuO. From the dependence of the glass transition temperature T g on the heating rate β, the fragility, F i , and the activation energy, E t , have been calculated. It is seen that F i and E t are attained their minimum values at 0 x -T g , SCL region and the GS. The GFA has been investigated on the basis of Hruby parameter K H , which is a strong indicator of GFA, and the relaxation time. Results of GFA are in good agreement with the fragility index, F i , calculations indicating that {90Li 2 B 4 O 7 .10CuO} is the best glass former. The stronger glass forming ability has decreasing the fragility index. XRD result indicates that no fully amorphous samples but a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases are formed in the samples containing x>25 mol% CuO and below it composed of glassy phase. Increasing the CuO content above 25 mol% helps the crystallization process, and thus promotes a distinct SCL region. XRD suggests the presence of micro-crystallites of remaining residual amorphous matrix by increasing the CuO content.

  15. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    Zhang, Hua; Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na 2 O/Li 2 O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn 0.60 Ni 0.20 Mg 0.20 )(Cr 1.37 Fe 0.63 )O 4 . The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q 3 species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na 2 O/Li 2 O base glass up to 28 days, due to a combination of the enhanced network

  16. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R a and R y values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  17. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  18. Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for a PMMA/glass Concentrator Photovoltaic System

    Miller, David C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Muller, Matthew T; Gray, Matthew H.; Araki, Kenji; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2014-04-08

    The durability of polymeric encapsulation materials was examined using outdoor exposure at the nominal geometric concentration of 500 suns. The results for 36 months cumulative field deployment are presented for materials including: poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate), (EVA); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); ionomer; polyethylene/ polyoctene copolymer (PO); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS); poly(diphenyl dimethyl siloxane) (PDPDMS); and poly(phenyl-methyl siloxane) (PPMS). Measurements of the field conditions including ambient temperature and ultraviolet (UV) dose were recorded at the test site during the experiment. Measurements for the experiment included optical transmittance (with subsequent analysis of solar-weighted transmittance, UV cut-off wavelength, and yellowness index), mass, visual photography, photoelastic imaging, and fluorescence spectroscopy. While the results to date for EVA are presented and discussed, examination here focuses more on the siloxane materials. A specimen recently observed to fail by thermal decomposition is discussed in terms of the implementation of the experiment as well as its fluorescence signature, which was observed to become more pronounced with age. Modulated thermogravimetry (allowing determination of the activation energy of thermal decomposition) was performed on a subset of the siloxanes to quantify the propensity for decomposition at elevated temperatures. Supplemental, Pt-catalyst- and primer-solutions as well as peroxide-cured PDMS specimens were examined to assess the source of the luminescence. The results of the study including the change in optical transmittance, observed failure modes, and subsequent analyses of the failure modes are described in the conclusions.

  19. Magnetic field dependent atomic tunneling in non-magnetic glasses

    Ludwig, S.; Enss, C.; Hunklinger, S.

    2003-01-01

    The low-temperature properties of insulating glasses are governed by atomic tunneling systems (TSs). Recently, strong magnetic field effects in the dielectric susceptibility have been discovered in glasses at audio frequencies at very low temperatures. Moreover, it has been found that the amplitude of two-pulse polarization echoes generated in non-magnetic multi-component glasses at radio frequencies and at very low temperatures shows a surprising non-monotonic magnetic field dependence. The magnitude of the latter effect indicates that virtually all TSs are affected by the magnetic field, not only a small subset of systems. We have studied the variation of the magnetic field dependence of the echo amplitude as a function of the delay time between the two excitation pulses and at different frequencies. Our results indicate that the evolution of the phase of resonant TSs is changed by the magnetic field

  20. Magnetic field dependent atomic tunneling in non-magnetic glasses

    Ludwig, S.; Enss, C.; Hunklinger, S.

    2003-05-01

    The low-temperature properties of insulating glasses are governed by atomic tunneling systems (TSs). Recently, strong magnetic field effects in the dielectric susceptibility have been discovered in glasses at audio frequencies at very low temperatures. Moreover, it has been found that the amplitude of two-pulse polarization echoes generated in non-magnetic multi-component glasses at radio frequencies and at very low temperatures shows a surprising non-monotonic magnetic field dependence. The magnitude of the latter effect indicates that virtually all TSs are affected by the magnetic field, not only a small subset of systems. We have studied the variation of the magnetic field dependence of the echo amplitude as a function of the delay time between the two excitation pulses and at different frequencies. Our results indicate that the evolution of the phase of resonant TSs is changed by the magnetic field.

  1. Glasses

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  2. Zero photoelastic and water durable ZnO–SnO–P2O5–B2O3 glasses

    Akira Saitoh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report properties of zero birefringent xZnO–(67–xSnO–(33–yP2O5–y B2O3 glasses, within 18.5 ≤ x ≤ 22 and y = 0, 3, and 10 mol. %. These compositions of boro-phosphate glasses provide both zero photoelastic constant (PEC and improved water durability. x = 19 and y = 3 compositions show minimum PEC of −0.002 × 10−12 Pa−1, which can contribute to candidate material for fiber current sensor devise without lead. The structures of zero photoelastic glasses were investigated by Raman scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Compositions of zero PEC glasses are explained by the empirical model proposed by Zwanziger et al. [Chem. Mater. 19, 286-290 (2007].

  3. Zero photoelastic and water durable ZnO–SnO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    Saitoh, Akira; Nakata, Kohei; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takebe, Hiromichi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tricot, Grégory; Chen, Yuanyuan [LASIR UMR-CNRS 8516, Université de Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq F-59655 (France)

    2015-04-01

    We report properties of zero birefringent xZnO–(67–x)SnO–(33–y)P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–y B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses, within 18.5 ≤ x ≤ 22 and y = 0, 3, and 10 mol. %. These compositions of boro-phosphate glasses provide both zero photoelastic constant (PEC) and improved water durability. x = 19 and y = 3 compositions show minimum PEC of −0.002 × 10{sup −12} Pa{sup −1}, which can contribute to candidate material for fiber current sensor devise without lead. The structures of zero photoelastic glasses were investigated by Raman scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Compositions of zero PEC glasses are explained by the empirical model proposed by Zwanziger et al. [Chem. Mater. 19, 286-290 (2007)].

  4. The effects of sulfate content on crystalline phase, microstructure, and chemical durability of zirconolite−barium borosilicate glass-ceramics

    Wu, Lang, E-mail: lang.wu@163.com [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wang, Xin; Li, Huidong; Teng, Yuancheng [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Peng, Long [Sichuan Province Key Laboratory of Information Materials and Devices Application, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu 610225 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The effects of sulfate content on structure and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics were studied. The results show that the glass-ceramics with 0–1.10 mol% SO{sub 3} possess mainly CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-2M phase along with a small amount of CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-3T and ZrO{sub 2} phases. The hexagonal CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-3T crystals crystallize on the surface of glass-ceramics. For the samples with 1.24–1.55 mol% SO{sub 3}, the main crystalline phases are CaTiSiO{sub 5} and CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-2M in the bulk, while a separate sulfate layer containing Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and BaSO{sub 4} is observed on the surface. X-ray fluorescence analysis indicates that about 2/3 of the SO{sub 3} originally added has been lost by volatility. The normalized mass loss (NL{sub i}) for Na, B, Ca elements remains almost unchanged (∼10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2}) after 7 days for the samples with 0–1.10 mol% SO{sub 3}. The NL{sub i} for both Na and B increases gradually after 7 days when the SO{sub 3} content is 1.24 mol%. - Highlights: • Strip-shaped CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-2M and plate-like CaTiSiO{sub 5} crystals crystallize in the bulk. • CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-3T crystals crystallize on the surface for samples with 0–1.10 mol% SO{sub 3}. • A separate sulfate layer crystallizes on the surface when SO{sub 3} exceeds solubility.

  5. Polycarboxylic acids as network modifiers for water durability improvement of inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate low-melting glasses

    Menaa, Bouzid; Mizuno, Megumi; Takahashi, Masahide; Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the water durability of the inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate glasses Me 2 SiO-SnO-P 2 O 5 (Me designs the organic methyl group) doped with organic acids (salicylic acid (SA), tartaric acid (TA), citric acid (Canada) and butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA)) containing one or more of carboxylic groups per molecule. The structure, thermal properties and durability of the final glasses obtained via a non-aqueous acid-base reaction were discussed owing to the nature and the concentration of the acid added. 29 Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and 31 P MAS NMR spectra, respectively, showed clearly a modification of the network in the host glass matrix of the Me 2 SiO-SnO-P 2 O 5 system. The polycondensation enhancement to form -P-O-Si-O-P- linkages (PSP) and the increase of the Q 2 unit (two bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) over the Q 3 unit (three bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) as a function of the acid in the order SA 2 SiO-SnO-P 2 O 5 matrix. In addition, this structural change is accompanied by a decrease of the coefficient of thermal expansion and an increase of the water durability of the glasses with the acids containing a large number of carboxylic groups per molecule. The presence of carboxylic groups of the acid acting as network modifier may retard the movement of water molecules through the glasses due to the steric hindrance strengthening the PSP connections in a chain-like structure

  6. The durability of waveguide fibers at cyclic change of loading, temperature and humidity

    Karimov, S.N.; Sultonov, U.; Shamsidinov, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    Present article is devoted to durability of waveguide fibers at cyclic change of loading, temperature and humidity. The mounting scheme and loading of sample is presented. The dependence of glass fiber durability on number of thermal cycles at various humidity rates was considered. The dependence of number of cycles on maximal loading at cyclic temperature change was studied.

  7. Study on the water durability of zinc boro-phosphate glasses doped with MgO, Fe2O3, and TiO2

    Hwang, Moon Kyung; Ryu, Bong Ki

    2016-07-01

    The water durability of zinc boro-phosphate (PZB) glasses with the composition 60P2O5-20ZnO-20B2O3- xMeO ( x = 0, 2, 4, 6 and MeO = MgO, Fe2O3, or TiO2) (mol%) was measured, and PZB glass was studied in terms of its thermal properties, density, and FTIR characteristics. The surface conditions and corrosion byproducts were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. When MgO, Fe2O3, and TiO2 were doped into the PZB glass, Q2 was decreased and Q1 was increased in the phosphate structure, while the number of BO4 structures increased with increasing MeO content. The density of the PZB glass was increased by the addition of Fe2O3 and TiO2, while the glass transition temperature ( T g ) and dilatometric softening temperature ( T d ) were increased when additional MgO, Fe2O3, and TiO2 were added. From the weight loss analysis (95 ◦ C, 96 h), TiO2 doped glass showed the lowest weight loss (1.70 × 10 -3 g/cm2) while MgO doped glass showed the highest value (2.44 × 10 -3 g/cm2), compared with PZB glass (3.07 × 10 -3 g/cm2). These results were discussed in terms of the Me n+ ions in the glass structure, and their different coordination numbers and bonding strengths.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ALKALI RESISTANT GLASS FIBER FOR CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT AND CHEMICAL DURABILITY COMPARISON WITH SrO-Mn2O3-Fe2O3-MgO-ZrO2-SiO2 (SMFMZS SYSTEM GLASSES

    Göktuğ GÜNKAYA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the relevant literature, the utilization of different kind of glass fibers in concrete introduces positive effect on the mechanical behavior, especially toughness. There are many glassfibers available to reinforce concretes. Glass fiber composition is so important because it may change the properties such as strength, elastic modulus and alkali resistance. Its most important property to be used in concrete is the alkali resistance. Some glasses of SrO–MgO–ZrO2–SiO2 (SMZS quaternary system, such as 26SrO, 20MgO, 14ZrO2, 40SiO2 (Zrn glass, have been found to be highly alkali resistant thanks to their high ZrO2 and MgO contents. Previous researches on these glasses with MnO and/or Fe2O3 partially replacing SrO have been made with the aim of improving the chemical resistance and decreasing the production cost.The main target of the present study, first of all, was to characterize commercially available alkali resistant glass fiber for concrete reinforcement and then to compare its alkali durability with those of the SrO-Mn2O3-Fe2O3-MgO-ZrO2-SiO2 (SMFMZS system glasses. For such purposes, XRF, Tg-DTA, alkali resistance tests and SEM analysis conducted with EDX were employed. According tothe alkali endurance test results it was revealed that some of the SMFMZS system glass powders are 10 times resistant to alkali environments than the commercial glass fibers used in this study.Therefore, they can be considered as alternative filling materials on the evolution of chemically resistant concrete structures.

  9. Chemical durability and resistance to irradiation of LnYSiAlO (Ln=La or Ce) glasses, potential immobilization matrix of minor actinides

    Gavarini, St.

    2002-11-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate glasses are known for their interesting mechanical and optical properties. Recent studies have shown that their chemical durability was very good too, such they have the potential to be used in the nuclear industry for the specific immobilization of trivalent actinides. Initial dissolution rates of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO were determined using a Soxhlet device (dynamic leaching). The differences linked to the nature of the rare earth element were studied by synthesizing analogous glasses that only differed in their rare earth element composition (%at.): Y-5%, La-5 %, Si-15%, Al-10% O-65%. The influence of pH on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics was also studied by static leaching tests performed in dilute solutions of NaOH or HNO 3 . Electronic defects and collision cascades, induced by a-disintegration of radioelements confined in storage matrix, can cause important modifications in the glass structure and, thus, influence its chemical durability. To simulate these effects, glass samples were irradiated with β particles and heavy ions accelerated to 2,5 MeV and 200 keV, respectively. Monoliths were then leached in static bi-distilled water (pH≥≥ 5.5) for one month in an autoclave heated to 90 degrees C. Initially, the structural changes caused by irradiation were determined using Raman, NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Ion μ-beams, SEM-EDS and XPS analysis were also performed to evaluate the potential modifications of the superficial composition. Finally, the leaching behavior was studied, for both irradiated and unirradiated samples, through solution and solid elementary characterization. (author)

  10. NiCrNx interlayer thickness dependence of spectral performance and environmental durability of protected-silver mirrors

    Xu, Xu; Li, Bincheng; He, Wenyan; Wang, Changjun; Wei, Ming

    2018-04-01

    Gemini-style protected-silver mirror (Sub / NiCrNx / Ag / NiCrNx / SiNx / Air) is a suitable choice for optical instruments requiring both long-term environmental durability and high broadband reflectance. Three Gemini-style protected-silver mirrors with NiCrNx interlayer thicknesses between 0.1 and 0.6 nm were prepared by magnetron sputtering, and the dependences of spectral properties and environmental durability of these protected-silver mirrors on the thickness of NiCrNx interlayer between the silver layer and SiNx layer were investigated in-depth. The reflectance, transmittance and total scattering loss measurements, optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope imaging were employed to characterize the spectral properties and surface morphology, and accelerated environmental tests, including humidity test and salt fog test, were applied to investigate the environmental durability. The experimental results showed that both optical and corrosion-resistant properties of protected-silver mirrors were NiCrNx interlayer thickness dependent, and an optimum NiCrNx interlayer thickness should be ˜0.3 nm for Gemini-style protected-silver mirrors to have reasonably both high reflectance in a broadband spectral range from visible to far infrared and good corrosion resistance for long-lifetime applications in harsh environments.

  11. NMR characterization of simulated Hanford low-activity waste glasses and its use in understanding waste form chemical durability

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; McGrail, B.P.

    1999-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structural and chemical environments of B, Al, and Si in model Hanford low-activity waste glasses. The average 29 Si NMR peak position was found to systematically change with changing glass composition and structure. From an understanding of the structural roles of Al and B obtained from MAS-NMR experiments, the authors first developed a model that reliably predicts the distribution of structural units and the average 29 Si chemical shift value, δ, based purely on glass composition. A product consistency test (PCT) was used to determine the normalized elemental release (NL) from the prepared glasses. Comparison of the NMR and PCT data obtained from sodium boro-aluminosilicate glasses indicates that a rudimentary exponential relationship exists between the 29 Si chemical shift value, and the boron NL value

  12. Studies on the accelerated chemical durability test and its impact on structural changes in borosilicate glass matrix

    Thorat, Vidya S.; Kadam, P.S.; Mishra, R.K.; Kumar, Amar; Kaushik, C.P.; Sudarsan, V.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium borosilicate glass used for the immobilisation of high level nuclear waste with tentative compositions (SiO 2 ) 0.477 (B 2 O 3 ) 0.239 (Na 2 O) 0.170 (TiO 2 ) 0.02 )3 (CaO) 0.068 (Al 2 O 3 ) 0.023 was evaluated for its long term stability in the repository conditions where it may be exposed to high temperature and pressure. 29 Si MAS NMR studies have confirmed that, upon leaching, sodium borosilicate glass undergoes congruent crystallization leading to the formation of an aluminosilicate phase, Na 6 Al 6 Si 10 O 32 . Further the residual glass structure in the composite sample is identical with that of the un-leached glass. Boron structural units are unaffected in the glass compositions upon leaching

  13. Crystallization and chemical durability of glasses in the system Bi2O3-SiO2

    Fredericci, C.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization of the Bi 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -TiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -Na 2 O-K 2 O and Bi 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -ZnO-Al 2 O 3 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O glasses was studied using glass samples prepared by traditional melt-quench method. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) curves suggested that surface crystallization played a major role in the crystallization of the glass samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the crystallization of bismuth silicate for both glasses and bismuth silicate and zinc silicate for the glass containing ZnO. Through scanning electron microscopy (MEV) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), it was possible to observe that the crystals of zinc silicate (Zn 2 SiO 4 ) were readily attacked by hot 0,1 N sulfuric acid, whereas bismuth silicate crystals were more resistant to acidic attack etching. (author)

  14. Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 1, Discussion and glass durability data

    Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. Data collected throughout the world are included in the data base; current emphasis is on waste glasses and their properties. The goal is to provide a data base of properties and compositions and an analysis of dominant property trends as a function of composition. This data base is a resource that nuclear waste producers, disposers, and regulators can use to compare properties of a particular high-level nuclear waste glass product with the properties of other glasses of similar compositions. Researchers may use the data base to guide experimental tests to fill gaps in the available knowledge or to refine empirical models. The data are incorporated into a computerized data base that will allow the data to be extracted based on, for example, glass composition or test duration. 3 figs

  15. Chemical durability of alkali-borosilicate glasses studied by analytical SEM, IBA, isotopic-tracing and SIMS

    Trocellier, P.; Djanarthany, S.; Chêne, J.; Haddi, A.; Brass, A. M.; Poissonnet, S.; Farges, F.

    2005-10-01

    Simple and complex alkali-borosilicate glasses were submitted to aqueous corrosion at room temperature, 60 and 90 °C in solutions with pH ranging between 0 and 12. Analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, isotopic tracing and secondary ion mass-depth profiling (SIMS) have been used to investigate the variations of the surface composition of glass. In acidic medium, the glass surface is generally covered by a thick hydrated silica layer, mobile elements like Li, Na and B and transition elements (Fe, Zr, Mo, etc.) are strongly depleted. Near pH 7, relative enrichments of aluminium, iron and rare earths are shown together with strong Li, Na and B depletions. In basic medium, the glass surface exhibits relative enrichments of the major part of transition metals (from Cr to U) whereas mobile elements seem to be kept close to their nominal concentration level at the glass surface and Si is severely impoverished. Hydrogen incorporated at the glass surface after leaching is much more immobile in neutral and basic media than in acid medium.

  16. Chemical durability of alkali-borosilicate glasses studied by analytical SEM, IBA, isotopic-tracing and SIMS

    Trocellier, P.; Djanarthany, S.; Chene, J.; Haddi, A.; Brass, A.M.; Poissonnet, S.; Farges, F.

    2005-01-01

    Simple and complex alkali-borosilicate glasses were submitted to aqueous corrosion at room temperature, 60 and 90 deg. C in solutions with pH ranging between 0 and 12. Analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, isotopic tracing and secondary ion mass-depth profiling (SIMS) have been used to investigate the variations of the surface composition of glass. In acidic medium, the glass surface is generally covered by a thick hydrated silica layer, mobile elements like Li, Na and B and transition elements (Fe, Zr, Mo, etc.) are strongly depleted. Near pH 7, relative enrichments of aluminium, iron and rare earths are shown together with strong Li, Na and B depletions. In basic medium, the glass surface exhibits relative enrichments of the major part of transition metals (from Cr to U) whereas mobile elements seem to be kept close to their nominal concentration level at the glass surface and Si is severely impoverished. Hydrogen incorporated at the glass surface after leaching is much more immobile in neutral and basic media than in acid medium

  17. Structural Dependence of Physical Properties in Sodium Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, Marcel; Mauro, John C.

    Boroaluminosilicate glasses have found applications in many fields. The extent and nature of the mixing of network formers like SiO2, B2O3, and Al2O3 play an important role in controlling the macroscopic properties. To understand the structure-property correlations in these glasses, we study...... a series of sodium boroaluminosilicate glasses with various [Al2O3]/[SiO2] ratios to access different regimes of sodium behavior. We determine dynamic properties, elastic moduli, and hardness of these glasses. The results reveal an existence of local minimum for density, fragility index, Young’s and shear...

  18. Electron transfer in organic glass. Distance and energy dependence

    Krongauz, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the distance and energy dependence of electron transfer in rigid organic glasses containing randomly dispersed electron donor and electron acceptor molecules. Pulsed radiolysis by an electron beam from a linear accelerator was used for ionization resulting in charge deposition on donor molecules. The disappearance kinetics of donor radical anions due to electron transfer to acceptor was monitored spectroscopically by the change in optical density at the wavelength corresponding to that of donor radical anion absorbance. It was found that the rate of the electron transfer observed experimentally was higher than that computed using the Marcus-Levich theory assuming that the electron-transfer activation barrier is equal to the binding energy of electron on the donor molecule. This discrepancy between the experimental and computed results suggests that the open-quotes inertclose quotes media in which electron-transfer reaction takes place may be participating in the process, resulting in experimentally observed higher electron-transfer rates. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Glass consistency and glass performance

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  20. Compositional dependences of average positron lifetime in binary As-S/Se glasses

    Ingram, A.; Golovchak, R.; Kostrzewa, M.; Wacke, S.; Shpotyuk, M.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2012-01-01

    Compositional dependence of average positron lifetime is studied systematically in typical representatives of binary As-S and As-Se glasses. This dependence is shown to be in opposite with molar volume evolution. The origin of this anomaly is discussed in terms of bond free solid angle concept applied to different types of structurally-intrinsic nanovoids in a glass.

  1. Compositional dependences of average positron lifetime in binary As-S/Se glasses

    Ingram, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Golovchak, R., E-mail: roman_ya@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Kostrzewa, M.; Wacke, S. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Shpotyuk, M. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12, Bandery str., Lviv, UA-79013 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    Compositional dependence of average positron lifetime is studied systematically in typical representatives of binary As-S and As-Se glasses. This dependence is shown to be in opposite with molar volume evolution. The origin of this anomaly is discussed in terms of bond free solid angle concept applied to different types of structurally-intrinsic nanovoids in a glass.

  2. Size-dependent penetrant diffusion in polymer glasses.

    Meng, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Kumar, Sanat K

    2018-05-18

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to understand the underpinning basis of the transport of gas-like solutes in deeply quenched polymeric glasses. As found in previous work, small solutes, with sizes smaller than 0.15 times the chain monomer size, move as might be expected in a medium with large pores. In contrast, the motion of larger solutes is activated and is strongly facilitated by matrix motion. In particular, solute motion is coupled to the local elastic fluctuations of the matrix as characterized by the Debye-Waller factor. While similar ideas have been previously proposed for the viscosity of supercooled liquids above their glass transition, to our knowledge, this is the first illustration of this concept in the context of solute mass transport in deeply quenched polymer glasses.

  3. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s...

  4. Pressure dependence of glass transition in As2Te3 glass.

    Ramesh, K

    2014-07-24

    Amorphous solids prepared from their melt state exhibit glass transition phenomenon upon heating. Viscosity, specific heat, and thermal expansion coefficient of the amorphous solids show rapid changes at the glass transition temperature (Tg). Generally, application of high pressure increases the Tg and this increase (a positive dT(g)/dP) has been understood adequately with free volume and entropy models which are purely thermodynamic in origin. In this study, the electrical resistivity of semiconducting As(2)Te(3) glass at high pressures as a function of temperature has been measured in a Bridgman anvil apparatus. Electrical resistivity showed a pronounced change at Tg. The Tg estimated from the slope change in the resistivity-temperature plot shows a decreasing trend (negative dT(g)/dP). The dT(g)/dP was found to be -2.36 °C/kbar for a linear fit and -2.99 °C/kbar for a polynomial fit in the pressure range 1 bar to 9 kbar. Chalcogenide glasses like Se, As(2)Se(3), and As(30)Se(30)Te(40) show a positive dT(g)/dP which is very well understood in terms of the thermodynamic models. The negative dT(g)/dP (which is generally uncommon in liquids) observed for As(2)Te(3) glass is against the predictions of the thermodynamic models. The Adam-Gibbs model of viscosity suggests a direct relationship between the isothermal pressure derivative of viscosity and the relaxational expansion coefficient. When the sign of the thermal expansion coefficient is negative, dT(g)/dP = Δk/Δα will be less than zero, which can result in a negative dT(g)/dP. In general, chalcogenides rich in tellurium show a negative thermal expansion coefficient (NTE) in the supercooled and stable liquid states. Hence, the negative dT(g)/dP observed in this study can be understood on the basis of the Adams-Gibbs model. An electronic model proposed by deNeufville and Rockstad finds a linear relation between Tg and the optical band gap (Eg) for covalent semiconducting glasses when they are grouped

  5. Composition dependence of the optical and structural properties of Eu-doped oxyfluoride glasses

    Zhu, Chaofeng; Wu, Dongqun; Zhang, Yanfei; Zhang, Meimei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Eu doped oxyfluoride glasses for LED applications are studied. • Conversion of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ is realized in the glasses prepared in air atmosphere. • CaF 2 crystals formed during melt cooling enhance the conversion of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ . • Content of CaF 2 crystals can be controlled by adjusting base glass compositions. - Abstract: Europium doped oxyfluoride glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method for the light emitting diodes applications. The optical and structural properties of these glasses were studied by means of photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage chromaticity coordinates, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectra. We find that the spontaneous reduction of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ is realized by Eu 3+ ions occupying the sites of Ca 2+ in the glasses prepared in air atmosphere. The Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ conversion efficiency, optical performances and structure of the glasses strongly depend on the base glass compositions. For certain base glass compositions, CaF 2 crystals can form during the melt cooling process, and thereby enhance the conversion from Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ . The formation of CaF 2 crystals can be suppressed by adding CaO, Al 2 O 3 and B 2 O 3 , but enhanced by adding Na 2 O and K 2 O in glass compositions. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain how the glass structure affects the reduction of Eu ions as well as optical properties of the glasses

  6. Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    Bai Yu; Jin Li

    2008-01-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (T f ) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials. (fast track communication)

  7. The effects of crystallization and residual glass on the chemical durability of iron phosphate waste forms containing 40 wt% of a high MoO3 Collins-CLT waste

    Hsu, Jen-Hsien; Bai, Jincheng; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Brow, Richard K.; Szabo, Joe; Zervos, Adam

    2018-03-01

    The effects of cooling rate on the chemical durability of iron phosphate waste forms containing up to 40 wt% of a high MoO3 Collins-CLT waste simulant were determined at 90 °C using the product consistency test (PCT). The waste form, designated 40wt%-5, meets appropriate Department of Energy (DOE) standards when rapidly quenched from the melt (as-cast) and after slow cooling following the CCC (canister centerline cooling)-protocol, although the quenched glass is more durable. The analysis of samples from the vapor hydration test (VHT) and the aqueous corrosion test (differential recession test) reveals that rare earth orthophosphate (monazite) and Zr-pyrophosphate crystals that form on cooling are more durable than the residual glass in the 40wt%-5 waste form. The residual glass in the CCC-treated samples has a greater average phosphate chain length and a lower Fe/P ratio, and those contribute to its faster corrosion kinetics.

  8. Compositional dependence thermal and optical properties of a novel germanate glass

    El-Rabaie, S.; Taha, T.A.; Higazy, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of zinc lithium germanate glasses of the composition (45−x)Li 2 O–xZnO–55GeO 2 have been synthesized via melt quenching technique. Dependencies of their thermal and optical properties on composition were investigated. It is found that the gradual replacement of Li 2 O by ZnO, decreases the glass transition temperature from 430 to 280 °C and increases the thermal stability (ΔT) of the studied glasses. The optical band gap E opt also decreases from 2.31 to 1.40 eV with increasing the mole content of ZnO

  9. Effect of alumina on the dissolution rate of glasses

    Palavit, G.; Montagne, L.

    1997-01-01

    Small alumina addition to silicate glasses improves their chemical durability, but a large amount of alumina can also be beneficial to obtain a high dissolution rate. This paper describes the effect of Al 3+ on the early stage of glass alteration, in relation with its coordination in the glass and also with the reactions involved (hydrolysis and ionic exchange). We describe briefly nuclear magnetic resonance tools available to characterize the aluminum environments in the glasses. The rote of alumina on the dissolution rate of phosphate glasses is also discussed in order to show that the effect of Al 3+ is dependant upon the nature of the glass matrix. (author)

  10. Dependence of conductivity on thickness within the variable-range hopping regime for Coulomb glasses

    M. Caravaca

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide some computational evidence concerning the dependence of conductivity on the system thickness for Coulomb glasses. We also verify the Efros–Shklovskii law and deal with the calculation of its characteristic parameter as a function of the thickness. Our results strengthen the link between theoretical and experimental fields. Keywords: Coulomb glass, Conductivity, Density of states, Efros–Shklovskii law

  11. Density dependence of relaxation dynamics in glass formers, and ...

    Anshul D S Parmar

    formers, we study the variation of relaxation dynamics with density, rather than temperature, as a control ... stronger behaviour, the use of scaled variables involving temperature and ... of the temperature dependence of B as written defines.

  12. Photon energy dependence and angular response of glass display used in mobile phones for accident dosimetry

    Discher, Michael; Greiter, Matthias; Woda, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that glass displays extracted from mobile phones are suitable as emergency dosimeters in case of an accidental radiation overexposure using the thermoluminescence (TL) method. So far these studies have focused only on recovering the absorbed dose to the material. However, dose in air or dose to the victim carrying the device might be significantly different. Therefore the aim of this work was to investigate photon energy dependence and angular response of glass display used in modern mobile phones. An over-response of about a factor of five is observed for low photon energies compared to the response to Cs-137 (662 keV) which is in reasonable agreement with calculated values mass energy-absorption coefficients of glass and air. Little variation in the energy dependence can be seen for glass displays coming from three different mobile phone models. The angular response for display glass is flat with regard to air kerma within the incident angle of ±60°, independent of the irradiation setup used (with a water phantom or with air kerma reference conditions). For incident angles of 90° the shielding effect of the mobile phones becomes important. With the dosimetric characterization of the photon energy and angular dependencies the absorbed dose in a glass display can be transferred to a reference air kerma dose and provides a useful option for retrospective accident dosimetry. - Highlights: • Determination of the photon energy dependence and angular response for display glass used as an accident dosimeter. • Over-response of about a factor of five for low photon energies. • Flat angular response within incident angles between ±60°

  13. Temperature-dependent structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass

    Golovchak, R., E-mail: roman_ya@yahoo.com [Lviv Sci. and Res. Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Academy of Management and Administration, 18 Niedzialkowski str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Shpotyuk, O. [Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, 42201, Czestochowa (Poland); Gorecki, Cz. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The origin of structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass at different annealing temperatures is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Strong physical aging effect, expressed through the increase of endothermic peak area in the vicinity of T{sub g}, is recorded by DSC technique at the annealing temperatures T{sub a}>90{sup o}C. EXAFS data show that the observed structural relaxation is not associated with significant changes in the short-range order of this glass. An explanation is proposed for this relaxation behavior assuming temperature-dependent constraints. -- Highlights: → In this study we report experimental evidence for temperature-dependent constraints theory. → Structural relaxation of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass at higher annealing temperatures is studied by DSC technique. → Accompanied changes in the structure are monitored by in situ EXAFS measurements.

  14. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). One of the process models within PCCS is known as the Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Reaction MOdel (THERMO™). The DWPF will soon be receiving increased concentrations of TiO2-, Na2O-, and Cs2O-enriched wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF has been built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to validate the existing TiO2 term in THERMO™ beyond 2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new durability data were developed over the target range of 2.00 to 6.00 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 1995 durability model. The durability was measured by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. This study documents the adequacy of the existing THERMO™ terms. It is recommended that the modified THERMO™ durability models and

  15. Resistência química de vitro-cerâmicos pertencentes a sistemas Li2O-ZrO2-BaO-SiO2 frente ao tratamento com soluções ácidas e básicas Chemical durability of the Li2O-ZrO2-BaO-SiO2 glass-ceramic treated with acidic and basic solution

    Silvia Denofre de Campos

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical durability of the Li2O-ZrO2-BaO-SiO2 system was examined by determination of the Vickers hardness. The dependence of hardness and of the chemical resistance with BaO addition was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the hardness increases with the BaO content. The samples surface's morphology submitted to the chemical treatment in acidic (H2SO4 and basic (KOH solution was accompanied by scanning electron microscopy. The chemical durability of the materials with BaO showed better than the glass ceramic without this content. These materials treated with H2SO4 solution showed a preferential attack to the silica rich sites.

  16. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of individual glass spherules, Apollo 11, 12, and 14 lunar samples.

    Thorpe, A. N.; Sullivan, S.; Alexander, C. C.; Senftle, F. E.; Dwornik, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 14 lunar fines have been measured from room temperature to 4 K. Data taken at room temperature, 77 K, and 4.2 K, show that the soft saturation magnetization was temperature independent. In the temperature range 300 to 77 K the temperature-dependent component of the magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie law. Susceptibility measurements on these same specimens and in addition 14 similar spherules from the Apollo 11 and 12 mission show a Curie-Weiss relation at temperatures less than 77 K with a Weiss temperature of 3-7 degrees in contrast to 2-3 degrees found for tektites and synthetic glasses of tektite composition. A proposed model and a theoretical expression closely predict the variation of the susceptibility of the glass spherules with temperature.

  17. Introduction to the crystallization phenomenon in nuclear glass

    Jacquet Francillon, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystallization is a subject for concern because of its potentially detrimental effects on the technological feasibility of high-temperature melting, and on the chemical durability of the material at intermediate and low temperatures during interim storage or after disposal. The tendency of glass to crystallize depends to a large extent on the composition of the frit and/or of the waste to be solidified. It depends too of the thermal history of the glass generally, the knowledge is mainly upon determination of the time-temperature-transition (TTT) curves, crystal identification and quantification techniques, and their effects on the durability of the glass matrix. French experience is presented. Only a few authors addressed the long-term development of crystalline phases, notably at temperatures below the vitreous transition temperature Tg. Some recommendations for glass crystallization studies are made but glass crystallization after disposal is acceptable provided some conditions are met. (author)

  18. Concrete durability

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-01-01

    The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of rese...

  19. Roughened glass slides and a spectrophotometer for the detection of the wavelength-dependent refractive index of transparent liquids.

    Niskanen, Ilpo; Räty, Jukka; Myllylä, Risto; Sutinen, Veijo; Matsuda, Kiyofumi; Homma, Kazuhiro; Silfsten, Pertti; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2012-07-01

    We describe a method to determine the wavelength-dependent refractive index of liquids by measurement of light transmittance with a spectrophotometer. The method is based on using roughened glass slides with different a priori known refractive indices and immersing the slides into the transparent liquid with unknown refractive index. Using the dispersion data on the glass material it is possible to find the index match between the liquid and the glass slide, and hence the refractive index of the liquid.

  20. Atomistic Origin of Rate-Dependent Serrated Plastic Flow in Metallic Glasses

    Yao YG

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanoindentation simulations on a binary metallic glass were performed under various strain rates by using molecular dynamics. The rate-dependent serrated plastic flow was clearly observed, and the spatiotemporal behavior of its underlying irreversible atomic rearrangement was probed. Our findings clearly validate that the serration is a temporally inhomogeneous characteristic of such rearrangements and not directly dependent on the resultant shear-banding spatiality. The unique spatiotemporal distribution of shear banding during nanoindentation is highlighted in terms of the potential energy landscape (PEL theory.

  1. Compositional Dependence Of Hardness Of Ge-Sb-Se Glass For Molded Lens Applications

    Park J.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glass in the ternary Ge-Sb-Se system is inherently moldable, thus being considered as a strong candidate material for use in infrared-transmitting lens applications from the viewpoint of thermal and mechanical stability. In an effort to experimentally determine compositional region suitable for the molded lens applications, we evaluate its compositional dependence of hardness. Among the constituent atoms, Ge content turns out to exert a most conspicuous correlation with hardness. This phenomenological behavior is then explained in connection with the structural evolution that Ge brings about.

  2. Compositional Dependence of Solubility/Retention of Molybdenum Oxides in Aluminoborosilicate-Based Model Nuclear Waste Glasses.

    Brehault, Antoine; Patil, Deepak; Kamat, Hrishikesh; Youngman, Randall E; Thirion, Lynn M; Mauro, John C; Corkhill, Claire L; McCloy, John S; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-02-08

    Molybdenum oxides are an integral component of the high-level waste streams being generated from the nuclear reactors in several countries. Although borosilicate glass has been chosen as the baseline waste form by most of the countries to immobilize these waste streams, molybdate oxyanions (MoO 4 2- ) exhibit very low solubility (∼1 mol %) in these glass matrices. In the past three to four decades, several studies describing the compositional and structural dependence of molybdate anions in borosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses have been reported in the literature, providing a basis for our understanding of fundamental science that governs the solubility and retention of these species in the nuclear waste glasses. However, there are still several open questions that need to be answered to gain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that control the solubility and retention of these oxyanions in glassy waste forms. This article is focused on finding answers to two such questions: (1) What are the solubility and retention limits of MoO 3 in aluminoborosilicate glasses as a function of chemical composition? (2) Why is there a considerable increase in the solubility of MoO 3 with incorporation of rare-earth oxides (for example, Nd 2 O 3 ) in aluminoborosilicate glasses? Accordingly, three different series of aluminoborosilicate glasses (compositional complexity being added in a tiered approach) with varying MoO 3 concentrations have been synthesized and characterized for their ability to accommodate molybdate ions in their structure (solubility) and as a glass-ceramic (retention). The contradictory viewpoints (between different research groups) pertaining to the impact of rare-earth cations on the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses are discussed, and their implications on the solubility of MoO 3 in these glasses are evaluated. A novel hypothesis explaining the mechanism governing the solubility of MoO 3 in rare-earth containing aluminoborosilicate

  3. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  4. Concrete durability

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of researchers and industries related with this material. Moreover, the new laboratory techniques are allowing to understand old problems and even to open again the discussion on reaction mechanisms which were believed to be completely understood. The article finalizes with a brief description of the numerous studies carried out at the Institute Eduardo Torroja on concrete durability, mainly those related with the resistance against gypsum attack (so abundant in our country land and against sea water attack.

    La realidad de que el hormigón no es un material eterno y es susceptible de sufrir ataques por agentes químicos, fue constatada desde el comienzo mismo de su uso industrial. En el presente trabajo el autor enumera los estudios realizados el siglo pasado y a comienzos del presente sobre la durabilidad del hormigón en agua de mar. En la actualidad y a pesar de los numerosos trabajos desarrollados desde entonces, el estudio de la durabilidad del hormigón sigue centrando la atención prioritaria y los recursos económicos de los investigadores e industrias relacionadas con este material. Además las nuevas técnicas de estudio están permitiendo comprender antiguos problemas e incluso reabrir la discusión sobre mecanismos de reacción que se creían completamente explicados. Finaliza el artículo con una descripción somera de los múltiples trabajos realizados en el Instituto Eduardo Torreja sobre la materia, en especial los estudios realizados sobre

  5. Durability of immunity by hepatitis B vaccine in Japanese health care workers depends on primary response titers and durations.

    Nori Yoshioka

    Full Text Available Health care workers (HCWs are frequently exposed to hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The efficacy and safety of immunization with the hepatitis B (HB vaccine are well recognized, but the durability of immunity and need for booster doses in those with secondary vaccine response failure remains controversial.This was a retrospective cohort study performed at Osaka University Hospital, Japan. We examined antibodies against HB surface antigen (anti-HBs titers annually after immunization for previously non-immunized HCWs. Primary responders were categorized by their sero-positive durations as short responders (those whose anti-HBs titers declined to negative range within 3 years, and long responders (those who retained positive anti-HBs levels for 3 years and more. We re-immunized short responders with either single or 3-dose boosters, the long responders with a single booster when their titers dropped below protective levels, and examined their sero-protection rates over time thereafter.From 2001 to 2012, data of 264 HCWs with a median age of 25.3 were collected. The rate of anti-HBs positivity after primary vaccination were 93.0% after three doses (n = 229, 54.5% after two doses (n = 11, and 4.2% after a single dose (n = 24. Of 213 primary responders, the anti-HBs levels of 95 participants (44.6% fell below the protective levels, including 46 short responders and 49 long responders. HCWs with higher initial anti-HBs titers after primary vaccination had significantly longer durations of sero-positivity. For short responders, 3-dose booster vaccination induced a longer duration of anti-HBs positivity compared to a single-dose booster, whereas for long responders, a single-dose booster alone could induce prolonged anti-HBs positivity.Our preliminary data suggested that it may be useful to differentiate HB vaccine responders based on their primary response durations to maintain protective levels of anti-HBs efficiently. A randomized, prospective

  6. Glass transition in thaumatin crystals revealed through temperature-dependent radiation-sensitivity measurements

    Warkentin, Matthew, E-mail: maw64@cornell.edu; Thorne, Robert E. [Physics Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Radiation damage to protein crystals exhibits two regimes of temperature-activated behavior between T = 300 and 100 K, with a crossover at the protein glass transition near 200 K. These results have implications for mechanistic studies of proteins and for structure determination when cooling to T = 100 K creates excessive disorder. The temperature-dependence of radiation damage to thaumatin crystals between T = 300 and 100 K is reported. The amount of damage for a given dose decreases sharply as the temperature decreases from 300 to 220 K and then decreases more gradually on further cooling below the protein-solvent glass transition. Two regimes of temperature-activated behavior were observed. At temperatures above ∼200 K the activation energy of 18.0 kJ mol{sup −1} indicates that radiation damage is dominated by diffusive motions in the protein and solvent. At temperatures below ∼200 K the activation energy is only 1.00 kJ mol{sup −1}, which is of the order of the thermal energy. Similar activation energies describe the temperature-dependence of radiation damage to a variety of solvent-free small-molecule organic crystals over the temperature range T = 300–80 K. It is suggested that radiation damage in this regime is vibrationally assisted and that the freezing-out of amino-acid scale vibrations contributes to the very weak temperature-dependence of radiation damage below ∼80 K. Analysis using the radiation-damage model of Blake and Phillips [Blake & Phillips (1962 ▶), Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation at the Molecular Level, pp. 183–191] indicates that large-scale conformational and molecular motions are frozen out below T = 200 K but become increasingly prevalent and make an increasing contribution to damage at higher temperatures. Possible alternative mechanisms for radiation damage involving the formation of hydrogen-gas bubbles are discussed and discounted. These results have implications for mechanistic studies of proteins and for

  7. Chemical durability and Structural approach of the glass series (40-y) Na2O-yFe2O3-5Al2O3-55P2O5-by IR, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Aqdim, S; Sayouty, El H; Elouad, B; Greneche, J M

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the composition and structure for the glasses of general composition (40-y)Na 2 O-yFe 2 O 3 -5Al 2 O 3 -55P 2 O 5 (5≤y≤20), has been studied. The chemical durability and density of these glasses increase with increasing Fe 2 O 3 content. The dissolution rate (D R ), calculated from the weight loss in distilled water at 90°C for up to 20 days was ≈ 3.10 −9 g/cm 2 /mn which is 30 times lower than that of window glass. The structure and valence states of the iron ions in the glasses were investigated using, X-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, potentiometric analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Both Mössbauer spectrometry and potentiometric analysis allow to estimate both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ contents in all these glasses. X-ray diffraction indicates that the local structure of iron phosphate glasses is related to the short range structures of NaFeP 2 O 7 . Infrared spectra indicate the formation of P–O–Fe bonds in the pyrophosphate glasses that replace P–O–Na bonds. The presence of a small content of Al 2 O 3 in the glass seems to play a role as a network modifier. The addition of Fe 2 O 3 to Al 2 O 3 in phosphate glasses favours the enhancement of the formation of pyrophosphate units because iron ions have stronger effect on the depolymerization of metaphosphate chains than the aluminium ions. Finally, the I.R spectra indicate that the presence of P-O-Fe bands of these glasses containing more than 15 mol%Fe 2 O 3 is consistent with their good chemical durability.

  8. Annealing time dependent up-conversion luminescence enhancement in magnesium–tellurite glass

    Amjad, Raja J., E-mail: rajajunaid25@gmail.com [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, QAC, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Sahar, M.R.; Ghoshal, S.K.; Dousti, M.R. [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Riaz, S. [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, QAC, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Samavati, A.R.; Arifin, R. [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Naseem, S. [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, QAC, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan)

    2013-04-15

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) embedded Er{sup 3+} ions doped magnesium–tellurite glasses are prepared using melt quenching technique. Heat treatment with different time intervals above the glass transition temperature is applied in order to reduce the silver ions (Ag{sup +}) to silver NPs (Ag{sup o}). The transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential thermal analyses (DTA), UV–vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy are used to examine annealing time dependent structural and optical properties. The characteristics temperatures such as glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) and melting temperature (T{sub m}) obtained from DTA for an as prepared sample are 322 °C, 450 °C and 580 °C, respectively. TEM image clearly shows the homogeneous distribution of silver NPs with an average diameter ∼12 nm. The observed localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band is evidenced at 534 nm. Furthermore, the infrared to visible frequency up-conversion (UC) emission under 786 nm excitation exhibits three emission bands centered at 532 nm, 554 nm and 634 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+}, respectively. Intensity of all the bands is found to enhance by increasing the annealing time up to 24 h. However, further increase in the annealing time duration (∼40 h) reduces the intensity. Enhancement in the luminescence intensity is understood in terms of the local field effect of the silver NPs whereas the quenching is attributed to the energy transfer from Er{sup 3+} ions to silver NPs. -- Highlights: ► Er{sup 3+}-doped silver NPs embedded magnesium–tellurite glasses are prepared. ► TEM confirms the successful precipitation of spherical NPs by heat treatment (HT). ► Luminescence is enhanced due to the growth of NPs after HT up to 24 h. ► With HT>24 h (40 h

  9. Mean-coordination number dependence of the fragility in Ge-Se-In glass-forming liquids

    Saffarini, G.; Saiter, A.; Garda, M.R.; Saiter, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements have been performed on elemental Se as well as on Ge x Se 94- x In 6 (x=4, 8, and 11 at%) and on Ge y Se 88- y In 12 (y=5, 7, and 9 at%) chalcogenide glasses. From the cooling rate dependence of the fictive temperature, the apparent activation energies, Δh*, and the fragility indices, m, as defined in the strong-fragile glass-forming liquid concept, are determined. It is found that, in Ge-Se-In system, there is an evolution from strong (m=67) to fragile (m=116) glass-forming liquids. The dependence of 'm' on the mean-coordination number, Z, is also obtained. This dependence is rationalized by assuming that, in this glassy alloy system, there is a tendency for the formation of In 2 Se 3 clusters

  10. Composition dependent structural and optical properties of PbF₂-TeO₂-B₂O₃-Eu₂O₃ glasses.

    Wagh, Akshatha; Raviprakash, Y; Upadhyaya, Vyasa; Kamath, Sudha D

    2015-12-05

    Boric oxide based quaternary glasses in the system PbF2-TeO2-B2O3-Eu2O3 have been prepared by melt quenching technique. Density, molar volume, FTIR, UV-Vis techniques were used to probe the structural modifications with incorporation of europium ions in the glass network. An increase in glass density & decrease in molar volume (Vm) values proved the structural changes occurring in coordination of boron atom [conversion of BO3 units to BO4]. This resulted in the increase of the compaction of the prepared glasses with increase in Eu2O3 contents. The amorphous natures of the samples were ascertained by XRD and metallization criterion (M) studies. XPS study showed the values of core-level binding energy [O1s, Eu3d, Eu4d, Te3d, Te4d, Pd4f, Pb5d, O1s, and F1s] of (PbF2-TeO2-B2O3-Eu2O3) the glass matrix. The frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of present glasses were investigated in the frequency range of 1 Hz-10 MHz and temperature range of 313-773K. The study of dielectric measurements proved good insulating and thermal stability of the prepared glasses. At room temperature, dielectric loss [tanδ] values were negligibly small for prepared glasses and increased with increase in temperature. FTIR spectroscopy results were in good agreement with optical band energy gap, density, molar volume and hardness values revealing network modifications caused by europium ions in the glass structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dependence of Hardness of Silicate Glasses on Composition and Thermal History

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    composition on hardness of silicate glasses. E-glasses of different compositions are subjected to various degrees of annealing to obtain various fictive temperatures in the glasses. It is found that hardness decreases with the fictive temperature. Addition of Na2O to a SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O glass system causes......The prediction of hardness is possible for crystalline materials, but so far not possible for glasses. In this work, several important factors that should be used for predicting the hardness of glasses are discussed. To do so, we have studied the influences of thermal history and chemical...... a decrease in hardness. However, hardness cannot solely be determined from the degree of polymerisation of the glass network. It is also determined by the effect of ionic radius on hardness. However, this effect has opposite trend for alkali and alkaline earth ions. The hardness increases with ionic radius...

  12. Concentration dependent luminescence quenching of Er{sup 3+}-doped zinc boro-tellurite glass

    Said Mahraz, Zahra Ashur; Sahar, M.R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com; Ghoshal, S.K.; Reza Dousti, M.

    2013-12-15

    Understanding the mechanism of luminescence quenching in rare earth doped tellurite glass is an important issue. The Er{sup 3+}-doped boro-tellurite glasses with compositions 30B{sub 2}O{sub 3}+10ZnO+(60−x)TeO{sub 2}+xEr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. Structural and optical properties of the proposed glasses were characterized using XRD, FTIR, density, UV–vis-IR absorption and PL spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of these glasses was confirmed by XRD technique. The IR-spectrum reveals five absorption bands assigned to different B–O and Te–O vibrational groups. UV–vis-IR absorption spectrum exhibits seven absorption bands at 6553, 10,244, 12,547, 15,360, 19,230, 20,661 and 22,522 cm{sup −1} corresponding to {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 7/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} excited states of Er{sup 3+} ion respectively. The optical band gap energy (E{sub opt}) corresponding to the direct and indirect allowed transitions decreased, while the Urbach energy and cut-off wavelengths are increased by the introduction of Er{sup 3+} ions. The refractive index, density and phonon cut-off edge of the samples are increased and the molar volume decreased with the further addition of dopants. The Judd–Ofelt parameter (Ω{sub 2}) decreased from 5.73 to 3.13×10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} with the increase of erbium ions concentration from 0.5 to 2 mol%. The PL spectra show green emissions for the transition from {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} excited states to {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} ground state, which show strong quenching due to the addition of Er{sup 3+} ions. -- Highlights: • Er{sup 3+}-doped zinc boro-tellurite glass has been synthesized by melt quench method. • Spectroscopic properties dependent concentration is analyzed by different techniques. • Judd–Ofelt intensity parameter (Ω{sub 2}) decreased by increase in erbium

  13. Durability of cement and geopolimer composites

    Błaszczyński, T.; Król, M.

    2017-10-01

    Concrete structures are constantly moving in the direction of improving the durability. This main feature depends on many factors, which are the composition of concrete mix, the usage of additives and admixtures and the place, where material will work and carry the load. The introduction of new geopolymer binders for geopolymer structures adds a new aspect that is type of used activator. This substance with strongly alkaline reaction is divided because of the physical state, the alkaline degree and above all the chemical composition. Taking into account, that at present the geopolymer binders are made essentially from waste materials or by products from the combustion of coal or iron ore smelting, unambiguous determination of the effect of the activator on the properties of the geopolymer material requires a number of trials, researches and observation. This paper shows the influence of the most alkaline activators on the basic parameters of the durability of geopolymer binders. In this study there were used a highly alkaline hydroxides, water glasses and granules, which are waste materials in a variety of processes taking place in a chemical plants. As the substrate of geopolymer binders there were used fly ash which came from coal and high calcium ash from the burning of lignite.

  14. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 1, Chemistry and properties of oxide glasses. Professor William C. LaCourse, Lecturer

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    The tutorial covers the following topics: Definitions and terminology; Introduction to glass structure and properties; The glass transition; Structure/property relationships in oxide glasses; Generalized models for predicting structure/properties; Glass surfaces; Chemical durability; and Mechanical properties

  15. Temperature effects on waste glass performance

    Mazer, J.J.

    1991-02-01

    The temperature dependence of glass durability, particularly that of nuclear waste glasses, is assessed by reviewing past studies. The reaction mechanism for glass dissolution in water is complex and involves multiple simultaneous reaction proceeded, including molecular water diffusion, ion exchange, surface reaction, and precipitation. These processes can change in relative importance or dominance with time or changes in temperature. The temperature dependence of each reaction process has been shown to follow an Arrhenius relationship in studies where the reaction process has been isolated, but the overall temperature dependence for nuclear waste glass reaction mechanisms is less well understood, Nuclear waste glass studies have often neglected to identify and characterize the reaction mechanism because of difficulties in performing microanalyses; thus, it is unclear if such results can be extrapolated to other temperatures or reaction times. Recent developments in analytical capabilities suggest that investigations of nuclear waste glass reactions with water can lead to better understandings of their reaction mechanisms and their temperature dependences. Until a better understanding of glass reaction mechanisms is available, caution should be exercised in using temperature as an accelerating parameter. 76 refs., 1 tab

  16. Characterization of Fibre-Direction Dependent Damping of Glass-Fibre Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Frequencies

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Dannemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the fibre-direction dependent damping capability of glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP) to be used in electrical power transmission pylons. A fibre-direction dependent damping analysis of unidirectional (UD) GFRP samples was carried out using...... a Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) for five different fibre orientations (0˚ | 30˚ | 45˚ | 60˚ and 90˚) and two different matrix systems (epoxy and a vinyl ester resin). Based on the dynamic characteristics the damping performance of the various composite materials was studied at three temperatures (-10˚C......, 0˚C and 10˚C) and three vibration frequencies (1 Hz, 10 Hz and 30 Hz). It was observed that the loss factor of Glass Fibre Reinforced Vinyl-Ester (GF-VE) was in general slightly higher compared to the Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GF-EP). The loss factor increased slightly with temperature, while...

  17. Composition dependence of the optical and structural properties of Eu-doped oxyfluoride glasses

    Zhu, C.F.; Wu, D.Q.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    Europium doped oxyfluoride glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method for the light emitting diodes applications. The optical and structural properties of these glasses were studied by means of photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates, X...... compositions. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain how the glass structure affects the reduction of Eu ions as well as optical properties of the glasses.......Europium doped oxyfluoride glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method for the light emitting diodes applications. The optical and structural properties of these glasses were studied by means of photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates, X...... on the base glass compositions. For certain base glass compositions, CaF2 crystals can form during the melt cooling process, and thereby enhance the conversion from Eu3+ to Eu2+. The formation of CaF2 crystals can be suppressed by adding CaO, Al2O3 and B2O3, but enhanced by adding Na2O and K2O in glass...

  18. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  19. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Mercado-Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Frizon, F.; Gin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage

  20. Observation on Surface Change of Fragile Glass: Temperature - Time Dependence Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    Kikkawa, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Amane; Takahashi, Isao

    2004-01-01

    The structural change of a fragile glass surface close to the glass transition temperature Tg is studied by using X-ray reflectivity. Measurements were performed on surfaces of maltitol, which is a typical polyalcohol fragile glass with Tg = 320K. Upon both heating and cooling, we find the following features which are also noticed in silicate glass surfaces: (i) On heating, the surface morphology indicates a variation at temperatures below Tg; (ii) A drastic increase in surface roughness occurs at a temperature about 333K on heating, which is 13K higher than Tg; (iii) During the cooling of the sample, formation of a low-density surface layer (3nm at 293K) is observed. Prior to the crystallization, nm - μm sized domains were grown at the surface, which might not be reported for other glasses

  1. Reliability and durability in solar energy systems

    Godolphin, D.

    1982-10-01

    The reliability and durability in solar energy systems for residential buildings is discussed. It is concluded that although strides have been made in design and manufacturing over the past years, the reliability and durability of the equipment depends on the proper installation. (MJF)

  2. Concrete aggregate durability study.

    2009-06-01

    There are many factors that affect the durability of Portland cement concrete (PCC), including the mix design and the : materials used, the quality of construction, and the environment. Durability is not an intrinsic property of the concrete, but : i...

  3. Size-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Silica Glass Nanofibers.

    Luo, Junhang; Wang, Jiangwei; Bitzek, Erik; Huang, Jian Yu; Zheng, He; Tong, Limin; Yang, Qing; Li, Ju; Mao, Scott X

    2016-01-13

    Silica (SiO2) glass, an essential material in human civilization, possesses excellent formability near its glass-transition temperature (Tg > 1100 °C). However, bulk SiO2 glass is very brittle at room temperature. Here we show a surprising brittle-to-ductile transition of SiO2 glass nanofibers at room temperature as its diameter reduces below 18 nm, accompanied by ultrahigh fracture strength. Large tensile plastic elongation up to 18% can be achieved at low strain rate. The unexpected ductility is due to a free surface affected zone in the nanofibers, with enhanced ionic mobility compared to the bulk that improves ductility by producing more bond-switching events per irreversible bond loss under tensile stress. Our discovery is fundamentally important for understanding the damage tolerance of small-scale amorphous structures.

  4. On the temperature dependence of the Adam-Gibbs equation around the crossover region in the glass transition

    Duque, Michel; Andraca, Adriana; Goldstein, Patricia; del Castillo, Luis Felipe

    2018-04-01

    The Adam-Gibbs equation has been used for more than five decades, and still a question remains unanswered on the temperature dependence of the chemical potential it includes. Nowadays, it is a well-known fact that in fragile glass formers, actually the behavior of the system depends on the temperature region it is being studied. Transport coefficients change due to the appearance of heterogeneity in the liquid as it is supercooled. Using the different forms for the logarithmic shift factor and the form of the configurational entropy, we evaluate this temperature dependence and present a discussion on our results.

  5. Geochemical and petrographic studies and the relationships to durability and leach resistance of vitrified products from the in situ vitrification process

    Timmons, D.M.; Thompson, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Soil and sludge contaminated with hazardous and radioactive materials from sites in the United States and Australia were vitrified using in situ vitrification. Some of the resulting products were subjected to detailed geochemical, leach and durability testing using a variety of analytical techniques. The leach resistance and durability performance was compared to that of vitrified high level waste with borosilicate composition. Particular attention was given to crystallization behavior, the effects of crystallization on residual melt chemistry and how crystallization influences the behavior of contaminant ions. The results of this work show that the vitrified material studied has superior chemical durability and leach resistance relative to typical borosilicate waste glasses. Crystallization behavior was variable depending upon melt chemistry and cooling history. Crystallization was not observed to adversely affect chemical durability or leach resistance

  6. On the size and temperature dependence of the energy gap in cadmium-selenide quantum dots embedded in fluorophosphate glasses

    Lipatova, Zh. O., E-mail: zluka-yo@mail.ru; Kolobkova, E. V.; Babkina, A. N.; Nikonorov, N. V. [ITMO University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The temperature and size dependences of the energy gap in CdSe quantum dots with diameters of 2.4, 4.0, and 5.2 nm embedded in fluorophosphate glasses are investigated. It is shown that the temperature coefficient of the band gap dE{sub g}/dT in the quantum dots differs from the bulk value and depends strictly on the dot size. It is found that, furthermore, the energy of each transition in these quantum dots is characterized by an individual temperature coefficient dE/dT.

  7. Structure-Dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+-Doped Phosphosilicate Glasses Modified by SiO₂.

    Wang, Ling; Zeng, Huidan; Yang, Bin; Ye, Feng; Chen, Jianding; Chen, Guorong; Smith, Andew T; Sun, Luyi

    2017-02-28

    Yb 3+ -doped phosphate glasses containing different amounts of SiO₂ were successfully synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method. The influence mechanism of SiO₂ on the structural and spectroscopic properties was investigated systematically using the micro-Raman technique. It was worth noting that the glass with 26.7 mol % SiO₂ possessed the longest fluorescence lifetime (1.51 ms), the highest gain coefficient (1.10 ms·pm²), the maximum Stark splitting manifold of ²F 7/2 level (781 cm -1 ), and the largest scalar crystal-field N J and Yb 3+ asymmetry degree. Micro-Raman spectra revealed that introducing SiO₂ promoted the formation of P=O linkages, but broke the P=O linkages when the SiO₂ content was greater than 26.7 mol %. Based on the previous 29 Si MAS NMR experimental results, these findings further demonstrated that the formation of [SiO₆] may significantly affect the formation of P=O linkages, and thus influences the spectroscopic properties of the glass. These results indicate that phosphosilicate glasses may have potential applications as a Yb 3+ -doped gain medium for solid-state lasers and optical fiber amplifiers.

  8. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading

  9. Concentration dependent spectroscopic properties of Dy3+ ions doped boro-phosphate glasses

    Mariyappan, M.; Marimuthu, K.

    2016-05-01

    Dy3+ ions doped boro-phosphate glasses have been synthesized by melt quenching method and characterized through FTIR, absorption and luminescence spectral measurements. The presence of various stretching and bending vibrations of different borate and phosphate groups were identified from the FTIR spectra. In order to examine the electronic band structure of the studied glasses, Optical energy gap (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) values were estimated from the absorption spectra. The Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters were calculated to examine the symmetry of the ligand environment around the Dy3+ ions site. The emission spectra exhibit two intense emission bands at around 482 nm (blue) and 574 nm (yellow) corresponding to the 4F9/2→6H15/2 and 4F9/2→6H13/2 transitions respectively. The emission spectra were characterized through Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) 1931 chromaticity diagram to explore its suitability for WLED applications.

  10. Spectral dependence of nonlinear optical absorption of silica glass with copper nanoparticles

    Golubev, A N; Nikitin, S I; Smirnov, M A; Stepanov, A L

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of silica glass with copper nanoparticles synthesized by ion implantation were investigated by z-scan method in nanosecond time scale. The reverse saturation absorption (RSA) at the wavelength range of 450–540 nm and saturation absorption (SA) at 550–585 nm were observed. It was supposed that the two-photon electron absorption from bound of d-states determined the RSA effect and the SA is due to saturation of plasmon excitation.

  11. Self-assembled Au nanoparticles on heated Corning glass by dc magnetron sputtering: size-dependent surface plasmon resonance tuning

    Grammatikopoulos, S.; Pappas, S. D. [University of Patras, Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering (Greece); Dracopoulos, V. [Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, (FORTH/ICE-HT), Foundation for Research and Technology (Greece); Poulopoulos, P., E-mail: poulop@upatras.gr [University of Patras, Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering (Greece); Fumagalli, P. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik (Germany); Velgakis, M. J.; Politis, C. [University of Patras, Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering (Greece)

    2013-02-15

    We report on the growth of Au nanoparticles on Corning glass by direct current magnetron sputtering and on the optical absorption of the films. The substrate temperature was kept to relatively high temperatures of 100 or 450 Degree-Sign C. This lead to the growth of Au nanoparticles instead of smooth Au films as the surface energy of Au is much larger than the one of glass. The size of the particles depended on the substrate temperature and deposition time and was shown to follow a logarithmic normal distribution function. Both, the surface plasmon resonance position and bandwidth, were found to depend upon the average particle size. The surface plasmon resonance position showed a 75 nm continuous blue shift from 14 nm down to 2.5 nm average particle size. Thus, we have shown how to tune the nanoparticle size and surface plasmon resonance of Au by varying the substrate temperature and deposition time. The experimental results are reproduced reasonably using a method which is based on the size- and wavelength-dependent complex dielectric function of Au within the framework of the Mie theory for the optical properties of metallic nanospheres.

  12. Increase of cyclic durability of pressure vessels

    Vorona, V.A.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.

    1980-01-01

    The durability of multilayer pressure vessels under cyclic loading is compared with single-layer vessels. The relative conditional durability is calculated taking into account the assumption on the consequent destruction of layers and viewing a vessel wall as an indefinite plate. It is established that the durability is mainly determined by the number of layers and to a lesser degree depends on the relative size of the defect for the given layer thickness. The advantage of the multilayer vessels is the possibility of selecting layer materials so that to exclude the effect of agressive corrosion media on the strength [ru

  13. Chemical durability and resistance to irradiation of LnYSiAlO (Ln=La or Ce) glasses, potential immobilization matrix of minor actinides; Durabilite chimique et comportement a l'irradiation des verres quaternaires LnYSiAlO (Ln = La ou Ce), matrice potentielle d'immobilisation d'actinides mineurs trivalents

    Gavarini, St

    2002-11-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate glasses are known for their interesting mechanical and optical properties. Recent studies have shown that their chemical durability was very good too, such they have the potential to be used in the nuclear industry for the specific immobilization of trivalent actinides. Initial dissolution rates of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO were determined using a Soxhlet device (dynamic leaching). The differences linked to the nature of the rare earth element were studied by synthesizing analogous glasses that only differed in their rare earth element composition (%at.): Y-5%, La-5 %, Si-15%, Al-10% O-65%. The influence of pH on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics was also studied by static leaching tests performed in dilute solutions of NaOH or HNO{sub 3}. Electronic defects and collision cascades, induced by a-disintegration of radioelements confined in storage matrix, can cause important modifications in the glass structure and, thus, influence its chemical durability. To simulate these effects, glass samples were irradiated with {beta} particles and heavy ions accelerated to 2,5 MeV and 200 keV, respectively. Monoliths were then leached in static bi-distilled water (pH{>=}{>=} 5.5) for one month in an autoclave heated to 90 degrees C. Initially, the structural changes caused by irradiation were determined using Raman, NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Ion {mu}-beams, SEM-EDS and XPS analysis were also performed to evaluate the potential modifications of the superficial composition. Finally, the leaching behavior was studied, for both irradiated and unirradiated samples, through solution and solid elementary characterization. (author)

  14. Monetary Policy with Sectoral Linkages and Durable Goods

    Petrella, Ivan; Rossi, Raffaele; Santoro, Emiliano

    We study the normative implications of a New Keynesian model featuring intersectoral trade of intermediate goods between two sectors that produce durables and non-durables. The interplay between durability and sectoral production linkages fundamentally alters the intersectoral stabilization trade....... Aggregating durable and non-durable inflation depending on the relative degrees of sectoral price stickiness may induce a severe bias. Input materials attenuate the response of sectoral inflations to movements in the real marginal costs, so that the effective slopes of the sectoral supply schedules...

  15. Thermal dependence of coercivity in granular CoNiCu glass coated microwires

    Zhukova, V.; Zhukov, A.; Palomares, F.J.; Pigazo, F.; Cebollada, F.; Del Val, J.J.; Garcia, C.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Gonzalez, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cu 80 Co 19 Ni 1 glass covered microwire samples with different geometric ratio, 0.13≤ρ≤0.5, has been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and VSM technique. Our results show (i) the presence of FCC Co crystallites dispersed on the Cu matrix, (ii) the observation in all the samples of the coercivity, at room temperature, of the order of kA, exhibiting a maximum and decreased down to a value of the order of the room temperature one at 25 K. These results are discussed in terms of a distribution of superparamagnetic Co nanoparticles

  16. International Congress on Glass XII

    Doremus, R H; LaCourse, W C; Mackenzie, J D; Varner, J R; Wolf, W W [eds.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 158 papers are included under nine headings: structure and glass formation; optical properties; electrical and magnetic properties; mechanical properties and relaxation; mass transport; chemical durability and surfaces; nucleation; crystallization; and glass ceramics; processing; and automatic controls. Separate abstracts were prepared for eight papers; four of the remaining papers had been processed previously for the data base. (DLC)

  17. Study on durability for thermal cycle of planar SOFC

    Ando, Motoo; Nakata, Kei-ichi; Wakayama, Sin-ichi [Tonen Corp., Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    TONEN CORPORATION has developed planar type SOFC since 1986. We demonstrated the output of 1.3 kW in 1991 and 5.1 kW in 1995. Simultaneously we have studied how to raise electric efficiency and reliability utilizing hydrogen and propane as fuel. Durability for thermal cycle is one of the most important problems of planar SOFC to make it more practical. The planar type SOFC is made up of separator, zirconia electrolyte and glass sealant. The thermal expansion of these components are expected to be the same value, however, they still possess small differences. In this situation, a thermal cycle causes a thermal stress due to the difference of the cell components and is often followed by a rupture in cell components, therefore, the analysis of the thermal stress should give us much useful information. The thermal cycle process consists of a heating up and cooling down procedure. Zirconia electrolyte is not bonded to the separator under the condition of the initial heating up procedure, and glass sealant becomes soft or melts and glass seals spaces between the zirconia and separator. The glass sealant becomes harder with the cooling down procedure. Moreover, zirconia is tightly bonded with separator below a temperature which is defined as a constraint temperature and thermal stress also occurs. This indicates that the heating up process relaxes the thermal stress and the cooling down increases it. In this paper, we simulated dependence of the stress on the sealing configuration, thermal expansion of sealant and constraint temperature of sealant glass. Furthermore, we presented SOFC electrical properties after a thermal cycle.

  18. Concentration dependent spectroscopic properties of Dy{sup 3+} ions doped boro-phosphate glasses

    Mariyappan, M.; Marimuthu, K., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute - Deemed University, Gandhigram – 624 302 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Dy{sup 3+} ions doped boro-phosphate glasses have been synthesized by melt quenching method and characterized through FTIR, absorption and luminescence spectral measurements. The presence of various stretching and bending vibrations of different borate and phosphate groups were identified from the FTIR spectra. In order to examine the electronic band structure of the studied glasses, Optical energy gap (E{sub opt}) and Urbach energy (ΔE) values were estimated from the absorption spectra. The Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters were calculated to examine the symmetry of the ligand environment around the Dy{sup 3+} ions site. The emission spectra exhibit two intense emission bands at around 482 nm (blue) and 574 nm (yellow) corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transitions respectively. The emission spectra were characterized through Commission International d’Eclairage (CIE) 1931 chromaticity diagram to explore its suitability for WLED applications.

  19. First Measurements of Time-Dependent Nucleation as a Function of Composition in Na2O.2CaO.3SiO2 Glasses

    Kelton, K. F.; Narayan, K. Lakshmi

    1996-01-01

    The first measurements in any system of the composition dependence of the time-dependent nucleation rate are presented Nucleation rates of the stoichiometric crystalline phase, Na2O.2CaO.3SiO2, from quenched glasses made with different SiO2 concentrations were determined as a function of temperature and glass composition. A strong compositional dependence of the nucleation rates and a weak dependence for the induction times are observed. Using measured values of the liquidus temperatures and growth velocities as a function of glass composition, these data are shown to be consistent with predictions from the classical theory of nucleation, assuming a composition-dependent interfacial energy.

  20. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of

  1. Use of a theoretical equation of state to interpret time-dependent free volume in polymer glasses

    Curro, J.G.; Lagasse, R.R.; Simha, R.

    1981-01-01

    Many physical properties of polymer glasses change spontaneously during isothermal aging by a process commonly modeled as collapse of free volume. The model has not been verified rigorously because free volume cannot be unambiguously measured. In the present investigation we tentatively identify the free-volume fraction with the fraction of empty sites in the equation of state of Simha and Somcynsky. With this theory, volume recovery measurements can be analyzed to yield directly the time-dependent, free-volume fraction. Using this approach, recent volume measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) are analyzed. The resulting free-volume fractions are then used in the Doolittle equation to predict the shift in stress relaxation curves at 23 0 C. These predicted shift factors agree with the experimental measurements of Cizmecioglu et al. In addition, it is shown that previous assumptions concerning temperature dependence of free volume are inconsistent with the theory

  2. Composition dependency of the glass forming ability (GFA) in Mg-Ni-Si system by mechanical alloying

    Xie Haowen; Lin Jianguo; Li Yuncang; Hodgson, Peter D.; Wen Cuie

    2007-01-01

    The pure elemental powder mixtures with the compositions of Mg 65 Ni x Si 35-x (x = 10, 20, 25, 33 at.%) were subject to high-energy ball mill, and the structures of the mixtures at different intervals of milling were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The compositional dependency of the glass forming ability (GFA) in Mg-Ni-Si system was evaluated based on the experimental results and the theoretical calculation. The compositional dependency of GFA in Mg-Ni-Si system can be understood well by comparing the enthalpies of the crystalline and amorphous phases based on the Miedema's theory for the formation enthalpy of alloys. Increasing the Ni/Mg ratio and/or decreasing Si content can improve the amorphous formability. The calculation results might be of great help in optimising the composition with high GFA in Mg-Ni-Si system

  3. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range.

    Sola, Daniel; Peña, Jose I

    2013-11-19

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth, removed volume and ablation yields reached their maximum, placing the sample out of focus. It was shown that these characteristics do not depend on the processing conditions, the wavelength or the optical configuration, and that this is intrinsic behavior of the processing method. Furthermore, the existence of a close relation between material hardness and ablation yields was demonstrated.

  4. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  5. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  6. Chemistry and kinetics of waste glass corrosion

    Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Under repository disposal conditions, the reaction of glass with water comprises the source term for release of radionuclides to the near-field environment. An understanding of glass reaction and the manner by which radionuclides are released is needed to design the waste package and to evaluate the total performance of the repository. The ASTM Standard C-1174-91 provides a general methodology for obtaining information related to the behavior of glass. This paper reviews the application of this standard to glass reaction. In the first step in the ASTM approach, the researcher identifies the materials and the conditions under which the long-term behavior is to be determined. Glass compositions have undergone a genesis over the past 15 years in response to concerns about feed streams, processing, and durability. A range of borosilicate compositions has been identified, but as new applications for vitrification occur, for example, immobilization of weapons plutonium and residue from plutonium processing, different compositions must be evaluated. The repository environment depends on the spatial emplacement of waste containers (glass and spent fuel), and both open-quotes hotclose quotes and open-quotes coldclose quotes scenarios have been proposed for the Yucca Mountain site. Regardless of the exact configuration, the near-field hydrology is expected to be unsaturated: that is, the waste packages are contacted initially by water vapor, and ultimately by small amounts of dripping or standing water. The behavior of glass can be studied as a function of composition within the constraints the environmental conditions place on the physical parameters that affect glass reaction (temperature, radiation field, groundwater composition, etc.). In the second step, the researcher reviews the literature and proposes a reaction pathway by which glass reacts in an unsaturated environment

  7. Composition dependence of spontaneous crystallization of phosphosilicate glass melts during cooling

    Liu, S.J.; Zhu, C.F.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2012-01-01

    Crystallization behavior of alumino-phospho-silicate melts during cooling is studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry and viscometry. The results show a pronounced impact of alkaline earth oxide, alkali oxide and fluoride on the crystal type and crystallizat......Crystallization behavior of alumino-phospho-silicate melts during cooling is studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry and viscometry. The results show a pronounced impact of alkaline earth oxide, alkali oxide and fluoride on the crystal type...... and crystallization degree. It is found that adding NaF into the studied compositions slightly decreases melt fragility and improves both the glass-forming ability and melt workability. This effect is associated with the unique structural role of NaF compared to the other modifier oxides. It is also found...

  8. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  9. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  10. Cooling rate dependence of simulated Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glass structure

    Ryltsev, R. E. [Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Kosygina Str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Klumov, B. A. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Kosygina Str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Aix-Marseille-Université, CNRS, Laboratoire PIIM, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); High Temperature Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/2 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Chtchelkatchev, N. M. [Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Kosygina Str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutskiy Per., Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 22 Sushchevskaya, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shunyaev, K. Yu. [Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom model potential, we study structural evolution of Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} alloy during the cooling in a wide range of cooling rates γ ∈ (1.5 ⋅ 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 13}) K/s. Investigating short- and medium-range orders, we show that the structure of Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glass essentially depends on cooling rate. In particular, a decrease of the cooling rate leads to an increase of abundances of both the icosahedral-like clusters and Frank-Kasper Z16 polyhedra. The amounts of these clusters in the glassy state drastically increase at the γ{sub min} = 1.5 ⋅ 10{sup 9} K/s. Analysing the structure of the glass at γ{sub min}, we observe the formation of nano-sized crystalline grain of Cu{sub 2}Zr intermetallic compound with the structure of Cu{sub 2}Mg Laves phase. The structure of this compound is isomorphous with that for Cu{sub 5}Zr intermetallic compound. Both crystal lattices consist of two types of clusters: Cu-centered 13-atom icosahedral-like cluster and Zr-centered 17-atom Frank-Kasper polyhedron Z16. That suggests the same structural motifs for the metallic glass and intermetallic compounds of Cu–Zr system and explains the drastic increase of the abundances of these clusters observed at γ{sub min}.

  11. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  12. Thermal transport in binary colloidal glasses: Composition dependence and percolation assessment

    Ruckdeschel, Pia; Philipp, Alexandra; Kopera, Bernd A. F.; Bitterlich, Flora; Dulle, Martin; Pech-May, Nelson W.; Retsch, Markus

    2018-02-01

    The combination of various types of materials is often used to create superior composites that outperform the pure phase components. For any rational design, the thermal conductivity of the composite as a function of the volume fraction of the filler component needs to be known. When approaching the nanoscale, the homogeneous mixture of various components poses an additional challenge. Here, we investigate binary nanocomposite materials based on polymer latex beads and hollow silica nanoparticles. These form randomly mixed colloidal glasses on a sub-μ m scale. We focus on the heat transport properties through such binary assembly structures. The thermal conductivity can be well described by the effective medium theory. However, film formation of the soft polymer component leads to phase segregation and a mismatch between existing mixing models. We confirm our experimental data by finite element modeling. This additionally allowed us to assess the onset of thermal transport percolation in such random particulate structures. Our study contributes to a better understanding of thermal transport through heterostructured particulate assemblies.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Arn+ Cluster Backscattering from Polymer Surfaces: a New Method to Determine the Surface Glass Transition Temperature.

    Poleunis, Claude; Cristaudo, Vanina; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2018-01-01

    In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to study the intensity variations of the backscattered Ar n + clusters as a function of temperature for several amorphous polymer surfaces (polyolefins, polystyrene, and polymethyl methacrylate). For all these investigated polymers, our results show a transition of the ratio Ar 2 + /(Ar 2 + + Ar 3 + ) when the temperature is scanned from -120 °C to +125 °C (the exact limits depend on the studied polymer). This transition generally spans over a few tens of degrees and the temperature of the inflection point of each curve is always lower than the bulk glass transition temperature (T g ) reported for the considered polymer. Due to the surface sensitivity of the cluster backscattering process (several nanometers), the presented analysis could provide a new method to specifically evaluate a surface transition temperature of polymers, with the same lateral resolution as the gas cluster beam. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  14. Dependence of glass-forming ability on starting compositions in Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 system

    Yixiang Chen; Zengchao Yang; Bin He; Guanghua Liu; Jiangtao Li; Liang Wu

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of glass-forming ability on starting compositions in Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 (YAS) system has been investigated by melting experiment. Transparent YAS glasses have been prepared under the condition of furnace cooling instead of quenching. It is found that, in the YAS ternary phase diagram, the compositions on the Y3Al5O12–SiO2 line and with 52-68 mol% SiO2 have a higher glass-forming ability to produce pure glass. For the compositions with too much or less SiO2 or with Y/Al = 5/3, 1/1,...

  15. Temperature-dependent evolution of RbBSi2O6 glass into crystalline Rb-boroleucite according to X-ray diffraction data

    Levin, Aleksandr A.; Filatov, Stanislav K.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Maria G.; Paufler, Peter; Bubnova, Rimma S.; Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg; Meyer, Dirk C.; Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg

    2013-01-01

    The temperature-dependent evolution of the glass into a crystalline phase is studied for a rubidium borosilicate glass of composition 16.7 Rb 2 O . 16.7 B 2 O 3 . 66.6 SiO 2 employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. A glass sample was prepared by melt quenching from 1500 within 0.5 hour. The glass sample was step-wise annealed at 13 distinct temperatures from 300 C up to 900 C for 1 h at every annealing step. To investigate changes in the glass structure, angle-dispersive XRD was applied by using an energy-resolving semiconductor detector. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) were calculated at every stage. For polycrystalline states the crystal structure of the samples with different thermal history was refined using the Rietveld method. Comparing correlation distances estimated from RDFs of glass and polycrystalline samples and mean interatomic distances calculated for polycrystalline samples by using atomic coordinates after Rietveld refinement, it is concluded that the borosilicate glass under study is converted into the crystalline state in the temperature range of 625-750 C (i.e. in the temperature range close to the glass transition range 620-695 C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry by using of heating rate of 20 K/min) at an average heating rate of about 0.35 K/min. When the heating rate is increased up to 10 or 20 K/min, the crystallisation temperature shifts sharply up to 831-900 C and 878-951 C, respectively. XRD data give evidence that distinctive traces of cubic RbBSi 2 O 6 appear from glass at about 625 C and a two-phase range exists up to 750 C. After annealing at higher temperatures (800-900 C) the crystal structure practically does not change any more. (orig.)

  16. Mono and sequential ion irradiation induced damage formation and damage recovery in oxide glasses: Stopping power dependence of the mechanical properties

    Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Toulemonde, M.; Bouffard, S.; Jegou, C.; Peuget, S.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and complex borosilicate glasses were irradiated with single and double ion beams of light and heavy ions over a broad fluence and stopping power range. As a result of the heavy ion irradiation (U, Kr, Au), the hardness was observed to diminish and saturate after a decrease by 35 ± 1%. Unlike slow and swift heavy ion irradiation, irradiation with light ions (He,O) induced a saturation hardness decrease of 18 ± 1% only. During double ion beam irradiation; where glasses were first irradiated with a heavy ion (gold) and then by a light ion (helium), the light ion irradiation induced partial damage recovery. As a consequence of the recovery effect, the hardness of the pre-irradiated glasses increased by 10–15% depending on the chemical composition. These results highlight that the nuclear energy loss and high electronic energy loss (≥4 keV/nm) result in significant and similar modifications whereas light ions with low electronic energy loss (≤1 keV/nm) result in only mild damage formation in virgin glasses and recovery in highly pre-damaged glasses. These results are important to understand the damage formation and recovery in actinide bearing minerals and in glasses subjected to self-irradiation by alpha decays. - Highlights: • Behavior of glasses strongly depends on the electronic energy loss (Se) of the ions. • High Se (≥4 keV/nm) induces large changes in comparison to lower Se values. • Apart from mild damage formation, low Se causes recovery of pre-existing damage. • Alpha induced partial recovery of the damage would occur in nuclear waste glasses.

  17. High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement

    Mariano Velez

    2008-03-31

    Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500°C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

  18. Consolidation through the looking-glass: sleep-dependent proactive interference on visuomotor adaptation in children.

    Urbain, Charline; Houyoux, Emeline; Albouy, Geneviève; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Although a beneficial role of post-training sleep for declarative memory has been consistently evidenced in children, as in adults, available data suggest that procedural memory consolidation does not benefit from sleep in children. However, besides the absence of performance gains in children, sleep-dependent plasticity processes involved in procedural memory consolidation might be expressed through differential interference effects on the learning of novel but related procedural material. To test this hypothesis, 32 10-12-year-old children were trained on a motor rotation adaptation task. After either a sleep or a wake period, they were first retested on the same rotation applied at learning, thus assessing offline sleep-dependent changes in performance, then on the opposite (unlearned) rotation to assess sleep-dependent modulations in proactive interference coming from the consolidated visuomotor memory trace. Results show that children gradually improve performance over the learning session, showing effective adaptation to the imposed rotation. In line with previous findings, no sleep-dependent changes in performance were observed for the learned rotation. However, presentation of the opposite, unlearned deviation elicited significantly higher interference effects after post-training sleep than wakefulness in children. Considering that a definite feature of procedural motor memory and skill acquisition is the implementation of highly automatized motor behaviour, thus lacking flexibility, our results suggest a better integration and/or automation or motor adaptation skills after post-training sleep, eventually resulting in higher proactive interference effects on untrained material. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Alteration of medieval stained-glasses. Contribution to the long-term behaviour of vitrified wastes

    Sterpenich, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, the behaviour of glasses during alteration have been studied in two different ways: 1)study of the alteration of medieval stained-glasses 2)experimental leaching of modelled glasses. Medieval stained-glasses have a silico-calcic and alkaline composition. It appears three different alteration modes for these glasses: 1)by condensation waters 2)by atmospheric agents 3)by porosity waters and humic acids. A chemical study of the altered areas has allowed to understand the alteration behaviour of a lot of elements: in particular transition elements, heavy metals and some rare earths. On the other hand, two vitrified wastes and a glass having the same composition of the potassic medieval stained-glasses have been leached in a static mode (pH=1 to 10, T=20 to 80 degrees Celsius, T=12 hours to 6 months). These experiments have revealed that the alteration mechanisms depend on the pH of the solution and on the chemical composition of the glass. An increasing durability of glasses in terms of the global polymerization degree has been revealed too. At last, the behaviours of glasses during alteration, observed with natural and experimental conditions, show that it is necessary to study natural analogous for predicting the long-term behaviour of vitrified wastes. (O.M.)

  20. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements of porous organosilicate glass using mercury and solid metal probes

    Pei, Dongfei; Nichols, Michael T.; Shohet, J. Leon; King, Sean W.; Clarke, James S.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is one of the major concerns for low-k dielectric materials. During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are subjected to vacuum ultraviolet photon radiation and charged-particle bombardment. To examine the change of TDDB properties, time-to-breakdown measurements are made to porous SiCOH before and after plasma exposure. Significant discrepancies between mercury and solid-metal probes are observed and have been shown to be attributed to mercury diffusion into the dielectric porosities

  1. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements of porous organosilicate glass using mercury and solid metal probes

    Pei, Dongfei; Nichols, Michael T.; Shohet, J. Leon, E-mail: shohet@engr.wisc.edu [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, Sean W.; Clarke, James S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is one of the major concerns for low-k dielectric materials. During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are subjected to vacuum ultraviolet photon radiation and charged-particle bombardment. To examine the change of TDDB properties, time-to-breakdown measurements are made to porous SiCOH before and after plasma exposure. Significant discrepancies between mercury and solid-metal probes are observed and have been shown to be attributed to mercury diffusion into the dielectric porosities.

  2. Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass

    Sun, Yang [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fzhang@ameslab.gov; Ye, Zhuo [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ding, Zejun [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ho, Kai-Ming [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials (ICQD), and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-07-07

    The atomic structure of Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. By performing a long sub-T{sub g} annealing, we developed a glass model closer to the experiments than the models prepared by continuous cooling. Using the cluster alignment method, we found that “3661” cluster is the dominating short-range order in the glass samples. The connection and arrangement of “3661” clusters, which define the medium-range order in the system, are enhanced significantly in the sub-T{sub g} annealed sample as compared with the fast cooled glass samples. Unlike some strong binary glass formers such as Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5}, the clusters representing the short-range order do not form an interconnected interpenetrating network in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10,} which has only marginal glass formability.

  3. Temperature dependence of luminescence for different surface flaws in high purity silica glass

    Fournier, J.; Grua, P.; Neauport, J.; Fargin, E.; Jubera, V.; Talaga, D.; Del Guerzo, A.; Raffy, G.; Jouannigot, S.

    2013-01-01

    In situ temperature dependence of the Photoluminescence under 325 nm irradiation is used to investigate defect populations existing in different surface flaws in high purity fused silica. Five photoluminescence bands peaking at 1.9, 2.1, 2.3, 2.63 and 3.11 eV have been detected in the spectral area ranging from 1.6 up to 3.6 eV. The Gaussian deconvolution of spectra allows dividing the five luminescence bands in two categories. The former corresponds to bands showing a significant intensity enhancement while temperature decreases; the latter corresponds to bands remaining insensitive to the temperature evolution. Such a behavior brings new information on defects involved in laser damage mechanism at 351 nm in nanosecond regime. (authors)

  4. Laboratory testing of LITCO glasses

    Ellison, A.; Wolf, S.; Buck, E.; Luo, J.S.; Dietz, N.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to measure, the intermediate and long-term durability of glasses developed by Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. (LITCO) for the immobilization of calcined radioactive wastes. The objective is to use accelerated corrosion tests as an aid in developing durable waste form compositions. This is a report of tests performed on two LITCO glass compositions, Formula 127 and Formula 532. The main avenue for release of radionuclides into the environment in a geologic repository is the reaction of a waste glass with ground water, which alters the glass and releases its components into solution. These stages in glass corrosion are analyzed by using accelerated laboratory tests in which the ratio of sample surface area to solution volume, SA/V, is varied. At low SA/V, the solution concentrations of glass corrosion products remain low and the reaction approaches the forward rate. At higher SA/V the solution approaches saturation levels for glass corrosion products. At very high SA/V the solution is rapidly saturated in glass corrosion products and secondary crystalline phases precipitate. Tests at very high SA/V provide information about the composition of the solution at saturation or, when no solution is recovered, the identities and the order of appearance of secondary crystalline phases. Tests were applied to Formula 127 and Formula 532 glasses to provide information about the interim and long-term stages in glass corrosion

  5. Temperature dependence of charge-transfer fluorescence from extended and U-shaped donor-bridge-acceptor systems in glass-forming solvents.

    Goes, M.; de Groot, M.; Koeberg, M.; Verhoeven, J.W.; Lokan, N.R.; Shephard, M.J.; Paddon-Row, M.N.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: The behavior is reported of three fluorescent D-bridge-A systems that display a fascinating temperature dependence in glass forming solvents over the temperature range between 77 and 293 K. In two of these systems, a rigid, saturated alkane bridge maintains an extended conformation, and as

  6. Silicate glasses. Chapter 1

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e. borosilicate glass. A historical overview of waste form development programs in nine countries is followed by a summary of the design criteria for borosilicate glass compositions glass compositions. In the sections on glass properties the waste form is characterized in terms of potential alterations under the influence of heat, thermal gradients, radiation, aqueous solutions and combinations thereof. The topics are phase transformations, mechanical properties, radiation effects and chemical durability. The results from studies of volcanic glasses, as natural analogues for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses in order to verify predictions obtained from short-term tests in the laboratory, have been compiled in a special section on natural analogues. A special section on advanced vitrification techniques summarizes the various actual and potential processing schemes and describes the facilities. The literature has been considered until 1985. (author). 430 refs.; 68 figs.; 29 tabs

  7. Influence Of Density On The Durabilities Of Three Ghanaian Timbers ...

    Review of factors influencing wood durability shows although density varies depending on trunk position, its role appears controversial for many timber species. Thus, for the first time, the influence of density on the durability of three Ghanaian timbers (Nauclea diderrichii (de Wild.) Merr., Nesogordonia papaverifera (A. Chev ...

  8. Effect of Unprofessional Supervision on Durability of Buildings.

    Yahaghi, Javad

    2018-02-01

    The durability of buildings which depends on the nature of the supervisory system used in their construction is an important feature of the construction industry. This article tries to draw the readers' attention to the effect of untrained and unprofessional building supervisors and their unethical performance on the durability of buildings.

  9. Composition Dependence of the Na(+) Ion Conductivity in 0.5Na2S + 0.5[xGeS2 + (1 - x)PS5/2] Mixed Glass Former Glasses: A Structural Interpretation of a Negative Mixed Glass Former Effect.

    Martin, Steve W; Bischoff, Christian; Schuller, Katherine

    2015-12-24

    A negative mixed glass former effect (MGFE) in the Na(+) ion conductivity of glass has been found in 0.5Na2S + 0.5[xGeS2 + (1 - x)PS5/2] glasses where the Na(+) ion conductivity is significantly smaller for all of the ternary glasses than either of the binary end-member glasses. The minimum conductivity of ∼0.4 × 10(-6) (Ω cm)(-1) at 25 °C occurs for the x = 0.7 glass. Prior to this observation, the alkali ion conductivity of sulfide glasses at constant alkali concentration, but variable ratio of one glass former for another (x) ternary mixed glass former (MGF) glasses, has always produced a positive MGFE in the alkali ion conductivity; that is, the ternary glasses have always had higher ion conductivities that either of the end-member binary glasses. While the Na(+) ion conductivity exhibits a single global minimum value, the conductivity activation energy exhibits a bimodal double maximum at x ≈ 0.4 and x ≈ 0.7. The modified Christensen-Martin-Anderson-Stuart (CMAS) model of the activation energies reveals the origin of the negative MGFE to be due to an increase in the dielectric stiffness (a decrease in relative dielectric permittivity) of these glasses. When coupled with an increase in the average Na(+) ion jump distance and a slight increase in the mechanical stiffness of the glass, this causes the activation energy to go through maximum values and thereby produce the negative MGFE. The double maximum in the conductivity activation energy is coincident with double maximums in CMAS calculated strain, ΔES, and Coulombic, ΔEC, activation energies. In these ternary glasses, the increase in the dielectric stiffness of the glass arises from a negative deviation of the limiting high frequency dielectric permittivity as compared to the binary end-member glasses. While the CMAS calculated total activation energies ΔEact = ΔES + ΔEC are found to reproduce the overall shape of the composition dependence of the measured ΔEact values, they are consistently

  10. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  11. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  12. Structural characterization and compositional dependence of the optical properties of Ge-Ga-La-S chalcohalide glass system

    Li, Lini; Jiao, Qing; Lin, Changgui; Dai, Shixun; Nie, Qiuhua

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, chalcogenide glasses of 80GeS2sbnd (20sbnd x)Ga2S3sbnd xLa2S3 (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 mol%) were synthesized through the traditional melt-quenching technique. The effects of La2S3 addition on the thermal, optical, and structural properties of Gesbnd Gasbnd S glasses were investigated. Results showed that the synthesized glasses possessed considerably high glass transition temperature, improved glass forming ability, high refractive index, and excellent infrared transmittance. A redshift at the visible absorbing cut-off edge lower than 500 nm was observed with increasing of La2S3 content. Direct and indirect optical band gap values were calculated. SEM result suggested that this glass system owned better glass forming ability and uniformity. Raman spectral analysis indicated that the introduction of La2S3 induced the dissociation of Gesbnd Ge metal bonds and transformed the [S3Gesbnd GeS3] structure to GeS4 tetrahedrons. Consequently, the connectivity between tetrahedrons of the vitreous network was enhanced. This work suggests that La2S3 modified Ge-Gasbnd Lasbnd S glass is a promising material for infrared optical research.

  13. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  14. Temperature dependence of luminescence from silica glasses under in-reactor and 60Co gamma-ray irradiation

    Takahara, Shogo; Yoshida, Tomoko; Tanabe, Tetuo; , Tatuya, Ii; Hirano, Masahiro; Okada, Moritami

    2004-06-01

    In order to investigate the temperature effects on the dynamic radiation damaging process, we have carried out in situ measurements of in-reactor luminescence (IRL) and gamma-ray induced luminescence (GIL) of a silica glass at temperatures ranging from 70 K to 370 K. Both luminescence spectra were found to consist of two broad emission centers at 3.1 eV and 4.1 eV with an additional temperature independent emission around 2.5 eV. The 2.5 eV emission different from the other two showed long tail to the lower energy side and was attributed to the Cherenkov radiation. The 3.1 eV band was attributed to a B 2 β oxygen deficient center on the basis of our photoluminescence measurement. The intensity of the 3.1 eV IRL increased with increasing temperature up to ca. 200 K and saturated above 200 K, which is clearly different from the reported temperature dependence of 3.1 eV photoluminescence, suggesting the existence of some different relaxation mechanism of excited electron under ionizing radiations.

  15. Dependence of glass-forming ability on starting compositions in Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 system

    Yixiang Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of glass-forming ability on starting compositions in Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 (YAS system has been investigated by melting experiment. Transparent YAS glasses have been prepared under the condition of furnace cooling instead of quenching. It is found that, in the YAS ternary phase diagram, the compositions on the Y3Al5O12–SiO2 line and with 52-68 mol% SiO2 have a higher glass-forming ability to produce pure glass. For the compositions with too much or less SiO2 or with Y/Al = 5/3, 1/1, or 1/3, crystallization occurs with the formation of Y3Al5O12, Y2Si2O7, Al6Si2O13, or SiO2. The densities of the YAS glasses increase with decreasing SiO2 contents and increasing Y/Al ratios, and for the samples with Y/Al = 3/5 there is a good linear relationship between the density and SiO2 content.

  16. Long-term damage to glass in Paris in a changing environment.

    Ionescu, Anda; Lefèvre, Roger-Alexandre; Brimblecombe, Peter; Grossi, Carlota M

    2012-08-01

    Glass weathering depends mainly on its chemical composition: Si-Ca-K mediaeval glass is low durable, while Si-Ca-Na Roman as well as modern glass are very durable. Mediaeval glass is subject to the superficial leaching of K and Ca ions leading to the formation of a hydrated silica-gel layer. Both types of glass develop a superficial stratum of deposited atmospheric particles cemented by crystals of gypsum (and syngenite in the case of Si-Ca-K glass), leading to an impairment of the optical properties: decrease of transparency and increase of haze. Dose-response functions established for the two types of glass reveal that haze depends only on pollution parameters (PM, SO(2), NO(2)), while leaching depends both on pollution and climate parameters (RH, T, SO(2), NO(2)). Instrumental records are available for temperature in Paris from 1800. Air pollution in Paris was estimated from statistics of fuel use from 1875 to 1943, measurements that started in the 1950s and projections across the 21st century. The estimated annual rate of haze development indicates a gradual rise from the 16th century. The increasing importance of coal as a fuel through the 19th century and enhanced sulphur dioxide concentration make a rapid increase in haze formation, which reaches a peak about 1950. The likely damage to mediaeval glass follows a rather similar pattern. The period of damage from aggressive pollutants looks later and for a briefer time in Paris than in London. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of Influence of Foaming Mixture Components on Structure and Properties of Foam Glass

    Karandashova, N. S.; Goltsman, B. M.; Yatsenko, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    It is recommended to use high-quality thermal insulation materials to increase the energy efficiency of buildings. One of the best thermal insulation materials is foam glass - durable, porous material that is resistant to almost any effect of substance. Glass foaming is a complex process depending on the foaming mode and the initial mixture composition. This paper discusses the influence of all components of the mixture - glass powder, foaming agent, enveloping material and water - on the foam glass structure. It was determined that glass powder is the basis of the future material. A foaming agent forms a gas phase in the process of thermal decomposition. This aforementioned gas foams the viscous glass mass. The unreacted residue thus changes a colour of the material. The enveloping agent slows the foaming agent decomposition preventing its premature burning out and, in addition, helps to accelerate the sintering of glass particles. The introduction of water reduces the viscosity of the foaming mixture making it evenly distributed and also promotes the formation of water gas that additionally foams the glass mass. The optimal composition for producing the foam glass with the density of 150 kg/m3 is defined according to the results of the research.

  18. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter

  19. Durability of Self Compacting Concrete

    Benmarce, A.; Boudjehem, H.; Bendjhaiche, R.

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) seem to be a very promising materials for construction thanks to their properties in a fresh state. Studying of the influence of the parameters of specific designed mixes to their mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics in a state hardened is an important stage so that it can be useful for new-to-the-field researchers and designers (worldwide) beginning studies and work involving self compacting concrete. The objective of this research is to study the durability of self compacting concrete. The durability of concrete depends very much on the porosity; the latter determines the intensity of interactions with aggressive agents. The pores inside of concrete facilitate the process of damage, which began generally on the surface. We are interested to measure the porosity of concrete on five SCC with different compositions (w/c, additives) and vibrated concrete to highlight the influence of the latter on the porosity, thereafter on the compressive strength and the transfer properties (oxygen permeability, chloride ion diffusion, capillary absorption). (author)

  20. DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied

  1. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    Thierry Woignier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical durability, silica glass optimizes the properties of a suitable host matrix. According to an easy sintering stage, nanoporous glasses such as xerogels, aerogels, and composite gels are alternative ways to synthesize silica glass at relatively low temperatures (≈1,000–1,200°C. Nuclear wastes exist as aqueous salt solutions and we propose using the open pore structure of the nanoporous glass to enable migration of the solution throughout the solid volume. The loaded material is then sintered, thereby trapping the radioactive chemical species. The structure of the sintered materials (glass ceramics is that of nanocomposites: actinide phases (~100 nm embedded in a vitreous silica matrix. Our results showed a large improvement in the chemical durability of glass ceramic over conventional nuclear glass.

  2. Decoration and durability

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Munch, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the scales of design there has been an exploding interest in the ornament that seems to be fuelled by different kinds of digital technology and media from CAD to digital printing in both 2D and 3D. In architecture and industrial design, it is discussed as a “return of ornament” because...... from fashion and tableware to archi- tecture and link ornamentation to the aesthetics of durability....

  3. Durability of critical infrastructures

    Raluca Pascu; Ramiro Sofronie

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with those infrastructures by which world society, under the pressure ofdemographic explosion, self-survives. The main threatening comes not from terrorist attacks, but fromthe great natural catastrophes and global climate change. It’s not for the first time in history when suchmeasures of self-protection are built up. First objective of this paper is to present the background fordurability analysis. Then, with the aid of these mathematical tools the absolute durability of thr...

  4. ACCELERATED METHODS FOR ESTIMATING THE DURABILITY OF PLAIN BEARINGS

    Myron Czerniec

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods for determining the durability of slide bearings. The developed methods enhance the calculation process by even 100000 times, compared to the accurate solution obtained with the generalized cumulative model of wear. The paper determines the accuracy of results for estimating the durability of bearings depending on the size of blocks of constant conditions of contact interaction between the shaft with small out-of-roundedness and the bush with a circular contour. The paper gives an approximate dependence for determining accurate durability using either a more accurate or an additional method.

  5. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  6. Frequency-dependent complex modulus at the glass transition in Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 bulk amorphous alloys

    Lee, M.L.; Li, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Carter, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    We report frequency-dependent measurements of the dynamic elastic modulus of a Pd 40 Cu 30 Ni 10 P 20 bulk amorphous phase near its glass transition temperature. The storage and loss moduli exhibit a structural relaxation similar to those observed by other characterization techniques. Parameters obtained by fitting to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation and the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model exhibit similar behaviors to those other methods

  7. Microstructural dependence on relevant physical-mechanical properties on SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5 biological glasses.

    Rajendran, V; Begum, A Nishara; Azooz, M A; el Batal, F H

    2002-11-01

    Bioactive glasses of the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5 have been prepared by the normal melting and annealing technique. The elastic moduli, attenuation, Vickers hardness, fracture toughness and fracture surface energy have been obtained using the known method at room temperature. The temperature dependence of elastic moduli and attenuation measurements have been extended over a wide range of temperature from 150 to 500 K. The SiO2 content dependence of velocities, attenuation, elastic moduli, and other parameters show an interesting observation at 45 wt% of SiO2 by exhibiting an anomalous behaviour. A linear relation is developed for Tg, which explores the influence of Na2O on SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5 bioactive glasses. The measured hardness, fracture toughness and fracture surface energy show a linear relation with Young's modulus. It is also interesting to note that the observed results are functions of polymerisation and the number of non-bridging oxygens (NBO) prevailing in the network with change in SiO2 content. The temperature dependence of velocities, attenuation and elastic moduli show the existence of softening in the glass network structure as temperature increases.

  8. Temperature dependence of the ultraviolet luminescence of Pr3+-doped 20Al(PO3)3-80LiF glass scintillator

    Tsuboi, Mizuki; Takeda, Kohei; Nakazato, Tomoharu

    2017-01-01

    The development of scintillator materials for scattered neutrons is essential in studying laser fusion experiments. We have previously investigated and proposed Pr 3+ -doped 20Al(PO 3 ) 3 -80LiF (APLF + Pr) glasses as scintillators for neutron detection. The APLF + Pr glass emissions are then investigated with synchrotron radiation excitation and varying sample temperature. APLF + Pr glasses exhibit luminescence emission located at 200 to 300 nm and 400 nm attributed to the 4f5d → 4f 2 and 4f 2 → 4f 2 ( 1 S 0 → 3 P j + 1 I 6 ) transitions, respectively. In addition, the 200 to 300-nm emission is not substantially affected by temperature, while the 400-nm emission intensities increase with decreasing sample temperature. This temperature dependence is attributed to cross relaxation whose effect can be controlled by the Pr-doping concentration. Our results suggest that doping concentration of APLF + Pr must be optimized and that APLF + Pr glasses must operate a low temperatures for better neutron detection. (author)

  9. Strong composition-dependence on glass-forming ability in Ni-(Ti,Zr)-Si pseudo-ternary alloys

    Yang, H.; Wang, J.Q.; Li, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The glass formation in Ni-(Ti,Zr)-Si pseudo-ternary alloys was studied. For suction casting, by carefully adjusting the alloy composition and studying the microstructure changes, the best glass-forming alloy with a 2 mm diameter is pinpointed in a narrow composition region of 57.5-58.5 at.% Ni, 36.5-38.5 at.% (Ti + Zr) and 5-5.5 at.% Si. The main competing crystalline phases, identified by XRD and SEM, were Ni 10 (Zr,Ti) 7 , Ni(Ti,Zr) and an unidentified Si-containing phase. Our results indicate a clear need for monitoring the microstructure change in the cross section of the ingots to locate the best glass-forming alloys

  10. Pulse energy dependence of refractive index change in lithium niobium silicate glass during femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Cao, Jing; Poumellec, Bertrand; Brisset, François; Lancry, Matthieu

    2018-03-19

    Femtosecond laser-induced refractive index changes in lithium niobium silicate glass were explored at high repetition rate (300 fs, 500 kHz) by polarized light microscopy, full-wave retardation plate, quantitative birefringence microscopy, and digital holographic microscopy. We found three regimes on energy increase. The first one corresponds to isotropic negative refractive index change (for pulse energy ranging 0.4-0.8 μJ/pulse, 0.6 NA, 5μm/s, 650μm focusing depth in the glass). The second one (0.8-1.2 μJ/pulse) corresponds to birefringence with well-defined slow axis orientation. The third one (above 1.2 μJ/pulse) is related to birefringence direction fluctuation. Interestingly, these regimes are consistent with crystallization ones. In addition, an asymmetric orientational writing effect has been detected on birefringence. These topics extend the possibility of controlling refractive index change in multi-component glasses.

  11. Durability of filament-wound composite flywheel rotors

    Koyanagi, Jun

    2012-02-01

    This paper predicts the durability of two types of flywheels, one assumes to fail in the radial direction and the other assumes to fail in the circumferential direction. The flywheel failing in the radial direction is a conventional filament-wound composite flywheel and the one failing in the circumferential direction is a tailor-made type. The durability of the former is predicted by Micromechanics of Failure (MMF) (Ha et al. in J. Compos. Mater. 42:1873-1875, 2008), employing time-dependent matrix strength, and that of the latter is predicted by Simultaneous Fiber Failure (SFF) (Koyanagi et al. in J. Compos. Mater. 43:1901-1914, 2009), employing identical time-dependent matrix strength. The predicted durability of the latter is much greater than that of the former, depending on the interface strength. This study suggests that a relatively weak interface is necessary for high-durability composite flywheel fabrication.

  12. Decoration and Durability

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Munch, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the scales of design there has been an exploding interest in the ornament that seems to be fuelled by different kinds of digital technology and media from CAD to digital printing in both 2D and 3D. In architecture and industrial design it is discussed as a Return of ornament, because...... appropriate or not. This leads us to suggest an array of parameters that points out different situations and meanings of ornamentation: Product categories, Durability of materials, Styles, Aesthetic experience, Emotional attachment and Historical references. We discuss these parameters in cases from fashion...

  13. Leaching and mechanical properties of cabal glasses developed as matrices for immobilization high-level wastes

    Ezz-Eldin, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the leaching behavior of simulated high-level-waste cabal glass (CaO-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) as a bulk specimen. During leach tests, the glass is immersed in either deionized water or in groundwater for up to 57 days at 70 deg. C. Based on the results, mechanisms observed with the leaching of the glass in deionized water or groundwater are discussed. Three factors, i.e., time of immersion, type of leaching solution and irradiation effect, are extensively studied. The corrosion was found to be linear with time in the limit of investigation (1-57 days) but with different rates depending on the type of solution and glass composition. Effects of γ-irradiation on the glass together with groundwater were found to decrease the glass durability. The evolution of the damage on mechanical and physical properties of the glass before and after leaching or irradiation was also discussed. The addition of waste oxide changes the properties of the glass matrix, so the influence of the guest oxides on the properties of host materials is also discussed

  14. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan

  15. Immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glasses. Devitrification evaluation produced with different thermal treatments

    Messi de Bernasconi, N.B.; Russo, D.O.; Bevilacqua, M.E.; Sterba, M.E.; Heredia, A.D.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glass, as alternative way to melting glass. Different chemical compositions of borosilicate glass with simulate waste were utilized and satisfactory results were obtained at laboratory scale. As another contribution to the materials studies by X ray powder diffraction analysis, the devitrification produced with different thermal treatments, was evaluated. The effect of the thermal history on the behaviour of fission products containing glasses has been studied by several working groups in the field of high level waste fixation. When the glass is cooled through the temperature range from 800 deg C down to less than 400 deg C (these temperatures are approximates) nucleation and crystal growth can take place. The rate of crystallization will be maximum near the transformation point but through this rate may be low at lower temperatures, devitrification can still occur over long periods of time, depending on the glass composition. It was verified that there can be an appreciable increase in leaching in some waste glass compositions owing to the presence of crystalline phases. On the other hand, other compositions show very little change in leachability and the devitrified product is often preferable as there is less tendency to cracking, particularly in massive blocks of glass. A borosilicate glass, named SG7, which was developed specially in the KfK for the hot pressing of HLW with glass frit was studied. It presents a much enhanced chemical durability than borosolicate glass developed for the melting process. The crystallization behaviour of SG7 glass products was investigated in our own experiments by annealing sintered samples up to 3000 h at temperatures between 675 and 825 deg C. The samples had contained simulated waste with noble metals, since these might act as foreign nuclei for crystallization. Results on the extent of devitrification and time- temperature- transformation curves are

  16. Structure-Dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+-Doped Phosphosilicate Glasses Modified by SiO2

    Ling Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yb3+-doped phosphate glasses containing different amounts of SiO2 were successfully synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method. The influence mechanism of SiO2 on the structural and spectroscopic properties was investigated systematically using the micro-Raman technique. It was worth noting that the glass with 26.7 mol % SiO2 possessed the longest fluorescence lifetime (1.51 ms, the highest gain coefficient (1.10 ms·pm2, the maximum Stark splitting manifold of 2F7/2 level (781 cm−1, and the largest scalar crystal-field NJ and Yb3+ asymmetry degree. Micro-Raman spectra revealed that introducing SiO2 promoted the formation of P=O linkages, but broke the P=O linkages when the SiO2 content was greater than 26.7 mol %. Based on the previous 29Si MAS NMR experimental results, these findings further demonstrated that the formation of [SiO6] may significantly affect the formation of P=O linkages, and thus influences the spectroscopic properties of the glass. These results indicate that phosphosilicate glasses may have potential applications as a Yb3+-doped gain medium for solid-state lasers and optical fiber amplifiers.

  17. Structure-Dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+-Doped Phosphosilicate Glasses Modified by SiO2

    Wang, Ling; Zeng, Huidan; Yang, Bin; Ye, Feng; Chen, Jianding; Chen, Guorong; Smith, Andew T.; Sun, Luyi

    2017-01-01

    Yb3+-doped phosphate glasses containing different amounts of SiO2 were successfully synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method. The influence mechanism of SiO2 on the structural and spectroscopic properties was investigated systematically using the micro-Raman technique. It was worth noting that the glass with 26.7 mol % SiO2 possessed the longest fluorescence lifetime (1.51 ms), the highest gain coefficient (1.10 ms·pm2), the maximum Stark splitting manifold of 2F7/2 level (781 cm−1), and the largest scalar crystal-field NJ and Yb3+ asymmetry degree. Micro-Raman spectra revealed that introducing SiO2 promoted the formation of P=O linkages, but broke the P=O linkages when the SiO2 content was greater than 26.7 mol %. Based on the previous 29Si MAS NMR experimental results, these findings further demonstrated that the formation of [SiO6] may significantly affect the formation of P=O linkages, and thus influences the spectroscopic properties of the glass. These results indicate that phosphosilicate glasses may have potential applications as a Yb3+-doped gain medium for solid-state lasers and optical fiber amplifiers. PMID:28772601

  18. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.

  19. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO₄) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe,Cr)₂O₄), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside of HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies.

  20. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model

  1. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-07-13

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model.

  2. Excitation light source dependence of emission in Sn2+-Ce3+ codoped ZnO-P2O5 glasses

    Masai, Hirokazu; Hino, Yusuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between excitation light source and the emission property of Sn^{2+}-Ce^{3+} co-doped zinc phosphate glasses is examined. Although photoluminescence (PL) peaks of both Sn^{2+}and Ce^{3+} shifted with increasing amount of Ce^{3+}, there was little energy resonance between Sn^{2+} and Ce^{3+} emission centers. On the other hand, radioluminescence (RL) spectra excited by X-ray was independent of the Ce concentration, indicating that emission was mainly observed from Sn^{2+} emission ...

  3. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    Woignier, Thierry; Primera, Juan; Reynes, Jerôme

    2016-01-01

    Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical dura...

  4. Durability of composites in a marine environment

    Rajapakse, Yapa

    2014-01-01

    Composites are widely used in marine applications. There is considerable experience of glass reinforced resins in boats and ships but these are usually not highly loaded. However, for new areas such as offshore and ocean energy there is a need for highly loaded structures to survive harsh conditions for 20 years or more. High performance composites are therefore being proposed. This book provides an overview of the state of the art in predicting the long term durability of composite marine structures. The following points are covered: •       Modelling water diffusion •       Damage induced by water •       Accelerated testing •       Including durability in design •       In-service experience. This is essential reading for all those involved with composites in the marine industry, from initial design and calculation through to manufacture and service exploitation. It also provides information unavailable elsewhere on the mechanisms involved in degradation and how to t...

  5. Photoluminescence and spectroscopic dependence of fluorophosphate glasses on samarium ions concentration and the induced defects by gamma irradiation

    Marzouk, M.A., E-mail: marzouk_nrc@yahoo.com [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth Street (former EL Tahrir), P.O. 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Hamdy, Y.M. [Spectroscopy Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth Street (former EL Tahrir), P.O. 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); ElBatal, H.A. [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth Street (former EL Tahrir), P.O. 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Ezz ElDin, F.M. [National Institute for Radiation Research & Technology, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    Combined optical, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of varying Sm{sup 3+} ions in NaF–AlF{sub 3}–phosphate glasses were investigated before and after successive gamma irradiation. Optical (UV–visible) absorption of the base undoped glass reveals UV absorption which becomes broadened and strong with progressive gamma irradiation. The UV absorption of the undoped glass is related to unavoidable trace iron impurity (Fe{sup 3+}) contaminated within the chemicals used for its preparation. Upon gamma irradiation, ferrous ions present in noticeable percent within the impurity due to the reducing nature of phosphate glass interact with positive holes during the irradiation process and are transformed to ferric ions through photochemical reactions and the additionally formed Fe{sup 3+} ions impart their characteristic strong absorption in the UV region. Sm{sup 3+} containing glasses show characteristic small peaks arranged into two regions from about 350 to 900 nm and from about 1000 to 1600 nm. Such absorption peaks are more distinct with the increase of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. Most of the limited number of absorption peaks are due to transitions from the {sup 6}H{sub 5/2} level to the various excited {sup 2s+1}L{sub J} levels. The majority of the transitions in the spectra are assumed to originate from induced electric dipole (ED) interactions with the selection rule ∆J≤6. The intense band {sup 6}P{sub 3/2}←{sup 6}H{sub 5/2} around 25,000 cm{sup −1} (~400 nm) is spin-allowed. The emission spectra of Sm{sup 2+} ions were recorded under the excitation wavelength of 402 nm for all prepared Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing glasses. The photoluminescence spectra show four emission lines, of which three consist of strong bands while the last line is a weak band. The wavelengths of the four luminescence peaks occur at about 560, 596, 642 and 702 nm and they are assigned to transitions from {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} to {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 9

  6. The dependence of shear modulus on dynamic relaxation and evolution of local structural heterogeneity in a metallic glass

    Huo, L.S.; Zeng, J.F.; Wang, W.H.; Liu, C.T.; Yang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the nanoscale structural heterogeneities intrinsic to metallic glasses (MGs), here we show that there are two concurrent contributions to their microscale quasi-static shear modulus G I : one (μ) is related to the atomic bonding strength of solid-like regions and the other (G II ) to the change in the possible configurations of liquid-like regions (dynamic relaxation). Through carefully designed high-rate nanoscale indentation tests, a simple constitutive relation (μ = G I + G II ) is experimentally verified. On a fundamental level, our current work provides a structure–property correlation that may be applicable to a wide range of glassy materials

  7. Humidity-dependent compression-induced glass transition of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA).

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Jung, Hyunjung; Choi, Yun Hwa; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Bang, Joona; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-07-28

    Constant rate compression isotherms of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA) show a distinct feature of an exponential increase in surface pressure in the high surface polymer concentration regime. We have previously demonstrated that this abrupt increase in surface pressure is linked to the glass transition of the polymer film, but the detailed mechanism of this process is not fully understood. In order to obtain a molecular-level understanding of this behavior, we performed extensive characterizations of the surface mechanical, structural and rheological properties of Langmuir PLGA films at the air-water interface, using combined experimental techniques including the Langmuir film balance, X-ray reflectivity and double-wall-ring interfacial rheometry methods. We observed that the mechanical and structural responses of the Langmuir PLGA films are significantly dependent on the rate of film compression; the glass transition was induced in the PLGA film only at fast compression rates. Surprisingly, we found that this deformation rate dependence is also dependent on the humidity of the environment. With water acting as a plasticizer for the PLGA material, the diffusion of water molecules through the PLGA film seems to be the key factor in the determination of the glass transformation properties and thus the mechanical response of the PLGA film against lateral compression. Based on our combined results, we hypothesize the following mechanism for the compression-induced glass transformation of the Langmuir PLGA film; (1) initially, a humidified/non-glassy PLGA film is formed in the full surface-coverage region (where the surface pressure shows a plateau) during compression; (2) further compression leads to the collapse of the PLGA chains and the formation of new surfaces on the air side of the film, and this newly formed top layer of the PLGA film is transiently glassy in character because the water evaporation rate

  8. SON68 glass alteration enhanced by magnetite

    Godon, Nicole; Gin, Stephane; Rebiscoul, Diane; Frugier, Pierre [CEA, DEN-Marcoule, F30207, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and modeling results of SON68 glass / magnetite interactions while in contact with synthetic groundwater from a clay environment. It is shown that magnetite enhances glass alteration, first by the sorption of Si released from the glass onto magnetite surfaces, then by a second process that could be the precipitation of an iron silicate mineral or the transformation of magnetite into a more reactive phase like hematite or goethite. This study globally suggests a detrimental effect of magnetite on the long-term durability of nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions. (authors)

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations and structural descriptors of radioisotope glass vectors for in situ radiotherapy.

    Christie, Jamieson K; Tilocca, Antonio

    2012-10-18

    The low solubility (high durability) of yttrium aluminosilicate (YAS) glass is one of its most important properties for use in in situ radiotherapy. Simple parameters, such as silica or yttria content or network connectivity, are not sufficient to rationalize the dependence of the solubility on the glass composition observed experimentally. We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of eight different YAS glasses of known solubility and analyzed the MD trajectories to identify specific structural features that are correlated and can be used to predict the solubility. We show that the (Si-)O-Si coordination number CN(SiOSi), the yttrium-yttrium clustering ratio R(YY), and the number of intratetrahedral O-Si-O bonds per yttrium atom N(intra) can be combined into a single structural descriptor s = f(CN(SiOSi),R(YY),N(intra)) with a high correlation with the solubility. The parameter s can thus be calculated from MD simulations and used to predict the solubility of YAS compositions, allowing one to adjust them to the range required by radiotherapy applications. For instance, its trend shows that high-silica- and low-yttria-content YAS glasses should be sufficiently durable for the radiotherapy application, although additional clinical considerations may set a lower limit to the yttria content.

  10. Characterization of Savannah River Plant waste glass

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the glass characterization programs at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is to ensure that glass containing Savannah River Plant high-level waste can be permanently stored in a federal repository, in an environmentally acceptable manner. To accomplish this objective, SRL is carrying out several experimental programs, including: fundamental studies of the reactions between waste glass and water, particularly repository groundwater; experiments in which candidate repository environments are simulated as accurately as possible; burial tests of simulated waste glass in candidate repository geologies; large-scale tests of glass durability; and determination of the effects of process conditions on glass quality. In this paper, the strategy and current status of each of these programs is discussed. The results indicate that waste packages containing SRP waste glass will satisfy emerging regulatory criteria

  11. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-06-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application.

  12. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application

  13. Glass formation, properties, and structure of soda-yttria-silicate glasses

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1991-01-01

    The glass formation region of the soda yttria silicate system was determined. The glasses within this region were measured to have a density of 2.4 to 3.1 g/cu cm, a refractive index of 1.50 to 1.60, a coefficient of thermal expansion of 7 x 10(exp -6)/C, softening temperatures between 500 and 780 C, and Vickers hardness values of 3.7 to 5.8 GPa. Aqueous chemical durability measurements were made on select glass compositions while infrared transmission spectra were used to study the glass structure and its effect on glass properties. A compositional region was identified which exhibited high thermal expansion, high softening temperatures, and good chemical durability.

  14. Glass formation, properties and structure of soda-yttria-silica glasses

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1992-01-01

    The glass formation region of the soda yttria silicate system was determined. The glasses within this region were measured to have a density of 2.4 to 3.1 g/cu cm, a refractive index of 1.50 to 1.60, a coefficient of thermal expansion of 7 x 10(exp -6)/C, softening temperatures between 500 and 780 C, and Vickers hardness values of 3.7 to 5.8 GPa. Aqueous chemical durability measurements were made on select glass compositions while infrared transmission spectra were used to study the glass structure and its effect on glass properties. A compositional region was identified which exhibited high thermal expansion, high softening temperatures, and good chemical durability.

  15. Structure-dependent tuning of electro-optic and thermoplastic properties in triphenyl groups containing molecular glasses

    Traskovskis, Kaspars, E-mail: kaspars.traskovskis@rtu.lv [Riga Technical University, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry, 3/7 Paula Valdena Street, Riga LV-1048 (Latvia); Zarins, Elmars; Laipniece, Lauma [Riga Technical University, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry, 3/7 Paula Valdena Street, Riga LV-1048 (Latvia); Tokmakovs, Andrejs [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Kokars, Valdis [Riga Technical University, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry, 3/7 Paula Valdena Street, Riga LV-1048 (Latvia); Rutkis, Martins [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia)

    2015-04-01

    The series of seven molecular compounds composed of D–π–A chromophores and triphenylmethyl auxiliary groups were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and quantum chemical calculations. Nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of compounds were determined by second harmonic generation measurements in corona poled thin glassy films. The results show that triphenylmethyl auxiliary groups are effective at shielding undesirable dipole interactions in solid phase thus increasing NLO efficiency of materials. Thermal stability up to 108 °C was achieved for a polar order in poled samples. - Highlights: • Triphenylmethyl groups can be used to reduce solid phase dipole interactions in organic molecular materials. • NLO efficiency of a poled material is higher, if a number of present triphenyl groups increases. • NLO efficiency of materials decreases, if polarity of used chromophores increases. • Thermal stability of polar order up to 108 °C can be achieved in poled organic glasses.

  16. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation

    Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Esquivel–Upshaw, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. Objective The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6 mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Materials and methods Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Results Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally-loaded 1,6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8 mm/0.8 mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4 mm/1.2 mm). Conclusion CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. Significance The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. PMID:24060349

  17. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based, glass-ceramic, molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation.

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Jadaan, Osama M; Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F

    2013-11-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally loaded 1.6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8mm/0.8mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4mm/1.2mm). CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  18. Modifying glass surfaces via internal diffusion

    Smedskjaer, M.M.; Yue, Y.Z.; Deubener, J.

    2010-01-01

    leads to outward diffusion (OD) of divalent cations (primarily Mg2+), i.e., diffusion from the interior of the glass to the surface, and thereby, to formation of an oxide surface nano-layer. in contrast, when the glasses are heat-treated in H-2/N-2 gas containing 10 vol.% H-2, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2...... on some properties such as hardness, chemical durability, and surface wettability....

  19. Glass sealing

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  20. Temperature dependent charge transport studies across thermodynamic glass transition in P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction: insight from J-V and impedance spectroscopy

    Sarkar, Atri; Rahaman, Abdulla Bin; Banerjee, Debamalya

    2018-03-01

    Temperature dependent charge transport properties of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction are analysed by dc and ac measurements under dark conditions across a wide temperature range of 110-473 K, which includes the thermodynamic glass transition temperature (Tg ˜320 K) of the system. A change from Ohmic conduction to space charge limited current conduction at higher (⩾1.2 V) applied bias voltages above  ⩾200 K is observed from J-V characteristics. From capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement at room temperature, the occurrence of a peak near the built-in voltage is observed below the dielectric relaxation frequency, originating from the competition between drift and diffusion driven motions of charges. Carrier concentration (N) is calculated from C-V measurements taken at different temperatures. Room temperature mobility values at various applied bias voltages are in accordance with that obtained from transient charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage measurement. Sample impedance is measured over five decades of frequency across temperature range by using lock-in detection. This data is used to extract temperature dependence of carrier mobility (μ), and dc conductivity (σ_dc ) which is low frequency extrapolation of ac conductivity. An activation energy of  ˜126 meV for the carrier hopping process at the metal-semiconductor interface is estimated from temperature dependence of σ_dc . Above T g, μ levels off to a constant value, whereas σ_dc starts to decrease after a transition knee at T g that can be seen as a combined effect of changes in μ and N. All these observed changes across T g can be correlated to enhanced polymer motion above the glass transition.

  1. Electrochromic Glasses.

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  2. Time-temperature-transformation kinetics in SRL waste glass

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bickford, D.F.; Karraker, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves have been determined for SRL 165 waste glass. Extent and sequence of crystallization were determined by XRD and SEM. The incipient crystallization product, spinel, can be determined at one volume percent by magnetic susceptibility. The type and percentage of crystallization is correlated with waste glass durability. 20 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  3. An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base

    Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

    2005-08-01

    This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data

  4. pH-dependent antibacterial effects on oral microorganisms through pure PLGA implants and composites with nanosized bioactive glass.

    Hild, Nora; Tawakoli, Pune N; Halter, Jonas G; Sauer, Bärbel; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Stark, Wendelin J; Mohn, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    Biomaterials made of biodegradable poly(α-hydroxyesters) such as poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) are known to decrease the pH in the vicinity of the implants. Bioactive glass (BG) is being investigated as a counteracting agent buffering the acidic degradation products. However, in dentistry the question arises whether an antibacterial effect is rather obtained from pure PLGA or from BG/PLGA composites, as BG has been proved to be antimicrobial. In the present study the antimicrobial properties of electrospun PLGA and BG45S5/PLGA fibres were investigated using human oral bacteria (specified with mass spectrometry) incubated for up to 24 h. BG45S5 nanoparticles were prepared by flame spray synthesis. The change in colony-forming units (CFU) of the bacteria was correlated with the pH of the medium during incubation. The morphology and structure of the scaffolds as well as the appearance of the bacteria were followed bymicroscopy. Additionally, we studied if the presence of BG45S5 had an influence on the degradation speed of the polymer. Finally, it turned out that the pH increase induced by the presence of BG45S5 in the scaffold did not last long enough to show a reduction in CFU. On the contrary, pure PLGA demonstrated antibacterial properties that should be taken into consideration when designing biomaterials for dental applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Some Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses and Their Glass Derivatives

    Abo Hussein, E.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses containing bismuth oxide have attracted considerable attention, although it is non-conventional glass forming oxide, but it has wide applications. In this work, it is aimed to prove that bismuth silicate glass can act as a good shielding material for γ- rays. For this purpose glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO_2 was prepared using melting-annealing technique. Also effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass such as PbO, BaO or SrO were also studied. The formed glasses were also heat treated at 450 degree C for 4 hours to give the corresponding heat treated glasses. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that the prepared glasses and heat treated glasses have very good stability when exposed to γ- irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using these glasses as gamma ray shielding materials. Many properties have been investigated, such as density to understand the structural properties, also mechanical properties were verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing their durability in both acidic and basic solutions. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass and heat treated glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 553 K, which proved that these glasses have very low conductivity even at high temperature. The formed phases of heat treated glass or glass ceramic samples were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also studying the structure of glasses and heat treated glasses before and after irradiation was investigated by the Infrared transmitting spectra. Calculations of optical band gap energies were demonstrated for some selected glasses and heat treated glasses from the data of UV optical absorption spectra to support the probability of using these bismuth silicate glasses for gamma radiation shielding processing.

  6. The Durability and Performance of Short Fibers for a Newly Developed Alkali-Activated Binder

    Henrik Funke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the development of a fiber-reinforced alkali-activated binder (FRAAB with an emphasis on the performance and the durability of the fibers in the alkaline alkali-activated binder (AAB-matrix. For the development of the matrix, the reactive components granulated slag and coal fly ash were used, which were alkali-activated with a mixture of sodium hydroxide (2–10 mol/L and an aqueous sodium silicate solution (SiO2/Na2O molar ratio: 2.1 at ambient temperature. For the reinforcement of the matrix integral fibers of alkali-resistant glass (AR-glass, E-glass, basalt, and carbon with a fiber volume content of 0.5% were used. By the integration of these short fibers, the three-point bending tensile strength of the AAB increased strikingly from 4.6 MPa (no fibers up to 5.7 MPa (carbon after one day. As a result of the investigations of the alkali resistance, the AR-glass and the carbon fibers showed the highest durability of all fibers in the FRAAB-matrix. In contrast to that, the weight loss of E-glass and basalt fibers was significant under the alkaline condition. According to these results, only the AR-glass and the carbon fibers reveal sufficient durability in the alkaline AAB-matrix.

  7. Low leach rate glasses for immobilization of nuclear wastes

    Chick, L.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1980-10-01

    Improved defense and commercial waste glass have about one order of magnitude lower leach rates at 90 0 C in static deionized water than reference glasses. This durability difference diminishes as the leaching temperature is raised, but at repository temperature less than 150 0 C, the improved compositions would have considerable advantages over reference glases. At the melting temperatures necessary for most of the high-durability glasses, volatility was found to be higher than that experienced in processing current reference glases. Higher volatilities might be compensated for by specific design of the off-gas system for improved off-gas treatment and volatile materials recovery. 6 figures, 2 tables

  8. Remediation and production of low-sludge high-level waste glasses

    Ramsey, W.G.; Brown, K.G.; Beam, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    High-level radioactive sludge will constitute 24-28 oxide weight percent of the high-level waste glass produced at the Savannah River Site. A recent melter campaign using non-radioactive, simulated feed was performed with a sludge content considerably lower than 24 percent. The resulting glass was processed and shown to have acceptable durability. However, the durability was lower than predicted by the durability algorithm. Additional melter runs were performed to demonstrate that low sludge feed could be remediated by simply adding sludge oxides. The Product Composition Control System, a computer code developed to predict the proper feed composition for production of high-level waste glass, was utilized to determine the necessary chemical additions. The methodology used to calculate the needed feed additives, the effects of sludge oxides on glass production, and the resulting glass durability are discussed

  9. Dependence of transfer number of fluorine on cation type in glasses of Ba(PO3)2-MeF2 systems (Me=Ba,Sr,Ca,Mg)

    Pronkin, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg cations on transfer numbers of fluorine in glasses of Ba(PO 3 ) 2 - MeF 2 pseudobinary systems is studied. Transfer numbers are essentially different in one and the same fluorine ion concentration in glasses, containing various alkali-earth cations: increase of the cation field force brings about decrease of the transfer numbers of fluorine, and the glass-formation region in the Ba-Sr-Ca-Mg series rises. The dependence of transfer numbers of fluorine on the fluorine concentration logarithm is presented. It is established, that alkali-earth metals influence the transfer numbers of fluorine on account of selective interaction with the phosphate constituent of glass structure

  10. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  11. Examining the role of canister cooling conditions on the formation of nepheline from nuclear waste glasses

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-01

    Nepheline (NaAlSiO₄) crystals can form during slow cooling of high-level waste (HLW) glass after it has been poured into a waste canister. Formation of these crystals can adversely affect the chemical durability of the glass. The tendency for nepheline crystallization to form in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al₂O₃ and Na₂O.

  12. Characterization of borosilicate glasses containing simulated high-level radioactive wastes from PNC

    Terai, R.; Eguchi, K.; Yamanaka, H.

    1979-01-01

    The characterization of borosilicate glasses containing simulated HLW from PNC has been carried out. Phase separation of molybdates, volatilization, viscosity, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, chemical durability, and devitrification of these glasses have been measured, and the suitability of the glasses for the vitrified solidification processes is discussed from the viewpoint of safety

  13. Optimization of glass composition for the vitrification of nuclear waste at the Savannah River Plant

    Soper, P.D.; Roberts, G.J.; Lightner, L.F.; Walker, D.D.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Waste glasses of different compositions were compared in terms of leachability, viscosity, liquidus temperature, and coefficient of expansion. The compositions of the glasses were determined by statistical optimization. Waste glass of the optimized composition is more durable than the current reference composition but can still be processed at low temperature

  14. Durable SOC stacks for production of hydrogen and synthesis gas by high temperature electrolysis

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Nielsen, Karsten Agersted

    2011-01-01

    . The degradation of the electrolysis cells was found to be influenced by the adsorption of impurities from the applied inlet gases, whereas the application of chromium containing interconnect plates and glass sealings do not seem to influence the durability when operated at 850 °C. Cleaning the inlet gases...

  15. Durability of air lime mortar

    Nielsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This contribution deals with the physical and chemical reasons why pure air lime mortars used in masonry of burned bricks exposed to outdoor climate have shown to be durable from the Middle Ages to our days. This sounds strange in modern times where pure air lime mortars are regarded as weak...... materials, which are omitted from standards for new masonry buildings, where use of hydraulic binders is prescribed. The reasons for the durability seam to be two: 1. The old mortars have high lime contents. 2. The carbonation process creates a pore structure with a fine pored outer layer and coarser pores...

  16. Glass corrosion in natural environments

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Barkatt, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Experiments carried out during the progress period are summarized. Experiments carried out involving glass samples exposed to solutions of Tris have shown the appearance of 'spikes' upon monitoring glass dissolution as a function of time. The periodic 'spikes' observed in Tris-based media were interpreted in terms of cracking due to excessive stress in the surface region of the glass. Studies of the interactions of silicate glasses with metal ions in buffered media were extended to systems containing Al. Caps buffer was used to establish the pH. The procedures used are described and the results are given. Preliminary studies were initiated as to the feasibility of adding a slowly dissolving solid compound of the additive to the glass-water system to maintain a supply of dissolved additive. It appears that several magnesium compounds have a suitable combination of solubility and affinity towards silicate glass surfaces to have a pronounced retarding effect on the extraction of uranium from the glass. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that introducing a magnesium source into geologic repositories for nuclear waste glass in the form of a sparingly soluble Mg-based backfill material may cause a substantial reduction in the extent of long-term glass corrosion. The studies described also provide mechanistic understanding of the roles of various metal solutes in the leachant. Such understanding forms the basis for developing long-term predictions of nuclear waste glass durability under repository conditions. From what is known about natural highly reduced glasses such as tektites, it is clear that iron is dissolved as ferrous iron with little or no ferric iron. The reducing conditions were high enough to cause metallic iron to exsolve out of the glass in the form of submicroscopic spherules. As the nuclear waste glass is much less reduced, a study was initiated on other natural glasses in addition to the nuclear waste glass. Extensive measurements were

  17. Chemical Durability Improvement and Static Fatigue of Glasses.

    1982-05-01

    Ss’n- 5cr.. Glassm. Union Scientifie. Contmentale de Verre , Belgium. 1962. 63 741 25 (1967). ’E. Orowan. "Fatigueueof Glas, Under Stress." Natre...PAGE 33703 CSILETmuE FORM . REPORT NUMER A2. DOV ACCRSION NOM S RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMER 4. TITLE (and sub.e.a S. TYPE OF REPORT 6 PERIOD COVERED...and J. S. Olcott, "Strengthening by Ion Exchange," J. this type of ion exchange is unlikely since Am. Ceram. Soc., 47 151 215-19 (1964). the alkali

  18. Modeling a novel glass immobilization waste treatment process using flow

    Ferrada, J.J.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Welch, T.D.; Giardina, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    One option for control and disposal of surplus fissile materials is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), a process developed at ORNL for directly converting Pu-bearing material into a durable high-quality glass waste form. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of the GMODS process flowsheet using FLOW, a chemical process simulator. The simulation showed that the glass chemistry postulated ion the models has acceptable levels of risks

  19. Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-09-30

    Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution

  20. Defining the Glass Composition Limits for SRS Contaminated Soils

    Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.; Crews, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminated soil resulting from the excavation, repair, and decommissioning of facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently being disposed of by shallow land burial or is being stored when considered only hazardous. Vitrification of this waste is being investigated, since it will bind the hazardous and radioactive species in a stable and durable glass matrix, which will reduce the risk of ground water contamination. However, the composition limits for producing durable glass have to be determined before the technology can be applied. Glass compositions, consisting of SRS soil and glass forming additives, were tested on a crucible-scale in three ternary phase systems. Nine different glass compositions were produced, with waste loadings ranging from 43 to 58 weight percent. These were characterized using varoius chemical methods and tested for durability in both alkaline and acidic environments. All nine performed well in alkaline environments, but only three met the strictest criteria for the acidic environment tests. Although the glasses did not meet all of the limits for the acidic tests, the test was performed on very conservative size samples, so the results were also conservative. Therefore, enough evidence was found to provide proof that SRS soil can be vitrified in a durable glass matrix

  1. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  2. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  3. Durability of building joint sealants

    Christopher C. White; Kar Tean Tan; Donald L. Hunston; R. Sam Williams

    2009-01-01

    Predicting the service life of building joint sealants exposed to service environments in less than real time has been a need of the sealant community for many decades. Despite extensive research efforts to design laboratory accelerated tests to duplicate the failure modes occurring in field exposures, little success has been achieved using conventional durability...

  4. Durability Issues and Status of PBI-Based Fuel Cells

    Jakobsen, Mark Tonny Dalsgaard; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2016-01-01

    This chapter briefly reviews durability and stability issues with key materials and components for HT-PEMFCs, including the polymer membrane, the doping acid, the electrocatalyst, the catalyst support and bipolar plates. Degradation mechanisms and their dependence on fuel cell operating condition...

  5. Colloidal glasses

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  6. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  7. Transition from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of structural relaxation time in glass-forming liquids: continuous versus discontinuous scenario.

    Popova, V A; Surovtsev, N V

    2014-09-01

    The temperature dependences of α relaxation time τ(α)(T) of three glass-forming liquids (salol, o-terphenyl, and α-picoline) were investigated by a depolarized light scattering technique. A detailed description of τ(α)(T) near T(A), the temperature of the transition from the Arrhenius law at high temperatures to a non-Arrhenius behavior of τ(α)(T) at lower temperatures, was done. It was found that this transition is quite sharp. If the transition is described as switching from the Arrhenius law to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law, it occurs within the temperature range of about 15 K or less. Most of the known expressions for τ(α)(T) cannot describe this sharp transition. Our analysis revealed that this transition can be described either as a discontinuous transition in the spirit of the frustration-limited domain theory [D. Kivelson, G. Tarjus, X. Zhao, and S. A. Kivelson, Phys. Rev. E 53, 751 (1996)], implying a phase transition, or by a phenomenological expression recently suggested [B. Schmidtke, N. Petzold, R. Kahlau, M. Hofmann, and E. A. Rössler, Phys. Rev. E 86, 041507 (2012)], where the activation energy includes the term depending exponentially on temperature.

  8. Development of antimicrobial optimum glass ionomer

    Angioletto, E.; Tezza, V.B.; Santos, M.J.; Montedo, O.R.K.; Pich, C.T.; Fiori, M.A.; Angioletto, Ev.

    2010-01-01

    The use of glass ionomer for restorations in dentistry for lower income population is a well established practice in public clinics of Brazil. However the average price of this kind of material and its low durability still have a negative impact on public health for being imported and frequently replaced it becomes expensive for the manufacturers and for public agencies. In glass ionomer the main antimicrobial agent is fluoride, which is released gradually. The material used for filling provides an average life of five years and its durability can be increased if the ionomer contains other oligodynamic elements. It was formulated, merged a new optimized glass ionomer which was characterized by X-ray diffraction, ion measurement and antimicrobial activity. This new product showed promising results, that pointed structural stability an increase of antimicrobial efficiency. (author)

  9. Glass bead cultivation of fungi

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, H.

    2013-01-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum...... and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier...... to specific nutrient factors. •Fungal growth on glass beads eases and improves fungal RNA extraction....

  10. Sodium diffusion in boroaluminosilicate glasses

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2011-01-01

    of isothermal sodium diffusion in BAS glasses by ion exchange, inward diffusion, and tracer diffusion experiments. By varying the [SiO2]/[Al2O3] ratio of the glasses, different structural regimes of sodium behavior are accessed. We show that the mobility of the sodium ions decreases with increasing [SiO2]/[Al2O......Understanding the fundamentals of alkali diffusion in boroaluminosilicate (BAS) glasses is of critical importance for advanced glass applications, e.g., the production of chemically strengthened glass covers for personal electronic devices. Here, we investigate the composition dependence...

  11. Operating Range for High Temperature Borosilicate Waste Glasses: (Simulated Hanford Enveloped)

    Mohammad, J.; Ramsey, W. G.; Toghiani, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    The following results are a part of an independent thesis study conducted at Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory-Mississippi State University. A series of small-scale borosilicate glass melts from high-level waste simulant were produced with waste loadings ranging from 20% to 55% (by mass). Crushed glass was allowed to react in an aqueous environment under static conditions for 7 days. The data obtained from the chemical analysis of the leachate solutions were used to test the durability of the resulting glasses. Studies were performed to determine the qualitative effects of increasing the B2O3 content on the overall waste glass leaching behavior. Structural changes in a glass arising due to B2O3 were detected indirectly by its chemical durability, which is a strong function of composition and structure. Modeling was performed to predict glass durability quantitatively in an aqueous environment as a direct function of oxide composition

  12. Durability of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The planned research will indicate, whether fibre reinforced concrete has better or worse durability than normal concrete. Durability specimens will be measured on cracked as well as uncracked specimens. Also the pore structure in the concrete will be characterized.Keywords: Fibre reinforced...... concrete, durability, pore structure, mechanical load...

  13. Nuclear waste immobilization in iron phosphate glasses

    Garcia, D.A.; Rodriguez, Diego A.; Menghini, Jorge E.; Bevilacqua, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Iron-phosphate glasses have become important in the nuclear waste immobilization area because they have some advantages over silicate-based glasses, such as a lower processing temperature and a higher nuclear waste load without losing chemical and mechanical properties. Structure and chemical properties of iron-phosphate glasses are determined in terms of the main components, in this case, phosphate oxide along with the other oxides that are added to improve some of the characteristics of the glasses. For example, Iron oxide improves chemical durability, lead oxide lowers fusion temperature and sodium oxide reduces viscosity at high temperature. In this work a study based on the composition-property relations was made. We used different techniques to characterize a series of iron-lead-phosphate glasses with uranium and aluminium oxide as simulated nuclear waste. We used the Arquimedes method to determine the bulk density, differential temperature analysis (DTA) to determine both glass transition temperature and crystallization temperature, dilatometric analysis to calculate the linear thermal expansion coefficient, chemical durability (MCC-1 test) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We also applied some theoretic models to calculate activation energies associated with the glass transition temperature and crystallization processes. (author)

  14. Temperature induced effects on the durability of MR fluids

    Wiehe, A; Maas, J; Kieburg, C

    2013-01-01

    Although commercial MR fluids exist for quite some time now and the feasibility as well as the advantages of the MR technology have been demonstrated for several applications by a variety of MR actuator prototypes, a sustainable market break-through of brake and clutch applications utilizing the shear mode is still missing. Essential impediments are the marginal knowledge about the durability of the MR technology. To overcome this situation, a long-term measurement system was developed for the durability analysis of MR fluid formulations within a technical relevant scale with respect to the volume of MR fluid and the transmitted torque. The focus of the presented series of measurements is given to the analysis of temperature induced effects on the durability. In this context four different failure indicators can be distinguished, namely an apparent negative viscosity, deviations in torque data obtained from different measurements as well as a pressure increase and a drop in the on-state torque. The measurement data of the present durability experiments indicate a significant dependency of the attainable energy intake density on the temperature. The aim of such durability tests is to establish a reliable data base for the industry to estimate the life-time of MR devices.

  15. Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

  16. Silicate glasses

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  17. Durability of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes

    Huang, Xinyu; Reifsnider, Ken

    Durability is still a critical limiting factor for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, a leading energy conversion technology for powering future hydrogen fueled automobiles, backup power systems (e.g., for base transceiver station of cellular networks), portable electronic devices, etc. Ionic conducting polymer (ionomer) electrolyte membranes are the critical enabling materials for the PEM fuel cells. They are also widely used as the central functional elements in hydrogen generation (e.g., electrolyzers), membrane cell for chlor-alkali production, etc. A perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer with the trade name Nafion® developed by DuPont™ is the most widely used PEM in chlor-alkali cells and PEM fuel cells. Similar PFSA membranes have been developed by Dow Chemical, Asahi Glass, and lately Solvay Solexis. Frequently, such membranes serve the dual function of reactant separation and selective ionic conduction between two otherwise separate compartments. For some applications, the compromise of the "separation" function via the degradation and mechanical failure of the electrolyte membrane can be the life-limiting factor; this is particularly the case for PEM in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells.

  18. Teeth: Among Nature's Most Durable Biocomposites

    Lawn, Brian R.; Lee, James J.-W.; Chai, Herzl

    2010-08-01

    This paper addresses the durability of natural teeth from a materials perspective. Teeth are depicted as smart biocomposites, highly resistant to cumulative deformation and fracture. Favorable morphological features of teeth at both macroscopic and microscopic levels contribute to an innate damage tolerance. Damage modes are activated readily within the brittle enamel coat but are contained from spreading catastrophically into the vulnerable tooth interior in sustained occlusal loading. Although tooth enamel contains a multitude of microstructural defects that can act as sources of fracture, substantial overloads are required to drive any developing cracks to ultimate failure—nature's strategy is to contain damage rather than avoid it. Tests on model glass-shell systems simulating the basic elements of the tooth enamel/dentin layer structure help to identify important damage modes. Fracture and deformation mechanics provide a basis for analyzing critical conditions for each mode, in terms of characteristic tooth dimensions and materials properties. Comparative tests on extracted human and animal teeth confirm the validity of the model test approach and point to new research directions. Implications in biomechanics, especially as they relate to dentistry and anthropology, are outlined.

  19. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  20. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  1. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input

  2. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling

  3. Effect of different glass and zeolite A compositions on the leach resistance of ceramic waste forms

    Lewis, M.A.; Hash, M.; Glandorf, D.

    1996-01-01

    A ceramic waste form is being developed for waste generated during electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste is generated when fission products are removed from the electrolyte, LiCl-KCl eutectic. The waste form is a composite fabricated by hot isostatic pressing a mixture of glass frit and zeolite occluded with fission products and salt. Normalized release rate is less than 1 g/m 2 d for all elements in MCC-1 leach test run for 28 days in deionized water at 90 C. This leach resistance is comparable to that of early Savannah River glasses. We are investigating how leach resistance is affected by changes in cationic form of zeolite and in glass composition. Composites were made with 3 forms of zeolite A and 6 glasses. We used 3-day ASTM C1220-92 (formerly MCC-1) leach tests to screen samples for development purposes only. The leach test results show that the glass composites of zeolites 5A and 4A retain fission products equally well. Loss of Cs is small (0.1-0.5 wt%), while the loss of divalent and trivalent fission products is one or more orders of magnitude smaller. Composites of 5A retain chloride ion better in these short-term screens than 4A and 3A. The more leach resistant composites were made with durable glasses rich in silica and poor in alkaline earth oxides. XRD show that a salt phase was absent in the leach resistant composites of 5A and the better glasses but was present in the other composites with poorer leach performance. Thus, absence of salt phase corresponds to improved leach resistance. Interactions between zeolite and glass depend on composition of both

  4. Durability of building materials and components

    Delgado, JMPQ

    2013-01-01

    Durability of Building Materials and Components provides a collection of recent research works to contribute to the systematization and dissemination of knowledge related to the long-term performance and durability of construction and, simultaneously, to show the most recent advances in this domain. It includes a set of new developments in the field of durability, service life prediction methodologies, the durability approach for historical and old buildings, asset and maintenance management and on the durability of materials, systems and components. The book is divided in several chapters that intend to be a resume of the current state of knowledge for benefit of professional colleagues.

  5. Crystallization of Yttrium and Samarium Aluminosilicate Glasses

    Lago, Diana Carolina; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Aluminosilicate glasses containing samarium and yttrium (SmAS and YAS glasses) exhibit high glass transition temperatures, corrosion resistance, and glass stability on heating which make them useful for technological applications. Yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres are currently being used for internal selective radiotherapy of liver cancer. During the preparation process, crystallization needs to be totally or partially avoided depending on the final application. Thus knowing the cry...

  6. Radionuclides containment in nuclear glasses. An overview

    Gin, Stephane; Jollivet, Patrick; Tribet, Magaly; Peuget, Sylvain; Schuller, Sophie [CEA Marcoule, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). DE2D SEVT

    2017-07-01

    Radioactive waste vitrification has been carried out industrially in several countries for nearly 40 years. Research into the formulation and long term behavior of high and intermediate level waste glasses, mainly borosilicate compositions, is still continuing in order to (i) safely condition new types of wastes and (ii) design and demonstrate the safety of the disposal of these long-lived waste forms in a deep geological repository. This article presents a summary of current knowledge on the formulation, irradiation resistance and the chemical durability of these conditioning materials, with a special focus on the fate of radionuclides during glass processing and aging. It is shown that, apart from the situation for certain elements with very low incorporation rate in glass matrices, vitrification in borosilicate glass can enable waste loadings of up to ∝20 wt% while maintaining the glass homogeneity for geological time scales and guaranteeing a high stability level in spite of irradiation and water contact.

  7. Fabrication of optical fiber of zinc tin borophosphate glass with zero photoelastic constant

    Saitoh, Akira; Oba, Yuya; Takebe, Hiromichi

    2015-10-01

    An optical fiber made of zinc tin boro-phosphate glass having a zero photoelastic constant, good water durability, and excluding hazardous elements was drawn from a prepared preform for use in a fiber-type current sensor device. The proposed cladding compositions enable single-mode propagation for a wavelength of 1550 nm, which is estimated from the difference in the refractive index between the core and cladding compositions. The drawing conditions should be controlled since the multiple-component glass is very sensitive to changes in viscosity and crystal precipitation during the heat-treated stretching of the preform. The temperature dependence of viscosity in the core and cladding reveals the feasibility of drawing.

  8. Edge-Strengthening of Structural Glass with Protective Coatings

    Lindqvist Maria; Louter Christian; Lebet Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    In modern buildings, glass is increasingly used as a load-carrying material in structural components, such as glass beams. For glass beams especially the edge strength of glass is important. However, the strength of glass is not a material constant but depends on various parameters, which makes glass, amongst other things, a challenging building material. One of the parameters influencing glass strength is the combination of humidity and stress, which may cause stress corrosion. The aim of th...

  9. Bulk metallic glasses: A new class of engineering materials

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    been discovered. Glass-forming ability depends on various factors like enthalpy ... The determination of a glass transition temperature in ... Rao (1980) has postulated that an alloy with the smallest possible molar volume is most prone to glass ...

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GLASS FIBRE CONCRETE AND NORMAL CONCRETE

    Mr.Yogesh S.Lanjewar*

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is basically the most important material concerning with the construction and infrastructural procedures, for which it should be of good strength and durability. Many researches are being conducted to make concrete more sustainable and of more strength and durability. Therefore keeping this in mind i have chosen to do the comparative study regarding the strength of normal concrete with the glass fibre added concrete using mix design procedure as per IS 10262-2009 for concrete. As w...

  11. Temperature and Vibration Dependence of the Faraday Effect of Gd₂O₃ NPs-Doped Alumino-Silicate Glass Optical Fiber.

    Ju, Seongmin; Kim, Jihun; Linganna, Kadathala; Watekar, Pramod R; Kang, Seong Gu; Kim, Bok Hyeon; Boo, Seongjae; Lee, Youjin; An, Yong Ho; Kim, Cheol Jin; Han, Won-Taek

    2018-03-27

    All-optical fiber magnetic field sensor based on the Gd₂O₃ nano-particles (NPs)-doped alumino-silicate glass optical fiber was developed, and its temperature and vibration dependence on the Faraday Effect were investigated. Uniformly embedded Gd₂O₃ NPs were identified to form in the core of the fiber, and the measured absorption peaks of the fiber appearing at 377 nm, 443 nm, and 551 nm were attributed to the Gd₂O₃ NPs incorporated in the fiber core. The Faraday rotation angle (FRA) of the linearly polarized light was measured at 650 nm with the induced magnetic field by the solenoid. The Faraday rotation angle was found to increase linearly with the magnetic field, and it was about 18.16° ± 0.048° at 0.142 Tesla (T) at temperatures of 25 °C-120 °C, by which the estimated Verdet constant was 3.19 rad/(T∙m) ± 0.01 rad/(T∙m). The variation of the FRA with time at 0.142 T and 120 °C was negligibly small (-9.78 × 10 -4 °/min). The variation of the FRA under the mechanical vibration with the acceleration below 10 g and the frequency above 50 Hz was within 0.5°.

  12. DEPENDENCY OF SULFATE SOLUBILITY ON MELT COMPOSITION AND MELT POLYMERIZATION

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfate and sulfate salts are not very soluble in borosilicate waste glass. When sulfate is present in excess it can form water soluble secondary phases and/or a molten salt layer (gall) on the melt pool surface which is purported to cause steam explosions in slurry fed melters. Therefore, sulfate can impact glass durability while formation of a molten salt layer on the melt pool can impact processing. Sulfate solubility has been shown to be compositionally dependent in various studies, (e.g. , B2O3, Li2O, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and Fe2O3 were shown to increase sulfate solubility while Al2O3 and SiO2 decreased sulfate solubility). This compositional dependency is shown to be related to the calculated melt viscosity at various temperatures and hence the melt polymerization

  13. PNL vitrification technology development project glass formulation strategy for LLW vitrification

    Kim, D.; Hrma, P.R.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This Glass Formulation Strategy describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions for Hanford's low-level waste vitrification between now and the projected low-level waste facility start-up in 2005. The objectives of the glass formulation task are to develop optimized glass compositions with satisfactory long-term durability, acceptable processing characteristics, adequate flexibility to handle waste variations, maximize waste loading to practical limits, and to develop methodology to respond to further waste variations

  14. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  15. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na_2O-B_2O_3-SiO_2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. In this paper, five new glasses with ~20 mass% Na_2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. Finally, these improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.

  16. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  17. Prediction of the Formulation Dependence of the Glass Transition Temperature for Amine-Epoxy Copolymers Using a Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Based on the AM1 Method

    Morrill, Jason

    2004-01-01

    A designer Quantitative Structure-Property Relationsbip (QSPR) based upon molecular properties calculated using the AM1 semi-empirical quantum mechanical metbod was developed to predict the glass transition temperature (Tg...

  18. Cosmos & Glass

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  19. Glass Glimpsed

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  20. ICP experiments more durable pavements

    Carta Petrolera

    1994-01-01

    A new asphalts technology that will make more durable the pavement in the highways and roads of the cities of Colombia investigates the Colombian Institute of the Petroleum ICP. The project that will have important incidence in the solution of one of the main problems in the roads of cities like Bogota, is only one of the 35 investigation programs and application of new technologies that with relationship to the sector of the hydrocarbons and its influence branches the ICP advances. The investigation looks for to elevate the current average of useful life of the pavements, with that it would be reached a standard that has the developed countries in this field

  1. Estimating Durability of Reinforced Concrete

    Varlamov, A. A.; Shapovalov, E. L.; Gavrilov, V. B.

    2017-11-01

    In this article we propose to use the methods of fracture mechanics to evaluate concrete durability. To evaluate concrete crack resistance characteristics of concrete directly in the structure in order to implement the methods of fracture mechanics, we have developed special methods. Various experimental studies have been carried out to determine the crack resistance characteristics and the concrete modulus of elasticity during its operating. A comparison was carried out for the results obtained with the use of the proposed methods and those obtained with the standard methods for determining the concrete crack resistance characteristics.

  2. Spin glasses

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  3. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  4. Plutonium Solubility In High-Level Waste Alkali Borosilicate Glass

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to ∼18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m 3 of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m 3 3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt

  5. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baker, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lujan, Roger W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Langlois, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadia, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kusoglu, Ahmet [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shi, Shouwnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); More, K. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grot, Steve [Ion Power, New Castle, DE (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  6. Immobilization of gadolinium in iron borophosphate glasses and iron borophosphate based glass-ceramics: Implications for the immobilization of plutonium(Ⅲ)

    Wang, Fu, E-mail: wangfu@swust.edu.cn; Liao, Qilong, E-mail: liaoqilong@swust.edu.cn; Dai, Yunya; Zhu, Hanzhen

    2016-08-15

    Immobilization of gadolinium (Gd), a nonradioactive surrogate for Pu{sup 3+}, in iron borophosphate glasses/glass-ceramics (IBP glasses/glass-ceramics) has been investigated. The IBP glass containing 4 mol% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is homogeneously amorphous. At higher Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations, additional Gd is retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of monazite GdPO{sub 4} crystalline phase detected with X-ray diffraction. Moreover, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition increases the T{sub g} of the IBP glasses in glass formation range, which is consistent with the structural modification of the glasses. The structure of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is mainly based on pyrophosphate units. The chemical durability of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is comparable to widely used borosilicate glass waste forms and the existence of monazite GdPO{sub 4} crystalline phase does not degrade the aqueous chemical durability of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics. The Gd-loading results imply that the solubility should not be a limiting factor in processing nuclide Pu{sup 3+} if the formed crystalline phase(s) have high chemical durability. - Highlights: • Monazite GdPO{sub 4} are identified in the IBP glasses containing up to 6 mol% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • R{sub L} of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics are about 10{sup −2} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1}. • Existence of GdPO{sub 4} does not degrade aqueous chemical durability of the IBP glass. • T{sub g} increases with increasing Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in glass formation range. • IBP glasses are potential hosts for the immobilization of Pu{sup 3+} containing HLWs.

  7. Investigation of lead-iron-phosphate glass for SRP waste

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    The search for a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous waste forms. Recently, lead-iron-phosphate (LIP) glasses have been proposed for solidification of all types of HLLW. Investigation of this glass for vitrification of SRP waste demonstrated that the phosphate glass is incompatible with the current borosilicate glass technology. The durability of LIP glasses in deionized water was comparable to current borosilicate waste glass formulations, and the LIP glass has a low melt temperature. However, many of the defense waste constituents have low solubility in the phosphate melt, producing an inhomogeneous product. Also, the LIP melt is highly corrosive which prevents the use of current melter materials, in particular Inconel 690, and thus requires more exotic materials of construction such as platinum

  8. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. Vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters, as is presently done with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is cooled rapidly, thus retaining its vitreous structure

  9. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate glass. Vitreous lead-iron-phosphate glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than borosilicate glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is presently done with borosilicate glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from borosilicate glass. Therefore, in order to realize the performance advantages of the lead-iron-phosphate material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is rapidly cooled, thus retaining its vitreous structure. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Hygrothermal Behavior, Building Pathology and Durability

    Delgado, JMPQ

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this book, Hygrothermal, Building Pathology and Durability, is to provide a collection of recent research works to contribute to the systematization and dissemination of knowledge related to construction pathology, hygrothermal behaviour of buildings, durability and diagnostic techniques and, simultaneously, to show the most recent advances in this domain. It includes a set of new developments in the field of building physics and hygrothermal behaviour, durability approach for historical and old buildings and building pathology vs. durability. The book is divided in several chapters that are a resume of the current state of knowledge for benefit of professional colleagues, scientists, students, practitioners, lecturers and other interested parties to network.

  11. Measuring Happiness: From Fluctuating Happiness to Authentic–Durable Happiness

    Dambrun, Michaël; Ricard, Matthieu; Després, Gérard; Drelon, Emilie; Gibelin, Eva; Gibelin, Marion; Loubeyre, Mélanie; Py, Delphine; Delpy, Aurore; Garibbo, Céline; Bray, Elise; Lac, Gérard; Michaux, Odile

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the theoretical distinction between self-centeredness and selflessness (Dambrun and Ricard, 2011), the main goal of this research was to develop two new scales assessing distinct dimensions of happiness. By trying to maximize pleasures and to avoid displeasures, we propose that a self-centered functioning induces a fluctuating happiness in which phases of pleasure and displeasure alternate repeatedly (i.e., Fluctuating Happiness). In contrast, a selfless psychological functioning postulates the existence of a state of durable plenitude that is less dependent upon circumstances but rather is related to a person’s inner resources and abilities to deal with whatever comes his way in life (i.e., Authentic–Durable Happiness). Using various samples (n = 735), we developed a 10-item Scale measuring Subjective Fluctuating Happiness (SFHS) and a 13-item scale assessing Subjective Authentic–Durable Happiness (SA–DHS). Results indicated high internal consistencies, satisfactory test–retest validities, and adequate convergent and discriminant validities with various constructs including a biological marker of stress (salivary cortisol). Consistent with our theoretical framework, while self-enhancement values were related only to fluctuating happiness, self-transcendence values were related only to authentic–durable happiness. Support for the distinction between contentment and inner-peace, two related markers of authentic happiness, also was found. PMID:22347202

  12. Effects of container material on PCT leach test results for high-level nuclear waste glasses

    Xing, S.B.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    A glass-based waste form used for the immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes should exhibit good resistance to aqueous corrosion since typically this is the primary process by which radionucleides could be released into the environment upon failure of other barriers. In the USA, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) provides a set of requirements to ensure the consistency of the waste forms produced and specifies the Product Consistency Test (PCT) as a measure of relative chemical durability. While the PCT procedure permits usage of both Teflon and stainless steel vessels for testing of simulated development glasses, Teflon is not permitted for testing of production glasses due to radiative degradation. The results presented in this paper indicate that there are very significant differences between tests conducted in the two types of vessels due to the well-known permeability of Teflon to atmospheric carbon dioxide which results in lowering of the solution pH and a consequent reduction in the leach rate of silicate glasses. A wide range of nuclear waste glass compositions was subjected to the PCT procedure using both Teflon and stainless steel vessels. The magnitude of the effect (up to a factor of four for B, Na, Li concentrations) depends strongly on glass composition, therefore the isolated checks performed previously were inconclusive. The permeability to CO, of two types of Teflon vessels specified in the PCT procedure was directly measured using buffer solutions: ingress of CO, is linear in time, strongly pH-dependent, and was as high as 100 ppm after 7 days. In actual PCT tests in Teflon vessels, the total CO, content was 560 ppm after 87 days and 1930 ppm after one year

  13. Experimental Study on Durability Improvement of Fly Ash Concrete with Durability Improving Admixture

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete,...

  14. Predicting liquid immiscibility in multicomponent nuclear waste glasses

    Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    Taylor's model for predicting amorphous phase separation in complex, multicomponent systems has been applied to high-level (simulated) radioactive waste glasses at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site. Taylor's model is primarily based on additions of modifying cations to a Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 (NBS) submixture of the multicomponent glass. The position of the submixture relative to the immiscibility dome defines the development probability of amorphous phase separation. Although prediction of amorphous phase separation in Hanford glasses (via experimental SEM/TEM analysis) is the primary thrust of this work; reported durability data is also provides limited insight into the composition/durability relationship. Using a modified model similar to Taylor's, the results indicate that immiscibility may be predicted for multicomponent waste glasses by the addition of Li 2 O to the open-quotes alkaliclose quotes corner of the NBS submixture

  15. Predicting liquid immiscibility in multicomponent nuclear waste glasses

    Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.R.

    1994-04-01

    Taylor's model for predicting amorphous phase separation in complex, multicomponent systems has been applied to high-level (simulated) radioactive waste glasses at the US Department of Energy's Hanford site. Taylor's model is primarily based on additions of modifying cations to a Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 (NBS) submixture of the multicomponent glass. The position of the submixture relative to the miscibility dome defines the development probability of amorphous phase separation. Although prediction of amorphous phase separation in Hanford glasses (via experimental SEM/TEM analysis) is the primary thrust of this work; reported durability data is also provides limited insight into the composition/durability relationship. Using a modified model similar to Taylor's, the results indicate that immiscibility may be predicted for multicomponent waste glasses by the addition of Li 2 O to the ''alkali'' corner of the NBS submixture

  16. Linear free energy relationships in glass corrosion

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bates, J.K.; Bohlke, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    Various theoretical models that have been proposed to correlate glass durability to their composition for a wide variety of silicate, borosilicate, and aluminosilicate glasses are examined. Comparisons are made between the predictions of these models and those of an empirical formulation extracted from existing data in the present work. The empirical approach provides independent confirmation of the relative accuracy of the silica release rate predictions of the different theoretical models in static leaching systems. Extension of the empirical approach used in this work are discussed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  18. Chemical durability and characterization of nuclear waste forms in a hydrothermal environment

    Braithwaite, J.W.; Johnstone, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical durability of a simulated copper borosilicate waste glass and titanate waste ceramic has been studied in hydrothermal environments which could possibly be encountered in a bedded salt or sub-sealed waste isolation repository. The major parameters investigated which affect matrix corrosion and cesium solubilization include solution saturation and equilibrium phenomena, solution composition (especially the Mg +2 ion concentration), pH, particle size, temperature, and time

  19. GLASS BOX

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  20. Radiation modification of glass fiber - reinforced plastics

    Allayarov, S.R.; Smirnov, Yu.N.; Lesnichaya, V.A.; Ol'khov, Yu.A.; Belov, G.P.; Dixon, D.A.; Kispert, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    Modification of glass fiber - reinforced plastics (GFRPs) by gamma-irradiation has been researched to receipt of polymeric composite materials. They were produced by the film - technology method and the cheapest thermoplastics (polythene, polyamide were used as polymeric matrixes for their manufacture. GFRPs were irradiated with Co 60 gamma-rays from a Gammatok-100 source in air and in vacuum. The strength properties of GFRPs and initial polymeric matrixes were investigated before and after radiolysis. Molecular - topological structure of the polymeric matrixes were tested by the method of thermomechanical spectroscopy. The strength properties of GFRPs depend on a parity of speeds of structural (physical) and chemical modification of the polymeric matrixes. These two processes proceed simultaneously. The structural modification includes physical transformation of polymers at preservation of their chemical structure. Covalent bonds between various macromolecules or between macromolecules and surface of fiberglasses are formed at the chemical modification of polymeric matrixes induced by radiation. Action of ionizing radiation on the used polymeric matrix results to its structurization (polythene) or to destruction (polyamide). Increasing of durability of GFRPs containing polythene is caused by formation of the optimum molecular topological structure of the polymeric matrix. (authors)

  1. Durability as integral characteristic of concrete

    Suleymanova, L. A.; Pogorelova, I. A.; Suleymanov, K. A.; Kirilenko, S. V.; Marushko, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The carried-out research provides insight into the internal bonds energy in material as the basis of its durability, deformability, integrity and resistance to different factors (combined effects of external loadings and (or) environment), into the limits of technical possibilities, durability and physical reality of the process of concrete deterioration, which allows designing reliable and cost-effective ferroconcrete constructions for different purposes.

  2. Durability of aircraft composite materials

    Dextern, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Confidence in the long term durability of advanced composites is developed through a series of flight service programs. Service experience is obtained by installing secondary and primary composite components on commercial and military transport aircraft and helicopters. Included are spoilers, rudders, elevators, ailerons, fairings and wing boxes on transport aircraft and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on helicopters. Materials included in the evaluation are boron/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy, graphite/epoxy and boron/aluminum. Inspection, maintenance, and repair results for the components in service are reported. The effects of long term exposure to laboratory, flight, and outdoor environmental conditions are reported for various composite materials. Included are effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, and aircraft fuels and fluids.

  3. Dissolution of lanthanide alumino-silicate oxynitride glasses

    Bois, L.; Barré, N.; Guillopé, S.; Guittet, M. J.; Gautier-Soyer, M.; Duraud, J. P.; Trocellier, P.; Verdier, P.; Laurent, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The aqueous corrosion behavior of lanthanide aluminosilicate glasses has been studied under static conditions ( T=96°C, duration=1 and 3 months, glass surface area/leachate volume, S/ V=0.3 cm -1) by means of solution and solid analyses. It was found that these glasses exhibit a high chemical durability. The influence of yttrium, magnesium and nitrogen, which are supposed to improve the mechanical properties, on the chemical durability, has been investigated. After a one-month experiment, lanthanum and yttrium releases were found to be about 10 -7 mol l -1, while silicon and aluminum releases were about 10 -5 mol l -1. Yttrium seems to improve the chemical durability. The presence of nitrogen does not seem to modify the glass constituents releases, but seems to improve the surface state of the altered glass. XPS experiments reveal that lanthanum and yttrium are more concentrated near the surface (20-30 Å) of the glass after the leaching test.

  4. Basaltic glass alteration in confined media: analogy with nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions

    Parruzot, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation concerns basaltic glass alteration mechanisms and rates. Through a better understanding of the processes controlling the basaltic glass durability, this thesis attempts to establish a link between laboratory studies and volcanic glass alteration in natural environment. The methodology used here is similar to the one used for nuclear glasses. Thus, we measured for the first time the residual alteration rate of basaltic glasses. Protective effect of the alteration film is clearly established. Moreover, synthetic glass representativeness is evaluated through a study focused on the effect of iron oxidation degree on the glass structure and leaching properties. A minor effect of Fe II on the forward rate and a negligible effect on the residual rate are shown. The residual rate is extrapolated at 5 C and compared to the mean alteration rate of natural samples of ages ranging from 1900 to 10 7 years. Non-zeolitized natural glasses follow this linear tendency, suggesting a control of the long-term rate by clayey secondary phase precipitation. Natural environments are open environments: a parametric study was performed in order to quantify the water flow rate effect on chemical composition of the alteration layer. When applied to two natural samples, the obtained laws provide coherent results. It seems possible to unify the descriptive approach from the study of natural environments to the mechanistic approach developed at the laboratory. The next step will consist in developing a model to transpose these results to nuclear glasses. (author) [fr

  5. Beta cloth durability assessment for Space Station Freedom (SSF) Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blanket covers

    Koontz, S.L.; Jacobs, S.; Le, J.

    1993-03-01

    MLI blankets for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) must comply with general program requirements and recommendations for long life and durability in the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Atomic oxygen and solar ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet are the most important factors in the SSF natural environment which affect materials life. Two types of Beta cloth (Teflon coated woven glass fabric), which had been proposed as MLI blanket covers, were tested for long-term durability in the LEO environment. General resistance to atomic oxygen attack and permeation were evaluated in the high velocity atomic oxygen beam system at Los Alamos National Laboratories. Long-term exposure to the LEO environment was simulated in the laboratory using a radio frequency oxygen plasma asher. The plasma asher treated Beta cloth specimens were tested for thermo-optical properties and mechanical durability. Space exposure data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility and the Intelsat Solar Array Coupon were also used in the durability assessment. Beta cloth fabricated to Rockwell specification MBO 135-027 (Chemglas 250) was shown to have acceptable durability for general use as an MLI blanket cover material in the LEO environment while Sheldahl G414500 should be used only in locations which are protected from direct Ram atomic oxygen

  6. Inelastic neutron scattering from glass formers

    Buchenau, U.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron spectra below and above the glass transition temperature show a pronounced difference between strong and fragile glass formers in Angell's fragility scheme. The strong anharmonic increase of the inelastic scattering with increasing temperature in fragile substances is absent in the strongest glass former SiO 2 . That difference is reflected in the temperature dependence of Brillouin sound velocities above the glass transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of sound waves and local modes at the low frequency boson peak. A relation between the fragility and the temperature dependence of the transverse hypersound velocity at the glass temperature is derived. (author)

  7. Production and remediation of low-sludge, simulated Purex waste glasses, 1: Effects of sludge oxide additions on melter operation

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Glass produced during the Purex 4 campaigns of the Integrated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter System (IDMS) and the 774 Research Melter contained a lower fraction of sludge components than targeted by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Purex 4 glass was more durable than the benchmark (EA) glass, but less durable than most simulated SRS high-level waste glasses. Also, Purex 4 glass was considerably less durable than predicted by the algorithm which will be used to control production of DWPF glass. A melter run was performed using the 774 Research Melter to determine if the initial PCCS target composition determined for Purex 4 would produce acceptable glass whose durability could be accurately modeled by Hydration Thermodynamics. Reagent grade oxides and carbonates were added to Purex 4 melter feed stock to simulate a higher sludge loading. Each canister of glass produced was sampled and the composition, crystallinity, and durability was determined. This document details the melter operation and composition and crystallinity analyses

  8. Glass as a waste form for the immobilization of plutonium

    Bates, J.K.; Ellison, A.J.G.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several alternatives for disposal of surplus plutonium are being considered. One method is incorporating Pu into glass and in this paper we discuss the development and corrosion behavior of an alkali-tin-silicate glass and update results in testing Pu doped Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference glasses. The alkali-tin-silicate glass was engineered to accommodate a high Pu loading and to be durable under conditions likely to accelerate glass reaction. The glass dissolves about 7 wt% Pu together with the neutron absorber Gd, and under test conditions expected to accelerate the glass reaction with water, is resistant to corrosion. The Pu and the Gd are released from the glass at nearly the same rate in static corrosion tests in water, and are not segregated into surface alteration phases when the glass is reacted in water vapor. Similar results for the behavior of Pu and Gd are found for the DWPF reference glasses, although the long-term rate of reaction for the reference glasses is more rapid than for the alkali-tin-silicate glass

  9. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased

  10. Pressure dependence of the elastic constants and vibrational anharmonicity of Pd sub 3 sub 9 Ni sub 1 sub 0 Cu sub 3 sub 0 P sub 2 sub 1 bulk metallic glass

    Wang Li; Sun, L L; Wang, W H; Wang, W K

    2003-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the acoustic velocities of a Pd sub 3 sub 9 Ni sub 1 sub 0 Cu sub 3 sub 0 P sub 2 sub 1 bulk metallic glass have been investigated up to 0.5 GPa at room temperature with the pulse echo overlap method. Two independent second-order elastic coefficients C sub 1 sub 1 and C sub 4 sub 4 and their pressure derivatives are yielded. The vibrational anharmonicity is shown by calculating both the acoustic mode Grueneisen parameters in the long-wavelength limit and the thermal Grueneisen parameter, and this result is compared with that for the Pd sub 4 sub 0 Ni sub 4 sub 0 P sub 2 sub 0 bulk glass.

  11. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  12. Utilization of borosilicate glass for transuranic waste immobilization

    Ledford, J.A.; Williams, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Incinerated transuranic waste and other low-level residues have been successfully vitrified by mixing with boric acid and sodium carbonate and heating to 1050 0 C in a bench-scale continuous melter. The resulting borosilicate glass demonstrates excellent mechanical durability and chemical stability

  13. Integrated durability process in product development

    Pompetzki, M.; Saadetian, H.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation describes the integrated durability process in product development. Each of the major components of the integrated process are described along with a number of examples of how integrated durability assessment has been used in the ground vehicle industry. The durability process starts with the acquisition of loading information, either physically through loads measurement or virtually through multibody dynamics. The loading information is then processed and characterized for further analysis. Durability assessment was historically test based and completed through field or laboratory evaluation. Today, it is common that both the test and CAE environments are used together in durability assessment. Test based durability assessment is used for final design sign-off but is also critically important for correlating CAE models, in order to investigate design alternatives. There is also a major initiative today to integrate the individual components into a process, by linking applications and providing a framework to communicate information as well as manage all the data involved in the entire process. Although a single process is presented, the details of the process can vary significantly for different products and applications. Recent applications that highlight different parts of the durability process are given. As well as an example of how integration of software tools between different disciplines (MBD, FE and fatigue) not only simplifies the process, but also significantly improves it. (author)

  14. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    Murthi, Vivek S.; Izzo, Elise; Bi, Wu; Guerrero, Sandra; Protsailo, Lesia

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE's stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  15. Degradation of glass in the soil

    Romich, H.; Gerlach, S.; Mottner, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fur Silicatforschung (ISC), Wertheim-Bronnbach (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Glass has been produced and used in Europe for over 2000 years. Glass objects from the Roman period onwards have been excavated during the last centuries. In general, Roman glass is chemically quite stable, and often the only sign of chemical alteration is an iridescent surface, caused by the leaching of cations, which leads to the formation of a hydrated silica-rich layer. Medieval potash glasses are much less durable, and their surfaces are often found deeply leached, sometimes to a point that no unaltered glass remains. These surfaces may be coherent, though fragile, or they are laminar, with no cohesion between the layers at all. In this study an analytical examination of a series of fragments of archaeological glass retrieved from different sites near Cologne and Stuttgart (Germany) has been carried out. Samples of corroded glasses were analysed by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX (surface and cross sections) in order to obtain information about the chemical composition of the bulk glass and the weathered layers. Since the environmental parameters have constantly varied for archaeological objects, mechanistic studies have to rely on laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. For an extensive exposure programme standardised soil or natural garden earth was used, for which the pH was modified. Several corrosion sensitive potash-lime silicate glasses have been designed to study the effect of glass composition. A model glass consisting of SiO{sub 2} (54.2), CaO (28.8) and K{sub 2}O (17.0 weight-%) mostly lead to the formation of a crust on the leached layer, with a total thickness of 100 micrometer (for soil with pH 7 to 8, 12 months exposure). Model glasses also containing Al, Mg and P have built up preferably laminated structures (total thickness up to 200 micrometer). This presentation will give an overview about the variety of degradation phenomena observed on originals and compare the results with controlled laboratory

  16. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  17. SETTLING OF SPINEL IN A HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS MELTER

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 decrees C to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling

  18. Glass compositions

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  19. Fracture Resistance, Surface Defects and Structural Strength of Glass

    Rodichev, Y.M.; Veer, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper poses the theory that the fracture resistance of basic float glass is dependent on it physicochemical properties and the surface defects fonned under the float glass production, glass processing and handling at the service conditions compose the aggregate basis for structural glass

  20. On-line redox sensors in industrial glass melting tanks

    Laimböck, P.R.; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Schaaf, van der J.; Kieffer, J.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation state or partial oxygen pressure (pO2) of the glass melt influences many glass melt and glass product properties such as fining and foaming behavior, radiant heat transfer, forming characteristics via (a color-dependent) cooling rate, and the glass color of the final product. For these

  1. Product consistency testing of three reference glasses in stainless steel and perfluoroalkoxy resin vessels

    Olson, K.M.; Smith, G.L.; Marschman, S.C.

    1995-03-01

    Because of their chemical durability, silicate glasses have been proposed and researched since the mid-1950s as a medium for incorporating high-level radioactive waste (HLW) generated from processing of nuclear materials. A number of different waste forms were evaluated and ranked in the early 1980s; durability (leach resistance) was the highest weighted factor. Borosilicate glass was rated the best waste form available for incorporation of HLW. Four different types of vessels and three different glasses were used to study the possible effect of vessel composition on durability test results from the Production Consistency Test (PCT). The vessels were 45-m 304 stainless steel vessels, 150-m 304 L stainless steel vessels, and 60-m perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) fluoropolymer resin vessels. The three glasses were the Environmental Assessment glass manufactured by Corning Incorporated and supplied by Westinghouse Savannah River company, and West Valley Nuclear Services reference glasses 5 and 6, manufactured and supplied by Catholic University of America. Within experimental error, no differences were found in durability test results using the 3 different glasses in the 304L stainless steel or PFA fluoropolymer resin vessels over the seven-day test period

  2. Ag2O dependent up-conversion luminescence properties in Tm3+/Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses

    Hu, Yuebo; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Zhou, Dacheng

    2014-01-01

    Up-conversion (UC) luminescence properties of Ag/Tm 3+ /Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses have been studied to assess the effective role of silver nanoparticles as a sensitizer for Tm 3+ and Er 3+ ions. The X-ray diffraction patterns obtained in this work do not reveal any crystalline phase in the glass. However, the absorption spectra reveal that surface plasmons resonance band of Ag undergoes a distinct split with two maxima and a very broad absorption peak with a background that extends toward the near infrared (NIR) with the increasing of Ag 2 O added concentration. Transmission electron microscope images confirm that silver nanoparticles have been precipitated from matrix glasses and show their distribution, size, and shapes. In addition, changes in UC luminescence intensity of four emission bands 476, 524, 546, and 658 nm corresponding to 1 G 4 → 3 H 6 (Tm 3+ ), ( 2 H 11/2 , 4 S 3/2 ) → 4 I 15/2 (Er 3+ ), and 4 F 9/2 → 4 I 15/2 (Er 3+ ) transitions, respectively, as a function of silver addition to the base composition have been measured under 980 nm excitation. It is confirmed that Ag 2 O added concentration plays an important role in increasing the UC luminescence intensity; however, further increase in Ag 2 O added concentration reduces the intensity

  3. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    Hendy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  4. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  5. Evolutionary model of an anonymous consumer durable market

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    An analytic model is presented that considers the evolution of a market of durable goods. The model suggests that after introduction goods spread always according to a Bass diffusion. However, this phase will be followed by a diffusion process for durable consumer goods governed by a variation-selection-reproduction mechanism and the growth dynamics can be described by a replicator equation. The theory suggests that products play the role of species in biological evolutionary models. It implies that the evolution of man-made products can be arranged into an evolutionary tree. The model suggests that each product can be characterized by its product fitness. The fitness space contains elements of both sites of the market, supply and demand. The unit sales of products with a higher product fitness compared to the mean fitness increase. Durables with a constant fitness advantage replace other goods according to a logistic law. The model predicts in particular that the mean price exhibits an exponential decrease over a long time period for durable goods. The evolutionary diffusion process is directly related to this price decline and is governed by Gompertz equation. Therefore it is denoted as Gompertz diffusion. Describing the aggregate sales as the sum of first, multiple and replacement purchase the product life cycle can be derived. Replacement purchase causes periodic variations of the sales determined by the finite lifetime of the good (Juglar cycles). The model suggests that both, Bass- and Gompertz diffusion may contribute to the product life cycle of a consumer durable. The theory contains the standard equilibrium view of a market as a special case. It depends on the time scale, whether an equilibrium or evolutionary description is more appropriate. The evolutionary framework is used to derive also the size, growth rate and price distribution of manufacturing business units. It predicts that the size distribution of the business units (products) is lognormal

  6. Fabrication, characterization, and evaluation of a fully radioactive glass

    Olson, K.M.; Elliott, M.L.; Shade, J.W.; Smith, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    West Valley Sludge Glass-1 (WVSG-1) was fabricated using high-level waste from the West Valley Demonstration Project. Melt foaming was a problem during fabrication and a unique two-step funnel system was designed to feed the melting calcine into a crucible. The resultant glass was essentially bubble free. Crushed WVSG-1 was tested for durability using the Product Consistency Test developed at WSRC. Except for Al, the release of nonradioactive elements from WVSG-1 was lower than the release of the same elements from ATM-10, the West Valley reference glass and the release of the radionuclides Th, U, and Tc was about the same as for ATM-10

  7. Numerical study of the glass-glass transition in short-ranged attractive colloids

    Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero

    2004-01-01

    We report extensive numerical simulations in the glass region for a simple model of short-ranged attractive colloids, the square well model. We investigate the behaviour of the density autocorrelation function and of the static structure factor in the region of temperatures and packing fractions where a glass-glass transition is expected according to theoretical predictions. We strengthen our observations by studying both waiting time and history dependence of the numerical results. We provide evidence supporting the possibility that activated bond-breaking processes destabilize the attractive glass, preventing the full observation of a sharp glass-glass kinetic transition

  8. Quick test for durability factor estimation.

    2010-03-01

    The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) is considering the use of the AASHTO T 161 Durability Factor (DF) as an endresult : performance specification criterion for evaluation of paving concrete. However, the test method duration can exceed ...

  9. International Conference on Durability of Critical Infrastructure

    Cherepetskaya, Elena; Pospichal, Vaclav

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the International Conference on Durability of Critical Infrastructure. Monitoring and Testing held in Satov, Czech Republic from 6 to 9 December 2016. It discusses the developments in the theoretical and practical aspects in the fields of Safety, Sustainability and Durability of the Critical Infrastructure. The contributions are dealing with monitoring and testing of structural and composite materials with a new methods for their using for protection and prevention of the selected objects.

  10. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  11. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  12. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  13. Insight into silicate-glass corrosion mechanisms

    Cailleteau, C; Angeli, F; Gin, S; Jollivet, P [CEA VALRHO, DEN, Lab Etude Comportement Long Terme, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Devreux, F [Ecole Polytech, CNRS, Lab Phys Mat Condensee, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Jestin, J [CEA, CNRS, Lab Leon Brillouin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Spalla, O [CEA, DSM, Lab Interdisciplinaire Org Nanometr et Supramol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The remarkable chemical durability of silicate glass makes it suitable for a wide range of applications. The slowdown of the aqueous glass corrosion kinetics that is frequently observed at long time is generally attributed to chemical affinity effects (saturation of the solution with respect to silica). Here, we demonstrate a new mechanism and highlight the impact of morphological transformations in the alteration layer on the leaching kinetics. A direct correlation between structure and reactivity is revealed by coupling the results of several structure-sensitive experiments with numerical simulations at mesoscopic scale. The sharp drop in the corrosion rate is shown to arise from densification of the outer layers of the alteration film, leading to pore closure. The presence of insoluble elements in the glass can inhibit the film restructuring responsible for this effect. This mechanism may be more broadly applicable to silicate minerals. (authors)

  14. Experimental studies of glued Aluminum-glass joints

    Ligaj, B.; Wirwicki, M.; Karolewska, K.; Jasińska, A.

    2018-04-01

    Glued steel-glass or aluminum-glass joints are to be found, among other things, in vehicles (cars, buses, trains, trams) as windscreen assembly pieces for the supporting structure. For the purposes of the experiments, samples were made in which the top beam was made of the AW-2017A aluminum alloy and the bottom beam was made of thermally reinforced soda-lime glass whereas the glued joints were made of one-component polyurethane glue Körapur 175. The tests were performed under four-point bending conditions at monotonic incremental bending moment values on the Instron 5965 durability machine. The experimental study of the durability of glued joints under four-point bending conditions with the monotonic incremental bending moment allows to determine the values of stresses, whose value is related to initiation of damage of the tested joint.

  15. Durable transparent carbon nanotube films for flexible device components

    Sierros, K.A.; Hecht, D.S.; Banerjee, D.A.; Morris, N.J.; Hu, L.; Irvin, G.C.; Lee, R.S.; Cairns, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a durable carbon nanotube (CNT) film for flexible devices and its mechanical properties. Films as thin as 10 nm thick have properties approaching those of existing electrodes based on indium tin oxide (ITO) but with significantly improved mechanical properties. In uniaxial tension, strains as high as 25% are required for permanent damage and at lower strains resistance changes are slight and consistent with elastic deformation of the individual CNTs. A simple model confirms that changes in electrical resistance are described by a Poisson's ratio of 0.22. These films are also durable to cyclic loading, and even at peak strains of 10% no significant damage occurs after 250 cycles. The scratch resistance is also high as measured by nanoscratch, and for a 50 μm tip a load of 140 mN is required to cause initial failure. This is more than 5 times higher than is required to cause cracking in ITO. The robustness of the transparent conductive coating leads to significant improvement in device performance. In touch screen devices fabricated using CNT no failure occurs after a million actuations while for devices based on ITO electrodes 400,000 cycles are needed to cause failure. These durable electrodes hold the key to developing robust, large-area, lightweight, optoelectronic devices such as lighting, displays, electronic-paper, and printable solar cells. Such devices could hold the key to producing inexpensive green energy, providing reliable solid-state lighting, and significantly reducing our dependence on paper.

  16. Reliability algorithms applied to reinforced concrete structures durability assessment

    C. G. Nogueira

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the analysis of probabilistic corrosion time initiation in reinforced concrete structures exposed to ions chloride penetration. Structural durability is an important criterion which must be evaluated in every type of structure, especially when these structures are constructed in aggressive atmospheres. Considering reinforced concrete members, chloride diffusion process is widely used to evaluate the durability. Therefore, at modelling this phenomenon, corrosion of reinforcements can be better estimated and prevented. These processes begin when a threshold level of chlorides concentration is reached at the steel bars of reinforcements. Despite the robustness of several models proposed in the literature, deterministic approaches fail to predict accurately the corrosion time initiation due to the inherently randomness observed in this process. In this regard, the durability can be more realistically represented using probabilistic approaches. A probabilistic analysis of ions chloride penetration is presented in this paper. The ions chloride penetration is simulated using the Fick's second law of diffusion. This law represents the chloride diffusion process, considering time dependent effects. The probability of failure is calculated using Monte Carlo simulation and the First Order Reliability Method (FORM with a direct coupling approach. Some examples are considered in order to study these phenomena and a simplified method is proposed to determine optimal values for concrete cover.

  17. Durability of ink jet prints

    Dobric, E; Mirkovic, I Bolanca; Bolanca, Z

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the result presentation of some optical properties research for ink jet prints after: exposing the prints to the mixed daylight and artificial light, exposing of prints to the sun-light through the glass window, and exposing of prints to outdoor conditions during the summer months. The prints obtained by piezoelectric and thermal ink jet technologies were used in the researches. The dye-based inks and the pigmented inks based on water and the low solvent inks were used. The results of these researches, except the scientific contribution in the domain of understanding and explaining the environmental conditions on the gamut size, i.e. the range of color tonality, colorimetric stability and print quality, can be used by the ink and paper manufacturers in new formulations, offer data for the printer producers for further production and evaluation of the position of their products.

  18. Immobilization of hazardous and radioactive waste into glass structures

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of more than three decades of international research, glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization of a wide range of potentially hazardous radioactive and non-radioactive materials. The ability of glass structures to incorporate and then immobilize many different elements into durable, high integrity, waste glass products is a direct function of the unique random network structure of the glassy state. Every major country involved with long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has either selected or is considering glass as the matrix of choice for immobilizing and ultimately, disposing of the potentially hazardous, high-level radioactive material. There are many reasons why glass is preferred. Among the most important considerations are the ability of glass structures to accommodate and immobilize the many different types of radionuclides present in HLW, and to produce a product that not only has excellent technical properties, but also possesses good processing features. Good processability allows the glass to be fabricated with relative ease even under difficult remote-handling conditions necessary for vitrification of highly radioactive material. The single most important property of the waste glass produced is its ability to retain hazardous species within the glass structure and this is reflected by its excellent chemical durability and corrosion resistance to a wide range of environmental conditions. In addition to immobilization of HLW glass matrices are also being considered for isolation of many other types of hazardous materials, both radioactive as well as nonradioactive. This includes vitrification of various actinides resulting from clean-up operations and the legacy of the cold war, as well as possible immobilization of weapons grade plutonium resulting from disarmament activities. Other types of wastes being considered for immobilization into glasses include transuranic wastes, mixed wastes, contaminated

  19. Reuse of ground waste glass as aggregate for mortars.

    Corinaldesi, V; Gnappi, G; Moriconi, G; Montenero, A

    2005-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying the possibility of reusing waste glass from crushed containers and building demolition as aggregate for preparing mortars and concrete. At present, this kind of reuse is still not common due to the risk of alkali-silica reaction between the alkalis of cement and silica of the waste glass. This expansive reaction can cause great problems of cracking and, consequently, it can be extremely deleterious for the durability of mortar and concrete. However, data reported in the literature show that if the waste glass is finely ground, under 75mum, this effect does not occur and mortar durability is guaranteed. Therefore, in this work the possible reactivity of waste glass with the cement paste in mortars was verified, by varying the particle size of the finely ground waste glass. No reaction has been detected with particle size up to 100mum thus indicating the feasibility of the waste glass reuse as fine aggregate in mortars and concrete. In addition, waste glass seems to positively contribute to the mortar micro-structural properties resulting in an evident improvement of its mechanical performance.

  20. The current status of glass leaching studies in France

    Laude, F.

    1983-11-01

    Glass has been selected in France as the material used to confine the activity of fission product solutions, and a continuous vitrification process has been developed at the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), the first industrial plant. Borosilicate glass was chosen in various compositions for its properties: it is a homogeneous, non-porous material that incorporates appreciable quantities of most of the fission product oxides, and is only alterable at the surface interface layer. Glass thus constitutes the primary radioactivity containment barrier, and it is essential to determine its long-term behavior. Water constitutes the principal hazard during temporary or definitive storage of the glass blocks. Two types of inherent material properties are studied from the standpoint of glass stability under leaching conditions: - chemical durability; - radioactive containability with regard to the various radionuclides, fission products and especially the actinides. Durability tests are carried out in SOXHLET devices and the alteration rates are measured by the weight loss. The containability is measured by the leach rate, i.e. by the rate of activity loss into the water. Leaching tests are conducted for several major objectives: - selection of glass compositions (leach rates); - leaching mechanism studies (hydrolyzed layer characteristics, effects of temperature, pressure, pH, etc.); - long-term behavior studies (glass specimens doped with alpha-emitters); - simulation of geological repository environments [fr

  1. Composition and property measurements for PHA Phase 4 glasses

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    The results presented in this report are for nine Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) Phase 4 glasses. Three of the glasses contained HM sludge at 22, 26, and 30 wt% respectively, 10 wt% PHA and 1.25 wt% monosodium titanate (MST), all on an oxide basis. The remaining six glasses were selected from the Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies (Purex sludge) but with an increased amount of MST. The high-end target for MST of 2.5 wt% oxide was missed in Phases 1 and 2 due to ∼30 wt% water content of the MST. A goal of this Phase 4 study was to determine whether this increase in titanium concentration from the MST had any impact on glass quality or processibility. Two of the glasses, pha14c and pha15c, were rebatched and melted due to apparent batching errors with pha14 and pha15. The models currently in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) were used to predict durability, homogeneity, liquidus, and viscosity for these nine glasses. All of the HM glasses and half of the Purex glasses were predicted to be phase separated, and consequently prediction of glass durability is precluded with the cument models for those glasses that failed the homogeneity constraint. If one may ignore the homogeneity constraint, the measured durabilities were within the 95% prediction limits of the model. Further efforts will be required to resolve this issue on phase separation (inhomogeneity). The liquidus model predicted unacceptable liquidus temperatures for four of the nine glasses. The approximate, bounding liquidus temperatures measured for all had upper limits of 1,000 C or less. Given the fact that liquidus temperatures were only approximated, the 30 wt% loading of Purex may be near or at the edge of acceptability for liquidus. The measured viscosities were close to the predictions of the model. For the Purex glasses, pha12c and pha15c, the measured viscosities of 28 and 23 poise, respectively, indicate that DWPF processing may be compromised

  2. Study of phase separation and crystallization phenomena in soda-lime borosilicate glass enriched in MoO3

    Magnin, M.

    2009-09-01

    Molybdenum oxide immobilization (MoO 3 , as fission product) is one of the major challenges in the nuclear glass formulation issues for high level waste solutions conditioning since many years, these solutions arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Phase separation and crystallisation processes may arise in molten glass when the MoO 3 content is higher than its solubility limit that may depend on glass composition. Molybdenum combined with other elements such as alkali and alkaline-earth may form crystalline molybdates, known as 'yellow phases' in nuclear glasses which may decrease the glass durability. In order to confine high level wastes (HLW) such as the fission product solutions arising from the reprocessing of high burn-up UOX-type nuclear spent fuels, a new glass composition (HLW glass) is being optimized. This work is devoted to the study of the origin and the mechanism of phase separation and crystallization phenomena induced by molybdenum oxide incorporation in the HLW glass. From microstructural and structural point of view, the molybdenum oxide behavior was studied in glass compositions belonging to the SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 - Na 2 O-CaO simplified system which constituted basis for the HLW glass formulation. The structural role of molybdenum oxide in borosilicate network explaining the phase separation and crystallization tendency was studied through the coupling of structural ( 95 Mo, 29 Si, 11 B, 23 Na MAS NMR, XRD) and microstructural (SEM, HRTEM) analysis techniques. The determination of phase separation (critical temperature) and crystallization (liquidus temperature) appearance temperatures by in situ viscosimetry and Raman spectroscopy experiments allowed us to propose a transformation scenario during melt cooling. These processes and the nature of the crystalline phases formed (CaMoO 4 , Na 2 MoO 4 ) that depend on the evolution of MoO 3 , CaO and B 2 O 3 contents were correlated with changes of sodium and calcium cations proportions in the

  3. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  4. VIS-IR transmitting BGG glass windows

    Bayya, Shyam S.; Chin, Geoff D.; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.

    2003-09-01

    BaO-Ga2O3-GeO2 (BGG) glasses have the desired properties for various window applications in the 0.5-5 μm wavelength region. These glasses are low cost alternatives to the currently used window materials. Fabrication of a high optical quality 18" diameter BGG glass window has been demonstrated with a transmitted wave front error of λ/10 at 632 nm. BGG substrates have also been successfully tested for environmental weatherability (MIL-F-48616) and rain erosion durability up to 300 mph. Preliminary EMI grids have been successfully applied on BGG glasses demonstrating attenuation of 20dB in X and Ku bands. Although the mechanical properties of BGG glasses are acceptable for various window applications, it is demonstrated here that the properties can be further improved significantly by the glassceramization process. The ceramization process does not add any significant cost to the final window material. The crystallite size in the present glass-ceramic limits its transmission to the 2-5 μm region.

  5. Characteristics of radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters

    Ito, Masashi; Shiraishi, Akemi; Murakami, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, a film badge is recently replaced by a new type radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimeter for external personal monitoring. Some fundamental characteristics of this dosimeter, such as dose dependence linearity, energy dependence, angular dependence, dose evaluation accuracy at mixed irradiation conditions, fading, etc., were examined at the Facility of Radiation Standard (FRS), JAERI. The results have proved that the RPL glass dosimeter has sufficient characteristics for practical use as a personal dosimeter for all of the items examined. (author)

  6. Preparation of orthophosphate glasses in the MgO-CaO-SiO2-Nb2O5-P2O5 system.

    Lee, Sungho; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki; Nakano, Takayoshi; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Niobia/magnesia-containing orthophosphate invert glasses were successfully prepared in our earlier work. Orthophosphate groups in the glasses were cross-linked by tetrahedral niobia (NbO4) and magnesia. The aim of this work is to prepare calcium orthophosphate invert glasses containing magnesia and niobia, incorporating silica, and to evaluate their structures and releasing behaviors. The glasses were prepared by melt-quenching, and their structures and ion-releasing behaviors were evaluated. 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies showed the glasses consist of orthophosphate (PO4), orthosilicate (SiO4), and NbO4 tetrahedra. NbO4 and MgO in the glasses act as network formers. By incorporating SiO2 into the glasses, the chemical durability of the glasses was slightly improved. The glasses reheated at 800°C formed the orthophosphate crystalline phases, such as β-Ca3(PO4)2, Mg3(PO4)2 and Mg3Ca3(PO4)4 in the glasses. The chemical durability of the crystallized glasses was slightly improved. Orthosilicate groups and NbO4 in the glasses coordinated with each other to form Si-O-Nb bonds. The chemical durability of the glasses was slightly improved by addition of SiO2, since the field strength of Si is larger than that of Ca or Mg.

  7. Assessment of Savannah River borosilicate glass in the repository environment

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-04-01

    Since 1973, borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In 1977, efforts began to develop and test the large-scale equipment necessary to convert the alkaline waste slurries at SRP into a durable borosilicate glass. A process has now been developed for the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which will annually produce approximately 500 canisters of SRP waste glass which will be stored on an interim basis on the Savannah River site. Current national policy calls for the permanent disposal of high-level waste in deep geologic repositories. In the repository environment, SRP waste glass will eventually be exposed to such stresses as lithostatic or hydrostatic pressures, radiation fields, and self-heating due to radioactive decay. In addition, producing and handling each canister of glass will also expose the glass to thermal and mechanical stresses. An important objective of the extensive glass characterization and testing programs of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has been to determine how these stresses affect the performance of SRP waste glass. The results of these programs indicate that: these stresses will not significantly affect the performance of borosilicate glass containing SRP waste; and SRP waste glass will effectively immobilize hazardous radionuclides in the repository environment

  8. Fracture Resistance, Surface Defects and Structural Strength of Glass

    Rodichev, Y.M.; Veer, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper poses the theory that the fracture resistance of basic float glass is dependent on it physicochemical properties and the surface defects fonned under the float glass production, glass processing and handling at the service conditions compose the aggregate basis for structural glass strength assessment. The effect of loading conditions, constructional and technological factors on the engineering strength of glass can be evaluated in certain cases using fracture mechanics with inform...

  9. Nitrate glass

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  10. Performance of a buried radioactive high level waste (HLW) glass after 24 years

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Bibler, Ned E.; Peeler, David K.; John Plodinec, M.

    2008-01-01

    A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in a lysimeter in the SRS burial ground for 24 years. Lysimeter leachate data was available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed this. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with results of other laboratory and field tests. Radionuclide profiling for alpha, beta, and 137 Cs indicated that Pu was not enriched in the soil while 137 Cs and 9 deg. C Sr were enriched in the first few centimeters surrounding the glass. Lysimeter leachate data indicated that 9 deg. C Sr and 137 Cs leaching from the glass was diffusion controlled

  11. Nuclear waste glass product consistency test (PCT), Version 5.0

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Ramsey, W.G.; Waters, B.J.

    1992-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), poured into stainless steel canisters, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS), the durability of the glass needs to be measured during production to assure its long term stability and radionuclide release properties. A durability test, designated the Produce Consistency Test (PCT), was developed for DWPF glass in order to meet the WAPS requirements. The response of the PCT procedure was based on extensive testing with glasses of widely different compositions. The PCT was determined to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, and to be easily performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. Version 5.0 of the PCT procedure is attached

  12. The influence of SiO2 Addition on 2MgO-Al2O3-3.3P2O5 Glass

    Larsen, P.H.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1999-01-01

    2MgO-Al2O3-3.3P2O5 glasses with increasing amounts of SiO2 are considered for sealing applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). The change in chemical durability under SOFC anode conditions and the linear thermal expansion is measured as functions of the SiO2 concentration. Raman spectroscopy...... analysis of the glasses reveals no sign of important changes in the glass structure upon SiO2 addition. Some increase in glass durability with SiO2 concentration is reported and its cause is discussed....

  13. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  14. Bioactive glass induced osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells is dependent on cell attachment mechanism and mitogen-activated protein kinases

    M Ojansivu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses (BaGs are widely utilised in bone tissue engineering (TE but the molecular response of cells to BaGs is poorly understood. To elucidate the mechanisms of cell attachment to BaGs and BaG-induced early osteogenic differentiation, we cultured human adipose stem cells (hASCs on discs of two silica-based BaGs S53P4 (23.0 Na2O - 20.0 CaO - 4.0 P2O5 - 53.0 SiO2 (wt-% and 1-06 (5.9 Na2O - 12.0 K2O - 5.3 MgO - 22.6 CaO - 4.0 P2O5 - 0.2 B2O3 - 50.0 SiO2 in the absence of osteogenic supplements. Both BaGs induced early osteogenic differentiation by increasing alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP and the expression of osteogenic marker genes RUNX2a and OSTERIX. Based on ALP activity, the slower reacting 1-06 glass was a stronger osteoinducer. Regarding the cell attachment, cells cultured on BaGs had enhanced integrinβ1 and vinculin production, and mature focal adhesions were smaller but more dispersed than on cell culture plastic (polystyrene. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK-induced c-Jun phosphorylations were upregulated by glass contact. Moreover, the BaG-stimulated osteoinduction was significantly reduced by FAK and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors, indicating an important role for FAK and MAPKs in the BaG-induced early osteogenic commitment of hASCs. Upon indirect insert culture, the ions released from the BaG discs could not reproduce the observed cellular changes, which highlighted the role of direct cell-BaG interactions in the osteopotential of BaGs. These findings gave valuable insight into the mechanism of BaG-induced osteogenic differentiation and therefore provided knowledge to aid the future design of new functional biomaterials to meet the increasing demand for clinical bone TE treatments.

  15. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    Maddrell, Ewan; Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na 2 O–Al 2 O 3 –B 2 O 3 –SiO 2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  16. Temperature-dependent luminescence and temperature-stimulated NIR-to-VIS up-conversion in Nd3+-doped La2O3-Na2O-ZnO-TeO2 glasses

    Sobczyk, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Telluride glasses of the composition xNd2O3-(7-x)La2O3-3Na2O-25ZnO-65TeO2, where (0≤x≤7) were prepared by the melt quench technique. Some physical and optical properties of the glasses were evaluated. The thermal behavior i.e. glass transition and crystallization temperatures were studied by using TGA-DTA technique. Optical properties of Nd3+-doped telluride glasses were investigated between 298 and 700 K. Basing on the obtained values of J-O parameter values (×10-20 cm2: Ω2=4.49±0.84, Ω4=5.03±0.61, Ω6=4.31±0.73), the radiative transition probabilities (AT), radiative lifetimes (τR), fluorescence branching ratios (β) and emission cross-sections (σem) were calculated for the 4F3/2→4IJ/2 (where J=9, 11 and 13) transitions of Nd3+ ions. The τR value of the 4F3/2 level amount to 164 μs and is slightly higher than the measured decay time of 162 μs. With the increasing of Nd2O3 concentration from 0.5 to 7.0 mol% the experimental lifetime of the fluorescent level decreases from 162 to 5.6 μs. The estimated quantum efficiency amount to 100%, based on a comparison of τR and the experimental decay time of a slightly doped Nd3+ telluride glass. An analysis of the non-radiative decay was based on the cross-relaxation mechanisms. The 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F5/2→4I9/2 transitions were analyzed with respect to the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) and were found to be temperature dependent. Infrared-to-visible up-conversion emissions with a maximum at 603.0 and 635.3 nm were observed at high temperatures using the 804 nm excitation and are due to the 4G5/2→4I9/2 and 4G5/2→4I11/2 transitions of Nd3+ ions, respectively. The near quadratic dependence of fluorescence on excitation laser power confirms that two photons contribute to up-conversion of the orange emissions. The temperature-stimulated up-conversion excitation processes have been analyzed in detail. The optical results indicate that the investigated glasses are potentially applicable as a 1063 nm

  17. A generalized definition for waste form durability

    Fanning, T. H.; Bauer, T. H.; Morris, E. E.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    When evaluating waste form performance, the term ''durability'' often appears in casual discourse, but in the technical literature, the focus is often on waste form ''degradation'' in terms of mass lost per unit area per unit time. Waste form degradation plays a key role in developing models of the long-term performance in a repository environment, but other factors also influence waste form performance. These include waste form geometry; density, porosity, and cracking; the presence of cladding; in-package chemistry feedback; etc. The paper proposes a formal definition of waste form ''durability'' which accounts for these effects. Examples from simple systems as well as from complex models used in the Total System Performance Assessment of Yucca Mountain are provided. The application of ''durability'' in the selection of bounding models is also discussed

  18. Durability analysis of gneiss using wear resistance

    José Luiz Ernandes Dias Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted in gneiss in Santo Antonio de Pádua, RJ, BR, including durability analysis of the rock using slake durability test. Rocks in the region of Pádua are mostly used for ornamental purposes. A lab equipment was developed to evaluate the influence of rotation in the test, allowing for the speed variation of 7 RPM to 238 RPM. This study could be implemented in a wide variety of rock materials, targeting them according to their lifetime in the project. With variation of the wear levels, increasing weight loss was observed until the inertia moment in which the sample holds to the machine wall. The results indicate an increase in linear mass loss. These procedures allow a more precise analysis of durability than can be applied in different different regions of the world.

  19. Glass manufacturing through induction

    Boen, R.; Paya, B.; Roscini, M.; Fautrelle, Y.; Tuaz, F.; Delage, D.

    1991-01-01

    Oxides and glasses are electrical and thermal insulators, but show the characteristic of being weakly conductors of electricity when they are melt. It is then possible to heat them through HF induction. This interesting property allows the development of a melting process in cold crucible induction furnace. The process is being studied and developed by a consortium made up of CFEI, CEA Marcoule, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE and MADYLAM laboratory. The studies include 2 parts: a) One experimental part to develop the technology and research for satisfying configurations, through a small size platform (10 to 30 kg/h). The long run continuous pouring melting tests made on different kinds of glass allow to go-on with industrial range units. b) One theoretical part to understand the magneto-thermo-hydraulic phenomenon hardly in relation with the heavy dependence of the physical characteristics (electrical and heat conductivities, viscosity) according to temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs [fr

  20. Performance and durability testing of parabolic trough receivers

    Lei, Dongqiang; Fu, Xuqiang; Zhao, Dongming; Yuan, Guofeng; Wang, Zhifeng; Guo, Minghuan

    2017-06-01

    The paper describes the key performance and durability testing facilities of the parabolic trough receiver developed by Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The indoor heat loss test can be applied at 4-7 different temperature levels within 200-550 on receivers. The optical efficiency test bench consists of 12 metal halide lamps as the solar simulator and a 5 m length half-elliptical cylinder reflector with flat end reflectors. 3 ultra-precision temperature sensors are used in receiver each end to get the temperature difference. The residual gas analysis test bench is applied to analyze and predict the vacuum lifetime of the receiver. It can test the variations of composition and partial pressure of residual gases with temperature and time in the receiver annulus space by a high sensitivity quadrupole mass spectrometer gas analyzer. A coating accelerated ageing test bench, which is also used to test the thermal cycle, has been developed. This test bench uses the absorber tube of the recevier as the resistance heater to heat up the whole receiver. The coating lifetime can be predicted by the Arrhenius parameters. For the cycling test, the compressed air is used to directly cool the inner surface of the absorber tube. The thermal cycling test is performed with temperature cycles from 150 °C to 450 °C for 160 cycles. The maximum thermal cycling frequency is 8 cycles per day. The mechanical fatigue test bench is used to test the bellows and the glass-to-metal seals durability at the same time. Both bellows are expanded and compressed to 6.5 mm in turn with 10,000 cycles. A new rotating test bench was also developed to test the thermal efficiency of the receiver.

  1. Pyramiding for Resistance Durability: Theory and Practice.

    Mundt, Chris

    2018-04-12

    Durable disease resistance is a key component of global food security, and combining resistance genes into "pyramids" is an important way to increase durability of resistance. The mechanisms by which pyramids impact durability are not well known. The traditional view of resistance pyramids considers the use of major resistance gene (R-gene) combinations deployed against pathogens that are primarily asexual. Interestingly, published examples of the successful use of pyramids in the traditional sense are rare. In contrast, most published descriptions of durable pyramids in practice are for cereal rusts, and tend to indicate an association between durability and cultivars combining major R-genes with incompletely expressed, adult plant resistance genes. Pyramids have been investigated experimentally for a diversity of pathogens, and many reduce disease levels below that of the single best gene. Resistance gene combinations have been identified through phenotypic reactions, molecular markers, and challenge against effector genes. As resistance genes do not express equally in all genetic backgrounds, however, a combination of genetic information and phenotypic analyses provide the ideal scenario for testing of putative pyramids. Not all resistance genes contribute equally to pyramids, and approaches have been suggested to identify the best genes and combinations of genes for inclusion. Combining multiple resistance genes into a single plant genotype quickly is a challenge that is being addressed through alternative breeding approaches, as well as through genomics tools such as resistance gene cassettes and gene editing. Experimental and modeling tests of pyramid durability are in their infancy, but have promise to help direct future studies of pyramids. Several areas for further work on resistance gene pyramids are suggested.

  2. Technetium Incorporation in Glass for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    A priority of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) is to dispose of nuclear wastes accumulated in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. These nuclear wastes date from the Manhattan Project of World War II and from plutonium production during the Cold War. The DOE plans to separate high-level radioactive wastes from low activity wastes and to treat each of the waste streams by vitrification (immobilization of the nuclides in glass) for disposal. The immobilized low-activity waste will be disposed of here at Hanford and the immobilized high-level waste at the national geologic repository. Included in the inventory of highly radioactive wastes is large volumes of 99Tc (~9 × 10E2 TBq or ~2.5 × 104 Ci or ~1500 kg). A problem facing safe disposal of Tc-bearing wastes is the processing of waste feed into in a chemically durable waste form. Technetium incorporates poorly into silicate glass in traditional glass melting. It readily evaporates during melting of glass feeds and out of the molten glass, leading to a spectrum of high-to-low retention (ca. 20 to 80%) in the cooled glass product. DOE-ORP currently has a program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Rutgers University and in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University that seeks to understand aspects of Tc retention by means of studying Tc partitioning, molten salt formation, volatilization pathways, and cold cap chemistry. Another problem involves the stability of Tc in glass in both the national geologic repository and on-site disposal after it has been immobilized. The major environmental concern with 99Tc is its high mobility in addition to a long half-life (2.1×105 yrs). The pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) is highly soluble in water and does not adsorb well onto the surface of minerals and so migrates nearly at the same velocity as groundwater

  3. Probabilistic Durability Analysis in Advanced Engineering Design

    A. Kudzys

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Expedience of probabilistic durability concepts and approaches in advanced engineering design of building materials, structural members and systems is considered. Target margin values of structural safety and serviceability indices are analyzed and their draft values are presented. Analytical methods of the cumulative coefficient of correlation and the limit transient action effect for calculation of reliability indices are given. Analysis can be used for probabilistic durability assessment of carrying and enclosure metal, reinforced concrete, wood, plastic, masonry both homogeneous and sandwich or composite structures and some kinds of equipments. Analysis models can be applied in other engineering fields.

  4. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Nielsen, Laila

    1997-01-01

    (capillary water uptake) is used, involving an in-situ method and a laboratory method. Three different concrete qualities as well as steel fibres (ZP) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared to results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without......Durability studies are carried out by subjecting FRC-beams to combined mechanical and environmental load. Mechanical load is obtained by exposing beams to il-point bending until a predefined crack width is reached, using a newly developed test setup. As environmental load, exposure to water...

  5. Properties and solubility of chrome in iron alumina phosphate glasses containing high level nuclear waste

    Huang, W.; Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.; Kim, C.W.; Reis, S.T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical durability, glass formation tendency, and other properties of iron alumina phosphate glasses containing 70 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW), doped with different amounts of Cr 2 O 3 , have been investigated. All of the iron alumina phosphate glasses had an outstanding chemical durability as measured by their small dissolution rate (1 . 10 -9 g/(cm 2 . min)) in deionized water at 90 C for 128 d, their low normalized mass release as determined by the product consistency test (PCT) and a barely measurable corrosion rate of 2 . d) after 7 d at 200 C by the vapor hydration test (VHT). The solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 in the iron phosphate melts was estimated at 4.1 wt%, but all of the as-annealed melts contained a few percent of crystalline Cr 2 O 3 that had no apparent effect on the chemical durability. The chemical durability was unchanged after deliberate crystallization, 48 h at 650 C. These iron phosphate waste forms, with a waste loading of at least 70 wt%, can be readily melted in commercial refractory crucibles at 1250 C for 2 to 4 h, are resistant to crystallization, meet all current US Department of Energy requirements for chemical durability, and have a solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 which is at least three times larger than that for borosilicate glasses. (orig.)

  6. Study of glass alteration mechanisms in cement waters

    Depierre, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the French deep geological repository concept, intermediate-level vitrified waste packages could be disposed of concrete medium. Chemical composition and pH of the interstitial leaching water are expected to influence the chemical durability of glass. Investigations have thus been carried out to study glass dissolution mechanisms and kinetics in contact with cement waters. Three cement pore waters were studied: the first two correspond to two stages of the Portland cement aging and the third corresponds to equilibrium with a low pH concrete. The S/V ratio (glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio) and the chemistry of cement waters are the two main parameters that control glass alteration mechanisms. If the leaching flow from the glass allows a degree of supersaturation to be reached and maintained which leads to nucleation of secondary phases, then precipitation of these phases drives glass dissolution. At a very low S/V ratio, the calcium uptake into the alteration layer increases its passivating properties. Conversely, at a high S/V ratio, the calcium precipitates as cementitious phases consuming elements which form the alteration layer. The glass dissolution is maintained at a high rate. This study contributes to highlighting the beneficial role of low pH cement in glass alteration, and is a first step towards understanding the mechanisms between the glass and the cement medium. (author) [fr

  7. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry

    Sharanbir K. Sidhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2–3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature.

  8. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  9. Joining Dental Ceramic Layers With Glass

    Saied, MA; Lloyd, IK; Haller, WK; Lawn, BR

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that glass-bonding of free-form veneer and core ceramic layers can produce robust interfaces, chemically durable and aesthetic in appearance and, above all, resistant to delamination. Methods Layers of independently produced porcelains (NobelRondo™ Press porcelain, Nobel BioCare AB and Sagkura Interaction porcelain, Elephant Dental) and matching alumina or zirconia core ceramics (Procera alumina, Nobel BioCare AB, BioZyram yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Cyrtina Dental) were joined with designed glasses, tailored to match thermal expansion coefficients of the components and free of toxic elements. Scanning electron microprobe analysis was used to characterize the chemistry of the joined interfaces, specifically to confirm interdiffusion of ions. Vickers indentations were used to drive controlled corner cracks into the glass interlayers to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces. Results The glass-bonded interfaces were found to have robust integrity relative to interfaces fused without glass, or those fused with a resin-based adhesive. Significance The structural integrity of the interfaces between porcelain veneers and alumina or zirconia cores is a critical factor in the longevity of all-ceramic dental crowns and fixed dental prostheses. PMID:21802131

  10. Study of Seal Glass for Solid Oxide Fuel/Electrolyzer Cells

    Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Seal glass is essential and plays a crucial role in solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell performance and durability. A seal glass should have a combination of thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties in order to seal different cell components and stacks and prevent gas leakage. All the desired properties can simultaneously be obtained in a seal glass by suitable compositional design. In this dissertation, SrO-La₂O₃-A₂O₃-B₂O₃3-SiO₂ based seal glasses have been developed and compo...

  11. The prospective buyer of consumer durables

    Jonge, Leendert de; Oppedijk van Veen, Walle Melis

    1982-01-01

    In this book, an empirical investigation is reported wich aims at the specification of models of individual households’ purchase behaviour for particular consumer durable goods, such as private passenger cars and television sets. In particular, the focus is on models wich can be used for predicting

  12. Advantage from Funding Durable Centers Leasing

    Alina Zając

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In present market conditions huge number of businessmen has problems from gain over from banks capital on purchase of durable centers not only, but also on develop - ment and operating activity Individual can use with different forms funding investment, it which is between different leasing.

  13. Enhancing composite durability : using thermal treatments

    Jerrold E. Winandy; W. Ramsay Smith

    2007-01-01

    The use of thermal treatments to enhance the moisture resistance and aboveground durability of solid wood materials has been studied for years. Much work was done at the Forest Products Laboratory in the last 15 years on the fundamental process of both short-and long-term exposure to heat on wood materials and its interaction with various treatment chemicals. This work...

  14. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    2010-07-01

    ....33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY... problems, deterioration in spark plug life, increase in carburetor or combustion chamber deposits, or..., then a durability run may be made as described in subpart E, in which fuel economy and exhaust...

  15. Durability of wood-plastic composite lumber

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2010-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) lumber has been marketed as a low-maintenance, high-durability product. Retail sales in the United States were slightly less than $1 billion in 2008. Applications include docking, railing, windows, doors, fencing, siding, moldings, landscape timbers, car interior parts, and furniture. The majority of these products are used outdoors and...

  16. Wear and chemistry of zirconium-silicate, aluminium-silicate and zirconium-aluminium-silicate glasses in alkaline medium

    Rouse, C.G.; Lemos Guenaga, C.M. de

    1984-01-01

    A study of the chemical durability, in alkaline solutions, of zirconium silicate, aluminium silicate, zirconium/aluminium silicate glasses as a function of glass composition is carried out. The glasses were tested using standard DIN-52322 method, where the glass samples are prepared in small polished pieces and attacked for 3 hours in a 800 ml solution of 1N (NaOH + NA 2 CO 3 ) at 97 0 C. The results show that the presence of ZrO 2 in the glass composition increases its chemical durability to alkaline attack. Glasses of the aluminium/zirconium silicate series were melted with and without TiO 2 . It was shown experimentally that for this series of glasses, the presence of both TiO 2 and ZrO 2 gave better chemical durability results. However, the best overall results were obtained from the simpler zirconium silicate glasses, where it was possible to make glasses with higher values of ZrO 2 . (Author) [pt

  17. Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass Standard Reference Material. Revision 1

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Crawford, C.L.; Pickett, M.A.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Primary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCI). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers.

  18. DURABILITY OF FLEXIBLE PAVEMENTS: A CASE STUDY OF ...

    user

    years, ranking, predominant factors affecting pavement durability and the estimate of durability. In this regard .... subgrade soil into the base course and provide the drainage of ..... [3] Oguara T. M. “A management model for road infrastructure ...

  19. Investigation of metastable immiscibility in nuclear-waste-glasses. I-III

    Egnell, J.; Larsen, J.G.; Moeller, L.; Roed, G.

    1981-12-01

    Metastable liquid-liquid separation in glasses can often cause significant changes in physical and chemical properties of the original homogeneous glass. In some technical borosilicate glasses this phenomenon is used to change the chemical durability of the glass. For potential nuclear-waste-glasses the slow cooling through the temperature range 550 0 C - 700 0 C may lead to such a liquid-liquid phase separation. In order to investigate the susceptibility of phase separation of nuclear-waste-glasses, two KBS model glasses, ABS-39 and ABS-41, were investigated. Two of the subsequent reports are concerned with this problem. The third report also takes into consideration the effects of MoO 3 on the immiscibility gap. The maximum amount of MoO 3 that can be dissolved in ABS-39 and ABS 41 is also determined. (Auth.)

  20. Gauge theory of glass transition

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5∼ t correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data

  1. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...... by varying the temperature of heat treatment. The predominant crystalline phase in the glass was identified as augite. It was found that the hardness of the glass phase decreased slightly with an increase in the degree of crystallisation, while that of the augite phase drastically decreased....

  2. Recycling of Glass

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  3. A study of the effects of LCD glass sand on the properties of concrete.

    Wang, Her-Yung

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the recycling of discarded liquid crystal display (LCD) glass into concrete (LCDGC), a portion of the usual river sand was replaced by sand prepared from discarded LCD glass. Three different mix designs were regulated by the ACI method (fc(28)=21, 28, and 35MPa) with 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% LCD glass sand replacements investigated; their engineering properties were determined. Test results revealed that, when compared to the design slump of 15cm, the 20% glass sand concrete for the three different mix designs kept good slump and slump flow. Furthermore, a slump loss ranging from 7 to 11cm was observed for specimens with 60% and 80% glass sand replacement for the design strengths of 28 and 35MPa. The compressive strengths of the concrete with glass sand replacement were higher than the design strengths. Moreover, the durability of the concrete with 20% glass sand replacement was better than that of the control group. Surface resistivity for specimens with different amounts of LCD glass sand replacement was also higher than that in the control group for mid to long curing ages. The sulfate attack in concrete with different amounts of glass sand replacement caused less weight loss than in the control group. Moderate chloride ion penetration was observed for glass sand concrete. Furthermore, the measured ultrasonic pulse velocities for LCD glass sand concrete specimens were higher than 4100m/s, which qualified these specimens as good concrete. OM and SEM indicate that the dense C-S-H gel hydrate was produced at the interface between the glass sand and cement paste. The test results indicate that the addition of 20% LCD glass sand to concrete satisfies the slump requirements and improves the strength and durability of concrete. This suggests that LCD glass sand can potentially be used as a recycled material in concrete applications.

  4. Investigations on vanadium doped glasses

    Madhusudana Rao, P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass samples studied in the present work have been prepared by melt quenching technique. They were prepared by mixing and grinding together by appropriate amounts of Li 2 O - Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 doped with V 2 O 5 in an agate motor before transferring into crucible. The mixtures were heated in an electric furnace at 1225K for 20 mm. The melt was then quenched to room temperature by pouring it on plane brass plate and pressing it with another brass plate. White and yellow coloured glasses have been obtained with good optical quality and high transparency. Finally the vitreous sample were annealed for 3 hrs at 423K to relieve residual internal stress and slowly cooled to room temperature. The polished glasses have been used for XRD, FTIR analysis and for DSC report. The DSC thermo grams for all the glasses were recorded on in the temperature range 50-550℃ with a heating rate of 10℃/min. Electron spin resonance and optical absorption of 20Li 2 O - 10 Na 2 O - (70-X)B 2 O 3 doped with XV 2 O 5 glass system are studied. ESR spectra of V 4+ ions doped in the glass exhibit peak at g =1.98. Spin Hamiltonian parameters are calculated. It was found that these parameters are dependent upon alkali ion concentration in the glass and the VO +2 ion in an octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression. The physical parameters of all glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition

  5. Strength and Fractography of Glass Wool Fibres

    Lund, Majbritt Deichgræber; Yue, Yuanzheng

      Glass wool fibres (GWFs) are produced using the cascade spinning process. The lengths of the fibers range from 1 to 4 cm, whereas the diameters range from 4 and 10 mm. GWFs are widely used as insulation material due to their excellent heat and sound isolation effect, chemical durability, and high...... between fracture strength (sf) and mirror radius (r), i.e., sf = A*r, is confirmed for all the GWFs studied. The materials constant, A, (mirror constant) is found to be 2.4 ~ 2.7 MPam½ for basaltic wool and 2.0 MPam½ for E-glass wool, which is similar to the value reported in the literature for different...

  6. Durability Properties of Self Compacting Concrete containing Fly ash, Lime powder and Metakaolin

    Rizwan Ahmad Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the durability properties of Self-compacting concrete (SCC, with different amounts of fly ash (FA, lime powder (LP and metakaolin (MK. A total of 6 mixes were prepared that have a constant water-binder ratio (w/b of 0.41 and superplasticizer dosage of 1% by weight of cement. In addition to compressive strength, the durability properties of SCC mixes were determined by means of Initial surface absorption test (ISAT and Capillary suction test. The test results indicated that the durability properties of the mixes appeared to be very dependent on the type and amount of the mineral admixture used; the mixes containing MK were found to have considerably higher permeability resistance. Good co-relation between strength and absorption were achieved.

  7. Mixed hydrocarbon/fluoropolymer membrane/ionomer MEAs for durability studies

    Li, Bo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Mahlon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cynthia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fenton, James [FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER

    2010-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Commercial viability depends on improving the durability of the fuel cell components to increase the system reliability. The aim of this work is to separate ionomer degradation from membrane degradation via mixed membrane/ionomer MEA experiments. The challenges of mixed MEA fabrication due to the incompatibility of the membrane and the electrode are addressed. OCV accelerated testing experiment (AST) were performed. Development of in situ diagnostics and unique experiments to characterize the performance and properties of the ionomer in the electrode as a function of time is reported. These measurements, along with extensive ex situ and post-mortem characterization, can delineate the degradation mechanisms in order to develop more durable fuel cells and fuel cell components.

  8. The influence of humidity on strengths and durability of light guides fibers

    Karimov, S.N.; Kuksenko, V.S.; Sultonov, U.; Abdumanonov, A.; Shamsidinov, M.I.

    1993-01-01

    Humidity influence on durability and light water durability fibres is studied are studied in this article. Humidity energy under influence of process destruction decreases activity, durability and durability decreases is shown

  9. Synthesis and characterization of niobium and iron phosphate glasses for U3O8 immobilization

    Ghussn, Luciana

    2005-01-01

    Niobium and iron phosphate glasses were produced by melting inorganic compound mixtures in electric furnaces and microwave ovens. The chemical durability was compared among niobium phosphate glasses produced by both processes, and equivalent results were obtained. Leaching tests were also performed to compare the chemical durability among monolithic glass blocks and sintered glasses. The glass transition, crystallization and melting temperatures as well the Hruby parameter (K H ) and the activation energy for crystallization were determined from differential thermal analysis of niobium phosphate glasses produced in electric furnaces. Niobium phosphate glasses are thermally more stable (K H =0.82 +- 0.04) than iron phosphate glasses (K H = 0.42 +- 0.03). Sintered glasses were produced from particles with different particle size distributions and sintering temperatures in the range of 720 - 800 deg C for niobium phosphate and 530 - 680 deg C for iron phosphate glasses. The sintering process was suitable because a glass with composition 37P 2 O 5 -23K 2 O-40Nb 2 O 5 showing leaching rate of 10 -6 g.cm -2 .d -1 , 99 % of the monolithic density and none crystalline phases was obtained. This glass only crystallizes itself after re heating at temperatures above 800 deg C , showing two crystalline phases identified as KNb 3 O 8 e K 3 NbP 2 O 9 . The activation energies for crystallization are 496 +- 7 kJ/mol and 513 +- 14 kJ/mol. Niobium phosphate sintered glasses are better densified than sintered iron phosphate glasses. The leaching rate of sintered glasses that show open porosity is higher than monolithic glass blocks. This effect is related to an increase of the surface area associated to open porous and, a correction of the value of the surface area used to calculate the leaching rate is required. A model was proposed based on the surface area of spherical porous to take in account that effect. Even after correcting the surface area, the leaching rates of sintered

  10. Photon emission induced by brittle fracture of borosilicate glasses

    Shiota, Tadashi, E-mail: tshiota@ceram.titech.ac.jp [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sato, Yoshitaka [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kishi, Tetsuo [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Yasuda, Kouichi [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Photon emission (PE) at wavelength ranges of 430–490 nm (B-PE), 500–600 nm (G-PE) and 610–680 nm (R-PE) caused by brittle fracture was simultaneously measured in the nanosecond-to-microsecond and millisecond time domains for two types of borosilicate glasses: Pyrex-type Tempax glass and BK7 glass. The results were compared to those for silica and soda lime glasses. The time dependence of the PE of Tempax glass was similar to that of silica glass, while the PE intensity was lower. Because Tempax glass contains both silica-rich and borate-rich amorphous phases, the PE must be mainly produced by the fracture of the silica-rich phase. Moreover, the proportion of B-PE of Tempax glass was higher than that of silica glass. This suggests that the measured B-PE might also include very weak PE caused by the fracture of the borate-rich phase. The PE time dependence of BK7 glass was similar to that of soda lime glass, which was different from the case for Tempax glass. The PE intensity of BK7 glass was slightly higher than that of soda lime glass, but much lower than that of Tempax glass. The result indicates that non-bridging oxygen in the glasses affects crack propagation behavior and reduces the PE. - Highlights: • Photon emission (PE) upon brittle fracture of borosilicate glasses was measured. • Pyrex-type Tempax and BK7 glasses showed different PE characteristics. • The rupture of Si–O bonds produces much stronger PE than that of B–O bonds. • Non-bridging oxygen in glass affects crack propagation behavior and reduces the PE.

  11. Assessment of lead tellurite glass for immobilizing electrochemical salt wastes from used nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Riley, Brian J.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Pierce, David A.; Ebert, William L.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Frank, Steven M.; George, Jaime L.; Kruska, Karen

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of research evaluating the use of lead tellurite glass as a waste form for salt wastes from electrochemical reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. The efficacy of using lead tellurite glass to immobilize three different salt compositions was evaluated: a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt containing fission products from oxide fuel, a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt containing fission products from metallic fuel, and SrCl2. Physical and chemical properties of glasses made with these salts were characterized with X-ray diffraction, bulk density measurements, differential thermal analysis, chemical durability tests, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These glasses were found to accommodate high salt concentrations and have high densities, but further development is needed to improve chemical durability. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced high strength concrete in simulated aggressive environment

    Kwan, W.H.; Cheah, C.B.; Ramli, M.; Chang, K.Y.

    2018-01-01

    The durability of the alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) in three simulated aggresive environments, namely tropical climate, cyclic air and seawater and seawater immersion was investigated. Durability examinations include chloride diffusion, gas permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy examination (SEM). The fiber content is in the range of 0.6 % to 2.4 %. Results reveal that the specimen containing highest AR glass fiber content suffered severe strength loss in seawater environment and relatively milder strength loss under cyclic conditions. The permeability property was found to be more inferior with the increase in the fiber content of the concrete. This suggests that the AR glass fiber is not suitable for use as the fiber reinforcement in concrete is exposed to seawater. However, in both the tropical climate and cyclic wetting and drying, the incorporation of AR glass fiber prevents a drastic increase in permeability. [es

  13. West Valley high-level nuclear waste glass development: a statistically designed mixture study

    Chick, L.A.; Bowen, W.M.; Lokken, R.O.; Wald, J.W.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    The first full-scale conversion of high-level commercial nuclear wastes to glass in the United States will be conducted at West Valley, New York, by West Valley Nuclear Services Company, Inc. (WVNS), for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting WVNS in the design of the glass-making process and the chemical formulation of the glass. This report describes the statistically designed study performed by PNL to develop the glass composition recommended for use at West Valley. The recommended glass contains 28 wt% waste, as limited by process requirements. The waste loading and the silica content (45 wt%) are similar to those in previously developed waste glasses; however, the new formulation contains more calcium and less boron. A series of tests verified that the increased calcium results in improved chemical durability and does not adversely affect the other modeled properties. The optimization study assessed the effects of seven oxide components on glass properties. Over 100 melts combining the seven components into a wide variety of statistically chosen compositions were tested. Viscosity, electrical conductivity, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and chemical durability were measured and empirically modeled as a function of the glass composition. The mathematical models were then used to predict the optimum formulation. This glass was tested and adjusted to arrive at the final composition recommended for use at West Valley. 56 references, 49 figures, 18 tables.

  14. A statistical approach to determine the effects of nuclear glass components on the short and long term glass alteration

    Advocat, Th.; Tovena, I.; Vernaz, E.; Larche, F.; Phan Tan Luu, R.

    1997-01-01

    The experimentation plan methodology may be a powerful tool to design statistical models able to calculate quantitative leach rates as a function of glass compositions. The investigation discussed here implemented an experimentation plan methodology covering a wide range of glass composition variations with two major objectives: - identify the effects of the main component oxides of R7T7 glass (SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , Na 2 O+Li 2 O, additive oxides, Fission Products oxides, actinide oxides) on the dissolution rates far and close to equilibrium; - and develop a statistical model relating the measured initial dissolution rate with the selected oxide compositions. A second-degree silica-based model was developed to express the initial dissolution rates at 100 deg C according to the oxide weight percentage of 6 major oxides or oxide groups. The model is qualified by comparison with independent experimental results. For the short term, far from saturation conditions (confined media), plotting the effects of the oxides clearly showed that SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and the additive oxides enhanced glass durability at 100 deg C, while B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O+Li 2 O diminished the initial corrosion resistance. For the long term, plotting the effects of the oxides showed that additive oxides, Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 enhanced glass durability at 90 deg C, in that order, while Na 2 O+Li 2 O still diminished the corrosion resistance. The fission products and actinide oxides and ZrO 2 have apparently a slight beneficial effect on the glass durability, under saturation conditions (long term). (author)

  15. A statistical approach to determine the effects of nuclear glass components on the short and long term glass alteration

    Advocat, Th; Tovena, I; Vernaz, E [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN, 30 - Marcoule (France); Larche, F [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France); Phan Tan Luu, R [Faculte de St Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-07-01

    The experimentation plan methodology may be a powerful tool to design statistical models able to calculate quantitative leach rates as a function of glass compositions. The investigation discussed here implemented an experimentation plan methodology covering a wide range of glass composition variations with two major objectives: - identify the effects of the main component oxides of R7T7 glass (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O+Li{sub 2}O, additive oxides, Fission Products oxides, actinide oxides) on the dissolution rates far and close to equilibrium; - and develop a statistical model relating the measured initial dissolution rate with the selected oxide compositions. A second-degree silica-based model was developed to express the initial dissolution rates at 100 deg C according to the oxide weight percentage of 6 major oxides or oxide groups. The model is qualified by comparison with independent experimental results. For the short term, far from saturation conditions (confined media), plotting the effects of the oxides clearly showed that SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the additive oxides enhanced glass durability at 100 deg C, while B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O+Li{sub 2}O diminished the initial corrosion resistance. For the long term, plotting the effects of the oxides showed that additive oxides, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} enhanced glass durability at 90 deg C, in that order, while Na{sub 2}O+Li{sub 2}O still diminished the corrosion resistance. The fission products and actinide oxides and ZrO{sub 2} have apparently a slight beneficial effect on the glass durability, under saturation conditions (long term). (author)

  16. Fixation of Hanford sludge by conversion to glass

    Kupfer, M.J.; Schulz, W.W.

    1977-03-01

    Redox and Purex process sludges stored at Hanford can be converted to durable borosilicate glasses by melting at 1100--1400 0 C charges containing 30 to 40 weight percent washed, dried sludge, 45 to 60 weight percent SiO 2 , 5 to 15 weight percent B 2 O 3 , 0 to 10 weight percent Na 2 O, 0 to 5 weight percent Li 2 O, and 0 to 5 weight percent TiO 2 . Leach rates in deionized water (25 0 C) for the glasses range from about 10 -7 to 10 -5 g/cm 2 -day

  17. Hydration of high-silica glasses in the deep sea

    Federman, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Natural analogs of nuclear waste glasses are important because they provide information of the one variable that is not controllable in the laboratory - long intervals of time in the actual environment of storage. Some natural glasses have persisted for millions of years in deep-sea sediments in the form of disseminated particles and distinct tephra layers, while other apparently similar specimens have been completely altered to clay assemblages relatively quickly. Geologists have reached no firm conclusions as to why these differences exist, and more research is certainly warranted. These glasses vary in age, composition, and in the in-situ conditions they have experienced. They may provide important information for two different aspects of nuclear waste glass research: First, the chemical composition and especially the water content of these glasses as a function of time may give an understanding of the mechanisms and rates of diffusion in glasses in the natural environment. Second, the apparent differing durability of these glasses in different environmental conditions may suggest the optimal characteristics of a nuclear waste glass depository

  18. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  19. Foaming of CRT panel glass powder with Na2CO3

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    melt, while Na2O becomes incorporated into the glass structure. We have quantified the melt expansion through density measurements and the Na2O incorporation is indicated by the decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the final foam glass. The glass foaming quality depends on the foaming......Recycling of cathode ray tube (CRT) glass remains a challenging task. The CRT glass consists of four glass types fused together: Funnel-, neck-, frit- and panel glass. The three former glasses contain toxic lead oxide, and therefore have a low recycling potential. The latter on the other hand...... is lead-free, but since barium and strontium oxide are present, panel glass is incompatible with most common recycling methods. However, foam glass production is a promising approach for the recycling of panel glass waste, since the process parameters can be changed according to the glass waste...

  20. Relationship between enamel bond fatigue durability and surface free-energy characteristics with universal adhesives.

    Nagura, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-04-01

    The relationship between enamel bond fatigue durability and surface free-energy characteristics with universal adhesives was investigated. The initial shear bond strengths and shear fatigue strengths of five universal adhesives to enamel were determined with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The surface free-energy characteristics of adhesive-treated enamel with and without pre-etching were also determined. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive to pre-etched enamel were higher than those to ground enamel. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive to pre-etched enamel were material dependent, unlike those to ground enamel. The surface free-energy of the solid (γ S ) and the hydrogen-bonding force (γSh) of universal adhesive-treated enamel were different depending on the adhesive, regardless of the presence or absence of pre-etching. The bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives was higher to pre-etched enamel than to ground enamel. In addition, the bond fatigue durability to pre-etched enamel was material dependent, unlike that to ground enamel. The surface free-energy characteristics of universal adhesive-treated enamel were influenced by the adhesive type, regardless of the presence or absence of pre-etching. The surface free-energy characteristics of universal adhesive-treated enamel were related to the results of the bond fatigue durability. © 2018 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Revisiting the role of durable polymers in cardiovascular devices.

    Mori, Hiroyoshi; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Gupta, Anuj; Jinnouchi, Hiroyuki; Torii, Sho; Harari, Emanuel; Virmani, Renu; Finn, Aloke V

    2017-11-01

    Polymers are an essential component of drug-eluting stents (DES) used to control drug release but remain the most controversial component of DES technology. There are two types of polymers employed in DES: durable polymer based DES (DP-DES) and biodegradable polymer DES (BP-DES). First-generation DES were exclusively composed of DP and demonstrated increased rates of late stent failure due in part to poor polymer biocompatibility. Newer generations DES use more biocompatible durable polymers or biodegradable polymers. Areas covered: We will cover issues identified with 1st-generation DP-DES, areas of success and failure in 2nd-generation DP-DES and examine the promise and shortcomings of BP-DES. Briefly, fluorinated polymers used in 2nd-generation DP-DES have excellent anti-thrombogenicity and better biocompatibility than 1st-generation DES polymers. However, these devices lead to persistent drug exposure to the endothelium which impairs endothelial function and predisposes towards neoatherosclerosis. Meanwhile, BP-DES has shortened the duration of drug exposure which might be beneficial for endothelial functional recovery leading to less neoatherosclerosis. However, it remains uncertain whether the long-term biocompatibility of bare metal surfaces is better than that of polymer-coated metals. Expert commentary: Each technology has distinct advantages, which can be optimized depending upon the particular characteristics of the patient being treated.

  2. Durable concrete for a waste repository - Measurement of ionic ingress

    Feldman, R.F.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Philipose, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    A waste repository for the below ground disposal of low level radioactive waste is planned at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. It relies greatly on the durability of concrete for the required 500 year service life. A research program to design durable concrete and predict its service life is in progress. The degradation of the concrete depends to a large extent on the rate of ingress of corrosive agents. Penetration of chloride and sulfate ions are particularly relevant. Twenty mix formulations were developed to create various types and qualities of concrete, and to study their behavior in different site environmental conditions. A total of 1,000 concrete specimens are being exposed at 20C and 45C to 25 different combinations of the corrosive agents including CO 2 . Procedures to measure the ionic profiles and to determine the factors controlling diffusion of the ions in the various concretes have been developed. Results of selected concrete systems exposed to chloride and sulfate solutions for 1 year are presented and discussed in terms of pore structure and permeability parameters of the concrete

  3. Effects of composition on properties in an 11-component nuclear waste glass system

    Chick, L.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Mellinger, G.B.; May, R.P.; Gray, W.J.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1981-09-01

    Ninety simplified nuclear waste glass compositions within an 11-component oxide composition matrix were tested for crystallinity, viscosity, volatility, and chemical durability. Empirical models of property response as a function of glass composition were developed using statistical experimental design and modeling techniques. A new statistical technique was developed to calculate the effects of oxide components on each property. Independent melts were used to check the prediction accuracy of the models

  4. Spin glasses

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  5. Durable terrestrial bedrock predicts submarine canyon formation

    Smith, Elliot; Finnegan, Noah J.; Mueller, Erich R.; Best, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Though submarine canyons are first-order topographic features of Earth, the processes responsible for their occurrence remain poorly understood. Potentially analogous studies of terrestrial rivers show that the flux and caliber of transported bedload are significant controls on bedrock incision. Here we hypothesize that coarse sediment load could exert a similar role in the formation of submarine canyons. We conducted a comprehensive empirical analysis of canyon occurrence along the West Coast of the contiguous United States which indicates that submarine canyon occurrence is best predicted by the occurrence of durable crystalline bedrock in adjacent terrestrial catchments. Canyon occurrence is also predicted by the flux of bed sediment to shore from terrestrial streams. Surprisingly, no significant correlation was observed between canyon occurrence and the slope or width of the continental shelf. These findings suggest that canyon incision is promoted by greater yields of durable terrestrial clasts to the shore.

  6. The influence of penetrating gamma radiation on the reaction of simulated nuclear waste glass in tuff groundwater

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Gerding, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Static leaching experiments have been performed to determine the influence of penetrating gamma radiation on the reaction of simulated nuclear waste glass in tuff groundwater at 90/degree/C. Both the leachates and the reacted glass monoliths were analyzed to characterize the reaction. Radiation was seen to acidify the leachates, but the high bicarbonate content of the groundwater prevented the pHs from dropping below 6.4. The glass reaction tended to raise the pH. Glass based on SRL 165 black frit and PNL 76-68 glass compositions were leached. The SRL 165 type glasses were quite durable and unaffected by radiation [NL(B) /approximately/4 g/m 2 after 278 days at all exposure rates]. The PNL 76-68 glasses were much less durable, with the durability decreasing as the exposure rate was increased [NL(B) was about 20 g/m 2 after 278 days at 1 /times/ 10 3 R/h for both ATM-1c and ATM-8 glasses]. 8 refs., 5 figs

  7. Mankiw's Puzzle on Consumer Durables: A Misspecification

    Tam Bang Vu

    2005-01-01

    Mankiw (1982) shows that consumer durables expenditures should follow a linear ARMA(1,1) process, but the data analyzed supports an AR(1) process instead; thus, a puzzle. In this paper, we employ a more general utility function than Mankiw's quadratic one. Further, the disturbance and depreciation rate are respecified, respectively, as multiplicative and stochastic. The analytical consequence is a nonlinear ARMA(infinity,1) process, which implies that the linear ARMA(1,1) is a misspecificatio...

  8. OPTIONS D'INTENSIFICATION DURABLE DES CULTURES ...

    (Received 14 August, 2001 ; accepted 10 May, 2002) RÉSUMÉ Pour intensifier de manière durable les cultures vivrières dans les zones de terres de barre dégradées au sud du Togo, plusieurs options ont été évaluées avec les paysans. Grâce à des entretiens collectifs de type participatif, sept différents groupes ...

  9. Durability 2007. Injection grout investigations. Background description

    Orantie, K.; Kuosa, H.

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this project was to evaluate the durability risks of injection grouts. The investigations were done with respect to the application conditions, materials and service life requirements at the ONKALO underground research facility. The study encompassed injection grout mixtures made of ultrafine cement with and without silica fume. Some of the mixtures hade a low pH and thus a high silica fume content. The project includes a background description on durability literature, laboratory testing programme, detailed analysis of results and recommendations for selecting of ideal grout mixtures. The background description was made for the experimental study of low-pH and reference rock injection grouts as regards pore- and microstructure, strength, shrinkage/swelling and thus versatile durability properties. A summary of test methods is presented as well as examples, i.e. literature information or former test results, of expected range of results from the tests. Also background information about how the test results correlate to other material properties and mix designs is presented. Besides the report provides basic information on the pore structure of cement based materials. Also the correlation between the pore structure of cement based materials and permeability is shortly discussed. The test methods included in the background description are compressive strength, measurement of bulk drying, autogenous and chemical shrinkage and swelling, hydraulic conductivity / permeability, capillary water uptake test, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and thin section analysis. Three main mixtures with water-binder ratio of 0.8, 1.0 and 1.4 and silica fume content of 0, 15 and 40% were studied in the laboratory. Besides two extra mixtures were studied to provide additional information about the effect of varying water-dry-material ratio and silica fume content on durability. The evaluation of water tightness based on water permeability coefficient and micro cracking was

  10. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  11. Amenagements sportifs et developpement durable : Des enjeux ...

    ... contredite » éprouvée par (Jeu, 1977), comme l'apanage d'une double hybridation culturelle des pays en développement. Derrière l'apparence de la dislocation des héritages, doit émerger une définition nouvelle sur les rapports que les sports devraient entretenir avec l'environnement pour un développement durable.

  12. Fission tracks diameters in glasses

    Garzon Ruiperez, L.; Veiguela, J.

    1974-01-01

    Standard glass microscope slides have been irradiated with fission fragments from the uranium. The etching track conditions have been the same for the series, having changed the etching time only for each specimen. For each glass, a minimum of 250 measurements of the tracks diameters have been made, the distributions of which are the bimodal type. Diameters-etching dependence with time is roughly lineal. Energy determinations have been made with the help of the diameters-energy relations. The calculated values agree very well with the know ones. (author) [es

  13. Durability of heavyweight concrete containing barite

    Binici, Hanifi

    2010-01-01

    The supplementary waste barite aggregates deposit in Osmaniye, southern Turkey, has been estimated at around 500 000 000 tons based on 2007 records. The aim of the present study is to investigate the durability of concrete incorporating waste barite as coarse and river sand (RS), granule blast furnace slag (GBFS), granule basaltic pumice (GBP) and ≤ 4 mm granule barite (B) as fine aggregates. The properties of the fresh concrete determined included the air content, slump, slump loss and setting time. They also included the compressive strength, flexural and splitting tensile strengths and Young's modulus of elasticity, resistance to abrasion and sulphate resistance of hardened concrete. Besides these, control mortars were prepared with crushed limestone aggregates. The influence of waste barite as coarse aggregates and RS, GBFS, GBP and B as fine aggregates on the durability of the concretes was evaluated. The mass attenuation coefficients were calculated at photon energies of 1 keV to 100 GeV using XCOM and the obtained results were compared with the measurements at 0.66 and 1.25 MeV. The results showed the possibility of using these waste barite aggregates in the production of heavy concretes. In several cases, some of these properties have been improved. Durability of the concrete made with these waste aggregates was improved. Thus, these materials should be preferably used as aggregates in heavyweight concrete production. (orig.)

  14. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  15. Durability evaluation of reversible solid oxide cells

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; O'Brien, Robert C.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  16. Effects of Irradiation on Albite's Chemical Durability.

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; La Plante, Erika Callagon; Krishnan, N M Anoop; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2017-10-19

    Albite (NaAlSi 3 O 8 ), a framework silicate of the plagioclase feldspar family and a common constituent of felsic rocks, is often present in the siliceous mineral aggregates that compose concrete. When exposed to radiation (e.g., in the form of neutrons) in nuclear power plants, the crystal structure of albite can undergo significant alterations. These alterations may degrade its chemical durability. Indeed, careful examinations of Ar + -implanted albite carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and molecular dynamics simulations show that albite's crystal structure, upon irradiation, undergoes progressive disordering, resulting in an expansion in its molar volume (i.e., a reduction of density) and a reduction in the connectivity of its atomic network. This loss of network connectivity (i.e., rigidity) results in an enhancement of the aqueous dissolution rate of albite-measured using vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) in alkaline environments-by a factor of 20. This enhancement in the dissolution rate (i.e., reduction in chemical durability) of albite following irradiation has significant impacts on the durability of felsic rocks and of concrete containing them upon their exposure to radiation in nuclear power plant (NPP) environments.

  17. Effect Of Climatic Conditions On Durability

    Ibrahem M. Al Kiki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Durability is one of the most important subjects in the soil stabilization. Since there is no specifications concerned the durability of lime stabilized soils, several factors were selected to show their effects on the durability, namely: wetting, drying, freezing, thawing and slaking.The effect of each one of the above factors as well as the combined effect of two or more factors, were studied on the volume change and soil strength and weight loss of soil samples stabilized with optimum lime content except the slaking test at which soil samples stabilized with different lime content.Tests results showed that the higher the lime content the lower the slaking effect, also its found the soil strength decreased when the period of immersion or freezing increased. The strength of the lime stabilized soils decreased when subjected to the cycles of wetting and drying or to the cycles freezing and thawing. However, the  combined effect of wetting, drying, freezing and thawing has a pronounced effect on reduction of the lime stabilized clayey soil. The worst condition recorded when lime stabilized soil undergo to freezing then drying then wetting which should be avoided in the field

  18. Microstructure and Rheology near an Attractive Colloidal Glass Transition

    Narayanan, T.; Sztucki, M.; Belina, G.; Pignon, F.

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure and rheological properties of a thermally reversible short-ranged attractive colloidal system are studied in the vicinity of the attractive glass transition line. At high volume fractions, the static structure factor changes very little but the low frequency shear moduli varies over several orders of magnitude across the transition. From the frequency dependence of shear moduli, fluid-attractive glass and repulsive glass-attractive glass transitions are identified

  19. Experimental study on durability improvement of fly ash concrete with durability improving admixture.

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete, the compressive strength of fly ash concrete can be improved by 10%-20%, and the drying shrinkage is reduced by 60%. Carbonation resistance of concrete is roughly proportional to water-cement ratio regardless of water-binder ratio and fly ash replacement ratio. For the specimens cured in air for 2 weeks, the freezing-thawing resistance is improved. In addition, by making use of durability improving admixture, it is easier to control the air content and make fly ash concrete into nonair-entraining one. The quality of fly ash concrete is thereby optimized.

  20. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    Jantzen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to

  1. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO 3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  3. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  5. The effect of composition and thermodynamics on the surface morphology of durable superhydrophobic polymer coatings

    Nahum T

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tehila Nahum,1 Hanna Dodiuk,2 Samuel Kenig,2 Artee Panwar,1 Carol Barry,1 Joey Mead,1 1Department of Plastics Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, USA; 2Department of Polymers and Plastics Engineering, Shenkar College of Engineering Design and Art, Ramat Gan, Israel Abstract: Durable superhydrophobic coatings were synthesized using a system of silica nanoparticles (NPs to provide nanoscale roughness, fluorosilane to give hydrophobic chemistry, and three different polymer binders: urethane acrylate, ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate, and epoxy. Coatings composed of different binders incorporating NPs in various concentrations exhibited different superhydrophobic attributes when applied on polycarbonate (PC and glass substrates and as a function of coating composition. It was found that the substrate surface characteristics and wettability affected the superhydrophobic characteristics of the coatings. Interfacial tension and spreading coefficient parameters (thermodynamics of the coating components were used to predict the localization of the NPs for the different binders’ concentrations. The thermodynamic analysis of the NPs localization was in good agreement with the experimental observations. On the basis of the thermodynamic analysis and the experimental scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy results, it was concluded that localization of the NPs on the surface was critical to provide the necessary roughness and resulting superhydrophobicity. The durability evaluated by tape testing of the epoxy formulations was the best on both glass and PC. Several coating compositions retained their superhydrophobicity after the tape test. In summary, it was concluded that thermodynamic analysis is a powerful tool to predict the roughness of the coating due to the location of NPs on the surface, and hence can be used in the design of superhydrophobic coatings. Keywords

  6. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ToF-SIMS analysis for leaching studies of potash–lime–silica glass

    De Bardi, Monica; Hutter, Herbert; Schreiner, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In this work the durability to acidic solutions of two kinds of potash–lime–silica glasses with compositions typical for mediaeval stained glass was investigated. The low amount of network formers such as silica and alumina, and the high amount of network modifiers such as potassium and calcium, give to the glass a lower chemical stability compared to modern glass. Studies on its durability are of interest to understand degradation mechanisms. In particular the leaching procedure was focused on determining any correlation between the type of acid and the corrosion of glass independently from the pH value, which was kept constant during the different acidic treatments. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a valuable tool to study compositional variations of glass, giving useful information concerning provenance, effects of the conservation environment, of weathering or leaching processes and about the compositional differences between the corroded layer and the bulk as a function of depth. In spite of that the insulating properties of glass, the surface roughness and the parameters used for the measurements can lead to possible misinterpretations of the results; in this paper these difficulties are discussed, in order to better interpret the analyses performed on leached glass. ToF-SIMS data are influenced by strong matrix effects making quantification difficult; for this reason the quantitative composition and surface morphology of the leached layer were additionally investigated with scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDX)

  8. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-09-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference nuclear waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. The evaluation was conducted as part of the Second Generation HLW Technology Subtask of the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to investigate possible alternatives to B-Si glass as second-generation waste forms. While vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass, severe crystallization or devitrification leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is the procedure with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the potential performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, the processing method would have to cool the material rapidly to retain its vitreous structure

  9. Predictive modeling of crystal accumulation in high-level waste glass melters processing radioactive waste

    Matyáš, Josef; Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Sannoh, Sulaiman E.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of HLW vitrification is limited by precipitation/accumulation of spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4] in the glass discharge riser of Joule-heated ceramic melters during idling. These crystals do not affect glass durability; however, if accumulated in thick layer, they can clog the melter and prevent discharge of molten glass into canisters. To address this problem, an empirical model was developed that can predict thicknesses of accumulated layers as a function of glass composition. This model predicts well the accumulation of single crystals and/or small-scale agglomerates, but, excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an under-prediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsen over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. Accumulation rate of ~53.8 ± 3.7 µm/h determined for this glass will result in ~26 mm thick layer in 20 days of melter idling.

  10. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Piovesan, V.; Bardez-Giboire, I.; Perret, D.; Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO2 - Al2O3 - B2O3 - Na2O - Li2O - CaO - La2O3 system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al3+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na+, Li+ or Ca2+. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, Tg), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties.

  11. Structural behavior of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass below and above the glass transition

    Mattern, N.; Hermann, H.; Roth, S.

    2003-01-01

    The thermal behavior of the structure of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass has been investigated in situ through the glass transition by means of high-temperature x-ray synchrotron diffraction. The dependence of the x-ray structure factor S(q) of the Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 glass on temperature follows...... the Debye theory up to the glass transition with a Debye temperature theta=296 K. Above the glass transition temperature T-g, the temperature dependence of S(q) is altered, pointing to a continuous development of structural changes in the liquid with temperature. The atomic pair correlation functions g......(r) indicate changes in short-range-order parameters of the first and the second neighborhood with temperature. The temperature dependence of structural parameters is different in glass and in supercooled liquid, with a continuous behavior through the glass transition. The nearest-neighbor distance decreases...

  12. Dynamics of a durable commodity market involving trade at disequilibrium

    Panchuk, A.; Puu, T.

    2018-05-01

    The present work considers a simple model of a durable commodity market involving two agents who trade stocks of two different types. Stock commodities, in contrast to flow commodities, remain on the market from period to period and, consequently, there is neither unique demand function nor unique supply function exists. We also set up exact conditions for trade at disequilibrium, the issue being usually neglected, though a fact of reality. The induced iterative system has infinite number of fixed points and path dependent dynamics. We show that a typical orbit is either attracted to one of the fixed points or eventually sticks at a no-trade point. For the latter the stock distribution always remains the same while the price displays periodic or chaotic oscillations.

  13. Durability and inflammogenic impact of carbon nanotubes compared with asbestos fibres

    Clark Steve

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that carbon nanotubes might conform to the fibre pathogenicity paradigm that explains the toxicities of asbestos and other fibres on a continuum based on length, aspect ratio and biopersistence. Some types of carbon nanotubes satisfy the first two aspects of the fibre paradigm but only recently has their biopersistence begun to be investigated. Biopersistence is complex and requires in vivo testing and analysis. However durability, the chemical mimicking of the process of fibre dissolution using in vitro treatment, is closely related to biopersistence and more readily determined. Here, we describe an experimental process to determine the durability of four types of carbon nanotubes in simulated biological fluid (Gambles solution, and their subsequent pathogenicity in vivo using a mouse model sensitive to inflammogenic effects of fibres. The in vitro and in vivo results were compared with well-characterised glass wool and asbestos fibre controls. Results After incubation for up to 24 weeks in Gambles solution, our control fibres were recovered at percentages consistent with their known in vitro durabilities and/or in vivo persistence, and three out of the four types of carbon nanotubes tested (single-walled (CNTSW and multi-walled (CNTTANG2, CNTSPIN showed no, or minimal, loss of mass or change in fibre length or morphology when examined by electron microscopy. However, the fourth type [multi-walled (CNTLONG1] lost 30% of its original mass within the first three weeks of incubation, after which there was no further loss. Electron microscopy of CNTLONG1 samples incubated for 10 weeks confirmed that the proportion of long fibres had decreased compared to samples briefly exposed to the Gambles solution. This loss of mass and fibre shortening was accompanied by a loss of pathogenicity when injected into the peritoneal cavities of C57Bl/6 mice compared to fibres incubated briefly. CNTSW did not elicit an

  14. Attenuation of glass dissolution in the presence of natural additives

    Sang, Jing C.; Barkatt, Aaron [Department of Chemistry, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); O`Keefe, John A. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The dissolution kinetics of silicate glasses in aqueous environments in systems which included a variety of natural crystalline solids in addition to the glass itself and the aqueous phase are reported. The results demonstrate the possibility of a dramatic decrease in the rate of dissolution of silicate glass in the presence of certain varieties of olivine-based materials. This decrease in dissolution rate was shown to be due to the fact that these additives consist mostly of Mg-based material but also contain minor amounts of Al and Ca. The combined presence of Mg with these minor species affected the corrosion rate of the glass as a whole, including its most soluble components such as boron. This study has potentially important implications to the durability of glasses exposed to natural environments. The results may be relevant to the use of active backfill materials in burial sites for nuclear waste glasses, as well as to better understanding of the environmental degradation of natural and ancient glasses.

  15. Comparative study of seven glasses for solidification of nuclear wastes

    Nogues, J.L.; Hench, L.L.; Zarzycki, J.

    1982-06-01

    The relative leaching behavior of seven alkali borosilicate glasses considered for immobilization of high level radioactive wastes was compared using a static 90 0 C leach test. Leaching times studied were 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days with ratios of glass surface area (SA) to solution volume (V) being SA/V = 1.0 cm -1 and 0.1 cm -1 . With the range of glass compositions studied, it was not possible to determine the effect of each element on leaching behavior, however some conclusions regarding the general influence of the glass network formers can be made: the addition of Al 2 O 3 , results in a large increase in the chemical durability of the glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 , is necessary to develop with Al 2 O 3 a second protective layer on top of the silica-rich film that results from rapid dealkalization. The difference between the results obtained at SA/V = 1.0 cm -1 and 0.1 cm -1 shows the importance of understanding both the effects of glass composition and solution concentrations on the behavior of nuclear waste glasses

  16. 6Li-doped silicate glass for thermal neutron shielding

    Stone, C.A.; Blackburn, D.H.; Kauffman, D.A.; Cranmer, D.C.; Olmez, I.

    1994-01-01

    Glass formulations are described that contain high concentrations of 6 Li and are suitable for use as thermal neutron shielding. One formulation contained 31 mol% of 6 Li 2 O and 69 mol% of SiO 2 . Studies were performed on a second formulation that contained as much as 37 mol% of 6 Li 2 O and 59 mol% of SiO 2 , with 4 mol% Al 2 O 3 added to prevent crystallization at such high 6 Li 2 O concentrations. These lithium silicate glasses can be formed into a variety of shapes using conventional glass fabrication techniques. Examples include flat plates, disks, hollow cylinders, and other more complex geometries. Both in-beam and in-core experiments have been performed to study the use and durability of Li silicate glasses. In-core experiments show the glass can withstand the intense radiation fields near the core of a reactor. The neutron attenuation of the glasses used in these studies was 90%/mm. In-beam studies show that the glass is effective for reducing the gamma-ray and neutron fields near experiments. ((orig.))

  17. Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. - fiscal year 1994 report

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to measure the intermediate and long-term durability of vitrified waste forms developed by Lockheed Idaho Technology Co. (LITCO) for the immobilization of calcined radioactive wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Two vitreous materials referred to as Formula 127 and Formula 532, have been subjected to accelerated durability tests to measure their long-term performance. Formula 127 consists of a glass matrix containing 5-10 vol % fluorite (CaF 2 ) as a primary crystalline phase. It shows low releases of glass components to solution in 7-, 28-, 70-, and 140-day Product Consistency Tests performed at 2000 m -1 at 90 degrees C. In these tests, release rates for glass-forming components were similar to those found for durable waste glasses. The Ca and F released by the glass as it corrodes appear to reprecipitate as fluorite. Formula 532 consists of a glass matrix containing 5-10 vol % of an Al-Si-rich primary crystalline phase. The release rates for components other than aluminum are relatively low, but aluminum is released at a much higher rate than is typical for durable waste glasses. Secondary crystalline phases form relatively early during the corrosion of Formula 532 and appear to consist almost entirely of the Al-Si-rich primary phase (or a crystal with the same Al:Si ratio) and a sodium-bearing zeolite. Future test results are expected to highlight the relative importance of primary and secondary crystalline phases to the rate of corrosion of Formula 127 and Formula 532

  18. lead glass brick

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  19. Impact of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co elements on glass alteration: Additive effects

    Aréna, H., E-mail: helene.arena@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France); Godon, N. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France); Rébiscoul, D.; Podor, R. [ICSM-UMR5257 CNRS/CEA/UM2/ENCSM, Site de Marcoule, Bat. 426, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Garcès, E. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France); Cabie, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CP2M, F-13397 Marseille (France); Mestre, J.-P. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France)

    2016-03-15

    The minor elements present in the nuclear glass composition or coming from the groundwater of the future repository may impact glass alteration. In this study, the effects of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co on the International Simple Glass (ISG) alteration were studied throughout 511 days of aqueous leaching experiments. The aim was to determine their additive or competitive effect on glass alteration and the nature of the alteration products. The four elements were introduced separately or altogether in solution as XCl{sub 2} chloride salts (X = Zn, Mg, Ni or Co) with monthly additions to compensate for their consumption. The alteration kinetics were determined by leachate analyses (ICP-AES) and alteration products were characterized in terms of composition, morphology and microstructure (SEM, TEM-EDX, ToF-SIMS and XRD). Results indicate that when they are introduced separately, Zn, Mg, Ni and Co have the same qualitative and quantitative effect on glass alteration kinetics and on pH: they form secondary phases leading to a pH decrease and a significant increase in glass alteration. The secondary phases were identified as silicates of the added X element: trioctahedral smectites with a stoichiometry of[(Si{sub (4-a)} Al{sub a}) (X{sub (3-b)} Al{sub b}) O{sub 10} (OH){sub 2}]{sup (a+b)−} [X{sub c} Na{sub d} Ca{sub e}] {sup (2c+d+2e) +} with a = 0.11 to 0.45, b = 0.00 to 0.29, c = 0, d = 0.19 to 0.74 and e = 0.10 to 0.14. . It was shown that as pH stabilizes at a minimum value, X-silicates no longer precipitate, thus leading to a significant drop in the glass alteration rate. This pH value depends on X and it has been identified as being 8 for Mg-silicates, probably around 7.3 for Ni and Co-silicates and less than 6.2 for Zn-silicates. When tested together, the effects of these four elements on glass alteration are additive and lead to the formation of a mix of X-silicates that precipitate as long as their constitutive elements are available and the pH is above

  20. Studies on Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O glasses and superconducting glass ceramics

    Singh, R.; Zacharias, E.

    1991-01-01

    Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O glasses and glass ceramics of various compositions were synthesised. The glass transition temperature varies from 396 to 422degC depending on the glass composition. The bulk glass ceramics of 4334, 4336, 2223 and 4246 compositions show superconductivity when the corresponding glass samples were heat-treated in air at 820degC for 3, 9, 12 and 24 h respectively. X-ray diffraction studies show that the superconducting phase present in all these compositions is Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 1 Cu 2 O x . The 4334 glass ceramic is almost a single-phase material with a preferred orientation such that the c axis is normal to the sample surface. The 2223 glass ceramic has a higher T c (onset) than the other three compositions indicating the presence of high T c phase (110 K) also. ESR studies on the glass samples indicate the existence of Cu 2+ . The effect of heat treatment on ESR shows that the intensity of resonance decreases with increase in heat-treatment duration. This effect is more pronounced for the 4334 and 2223 compositions. The advantages of synthesizing superconducting materials by glass route are discussed in view of practical applications. (author). 9 refs., 6 figs

  1. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently.

  2. Are the dynamics of silicate glasses and glass-forming liquids embedded in their elastic properties?

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    According to the elastic theory of the glass transition, the dynamics of glasses and glass-forming liquids are controlled by the evolution of shear modulus. In particular, the elastic shoving model expresses dynamics in terms of an activation energy required to shove aside the surrounding atoms......, which is determined by the shear modulus. First, we here present an in situ high-temperature Brillouin spectroscopy test of the shoving model near the glass transition of eight aluminosilicate glass-forming systems. We find that the measured viscosity data agree qualitatively with the measured...... temperature dependence of shear moduli, as predicted by the shoving model. However, the model systematically underpredicts the values of fragility. Second, we also present a thorough test of the shoving model for predicting the low temperature dynamics of an aluminosilicate glass system. This is done...

  3. Microcracking and durability of high strength concretes

    Yssorche, M.P.

    1995-07-01

    Durability of 28 days compressive strength concrete of 20 to 120 MPa has been studied. The ability of concrete to transport aggressive agents has been determined for four properties: the air permeability, the chloride diffusivity, the water absorption and the carbonation. A chloride migration test for high and very high strength concrete (HSC and VHSC) has been built. The relationship between transport properties and the compressive strength after one and 28 days of humid curing has always the same shape: transport decreases when strength increases. However, transport properties often vary in the ordinary concrete field. Beyond, the domain is much more limited. The relationship between transport properties and strength valid for ordinary concrete can not be simply extrapolated for HSC and VHSC. To determine the part of microcracking of HSC and VHSC, concrete behaviour stored in two mediums has been studied: the ones shaming the storing condition of concrete in auto-desiccation, the others reproducing the storing conditions of concrete in desiccation. Auto-desiccation (measuring relative humidity at balance) and desiccation (measuring mass losses) have been showed. Microcracks and shrinkage strains have been measured. It has been showed that auto-desiccation microcracks proving in HSC or VHSC don't question the durability. Microcracks, as for permeability, do not develop between 28 days and one year. On the contrary, desiccation microcracks observed in HSC and VHSC, increase with transport properties between 28 days and 1.5 year. Thus, a bulk concrete is always more durable than a cover concrete. At last, the good influence of increase of curing of 1 to 28 days on the transport of all concretes has been emphasized. (author)

  4. Durable fear memories require PSD-95

    Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Pinard, Courtney R.; Camp, Marguerite C.; Feyder, Michael; Sah, Anupam; Bergstrom, Hadley; Graybeal, Carolyn; Liu, Yan; Schlüter, Oliver; Grant, Seth G.N.; Singewald, Nicolas; Xu, Weifeng; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. While overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Employing a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95GK), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95GK mice to retrieve remote cued fear memories was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic cortex (IL) (not anterior cingulate (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated PSD-95 virus-mediated knockdown in the IL, not ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories. PMID:25510511

  5. Predicting Shear Transformation Events in Metallic Glasses

    Xu, Bin; Falk, Michael L.; Li, J. F.; Kong, L. T.

    2018-03-01

    Shear transformation is the elementary process for plastic deformation of metallic glasses, the prediction of the occurrence of the shear transformation events is therefore of vital importance to understand the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. In this Letter, from the view of the potential energy landscape, we find that the protocol-dependent behavior of shear transformation is governed by the stress gradient along its minimum energy path and we propose a framework as well as an atomistic approach to predict the triggering strains, locations, and structural transformations of the shear transformation events under different shear protocols in metallic glasses. Verification with a model Cu64 Zr36 metallic glass reveals that the prediction agrees well with athermal quasistatic shear simulations. The proposed framework is believed to provide an important tool for developing a quantitative understanding of the deformation processes that control mechanical behavior of metallic glasses.

  6. 57Fe Moessbauer effect in borosilicate glasses

    Music, S.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was carried out to elucidate the valence state of iron and its co-ordination in borosilicate glasses, which are being investigated as possible solidification matrices for the immobilization of a simulated nuclear waste. 57 Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy was used as the experimental technique. The chemical compositions of glass samples and the experimental conditions for the preparation of these samples are given. Iron in the form of haematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was used as doping material. Details of the experimental procedure have previously been described. Isomer shifts are calculated relative to α-iron. The results indicate a strong dependence of the valency of the iron and its coordination on the chemical composition of the glass and the Fe 2 O 3 content. The method of preparing the glasses also influences the state of the iron in oxide glasses. (Author)

  7. Characterization of iron phosphate glasses prepared by microwave heating

    Almeida, Fabio Jesus Moreira de

    2006-01-01

    Phosphate glasses have been investigated since the fifties, because they are relatively easy to prepare, have low melting temperatures (1000 deg C - 1200 deg C and low glass transition. However, these glasses were very sensitive to humidity, showing a very low chemical durability. Iron phosphate glasses have been prepared by melting inorganic precursors in conventional electric furnaces and induction furnaces. By adding iron, phosphate glasses became chemical resistant and were thought to be used as nuclear waste forms or mechanical resistance fibers. The use of microwaves has been investigated because it makes possible a fast and homogeneous heating of the materials. Microwave promotes the self-heating of the material by the interaction of the external electromagnetic field with the molecules and ions of the material. Niobium phosphate glasses was also produced already through the heating of precursors in microwave ovens. Other glasses containing iron in theirs structure was produced by conventional furnaces and they had your structures analyzed. But even so, it was not still published synthesis of iron phosphate glasses starting from the melting of precursors materials in microwave ovens. In the present work mixtures of (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 3 O 4 or (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 2 O 3 were exposed to microwave energy with electromagnetic waves of 2,45 GHz. It was proposed that the absorption of this radiation for the material causes the heating from room temperature to melting temperature. The obtained iron phosphate glasses was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Differential Thermal Analysis. Iron phosphate glasses were also produced in electrical furnaces for comparison. (author)

  8. Characterization of iron phosphate glasses prepared by microwave heating

    Almeida, Fabio Jesus Moreira de

    2006-01-01

    Phosphate glasses have been investigated since the fifties, because they are relatively easy to prepare, have low melting temperatures (1000 deg C - 1200 deg C), and low glass transition. However, these glasses were very sensitive to humidity, showing a very low chemical durability. Iron phosphate glasses have been prepared by melting inorganic precursors in conventional electric furnaces and induction furnaces. By adding iron, phosphate glasses became chemical resistant and were thought to be used as nuclear waste forms or mechanical resistance fibers. The use of microwaves has been investigated because it makes possible a fast and homogeneous heating of the materials. Microwave promotes the self-heating of the material by the interaction of the external electromagnetic field with the molecules and ions of the material. Niobium phosphate glasses was also produced already through the heating of precursors in microwave ovens. Other glasses containing iron in theirs structure was produced by conventional furnaces and they had your structures analyzed. But even so, it was not still published synthesis of iron phosphate glasses starting from the melting of precursors materials in microwave ovens. In the present work mixtures of (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 3 O 4 or (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 2 O 3 were exposed to microwave energy with electromagnetic waves of 2,45 GHz. It was proposed that the absorption of this radiation for the material causes the heating from room temperature to melting temperature. The obtained iron phosphate glasses was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Differential Thermal Analysis. Iron phosphate glasses were also produced in electrical furnaces for comparison. (author)

  9. Immobilization of Uranium Silicide in Sintered Iron-Phosphate Glass

    Mateos, Patricia; Russo, Diego; Rodriguez, Diego; Heredia, A; Sanfilippo, M.; Sterba, Mario

    2003-01-01

    This work is a continuation of a previous one performed in vitrification of uranium silicide in borosilicate and iron-silicate glasses, by sintering.We present the results obtained with an iron-phosphate glass developed at our laboratory and we compare this results with those obtained with the above mentioned glasses. The main objective was to develop a method as simple as possible, so as to get a monolithic glass block with the appropriate properties to be disposed in a deep geological repository.The thermal transformation of the uranium silicide was characterized by DTA/TG analysis and X-ray diffraction.We determined the evolution of the crystalline phases and the change in weight.Calcined uranium silicide was mixed with natural U 3 O 8 , the amount of U 3 O 8 was calculated to simulate an isotopic dilution of 4%.This material was mixed with powdered iron-phosphate glass (in wt.%: 64,9 P 2 O 5 ; 22,7 Fe 2 O 3 ; 8,1 Al 2 O 3 ; 4,3 Na 2 O) in different proportions (in wt%): 7%, 10% y 15%.The powders were pressed and sintered at temperatures between 585 y 670 °C. Samples of the sintered pellet were prepared for the lixiviation tests (MCC-1P: monolithic samples; deionised water; 90° C; 7, 14 and 28 days).The samples showed a quite good durability (0,6 g.m -2 .day -1 ), similar to borosilicate glasses.The microstructure of the glass samples showed that the uranium particles are much better integrated to the glass matrix in the iron-phosphate glasses than in the borosilicate or iron-silicate glasses.We can conclude that the sintered product obtained could be a good alternative for the immobilization of nuclear wastes with high content of uranium, as the ones arising from the conditioning of research reactors spent fuels

  10. Foam glass obtained through high-pressure sintering

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    Foam glasses are usually prepared through a chemical approach, that is, by mixing glass powder with foaming agents, and heating the mixture to a temperature above the softening point (106.6 Pa s) of the glass. The foaming agents release gas, enabling expansion of the sintered glass. Here, we use...... a physical foaming approach to prepare foam glass. First, closed pores filled with inert gases (He, Ar, or N2) are physically introduced into a glass body by sintering cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass powder at high gas pressure (5‐25 MPa) at 640°C and, then cooled to room temperature. The sintered bodies...... are subjected to a second heat treatment above the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure. This heat treatment causes expansion of the pores due to high internal gas pressure. We found that the foaming ability strongly depends on the gas pressure applied during sintering, and on the kinetic...

  11. Durability Testing of Idlers for Belt Conveyors

    Andrzej Pytlik

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the durability tests carried out on both of these idlers it can be concluded that the applied research methodology describes the test conditions of idlers, in a manner as close as possible to their actual operational conditions, which were subject to a variety of factors for a total time of 116 hours, they included: dust, water, loads and variable rotational speed. This methodology allowed us to determine, even at the stage of laboratory tests, the suitability of a particular idler to certain operational conditions.

  12. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  13. Test plan: Effects of phase separation on waste loading for high level waste glasses

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the Tanks Focus Area's (TFA) effort to increase waste loading for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification at various facilities in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, the occurrence of phase separation in waste glasses spanning the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) composition ranges were studied during FY99. The type, extent, and impact of phase separation on glass durability for a series of HLW glasses, e.g., SRS-type and INEEL-type, were examined

  14. Glass and nuclear wastes

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  15. Microstructuring of glasses

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  16. DURABILITY OF ASPHALT CONCRETE MIXTURES USING DOLOMITE AGGREGATES

    Imad Al-Shalout

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the durability of asphalt concrete, including the effects of different gradations, compaction temperatures and immersion time on the durability potential of mixtures. The specific objectives of this study are: to investigate the effect of compaction temperature on the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mixtures; investigate the effect of bitumen content and different aggregate gradations on the durability potential of bituminous mixtures.

  17. Durability of capital goods: taxes and market structure

    Raviv, A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh; Zemel, E

    1977-04-01

    This paper examines the durability of capital goods produced under different market structures when tax considerations are included. Since investment tax credit and depreciation allowances are realized by the owner of the durable good, the durability of products produced by an industry which sells its output differs from that of an industry which rents. For each of these two commercial forms, both monopolistic and competitive market structure are considered. Potential gains from different forms of regulation are discussed.

  18. The household decision making process in replacement of durable goods

    Marell Molander, Agneta

    1998-01-01

    As durables are essential in many households, the level of ownership is high and, due to the high degree of penetration, a vast proportion of the current sales are replacement purchases. Even though a lot of research attention has been paid to decision making and decision processes many models are oriented towards non-durable goods and although a majority of purchases of many durable goods are replacements, few studies seem to make a distinction between a replacement purchase decision and a d...

  19. Intrahousehold Bargaining and the Demand for Consumer Durables in Brazil

    Polato e Fava, Ana Claudia; Arends-Kuenning, Mary P.

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil, wives do most of the household work. About sixty percent of them also work outside the household, working a total of about 10 hours more per week than men. Because of this unequal distribution of household work, husbands and wives might have different priorities regarding the purchase of durable goods. Although both husbands and wives enjoy entertainment durable goods, wives might have a relative preference for household-production durable goods such as washing machines over entert...

  20. ION EXCHANGE IN GLASS-CERAMICS

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness. There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass. The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change.This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.