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Sample records for glass composite material

  1. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  2. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  3. Materials Characterisation of Glass/epoxy Composites - Focusing on Process Conditions

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Lyckegaard, Anders; Jensen, Erik Appel

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the behaviour of fibre reinforced polymer composites taking the process conditions into account involves advanced modelling techniques and an extensive materials characterisation. The materials characterisation of a chopped strand mat glass/epoxy composite has been the focus...

  4. New composite glass materials for non linear optical applications

    Menke, Y.; Ferraris, M.; Corbari, C.

    2004-01-01

    Metal nanocluster composite glasses were prepared via evaporation of a thin gold layer followed by diffusion. The effect of the deposition conditions, resulting in different evaporated gold thicknesses, and the influence of diffusion temperature and time have been studied. Resonance enhancement o...

  5. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  6. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  7. Composite glass ceramics - a promising material for aviation

    М. В. Дмитрієв

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the technical and technological characteristics of the composite ceramic as a material for electrical and structural parts in aircraft. The economic and technological advantages compared to ceramic pottery and proposed options for development of production in Ukraine

  8. Research of glass fibre used in the electromagnetic wave shielding and absorption composite material

    Xu, M.; Jia, F.; Bao, H. Q.; Cui, K.; Zhang, F.

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic shielding and absorption composite material plays an important role in the defence and economic field. Comparing with other filler, Glass fibre and its processed product—metal-coated glass fibre can greatly reduce the material's weight and costs, while it still remains the high strength and the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. In this paper, the electromagnetic absorption mechanism and the reflection mechanism have been investigated as a whole, and the shielding effectiveness of the double-layer glass fibre composite material is mainly focused. The relationship between the shielding effectiveness and the filled glass fibre as well as its metal-coated product's parameters has also been studied. From the subsequent coaxial flange and anechoic chamber analysis, it can be confirmed that the peak electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of this double-layer material can reach -78dB while the bandwidth is from 2GHz to 18GHz.

  9. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  10. Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications

    Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

  11. Glass compositions

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  12. Development of Composite Materials Under Ecological Aspects as Recycling Concept For Borosilicate Glass Containing Iron Slags

    Khalil, T.K.; Bossert, J.; Aly, H.F.; Bossert, J.

    1999-01-01

    Composite concept in materials science can be conveniently applied in the waste treatment technology to construct specific t ailor made c omposite materials, in which at least one of the phases is built by the waste material. In this work the applicability of this concept for the fixation and recycling of slags wastes is done, whereby different mixtures of blast furnace slags are mixed with two different borosilicate glasses, which serve as matrix material. Thermal behaviour of the produced compacts were studied. Both melting and powder technology are applied for the fabrication of dense products. The microstructure of sintered samples is investigated by electron microscopy. The mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness are determined by a Vickers technique. An improvement of the fracture toughness of more than 50% over the value for the original glass VG 98 is achieved by slag addition

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Microhybrid Composite and Glass lonomer Restorative Material in Permanent Teeth.

    Kharma, Khalil; Zogheib, Tatiana; Bhandi, Shilpa; Mehanna, Carina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clinically compare glass ionomer cement (GIC) with microhybrid composite resin used in class I cavities on permanent teeth over a period of 9 months. A total of 40 teeth with class I cavities were divided into two groups (n = 20) and restored with GIC (EQUIA; GC) and microhybrid resin composite (Amelogen Plus; Ultradent). Restorations were evaluated at ×4.5 magnification using the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria every 3 months. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test (a material handling, adaptation, and marginal staining. The results of this clinical study showed that GIC (EQUIA; GC) can be used for the restoration of permanent teeth and may be more appropriate for certain clinical situations than the resin composite material. EQUIA (GIC) is a viable alternative to resin composite in restoring class I cavities in permanent teeth.

  14. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. GRC: Composite material from an inorganic matrix reinforced with AR glass fibres

    Comino Almenara, P. I.

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the historical background of Cem-FIL. Alkali Resistant Glass Fibre, as well as the composite characteristics of the element they generate: GRC. The most important advantages and properties of this type of Composite Material are also detailed.

    En este artículo se detallan cuáles son las bases históricas de las Fibras de Vidrio Álcali-Resistentes Cem-FIL así como las características del elemento compuesto que ellas generan: GRC. En este documento también se pueden encontrar indicaciones sobre las principales ventajas y propiedades de este tipo de Material Compuesto.

  16. FIRE-RESISTANCE PROPERTIES RESEARCH OF “WATER GLASS - GRAPHITE MICROPARTICLES” COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    E. A. Pitukhin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Research results of the fire-resistance for “water glass - graphite microparticles” composite material (CM are given. The method for fire-resistance test of the micro composition is suggested in order to determine the limit state of the experimental samples under hightemperature action. Method. Test-benchequipment being used for research includes metering devices of temperature and time, as well as laboratory electric furnace PL20 with a maximum temperature in the chamber up to 1250ºC. Fire-resistance limit for the test samples of composite material is determined by the loss of insulating ability (I. For that purpose, the time is obtained from the test beginning with the standard temperature mode up to a limiting condition. Main Results. In accordance with the requirements of regulatory documents fire-resistance limit I15 has been obtained equal to 15 minutes. The qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of the CM structure has been done. By the study of samples by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy we have determined that the material retains the same chemical structure with a monotonic heating above 700° C. Practical Relevance. The composite material with obtained characteristics can be used as a protective coating for building constructions with the aim of fire-resistance enhancement and fuel hazard reduction.

  17. Mechanical and abrasive wear characterization of bidirectional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite materials

    Siddhartha,; Gupta, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated. ► Three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed. ► Results are validated against existing microscopic models of Lancaster and Wang. ► Tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases. ► Chopped glass fiber composites are found better in abrasive wear situations. -- Abstract: Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated in five different (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35) wt% in an epoxy resin matrix. The mechanical characterization of these composites is performed. The three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. Abrasive wear characteristics of these composites are successfully analysed using Taguchi’s experimental design scheme and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results obtained from these experiments are also validated against existing microscopic models of Ratner-Lancaster and Wang. It is observed that quite good linear relationships is held between specific wear rate and reciprocal of ultimate strength and strain at tensile fracture of these composites which is an indicative that the experimental results are in fair agreement with these existing models. Out of all composites fabricated it is found that tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases because of interface strength enhancement. Chopped glass fiber reinforced composites are observed to perform better than bi-directional glass fiber reinforced composites under abrasive wear situations. The morphology of worn composite specimens has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand about dominant wear mechanisms.

  18. Delamination R-curve as a material property of unidirectional glass/epoxy composites

    Shokrieh, M.M.; Heidari-Rarani, M.; Ayatollahi, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The R-curve behavior of a unidirectional laminate as a material property is investigated. → Effect of initial crack length and thickness on R-curve is experimentally shown. → A mathematical relation is proposed to model the R-curve behavior of any unidirectional laminated composite. -- Abstract: It is still questionable to think of delamination resistance of a double cantilever beam (DCB) as a material property independent of the specimen size and geometry. In this research, the effects of initial crack length and DCB specimen thickness on the mode I delamination resistance curve (R-curve) behavior of different unidirectional glass/epoxy DCB specimens are experimentally investigated. It is observed that the magnitudes of initiation and propagation delamination toughness (G Ic-init and G Ic-prop ) as well as the fiber bridging length are constant in a specific range of the initial crack length to the DCB specimen thickness ratios of 8.5 0 /h < 19. Finally, a mathematical relationship is proposed for prediction of mode I delamination behavior (from the initiation to propagation) of E-glass/epoxy DCB specimens.

  19. Study of the Effect of Reinforced Glass Fibers on Fatigue Properties for Composite Materials

    Mohamed G. Hamad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This  research  included  the  study of  the effect  of  reinforced  glass fibers  on  fatigue  properties  for composite materials. Polyester  resin  is used  as  connective  material(matrix in two types  of  glass  fibers  for reinforced. The  first  type  is regular  glass fibers  (woven  roving with the  directional(0-90, the second  is  glass  fibers  with  the  random  direction. The first type is the panels with regular reinforced (0-90, and with number of layer (1,2.The  second  type  is  the  panels with random  reinforced  and  with  number  of  layers (1,2. The  results  and  the  laboratory  examinations  for  the samples  reinforce  with  fibers  have  manifested (0-90  that there  is  a decrease  in the number  of  cycles  to the  fatigue  limit  when  the  number  of  reinforce  layers  have  increased . And  an elasticity of this  type  of  samples  are decreased  by  increasing  the number  of  reinforced  layers  with  fiber  .We  find  the  random  reinforced  number  of  fatigue  cycles  for the samples  with  two  layers  of  random  reinforced  are  decreased  more  than the samples  with  one  layer of random  reinforced .

  20. Design and Analysis of Drive Shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a Composite Material

    Karthikeyan, P.; Gobinath, R.; Kumar, L. Ajith; Jenish, D. Xavier

    2017-05-01

    In automobile industry drive shaft is one of the most important components to transmit power form the engine to rear wheel through the differential gear. Generally steel drive shaft is used in automobile industry, nowadays they are more interested to replace steel drive shaft with that of composite drive shaft. The overall objective of this paper is to analyze the composite drive shaft using to find out the best replacement for conventional steel drive shaft. The uses of advanced composite materials such as Kevlar, Graphite, Carbon and Glass with proper resins ware resulted in remarkable achievements in automobile industry because of its greater specific strength and specific modulus, improved fatigue and corrosion resistances and reduction in energy requirements due to reduction in weight as compared to steel shaft. This paper is to presents, the modeling and analysis of drive shaft using Kevlar/Epoxy and Glass/Epoxy as a composite material and to find best replacement for conventional steel drive shafts with an Kevlar/epoxy or Glass/Epoxy resin composite drive shaft. Modeling is done using CATIA software and Analysis is carried out by using ANSYS 10.0 software for easy understanding. The composite drive shaft reduces the weight by 81.67 % for Kevlar/Epoxy and 72.66% for Glass/Epoxy when compared with conventional steel drive shaft.

  1. GLASS FORMATION AND PROPERTIES OF CORDIERITE COMPOSITIONS FROM TALC-BASED NATURAL RAW MATERIALS WITH BORON OXIDE ADDITION

    Esin GÜNAY

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the glass forming behaviour of cordierite compositions in MAS (MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system with added B2O3 content up to 3% were studied by melting the natural raw materials such as; talc, kaolin, alumina and boric acid as the source of MgO, SiO2, Al2O3 and B2O3 respectively. XRD analysis revealed the glass formation. Optical properties of the glasses were measured using UV-VIS spectrophotometer and structural changes were monitored by using FT-IR spectrometer. Physical properties such as density, colour, thermal expansion coefficients and hardness were measured according to the standard test methods. Glasses with a green colour were produced and this was attributed to the Fe content in the glass up to 0.5% coming from talc and kaolin. The addition of B2O3 to the glasses increased the glass transition temperatures (Tg values and reduced the thermal expansion coefficient values of the glasses from 5.2226 to 5.0072ºCx10-6, for MAS-T-0 and MAS-T-3, respectively.

  2. Thermo-mechanical Characterisation of In-plane Properties for CSM E-glass Epoxy Polymer Composite Materials

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Jensen, Martin; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The in-plane Young’s modulus of a CSM E-glass/epoxy material is characterised through the use of dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The measured data is used to generate material models which describe the property behaviour as a function of conversion and temperature. Gelation of the epoxy resin...... plays a major role in the modulus development and is measured directly on the glass/epoxy material. The Young’s modulus is described through a bi-functional model including the liquid/solid transition of the material. The evolution of Young’s modulus is modelled by decoupling modulus increments caused...... by time and temperature, and is graphically illustrated through a Modulus-Temperature- Transformation (MTT) diagram. Based on the established material models presented in this paper and models in Part-1, it is feasible to assess residual stresses and shape distortions of composite parts made from...

  3. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  4. Characterising the thermoforming behaviour of glass fibre textile reinforced thermoplastic composite materials

    Kuhtz, M.; Maron, B.; Hornig, A.; Müller, M.; Langkamp, A.; Gude, M.

    2018-05-01

    Textile reinforced thermoplastic composites are predestined for highly automated medium- and high-volume production processes. The presented work focusses on experimental studies of different types of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene (GF-PP) semi-finished thermoplastic textiles to characterise the forming behaviour. The main deformation modes fabric shear, tension, thought-thickness compression and bending are investigated with special emphasis on the impact of the textile structure, the deformation temperature and rate dependency. The understanding of the fundamental forming behaviour is required to allow FEM based assessment and improvement of thermoforming process chains.

  5. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  6. Predicting the glass transition temperature and viscosity of secondary organic material using molecular composition

    W.-S. W. DeRieux

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA accounts for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere. SOA can occur in amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity (RH, and temperature. The phase transition between amorphous solid and semi-solid states occurs at the glass transition temperature (Tg. We have recently developed a method to estimate Tg of pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms (CHO compounds with molar mass less than 450 g mol−1 based on their molar mass and atomic O : C ratio. In this study, we refine and extend this method for CH and CHO compounds with molar mass up to ∼ 1100 g mol−1 using the number of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. We predict viscosity from the Tg-scaled Arrhenius plot of fragility (viscosity vs. Tg∕T as a function of the fragility parameter D. We compiled D values of organic compounds from the literature and found that D approaches a lower limit of ∼ 10 (±1.7 as the molar mass increases. We estimated the viscosity of α-pinene and isoprene SOA as a function of RH by accounting for the hygroscopic growth of SOA and applying the Gordon–Taylor mixing rule, reproducing previously published experimental measurements very well. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate impacts of Tg, D, the hygroscopicity parameter (κ, and the Gordon–Taylor constant on viscosity predictions. The viscosity of toluene SOA was predicted using the elemental composition obtained by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS, resulting in a good agreement with the measured viscosity. We also estimated the viscosity of biomass burning particles using the chemical composition measured by HRMS with two different ionization techniques: electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI. Due to differences in detected organic compounds and signal intensity, predicted viscosities at low RH based on ESI and

  7. Predicting the glass transition temperature and viscosity of secondary organic material using molecular composition

    Wong DeRieux, Wing-Sy; Li, Ying; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Bertram, Allan K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2018-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere. SOA can occur in amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity (RH), and temperature. The phase transition between amorphous solid and semi-solid states occurs at the glass transition temperature (Tg). We have recently developed a method to estimate Tg of pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms (CHO compounds) with molar mass less than 450 g mol-1 based on their molar mass and atomic O : C ratio. In this study, we refine and extend this method for CH and CHO compounds with molar mass up to ˜ 1100 g mol-1 using the number of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. We predict viscosity from the Tg-scaled Arrhenius plot of fragility (viscosity vs. Tg/T) as a function of the fragility parameter D. We compiled D values of organic compounds from the literature and found that D approaches a lower limit of ˜ 10 (±1.7) as the molar mass increases. We estimated the viscosity of α-pinene and isoprene SOA as a function of RH by accounting for the hygroscopic growth of SOA and applying the Gordon-Taylor mixing rule, reproducing previously published experimental measurements very well. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate impacts of Tg, D, the hygroscopicity parameter (κ), and the Gordon-Taylor constant on viscosity predictions. The viscosity of toluene SOA was predicted using the elemental composition obtained by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), resulting in a good agreement with the measured viscosity. We also estimated the viscosity of biomass burning particles using the chemical composition measured by HRMS with two different ionization techniques: electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Due to differences in detected organic compounds and signal intensity, predicted viscosities at low RH based on ESI and APPI measurements differ by 2-5 orders

  8. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garino, Terry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Croes, Kenneth James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  9. New generation poly(ε-caprolactone)/gel-derived bioactive glass composites for bone tissue engineering: Part I. Material properties.

    Dziadek, Michal; Menaszek, Elzbieta; Zagrajczuk, Barbara; Pawlik, Justyna; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) based composite films containing 12 and 21vol.% bioactive glass (SBG) microparticles were prepared by solvent casting method. Two gel-derived SBGs of SiO2-CaO-P2O5 system differing in SiO2 and CaO contents were applied (mol%): S2: 80SiO2, 16CaO, 4P2O5 and A2: 40SiO2, 54CaO, 6P2O5. The surfaces of the films in contact with Petri dish and exposed to the gas phase during casting were denoted as GS and AS, respectively. Both surfaces of films were characterised in terms of their morphology, micro- and nano-topography as well as wettability. Also mechanical properties (tensile strength, Young's modulus) and PCL matrix crystallinity (degree of crystallinity, crystal size) were evaluated. Degradation behaviour was examined by incubation of materials in UHQ-water at 37°C for 56weeks. The crystallinity, melting temperature and mass loss of incubated materials and pH changes of water were monitored. Furthermore, proliferation of MG-63 osteoblastic cells by direct contact and cytotoxic effect of obtained materials were investigated. Results showed that opposite surfaces of the same polymer and composite films differ in studied surface parameters. The addition of SBG particles into PCL matrix improves nano- and micro-roughness of both surfaces, enhances the hydrophilicity of GS surfaces (~67° for 21A2-PCL compared to ~78° for pure PCL) and also makes AS surface more hydrophobic (~94° for 21S2-PCL compared to ~86° for pure PCL). The nucleation density of PCL was increased with increasing content of SBG particles, which results in the large number of fine spherulites on composite AS surfaces observed using polarized optical (POM), scanning electron (SEM), and atomic force (AFM) microscopies. Higher content of SBG particles causes a notable increase of Young's modulus (from 0.38GPa for pure PCL, 0.90GPa for 12A2-PCL to 1.31GPa for 21A2-PCL), which also depends on SBG chemical composition. After 56-week degradation test, considerably higher

  10. Composite Materials

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...

  11. Superconducting composites materials

    Kerjouan, P.; Boterel, F.; Lostec, J.; Bertot, J.P.; Haussonne, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ , by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs [fr

  12. A low temperature co-fired ceramic power inductor manufactured using a glass-free ternary composite material system

    Li, Yuanxun; Xie, Yunsong; Xie, Ru; Chen, Daming; Han, Likun; Su, Hua

    2018-03-01

    A glass-free ternary composite material system (CMS) manufactured employing the low temperature ( 890 ° C ) co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technique is reported. This ternary CMS consists of silver, NiCuZn ferrite, and Zn2SiO4 ceramic. The reported device fabricated from this ternary CMS is a power inductor with a nominal inductance of 1.0 μH. Three major highlights were achieved from the device and the material study. First, unlike most other LTCC methods, no glass is required to be added in either of the dielectric materials in order to co-fire the NiCuZn ferrite, Zn2SiO4 ceramic, and silver. Second, a successfully co-fired silver, NiCuZn, and Zn2SiO4 device can be achieved by optimizing the thermal shrinkage properties of both NiCuZn and Zn2SiO4, so that they have a very similar temperature shrinkage profile. We have also found that strong non-magnetic elemental diffusion occurs during the densification process, which further enhances the success rate of manufacturing co-fired devices. Last but not least, elemental mapping suggests that strong magnetic elemental diffusion between NiCuZn and Zn2SiO4 has been suppressed during the co-firing process. The investigation of electrical performance illustrates that while the ordinary binary CMS based power inductor can deal with 400 mA DC, the ternary CMS based power inductor is able to handle higher DC currents, 700 mA and 620 mA DC, according to both simulation and experiment demonstrations, respectively.

  13. Composite material

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  14. Characterization of waste of soda-lime glass generated from lapping process to reuse as filler in composite materials as thermal insulation

    A. C. P. Galvão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe beneficiation plate process by soda-lime glass lapping in the glass industry generates, an untapped residue (waste. The waste of this material is sent to landfills, causing impact on the environment. This work aimed to characterize and evaluate the waste of soda-lime glass (GP lapping. After its acquisition, the GP was processed by grinding and sieving and further characterized by the chemical/mineralogical analysis (XRF, EDS and XRD, SEM morphology, particle size by laser diffraction, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA and DSC and thermophysical analyses. It was observed that the GP particles are irregular and micrometric with the predominant presence of Na, Si and Ca elements characteristic of amorphous soda-lime glass. The assessment of the chemical/mineralogical, morphological, thermophysical and thermal gravimetric characteristics of GP suggest its reuse as reinforcing fillers or filler in composite materials to obtain thermal insulation.

  15. Thermal conductivity of glass copper-composite

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Terai, Ryohei; Haidai, Haruki

    1980-01-01

    Glass-metal composites are to be one of the answers for promoting thermal conduction in the glassy solids containing high-level radioactive wastes. In order to investigate the effect of metal addition on thermal conductivity of glasses, glass-copper composites were selected, and the conductivities of the composites were measured and discussed in regards to copper content and microstructure. Fully densified composites were successfully prepared by pressure sintering of the powder mixtures of glass and copper at temperatures above the yield points of the constituent glasses if the copper content was not so much. The conductivity was measured by means of a comparative method, in which the thermal gradient of the specimen was compared with that of quartz glass as standard under thermally steady state. Measurements were carried out at around 50 0 C. The thermal conductivity increased with increasing content of copper depending on the kind of copper powder used. The conductivities of the composites of the same copper content differed considerably each another. Fine copper powder was effective on increasing conductivity, and the conductivity became about threefold of that of glass by mixing the fine copper powder about 10 vol%. For the composites containing the fine copper powder less than 5 vol%, the conductivity obeyed so-called logarithmic rule, one of the mixture rules of conductivity, whereas for composites containing more than 5 vol%, the conductivity remarkably increased apart from the rule. This fact suggests that copper becomes continuous in the composite when the copper content increased beyond 5 vol%. For the composites containing coarse copper powder, the conductivity was increased not significantly, and obeyed an equation derived from the model in which conductive material dispersed in less conductive one. (author)

  16. Composite materials

    Sambrook, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A superconductor composite is described comprising at least one longitudinally extending superconductor filament or bundle of sub-filaments, each filament or bundle of sub-filaments being surrounded by and in good electrical contact with a matrix material, the matrix material comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending cells of a metal of high electrical conductivity surrounded by a material of lower electrical conductivity. The high electrical conductivity material surrounding the superconducting filament or bundle of sub-filaments is interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of the lower electrical conductivity, the arrangement being such that at least two superconductor filaments or sub-filaments are circumferentially circumscribed by a single annulus of the material of high electrical conductivity. The annulus is electrically interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of low electrical conductivity

  17. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region

  18. Tensile Characterization of Injection-Molded Fuzzy Glass Fiber/Nylon Composite Material

    2016-05-01

    enhanced reinforcement (CER) in a nylon matrix. A majority of the masterbatch CER material research is focused on electromagnetic shielding applications...close as notionally shown in Fig. 1. These CER systems are subsequently enveloped in a polymer matrix to form a masterbatch CER pellet. In this

  19. The application of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method for the determination chemical composition of glass bath raw materials

    Werfel, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The estimation of determination accuracy of glass sand, limestone and dolomite compositions by the means of X-ray fluorescence method has been made. The most important advantage of XRF method application is short time of analysis. The preparation time of sample is not longer than 20 minutes, the analysis of single sample is about 1,5 minutes. The comparison of results of determinations by the means of XRF and complexometric methods have been given. (author)

  20. Thermoset composite recycling: Properties of recovered glass fiber

    Beauson, Justine; Fraisse, Anthony; Toncelli, C.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of glass fiber thermoset polymer composite is a challenging topic and a process able to recover the glass fibers original properties in a limited cost is still under investigation. This paper focuses on the recycling technique separating the glass fiber from the matrix material. Four...

  1. Using physical properties of molten glass to estimate glass composition

    Choi, Kwan Sik; Yang, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Jong Kil

    1997-01-01

    A vitrification process is under development in KEPRI for the treatment of low-and medium-level radioactive waste. Although the project is for developing and building Vitrification Pilot Plant in Korea, one of KEPRI's concerns is the quality control of the vitrified glass. This paper discusses a methodology for the estimation of glass composition by on-line measurement of molten glass properties, which could be applied to the plant for real-time quality control of the glass product. By remotely measuring viscosity and density of the molten glass, the glass characteristics such as composition can be estimated and eventually controlled. For this purpose, using the database of glass composition vs. physical properties in isothermal three-component system of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 , a software TERNARY has been developed which determines the glass composition by using two known physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity)

  2. Database for waste glass composition and properties

    Peters, R.D.; Chapman, C.C.; Mendel, J.E.; Williams, C.G.

    1993-09-01

    A database of waste glass composition and properties, called PNL Waste Glass Database, has been developed. The source of data is published literature and files from projects funded by the US Department of Energy. The glass data have been organized into categories and corresponding data files have been prepared. These categories are glass chemical composition, thermal properties, leaching data, waste composition, glass radionuclide composition and crystallinity data. The data files are compatible with commercial database software. Glass compositions are linked to properties across the various files using a unique glass code. Programs have been written in database software language to permit searches and retrievals of data. The database provides easy access to the vast quantities of glass compositions and properties that have been studied. It will be a tool for researchers and others investigating vitrification and glass waste forms

  3. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  4. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  5. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system

  6. A Comparison of gel point for a Glass/Epoxy Composite and a Neat Epoxy Material during Isothermal Curing

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens H.; Thomsen, Ole Thybo

    2014-01-01

    Determination of gel point is important for a modelling assessment of residual stresses developed during curing of composite materials. Residual stresses in a composite structure may have a detrimental effect on its mechanical performance and compromise its integrity. In this article, the evoluti...

  7. Cordierite Glass-Ceramics for Dielectric Materials

    Siti Mazatul Azwa Saiyed Mohd Nurddin; Selamat, Malek; Ismail, Abdullah

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this project is to examine the potential of using Malaysian silica sand deposit as SiO2 raw material in producing cordierite glass-ceramics (2MgO-2Al2O3-5SiO2) for dielectric materials. Upgraded silica sands from Terengganu and ex-mining land in Perak were used in the test-works. The glass batch of the present work has a composition of 45.00% SiO2, 24.00% Al2O3, 15.00% MgO and 8.50% TiO2 as nucleation agent. From the differential thermal analysis results, the crystallization temperature was found to start around 900 deg. C. The glass samples were heat-treated at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results showed glass-ceramics from Terengganu samples containing mainly cordierite and minor β-quartz crystals. However, glass-ceramics from ex-mining land samples contained mainly α-quartz and minor cordierite crystals. Glass-ceramics with different crystal phases exhibit different mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties. Based on the test works, both silica sand deposits, can be potentially used to produce dielectric material component

  8. Superconducting composites materials. Materiaux composites supraconducteurs

    Kerjouan, P; Boterel, F; Lostec, J; Bertot, J P; Haussonne, J M [Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 22 - Lannion (FR)

    1991-11-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs.

  9. Glass compositions suitable for PFR wastes

    Boult, K.A.; Dalton, J.T.; Eccles, E.W.; Hough, A.; Marples, J.A.C.; Paige, E.L.; Sutcliffe, P.W.

    1988-03-01

    Previous work had identified glass compositions that were suitable for vitrifying current and future high level wastes from the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) fuel reprocessing plant. Further work on these glasses has shown that: a) Foaming and crystallisation can occur under certain conditions, both probably associated with the presence of iron in the waste. Either of these could lead to greater difficulties in processing. b) Inconel 690, the preferred JCM (Joule-heated Ceramic Melter) electrode material has an acceptable corrosion rate at 1200 0 C: ca 0.6mm.y -1 . c) The leach rates are unaffected by radiation damage. The density of the glass decreases slightly with α-dose, with a dependency that extrapolates, at infinite time, to an 0.13% linear expansion. d) The concentrations of the radiologically important elements Tc, Np, Pu and Am, observed in a 'repository simulation' leach test, were satisfactorily low. (author)

  10. Influence of Chemical Composition and Structure in Silicon Dielectric Materials on Passivation of Thin Crystalline Silicon on Glass.

    Calnan, Sonya; Gabriel, Onno; Rothert, Inga; Werth, Matteo; Ring, Sven; Stannowski, Bernd; Schlatmann, Rutger

    2015-09-02

    In this study, various silicon dielectric films, namely, a-SiOx:H, a-SiNx:H, and a-SiOxNy:H, grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) were evaluated for use as interlayers (ILs) between crystalline silicon and glass. Chemical bonding analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that high values of oxidant gases (CO2 and/or N2), added to SiH4 during PECVD, reduced the Si-H and N-H bond density in the silicon dielectrics. Various three layer stacks combining the silicon dielectric materials were designed to minimize optical losses between silicon and glass in rear side contacted heterojunction pn test cells. The PECVD grown silicon dielectrics retained their functionality despite being subjected to harsh subsequent processing such as crystallization of the silicon at 1414 °C or above. High values of short circuit current density (Jsc; without additional hydrogen passivation) required a high density of Si-H bonds and for the nitrogen containing films, additionally, a high N-H bond density. Concurrently high values of both Jsc and open circuit voltage Voc were only observed when [Si-H] was equal to or exceeded [N-H]. Generally, Voc correlated with a high density of [Si-H] bonds in the silicon dielectric; otherwise, additional hydrogen passivation using an active plasma process was required. The highest Voc ∼ 560 mV, for a silicon acceptor concentration of about 10(16) cm(-3), was observed for stacks where an a-SiOxNy:H film was adjacent to the silicon. Regardless of the cell absorber thickness, field effect passivation of the buried silicon surface by the silicon dielectric was mandatory for efficient collection of carriers generated from short wavelength light (in the vicinity of the glass-Si interface). However, additional hydrogen passivation was obligatory for an increased diffusion length of the photogenerated carriers and thus Jsc in solar cells with thicker absorbers.

  11. δ18O and chemical composition of Libyan Desert Glass, country rocks, and sands: New considerations on target material

    Longinelli, Antonio; Sighinolfi, Giampaolo; de Michele, Vincenzo; Selmo, Enricomaria

    2011-02-01

    Oxygen isotope and chemical measurements were carried out on 25 samples of Libyan Desert Glass (LDG), 21 samples of sandstone, and 3 of sand from the same area. The δ18O of LDG samples range from 9.0‰ to 11.9‰ (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water [VSMOW]); some correlations between isotope data and typological features of the LDG samples are pointed out. The initial δ18O of a bulk parent material may be slightly increased by fusion due to the loss of isotopically light pore water with no isotope exchange with oxygen containing minerals. Accordingly, the δ18O of the bulk parent material of LDG may have been about 9.0 ± 1‰ (VSMOW). The measured bulk sandstone and sand samples have δ18O values ranging from 12.6‰ to 19.5‰ and are consequently ruled out as parent materials, matching the results of previous studies. However, separated quartz fractions have δ18O values compatible with the LDG values suggesting that the modern surface sand inherited quartz from the target material. This hypothesis fits previous findings of lechatelierite and baddeleyite in these materials. As the age of the parent material reported in previous studies is Pan-African, we measured the δ18O values of bulk rock and quartz from intrusives of Pan-African age and the results obtained were compatible with the LDG values. The main element abundances (Fe, Mg, Ca, K, Na) in our LDG samples conform to previous estimates; Fe, Mg, and K tend to be higher in heterogeneous samples with dark layers. The hypothesis of a low-altitude airburst involving silica-rich surface materials deriving from weathered intrusives of Pan-African age, partially melted and blown over a huge surface by supersonic winds matches the results obtained.

  12. Influence of nuclear glasses composition on their liability to deterioration

    Tovena, I.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the study of the nuclear glasses composition influence on their liability to deterioration. The methodology of the experimental research used has lead to define between the thirty oxides which form the reference glass light water, six oxides of interest. For each of these oxides, a composition variation area has been defined. A matrix of twenty glass compositions has then been defined. The preparation of materials of these compositions has sometimes lead to materials weakly heterogeneous which have been characterized before deterioration. This study has been completed by those of three glasses in a composition variation area narrower of the light water nuclear glass : the R7T7 and two glasses at limits having respectively an initial dissolution velocity at 100 degrees Celsius theoretically maximum and minimum. Some deterioration parameters in pure water have been experimentally measured on the twenty three glasses : 1) an initial dissolution velocity at 100 degrees (Vo 1 00) Celsius and another one at 90 degrees Celsius (Vo 9 0) 2) a dissolution velocity in conditions near the saturation at 90 degrees Celsius 3) an apparent solubility of glass based on the ortho silicic acid activity 4) the evolution of the dissolution kinetics at 90 degrees Celsius in sub-saturated medium towards saturated medium 5) the alteration films nature developed at the glasses surface during these last alteration tests. Some thermodynamic and structural models have been studied in order to predict Vo 9 0 and Vo 1 00. The dissolution kinetic law developed from reference glass dissolution results has been studied with the calculation code LIXIVER. It has not been able to be used for most of the glasses compositions studied. As a consequence, the glasses dissolution control by a surface reaction which are itself controlled by the only dissolved silica is an hypothesis which is not verified for the greater part of the glasses. (O.L.). refs., figs

  13. Characterization of low concentration uranium glass working materials

    Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wimpenny, J. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leever, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-22

    A series of uranium-doped silicate glasses were created at (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) LLNL, to be used as working reference material analogs for low uranium concentration research. Specifically, the aim of this effort was the generation of well-characterized glasses spanning a range of concentrations and compositions, and of sufficient homogeneity in uranium concentration and isotopic composition, for instrumentation research and development purposes. While the glasses produced here are not intended to replace or become standard materials for uranium concentration or uranium isotopic composition, it is hoped that they will help fill a current gap, providing low-level uranium glasses sufficient for methods development and method comparisons within the limitations of the produced glass suite. Glasses are available for research use by request.

  14. Metallic composite materials

    Frommeyer, G.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and properties of metallic composite materials and composite materials with metallic matrix are considered. In agreement with the morphology of constituent phases the following types of composite materials are described: dispersion-strengthened composite materials; particle-reinforced composite materials; fibrous composite materials; laminar composite materials. Data on strength and electric properties of the above-mentioned materials, as well as effect of the amount, location and geometric shape of the second phase on them, are presented

  15. Fracture behaviour of brittle (glass) matrix composites

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 115-122 ISSN 0255-5476. [International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /4./. Brno, 23.06.2004-25.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Ceramic matrix composites * fracture toughness * toughening effects Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  16. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  17. Fiber glass-bioactive glass composite for bone replacing and bone anchoring implants.

    Vallittu, Pekka K; Närhi, Timo O; Hupa, Leena

    2015-04-01

    Although metal implants have successfully been used for decades, devices made out of metals do not meet all clinical requirements, for example, metal objects may interfere with some new medical imaging systems, while their stiffness also differs from natural bone and may cause stress-shielding and over-loading of bone. Peer-review articles and other scientific literature were reviewed for providing up-dated information how fiber-reinforced composites and bioactive glass can be utilized in implantology. There has been a lot of development in the field of composite material research, which has focused to a large extent on biodegradable composites. However, it has become evident that biostable composites may also have several clinical benefits. Fiber reinforced composites containing bioactive glasses are relatively new types of biomaterials in the field of implantology. Biostable glass fibers are responsible for the load-bearing capacity of the implant, while the dissolution of the bioactive glass particles supports bone bonding and provides antimicrobial properties for the implant. These kinds of combination materials have been used clinically in cranioplasty implants and they have been investigated also as oral and orthopedic implants. The present knowledge suggests that by combining glass fiber-reinforced composite with particles of bioactive glass can be used in cranial implants and that the combination of materials may have potential use also as other types of bone replacing and repairing implants. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recycling solid residues recovered from glass fibre-reinforced composites – A review applied to wind turbine blade materials

    Beauson, Justine; Lilholt, Hans; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    For the sustainable development of modern societies, optimized life cycle management of any technologies must be considered, from their development and implementation to their end of life (EoL). This is of main concern for the wind energy sector. Rapidly growing, this industrial sector will have...... to face large amount of future wind turbine (WT) blades coming to EoL. Among the EoL solutions available for WT blades, i.e. reuse, remanufacturing, recycling, incineration or disposal, this literature review focuses on recycling and particularly the recycling of shredded composite (SC) materials...

  19. Adhesion analysis between metal supplies and composites materials reinforce with glass fiber; Analise de adesao antre materiais metalicos e materiais compositos reforcados com fibra e vidro

    Oushiro, Karol B.; Costa, Anahi P. da; Botelho, Edson C. [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia], e-mail: kaoushiro@hotmail.com; Costa, Michelle L. [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia; Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (AMR/IAE/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of defects, mainly thinning caused by corrosion, is unavoidable in pipeline transport of fluids. Many repair techniques have been developed, among them, has been highlighting the pipeline repair with composite that is to involve the passage of the corroded pipeline with composite material. The study of these techniques is of great interest for the branch industry, since the efficiency of repair will depend on good adhesion between the repair composite and steel pipe. In this work, the bond strength between fiber glass/epoxy composite bonded to a steel tubing used in petrochemical plants was evaluated by mechanical testing of lap shear (ASTM D1002). These samples were conditioned using 2000 thermal shock cycles, and the mechanical results of the conditioned and non-conditioned samples were compared. With this, we observed that the polymer composites can be successfully used for repair of metallic pipes with petrochemical application, because when exposed to sudden temperature changes their mechanical properties (shear) remained practically unchanged. (author)

  20. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  1. Investigation of sizing - from glass fibre surface to composite interface

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro

    significantly. The usage span wide, from furniture and car components to construction materials. Even though, the concept of composites is well known and widely applied, the fundamental principles of the interaction of the constituents, in the composites are still not fully understood. This thesis is a part...... of the sizing from the glass fibre surface to the interface in composites. Through soxhlet extraction with acetone it was possible to remove a part of the sizing from the glass fibres for analysis. By burning off the sizing at 565 ºC a higher mass loss was obtained than from the extraction, indicating...... increased after the removal of sizing by extraction but also when the sizing was removed by burning. This could partly be explained by the sizing being less dense than the glass fibres. For the burned glass fibres compactment of the glass structure also yields an increase in stiffness. The fibre strength...

  2. Processing glass-pyrochlore composites for nuclear waste encapsulation

    Pace, S.; Cannillo, V.; Wu, J.; Boccaccini, D.N.; Seglem, S.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Glass matrix composites have been developed as alternative materials to immobilize nuclear solid waste, in particular actinides. These composites are made of soda borosilicate glass matrix, into which particles of lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore are encapsulated in concentrations of 30 vol.%. The fabrication process involves powder mixing followed by hot-pressing. At the relatively low processing temperature used (620 deg. C), the pyrochlore crystalline structure of the zirconate, which is relevant for containment of radioactive nuclei, remains unaltered. The microstructure of the composites exhibits a homogeneous distribution of isolated pyrochlore particles in the glass matrix and strong bonding at the matrix-particle interfaces. Hot-pressing was found to lead to high densification (95% th.d.) of the composite. The materials are characterized by relatively high elastic modulus, flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness. A numerical approach using a microstructure-based finite element solver was used in order to investigate the mechanical properties of the composites

  3. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  4. Aerogel / Polymer Composite Materials

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  5. Elemental compositions of suspended particles released in glass manufacture

    Mamuro, T; Mizohata, A; Kubota, T [Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan)

    1980-03-01

    Suspended particles released in glass manufacture were subjected to multielement analysis by means of instrumental neutron activation method and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Suspended particles emitted from glass manufacture generally consist of both particles emitted from glass fusion and those produced through fuel combustion (mainly oil combustion). Elemental compositions of suspended particles emitted from glass fusion were found to be strongly dependent on the kind and recipe of raw materials and additives. Of the various metallic elements involved in suspended particles emitted from glass fusion, the elements, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Pb and so on are regarded to produce the most serious air pollution. The amount of emission of these elements to the environment is, howerer, quite varied from manufacturer to manufacturer. The replacement of electric furnace by oil combustion in opal glass manufacture remarkably reduced the emission of metallic elements to the environment.

  6. GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2004-01-01

    A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model

  7. Field survey and laboratory tests on composite materials case of GRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester tubes for water suply

    Radu Hariga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Moldova land, were made two lines of water adduction, having 6000 m length and 40 m slope, or 1/150 slope. The water supply component tubes were disposed under the plant: The tubes are made of glass – reinforced thermosetting plastics (GRP. After about 180 days of operation, one of the lines showed severe deterioration of the quality pipe components. This paper deals with some laboratory tests in order to detect the failure cases of the pipelines components.

  8. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  9. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model

  10. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-07-13

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model.

  11. Glass Ceramics Composites Fabricated from Coal Fly Ash and Waste Glass

    Angjusheva, B.; Jovanov, V.; Srebrenkoska, V.; Fidancevska, E.

    2014-01-01

    Great quantities of coal ash are produced in thermal power plants which present a double problem to the society: economical and environmental. This waste is a result of burning of coal at temperatures between 1100-14500C. Fly ash available as fine powder presents a source of important oxides SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, Na2O, but also consist of small amount of ecologically hazardous oxides such as Cr2O3, NiO, MnO. The combination of the fly ash with waste glass under controlled sintering procedure gave bulk glass-ceramics composite material. The principle of this procedure is presented as a multi barrier concept. Many researches have been conducted the investigations for utilization of fly ash as starting material for various glass–ceramics production. Using waste glass ecologically hazardous components are fixed at the molecular level in the silicate phase and the fabricated new glass-ceramic composites possess significantly higher mechanical properties. The aim of this investigation was to fabricate dense glass ceramic composites using fly ash and waste glass with the potential for its utilization as building material

  12. Mechanical characterization of glass fiber (woven roving/chopped strand mat E-glass fiber) reinforced polyester composites

    Bhaskar, V. Vijaya; Srinivas, Kolla

    2017-07-01

    Polymer reinforced composites have been replacing most of the engineering material and their applications become more and more day by day. Polymer composites have been analyzing from past thirty five years for their betterment for adapting more applications. This paper aims at the mechanical properties of polyester reinforced with glass fiber composites. The glass fiber is reinforced with polyester in two forms viz Woven Rovings (WRG) and Chopped Strand Mat (CSMG) E-glass fibers. The composites are fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the composites are cut as per ASTM Standard sizes for corresponding tests like flexural, compression and impact tests, so that flexural strength, compression strength, impact strength and inter laminar shear stress(ILSS) of polymer matrix composites are analyzed. From the tests and further calculations, the polyester composites reinforced with Chopped Strand Mat glass fiber have shown better performance against flexural load, compression load and impact load than that of Woven Roving glass fiber.

  13. New gadolinium based glasses for gamma-rays shielding materials

    Kaewjang, S.; Maghanemi, U.; Kothan, S.; Kim, H.J.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd 2 O 3 based glasses have been fabricated and investigated radiation shielding properties between 223 and 662 keV. • Density of the glass increases with increasing of Gd 2 O 3. • All the glasses of Gd 2 O 3 compositions studied had been shown lower HVL than X-rays shielding window. • Prepared glasses to be utilized as radiation shielding material with Pb-free advantage. • This work is the first to reports on radiation shielding properties of Gd 2 O 3 based glass matrices. - Abstract: In this work, Gd 2 O 3 based glasses in compositions (80−x)B 2 O 3 -10SiO 2 -10CaO-xGd 2 O 3 (where x = 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 mol%) have been fabricated and investigated for their radiation shielding, physical and optical properties. The density of the glass was found to increase with the increasing of Gd 2 O 3 concentration. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ m ), effective atomic number (Z eff ) and effective electron densities (N e ) of the glasses were found to increase with the increasing of Gd 2 O 3 concentration and also with the decreasing of photon energy from 223 to 662 keV. The glasses of all Gd 2 O 3 compositions studied have been shown with lower HVL values in comparison to an X-rays shielding window, ordinary concrete and commercial window; indicating their potential as radiation shielding materials with Pb-free advantage. Optical spectra of the glasses in the present study had been shown with light transparency; an advantage when used as radiation shielding materials

  14. New gadolinium based glasses for gamma-rays shielding materials

    Kaewjang, S.; Maghanemi, U.; Kothan, S. [Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chang Mai University, Chang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Limkitjaroenporn, P. [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: mink110@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses have been fabricated and investigated radiation shielding properties between 223 and 662 keV. • Density of the glass increases with increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3.} • All the glasses of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions studied had been shown lower HVL than X-rays shielding window. • Prepared glasses to be utilized as radiation shielding material with Pb-free advantage. • This work is the first to reports on radiation shielding properties of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glass matrices. - Abstract: In this work, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses in compositions (80−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-10SiO{sub 2}-10CaO-xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x = 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 mol%) have been fabricated and investigated for their radiation shielding, physical and optical properties. The density of the glass was found to increase with the increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ{sub m}), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and effective electron densities (N{sub e}) of the glasses were found to increase with the increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration and also with the decreasing of photon energy from 223 to 662 keV. The glasses of all Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions studied have been shown with lower HVL values in comparison to an X-rays shielding window, ordinary concrete and commercial window; indicating their potential as radiation shielding materials with Pb-free advantage. Optical spectra of the glasses in the present study had been shown with light transparency; an advantage when used as radiation shielding materials.

  15. Thermo-Mechanical Characterisation of In-Plane Properties for CSM E-glass Epoxy Polymer Composite Materials – Part 1

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Jensen, Martin; Andreasen, Jens H.

    2013-01-01

    The in-plane thermo-mechanical properties and residual stresses of a CSM E-glass/Epoxy material are characterised through the use of DSC and TMA. The measured data is used to generate material models which describe the mechanical behaviour as a function of conversion and temperature. The in-plane...

  16. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    Eagan, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A glass-ceramic composition is described having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, and a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum. The composition is adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures between 900 and about 950 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body

  17. Preparation of fullerene/glass composites

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; McBranch, Duncan W.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Love, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

  18. Bioactive glasses materials, properties and applications

    Ylänen, Heimo

    2011-01-01

    Due to their biocompatibility and bioactivity, bioactive glasses are used as highly effective implant materials throughout the human body to replace or repair damaged tissue. As a result, they have been in continuous use since shortly after their invention in the late 1960s and are the subject of extensive research worldwide.Bioactive glasses provides readers with a detailed review of the current status of this unique material, its properties, technologies and applications. Chapters in part one deal with the materials and mechanical properties of bioactive glass, examining topics such

  19. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    Kolitsch, A.; Richter, E.; Wolf, M.

    1978-10-01

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  20. calcium sulphate hemihydrate and bioactive glass composites for ...

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 41; Issue 2. In vitro bioactivity evaluation of α -calcium sulphate hemihydrate and bioactive glass composites for their potential use in bone regeneration. YANYAN ZHENG CHENGDONG XIONG DUJUAN ZHANG LIFANG ZHANG. Volume 41 Issue 2 April 2018 Article ID ...

  1. Composite material dosimeters

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  2. Valorization of sugarcane bagasse ash: producing glass-ceramic materials.

    Teixeira, S R; Magalhães, R S; Arenales, A; Souza, A E; Romero, M; Rincón, J M

    2014-02-15

    Some aluminosilicates, for example mullite and wollastonite, are very important in the ceramic and construction industries. The most significant glass-ceramic for building applications has wollastonite as the main crystal phase. In this work we report on the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) to produce glass-ceramics with silicates as the major crystalline phases. The glasses (frits) were prepared by mixing ash, limestone (calcium and magnesium carbonates) and potassium carbonate as the fluxing agent. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the chemical composition of the glasses and their crystallization was assessed by using thermal analysis (DTA/DSC/TGA) and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that glass-ceramic material can be produced with wollastonite as the major phase, at a temperature lower than 900 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glass-ceramics as building materials

    Rincón, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics are materials composed as any ceramic material by several crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous or vitreous matrix, but their manufacture process implies the controlled devitrification or nucleation and growth of phases from an original glass. The original shape of the original glass molded by conventional methods is carried out by using pressing and sintering followed by crystallization steps. By both processing routes are obtained transparent and/or opaque materials, with or without colours, which after adequate control and design of composition and microstructure have numerous domestic and architectonic applications. They can be used as pavements or wall coatings and in various decorative elements. In fact, their use is very extensive in east-European, American and Asian (Japan countries in constructions for covering large surfaces. The greater advantage of the glass-ceramic process is that due to the own process of vitrification allows the incorporation in their structure of a wide range of compositions from mining and industrial residues, such as red muds, ashes, fangos, scraps... which they can in this way not only be inertizated, but furthermore it be converted without risk for the environment into products useful in construction applications, offering to the architect and to the decorator a new range of "eco-materials" with multiple complementary possibilities of the already existing architectural materials in the market.

    Los productos o materiales vitrocerámicos se componen, como cualquier material de tipo cerámico, de una o varias fases cristalinas embebidas en una matriz amorfa o vítrea, pero cuyo proceso de fabricación implica la desvitrificación o nucleación y cristalización controlada de un vidrio original o de partida. En el proceso de obtención de estos materiales se puede conservar la forma original conferida al vidrio de partida por los métodos convencionales de moldeado de vidrios

  4. Using glass as a shielding material

    Yousef, S.

    2002-04-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  5. Using glass as a shielding material

    Yousef, S.

    2003-01-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  6. Corrosion resistant composite materials

    Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Foundations for corrosion-resistant composite materials design are considered with account of components compatibility. Fibrous and lamellar composites with metal matrix, dispersion-hardened steels and alloys, refractory metal carbides-, borides-, nitrides-, silicides-based composites are described. Cermet compositions and fields of their application, such as protective coatings for operation in agressive media at high temperatures, are presented

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  8. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    Rozenstrauha, I.; Sosins, G.; Krage, L.; Sedmale, G.; Vaiciukyniene, D.

    2013-01-01

    Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50 % of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminium borosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 degree centigrade). In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites) the mentioned by-products and illitic clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia) with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90 % was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA) and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15 - 35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45 - 65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 degree centigrade in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090 - 1100 degree centigrade with the most optimal properties - porosity 38 - 52 %, water absorption 39 -47 % and bulk density 1.35 - 1.67 g/cm 3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35 - 1.1 %, water absorption 0.7 - 2.6 % and bulk density 2.1 - 2.3 g/cm 3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected. (Author)

  9. Improvement of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites by poling treatment

    Oh, S M; Hwang, H Y

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new non-destructive method has been proposed for damage monitoring of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials using the piezoelectric characteristics of a polymeric matrix. Several studies of the piezoelectric properties of unidirectional glass fiber epoxy composites and damage monitoring of double-cantilever beams have supported the claim that the piezoelectric method is feasible and powerful enough to monitor the damage of glass fiber epoxy composites. Generally, conventional piezoelectric materials have higher piezoelectric characteristics through poling treatment. In this work, we investigated the change of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites before and after poling treatment. The piezoelectric constants (d 33 ) of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites increased by more than 400%. Also, x-ray diffraction tests revealed that poling treatment changed the degree of crystallinity of the epoxy matrix, and this led to the improvement of the piezoelectric characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. (paper)

  10. Nano-composite materials

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  11. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  12. Multifunctional materials and composites

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Jeon, Ki-Wan

    2017-08-22

    Forming multifunctional materials and composites thereof includes contacting a first material having a plurality of oxygen-containing functional groups with a chalcogenide compound, and initiating a chemical reaction between the first material and the chalcogenide compound, thereby replacing oxygen in some of the oxygen-containing functional groups with chalcogen from the chalcogen-containing compound to yield a second material having chalcogen-containing functional groups and oxygen-containing functional groups. The first material is a carbonaceous material or a macromolecular material. A product including the second material is collected and may be processed further to yield a modified product or a composite.

  13. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  14. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  15. Damage characterization of E-glass and C-glass fibre polymer composites after high velocity impact

    Razali, N.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.; Jawaid, M.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to identify impact damage on glass fibre reinforced polymer composite structures after high velocity impact. In this research, Type C-glass (600 g/m2) and Type E-glass (600 g/m2) were used to fabricate Glass Fibre-Reinforced Polymer composites (GFRP) plates. The panels were fabricated using a vacuum bagging and hot bounder method. Single stage gas gun (SSGG) was used to do the testing and data acquisition system was used to collect the damage data. Different types of bullets and different pressure levels were used for the experiment. The obtained results showed that the C-glass type of GFRP experienced more damage in comparison to E-glass type of materials based on the amount of energy absorbed on impact and the size of the damage area. All specimens underwent a partial fibre breakage but the laminates were not fully penetrated by the bullets. This indicated that both types of materials have high impact resistance even though the applied pressures of the gas gun were on the high range. We concluded that within the material specifications of the laminates including the type of glass fibre reinforcement and the thickness of the panels, those composite materials are safe to be applied in structural and body armour applications as an alternative to more expensive materials such as Kevlar and type S-glass fibre based panels.

  16. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  17. Systematic approach to preparing ceramic-glass composites with high translucency for dental restorations.

    Yoshimura, Humberto N; Chimanski, Afonso; Cesar, Paulo F

    2015-10-01

    Ceramic composites are promising materials for dental restorations. However, it is difficult to prepare highly translucent composites due to the light scattering that occurs in multiphase ceramics. The objective of this work was to verify the effectiveness of a systematic approach in designing specific glass compositions with target properties in order to prepare glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency. First it was necessary to calculate from literature data the viscosity of glass at the infiltration temperature using the SciGlass software. Then, a glass composition was designed for targeted viscosity and refractive index. The glass of the system SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-La2O3-TiO2 prepared by melting the oxide raw materials was spontaneously infiltrated into porous alumina preforms at 1200°C. The optical properties were evaluated using a refractometer and a spectrophotometer. The absorption and scattering coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model. The light transmittance of prepared composite was significantly higher than a commercial ceramic-glass composite, due to the matching of glass and preform refractive indexes which decreased the scattering, and also to the decrease in absorption coefficient. The proposed systematic approach was efficient for development of glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency, which benefits include the better aesthetic performance of the final prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  19. Investigation of mechanical properties of hemp/glass fiber reinforced nano clay hybrid composites

    Unki, Hanamantappa Ningappa; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    Over the last twenty to thirty years composite materials have been used in engineering field. Composite materials possess high strength, high strength to weight ratio due to these facts composite materials are becoming popular among researchers and scientists. The major proportion of engineering materials consists of composite materials. Composite materials are used in vast applications ranging from day-to-day household articles to highly sophisticated applications. In this paper an attempt is made to prepare three different composite materials using e-glass and Hemp. In this present investigation hybrid composite of Hemp, Glass fiber and Nano clay will be prepared by Hand-layup technique. The glass fiber used in this present investigation is E-glass fiber bi-directional: 90˚ orientation. The composite samples will be made in the form of a Laminates. The wt% of nanoclay added in the preparation of sample is 20 gm constant. The fabricated composite Laminate will be cut into corresponding profiles as per ASTM standards for Mechanical Testing. The effect of addition of Nano clay and variation of Hemp/glass fibers will be studied. In the present work, a new Hybrid composite is developed in which Hemp, E glass fibers is reinforced with epoxy resin and with Nano clay.

  20. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2015

  1. Study of the influence of chemical composition on the pozzolanicity of soda-lime glass microparticles

    Sales, R.B.C.; Mohallem, N.D.S.; Aguilar, M.T.P.

    2014-01-01

    The use of residues presents interesting possibilities for obtaining eco-efficient concretes. Research has investigated the use of glass residue in Portland cement composite, whether as an aggregate or a supplementary material. However, there is still no consensus on the influence of the chemical composition of glass on the behaviour of the composites in which it is used. This paper aims to analyse the influence of this composition on the performance of cement composites produced with microparticles of colourless and amber glass. Pozzolanicity was assessed by means of direct tests (modified Chapelle and electrical conductivity) and indirect tests (chemical characterization, X-ray diffraction, thermo analysis and pozzolanic activity index). Most of the results show that microparticles of both types of glass display pozzolanic activity, with no significant differences between them. This indicates the potential for the use of glass microparticles as a supplementary material in cement composites. (author)

  2. Electrically conductive composite material

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  3. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Dispersed Glass Sphere Composites Over a Range of Volume Fractions

    Carson, James K.

    2018-06-01

    Glass spheres are often used as filler materials for composites. Comparatively few articles in the literature have been devoted to the measurement or modelling of thermal properties of composites containing glass spheres, and there does not appear to be any reported data on the measurement of thermal diffusivities over a range of filler volume fractions. In this study, the thermal diffusivities of guar-gel/glass sphere composites were measured using a transient comparative method. The addition of the glass beads to the gel increased the thermal diffusivity of the composite, more than doubling the thermal diffusivity of the composite relative to the diffusivity of the gel at the maximum glass volume fraction of approximately 0.57. Thermal conductivities of the composites were derived from the thermal diffusivity measurements, measured densities and estimated specific heat capacities of the composites. Two approaches to modelling the effective thermal diffusivity were considered.

  4. Producing glass-ceramics from waste materials

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Rawlings, R.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    An overview is given of recent research at the Department of Materials of Imperial College, London, UK, concerning the production of useful glass-ceramic products from industrial waste materials. The new work, using controlled crystallisation to improve the properties of vitrified products, could help to solve the problem of what to do with increasing amounts of slag, fly ash and combustion dust. The results show, that it is possible to produce new materials with interesting magnetic and constructive properties.

  5. Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass

    Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials

  6. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    Yudhanto, Arief; Lubineau, Gilles; Wafai, Husam; Mulle, Matthieu; Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah; Yaldiz, R.; Verghese, N.

    2016-01-01

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact

  7. Nano-Micro Materials Enabled Thermoelectricity From Window Glasses

    Inayat, Salman Bin

    2012-01-01

    of individual glass strips to form the thickness depth of the glass on subsequent curing of the strips, and c) embedding nano-manufactured thermoelectric pillars, have been implemented for innovative integration of thermoelectric materials into window glasses

  8. Immobilization of transuranic sludge in glass-ceramic materials

    Welch, J.M.; Schuman, R.P.; Flinn, J.E.

    1982-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effectiveness of glass-ceramic waste forms, particularly iron-enriched basalt, for immobilizing transuranic waste sludges from the Rocky Flats plant operations. Two sludges were used in the study - one was nonradioactive and the other contained approx. 2200 dps/mg of 241 Am. The glass-ceramic waste forms were produced from laboratory-scale melting operations with subsequent controlled cooling. The waste forms were examined to assess the microstructures which resulted from systematically varied compositions and controlled cooling sequences. Leach tests in deionized water were performed on small monolithic specimens of the various glass-ceramic materials. The test results showed a rather strong temperature dependence for leach rates. Also, for some of these materials, marked differences in the 241 Am leaching behavior were seen in measurements obtained on acidified versus neutral aliquots of the spent leachates. 8 figures, 12 tables

  9. Composite Material Switches

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  10. A new basaltic glass microanalytical reference material for multiple techniques

    Wilson, Steve; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been producing reference materials since the 1950s. Over 50 materials have been developed to cover bulk rock, sediment, and soils for the geological community. These materials are used globally in geochemistry, environmental, and analytical laboratories that perform bulk chemistry and/or microanalysis for instrument calibration and quality assurance testing. To answer the growing demand for higher spatial resolution and sensitivity, there is a need to create a new generation of microanalytical reference materials suitable for a variety of techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As such, the microanalytical reference material (MRM) needs to be stable under the beam, be homogeneous at scales of better than 10–25 micrometers for the major to ultra-trace element level, and contain all of the analytes (elements or isotopes) of interest. Previous development of basaltic glasses intended for LA-ICP-MS has resulted in a synthetic basaltic matrix series of glasses (USGS GS-series) and a natural basalt series of glasses (BCR-1G, BHVO-2G, and NKT-1G). These materials have been useful for the LA-ICP-MS community but were not originally intended for use by the electron or ion beam community. A material developed from start to finish with intended use in multiple microanalytical instruments would be useful for inter-laboratory and inter-instrument platform comparisons. This article summarizes the experiments undertaken to produce a basalt glass reference material suitable for distribution as a multiple-technique round robin material. The goal of the analytical work presented here is to demonstrate that the elemental homogeneity of the new glass is acceptable for its use as a reference material. Because the round robin exercise is still underway, only

  11. Improving subcritical crack growth resistance for alumina glass dental composite

    Zhu, Q.; With, de G.

    2005-01-01

    The improvement of subcritical crack growth (SCG) resistance for alumina glass dental composites was explored in this study. The addition of nitrogen to the glass phases in the composite was found to increase the SCG resistance, where the SCG exponent n increases from 22 for the oxide glass

  12. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  13. Influence of nuclear glasses composition on their liability to deterioration; Influence de la composition des verres nucleaires sur leur alterabilite

    Tovena, I

    1995-09-29

    This contributes to the study of the nuclear glasses composition influence on their liability to deterioration. The methodology of the experimental research used has lead to define between the thirty oxides which form the reference glass light water, six oxides of interest. For each of these oxides, a composition variation area has been defined. A matrix of twenty glass compositions has then been defined. The preparation of materials of these compositions has sometimes lead to materials weakly heterogeneous which have been characterized before deterioration. This study has been completed by those of three glasses in a composition variation area narrower of the light water nuclear glass : the R7T7 and two glasses at limits having respectively an initial dissolution velocity at 100 degrees Celsius theoretically maximum and minimum. Some deterioration parameters in pure water have been experimentally measured on the twenty three glasses : 1) an initial dissolution velocity at 100 degrees (Vo{sub 1}00) Celsius and another one at 90 degrees Celsius (Vo{sub 9}0) 2) a dissolution velocity in conditions near the saturation at 90 degrees Celsius 3) an apparent solubility of glass based on the ortho silicic acid activity 4) the evolution of the dissolution kinetics at 90 degrees Celsius in sub-saturated medium towards saturated medium 5) the alteration films nature developed at the glasses surface during these last alteration tests. Some thermodynamic and structural models have been studied in order to predict Vo{sub 9}0 and Vo{sub 1}00. The dissolution kinetic law developed from reference glass dissolution results has been studied with the calculation code LIXIVER. It has not been able to be used for most of the glasses compositions studied. As a consequence, the glasses dissolution control by a surface reaction which are itself controlled by the only dissolved silica is an hypothesis which is not verified for the greater part of the glasses. (O.L.). refs., figs., tabs.

  14. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  15. Composite materials. From gammas to weight measurement

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    A gamma photons backscattering gauge called 'Filbor 2' has been designed by the CEA/DAMRI (Saclay, France) and allows to measure the resin content of fiber wicks (boron, carbon, kevlar, glass..) devoted to the manufacturing of elements made of composite materials. (J.S.)

  16. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-μm iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-μm ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 μm, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs

  17. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dependence of Hardness of Silicate Glasses on Composition and Thermal History

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    composition on hardness of silicate glasses. E-glasses of different compositions are subjected to various degrees of annealing to obtain various fictive temperatures in the glasses. It is found that hardness decreases with the fictive temperature. Addition of Na2O to a SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O glass system causes......The prediction of hardness is possible for crystalline materials, but so far not possible for glasses. In this work, several important factors that should be used for predicting the hardness of glasses are discussed. To do so, we have studied the influences of thermal history and chemical...... a decrease in hardness. However, hardness cannot solely be determined from the degree of polymerisation of the glass network. It is also determined by the effect of ionic radius on hardness. However, this effect has opposite trend for alkali and alkaline earth ions. The hardness increases with ionic radius...

  19. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  20. A new method locating good glass-forming compositions

    Yu, Dechuan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Geng, Yan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Li, Zhengkun [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Liu, Dingming [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Fu, Huameng; Zhu, Zhengwang [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Qi, Yang, E-mail: qiyang@imp.neu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, Northeastern University, No.3-11, Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110819 (China); Zhang, Haifeng, E-mail: hfzhang@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A new method was proposed to pinpoint the compositions with good glass forming ability (GFA) by combining atomic clusters and mixing entropy. The clusters were confirmed by analyzing competing crystalline phases. The method was applied to the Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloy system. A series of glass formers with diameter up to 20 mm were quickly detected in this system. The good glass formers were located only after trying 5 compositions around the calculated composition. The method was also effective in other multi-component systems. This method might provide a new way to understand glass formation and to quickly pinpoint compositions with high GFA. - Highlights: • A new method was proposed to quickly design glass formers with high glass forming ability. • The method of designing pentabasic Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloys was applied. • A series of new Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with critical diameter of 20 mm were discovered.

  1. A new method locating good glass-forming compositions

    Yu, Dechuan; Geng, Yan; Li, Zhengkun; Liu, Dingming; Fu, Huameng; Zhu, Zhengwang; Qi, Yang; Zhang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    A new method was proposed to pinpoint the compositions with good glass forming ability (GFA) by combining atomic clusters and mixing entropy. The clusters were confirmed by analyzing competing crystalline phases. The method was applied to the Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloy system. A series of glass formers with diameter up to 20 mm were quickly detected in this system. The good glass formers were located only after trying 5 compositions around the calculated composition. The method was also effective in other multi-component systems. This method might provide a new way to understand glass formation and to quickly pinpoint compositions with high GFA. - Highlights: • A new method was proposed to quickly design glass formers with high glass forming ability. • The method of designing pentabasic Zr–Al–Ni–Cu–Ag alloys was applied. • A series of new Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with critical diameter of 20 mm were discovered

  2. Basic study on intelligent materialization of glass; Glass no intelligent ko zairyoka ni kansuru kenkyu

    NONE

    1997-10-31

    This is the report No. 98 issued by the Inorganic Material Research Institute. An intelligent material is a substance and/or material which responds intelligently to environmental conditions and exhibits functions. One of the features of amorphous materials including amorphous glass is a large freedom in chemical composition. These materials maintain order in short distance, but have as a whole the turbulent and specific atom orientation. Therefore, high tolerability in selecting the composition, and diverse synthesizing methods are available. A wide range of utilization may be conceived, such as introduction of the state of electrons having different valences in a structure, and the diverse chemical combinations. Patterns of existence of polyhedrons having different orientations, and how they are connected correlate closely with an external environment. Intelligent materials have high freedom against change in the external environment and are suitable to exhibit intelligent functions. Setting heat and light as the external conditions, attempts have been made on search and creation of intelligent materials based on state change induced by interactions between the two factors. Fundamental studies have been made on synthesis of different environment responding glasses and films, and on factors and phenomena for exhibition of the intelligence. 62 refs., 91 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Composition models for the viscosity and chemical durability of West Valley related nuclear waste glasses

    Feng, X.; Saad, E.E.; Freeborn, W.P.; Macedo, P.B.; Pegg, I.L.; Sassoon, R.E.; Barkatt, A.; Finger, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    There are two important criteria that must be satisfied by a nuclear waste glass durability and processability. The chemical composition of the glass must be such that it does not dissolve or erode appreciably faster than the decay of the radioactive materials embedded in it. The second criterion, processability, means that the glass must melt with ease, must be easily pourable, and must not crystallize appreciably. This paper summarizes the development of simple models for predicting the durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses from their composition

  4. Glass Composition for the use as a Sealant

    2014-01-01

    The invention concerns a glass composition for the use as a sealant, particularly in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or in a solid oxide electrolyser cell (SOEC). The glass composition comprises 35-70 mol% CaO, 5-45 mol% ZnO, 5-50 mol% B2O3, 1-45 mol% SiO2, and 1 mol% or less of each element...... of the group, comprising Ba, Na and Sr, based on the total glass composition. Furthermore, the invention relates to an SOFC and an SOEC employing a sealant of said glass composition....

  5. Materials analyses of ceramics for glass furnace recuperators

    Weber, G.W.; Tennery, V.J.

    1979-11-01

    The use of waste heat recuperation systems offers significant promise for meaningful energy conservation in the process heat industries. This report details the analysis of candidate ceramic recuperator materials exposed to simulated industrial glass furnace hot flue gas environments. Several candidate structural ceramic materials including various types of silicon carbide, several grades of alumina, mullite, cordierite, and silicon nitride were exposed to high-temperature flue gas atmospheres from specially constructed day tank furnaces. Furnace charging, operation, and batch composition were selected to closely simulate industrial practice. Material samples were exposed in flues both with and without glass batch in the furnace for times up to 116 d at temperatures from 1150 to 1550/sup 0/C (2100 to 2800/sup 0/F). Exposed materials were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence to identify material degradation mechanisms. The materials observations were summarized as: Silicon carbide exhibited enhanced corrosion at lower temperatures (1150/sup 0/C) when alkalies were deposited on the carbide from the flue gas and less corrosion at higher temperatures (1550/sup 0/C) when alkalies were not deposited on the carbide; alumina corrosion depended strongly upon purity and density and alumina contents less than 99.8% were unsatisfactory above 1400/sup 0/C; and mullite and cordierite are generally unacceptable for application in soda-lime glass melting environments at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/C.

  6. Compressive behavior of wire reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Lee, Seung-Yub [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Choi-Yim, Haein [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aydiner, C. Can [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess a unique set of mechanical properties that make them attractive structural materials. However, when loaded without constraint, BMGs fracture catastrophically due to formation of macroscopic shear bands and this behavior reduces their reliability. To address this issue, BMG matrix composites have been developed. In this investigation, neutron diffraction was used during uniaxial compressive loading to measure the internal strains in the second phases of various BMG composites reinforced with Ta, Mo, or stainless steel wires. The diffraction data were then employed to develop a finite element model that deduced the in situ constitutive behavior of each phase. It was found that the reinforcements yielded first and started transferring load to the matrix, which remained elastic during the whole experiment. While the present composites exhibited enhanced ductility, largely due to their ductile reinforcements, they yielded at applied stresses lower than those found in W reinforced composites.

  7. composite materials under static loading

    Hamrat Mostefa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work constitutes a contribution to the analysis of the behavior of beams repaired by composite materials. To analyze the overall behavior and failure modes of the beams, an experimental study of nine reinforced concrete beams, pre-cracked and then repaired by composite materials was conducted. Six beams were pre-cracked and repaired in the tensioned part (bending repair and in the other two beams on the tensioned and lateral parts with strips in the shape of U (shear repair. A comparative study was made between the ultimate moments measured experimentally and those calculated by the theoretical models. Compared to the control beam, the resistance gain for the beams repaired in bending is 50% to 90%, while that of beams repaired in shear is from 120% to177 %. The beams repaired in shear exhibit a ductile rupture in bending. However, the beams repaired in bending were failed by the lift-off of composite or by failure of concrete cover layer (except for beams repaired by fiber glass. BAEL99, EC2-04 and ACI318-08 models give the best prediction of the ultimate moments with a mean value of 1.16 for the ratio of MExp./Mtheor. and a mean standard deviation of 0.33.

  8. Near net-shape fabrication of hydroxyapatite glass composites

    Zhu, Q.; With, de G.; Dortmans, L.; Feenstra, F.

    2004-01-01

    Near net-shape fabrication of hydroxyapatite (HA) glass composites has been attempted by infiltrating a glass into porous HA performs. Main efforts were put to develop glasses that are chemically compatible with HA at elevated temperatures. After extensive investigations in the phosphate and

  9. Micromechanics of Composite Materials

    Dvorak, George

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad exposition of analytical and numerical methods for modeling composite materials, laminates, polycrystals and other heterogeneous solids, with emphasis on connections between material properties and responses on several length scales, ranging from the nano and microscales to the macroscale. Many new results and methods developed by the author are incorporated into a rich fabric of the subject, which has been explored by several researchers over the last 40 years.   The first  part of the book reviews anisotropic elasticity theory, and then it describes the frequently used procedures and theorems for bounding and estimating overall properties, local fields and energy changes in elastic inhomogeneities, heterogeneous media, fiber composites and functionally graded materials.  Those are caused by mechanical loads and by phase eigenstrains, such as thermal, transformation and inelastic strains, and also by cavities and cracks.    Worked examples show that the eigendeformations may...

  10. Behaviour of E-glass fibre reinforced vinylester resin composites ...

    Unknown

    Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. ... Impact fatigue; static fatigue; residual stress; E-glass fibre; vinylester resin. 1. ... The present work ..... American Society for Testing and Materials) 497 p. 311.

  11. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    Maddrell, Ewan; Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na 2 O–Al 2 O 3 –B 2 O 3 –SiO 2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  12. Characteristics of diffusion zone in changing glass-metal composite processing conditions

    Lyubimova, O. N.; Morkovin, A. V.; Andreev, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    The influence of manufacturing technology on the characteristics of the glass and steel contact zone in manufacturing new structural material - glass-metal composite is studied theoretically and experimentally. Different types of structures in the contact zone and its dimensions affect the strength characteristics of the composite. Knowledge about changing the width of the glass and steel contact zone after changing such parameters of the technological regime as temperature, holding time and use of solders will allow one to control the structure and characteristics of the glass-metal composite. Experimental measurements of the width of the diffusion zone in the glass-metal composite for different regimes and their statistical processing according to the full factor experiment are presented in this article. The results of analysis of some mechanical characteristics of the diffusion zone are presented: microhardness and modulus of elasticity for samples, prepared according to different processing regimes.

  13. COMPARISON OF BIOACTIVITY IN VITRO OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC MATERIALS DURING SOAKING IN SBF AND DMEM MEDIUM

    GABRIELA LUTIŠANOVÁ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the surface reactivity of two sets of glasses and glass ceramic materials belonging to the Li2O–SiO2–CaO–P2O5–CaF2 system. The in vitro bioactivity of coatings was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM soaking test in static regime for up to 28 days at 36.5°C in microincubator. The surface structure changes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA methods. The functional groups of the silicate and phosphates were identified by infrared spectroscopy (IR. The crystal phases of the glasses and glass ceramics were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The results suggest the bioactivity behavior for all compositions of glasses as well as glass ceramic samples after 28 days in the SBF and DMEM medium. The surface characterization and in vitro tests revealed a few variations in the reactivity of the different glasses and glass ceramic samples in their pristine form. The best results show the samples of glass and glass ceramic samples with higher content of fluorapatite (FA. The use of the acellular culture medium DMEM resulted in a delay at the start of precipitation.

  14. GLASS-FIBRE REINFORCED COMPOSITES: THE EFFECT OF ...

    HOD

    mechanical and corrosion wear behaviour of any reinforced composites. In other ..... physical properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin and the following .... waste in concrete and cement composites," Journal of Cleaner Production, vol.

  15. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    Ballard, C.P. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950 0 C to about 1100 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO 2 , from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al 2 O 3 , from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li 2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P 2 O 5

  16. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    Ballard, Jr., Clifford P.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950.degree. C to about 1100.degree. C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO.sub.2, from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li.sub.2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5.

  17. Characterization study of industrial waste glass as starting material ...

    In present study, an industrial waste glass was characterized and the potential to assess as starting material in development of bioactive materials was investigated. A waste glass collected from the two different glass industry was grounded to fine powder. The samples were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ...

  18. Modern filaments for composite materials

    Krivelli-Viskonti, I.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of modern state and ways to improve properties of different filaments for the forecast of the filament application in composite materials has been conducted. In the near future as before the greatest attention will be paid to fibre glass, as this material is widely used in the reinforcing of organic matrices. Carbon and kevlar filaments are the most prospective ones. For the service at medium, high or superhigh temperatures selection of matrix material is more significant than selection of filament. Organic matrices can not be used at temperatures > 250 deg C: this is already the range of metal matrix application. Though at temperatures above room one many filaments can be used, boron filaments and metal wire are the only reinforcing materials, inspite of the fact that carbon filaments are successfully used for metal matrix reinforcing. At very high temperatures only carbon filaments or silicon carbide ones can be used, but their cost is very high and besides economical problems there are many difficulties of technical character

  19. Methodology for characterisation of glass fibre composite architecture

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Larsen, J.B.; Østergaard, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    of the fibres. The information is used for different analyses to investigate and characterise the fibre architecture. As an example, the methodology is applied to glass fibre reinforced composites with varying fibre contents. The different fibre volume fractions (FVFs) affect the number of contact points per......The present study outlines a methodology for microstructural characterisation of fibre reinforced composites containing circular fibres. Digital micrographs of polished cross-sections are used as input to a numerical image processing tool that determines spatial mapping and radii detection...... fibre, the communal fibre distance and the local FVF. The fibre diameter distribution and packing pattern remain somewhat similar for the considered materials. The methodology is a step towards a better understanding of the composite microstructure and can be used to evaluate the interconnection between...

  20. Dielectric studies of Graphene and Glass Fiber reinforced composites

    Praveen, D.; Shashi Kumar, M. E.; Pramod, R.

    2018-02-01

    Graphene and E-glass fibres are one of the key materials used currently due to their unique chemical and mechanical properties. Lately graphene has attracted many researchers across academic fraternity as it can yield better properties with lesser reinforcement percentages. The current research emphasizes on the development of graphene-based nanocomposites and its investigation on dielectric applications. The composites were fabricated by adding graphene reinforcements from 1%-3% by weight using conventional Hand-lay process. A thorough investigation was carried out to determine the dielectric behaviour of the nano-composites using impedance analyser according to ASTM standards. The dielectric measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 300K to 400K in a step of 20K. The current research proposes the material for application in capacitor industry as the sample of 2.5% weight fraction showed highest value of K with 14 at 26.1 Hz and 403K.

  1. Composition-Structure-Property Relations of Compressed Borosilicate Glasses

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Fuglsang, Søren D.; Pedersen, Rune H.; Tjell, Anders Ø.; Østergaard, Martin B.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-08-01

    Hot isostatic compression is an interesting method for modifying the structure and properties of bulk inorganic glasses. However, the structural and topological origins of the pressure-induced changes in macroscopic properties are not yet well understood. In this study, we report on the pressure and composition dependences of density and micromechanical properties (hardness, crack resistance, and brittleness) of five soda-lime borosilicate glasses with constant modifier content, covering the extremes from Na-Ca borate to Na-Ca silicate end members. Compression experiments are performed at pressures ≤1.0 GPa at the glass transition temperature in order to allow processing of large samples with relevance for industrial applications. In line with previous reports, we find an increasing fraction of tetrahedral boron, density, and hardness but a decreasing crack resistance and brittleness upon isostatic compression. Interestingly, a strong linear correlation between plastic (irreversible) compressibility and initial trigonal boron content is demonstrated, as the trigonal boron units are the ones most disposed for structural and topological rearrangements upon network compaction. A linear correlation is also found between plastic compressibility and the relative change in hardness with pressure, which could indicate that the overall network densification is responsible for the increase in hardness. Finally, we find that the micromechanical properties exhibit significantly different composition dependences before and after pressurization. The findings have important implications for tailoring microscopic and macroscopic structures of glassy materials and thus their properties through the hot isostatic compression method.

  2. Development of glass fibre reinforced composites using microwave heating technology

    Köhler, T.; Vonberg, K.; Gries, T.; Seide, G.

    2017-10-01

    Fibre reinforced composites are differentiated by the used matrix material (thermoplastic versus duroplastic matrix) and the level of impregnation. Thermoplastic matrix systems get more important due to their suitability for mass production, their good shapeability and their high impact resistance. A challenge in the processing of these materials is the reduction of the melt flow paths of the thermoplastic matrix. The viscosity of molten thermoplastic material is distinctly higher than the viscosity of duroplastic material. An approach to reduce the flow paths of the thermoplastic melt is given by a commingling process. Composites made from commingling hybrid yarns consist of thermoplastic and reinforcing fibres. Fabrics made from these hybrid yarns are heated and consolidated by the use of heat pressing to form so called organic sheets. An innovative heating system is given by microwaves. The advantage of microwave heating is the volumetric heating of the material, where the energy of the electromagnetic radiation is converted into thermal energy inside the material. In this research project microwave active hybrid yarns are produced and examined at the Institute for Textile Technology of RWTH Aachen University (ITA). The industrial research partner Fricke und Mallah Microwave Technology GmbH, Peine, Germany develops an innovative pressing systems based on a microwave heating system. By implementing the designed microwave heating technology into an existing heat pressing process, FRTCs are being manufactured from glass and nanomodified polypropylene fibre woven fabrics. In this paper the composites are investigated for their mechanical and optical properties.

  3. Transparent Nanoporous Glass-Polymer Composite for U.S. Army Applications

    2008-10-01

    material is created by infiltrating nanoporous glass (Vycor, Corning Inc.) with different polymers. The Vycor pores (4–6 nm) are much smaller than the...glass-polymer composite to a carbon-silica composite through pyrolysis . Sotomayor et al. (12) used polyanaline-infused Vycor to produce a pH sensor...Vycor is a registered trademark of Corning , Inc., Corning , NY. 3 In this report, we will explore the processing and mechanical behavior of

  4. Characterization and Morphological Properties of Glass Fiber ...

    PROF HORSFALL

    used as the matrix for the glass fibre-epoxy resin formation. E- Glass fibre ... reinforcement of composites, coatings of materials, and other ..... composite for the manufacture of glass-ceramic materials ... reinforced epoxy composites with carbon.

  5. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  6. Fabrication of slag-glass composite with controlled porosity

    Ranko Adziski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and performance of porous ceramics made from waste materials were investigated. Slag from thermal electrical plant Kakanj (Bosnia and Herzegovina with defined granulations: (0.500÷0.250 mm; (0.250÷0.125 mm; (0.125÷0.063 mm; (0.063÷0.045 mm and 20/10 wt.% of the waste TV screen glass with a granulation <0.063 mm were used for obtaining slag-glass composites with controlled porosity. The one produced from the slag powder fraction (0.125÷0.063 mm and 20 wt.% TV screen glass, sintered at 950°C/2h, was considered as the optimal. This system possesses open porosity of 26.8±1.0%, and interconnected pores with the size of 250–400 μm. The values of E-modulus and bending strength of this composite were 10.6±0.6 GPa and 45.7±0.7 MPa, respectively. The coefficient of thermal expansion was 8.47·10-6/°C. The mass loss in 0.1M HCl solution after 30 days was 1.2 wt.%. The permeability and the form coefficient of the porous composite were K0=0.12 Da and C0=4.53·105 m-1, respectively. The porous composite shows great potential to be used as filters, diffusers for water aeration, dust collectors, acoustic absorbers, etc.

  7. Characterization of Glass Fibre – Coconut Coir– Human Hair Hybrid Composites

    D. Senthilnathan; A Gnanavel Babu; G. B. Bhaskar; KGS. Gopinath

    2014-01-01

    A composite material is a combination of two or more materials arranged in the form of layer one on the other layer using binding material through some prescribed methods. In the Glass fibre coconut fibre human hair hybrid composite method, the epoxy resin is used as binding material, in which one layer is formed of glass fibre, followed by coconut fibre and then by human hair. By using hand layup method and by changing the above arrangement of layers, six types of laminates are prepared by u...

  8. The influence of stiffeners on axial crushing of glass-fabric-reinforced epoxy composite shells

    A. Vasanthanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A generic static and impact experimental procedure has been developed in this work aimed at improving the stability of glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell structures by bonding with axial stiffeners. Crashworthy structures fabricated from composite laminate with stiffeners would offer energy absorption superior to metallic structures under compressive loading situations. An experimental material characterisation of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite under uni-axial tension has been carried out in this study. This work provides a numerical simulation procedure to describe the static and dynamic response of unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (without stiffeners and stiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (with axial stiffeners under static and impact loading using the Finite Element Method. The finite element calculation for the present study was made with ANSYS®-LS-DYNA® software. Based upon the experimental and numerical investigations, it has been asserted that glass fabric reinforced epoxy shells stiffened with GFRP stiffeners are better than unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell and glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell stiffened with aluminium stiffeners. The failure surfaces of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell structures tested under impact were examined by SEM.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of MCC [Materials Characterization Center] approved testing material---ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 glasses

    Wald, J.W.

    1988-03-01

    Materials Characterization Center glasses ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 are designed to simulate high-level waste glasses that are likely to result from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The three Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) are borosilicate glasses based upon the MCC-76-68 glass composition. One radioisotope was added to form each ATM. The radioisotopes added to form ATM-2, ATM-3, and ATM-4 were 241 Am, 237 Np, and 239 Pu, respectively. Each of the ATM lots was produced in a nominal lot size of 450 g from feed stock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1200/degree/C in a platinum crucible. Each ATM was then cast into bars. Analyzed compositions of these glasses are listed. The nonradioactive elements were analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP), and the radioisotope analyses were done by alpha energy analysis. Results are discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Glass Frit Dissolution Influenced by Material Composition and the Water Content in Iodide/Triiodide Electrolyte of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Katrine Flarup Jensen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure long-term stable dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs and modules, a hermetic sealing is required. This research investigates the chemical stability of I-/I3- redox electrolyte and four different glass frits (GFs. Sintered GF layers were openly exposed to nonaqueous redox electrolyte and redox electrolyte with 1, 5, and 10 wt% H2O in thin, encapsulated cells. The change in I3− absorbance was assigned to a reaction between the GF and I-/I3- electrolyte and was used to evaluate the chemical stability of the different GFs. The I3− absorbance change was monitored over 100 days. Two out of the four GFs were unstable when H2O was added to the redox electrolyte. The H2O caused metal ion leaching which was determined from EDX analysis of the inorganic remains of electrolyte samples. A GF based on Bi2O3–SiO2–B2O3 with low bond strength leached bismuth into electrolyte and formed the BiI3- complex. A ZnO–SiO2–Al2O3-based GF also became unstable when H2O was added to the redox electrolyte. Leaching of zinc ions due to exchange with H+ resulted in the formation of a zinc-iodine compound which caused I3− depletion. By applying the test design to different types of GFs, the material suitability in the DSC working environment was investigated.

  11. Glass solidification material confinement test device

    Namiki, Shigekazu.

    1997-01-01

    In a device for confining glass solidification materials, a pipeline connecting a detection vessel and a detector is formed to have a double walled structure, and air blowing holes are formed on the wall of the inner pipe, and an air supply mechanism is connected to inner and outer pipes for supplying blowing air thereby preventing deposition on the inner pipe wall. The air blowing holes are formed by constituting the pipe by using a porous sintered material and porous portions thereof are defined as the air blowing holes, or holes are formed on the pipe wall made of a metal by machining. A blowing boundary layer is formed by blowing the supplied air along the pipe wall of the inner pipe, by which deposition of the sucked materials to the inner wall of the inner pipe is prevented, and all of the materials sucked from the detection vessel are collected to the detector. In addition, an air exit pipe is formed into a double walled structure so as to be supplied blowing air from the air supply mechanism thereby enabling to prevent deposition of sucked materials more reliably. (N.H.)

  12. Effect of Different Fillers on Adhesive Wear Properties of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composites

    E. Feyzullahoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites are used for different aims as substitute of traditional materials such as metals; due to their improved strength at small specific weight. The fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite material consists of polymeric matrix and reinforcing material. Polymeric materials are commonly reinforced with synthetic fibers such as glass and carbon. The glass fiber reinforced polyester (GFRP composites are used with different filler materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different filler materials on adhesive wear behavior of GFRP. In this experimental study; polymetilmetacrilat (PMMA, Glass beads (GB and Glass sand (GS were used as filling material in GFRP composite samples. The adhesive wear behaviors of samples were carried out using ball on disc type tribometer. The friction force and coefficient of friction were measured during the test. The volume loss and wear rate values of samples were calculated according to test results. Barcol hardness values of samples were measured. The densities of samples were measured. Results show that the wear resistance of GB filled GFRP composite samples was much more than non-filled and PMMA filled GFRP composite samples.

  13. Coating material composition

    Kimura, Tadashi; Ozeki, Takao; Kobayashi, Juichi; Nakamoto, Hideo; Maeda, Yutaka.

    1969-01-01

    A coating material composition is provided which can easily be cross-linked by irradiation with active energy, particularly electron beams and ultraviolet light, using a mixture of a prepolymer (a) with an addition reaction product (b). Such compositions have coating properties as good as thermosetting acrylic or amino alkyd resins. The prepolymer (a) is produced by primarily reacting at least 0.1 mol of saturated cyclocarboxylic acid anhydrides and/or alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acid anhydrides by addition reaction with one mol of hydroxyl radicals of a basic polymer having a molecular weight of 1,000 to 100,000, the basic polymer being obtained from 1%-40% of a hydroxyl radical containing vinyl monomer and at least 30% of (meth)acrylate monomer. One mol of the sum of hydroxyl radicals and carboxyl radicals of the primary reaction product undergoes a secondary addition reaction with at least 0.1 mol of an epoxy radical-containing vinyl monomer to form the prepolymer(a). The addition reaction product(b) is produced by reacting an epoxy radical-containing vinyl monomer with alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acids or their anhydrides. The coating material composition contains a majority of a mixture consisting of 10%-90% of (a) and 90%-10% of (b) above by weight. Four examples of the production of basic polymers, seven examples of the production of prepolymers, seven examples of the production of oligomers, and five examples of applications are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  14. Technical Note: Updated durability/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses

    Piepel, G.F.; Hartley, S.A.; Redgate, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    This technical note presents empirical models developed in FYI 995 to predict durability as functions of glass composition. Models are presented for normalized releases of B, Li, Na, and Si from the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) applied to quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses as well as from the 28-day Materials Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) test applied to quenched glasses. Models are presented for Composition Variation Study (CVS) data from low temperature melter (LTM) studies (Hrma, Piepel, et al. 1994) and high temperature melter (HTM) studies (Vienna et al. 1995). The data used for modeling in this technical note are listed in Appendix A

  15. Examination of the Thermo-mechanical Properties of E-Glass/Carbon Composites

    Hande Sezgin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight-ply E-glass, carbon and E-glass/carbon fabric-reinforced polyester based hybrid composites were manufactured in this study. A vacuum infusion system was used as the production method. Dynamic mechanical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry analysis were conducted to examine the thermo-mechanical properties of composite samples. The effect of reinforcement type and different stacking sequences of fabric plies on the thermo-mechanical properties of composite samples were also investigated. Results showed that the type and alignment of reinforcement material has a signifi cant effect on the dynamic mechanical properties of composite samples.

  16. Composite properties for S-2 glass in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix

    Clements, L. L.; Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have measured thermal and mechanical properties of several composites of S-2 glass fiber in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix. The filament-wound composites ranged from 50 to 70 vol% fiber. The composites had generally good to excellent mechanical properties, particularly in view of the moderate cost of the material. However, the composites showed rapid increases in transverse thermal expansion above 50 C, and this property must be carefully considered if any use above that temperature is contemplated.

  17. Mechanical behaviour of degradable phosphate glass fibres and composites-a review.

    Colquhoun, R; Tanner, K E

    2015-12-23

    Biodegradable materials are potentially an advantageous alternative to the traditional metallic fracture fixation devices used in the reconstruction of bone tissue defects. This is due to the occurrence of stress shielding in the surrounding bone tissue that arises from the absence of mechanical stimulus to the regenerating bone due to the mismatch between the elastic modulus of bone and the metal implant. However although degradable polymers may alleviate such issues, these inert materials possess insufficient mechanical properties to be considered as a suitable alternative to current metallic devices at sites of sufficient mechanical loading. Phosphate based glasses are an advantageous group of materials for tissue regenerative applications due to their ability to completely degrade in vivo at highly controllable rates based on the specific glass composition. Furthermore the release of the glass's constituent ions can evoke a therapeutic stimulus in vivo (i.e. osteoinduction) whilst also generating a bioactive response. The processing of these materials into fibres subsequently allows them to act as reinforcing agents in degradable polymers to simultaneously increase its mechanical properties and enhance its in vivo response. However despite the various review articles relating to the compositional influences of different phosphate glass systems, there has been limited work summarising the mechanical properties of different phosphate based glass fibres and their subsequent incorporation as a reinforcing agent in degradable composite materials. As a result, this review article examines the compositional influences behind the development of different phosphate based glass fibre compositions intended as composite reinforcing agents along with an analysis of different potential composite configurations. This includes variations in the fibre content, matrix material and fibre architecture as well as other novel composites designs.

  18. In situ preparation of NiS2/CoS2 composite electrocatalytic materials on conductive glass substrates with electronic modulation for high-performance counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Li, Faxin; Wang, Jiali; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Yaqiang; Huang, Niu; Sun, Panpan; Fang, Liang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Xiaohua

    2018-04-01

    The electrocatalytic composite materials of honeycomb structure NiS2 nanosheets loaded with metallic CoS2 nanoparticles are in situ prepared on F doped SnO2 conductive glass (FTO) substrates used as counter electrodes of DSSCs through chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sulfidizing process. Single crystalline NiS2 honeycomb structure array lay a foundation for the large surface area of NiS2/CoS2 composite CEs. The formed NiS2/CoS2 nanointerface modulates electronic structure of composite CEs from the synergetic interactions between CoS2 nanoparticles and NiS2 nanosheets, which dramatically improves the electrocatalytic activity of NiS2/CoS2 composite CEs; Metallic CoS2 nanoparticles covering NiS2 nanosheets electrodes adjusts the electrodes' structure and then reduces the series resistance (Rs) and the Nernst diffusion resistance (Zw) of counter electrodes. The improvement of these areas greatly enhances the electrocatalytic performance of CEs and the short circuit current density (Jsc) and Fill factor (FF) of DSSCs. Impressively, the DSSC based on NiS2/CoS2-0.1 CE shows the best photovoltaic performance with photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 8.22%, which is 24.36% higher than that (6.61%) of the DSSC with Pt CE. And the NiS2/CoS2-0.1 CE also displays a good stability in the iodine based electrolyte. This work indicates that rational construction of composite electrocatalytic materials paves an avenue for high-performance counter electrodes of DSSCs.

  19. Composite materials processing, applications, characterizations

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are used as substitutions of metals/traditional materials in aerospace, automotive, civil, mechanical and other industries. The present book collects the current knowledge and recent developments in the characterization and application of composite materials. To this purpose the volume describes the outstanding properties of this class of advanced material which recommend it for various industrial applications.

  20. Bioactivity of thermal plasma synthesized bovine hydroxyapatite/glass ceramic composites

    Yoganand, C P; Selvarajan, V; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Cannillo, Valeria; Sola, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Bone injuries and failures often require the inception of implant biomaterials. Research in this area is receiving increasing attention worldwide. A variety of artificial bone materials, such as metals, polymeric materials, composites and ceramics, are being explored to replace diseased bones. Calcium phosphate ceramics are currently used as biomaterials for many applications in both dentistry and orthopedics. Bioactive silicate-based glasses show a higher bioactive behaviour than calcium phosphate materials. It is very interesting to study the mixtures of HA and silicate-based glasses. In the present study; natural bovine hydroxyapatite / SiO 2 -CaO-MgO glass composites were produced using the Transferred arc plasma (TAP) melting method. TAP melting route is a brisk process of preparation of glass-ceramics in which the raw materials are melted in the plasma and crystallization of the melt occurs while cooling down at a much faster rate in relatively short processing times compared to the conventional methods of manufacture of glass ceramics/composites. It is well known that; one essential step to the understanding of the biological events occurring at the bone tissue/material interface is the biological investigation by in vitro tests. Cell lines are commonly used for biocompatibility tests, and are very efficient because of their reproducibility and culture facility. In this study, we report the results of a study on the response of primary cultures of human fibroblast cells to TAP melted bioactive glass ceramics.

  1. Near net-shape fabrication of alumina glass composites

    Zhu, Q.; With, de G.; Dortmans, L.J.M.G.; Feenstra, F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to fabricate alumina glass composites by melt infiltration with better dimensional control through reducing both the presintering and infiltration temperature. Main efforts were put to develop glasses that are chemically compatible with alumina. After extensive

  2. Mechanical, dielectric and optical assessment of glass composites ...

    The band gap, Urbach energy and the extinction coefficient of the glass composites have been ... icate glasses during our previous studies.7 Lanthanum oxide. (La2O3) .... vs. incident photon energy hν are used to determine the type of optical ...

  3. Development and Characterization of Sr-Containing Glass-Ceramic Composites Based on Biogenic Hydroxyapatite

    Kuda, Oleksii; Pinchuk, Nataliia; Bykov, Oleksandr; Tomila, Tamara; Olifan, Olena; Golovkova, Maryna

    2018-05-01

    Composite materials based on hydroxyapatite are widely used for bone tissue engineering. There is evidence of a positive effect of the presence of strontium in osteoplastic materials in the case of a Ca/Sr certain ratio. To examine the effect of the addition of Sr2+, a study was made by introducing it into the material composition based on biogenic hydroxyapatite and sodium borosilicate glass (50/50% wt.). The strontium was introduced into the composition in an amount of 1% wt. Composite materials were obtained at final sintering temperatures of 780 °C and a sintering time of 1 h. The effect of additions of glass phase and strontium affect changes in the crystal lattice of biogenic hydroxyapatite was investigated with the help of X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy. Also the behavior of composites in vitro in physiological solution was studied.

  4. Analysis of composition and microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites

    Beauson, J.; Markussen, C.M.; Madsen, Bo

    2013-09-01

    In hybrid fibre composites, the intermixing of the two types of fibres imposes challenges to obtain materials with a well-defined and uniform microstructure. In the present paper, the composition and the microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites mixed at the fibre bundle level are investigated. The different levels of compositions in the composites are defined and experimentally determined. The composite volume fractions are determined using an image analysis based procedure. The global fibre volume fractions are determined using a gravimetrical based method. The local fibre volume fractions are determined using volumetric calculations. A model is presented to predict the interrelation of volume fractions in hybrid fibre composites. The microstructural uniformity of the composites is analysed by the determined variation in composite volume fractions. Two analytical methods, a standard deviation based method and a fast Fourier transform method, are used to quantify the difference in microstructural uniformity between composites, and to detect and quantify any repeating pattern in the composite microstructure. (Author)

  5. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... between 750 and 850°C. We investigated the influence of milling time, particle size, foaming and oxidizing agent concentrations, temperature and time on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. Only moderate foaming was observed in carbon containing samples, while the addition...... of the oxidizing agent greatly improved the foaming quality. The results showed that the amount of oxygen available from the glass is not sufficient to combust all of the added carbon, therefore, additional oxygen was supplied via manganese reduction. In general, a minimum in the foam glass density was observed...

  6. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-15

    DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Both low-activity and high-level wastes will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass. One area of work is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated low-activity waste glass, LAWA44, provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 97.9 to 102.6 wt %, indicating acceptable recovery of the glass components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. It was noted that the measured B2O3 concentrations are somewhat above the targeted values for the study glasses. No obvious trends were observed with regard to the multiple melting steps used to prepare the study glasses, indicating that any potential effects of volatility were below measurable thresholds.

  7. In vitro behaviour of three biocompatible glasses in composite implants.

    Varila, Leena; Lehtonen, Timo; Tuominen, Jukka; Hupa, Mikko; Hupa, Leena

    2012-10-01

    Poly(L,DL-lactide) composites containing filler particles of bioactive glasses 45S5 and S53P4 were compared with a composite containing a slowly dissolving glass S68. The in vitro reactivity of the composites was studied in simulated body fluid, Tris-buffered solution, and phosphate buffered saline. The high processing temperature induced thermal degradation giving cavities in the composites containing 45S5 and S53P4, while good adhesion of S68 to the polymer was observed. The cavities partly affected the in vitro reactivity of the composites. The degradation of the composites containing the bioactive glasses was faster in phosphate buffered saline than in the two other solutions. Hydroxyapatite precipitation suggesting bone tissue bonding capability was observed on these two composites in all three solutions. The slower dissolution of S68 glass particles and the limited hydroxyapatite precipitation suggested that this glass has potential as a reinforcing composition with the capability to guide bone tissue growth in biodegradable polymer composites.

  8. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  9. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  10. Magnetic losses in composite materials

    Ramprecht, J; Sjoeberg, D

    2008-01-01

    We discuss some of the problems involved in homogenization of a composite material built from ferromagnetic inclusions in a nonmagnetic background material. The small signal permeability for a ferromagnetic spherical particle is combined with a homogenization formula to give an effective permeability for the composite material. The composite material inherits the gyrotropic structure and resonant behaviour of the single particle. The resonance frequency of the composite material is found to be independent of the volume fraction, unlike dielectric composite materials. The magnetic losses are described by a magnetic conductivity which can be made independent of frequency and proportional to the volume fraction by choosing a certain bias. Finally, some concerns regarding particles of small size, i.e. nanoparticles, are treated and the possibility of exciting exchange modes are discussed. These exchange modes may be an interesting way to increase losses in composite materials

  11. Composition-Structure-Property Relationships in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. Our results reveal a pronounced change in all the measured physical properties (density, elastic moduli, hardness, glass transition temperature, and liquid fragility) around [Al2O3]–[Na2O]=0. The structural......The complicated structural speciation in boroaluminosilicate glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties as a function of chemical composition. Here we study the composition–structure–property relationships in a series of sodium...

  12. Carbon/carbon composite materials

    Thebault, J.; Orly, P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites are singular materials from their components, their manufacturing process as well as their characteristics. This paper gives a global overview of these particularities and applications which make them now daily used composites. (authors)

  13. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  14. Composite materials design and applications

    Gay, Daniel; Tsai, Stephen W

    2002-01-01

    PART ONE. PRINCIPLES OF CONSTRUCTIONCOMPOSITE MATERIALS, INTEREST AND PROPERTIESWhat is Composite Material Fibers and MatrixWhat can be Made Using Composite Materials?Typical Examples of Interest on the Use of Composite MaterialsExamples on Replacing Conventional Solutions with CompositesPrincipal Physical PropertiesFABRICATION PROCESSESMolding ProcessesOther Forming ProcessesPractical Hints in the Manufacturing ProcessesPLY PROPERTIESIsotropy and AnisotropyCharacteristics of the Reinforcement-Matrix MixtureUnidirectional PlyWoven FabricsMats and Reinforced MatricesMultidimensional FabricsMetal Matrix CompositesTestsSANDWICH STRUCTURES:What is a Sandwich Structure?Simplified FlexureA Few Special AspectsFabrication and Design ProblemsNondestructive Quality ControlCONCEPTION AND DESIGNDesign of a Composite PieceThe LaminateFailure of LaminatesSizing of LaminatesJOINING AND ASSEMBLYRiveting and BoltingBondingInsertsCOMPOSITE MATERIALS AND AEROSPACE CONSTRUCTIONAircraftHelicoptersPropeller Blades for AirplanesTur...

  15. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  16. Effect of additional materials on the properties of glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ashes.

    Cheng, T W

    2004-07-01

    There are 21 Metro-waste incinerators in Taiwan under construction and are expected to be finished at year 2003. It is estimated that these incinerators will produce about two million tons of incinerator ash. In order to reduce the volume and eliminate contamination problems, high temperature molten technology studies have been conducted. The purpose of this research was that of trying to control the chemical composition of the glass-ceramic produced from incinerator fly ash, in order to improve the characteristics of the glass-ceramic. The experimental results showed that the additional materials, Mg(OH)2 and waste glass cullet, can change glass-ceramic phases from gehlenite to augite, pigeonite, and diopside. The physical, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the glass-ceramic also showed much better characteristics than prepared glass-ceramic using incinerator fly ash alone.

  17. The effect of casting conditions on the biaxial flexural strength of glass-ceramic materials.

    Johnson, A; Shareef, M Y; Walsh, J M; Hatton, P V; van Noort, R; Hill, R G

    1998-11-01

    To assess the effect of mould and glass casting temperatures on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of two different types of castable glass-ceramic, using existing laboratory equipment and techniques. Two castable glass-ceramic materials were evaluated. One glass (LG3) is based on SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-CaO-CaF2, and is similar in composition to glasses used in the manufacture of glass-ionomer cements. The other glass (SG3) is based on SiO2-K2O-Na2O-CaO-CaF2, and is a canasite-based material. Both materials were used to produce discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness using the same lost-wax casting process as used for metal castings. Mould temperatures of between 500 degrees C and 1000 degrees C and glass casting temperatures of between 1100 degrees C and 1450 degrees C were evaluated. The cast discs were cerammed and the biaxial flexural strength determined with a Lloyd 2000 R tester. A significant difference was found for the BFS in the range of mould temperatures evaluated, with the optimum investment mould temperature being 590 degrees C for LG3 and 610 degrees C for SG3 (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.019, respectively). No significant differences were seen between any of the glass casting temperatures evaluated. The mould temperature for castable glass-ceramic materials produced using the lost-wax casting process can have a significant effect on BFS. The optimum mould temperature may differ slightly depending on the type of material being used. The glass casting temperature of these materials does not appear to have a significant effect on BFS.

  18. Polymerization kinetics of experimental bioactive composites containing bioactive glass.

    Par, Matej; Tarle, Zrinka; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2018-06-21

    To investigate the polymerization kinetics and the degree of conversion (DC) of experimental resin composites with varying amount of bioactive glass 45S5 (BG). Experimental resin composites based on a photo-curable Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system were prepared. The composite series contained 0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 wt% of BG and reinforcing fillers up to the total filler amount of 70 wt%. Composite specimens were light cured with 1,219 mW/cm 2 for 20 or 40 s and their DC was monitored during 5 min at the data collection rate of 2 s -1 using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The 5-min DC values for experimental composites were in the range of 42.4-55.9% and 47.3-57.9% for curing times of 20 and 40 s, respectively. The differences in the 5-min DC between curing times of 20 s or 40 s became more pronounced in materials with higher BG amount. Within both curing times, a decreasing trend of the 5-min DC values was observed with the increasing percentage of BG fillers. The maximum polymerization rate also decreased consistently with the increasing BG amount. Unsilanized BG fillers showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on polymerization rate and the DC. Extending the curing time from 20 to 40 s showed a limited potential to improve the DC of composites with higher BG amount. The observed inhibitory effect of BG fillers on the polymerization of resin composites may have a negative influence on mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Multifunctional Composite Materials, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymeric composite materials that are currently utilized in aircraft structures are susceptible to significant damage from lightning strikes. Enhanced electrical...

  20. Heavy metal oxide glasses as gamma rays shielding material

    Kaur, Preet; Singh, Devinder; Singh, Tejbir

    2016-01-01

    The gamma rays shielding parameters for heavy metal oxide glasses and concrete samples are comparable. However, the transparent nature of glasses provides additional feature to visualize inside the shielding material. Hence, different researchers had contributed in computing/measuring different shielding parameters for different configurations of heavy metal oxide glass systems. In the present work, a detailed study on different heavy metal (_5_6Ba, _6_4Gd, _8_2Pb, _8_3Bi) oxide glasses has been presented on the basis of different gamma rays shielding parameters as reported by different researchers in the recent years. It has been observed that among the selected heavy metal oxide glass systems, Bismuth based glasses provide better gamma rays shielding. Hence, Bismuth based glasses can be better substitute to concrete walls at nuclear reactor sites and nuclear labs.

  1. Heavy metal oxide glasses as gamma rays shielding material

    Kaur, Preet; Singh, Devinder; Singh, Tejbir, E-mail: dr.tejbir@gmail.com

    2016-10-15

    The gamma rays shielding parameters for heavy metal oxide glasses and concrete samples are comparable. However, the transparent nature of glasses provides additional feature to visualize inside the shielding material. Hence, different researchers had contributed in computing/measuring different shielding parameters for different configurations of heavy metal oxide glass systems. In the present work, a detailed study on different heavy metal ({sub 56}Ba, {sub 64}Gd, {sub 82}Pb, {sub 83}Bi) oxide glasses has been presented on the basis of different gamma rays shielding parameters as reported by different researchers in the recent years. It has been observed that among the selected heavy metal oxide glass systems, Bismuth based glasses provide better gamma rays shielding. Hence, Bismuth based glasses can be better substitute to concrete walls at nuclear reactor sites and nuclear labs.

  2. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  3. Composite materials for aircraft structures

    Baker, A. A; Dutton, Stuart; Kelly, Donald

    2004-01-01

    ... materials for aircraft structures / Alan Baker, Stuart Dutton, and Donald Kelly- 2nd ed. p. cm. - (Education series) Rev. ed. of: Composite materials for aircraft structures / edited by B. C. Hos...

  4. Defining the Glass Composition Limits for SRS Contaminated Soils

    Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.; Crews, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminated soil resulting from the excavation, repair, and decommissioning of facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently being disposed of by shallow land burial or is being stored when considered only hazardous. Vitrification of this waste is being investigated, since it will bind the hazardous and radioactive species in a stable and durable glass matrix, which will reduce the risk of ground water contamination. However, the composition limits for producing durable glass have to be determined before the technology can be applied. Glass compositions, consisting of SRS soil and glass forming additives, were tested on a crucible-scale in three ternary phase systems. Nine different glass compositions were produced, with waste loadings ranging from 43 to 58 weight percent. These were characterized using varoius chemical methods and tested for durability in both alkaline and acidic environments. All nine performed well in alkaline environments, but only three met the strictest criteria for the acidic environment tests. Although the glasses did not meet all of the limits for the acidic tests, the test was performed on very conservative size samples, so the results were also conservative. Therefore, enough evidence was found to provide proof that SRS soil can be vitrified in a durable glass matrix

  5. Effect of Polymer Form and its Consolidation on Mechanical Properties and Quality of Glass/PBT Composites

    Durai Prabhakaran, R. T.; Pillai, Saju; Charca, Samuel; Oshkovr, Simin Ataollahi; Knudsen, Hans; Andersen, Tom Løgstrup; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Lilholt, Hans

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of the processing in determining the mechanical properties of glass fibre reinforced polybutylene terephthalate composites (Glass/PBT). Unidirectional (UD) composite laminates were manufactured by the vacuum consolidation technique using three different material systems included in this study; Glass/CBT (CBT160 powder based resin), Glass/PBT (prepreg tapes), and Glass/PBT (commingled yarns). The different types of thermoplastic polymer resin systems used for the manufacturing of the composite UD laminate dictate the differences in final mechanical properties which were evaluated by through compression, flexural and short beam transverse bending tests. Microscopy was used to evaluate the quality of the processed laminates, and fractography was used to characterize the observed failure modes. The study provides an improved understanding of the relationships between processing methods, resin characteristics, and mechanical performance of thermoplastic resin composite materials.

  6. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  7. Preliminary results of durability testing with borosilicate glass compositions

    Adel-Hadadi, M.; Adiga, R.; Barkatt, Aa.

    1987-01-01

    This is a report on the first year of research conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project. One objective is the vitrification of liquid waste generated by previous nuclear fuel reprocessing. This work has been directed principally at the problem of glass composition optimization. This has necessitated the development of a coordinated program of glass production, durability measurements, and processability assessment. A small-scale continuous melter has been constructed for melting uranium and thorium containing glasses and for studying glass processing characteristics. Glass viscosities have been measured over a range of temperatures. A large number of glasses have also been produced in small crucible melts. Glass durability has been assessed using four types of leach tests: MCC-3, MCC-1, IAEA/ISO, and pulsed-flow tests. Extensive data from these tests are reported. The data have led to the design of very durable glasses (comparable to the Savannah River Laboratory Defense Waste Reference Glass) which have the requisite waste loading and processing characteristics. 14 refs., 4 figs., 77 tabs

  8. Chemical and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Roman and Late Antique Glass from Northern Greece

    Alberta Silvestri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper emphasizes the importance of measuring the oxygen isotopic and chemical compositions of ancient glass, in order to constrain some features such as age, raw materials, and production technologies and to identify the “fingerprint” of local productions. In this context, thirty-nine Roman and late Antique glass samples and eight chert samples from northern Greece were selected and analysed for their oxygen isotopic and chemical compositions. Results show that the majority of glass samples are produced using natron as flux and have δ18O values of about 15.5‰, plus or minus a few tenths of one per mil, suggesting that raw materials probably come from Levantine area. Four samples are heavily enriched in 18O, and their chemical composition clearly shows that they were made with soda plant ash as flux. Isotopic and chemical data of Greek chert samples support the hypothesis of local production of the above samples. About half of the glass samples have chemical compositions, which allow their age to be constrained to the late Antique period. For the remaining glass, similarities with literature compositional groups are reported and discussed.

  9. Composite Materials in Overhead Lines

    Sørensen, Thomas Kjærsgaard; Holbøll, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    towers and recently conductors based on composite materials are available at transmission levels. In this paper it is investigated which composite based solutions are available in connection with complete overhead line systems including insulators, towers and conductors. The components are reviewed......The use of composite materials, e.g. fibreglass materials, in overhead transmission line systems is nothing new. Composite based insulators have been applied to transmission lines for over 30 years, mainly as suspension and post insulators and often as an option for special applications. Also...... with respect to solved and persisting known failures/problems of both mechanical and electrical nature. Major challenges related to extensive use of composite materials in an overhead line system are identified, as are possible benefits - both when using standard as well as customised composite components, e...

  10. Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale

  11. Multifunctionality in epoxy/glass fibers composites with graphene interphase

    Mahmood, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    In this project, the synergetic effect of a graphene interphase in epoxy/glass fibers composites was investigated by coating glass fibers (GF) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. Graphite oxide was prepared using modified Hummers method in which raw graphite powder was oxidized using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in acidic solution. Using ultrasonic technique, the graphite oxide was dispersed homogenously in w...

  12. Mechanical Characterization of Basalt and Glass Fiber Epoxy Composite Tube

    Lapena, Mauro Henrique; Marinucci, Gerson

    2017-01-01

    The application of basalt fibers are possible in many areas thanks to its multiple and good properties. It exhibits excellent resistance to alkalis, similar to glass fiber, at a much lower cost than carbon and aramid fibers. In the present paper, a comparative study on mechanical properties of basalt and E-glass fiber composites was performed. Results of apparent hoop tensile strength test of ring specimens cut from tubes and the interlaminar shear stress (ILSS) test are presented. Tensile te...

  13. Strain-Detecting Composite Materials

    Wallace, Terryl A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Horne, Michael R. (Inventor); Messick, Peter L. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor); Hailer, Benjamin T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A composite material includes a structural material and a shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite in response to a predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. In a second embodiment, the composite material includes a plurality of particles of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite and changes magnetic phase in response to the predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. A method of forming a composite material for sensing the predefined critical macroscopic average strain includes providing the shape-memory alloy having an austenite crystallographic phase, changing a size and shape of the shape-memory alloy to thereby form a plurality of particles, and combining the structural material and the particles at a temperature of from about 100-700.degree. C. to form the composite material.

  14. Research on the Properties of the Waste Glass Concrete Composite Foundation

    Jia, Shilong; Chen, Kaihui; Chen, Zhongliang

    2018-02-01

    The composite foundation of glass concrete can not only reuse the large number of waste glass, but also improve the bearing capacity of weak foundation and soil with special properties. In this paper, the engineering properties of glass concrete composite foundation are studied based on the development situation of glass concrete and the technology of composite foundation.

  15. Neural network analysis of nuclear waste glass composition vs durability

    Seibel, C.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between the chemical composition of oxide glasses and their physical properties is poorly understood, but it is becoming more important as vitrification (transformation into glass) of high-level nuclear waste becomes the favored method for long-term storage. The vitrified waste will be stored deep in geologic repositories where it must remain intact for at least 10,000 years. A strong resistance to groundwater exposure; i.c. a slow rate of glass dissolution, is of great importance. This project deals specifically with glass samples developed and tested for the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility near West Valley, New York. This facility needs to dispose of approximately 2.2 million liters of high-level radioactive liquid waste currently stored in stainless steel tanks. A self-organizing, artificial neural network was used to analyze the trends in the glass dissolution data for the effects of composition and the resulting durability of borosilicate glasses in an aqueous environment. This durability data can be used to systematically optimize the properties of the complex nuclear glasses and slow the dissolution rate of radionuclides into the environment

  16. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    Hermansen, Christian

    also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models...... are proposed based on topological selection rules and experimentally verified. The relation between structure and properties is evaluated using topological constraint theory, which in its essence is a theory that quantifies the two intuitions of the glass scientist. The end result is a quantitative model...

  17. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-12 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material ATM-12 is a borosilicate glass that incorporates elements typical of high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuels. The composition has been adjusted to match that predicted for HLW type 76-68 glass at an age of 300 y. Radioactive constituents contained in this glass include depleted uranium, 99 Tc, 237 Np, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. The glass was produced by the MCC at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). ATM-12 glass ws produced from July to November of 1984 at the request of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigations (NNWSI) Program and is the third in a series of glasses produced for NNWSI. Most of the glass produced was in the form of cast bars; special castings and crushed material were also produced. Three kilograms of ATM-12 glass were produced from a feedstock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1150 0 C in a platinum crucible, and formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars and the special casting shapes requested by NNWSI. Bars of ATM-12 were nominally 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm, with an average mass of 111 g each. Nineteen bars and 37 special castings were made. ATM-12 glass has been provided to the NNWSI Program, in the form of bars, crushed powder and special castings. As of August 1985 approximately 590 g of ATM-12 is available for distribution. Requests for materials or services related to this glass should be directed to the Materials Characterization Center Program Office, PNL

  18. Index change of chalcogenide materials from precision glass molding processes

    Deegan, J.; Walsh, K.; Lindberg, G.; Benson, R.; Gibson, D.; Bayya, S.; Sanghera, J.; Stover, E.

    2015-05-01

    With the increase in demand for infrared optics for thermal applications and the use of glass molding of chalcogenide materials to support these higher volume optical designs, an investigation of changes to the optical properties of these materials is required. Typical precision glass molding requires specific thermal conditions for proper lens molding of any type of optical glass. With these conditions a change (reduction) of optical index occurs after molding of all oxide glass types and it is presumed that a similar behavior will happen with chalcogenide based materials. We will discuss the effects of a typical molding thermal cycle for use with commercially and newly developed chalcogenide materials and show results of index variation from nominally established material data.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-9 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-9 glass is designed to be representative of glass to be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. ATM-9 glass contains all of the major components of the DWPF glass and corresponds to a waste loading of 29 wt %. The feedstock material for this glass was supplied by Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC, as SRL-165 Black Frit to which was added Ba, Cs, Md, Nd, Zr, as well as 99 Tc, depleted U, 237 Np, 239+240 Pu, and 243 Am. The glass was produced under reducing conditions by the addition of 0.7 wt % graphite during the final melting process. Three kilograms of the glass were produced from April to May of 1984. On final melting, the glass was formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars of two sizes: 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm and 1.3 x 1.3 x 10 cm. Seventeen bars of each size were made. The analyzed composition of ATM-9 glass is listed. Examination by optical microscopy of a single transverse section from one bar showed random porosity estimated at 0.36 vol % with nominal pore diameters ranging from approx. 5 μm to 200 μm. Only one distinct second phase was observed and it was at a low concentraction level in the glass matrix. The phase appeared as spherical metallic particles. X-ray diffraction analysis of this same sample did not show any diffraction peaks from crystalline components, indicating that the glass contained less than 5 wt % of crystalline devitrification products. The even shading on the radiograph exposure indicated a generally uniform distribution of radioactivity throughout the glass matrix, with no distinct high-concentration regions

  20. Mechanics in Composite Materials and Process

    Lee, Dae Gil

    1993-03-01

    This book includes introduction of composite materials, stress, in-plane stiffness of laminates strain rate, ply stress, failure criterion and bending, composite materials micromechanics, composite plates and micromechanics of composite materials. It also deals with process of composite materials such as autoclave vacuum bag degassing process, connection of composite materials, filament winding process, resin transfer molding, sheet molding compound and compression molding.

  1. Glass composite waste forms for iodine confined in bismuth-embedded SBA-15

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Yim, Man-Sung

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to stabilize bismuth-embedded SBA-15 that captured iodine gas by fabrication of monolithic waste forms. The iodine containing waste was mixed with Bi2O3 (a stabilizing additive) and low-temperature sintering glass followed by pelletizing and the sintering process to produce glass composite materials. Iodine volatility during the sintering process was significantly affected by the ratio of Bi2O3 and the glass composition. It was confirmed that BiI3, the main iodine phase within bismuth-embedded SBA-15, was effectively transformed to the mixed phases of Bi5O7I and BiOI. The initial leaching rates of iodine from the glass composite waste forms ranged 10-3-10-2 g/m2 day, showing the stability of the iodine phases encapsulated by the glassy networks. It was also observed that common groundwater anions (e.g., chloride, carbonate, sulfite, and fluoride) elevated the iodine leaching rate by anion exchange reactions. The present results suggest that the glass composite waste form of bismuth-embedded SBA-15 could be a candidate material for stable storage of 129I.

  2. Predicting bioactive glass properties from the molecular chemical composition: glass transition temperature.

    O'Donnell, Matthew D

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of inorganic glasses is an important parameter than can be used to correlate with other glass properties, such as dissolution rate, which governs in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. Seven bioactive glass compositional series reported in the literature (77 in total) were analysed here with T(g) values obtained by a number of different methods: differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and dilatometry. An iterative least-squares fitting method was used to correlate T(g) from thermal analysis of these compositions with the levels of individual oxide and fluoride components in the glasses. When all seven series were fitted a reasonable correlation was found between calculated and experimental values (R(2)=0.89). When the two compositional series that were designed in weight percentages (the remaining five were designed in molar percentage) were removed from the model an improved fit was achieved (R(2)=0.97). This study shows that T(g) for a wide range in compositions (e.g. SiO(2) content of 37.3-68.4 mol.%) can be predicted to reasonable accuracy enabling processing parameters to be predicted such as annealing, fibre-drawing and sintering temperatures. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  4. Effect of static pre-loading on fracture toughness of Nicalon fibre glass matrix composite

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Chawla, K. K.; Kulkarmi, R.; Koopman, M.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    č. 367 (2004), s. 17-23 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Nicalon fibre * glass matrix composite * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  5. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  6. Monitoring chemical degradation of thermally cycled glass-fibre composites using hyperspectral imaging

    Papadakis, V.; Muller, B.; Hagenbeek, M.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R.M.; Yu, T.; Gyekenyesi, A.L.; Shull, P.J.; Wu, H.F.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the application of glass-fibre composites in light-weight structures is growing. Although mechanical characterizations of those structures are commonly performed in testing, chemical changes of materials under stresses have not yet been well documented. In the present work coupon tests and

  7. Hydrothermal ageing of glass/epoxy composites for wind turbine blades

    Rocha, I.B.C.M.; Raijmaekers, S.; Nijssen, R.P.L.; Van der Meer, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a glass/epoxy material system commonly applied in wind turbine design was used to evaluate damage processes brought by water ingression during service life. Composite short-beams and neat epoxy beams and dog-bones were conditioned by water immersion at 50º until saturation and tested

  8. Durability testing with West Valley borosilicate glass composition- Phase II

    Macedo, P.B.; Finger, S.M.; Barkatt, A.A.; Pegg, I.L.; Feng, X.; Freeborn, W.P.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the research performed by the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) during FY 1987 in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) nuclear waste vitrification process. A principal objective of this work is the optimization of the glass composition be used for the vitrification of the liquid high-level waste generated at West Valley during nuclear fuel reprocessing. This report discusses (1) the experimental investigations to optimize the reference glass composition (the current leading candidates are WVCM-50 and ATM-10) for the WVDP vitrification process; (2) the systematic experimental investigation performed to determine the effects of compositional variations in WVCM-50 and WV-205 reference glasses on their viscosity and durability (including initial results of long-term leach tests of WVCM-50 under repository conditions); (3) the development of short-time and predictive leach tests; (4) the development of a process model for the West Valley vitrification process which predicts the range of glass compositions which may be encountered during normal operations and the effects of deviations in process control parameters; and (5) the development of product models for predicting the durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses

  9. Industrial waste as a source for fabrication of composite ceramics-glass with a controlled porosity

    Adziski R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallurgical slag with granulation (-0.125+0.063mm and 20 wt% waste TV glass were used for obtaining a glass ceramic composite with a controlled porosity. This material obtained by sintering at 950oC/2h possessed thermal stability, integral porosity of 43.6% and E-modulus and bending strength of 12 GPa and 39 MPa, respectively. The composite was characterized with a permeability of 0.47 Da and generation of air bubbles with size of 1-4 mm in a water medium.

  10. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  11. Composition of 12-18th century window glass in Belgium: Non-figurative windows in secular buildings and stained-glass windows in religious buildings

    Schalm, Olivier; Janssens, Koen; Wouters, Hilde; Caluwe, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    A set of ca. 500 window glass fragments originating from different historical sites in Belgium and covering the period 12 th -18 th century was analyzed by means of electron probe microanalysis. Most samples are archaeological finds deriving from non-figurative windows in secular buildings. However, the analyzed set also contains glass sampled from still existing non-figurative windows in secular buildings and stained-glass windows in religious buildings. A sudden compositional change at the end of the 14 th century can be noticed among the series of glass compositions that were obtained. These changes could be related to the use of different glassmaker recipes and to the introduction of new raw materials for glass making

  12. Composition of 12-18 th century window glass in Belgium: Non-figurative windows in secular buildings and stained-glass windows in religious buildings

    Schalm, Olivier; Janssens, Koen; Wouters, Hilde; Caluwé, Danielle

    2007-07-01

    A set of ca. 500 window glass fragments originating from different historical sites in Belgium and covering the period 12 th-18 th century was analyzed by means of electron probe microanalysis. Most samples are archaeological finds deriving from non-figurative windows in secular buildings. However, the analyzed set also contains glass sampled from still existing non-figurative windows in secular buildings and stained-glass windows in religious buildings. A sudden compositional change at the end of the 14 th century can be noticed among the series of glass compositions that were obtained. These changes could be related to the use of different glassmaker recipes and to the introduction of new raw materials for glass making.

  13. Plasmonic Glasses and Films Based on Alternative Inexpensive Materials for Blocking Infrared Radiation.

    V Besteiro, Lucas; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Wang, Zhiming; Rosei, Federico; Govorov, Alexander O

    2018-04-16

    The need for energy-saving materials is pressing. This Letter reports on the design of energy-saving glasses and films based on plasmonic nanocrystals that efficiently block infrared radiation. Designing such plasmonic composite glasses is nontrivial and requires taking full advantage of both material and geometrical properties of the nanoparticles. We compute the performance of solar plasmonic glasses incorporating a transparent matrix and specially shaped nanocrystals. This performance depends on the shape and material of such nanocrystals. Glasses designed with plasmonic nanoshells are shown to exhibit overall better performances as compared to nanorods and nanocups. Simultaneously, scalable synthesis of plasmonic nanoshells and nanocups is technologically feasible using gas-phase fabrication methods. The computational simulations were performed for noble metals (gold and silver) as well as for alternative plasmonic materials (aluminum, copper, and titanium nitride). Inexpensive plasmonic materials (silver, copper, aluminum, and titanium nitride) show an overall good performance in terms of the commonly used figures of merit of industrial glass windows. Together with numerical data for specific materials, this study includes a set of general rules for designing efficient plasmonic IR-blocking media. The plasmonic glasses proposed herein are good candidates for the creation of cheap optical media, to be used in energy-saving windows in warm climates' housing or temperature-sensitive infrastructure.

  14. Fatigue damage propagation in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Østergaard, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    bundles. The underlying mechanisms are examined using digital microscopy, and it is postulated that fatigue damage initiates due to stress concentrations between the backing (transverse) layer and the unidirectional layer, followed by a cyclic fretting and axial fibre debonding. This fretting mechanism......Damage progression in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites exposed to tension fatigue is investigated, and a quantitative explanation is given for the observed stiffness loss. The stiffness degradation during fatigue is directly related to fibre breaks in the load-carrying axial fibre...... needs further attention and understanding in order to improve the fatigue life-time of glass fibre reinforced composites....

  15. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial ...

    Unknown

    such as abrasion, impact etc as compared to other coating materials applied by thermal spraying in its different forms viz. ... in some systematic way information on glass and glass– ... the industries by proper maintenance of the machinery/.

  16. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  17. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    Rozenstrauha, I.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50% of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminiumborosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 ºC. In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites the mentioned by-products and illitic clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90% was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15–35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45–65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 ºC in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090–1100 ºC with the most optimal properties - porosity 38-52%, water absorption 39–47% and bulk density 1.35–1.67 g/cm3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35–1.1%, water absorption 0.7–2.6 % and bulk density 2.1–2.3 g/cm3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM. By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected.Durante la obtención de ciertas fibras de vidrio se generan dos subproductos o residuos principalmente: Lodo de arcilla montmorillonítica capaz de adsorber el 50 % de materia orgánica y un vidrio silicato alumínico con temperatura de reblandecimiento relativamente alta (> 600 ºC. Con el fin de elaborar nuevos

  18. Biotechnology and Composite Materials

    1993-04-01

    means. Silk made from the caterpillar, Bombyx mori , has outstanding mechanical and good thermal properties. The Bombyx mori synthesises the components of...Silk Proteins for Composite Fibers 185 In natural systems, the two c=nm=n sources of silks are the dch!sticated silkworm, mori , and the orb weaving...unit cell remain parallel to their original orientation during deformation. This prevents the formation of any voids or gaps in the model. Using the

  19. Composition and property measurements for PHA Phase 4 glasses

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    The results presented in this report are for nine Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) Phase 4 glasses. Three of the glasses contained HM sludge at 22, 26, and 30 wt% respectively, 10 wt% PHA and 1.25 wt% monosodium titanate (MST), all on an oxide basis. The remaining six glasses were selected from the Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies (Purex sludge) but with an increased amount of MST. The high-end target for MST of 2.5 wt% oxide was missed in Phases 1 and 2 due to ∼30 wt% water content of the MST. A goal of this Phase 4 study was to determine whether this increase in titanium concentration from the MST had any impact on glass quality or processibility. Two of the glasses, pha14c and pha15c, were rebatched and melted due to apparent batching errors with pha14 and pha15. The models currently in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) were used to predict durability, homogeneity, liquidus, and viscosity for these nine glasses. All of the HM glasses and half of the Purex glasses were predicted to be phase separated, and consequently prediction of glass durability is precluded with the cument models for those glasses that failed the homogeneity constraint. If one may ignore the homogeneity constraint, the measured durabilities were within the 95% prediction limits of the model. Further efforts will be required to resolve this issue on phase separation (inhomogeneity). The liquidus model predicted unacceptable liquidus temperatures for four of the nine glasses. The approximate, bounding liquidus temperatures measured for all had upper limits of 1,000 C or less. Given the fact that liquidus temperatures were only approximated, the 30 wt% loading of Purex may be near or at the edge of acceptability for liquidus. The measured viscosities were close to the predictions of the model. For the Purex glasses, pha12c and pha15c, the measured viscosities of 28 and 23 poise, respectively, indicate that DWPF processing may be compromised

  20. Production and Mechanical Characterization of Ballistic Thermoplastic Composite Materials

    D. Korsacilar; C. Atas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, first thermoplastic composite materials /plates that have high ballistic impact resistance were produced. For this purpose, the thermoplastic prepreg and the vacuum bagging technique were used to produce a composite material. Thermoplastic prepregs (resin-impregnated fiber) that are supplied ready to be used, namely high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was chosen as matrix and unidirectional glass fiber was used as reinforcement. In order to compare the fiber c...

  1. Fatigue of hybrid glass/carbon composites: 3D computational studies

    Dai, Gaoming; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2014-01-01

    3D computational simulations of fatigue of hybrid carbon/glass fiber reinforced composites is carried out using X-FEM and multifiber unit cell models. A new software code for the automatic generation of unit cell multifiber models of composites with randomly misaligned fibers of various properties...... and geometrical parameters is developed. With the use of this program code and the X-FEM method, systematic investigations of the effect of microstructure of hybrid composites (fraction of carbon versus glass fibers, misalignment, and interface strength) and the loading conditions (tensile versus compression...... cyclic loading effects) on fatigue behavior of the materials are carried out. It was demonstrated that the higher fraction of carbon fibers in hybrid composites is beneficial for the fatigue lifetime of the composites under tension-tension cyclic loading, but might have negative effect on the lifetime...

  2. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  3. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  4. Optimization of glass composition for the vitrification of nuclear waste at the Savannah River Plant

    Soper, P.D.; Roberts, G.J.; Lightner, L.F.; Walker, D.D.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Waste glasses of different compositions were compared in terms of leachability, viscosity, liquidus temperature, and coefficient of expansion. The compositions of the glasses were determined by statistical optimization. Waste glass of the optimized composition is more durable than the current reference composition but can still be processed at low temperature

  5. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material - ATM-8 glass

    Wald, J.W.

    1985-10-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) Approved Testing Material ATM-8 is a borosilicate glass that incorporates elements typical of high-level waste (HLW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial nuclear reactor fuel. Its composition is based upon the simulated HLW glass type 76-68 (Mendel, J.E. et al., 1977, Annual Report of the Characteristics of High-Level Waste Glasses, BNWL-2252, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington), to which depleted uranium, technetium-99, neptunium-237 and plutonium-239 have been added at moderate to low levels. The glass was requested by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. It was produced by the MCC at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute. ATM-8 glass was produced in April of 1984, and is the second in a series of testing materials for NNWSI. This report discusses its fabrication (starting materials, batch and glass preparation, measurement and testing equipment, other equipment, procedures, identification system and materials availability and storage, and characterization (bulk density) measurements, chemical analysis, microscopic examination, and x-ray diffraction analysis. 4 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Thermal Aging of Unsaturated Polyester Composite Reinforced with E-Glass Nonwoven Mat

    Hossain Milon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out using glass fiber (GF as reinforcing materials with unsaturated polyester matrix to fabricate composite by hand layup technique. Four layers of GF were impregnated by polyester resin and pressed under a load of 5 kg for 20 hours. The prepared composite samples were treated by prolonged exposure to heat for 1 hour at 60-150°C and compared with untreated GF-polyester composite. Different mechanical test of the fabricated composite were investigated. The experiment depicted significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the fabricated composite resulted from the heat treatment. The maximum tensile strength of 200.6 MPa is found for 90°C heat-treated sample. The mechanical properties of the composite do seem to be very affected negatively above 100°C. Water uptake of the composite was carried out and thermal stability of the composite was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, and it was found that the composite is stable up to 600°C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows the characteristic bond in the composite. Finally, the excellent elevated heat resistant capacity of glass-fiber-reinforced polymeric composite shows the suitability of its application to heat exposure areas such as kitchen furniture materials, marine, and electric board.

  7. Exposure Assessment of Particulate Matter from Abrasive Treatment of Carbon and Glass Fibre-Reinforced Epoxy-Composites

    Jensen, Alexander C. Ø.; Levin, Marcus; Koivisto, Antti J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composites is ever increasing due to their important structural and chemical features. The composite component production often involves high energy grinding and sanding processes to which emissions workers are potentially exposed. In this study we investigated the machining of carbon...... and glass fibre-reinforced epoxy composite materials at two facilities. We measured particle number concentrations and size distributions of the released material in near field and far field during sanding of glass-and carbon fibre-reinforced composites. We assessed the means of reducing exposure during...

  8. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  9. Bismuth silicate glass containing heavy metal oxide as a promising radiation shielding material

    Elalaily, Nagia A.; Abou-Hussien, Eman M.; Saad, Ebtisam A.

    2016-12-01

    Optical and FTIR spectroscopic measurements and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties have been utilized to investigate and characterize the given compositions of binary bismuth silicate glasses. In this work, it is aimed to study the possibility of using the prepared bismuth silicate glasses as a good shielding material for γ-rays in which adding bismuth oxide to silicate glasses causes distinguish increase in its density by an order of magnitude ranging from one to two more than mono divalent oxides. The good thermal stability and high density of the bismuth-based silicate glass encourage many studies to be undertaken to understand its radiation shielding efficiency. For this purpose a glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO2 was prepared using the melting-annealing technique. In addition the effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass, such as PbO, BaO or SrO, were also studied. EPR measurements show that the prepared glasses have good stability when exposed to γ-irradiation. The changes in the FTIR spectra due to the presence of metal oxides were referred to the different housing positions and physical properties of the respective divalent Sr2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ ions. Calculations of optical band gap energies were presented for some selected glasses from the UV data to support the probability of using these glasses as a gamma radiation shielding material. The results showed stability of both optical and magnetic spectra of the studied glasses toward gamma irradiation, which validates their irradiation shielding behavior and suitability as the radiation shielding candidate materials.

  10. Application of ceramic and glass materials in nuclear power plants

    Hamnabard, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic and glass are high temperature materials that can be used in many fields of application in nuclear industries. First, it is known that nuclear fuel UO 2 is a ceramic material. Also, ability to absorb neutrons without forming long lived radio-nuclides make the non-oxide ceramics attractive as an absorbent for neutron radiation arising in nuclear power plants. Glass-ceramic materials are a new type of ceramic that produced by the controlled nucleation and crystallization of glass, and have several advantages such as very low or null porosity, uniformity of microstructure, high chemical resistance etc. over conventional powder processed ceramics. These ceramic materials are synthesized in different systems based on their properties and applications. In nuclear industries, those are resistant to leaching and radiation damage for thousands of years, Such as glass-ceramics designed for radioactive waste immobilization and machinable glass-ceramics are used. This article introduces requirements of different glass and ceramic materials used in nuclear power plants and have been focused on developments in properties and application of them

  11. Hydrogel/bioactive glass composites for bone regeneration applications: Synthesis and characterisation

    Killion, John A.; Kehoe, Sharon; Geever, Luke M.; Devine, Declan M.; Sheehan, Eoin; Boyd, Daniel; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the deficiencies of current commercially available biological bone grafts, alternative bone graft substitutes have come to the forefront of tissue engineering in recent times. The main challenge for scientists in manufacturing bone graft substitutes is to obtain a scaffold that has sufficient mechanical strength and bioactive properties to promote formation of new tissue. The ability to synthesise hydrogel based composite scaffolds using photopolymerisation has been demonstrated in this study. The prepared hydrogel based composites were characterised using techniques including Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), rheological studies and compression testing. In addition, gel fraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), porosity and swelling studies of the composites were carried out. It was found that these novel hydrogel bioglass composite formulations did not display the inherent brittleness that is typically associated with bioactive glass based bone graft materials and exhibited enhanced biomechanical properties compared to the polyethylene glycol hydrogel scaffolds along. Together, the combination of enhanced mechanical properties and the deposition of apatite on the surface of these hydrogel based composites make them an ideal candidate as bone graft substitutes in cancellous bone defects or low load bearing applications. Highlights: • Young's modulus increases with the addition of bioactive glasses. • Hydrogel based composites formed an apatite layer in simulated body fluid. • Storage modulus increases with addition of bioactive glasses. • Compressive strength is dependent on molecular weight and bioactive glass loading

  12. Glass composite waste forms for iodine confined in bismuth-embedded SBA-15

    Yang, Jae Hwan [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to stabilize bismuth-embedded SBA-15 that captured iodine gas by fabrication of monolithic waste forms. The iodine containing waste was mixed with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} (a stabilizing additive) and low-temperature sintering glass followed by pelletizing and the sintering process to produce glass composite materials. Iodine volatility during the sintering process was significantly affected by the ratio of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the glass composition. It was confirmed that BiI{sub 3}, the main iodine phase within bismuth-embedded SBA-15, was effectively transformed to the mixed phases of Bi{sub 5}O{sub 7}I and BiOI. The initial leaching rates of iodine from the glass composite waste forms ranged 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2} day, showing the stability of the iodine phases encapsulated by the glassy networks. It was also observed that common groundwater anions (e.g., chloride, carbonate, sulfite, and fluoride) elevated the iodine leaching rate by anion exchange reactions. The present results suggest that the glass composite waste form of bismuth-embedded SBA-15 could be a candidate material for stable storage of {sup 129}I. - Highlights: • Glass composite waste forms were developed to stabilize iodine confined in Bi-embedded SBA-15. • BiI{sub 3} within Bi-embedded SBA-15 was transformed to BiOI and Bi{sub 5}O{sub 7}I during sintering process. • Iodine volatility was significantly affected by glass composition and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive. • Iodine leaching rates were 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2} day due to the stable iodine phases encapsulated by glassy networks. • Glass composite waste form of Bi-embedded SBA-15 is expected to be a candidate material for stable storage of {sup 129}I.

  13. Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites: mechanical properties and biological evaluation.

    Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Anesi, Alexandre; Salvatori, Roberta; Chiarini, Luigi; Cannillo, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites for bone tissue repair and regeneration have been produced and discussed. The use of a recently developed glass, namely BG_Ca/Mix, with its low tendency to crystallize, allowed one to sinter the samples at a relatively low temperature thus avoiding several adverse effects usually reported in the literature, such as extensive crystallization of the glassy phase, hydroxyapatite (HA) decomposition and reaction between HA and glass. The mechanical properties of the composites with 80wt.% BG_Ca/Mix and 20wt.% HA are sensibly higher than those of Bioglass® 45S5 reference samples due to the presence of HA (mechanically stronger than the 45S5 glass) and to the thermal behaviour of the BG_Ca/Mix, which is able to favour the sintering process of the composites. Biocompatibility tests, performed with murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 and osteocites MLO-Y4 throughout a multi-parametrical approach, allow one to look with optimism to the produced composites, since both the samples themselves and their extracts do not induce negative effects in cell viability and do not cause inhibition in cell growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M

    2003-07-15

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix.

  15. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix

  16. Thermal recycling and re-manufacturing of glass fibre thermosetting composites

    Fraisse, Anthony; Beauson, Justine; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of using thermally recycled glass fibre in re-manufactured composites was investigated. A unidirectional glass fibre thermosetting composite laminate was manufactured. The matrix in one part of the laminate was burnt off to recover the glass fibres. These recycled glass fibres were used...

  17. Exploring high-strength glass-ceramic materials for upcycling of industrial wastes

    Back, Gu-Seul; Park, Hyun Seo; Seo, Sung Mo; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-11-01

    To promote the recycling of industrial waste and to develop value-added products using these resources, the possibility of manufacturing glass-ceramic materials of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 system has been investigated by various heat treatment processes. Glass-ceramic materials with six different chemical compositions were prepared using steel industry slags and power plant waste by melting, casting and heat treatment. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that diopside and anorthite were the primary phases in the samples. The anorthite phase was formed in SiO2-rich material (at least 43 wt%). In CaO-rich material, the gehlenite phase was formed. By the differential scanning calorimetry analyses, it was found that the glass transition point was in the range of 973-1023 K, and the crystallization temperature was in the range of 1123-1223 K. The crystallization temperature increased as the content of Fe2O3 decreased. By the multi-step heat treatment process, the formation of the anorthite phase was enhanced. Using FactSage, the ratio of various phases was calculated as a function of temperature. The viscosities and the latent heats for the samples with various compositions were also calculated by FactSage. The optimal compositions for glass-ceramics materials were discussed in terms of their compressive strength, and micro-hardness.

  18. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material

    Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  19. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Composites and Complex Materials

    Spowart, Jonathan E.; Gupta, Nikhil; Lehmhus, Dirk

    2018-03-01

    Advanced composite materials form an important class of high-performance industrial materials used in weight-sensitive applications such as aerospace structures, automotive structures and sports equipment. In many of these applications, parts are made in small production runs, are highly customized and involve long process development times. Developments in additive manufacturing (AM) methods have helped in overcoming many of these limitations. The special topic of Additive Manufacturing of Composites and Complex Materials captures the state of the art in this area by collecting nine papers that present much novel advancement in this field. The studies under this topic show advancement in the area of AM of carbon fiber and graphene-reinforced composites with high thermal and electrical conductivities, development of new hollow glass particle-filled syntactic foam filaments for printing lightweight structures and integration of sensors or actuators during AM of metallic parts. Some of the studies are focused on process optimization or modification to increase the manufacturing speed or tuning manufacturing techniques to enable AM of new materials.

  1. Evaluating morphology and mechanical properties of glass-reinforced natural hydroxyapatite composites.

    Yazdanpanah, Z; Bahrololoom, M E; Hashemi, B

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite has been used in a wide variety of biomedical applications and it can be produced from natural resources such as bovine bone. This material does not have acceptable mechanical properties by itself. In the present work, hydroxyapatite composites with different weight percentages of sodalime glass were made and sintered at different temperatures (800-1200°C). Eventually the properties such as density, micro hardness, compressive strength and wear of specimens were evaluated. Specific percentages of glass additive increased the density and hardness of specimens due to increasing the sintering temperature. The hardness and density of specimens were decreased with higher percentage of glass additive. Moreover, the results of compressive test showed that increasing the glass addition increases the compressive performance. Furthermore, the SEM micrographs on worn specimens showed that the mechanism of wear was abrasive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of the final flotation waste for obtaining the glass-ceramic materials

    Cocić Mira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the investigation of the final flotation waste (FFW, originating from the RTB Bor Company (Serbia, as the main component for the production of glass-ceramic materials. The glass-ceramics was synthesized by the sintering of FFW, mixtures of FFW with basalt (10%, 20%, and 40%, and mixtures of FFW with tuff (20% and 40%. The sintering was conducted at the different temperatures and with the different time duration in order to find the optimal composition and conditions for crystallization. The increase of temperature, from 1100 to 1480°C, and sintering time, from 4 to 6h resulted in a higher content of hematite crystal in the obtained glass-ceramic (up to 44%. The glass-ceramics sintered from pure FFW (1080°C/36h has good mechanical properties, such as high propagation speed (4500 m/s and hardness (10800 MPa, as well as very good thermal stability. The glass-ceramics obtained from mixtures shows weaker mechanical properties compared to that obtained from pure FFW. The mixtures of FFW with tuff have a significantly lower bulk density compared to other obtained glass-ceramics. Our results indicate that FFW can be applied as a basis for obtaining the construction materials. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 176010: Composition, genesis, application, and contribution to the environmental sustainability

  3. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  4. Material Modelling - Composite Approach

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    is successfully justified comparing predicted results with experimental data obtained in the HETEK-project on creep, relaxation, and shrinkage of very young concretes cured at a temperature of T = 20^o C and a relative humidity of RH = 100%. The model is also justified comparing predicted creep, shrinkage......, and internal stresses caused by drying shrinkage with experimental results reported in the literature on the mechanical behavior of mature concretes. It is then concluded that the model presented applied in general with respect to age at loading.From a stress analysis point of view the most important finding...... in this report is that cement paste and concrete behave practically as linear-viscoelastic materials from an age of approximately 10 hours. This is a significant age extension relative to earlier studies in the literature where linear-viscoelastic behavior is only demonstrated from ages of a few days. Thus...

  5. Effect of Polymer Form and its Consolidation on Mechanical Properties and Quality of Glass/PBT Composites

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Pillai, Saju; Charca, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    different material systems included in this study; Glass/CBT (CBT160 powder based resin), Glass/PBT (prepreg tapes), and Glass/PBT (commingled yarns). The different types of thermoplastic polymer resin systems used for the manufacturing of the composite UD laminate dictate the differences in final......The aim of this study was to understand the role of the processing in determining the mechanical properties of glass fibre reinforced polybutylene terephthalate composites (Glass/PBT). Unidirectional (UD) composite laminates were manufactured by the vacuum consolidation technique using three...... mechanical properties which were evaluated by through compression, flexural and short beam transverse bending tests. Microscopy was used to evaluate the quality of the processed laminates, and fractography was used to characterize the observed failure modes. The study provides an improved understanding...

  6. Hybrid and hierarchical composite materials

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Sano, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses a broad spectrum of areas in both hybrid materials and hierarchical composites, including recent development of processing technologies, structural designs, modern computer simulation techniques, and the relationships between the processing-structure-property-performance. Each topic is introduced at length with numerous  and detailed examples and over 150 illustrations.   In addition, the authors present a method of categorizing these materials, so that representative examples of all material classes are discussed.

  7. Photon Interaction Studies with Some Glasses and Building Materials

    Singh, Harvinder; Singh, Kulwant; Sharma, Gopi; Nathuram, R.; Sahota, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of some shielding materials, namely, Bakelite, black cement, white cement, plaster of paris, and concrete were determined at 356-, 511-, 662-, 1173-, and 1332-keV energies, and those of glasses containing oxides of B, Cd, Pb, and Bi were determined only at 662 keV using a narrow beam transmission method. These coefficients of glasses were then used to determine their interaction cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical values. It has been proven that glasses have a potential application as a transparent radiation shielding

  8. The composition effect on the long-term corrosion of high-level waste glass

    Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Waste glass can be optimized for long-term corrosion behavior if the key parameters that control the rate of corrosion are identified, measured, and modeled as functions of glass composition. Second-order polynomial models have been used to optimize glass with respect to a set of requirements on glass properties, such as viscosity and outcomes of standard corrosion tests. Extensive databases exist for the 7-day Product Consistency Test and the 28-day Materials Characterization Center tests, which have been used for nuclear waste glasses in the United States. Models based on these tests are reviewed and discussed to demonstrate the compositional effects on the extent of corrosion under specified conditions. However, modeling the rate of corrosion is potentially more useful for predicting long-term behavior than modeling the extent of corrosion measured by standard tests. Based on an experimental study of two glasses, it is shown that the rate of corrosion can be characterized by simple functions with physically meaningful coefficients. (author)

  9. Viscoelastic behaviour and static fatigue strength of glass/epoxy composites. Influence of hydrothermal ageing

    Chateauminois, Antoine

    1991-01-01

    As ageing strength of composites appears to be one of the main criteria of their durability, this research thesis addresses the hydrothermal ageing of unidirectional glass/epoxy composites used for load-bearing structures. After having presented the used materials (epoxy matrix, reinforcement, composite elaboration), the author present the experimental techniques: viscoelastic analysis, three-point bend static fatigue test, coupled gravimetry and calorimetry, and thermogravimetry. In the next parts, the author reports the study of water sorption processes (bibliographical study, experimental study of water sorption kinetics, experimental study of interfacial diffusion within the composite), the study of plasticizing phenomena (methodology of study of plasticizing phenomena, study of the modifications of the linear viscoelastic behaviour in the glass transition region and at room temperature, relationship between plasticizing and fatigue mechanical properties by fracture studies), and the study of irreversible degradation and damage mechanisms

  10. Glass fibres reinforced polyester composites degradation monitoring by surface analysis

    Croitoru, Catalin [“Transilvania” University of Brasov, Materials Engineering and Welding Department, Eroilor 29 Str., 500036 Brasov (Romania); Patachia, Silvia, E-mail: st.patachia@unitbv.ro [“Transilvania” University of Brasov, Product Design Environment and Mechatronics Department, Eroilor 29 Str., 500036 Brasov (Romania); Papancea, Adina [“Transilvania” University of Brasov, Product Design Environment and Mechatronics Department, Eroilor 29 Str., 500036 Brasov (Romania); Baltes, Liana; Tierean, Mircea [“Transilvania” University of Brasov, Materials Engineering and Welding Department, Eroilor 29 Str., 500036 Brasov (Romania)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Glass fibre-reinforced polyester composites surface analysis by photographic method. • The composites are submitted to accelerated ageing by UV irradiation at 254 nm. • The UV irradiation promotes differences in the surface chemistry of the composites. • MB dye is differently adsorbed on surfaces with different degradation degrees. • Good correlation between the colouring degree and surface chemistry. - Abstract: The paper presents a novel method for quantification of the modifications that occur on the surface of different types of gel-coated glass fibre-reinforced polyester composites under artificial UV-ageing at 254 nm. The method implies the adsorption of an ionic dye, namely methylene blue, on the UV-aged composite, and computing the CIELab colour space parameters from the photographic image of the coloured composite's surface. The method significantly enhances the colour differences between the irradiated composites and the reference, in contrast with the non-coloured ones. The colour modifications that occur represent a good indicative of the surface degradation, alteration of surface hydrophily and roughness of the composite and are in good correlation with the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy results. The proposed method is easier, faster and cheaper than the traditional ones.

  11. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  12. Cast bulk metallic glass alloys: prospects as wear materials

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Shiflet, Gary J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are single phase materials with unusual physical and mechanical properties. One intriguing area of possible use is as a wear material. Usually, pure metals and single phase dilute alloys do not perform well in tribological conditions. When the metal or alloy is lightweight, it is usually soft leading to galling in sliding situations. For the harder metals and alloys, their density is usually high, so there is an energy penalty when using these materials in wear situations. However, bulk metallic glasses at the same density are usually harder than corresponding metals and dilute single phase alloys, and so could offer better wear resistance. This work will discuss preliminary wear results for metallic glasses with densities in the range of 4.5 to 7.9 g/cc. The wear behavior of these materials will be compared to similar metals and alloys.

  13. Genetic Homogenization of Composite Materials

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on numerical studies of electromagnetic properties of composite materials used for the construction of small airplanes. Discussions concentrate on the genetic homogenization of composite layers and composite layers with a slot. The homogenization is aimed to reduce CPU-time demands of EMC computational models of electrically large airplanes. First, a methodology of creating a 3-dimensional numerical model of a composite material in CST Microwave Studio is proposed focusing on a sufficient accuracy of the model. Second, a proper implementation of a genetic optimization in Matlab is discussed. Third, an association of the optimization script and a simplified 2-dimensional model of the homogeneous equivalent model in Comsol Multiphysics is proposed considering EMC issues. Results of computations are experimentally verified.

  14. Glass-crystalline materials for active waste incorporation

    Kulichenko, V.V.; Krylova, N.V.; Vlasov, V.I.; Polyakov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the possibility and conditions for using glass-crystalline materials for the incorporation of radionuclides. Materials of a cast pyroxene type that are obtained by smelting calcined wastes with acid blast furnace slags are described. A study was also made of materials of a basalt type prepared from wastes with and without alkali metal salt. Changes in the structure and properties of materials in the process of storage at different temperatures have been studied

  15. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material

    Felisberto, R.; Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  16. Modeling Non-Linear Material Properties in Composite Materials

    2016-06-28

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-16013 MODELING NON-LINEAR MATERIAL PROPERTIES IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS Michael F. Macri Andrew G...REPORT TYPE Technical 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MODELING NON-LINEAR MATERIAL PROPERTIES IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS ...systems are increasingly incorporating composite materials into their design. Many of these systems subject the composites to environmental conditions

  17. Subcritical crack growth behavior of AI2O3-Glass dental composites

    Zhu, Q.; With, G. de; Dortmans, L.J.M.G.; Feenstra, F.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the subcritical crack growth (SCG) behavior of alumina-glass dental composites. Alumina-glass composites were fabricated by infiltrating molten glass to porous alumina preforms. Rectangular bars of the composite were subject to dynamic loading in air, with

  18. Development of glass/glass-ceramics materials and devices and their micro-structural studies

    Goswami, Madhumita; Sarkar, Arjun; Shingarvelan, Shobha; Kumar, Rakesh; Ananathanarayan, Arvind; Shrikhande, V.K.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Materials and devices based on glass and glass-ceramics (GCs) find applications in various high pressure and vacuum applications. We have prepared different glasses/glass-ceramics with requisite thermal expansion coefficient, electrical, vacuum and wetting characteristics to fabricate hermetic seals with different metals/alloys as well as components for these applications. Some of these are, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -B 2O3 (BS) for matched type of seal fabricated with Kovar alloy, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-BaO-PbO(LS) for fabrication of compressive type seals with stainless steel and SS 446 alloys, P 2 O 5 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -BaO-PbO(NAP) for fabrication of matched type of seal with relatively low melting metals/alloys like AI/Cu-Be and Li 2 O-ZnO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (LZS) and Lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics to fabricate matched and compression types feedtroughs/conductivity probes Magnesium aluminium silicate (MAS) machinable glass-ceramics is another development for high voltage and ultra high vacuum applications. Micro-structural studies have been carried out on these materials to understand the mechanism of their behaviour and have also been deployed in various systems and plants in DAE. (author)

  19. Bioactive glass particulate filler composite: Effect of coupling of fillers and filler loading on some physical properties.

    Oral, Onur; Lassila, Lippo V; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silanization of biostable and bioactive glass fillers in a polymer matrix on some of the physical properties of the composite. The water absorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness of different particulate filler composite resins were studied in vitro. Five different specimen groups were analyzed: A glass-free control, a non-silanized bioactive glass, a silanized bioactive glass, a non-silanized biostable glass and a silanized biostable glass groups. All of these five groups were further divided into sub-groups of dry and water-stored materials, both of them containing groups with 3wt%, 6wt%, 9wt% or 12wt% of glass particles (n=8 per group). The silanization of the glass particles was carried out with 2% of gamma-3-methacryloxyproyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). For the water absorption and solubility tests, the test specimens were stored in water for 60 days, and the percentages of weight change were statistically analyzed. Flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness values were tested with a three-point bending test and statistically analyzed. Higher solubility values were observed in non-silanized glass in proportion to the percentage of glass particles. Silanization, on the other hand, decreased the solubility values of both types of glass particles and polymer. While 12wt% non-silanized bioactive glass specimens showed -0.98wt% solubility, 12wt% silanized biostable glass specimens were observed to have only -0.34wt% solubility. The three-point bending results of the dry specimens showed that flexural strength, toughness and flexural modulus decreased in proportion to the increase of glass fillers. The control group presented the highest results (106.6MPa for flexural strength, 335.7kPA for toughness, 3.23GPa for flexural modulus), whereas for flexural strength and toughness, 12wt% of non-silanized biostable glass filler groups presented the lowest (70.3MPa for flexural strength

  20. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  1. Effects of glass composition on the residual rate of alteration and modelling parameters

    Fleury, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the long-term behavior of the French nuclear glasses R7T7. An experiment plan (based on 27 glass compositions) is developed for studying the effect of glass composition on the residual rate of alteration. The impact of Mg-phase precipitation on glass alteration is also studied and several modelling exercises are performed. There is one order of magnitude between the different measurements (rate or pH...) associated with the different glass compositions. The statistical treatment of these measurements results in predictive equations and several observable trends are valid for all materials with a composition complying with the experiment plan conditions. The effect of Si, Na, B and Al on alteration (.i.e, gel and secondary phase's formation, pH) is confirmed, the influence of Zn, Zr and Ni-Co is evidenced. The role of Cr has to be clarified. Experiments show that glass alteration rate in underground water, which contains high level of Ca and Mg, is one order of magnitude higher than in the case of pure water. The glass composition plays the same role for the alteration in the two types of solution. During alteration, the late addition of Mg introduces a time lag in the resumption response because silicon is first provided from partial dissolution of the previously-formed alteration gel. The nucleation process does not limit Mg-silicate precipitation whereas a pH above 8-8.5 is necessary for Mg-silicate precipitation. The glass alteration rate can be a limiting factor if the quantity of Mg supplied to the reaction is enough. The Mg silicate phase seems to have systematically a molar ratio Mg/Si between 0.2 and 0.4. It is also shown that the air tightness of the reactor influences the rate of dissolution of CO 2 in the solution leading to a decrease of pH. Finally, modelling exercises with GRAAL show promising results. Such modelling is required in order to extend the prediction of the long-term alteration behavior to different glass

  2. Hot isostatic pressing of glass-zeolite composites

    Hash, M.C.; Pereira, C.; Lewis, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-zeolite waste forms are being developed for immobilizing the chloride waste salt generated from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent fuel. Glass-zeolite composites with high densities were made using hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Processing parameters were investigated to yield desirable structural ceramic properties such as mechanical, chemical, and thermal stability. Limits for these parameters were determined by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. The resulting ceramic properties such as bulk density, open or apparent porosity, and leach resistance were determined. In addition, phase equilibria and particle-size distribution were observed by optical light and electron microscopy. Pre-HIP processing techniques were also studied to ensure intimate mixing of the glass and zeolite powders. Particle size distributions resulting from dry blending procedure are appropriate for needed flow and packing characteristics

  3. The Assessing of the Failure Behavior of Glass/Polyester Composites Subject to Quasi Static Stresses

    Stanciu, M. D.; Savin, A.; Teodorescu-Drăghicescu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Using glass fabric reinforced composites for structure of wind turbine blades requires high mechanical strengths especially to cyclic stresses. Studies have shown that approximately 50% of composite material failure occurs because of fatigue. Composites behavior to cyclic stresses involves three stages regarding to stiffness variation: the first stage is characterized by the accelerated decline of stiffness with micro-cracks, the second stage - a slight decrease of stiffness characterized by the occurrence of delamination and third stage characterized by higher decreases of resistance and occurrence of fracture thereof. The aim of the paper is to analyzed the behavior of composites reinforced with glass fibers fabric type RT500 and polyester resin subjected to tensile cyclic loading with pulsating quasi-static regime with asymmetry coefficient R = 0. The samples were tested with the universal tensile machine LS100 Lloyd Instruments Plus, with a load capacity of 100 kN. The load was applied with different speeds of 1 mm/min, 10 mm/min and 20 mm/min. After tests, it was observed that the greatest permanent strains were recorded in the first load cycles when the total energy storage by material was lost due to internal friction. With increasing number of cycles, the glass/polyester composites ability to store energy of deformation decreases, the flow phenomenon characterized by large displacements to smaller loading forces appearing.

  4. A Comparative Study of the Behaviour of Five Dense Glass Materials Under Shock Loading Conditions

    Radford, Darren D.; Proud, William G.; Field, John E.

    2001-06-01

    Previous work at the Cavendish Laboratory on the properties of glasses under shock loading has demonstrated that the material response is highly dependent upon the composition of the glass. The shock response of glass materials with an open structure, such as borosilicate, exhibits a ramping behaviour in the longitudinal stress histories due to structural collapse. Glass materials with a “filled” microstructure, as in the case of Type-D, Extra Dense Flint (DEDF) do not exhibit a ramping behaviour and behave in a manner similar to polycrystalline ceramics [1]. The current investigation compares the behaviour of five such glasses (SF15, DEDF, LACA, SF57 and DEDF-927210) under shock loading conditions. It is observed that slight changes in material composition can have a large affect on the inelastic behaviour. Principal Hugoniot and shear strength data are presented for all of the materials for pressures ranging from 2 to 14 GPa. Evidence of the so-called failure-front [2] is presented via lateral stress histories measured using manganin stress gauges and confirmed with high-speed photography. 1. Bourne, N.K., Millett, J.C.F., and Field, J.E., “On the strength of shocked glasses” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 455 (1999) 1275-1282 2. Brar, N.S., “Failure Waves in Glass and Ceramics Under Shock Compression”, in "Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 1999", ed. M.D. Furnish, L.C. Chhabildas, and R.S. Hixson, American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, New York, (1999) 601-606

  5. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  6. Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An examination has been made of the mechanical and failure properties of several composite materials, such as a short and a long carbon fiber reinforced plastic (short- and long-CFRP and metal based composite material. The short CFRP materials were used for a recycled CFRP which fabricated by the following process: the CFRP, consisting of epoxy resin with carbon fiber, is injected to a rectangular plate cavity after mixing with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene resin with different weight fractions of CFRP. The fatigue and ultimate tensile strength (UTS increased with increasing CFRP content. These correlations, however, break down, especially for tensile strength, as the CFPR content becomes more than 70%. Influence of sample temperature on the bending strength of the long-CFRP was investigated, and it appears that the strength slightly degreases with increasing the temperature, due to the weakness in the matrix. Broken fiber and pull-out or debonding between the fiber and matrix were related to the main failure of the short- and long-CFRP samples. Mechanical properties of metal based composite materials have been also investigated, where fiber-like high hardness CuAl2 structure is formed in aluminum matrix. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained in this alloy, e.g., the higher strength and the higher ductility, compared tothe same alloy without the fiber-like structure. There are strong anisotropic effects on the mechanical properties due to the fiber-like metal composite in a soft Al based matrix.

  7. Durability of aircraft composite materials

    Dextern, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Confidence in the long term durability of advanced composites is developed through a series of flight service programs. Service experience is obtained by installing secondary and primary composite components on commercial and military transport aircraft and helicopters. Included are spoilers, rudders, elevators, ailerons, fairings and wing boxes on transport aircraft and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on helicopters. Materials included in the evaluation are boron/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy, graphite/epoxy and boron/aluminum. Inspection, maintenance, and repair results for the components in service are reported. The effects of long term exposure to laboratory, flight, and outdoor environmental conditions are reported for various composite materials. Included are effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, and aircraft fuels and fluids.

  8. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    Muller, Isabelle [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [Energy Solutions, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  9. Creep of fibrous composite materials

    Lilholt, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Models are presented for the creep behaviour of fibrous composite materials with aligned fibres. The models comprise both cases where the fibres remain rigid in a creeping matrix and cases where the fibres are creeping in a creeping matrix. The treatment allows for several contributions...... to the creep strength of composites. The advantage of combined analyses of several data sets is emphasized and illustrated for some experimental data. The analyses show that it is possible to derive creep equations for the (in situ) properties of the fibres. The experiments treated include model systems...... such as Ni + W-fibres, high temperature materials such as Ni + Ni3Al + Cr3C2-fibres, and medium temperature materials such as Al + SiC-fibres. For the first two systems reasonable consistency is found for the models and the experiments, while for the third system too many unquantified parameters exist...

  10. Bioactive Glass Fiber Reinforced Starch-Polycaprolactone Composite for Bone Applications

    Jukola, H.; Nikkola, L.; Tukiainen, M.; Kellomaeki, M.; Ashammakhi, N.; Gomes, M. E.; Reis, R. L.; Chiellini, F.; Chiellini, E.

    2008-01-01

    For bone regeneration and repair, combinations of different materials are often needed. Biodegradable polymers are often combined with osteoconductive materials, such as bioactive glass (BaG), which can also improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize BaG fiber-reinforced starch-poly-ε-caprolactone (SPCL) composite. Sheets of SPCL (30/70 wt%) were produced using single-screw extrusion. They were then cut and compression molded in layers with BaG fibers to form composite structures of different combinations. Thermal, mechanical, and degradation properties of the composites were studied. The actual amount of BaG in the composites was determined using combustion tests. A strong endothermic peak indicating melting at about 56 deg. C was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) showed that thermal decomposition of SPCL started at 325 deg. C with the decomposition of starch and continued at 400 deg. C with the degradation of polycaprolactone (PCL). Initial mechanical properties of the reinforced composites were at least 50% better than the properties of the non-reinforced composites. However, the mechanical properties of the composites after two weeks of hydrolysis were comparable to those of the non-reinforced samples. During the six weeks' hydrolysis the mass of the composites had decreased only by about 5%. The amount of glass in the composites remained the same for the six-week period of hydrolysis. In conclusion, it is possible to enhance the initial mechanical properties of SPCL by reinforcing it with BaG fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the composites are only sufficient for use as filler material and they need to be further improved to allow long-lasting bone applications

  11. Bioactive Glass Fiber Reinforced Starch-Polycaprolactone Composite for Bone Applications

    Jukola, H.; Nikkola, L.; Gomes, M. E.; Chiellini, F.; Tukiainen, M.; Kellomäki, M.; Chiellini, E.; Reis, R. L.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    For bone regeneration and repair, combinations of different materials are often needed. Biodegradable polymers are often combined with osteoconductive materials, such as bioactive glass (BaG), which can also improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize BaG fiber-reinforced starch-poly-ɛ-caprolactone (SPCL) composite. Sheets of SPCL (30/70 wt%) were produced using single-screw extrusion. They were then cut and compression molded in layers with BaG fibers to form composite structures of different combinations. Thermal, mechanical, and degradation properties of the composites were studied. The actual amount of BaG in the composites was determined using combustion tests. A strong endothermic peak indicating melting at about 56 °C was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) showed that thermal decomposition of SPCL started at 325 °C with the decomposition of starch and continued at 400 °C with the degradation of polycaprolactone (PCL). Initial mechanical properties of the reinforced composites were at least 50% better than the properties of the non-reinforced composites. However, the mechanical properties of the composites after two weeks of hydrolysis were comparable to those of the non-reinforced samples. During the six weeks' hydrolysis the mass of the composites had decreased only by about 5%. The amount of glass in the composites remained the same for the six-week period of hydrolysis. In conclusion, it is possible to enhance the initial mechanical properties of SPCL by reinforcing it with BaG fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the composites are only sufficient for use as filler material and they need to be further improved to allow long-lasting bone applications.

  12. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    Gong, Chaokun

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have been investigated with important new applications: (1) healable polymer composites for structural application and healable composite conductor for electronic device application; (2) conducting polymer polypyrrole actuator for implantable medical device application; and (3) ferroelectric polymer and ceramic nanoparticles composites for electrocaloric effect based solid state refrigeration application. These application entail highly challenging materials innovation, and my work has led to significant progress in all three areas. For the healable polymer composites, well known intrinsically healable polymer 2MEP4F (a Diels-Alder crosslinked polymer formed from a monomer with four furan groups and another monomer with two maleimide groups) was first chosen as the matrix reinforced with fiber. Glass fibers were successfully functionalized with maleimide functional groups on their surface. Composites from functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F healable polymer were made to compare with composites made from commercial carbon fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. Dramatically improved short beam shear strength was obtained from composite of functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. The high cost of 2MEP4F polymer can potentially limit the large-scale application of the developed healable composite, we further developed a new healable polymer with much lower cost. This new polymer was formed through the Diels-Alder crosslinking of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) and 1,1'-(Methylenedi-4

  13. Characterization,Mechanical, and In Vitro Bioactivity Properties of Hydroxyapatite/Bioactive Glass Composite

    Israa Kahatan Sabree

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive ceramic materials can help bone reparation and regeneration by offering support to bone growth. Biological hydroxyapatite powder was prepared by burning animal bone followed by studying the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite (HA/ (20wt.%, and 40wt.% of binary bioactive glass (70% SiO2- 30% CaO in order to evaluate the influence of composition on the compressive strength and hardness. HA-composite material exhibited increasing density, microhardness, and compressive strength with increasing amount of glass addition. X-ray diffraction after sintering at 1200°C showed no alter of HA to secondary phases while the hydroxyapatite/ bioactive glass composites contained a HA phase and different amounts of wollastonite phase, depending on the amount of bioglass added. In vitro tests, the samples were soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF for ten days in order to evaluate the change in compression strength, weight loss, and pH. The HA composite reinforced with 40 wt % bioglass showed highest compression strength, and lowest weight loss

  14. Influence of Hybridizing Flax and Hemp-Agave Fibers with Glass Fiber as Reinforcement in a Polyurethane Composite

    Pankaj Pandey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, six combinations of flax, hemp, and glass fiber were investigated for a hybrid reinforcement system in a polyurethane (PU composite. The natural fibers were combined with glass fibers in a PU composite in order to achieve a better mechanical reinforcement in the composite material. The effect of fiber hybridization in PU composites was evaluated through physical and mechanical properties such as water absorption (WA, specific gravity (SG, coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE, flexural and compression properties, and hardness. The mechanical properties of hybridized samples showed mixed trends compared to the unhybridized samples, but hybridization with glass fiber reduced water absorption by 37% and 43% for flax and hemp-agave PU composites respectively.

  15. Biofilm formation affects surface properties of novel bioactive glass-containing composites.

    Hyun, Hong-Keun; Salehi, Satin; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of bacterial biofilm on the surface properties of novel bioactive glass (BAG)-containing composites of different initial surface roughness. BAG (65 mol% Si; 4% P; 31% Ca) and BAG-F (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and micronized (size ∼0.1-10 μm). Composites with 72wt% total filler load were prepared by replacing 15% of the silanized Sr glass with BAG, BAG-F, or silanized silica. Specimens (n=10/group) were light-cured and divided into 4 subgroups of different surface roughness by wet polishing with 600 and then up to 1200, 2400, or 4000 grit SiC. Surface roughness (SR), gloss, and Knoop microhardness were measured before and after incubating in media with or without a Streptococcus mutans (UA 159) biofilm for 2 weeks. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=0.05). The SR of the BAG-containing composites with the smoothest surfaces (2400/4000 grit) increased in media or bacteria; the SR of the roughest composites (600 grit) decreased. The gloss of the smoothest BAG-containing composites decreased in bacteria and media-only, but more in media-alone. The microhardness of all of the composites decreased with exposure to media or bacteria, with BAG-containing composites affected more than the control. Exposure to bacterial biofilm and its media produced enhanced roughness and reduced gloss and surface microhardness of highly polished dental composites containing a bioactive glass additive, which could affect further biofilm formation, as well as the esthetics, of restorations made from such a material. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The first Polish conference: Special glasses and amorphous materials. Introduction

    1993-01-01

    The present issue brings a collection of papers submitted to the 1. Polish Conference on special glasses and amorphous materials, held on June 1993 at the University of Mining and Metallurgy in Cracow. It was a survey of the research topics and attainments of the research teams working in this referring to the nature of the glassy state of the matter and the relation between glasses and other amorphous materials, properties of these materials as well as modern methods of their synthesis both at low and high temperatures. Some of the results presented at the Conference have already found application in industry. Here belong, among others, the works on optic fibres. Several new materials which have been recently elaborated may also find interesting and new practical application. (author)

  17. Preparation of glass-forming materials from granulated blast furnace slag

    Alonso, M.; Sáinz, E.; Lopez, F. A.

    1996-10-01

    Glass precursor materials, to be used for the vitrification of hazardous wastes, have been prepared from blast furnace slag powder through a sol-gel route. The slag is initially reacted with a mixture of alcohol (ethanol or methanol) and mineral acid (HNO3 or H2SO4) to give a sol principally consisting of Si, Ca, Al, and Mg alkoxides. Gelation is carried out with variable amounts of either ammonia or water. The gelation rate can be made as fast as desired by adding excess hydrolizing agent or else by distilling the excess alcohol out of the alkoxide solution. The resulting gel is first dried at low temperature and ground. The powder thus obtained is then heat treated at several temperatures. The intermediate and final materials are characterized by thermal analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. From the results, the operating conditions yielding a variety of glass precursors differing in their composition are established. The method, in comparison with direct vitrification of slag, presents a number of advantages: (1) the glass precursor obtained devitrifies at higher temperatures; (2) it enables the adjustment, to a certain extent, of the chemical composition of the glass precursor; and (3) it permits recovering marketable materials at different stages of the process.

  18. Evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of the composite material

    Pavlenko, V.I.; Chekashina, N.I.; Yastrebinskij, R.N.; Sokolenko, I.V.; Noskov, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of composite materials with respect to gamma-radiation. As a binder for the synthesis of radiation-shielding composites we used lead boronsilicate glass matrix. As filler we used nanotubular chrysotile filled with lead tungstate PbWO4. It is shown that all the developed composites have good physical-mechanical characteristics, such as compressive strength, thermal stability and can be used as structural materials. On the basis of theoretical calculation we described the graphs of the gamma-quanta linear attenuation coefficient depending on the emitted energy for all investigated composites. We founded high radiation-shielding properties of all the composites on the basis of theoretical and experimental data compared to materials conventionally used in the nuclear industry - iron, concrete, etc

  19. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  20. Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Smart Soft Composite Actuators According to Material Composition

    Han, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon [Seoul Nat’l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites, which are made by combining a continuous fiber that acts as reinforcement and a homogeneous polymeric material that acts as a host, are engineering materials with high strength and stiffness and a lightweight structure. In this study, a shape memory alloy(SMA) reinforced composite actuator is presented. This actuator is used to generate large deformations in single lightweight structures and can be used in applications requiring a high degree of adaptability to various external conditions. The proposed actuator consists of numerous individual laminas of the glass-fiber fabric that are embedded in a polymeric matrix. To characterize its deformation behavior, the composition of the actuator was changed by changing the matrix material and the number of the glass-fiber fabric layers. In addition, current of various magnitudes were applied to each actuator to study the effect of the heating of SMA wires on applying current.

  1. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials.

    Gorni, Giulio; Velázquez, Jose J; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-30

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF₄ glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO₂ precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  2. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    Giulio Gorni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  3. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    Gorni, Giulio; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications. PMID:29385706

  4. Determining the fracture resistance of fibre-reinforced glass matrix composites by means of the chevron-notch flexural technique

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Kern, H.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 308, 1/2 (2001), s. 111-117 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV101/96/K264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : glass matrix composites * fracture toughness * chevron notch test Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.978, year: 2001

  5. Material interactions between system components and glass product melts in a ceramic melter

    Knitter, R.

    1989-07-01

    The interactions of the ceramic and metallic components of a ceramic melter for the vitrification of High Active Waste were investigated with simulated glass product melts in static crucible tests at 1000 0 C and 1150 0 C. Corrosion of the fusion-cast Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 - and Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 -Cr 2 O 3 -refractories (ER 1711 and ER 2161) is characterized by homogeneous chemical dissolution and diffusion through the glass matrix of the refractory. The resulting boundary compositions lead to characteristic modification and formation of phases, not only inside the refractory but also in the glass melt. The attack of the electrode material, a Ni-Cr-Fe-alloy Inconel 690, by the glass melt takes place via grain boundaries and leads to the oxidation of Cr and growth of Cr 2 O 3 -crystals at the boundary layer. Noble metals, added to the glass melt can form solid solutions with the alloy with varying compositions. (orig.) [de

  6. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ustuendag, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Kim, C.P. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States); Brown, D.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendc second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite.

  7. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.Y.; Ustuendag, E.; Kim, C.P.; Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendritic second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite

  8. Development and characterization of composite materials for production of composite risers by filament winding

    Sobrinho, L.L.; Bastian, F.L. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering], e-mail: ledjane@metalmat.ufrj.br; Calado, V.M.A. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Industry has been challenged to provide riser systems which are more cost effective and which can fill the technology gaps with respect to water depth, riser diameter and high temperatures left open by flexible, steel catenary risers (SCRs) and hybrid risers. Composite materials present advantages over conventional steel risers because composite materials are lighter, more fatigue and corrosion resistant, better thermal insulators and can be designed for improving the structural and mechanical response. Besides, composite materials present some attractive attributes for the offshore service, such as: high specific strength and stiffness. This paper focuses on the development and characterization of a polymer matrix (epoxy) and of material composite (epoxy/fiber glass), which will be used in a development for composites risers by the filament winding process (wet winding). (author)

  9. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  10. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO 2 , 20 mass % Na 2 O, 10 mass % Al 2 O 3 , 8 mass % B 2 O 3 , and 1.5 mass % K 2 O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  11. Compositional Dependence Of Hardness Of Ge-Sb-Se Glass For Molded Lens Applications

    Park J.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glass in the ternary Ge-Sb-Se system is inherently moldable, thus being considered as a strong candidate material for use in infrared-transmitting lens applications from the viewpoint of thermal and mechanical stability. In an effort to experimentally determine compositional region suitable for the molded lens applications, we evaluate its compositional dependence of hardness. Among the constituent atoms, Ge content turns out to exert a most conspicuous correlation with hardness. This phenomenological behavior is then explained in connection with the structural evolution that Ge brings about.

  12. A hazardous waste from secondary aluminium metallurgy as a new raw material for calcium aluminate glasses.

    López-Delgado, Aurora; Tayibi, Hanan; Pérez, Carlos; Alguacil, Francisco José; López, Félix Antonio

    2009-06-15

    A solid waste coming from the secondary aluminium industry was successfully vitrified in the ternary CaO-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2) system at 1500 degrees C. This waste is a complex material which is considered hazardous because of its behaviour in the presence of water or moisture. In these conditions, the dust can generate gases such as H(2), NH(3), CH(4), H(2)S, along with heat and potential aluminothermy. Only silica sand and calcium carbonate were added as external raw materials to complete the glasses formula. Different nominal compositions of glasses, with Al(2)O(3) ranging between 20% and 54%, were studied to determine the glass forming area. The glasses obtained allow the immobilisation of up to 75% of waste in a multicomponent oxide system in which all the components of the waste are incorporated. The microhardness Hv values varied between 6.05 and 6.62GPa and the linear thermal expansion coefficient, alpha, varied between (62 and 139)x10(-7)K(-1). Several glasses showed a high hydrolytic resistance in deionised water at 98 degrees C.

  13. Development of a bioactive glass-polymer composite for wound healing applications.

    Moura, D; Souza, M T; Liverani, L; Rella, G; Luz, G M; Mano, J F; Boccaccini, A R

    2017-07-01

    This study reports the production and characterization of a composite material for wound healing applications. A bioactive glass obtained by sol-gel process and doped with two different metal ions was investigated. Silver (Ag) and cobalt (Co) were chosen due to their antibacterial and angiogenic properties, respectively, very beneficial in the wound healing process. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers were produced by electrospinning (ES) from a polymeric solution using acetone as a solvent. After optimization of the ES parameters, two main suspensions were prepared, namely: PCL containing bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG-NP) and PCL with Ag 2 O and CoO doped BG-NP (DP BG-NP), which were processed with different concentrations of BG-NP (0.25%, 0.5% and 0.75wt%). The composite membranes were characterized in terms of morphology, fiber diameter, weight loss, mineralization potential and mechanical performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass cranioplasty implant: A case study of an early development stage implant removed due to a late infection.

    Posti, Jussi P; Piitulainen, Jaakko M; Hupa, Leena; Fagerlund, Susanne; Frantzén, Janek; Aitasalo, Kalle M J; Vuorinen, Ville; Serlo, Willy; Syrjänen, Stina; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-03-01

    This case study describes the properties of an early development stage bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite calvarial implant with histology that has been in function for two years and three months. The patient is a 33-year old woman with a history of substance abuse, who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury later unsuccessfully treated with an autologous bone flap and a custom-made porous polyethylene implant. She was thereafter treated with developmental stage glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass implant. After two years and three months, the implant was removed due to an implant site infection. The implant was analyzed histologically, mechanically, and in terms of chemistry and dissolution of bioactive glass. Mechanical integrity of the load bearing fiber-reinforced composite part of the implant was not affected by the in vivo period. Bioactive glass particles demonstrated surface layers of hydroxyapatite like mineral and dissolution, and related increase of pH was considerably less after two and three months period than that for fresh bioactive glass. There was a difference in the histology of the tissues inside the implant areas near to the margin of the implant that absorbed blood during implant installation surgery, showed fibrous tissue with blood vessels, osteoblasts, collagenous fibers with osteoid formation, and tiny clusters of more mature hard tissue. In the center of the implant, where there was less absorbed blood, only fibrous tissue was observed. This finding is in line with the combined positron emission tomography - computed tomography examination with (18F)-fluoride marker, which demonstrated activity of the mineralizing bone by osteoblasts especially at the area near to the margin of the implant 10 months after implantation. Based on these promising reactions found in the bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite implant that has been implanted for two years and three months, calvarial

  15. Compressive evaluation of homogeneous and graded epoxy-glass particulate composites.

    Seaglar, J; Rousseau, C-E

    2015-04-01

    The propagation of stress waves in epoxy-glass particulate composites and graded materials was studied experimentally. Materials tested in this study consisted of an epoxy matrix with various concentrations of spherical glass particles having a mean diameter of 42μm. Plate impact experiments were performed using a gas gun. Embedded within the specimens were manganin stress gauges used to record propagating compressive longitudinal stress waves through the material. High strain rate experiments using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) apparatus were also performed to evaluate the dynamic strength of the specimens, while quasi-static compression tests were undertaken to characterize their quasi-static behavior. Ultrasonic wave speed measurements were carried-out in order to obtain additional material properties and characterize the gradation in functionally graded materials (FGM). It was found that low volume fractions of particles are detrimental to the performance of the material under impact loading, while concentrations in the range of about 30 to 45% by volume exhibit characteristics of higher degrees of scattering. This suggests that materials in this latter range would be more effective in the thwarting of destructive shock waves than the homogeneous matrix material. Impact testing of FGM specimens suggests that impact loading on the stiff (high volume fraction) face results in much higher levels of scattering. Therefore, such materials would be effective for use in light weight armor or as shielding materials due to their effective attenuation of mechanical impulses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Manufacturing Method to Tensile Properties of Hybrid Composite Reinforced by Natural (Agel Leaf Fiber) and Glass Fibers

    Nugroho, A.; Abdurohman, K.; Kusmono; Hestiawan, H.; Jamasri

    2018-04-01

    This paper described the effect of different type of manufacturing method to tensile properties of hybrid composite woven agel leaf fiber and glass fiber as an alternative of LSU structure material. The research was done by using 3 ply of woven agel leaf fiber (ALF) and 3 ply of glass fiber (wr200) while the matrix was using unsaturated polyester. Composite manufacturing method used hand lay-up and vacuum bagging. Tensile test conducted with Tensilon universal testing machine, specimen shape and size according to standard size ASTM D 638. Based on tensile test result showed that the tensile strength of agel leaf fiber composite with unsaturated polyester matrix is 54.5 MPa by hand lay-up and 84.6 MPa with vacuum bagging method. From result of tensile test, hybrid fiber agel composite and glass fiber with unsaturated polyester matrix have potential as LSU structure.

  17. Composite Biomaterials Based on Sol-Gel Mesoporous Silicate Glasses: A Review

    Baino, Francesco; Fiorilli, Sonia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive glasses are able to bond to bone and stimulate the growth of new tissue while dissolving over time, which makes them ideal materials for regenerative medicine. The advent of mesoporous glasses, which are typically synthesized via sol-gel routes, allowed researchers to develop a broad and versatile class of novel biomaterials that combine superior bone regenerative potential (compared to traditional melt-derived glasses) with the ability of incorporating drugs and various biomolecules for targeted therapy in situ. Mesoporous glass particles can be directly embedded as a bioactive phase within a non-porous (e.g., microspheres), porous (3D scaffolds) or injectable matrix, or be processed to manufacture a surface coating on inorganic or organic (macro)porous substrates, thereby obtaining hierarchical structures with multiscale porosity. This review provides a picture of composite systems and coatings based on mesoporous glasses and highlights the challenges for the future, including the great potential of inorganic–organic hybrid sol-gel biomaterials. PMID:28952496

  18. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    1991-01-01

    In the present study it was attempted to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca). 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  19. Dense and porous glass and glass ceramics from natural and waste raw materials

    Marangoni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of the herewith presented research activities was to develop innovative processes and materials for building applications adapted to the needs of Saudi Arabia according to the information exchanged with the partners from KACST (King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology). The research activity focused on the development of a wide range of ceramic components via sinter-crystallization of glasses produced from waste (fly ash, slag, sludge) with or without the addition of vit...

  20. Development of an oxidation resistant glass-ceramic composite coating on Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy

    Li, Wenbo; Zhu, Shenglong; Chen, Minghui; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-02-01

    Three glass-ceramic composite coatings were prepared on Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy by air spraying technique and subsequent firing. The aim of this work is to study the reactions between glass matrix and inclusions and their effects on the oxidation resistance of the glass-ceramic composite coating. The powders of alumina, quartz, or both were added into the aqueous solution of potassium silicate (ASPS) to form slurries used as the starting materials for the composite coatings. The coating formed from an ASPS-alumina slurry was porous, because the reaction between alumina and potassium silicate glass resulted in the formation of leucite (KAlSi2O6), consuming substantive glass phase and hindering the densification of the composite coating. Cracks were observed in the coating prepared from an ASPS-quartz slurry due to the larger volume shrinkage of the coating than that of the alloy. In contrast, an intact and dense SiO2-Al2O3-glass coating was successfully prepared from an ASPS-alumina-silica slurry. The oxidation behavior of the SiO2-Al2O3-glass composite coating on Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was studied at 900 °C. The SiO2-Al2O3-glass composite coating acted as an oxygen diffusion barrier, and prevented the inward diffusion of the oxygen from the air to the coating/alloy interface, therefore, decreasing the oxidation rate of the Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy significantly.

  1. Characterization of Glass Fiber Separator Material for Lithium Batteries

    Subbarao, S.; Frank, H.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization studies were carried out on a glass fiber paper that is currently employed as a separator material for some LiSOCl2 primary cells. The material is of the non-woven type made from microfilaments of E-type glass and contains an ethyl acrylate binder. Results from extraction studies and tensile testing revealed that the binder content and tensile strength of the paper were significantly less than values specified by the manufacturer. Scanning electron micrographs revealed the presence of clusters of impurities many of which were high in iron content. Results of emission spectroscopy revealed high overall levels of iron and leaching, followed by atomic absorption measurements, revealed that essentially all of this iron is soluble in SOCl2.

  2. Ion-exchange properties of zeolite/glass hybrid materials

    Taira, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Kohei; Fukushima, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid materials were prepared from ground glass powder and various zeolites such as A-type, mordenite, X-type, and Y-type zeolites, and their ion removal effect was investigated. The hybrid materials of A-type, Y-type, and mordenite zeolites showed similar Sr"2"+ removal rates from aqueous solutions. The removal rate of Sr"2"+ ions increased as the amount of zeolite in the hybrid materials increased. Compared with other hybrid materials, the hybrid materials of X-type zeolite showed higher Sr"2"+ removal rates, especially for zeolite content greater than 25%. As the amount of X-type zeolite in the hybrid materials increased, the Sr"2"+ removal rate increased greatly, with a 100% removal rate when the content of X-type zeolite exceeded 62.5%. (author)

  3. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Automotive Structural Composite; TOPICAL

    Battiste, R.L.; Corum, J.M.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design criteria for a chopped-glass-fiber reinforced polymeric composite for automotive structural applications. The criteria closely follow the framework of an earlier criteria document for a continuous-strand-mat (CSM) glass-fiber reference composite. Together these design criteria demonstrate a framework that can be adapted for future random-glass-fiber composites for automotive structural applications

  4. Preparation of SnO_2-Glass Composite Containing Cu Particles Reduced from Copper Ions in Glass Matrix : Effect of Glass Particle Size on Microstructure and Electrical Property

    Haruhisa, SHIOMI; Kaori, UMEHARA; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the electrical properties of SnO_2-glass composites by dispersing Cu particles with low resistivity and positive temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR)in the glass matrix. Cu metal particles were precipitated by reducing Cu_2O previously dissolved into the matrix glass by adding LaB_6 as a reducing agent. The effect of the glass particle size, which influences the homogeneity of LaB_6 dispersion in the powder mixture before firing, on the Cu precipitation in...

  5. Partial Replacement of Glass Fiber by Woven Kenaf in Hybrid Composites and its Effect on Monotonic and Fatigue Properties

    Mohaiman Jaffar Sharba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural–synthetic fiber hybrid composites offer a combination of high mechanical properties from the synthetic fibers and the advantages of renewable fibers to produce a material with highly specific and determined properties. In this study, plain-woven kenaf/glass reinforced unsaturated polyester (UP hybrid composites were fabricated using the hand lay-up method with a cold hydraulic press in a sandwich-configuration laminate. The glass was used as a shell with kenaf as a core, with an approximate total fiber content of 40%. Three glass/kenaf weight ratios percentages of (70/30% (H1, (55/45% (H2, and (30/70% (H3 were used to fabricate hybrid composites. Also pure glass/UP and kenaf/UP were fabricated for comparison purposes. Monotonic tests, namely tensile, compression, and flexural strengths of the composites, were performed. The morphological properties of tensile and compression failure of kenaf and hybrid composites were studied. In addition, uniaxial tensile fatigue life of hybrid composites were conducted and evaluated. The results revealed that the hybrid composite (H1 offered a good balance and the best static properties, but in tensile fatigue loading (H3 displayed low fatigue sensitivity when compared with the other hybrid composites.

  6. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of MCC approved testing material: ATM-11 glass

    Wald, J.W.; Daniel, J.L.

    1986-08-01

    ATM-11 glass is designed to be representative of defense high-level waste glasses that will be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. It is representative of a 300-year-old nuclear waste glass and was intended as a conservative compromise between 10-year-old waste and 1000-year-old waste. The feedstock material for this glass was supplied by Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, SC, as SRL-165 black frit to which was added Ba, Cs, Mo, Nd, Ni, Pd, Rb, Ru, Sr, Te, Y, and Zr, as well as 241 Am, 237 Np, /sup 239+240/Pu, 151 Sm, 99 Tc, and depleted U. The glass was melted under the reducing conditions that resulted from the addition of 0.7 wt% graphite during the final melting process. Nearly 3 kg of ATM-11 glass were produced from a feedstock melted in a nitrogen-atmosphere glove box at 1250 0 C in Denver Fire Clay crucibles. After final melting, the glass was formed into stress-annealed rectangular bars 1.9 x 1.9 x 10 cm nominal size. Twenty-six bars were cast with a nominal weight of about 100 g each. The analyzed composition of ATM-11 glass is tabulated. Examination of a single transverse section from one bar by reflected light microscopy showed random porosity estimated at 0.4 vol% with nominal pore diameters ranging from ∼5 μm to 175 μm. A distinct randomly distributed second phase was observed at a very low concentration in the glass matrix as agglomerated, metallic-like clusters. One form of the aggregates contained mainly a high concentration of iron, while a second form had regions of high nickel concentration, and of high palladium concentration. All aggregates also contained a low concentration of technetium and/or ruthenium. An autoradiograph of the sample provided an indication of the total radionuclide ditribution. X-ray diffraction analysis of this same sample indicates that the glass probably contained 5 wt% crystalline material

  8. Replacement of glass particles by multidirectional short glass fibers in experimental composites: Effects on degree of conversion, mechanical properties and polymerization shrinkage.

    Bocalon, Anne C E; Mita, Daniela; Narumyia, Isabela; Shouha, Paul; Xavier, Tathy A; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero

    2016-09-01

    To test the null hypothesis that the replacement of a small fraction of glass particles with random short glass fibers does not affect degree of conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS), fracture toughness (FT) and post-gel polymerization shrinkage (PS) of experimental composites. Four experimental photocurable composites containing 1 BisGMA:1 TEGDMA (by weight) and 60vol% of fillers were prepared. The reinforcing phase was constituted by barium glass particles (2μm) and 0%, 2.5%, 5.0% or 7.5% of silanated glass fibers (1.4mm in length, 7-13μm in diameter). DC (n=4) was obtained using near-FTIR. FS (n=10) was calculated via biaxial flexural test and FT (n=10) used the "single edge notched beam" method. PS at 5min (n=8) was determined using the strain gage method. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (DC, FS, PS) or Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn's test (FT, alpha: 5% for both tests). DC was similar among groups (p>0.05). Only the composite containing 5.0% of fibers presented lower FS than the control (pglass fibers significantly increased fracture toughness and reduced post-gel shrinkage of experimental composites. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vegetable ash as raw material in the production of glasses and enamels, for example the contemporary vegetable ashes from Burgundy, France

    Colomban, Philippe; Tournié, Aurélie; De Montmollin, Frère Daniel; Krainhoefner, Frère Luc

    2010-01-01

    The powdery nature and high alkali content of vegetable ashes make them ideal raw materials to be used as modifiers of silicate compositions (glasses, enamels and ceramics). Their utilisation since ancient times is described in the literature of the history of glasses, but studies on the analyses of their composition are still limited. We discuss here the compositions of tree and shrub ashes (wattle, hawthorn, oak, green oak, olive wood, elm, poplar, apple tree, vine shoot), of plants (carex,...

  10. Characterisation of glass matrix composites reinforced with lead zirconate titanate particles

    Cannillo, Valeria; Manfredini, Tiziano; Montorsi, Monia; Tavoni, Francesca; Minay, Emma J.; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2005-01-01

    A new type of glass matrix composite reinforced with ferroelectric particulate secondary phase was investigated. Samples containing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) particles in a silicate lead glass were fabricated. Various sintering strategies were tested in order to optimise the processing route. The densest samples were obtained by hot-pressing. The composites were characterized by means of SEM observations, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and Vickers indentations. In order to get a deeper insight into the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the material, a FEM based numerical model was prepared and applied. In particular, the crack-particle interaction was assessed and thus possible toughening mechanisms were investigated. By means of the numerical modelling supported by SEM observations, traditional toughening mechanisms (e.g. crack deflection, particle debonding) were ruled out. Since the experimentally measured indentation fracture toughness of the composite is significantly higher than that of the unreinforced glass, the findings suggest that a new toughening mechanism may be active, based on the piezoelectric effect

  11. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 2, Operating electric glass melters. James N. Edmonson, Lecturer

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains basic information on electric furnaces used for glass melting and on the properties of glass useful for the stabilization of radioactive wastes. Furnace nomenclature, furnace types, typical silicate glass composition and properties, thermal conductivity information, kinetics of the melting process, glass furnace refractory materials composition and thermal conductivity, and equations required for the operation of glass melters are included

  12. Waste vitrification: prediction of acceptable compositions in a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system

    Gilliam, T.M.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    A model is presented based upon calculated bridging oxygens which allows the prediction of the region of acceptable glass compositions for a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system containing mixed waste. The model can be used to guide glass formulation studies (e.g., treatability studies) or assess the applicability of vitrification to candidate waste streams

  13. First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition

  14. Omni-directional selective shielding material based on amorphous glass coated microwires.

    Ababei, G; Chiriac, H; David, V; Dafinescu, V; Nica, I

    2012-01-01

    The shielding effectiveness of the omni-directional selective shielding material based on CoFe-glass coated amorphous wires in 0.8 GHz-3 GHz microwave frequency range is investigated. The measurements were done in a controlled medium using a TEM cell and in the free space using horn antennas, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite shielding material can be developed with desired shielding effectiveness and selective absorption of the microwave frequency range by controlling the number of the layers and the length of microwires.

  15. Mechanical Characterization of Cotton Fiber/Polyester Composite Material

    Altaf Hussain Rajper

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of composite from natural fiber for lower structural application is growing for long-term sustainable perspective. Cotton fiber composite material has the added advantages of high specific strength, corrosion resistance, low cost and low weight compared to glass fiber on the expense of internal components of IC engines. The primary aim of the research study is to examine the effect of the cotton fiber on mechanical properties of lower structural applications when added with the polyester resin. In this paper composite material sample has been prepared by hand Lay-Up process. A mould is locally developed in the laboratory for test sample preparation. Initially samples of polyester resin with appropriate ratio of the hardener were developed and tested. At the second stage yarns of cotton fiber were mixed with the polyester resin and sample specimens were developed and tested. Relative effect of the cotton as reinforcing agent was examined and observed that developed composite specimen possess significant improvement in mechanical properties such as tensile strength was improved as 19.78 % and modulus of elasticity was increased up to 24.81%. Through this research it was also observed that developed composite material was of ductile nature and its density decreases up to 2.6%. Results from this study were compared with relevant available advanced composite materials and found improved mechanical properties of developed composite material

  16. Characterization of surface properties of glass vials used as primary packaging material for parenterals.

    Ditter, Dominique; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Roehl, Holger; Wahl, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Nieto, Alejandra; Allmendinger, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    The appropriate selection of adequate primary packaging, such as the glass vial, rubber stopper, and crimp cap for parenteral products is of high importance to ensure product stability, microbiological quality (integrity) during storage as well as patient safety. A number of issues can arise when inadequate vial material is chosen, and sole compliance to hydrolytic class I is sometimes not sufficient when choosing a glass vial. Using an appropriate pre-treatment, such as surface modification or coating of the inner vial surface after the vial forming process the glass container quality is often improved and interactions of the formulation with the surface of glass may be minimized. This study aimed to characterize the inner surface of different type I glass vials (Exp33, Exp51, Siliconized, TopLyo™ and Type I plus®) at the nanoscale level. All vials were investigated topographically by colorimetric staining and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Glass composition of the surface was studied by Time-of-Flight - Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the inner surface was assessed by dye tests and surface energy measurements. All containers were studied unprocessed, as received from the vendor, i.e. in unwashed and non-depyrogenized condition. Clear differences were found between the different vial types studied. Especially glass vials without further surface modifications, like Exp33 and Exp51 vials, showed significant (I) vial-to-vial variations within one vial lot as well as (II) variations along the vertical axis of a single vial when studying topography and chemical composition. In addition, differences and heterogeneity in surface energy were found within a given tranche (circumferential direction) of Exp51 as well as Type I plus® vials. Most consistent quality was achieved with TopLyo™ vials. The present comprehensive characterization of surface properties of the

  17. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  18. Nano-Micro Materials Enabled Thermoelectricity From Window Glasses

    Inayat, Salman Bin

    2012-11-03

    With growing world population and decreasing fossil fuel reserves we need to explore and utilize variety of renewable and clean energy sources to meet the imminent challenge of energy crisis. Solar energy is considered as the leading promising alternate energy source with the pertinent challenge of off sunshine period and uneven worldwide distribution of usable sun light. Although thermoelectricity is considered as a reasonable energy harvester from wasted heat, its mass scale usage is yet to be developed. By transforming window glasses into generators of thermoelectricity, this doctoral work explores engineering aspects of using the temperature gradient between the hot outdoor heated by the sun and the relatively cold indoor of a building for mass scale energy generation. In order to utilize the two counter temperature environments simultaneously, variety of techniques, including: a) insertion of basic metals like copper and nickel wire, b) sputtering of thermoelectric films on side walls of individual glass strips to form the thickness depth of the glass on subsequent curing of the strips, and c) embedding nano-manufactured thermoelectric pillars, have been implemented for innovative integration of thermoelectric materials into window glasses. The practical demonstration of thermoelectric windows has been validated using a finite element model to predict the behavior of thermoelectric window under variety of varying conditions. MEMS based characterization platform has been fabricated for thermoelectric characterization of thin films employing van der Pauw and four probe modules. Enhancement of thermoelectric properties of the nano- manufactured pillars due to nano-structuring, achieved through mechanical alloying of micro-sized thermoelectric powders, has been explored. Modulation of thermoelectric properties of the nano-structured thermoelectric pillars by addition of sulfur to nano-powder matrix has also been investigated in detail. Using the best possible p

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced materials - glass fiber reinforced materials

    Krautwald, R

    1980-10-01

    Wind power plants are promising alternative energy systems. The rotor blades are subject to high demands: Long life, light weight, and high stiffness. A GFRP/CFRP combination was chosen for a 316 kW plant, the composite construction is by far superior to the metal construction. Design, fabrication, and testing are described. The plant has a power of 316 kW for a wind velocity of 8.5 m/sec, a rotational speed of 37 min/sup -1/, a rotor diameter of 52 m with a blade length of 25.2 m and a blade mass of 1 t. An experimental component 10.2 m long was constructed and tested with satisfactory results.

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Durability of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites Containing Nanocomposite

    Weiwen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoclay layers incorporated into polymer/clay nanocomposites can inhibit the harmful penetration of water and chemicals into the material, and thus the durability of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP composites should be enhanced by using polymer/clay nanocomposite as the matrix material. In this study, 1.5 wt% vinyl ester (VE/organoclay and 2 wt% epoxy (EP/organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by an in situ polymerization method. The dispersion states of clay in the nanocomposites were studied by performing XRD analysis. GFRP composites were then fabricated with the prepared 1.5 wt% VE/clay and 2.0 wt% EP/clay nanocomposites to investigate the effects of a nanocomposite matrix on the durability of GFRP composites. The durability of the two kinds of GFRP composites was characterized by monitoring tensile properties following degradation of GFRP specimens aged in water and alkaline solution at 60°C, and SEM was employed to study fracture behaviors of aged GFRP composites under tension. The results show that tensile properties of the two types of GFRP composites with and without clay degrade significantly with aging time. However, the GFRP composites with nanoclay show a lower degradation rate compared with those without nanoclay, supporting the aforementioned hypothesis. And the modification of EP/GFRP enhanced the durability more effectively.

  1. Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs

  2. Bulk metallic glass matrix composite for good biocompatibility

    Hadjoub, F; Metiri, W; Doghmane, A; Hadjoub, Z

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement volume fraction effects on acoustical parameters of Zr 41.2 Ti 13.8 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 matrix composites reinforced by Mg, Ag and Cd metals have been studied via a simulation program based on acoustic microscopy technique. Moreover, acoustical parameters of human bone were compared to those of BMGs in both monolithic and reinforced case. It was found that elastic behavior of BMGs matrix composites in high reinforcement volume fraction is similar of that of human bone. This behavior leads to high biocompatibility and good transfer of stress between composite material and human system.

  3. Mechanical properties and fabrication of small boat using woven glass/sugar palm fibres reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composite

    Misri, S; Leman, Z; Sapuan, S M; Ishak, M R

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, sugar palm fibre has been found to have great potential to be used as fibre reinforcement in polymer matrix composites. This research investigates the mechanical properties of woven glass/sugar palm fibres reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composite. The composite specimens made of different layer of fibres such as strand mat, natural and hand woven of sugar palm fibres. The composites were fabricated using a compression moulding technique. The tensile and impact test was carried out in accordance to ASTM 5083 and ASTM D256 standard. The fibre glass boat is a familiar material used in boat industry. A lot of research on fabrication process such as lay-up, vacuum infusion mould and resin transfer mould has been conducted. Hybrid material of sugar palm fibre and fibre glass was used in fabricating the boat. This research investigates the method selection for fabrication of small boat application of natural fibre composites. The composite specimens made of different layer of fibres; woven glass fibre, strand mat, natural and hand woven of woven sugar palm fibres were prepared. The small boat were fabricated using a compression moulding and lay up technique. The results of the experiment showed that the tensile strength, tensile modulus, elongation at break value and impact strength were higher than the natural woven sugar palm fibre. The best method for fabricating the small boat was compression moulding technique. As a general conclusion, the usage of glass fibre had improved the tensile properties sugar palm fibre composites and compression moulding technique is suitable to be used in making a small boat application of natural fibre composites.

  4. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber–epoxy composite laminate

    Konka, Hari P; Wahab, M A; Lian, K

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber–epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension–tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT

  5. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminate

    Konka, Hari P.; Wahab, M. A.; Lian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension-tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT sensors

  6. Fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM glass-ceramic materials used for single-tooth implant crowns.

    Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sahin, Erdal; Gürbüz, Riza; Akça, Kivanç

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance of 2 different CAD/CAM in-office monoceramic materials with single-tooth implant-supported crowns in functional area. A metal experimental model with a dental implant was designed to receive in-office CAD/CAM-generated monoceramic crowns. Laterally positioned axial dynamic loading of 300 N at 2 Hz was applied to implant-supported crowns machined from 2 different glass materials for 100,000 cycle. Failures in terms of fracture, crack formation, and chipping were macroscopically recorded and microscopically evaluated. Four of 10 aluminasilicate glass-ceramic crowns fractured at early loading cycles, the rest completed loading with a visible crack formation. Crack formation was recorded for 2 of 10 leucite glass-ceramic crowns. Others completed test without visible damage but fractured upon removal. Lack in chemical adhesion between titanium abutment and dental cement likely reduces the fatigue resistance of machinable glass-ceramic materials. However, relatively better fractural strength of leucite glass-ceramics could be taken into consideration. Accordingly, progress on developmental changes in filler composition of glass-ceramics may be promising. Machinable glass-ceramics do not possess sufficient fatigue resistance for single-tooth implant crowns in functional area.

  7. Bulk metallic glasses: A new class of engineering materials

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    been discovered. Glass-forming ability depends on various factors like enthalpy ... The determination of a glass transition temperature in ... Rao (1980) has postulated that an alloy with the smallest possible molar volume is most prone to glass ...

  8. Study of optical properties of Erbium doped Tellurite glass-polymer composite

    Sushama, D., E-mail: sushasukumar@gmail.com [Research Awardee, LAMP, Dept. of Physics, Nit, Calicut, India and Dept. of Physics, M.S.M. College, Kayamkulam, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    Chalcogenide glasses have wide applications in optical device technology. But it has some disadvantages like thermal instability. Among them Tellurite glasses exhibits high thermal Stability. Doping of rare earth elements into the Tellurite glasses improve its optical properties. To improve its mechanical properties composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared. Bulk samples of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped TeO{sub 2}‐WO{sub 3}‐La{sub 2}O{sub 3} Tellurite glasses are prepared from high purity oxide mixtures, melting in an alumina crucible in air atmosphere. Composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared by powder mixing method and the thin films of these composites are prepared using polymer press. Variations in band gap of these composites are studied from the UV/Vis/NIR absorption.

  9. Study of optical properties of Erbium doped Tellurite glass-polymer composite

    Sushama, D.

    2014-01-01

    Chalcogenide glasses have wide applications in optical device technology. But it has some disadvantages like thermal instability. Among them Tellurite glasses exhibits high thermal Stability. Doping of rare earth elements into the Tellurite glasses improve its optical properties. To improve its mechanical properties composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared. Bulk samples of Er 2 O 3 doped TeO 2 ‐WO 3 ‐La 2 O 3 Tellurite glasses are prepared from high purity oxide mixtures, melting in an alumina crucible in air atmosphere. Composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared by powder mixing method and the thin films of these composites are prepared using polymer press. Variations in band gap of these composites are studied from the UV/Vis/NIR absorption

  10. Study of optical properties of Erbium doped Tellurite glass-polymer composite

    Sushama, D.

    2014-10-01

    Chalcogenide glasses have wide applications in optical device technology. But it has some disadvantages like thermal instability. Among them Tellurite glasses exhibits high thermal Stability. Doping of rare earth elements into the Tellurite glasses improve its optical properties. To improve its mechanical properties composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared. Bulk samples of Er2O3 doped TeO2-WO3-La2O3 Tellurite glasses are prepared from high purity oxide mixtures, melting in an alumina crucible in air atmosphere. Composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared by powder mixing method and the thin films of these composites are prepared using polymer press. Variations in band gap of these composites are studied from the UV/Vis/NIR absorption.

  11. High temperature oxidation and crystallization behavior of phosphate glass compositions

    Russo, Diego; Rodriguez, Diego; Grumbaum, N.; Gonzalez Oliver, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the thermal transformation of three iron phosphate glasses having the following nominal compositions: M4 [70% P 2 O 5 , 30% Fe 2 O 3 ], M5 [85% M4, 15% UO 2 ] y M7 [69.7% P 2 O 5 , 28.6% Fe 2 O 3 , 1,7% Al 2 O 3 ]. Thermogravimetric analysis, DTA (differential thermal analysis) and SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) were performed.It was observed that it is easily possible to produce glasses in these systems having very low crystallinity.We could determine the final stable crystalline phases [Fe 4 (P 2 O 7 ) 3 , Fe(PO 3 ) 3 and Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 2 ].The presence of uranium ions affects not only the redox effects but also the crystallization of the system.SAXS data obtained during the heating in vacuum up to ∼600degC, gave some variation of scattering intensities vs. scattering vector suggesting the development of an extra phase or some kind inhomogeneities that seems to disappear on heating

  12. Composites materials: the technology of future

    Ahmed, M.N.; Memon, I.R.; Ahmad, F.; Zafar, N.

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials have a long history of usage. Their precise beginnings are not known; however all recorded history contains references to some form of composite material. e.g. straw was used by man to strengthen mud bricks thousands of years ago. This article presents the use of advanced composites materials in aircraft and space industry. Its brief history, use in military and civil aviation, use in space program, future usage, advantages in terms of cost, weight and strength. Use of composites in unmanned aerial vehicles and problems associated with usage of composites materials are also discussed. (author)

  13. Mechanical characterization of SiC particulate & E-glass fiber reinforced Al 3003 hybrid metal matrix composites

    Narayana, K. S. Lakshmi; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    Metal matrix composites constitute a class of low cost high quality materials which offer high performance for various industrial applications. The orientation of this research is towards the study of mechanical properties of as cast silicon carbide (SiC) particulates and Short E-Glass fibers reinforced Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). The Hybrid metal matrix composite is developed by reinforcing SiC particulates of 100 microns and short E-Glass fibers of 2-3 mm length with Al 3003 in different compositions. The vortex method of stir casting was employed, in which the reinforcements were introduced into the vortex created by the molten metal by means of mechanical stirrer. The mechanical properties of the prepared metal matrix composites were analyzed. From the studies it was noticed that an improvement in mechanical properties of the reinforced alloys compared to unreinforced alloys.

  14. Marginal leakage of two newer glass-ionomer-based sealant materials assessed using micro-CT.

    Chen, X.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Fan, M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test newer glass-ionomer-based materials as sealant materials. One glass-ionomer sealant was light-cured to obtain an early setting reaction. The null-hypothesis tested was: there is no difference in marginal leakage of sealants produced with high-viscosity glass-ionomer, with and

  15. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  16. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  17. Flexible, Heat-Resistant, and Flame-Retardant Glass Fiber Nonwoven/Glass Platelet Composite Separator for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Ulrich Schadeck

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of high-temperature stable and self-supporting composite separator for lithium-ion batteries was developed consisting of custom-made ultrathin micrometer-sized glass platelets embedded in a glass fiber nonwoven together with a water-based sodium alginate binder. The physical and electrochemical properties were investigated and compared to commercial polymer-based separators. Full-cell configuration cycling tests at different current rates were performed using graphite and lithium iron phosphate as electrode materials. The glass separator was high-temperature tested and showed a stability up to at least 600 °C without significant shrinking. Furthermore, it showed an exceptional wettability for non-aqueous electrolytes. The electrochemical performance was excellent compared to commercially available polymer-based separators. The results clearly show that glass platelets integrated into a glass fiber nonwoven performs remarkably well as a separator material in lithium-ion batteries and show high-temperature stability.

  18. Comparative evaluation of fluoride release and recharge of pre-reacted glass ionomer composite and nano-ionomeric glass ionomer with daily fluoride exposure: An in vitro study

    Jayanthi Mungara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This in vitro study was designed to investigate the effects of daily fluoride exposures on fluoride release and recharge by prereacted glass ionomer (PRG composite and nano-ionomeric glass ionomer. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two specimens (36 of each material were prepared and by placing the restorative materials into Teflon mold. Each specimen was subjected to one of three daily treatments (n = 12: (1 No fluoride treatment (control; (2 application of a fluoride dentifrice (1,000 ppm once daily; and (3 the same regimen as (2, plus immersion in a 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF mouth rinse (225 ppm immediately following the dentifrice application. Specimens were suspended in a storage vial containing 10 ml demineralizing solution for 6 h and transferred to a new test tube containing 10 ml remineralizing solution for 18 h. Fluoride treatments of the specimens were completed every day prior to their immersion in the demineralizing solution. Media solutions were buffered with equal volumes of total ionic strength adjustment buffer (TISAB II; fluoride levels were measured using a digital ion analyzer and fluoride electrode throughout the 21 day duration of the experiment. Results: Nano-ionomeric glass ionomer showed a better amount of fluoride release than PRG composite irrespective of the fluoride treatment supplementation (P < 0.01. Additional fluoride supplementation improved fluoride release and recharge ability for both the materials when compared to their respective control groups. The fluoride recharge for both materials did not show any sustained pattern of release. Conclusion: Nano-ionomeric glass ionomer demonstrated a greater ability to release and recharge compared with that of PRG composite.

  19. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  20. Parametric Study of End Milling Glass Fibre Reinforced Composites

    Azmi, Azwan I.; Lin, Richard J. T.; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of Taguchi 'Design of Experiment' method to investigate the effects of end milling parameters on machinability characteristics of unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. A series of milling experiments were conducted using tungsten carbide end milling cutters at various spindle speeds, feed rates and depths of cut. Taguchi analysis was carried out and the signal to noise (S/N) ratio with analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to analyse the effects of those parameters on GFRP machinability. Overall, the results of the current investigations present some desirable combinations of the machining parameters that can further enhance the end milling machinability characteristics to suit the final requirements of the finished GFRP products.

  1. Influence of biofilm formation on the optical properties of novel bioactive glass-containing composites.

    Hyun, Hong-Keun; Ferracane, Jack L

    2016-09-01

    Bioactive glass (BAG) has been suggested as a possible additive for dental restorative materials because of its antimicrobial effect and potential for promoting apatite formation in body fluids. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of bacterial biofilm on the change of colorimetric value and translucency of novel BAG-containing composites having different initial surface roughness. Composites with 72wt% total filler load were prepared by replacing 15% of the silanized Sr glass with BAG (65 mol % Si; 4% P; 31% Ca), BAG-F (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B), or silanized silica. Light-cured discs of 2-mm thickness (n=10/group) were divided into 4 different surface roughness subgroups produced by wet polishing with 600 and then up to 1200, 2400, or 4000 grit SiC. CIE L*a*b* were measured and the color difference and translucency parameter (TP) were calculated before and after incubating in media with or without a Streptococcus mutans (UA 159) biofilm for 2 wks (no agitation). Results were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=0.05). All the color differences for BAG and BAG-F composite showed significant decreases with bacterial biofilm compared to media-only. The mean TP (SD) of BAG and BAG-F composite before aging [10.0 (2.8) and 8.5 (1.4)] was higher than that of the control composite [4.9 (0.8)], while the change in TP with aging was greater compared to the control with or without bacteria. BAG-F composites with the smoothest surfaces showed a greater decrease in TP under bacterial biofilm compared to the BAG composite. Highly polished dental composites containing bioactive glass additives may become slightly rougher and show reduced translucency when exposed to bacterial biofilms, but do not discolor any more than control composites that do not contain the BAG. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  2. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  3. Hybrid carbon-glass fiber/toughened epoxy thick composites subject to drop-weight and ballistic impacts

    Sevkat, Ercan

    The goals of this study are to investigate the low velocity and ballistic impact response of thick-section hybrid fiber composites at room temperature. Plain-woven S2-Glass and IM7 Graphite fabrics are chosen as fiber materials reinforcing the SC-79 epoxy. Four different types of composites consisting of alternating layers of glass and graphite woven fabric sheets are considered. Tensile tests are conducted using 98 KN (22 kip) MTS testing machine equipped with environmental chamber. Low-velocity impact tests are conducted using an Instron-Dynatup 8250 impact test machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Ballistic impact tests are performed using helium pressured high-speed gas-gun. Tensile tests results were used to define the material behavior of the hybrid and non-hybrid composites in Finite Element modeling. The low velocity and ballistic impact tests showed that hybrid composites performance was somewhere between non-hybrid woven composites. Using woven glass fabrics as outer skin improved the impact performance of woven graphite composite. However hybrid composites are prone to delamination especially between dissimilar layers. The ballistic limit velocity V50 hybrid composites were higher that of woven graphite composite and lower than that of woven glass composite. Both destructive cross-sectional micrographs and nondestructive ultrasonic techniques are used to evaluate the damage created by impact. The Finite Element code LS-DYNA is chosen to perform numerical simulations of low velocity and ballistic impact on thick-section hybrid composites. The damage progression in these composites shows anisotropic nonlinearity. The material model to describe this behavior is not available in LS-DYNA material library. Initially, linear orthotropic material with damage (Chan-Chan Model) is employed to simulate some of the experimental results. Then, user-defined material subroutine is incorporated into LS-DYNA to simulate the nonlinear behavior. The

  4. Effect of Sodium bicarbonate on Fire behaviour of tilled E- Glass Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Girish, S.; Devendra, K.; Bharath, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    Composites such as fibre reinforced polymers give us the good mechanical properties, but their fire behaviour is not appreciable and needs to be improved. In this work, E- glass fiber is used as a reinforcement material and Epoxy resin is used as a matrix with particulate sodium bi-carbonate (NaHCO3) is used as additive. The hand lay-up technique is adopted for the development of composites by varying percentage of additive. All the tests were conducted according to ASTM standards to study the Fire behaviour of the developed composites. The different fire properties like Ignition time, mass loss rate and flame propagation rate of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) with NaHCO3 are compared with neat FRPs. It is found that the ignition time increases as the percentage of additive is increased.

  5. Evaluation of Shielding Performance for Newly Developed Composite Materials

    Evans, Beren Richard

    This work details an investigation into the contributing factors behind the success of newly developed composite neutron shield materials. Monte Carlo simulation methods were utilized to assess the neutron shielding capabilities and secondary radiation production characteristics of aluminum boron carbide, tungsten boron carbide, bismuth borosilicate glass, and Metathene within various neutron energy spectra. Shielding performance and secondary radiation data suggested that tungsten boron carbide was the most effective composite material. An analysis of the macroscopic cross-section contributions from constituent materials and interaction mechanisms was then performed in an attempt to determine the reasons for tungsten boron carbide's success over the other investigated materials. This analysis determined that there was a positive correlation between a non-elastic interaction contribution towards a material's total cross-section and shielding performance within the thermal and epi-thermal energy regimes. This finding was assumed to be a result of the boron-10 absorption reaction. The analysis also determined that within the faster energy regions, materials featuring higher non-elastic interaction contributions were comparable to those exhibiting primarily elastic scattering via low Z elements. This allowed for the conclusion that composite shield success within higher energy neutron spectra does not necessitate the use elastic scattering via low Z elements. These findings suggest that the inclusion of materials featuring high thermal absorption properties is more critical to composite neutron shield performance than the presence of constituent materials more inclined to maximize elastic scattering energy loss.

  6. Measurement and analysis of thrust force in drilling sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Ramesh, M.; Gopinath, A.

    2017-05-01

    Drilling of composite materials is difficult when compared to the conventional materials because of its in-homogeneous nature. The force developed during drilling play a major role in the surface quality of the hole and minimizing the damages around the surface. This paper focuses the effect of drilling parameters on thrust force in drilling of sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates. The quadratic response models are developed by using response surface methodology (RSM) to predict the influence of cutting parameters on thrust force. The adequacy of the models is checked by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis is carried out to analyze the quality of the drilled surface. From the results, it is found that, the feed rate is the most influencing parameter followed by spindle speed and the drill diameter is the least influencing parameter on the thrust force.

  7. Structural health monitoring of glass/epoxy composite plates with MEMS PMN-PT sensors

    Simon, Brenton R.; Tang, Hong-Yue; Horsley, David A.; La Saponara, Valeria; Lestari, Wahyu

    2009-03-01

    Sensors constructed with single-crystal PMN-PT, i.e. Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 or PMN, are developed in this paper for structural health monitoring of composite plates. To determine the potential of PMN-PT for this application, glass/epoxy composite specimens were created containing an embedded delamination-starter. Two different piezoelectric materials were bonded to the surface of each specimen: PMN-PT, the test material, was placed on one side of the specimen, while a traditional material, PZT-4, was placed on the other. A comparison of the ability of both materials to transmit and receive an ultrasonic pulse was conducted, with the received signal detected by both a second surface-bonded transducer constructed of the same material, as well as a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) analyzing the same location. The optimal frequency range of both sets of transducers is discussed and a comparison is presented of the experimental results to theory. The specimens will be fatigued until failure with further data collected every 3,000 cycles to characterize the ability of each material to detect the growing delamination in the composite structure. This additional information will be made available during the conference.

  8. Composite material and method of making

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  9. Experimental Tensile Strength Analysis of Woven-Glass/Epoxy Composite Plates with Central Circular Hole

    Hadi, Bambang K.; Rofa, Bima K.

    2018-04-01

    The use of composite materials in aerospace engineering, as well as in maritime structure has increased significantly during the recent years. The extensive use of composite materials in industrial applications should make composite structural engineers and scientists more aware of the advantage and disadvantage of this material and provide them with necessary data and certification process. One of the problems in composite structures is the existence of hole. Hole can not be avoided in actual structures, since it may be the necessity of providing access for maintenance or due to impact damage. The presence of hole will weaken the structures. Therefore, in this paper, the effect of hole on the strength of glass-woven/epoxy composite will be discussed. Extensive tests have been carried out to study the effect of hole-diameter on the tensile strengths of these specimens. The results showed that the bigger the hole-diameter compared to the width of the specimens has weakened the structures further, as expected. Further study should be carried in the future to model it with the finite element and theoretical analysis precisely.

  10. In Situ Wire Drawing of Phosphate Glass in Polymer Matrices for Material Extrusion 3D Printing

    J. Gilberto Siqueiros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A strategy to increase the amount of materials available for additive manufacturing platforms such as material extrusion 3D printing (ME3DP is the creation of printable thermoplastic composites. Potential limiters to the incorporation of filler materials into a thermoplastic resin include agglomeration of the filler materials, which can compromise the mechanical properties of the material system and a static morphology of the filler material. A potential solution to these issues is the use of filler materials with low glass transition temperatures allowing for a change in morphology during the extrusion process. Here, we successfully demonstrate the drawing of phosphate glass particles into a wire-like morphology within two polymeric systems: (1 a rubberized acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS blend and (2 polylactic acid (PLA. After applying a normalization process to account for the effect of air gap within the 3D printed test specimens, an enhancement in the mechanical properties was demonstrated where an increase in strength was as high as 21% over baseline specimens. Scanning electron microanalysis was used to characterize the fracture surface and wire drawing efficacy. Factors affecting the ability to achieve wire drawing such as polymer viscosity and print temperature are also highlighted.

  11. Gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer factor of some oxide glass shielding materials

    Waly, El-Sayed A.; Fusco, Michael A.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    The variation in dosimetric parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer factor, exposure buildup factor, and the photon mean free path for different oxide glasses for the incident gamma energy range 0.015–15 MeV has been studied using MicroShield code. It has been inferred that the addition of PbO and Bi 2 O 3 improves the gamma ray shielding properties. Thus, the effect of chemical composition on these parameters is investigated in the form of six different glass compositions, which are compared with specialty concrete for nuclear radiation shielding. The composition termed ‘Glass 6’ in this paper has the highest mass attenuation and the smallest half value layer and may have potential applications in radiation shielding. An example dry storage cask utilizing an additional layer of Glass 6 as an intermediate shielding layer, simulated in MicroShield, is capable of reducing the exposure rate at the cask surface by over 20 orders of magnitude compared to the case without a glass layer. Based on this study, Glass 6 shows promise as a gamma-ray shielding material, particularly for dry cask storage.

  12. Physicochemical properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber reinforced resin composite.

    Huang, Qiting; Qin, Wei; Garoushi, Sufyan; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2018-01-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate several physicochemical properties of an experimental discontinuous S2-glass fiber-reinforced resin composite. The experimental composite was prepared by mixing 10 wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers with 27.5 wt% of resin matrix and 62.5 wt% of particulate fillers. Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), fracture toughness (FT), work of fracture (WOF), double bond conversion (DC), Vickers hardness, volume shrinkage (VS) and fiber length distribution were determined. These were compared with two commercial resin composites. The experimental composite showed the highest FS, WOF and FT compared with two control composites. The DC of the experimental composite was comparable with controls. No significant difference was observed in VS between the three tested composites. The use of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with polymer matrix and particulate fillers yielded improved physical properties and substantial improvement was associated with the use of S2-glass fiber.

  13. The Fabrication and Characterization of PCL/Rice Husk Derived Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composite Scaffolds

    Farnaz Naghizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to fabricate a 3D scaffold using polycaprolactone (PCL and silicate based bioactive glass-ceramic (R-SBgC. Different concentrations of R-SBgC prepared from rice husk ash (RHA were combined with PCL to fabricate a composite scaffold using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS method. The products were then characterized using SEM and EDX. The results demonstrated that R-SBgC in PCL matrix produced a bioactive material which has highly porous structure with interconnected porosities. There appears to be a relationship between the increase in R-SBgC concentration and increased material density and compressive modulus; however, increasing R-SBgC concentration result in reduced scaffold porosity. In conclusion, it is possible to fabricate a PCL/bioactive glass-ceramic composite from processed rice husk. Varying the R-SBgC concentrations can control the properties of this material, which is useful in the development of the ideal scaffold intended for use as a bone substitute in nonload bearing sites.

  14. Static and cyclic performance of cementitious composites reinforced with glass-fibres

    Arabi, N.

    2018-01-01

    This paper concerns an experimental study of the influence of short glass-fibres randomly oriented of a reinforced cement-based composite on the mechanical behaviour. The matrix material parameters used are: cement/sand ratio and water/cement ratio fixed at 0.5; the glass-fibre content (0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2% and 2.5%) and fibre lengths (3, 6 and 12 mm). Composites mechanical characterisation under static behaviour at flexural and compression tests, shows that the reinforcement effect is beneficial only in flexural case. A synergy (matrix-reinforcement) was observed when fibre length of 12 mm is used with application rate of 2% in flexural. The fatigue behaviour determined by Wöhler plots (stress-number of cycles to rupture), derived from experimental results; showed a large results dispersion which is attributed to many causes initiating this damage. The cyclic tests illustrate brittle character of these materials; even with low-amplitude cycles of loading no adaptation of these materials can be reported. [es

  15. Influence of Coating with Some Natural Based Materials on the Erosion Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    Aseel Basim Abdul Hussein; Emad Saadi AL-Hassani; Reem Alaa Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, composites were prepared by Hand lay-up molding. The composites constituents were epoxy resin as a matrix, 6% volume fractions of glass fibers (G.F) as reinforcement and 3%, 6% volume fractions of preparation natural material (Rice Husk Ash, Carrot Powder, and Sawdust) as filler. Studied the erosion wear behavior and coating by natural wastes (Rice Husk Ash) with epoxy resin after erosion. The results showed the non – reinforced epoxy have lower resistance erosion than n...

  16. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria; FINAL

    Ren, W

    2001-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria

  17. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  18. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications.

  19. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria; FINAL

    Ren, W

    2001-01-01

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications

  20. Composition and redox control of waste glasses: Recommendation for process control limit

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrochemical series of redox couples, originally developed for Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 131 (SRL-131) as a reference composition, has been extended to two other alkali borosilicate compositions that are candidate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization. Since no dramatic differences were ascertained in the redox chemistry of selected multivalent elements in SRL-131 versus that in Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 165 (SRL-165) and in West Valley glass number-sign 205 (WV-205), the comprehensive electrochemical series can readily be applied to a range of nuclear waste glass compositions. In order to alleviate potential problems with foaming and precipitation of insolubles during the processing of the nuclear waste in these glass melts, the [Fe 2+ ]/[Fe 3+ ] ratio of the melt should be between 0.1 and 0.5. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Barium and calcium borate glasses as shielding materials for x rays and gamma rays

    Singh, H.; Singh, K.; Sharma, G.

    2003-01-01

    Values of the gamma-ray, mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number have been determined experimentally for xBaO.(1-x) B2O3 (x=0.24, 0.30, 0.34,0.40 and 0.44) and xCaO. (I-x)B2O3 (x=0.30 and 0.40) glasses at photon energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV It is pointed out tha...... that these glasses are potential radiation shielding materials. The specific volume of the glasses has been derived from density measurements and studied as a function of composition.......Values of the gamma-ray, mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number have been determined experimentally for xBaO.(1-x) B2O3 (x=0.24, 0.30, 0.34,0.40 and 0.44) and xCaO. (I-x)B2O3 (x=0.30 and 0.40) glasses at photon energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV It is pointed out...

  2. Morphology and microstructure of composite materials

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Lightweight continuous carbon fiber based polymeric composites are currently enjoying increasing acceptance as structural materials capable of replacing metals and alloys in load bearing applications. As with most new materials, these composites are undergoing trials with several competing processing techniques aimed at cost effectively producing void free consolidations with good mechanical properties. As metallic materials have been in use for several centuries, a considerable database exists on their morphology - microstructure; and the interrelationships between structure and properties have been well documented. Numerous studies on composites have established the crucial relationship between microstructure - morphology and properties. The various microstructural and morphological features of composite materials, particularly those accompanying different processing routes, are documented.

  3. A composite material based on recycled tires

    Malers, L.; Plesuma, R.; Locmele, L.

    2009-01-01

    The present study is devoted to the elaboration and investigation of a composite material based on mechanically grinded recycled tires and a polymer binder. The correlation between the content of the binder, some technological parameters, and material properties of the composite was clarified. The apparent density, the compressive stress at a 10% strain, the compressive elastic modulus in static and cyclic loadings, and the insulating properties (acoustic and thermal) were the parameters of special interest of the present investigation. It is found that a purposeful variation of material composition and some technological parameters leads to multifunctional composite materials with different and predictable mechanical and insulation properties.

  4. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-01-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO 2 –Na 2 O–CaO–P 2 O 5 –FeO–Fe 2 O 3 and contains magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests show hydroxyapatite precipitates

  5. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    Verné, Enrica, E-mail: enrica.verne@polito.it [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bruno, Matteo [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Miola, Marta [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta [Traumatology Orthopedics and Occupational Medicine Dept., Università di Torino, Via G. Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Cochis, Andrea [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Rimondini, Lia [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–FeO–Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and contains magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests

  6. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  7. IR spectroscopy of synthetic glasses with Mercury surface composition: Analogs for remote sensing

    Morlok, Andreas; Klemme, Stephan; Weber, Iris; Stojic, Aleksandra; Sohn, Martin; Hiesinger, Harald

    2017-11-01

    In a study to provide ground-truth data for mid-infrared observations of the surface of Mercury with the MERTIS (Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer) instrument onboard the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission, we have studied 17 synthetic glasses. These samples have the chemical compositions of characteristic Hermean surface areas based on MESSENGER data. The samples have been characterized using optical microscopy, EMPA and Raman spectroscopy. Mid-infrared spectra have been obtained from polished thin sections using Micro-FTIR, and of powdered size fractions of bulk material (0-25, 25-63, 93-125 and 125-250 μm) in the 2.5-18 μm range. The synthetic glasses display mostly spectra typical for amorphous materials with a dominating, single Reststrahlen Band (RB) at 9.5-10.7 μm. RB Features of crystalline forsterite are found in some cases at 9.5-10.2 μm, 10.4-11.2 μm, and at 11.9 μm. Dendritic crystallization starts at a MgO content higher than 23 wt.% MgO. The Reststrahlen Bands, Christiansen Features (CF), and Transparency Features (TF) shift depending on the SiO2 and MgO contents. Also a shift of the Christiansen Feature of the glasses compared with the SCFM (SiO2/(SiO2+CaO+FeO+MgO)) index is observed. This shift could potentially help distinguish crystalline and amorphous material in remote sensing data. A comparison between the degree of polymerization of the glass and the width of the characteristic strong silicate feature shows a weak positive correlation. A comparison with a high-quality mid-IR spectrum of Mercury shows some moderate similarity to the results of this study, but does not explain all features.

  8. Potash - a key raw material of glass batch for Bohemian glasses from 14th-17th centuries?

    Cílová, Z.; Woitsch, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 2 (2012), s. 371-380 ISSN 0305-4403 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB900580701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : Wood ash * Potash * Medieval glass * Chemical composition * Glass batch * archaeological experiment * Reconstruction of technology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 1.889, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440311003505

  9. Effects of sea water environment on glass fiber reinforced plastic materials used for marine civil engineering constructions

    Garcia-Espinel, J.D.; Castro-Fresno, D.; Parbole Gayo, P.; Ballester-Muñoz, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Seawater environment over composite material that are suitable for civil applications. • Seawater intake is linked to tensile and flexural strength degradation in GFC. • Fatigue performance of glass composites is similar in seawater environment than in air. - Abstract: Glass fiber composites (GFRP) are common in civil engineering projects, but not in marine structures. One reason is that seawater effects degrade GFRP composites mechanical properties and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). Here, influence of seawater environment is studied to determine the best composite materials for marine civil engineer applications, studying the influence of several factors in their mechanical properties. This is to determine safety factors to use in the design of structural calculations for marine applications. Glass/epoxy composites are the safest materials to use in marine civil structures as mechanical properties degradation becomes stabilized after moisture saturation level. UV and water cyclic analysis must be done to determine affection to transversal strength. Only vinylester GFRP has problems with biodegradation. GFRP fatigue performance is not influenced by seawater environment

  10. Electrochemical and Friction Characteristics of Metallic Glass Composites at the Microstructural Length-scales.

    Ayyagari, Aditya; Hasannaeimi, Vahid; Arora, Harpreet; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2018-01-17

    Metallic glass composites represent a unique alloy design strategy comprising of in situ crystalline dendrites in an amorphous matrix to achieve damage tolerance unseen in conventional structural materials. They are promising for a range of advanced applications including spacecraft gears, high-performance sporting goods and bio-implants, all of which demand high surface degradation resistance. Here, we evaluated the phase-specific electrochemical and friction characteristics of a Zr-based metallic glass composite, Zr 56.2 Ti 13.8 Nb 5.0 Cu 6.9 Ni 5.6 Be 12.5 , which comprised roughly of 40% by volume crystalline dendrites in an amorphous matrix. The amorphous matrix showed higher hardness and friction coefficient compared to the crystalline dendrites. But sliding reciprocating tests for the composite revealed inter-phase delamination rather than preferred wearing of one phase. Pitting during potentiodynamic polarization in NaCl solution was prevalent at the inter-phase boundary, confirming that galvanic coupling was the predominant corrosion mechanism. Scanning vibration electrode technique demonstrated that the amorphous matrix corroded much faster than the crystalline dendrites due to its unfavorable chemistry. Relative work function values measured using scanning kelvin probe showed the amorphous matrix to be more electropositive, which explain its preferred corrosion over the crystalline dendrites as well as its characteristic friction behavior. This study paves the way for careful partitioning of elements between the two phases in a metallic glass composite to tune its surface degradation behavior for a range of advanced applications.

  11. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite - HAp - layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Using optical spectroscopy to characterize the material of a 16th c. stained glass window

    Ceglia, A.; Meulebroeck, W.; Wouters, H.; Baert, K.; Nys, K.; Terryn, H.; Thienpont, H.

    In this paper we studied the transmittance spectra of a collection of several glass samples taken from a 16th century stained window of the Church of Our Lady in Bruges, Belgium. We recorded the optical spectra for all the samples in the region between 350 and 1600 nm. The goal of our research was to reveal information about the composition of the glass artifacts in a fast and non-destructive way. Analysis of the optical spectra allowed us in the first place to identify the type of colorants that were used. It was possible to recognize metal ions, such as Fe2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Mn3+, Cr3+ and Cu2+. Also colors made of metal nanoparticles, such as silver and copper colloids were successfully identified. The recognition of the coloring agents is of particular interest in dating the glass pieces. This is because some colorants were only used in certain periods. Green glass colored by chromium was produced only after the mid 19th century onwards. Our study showed that 3 of the 10 pieces were colored by this element and they originate as such from a later period. A second conclusion refers to the applied fluxing agent. By analyzing the spectral position of the first cobalt absorption band, we were able to classify the glass pieces as potash based (used in medieval times) or soda-based (used in modern times) and therefore to classify them as original or as restoration material. From the 10 blue colored samples, 7 of them were recognized as original material. Finally, for the naturally colored parts the analysis of the spectra allowed us to group them based on cobalt impurities.

  13. The Load-Bearing Capacity of Timber-Glass Composite I-Beams Made with Polyurethane Adhesives

    Rodacki, Konrad

    2017-12-01

    This article discusses the issue of composite timber-glass I-beams, which are an interesting alternative for load-bearing beams of ceilings and roofs. The reasoning behind the use of timber-glass I-beams is the combination of the best features of both materials - this enables the creation of particularly safe beams with regard to structural stability and post-breakage load capacity. Due to the significant differences between the bonding surfaces of timber and glass, a study on the adhesion of various adhesives to both surfaces is presented at the beginning of the paper. After examination, two adhesives were selected for offering the best performance when used with composite beams. The beams were investigated using a four-point bending test under quasi-static loading.

  14. Molecular modeling of polycarbonate materials: Glass transition and mechanical properties

    Palczynski, Karol; Wilke, Andreas; Paeschke, Manfred; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Linking the experimentally accessible macroscopic properties of thermoplastic polymers to their microscopic static and dynamic properties is a key requirement for targeted material design. Classical molecular dynamics simulations enable us to study the structural and dynamic behavior of molecules on microscopic scales, and statistical physics provides a framework for relating these properties to the macroscopic properties. We take a first step toward creating an automated workflow for the theoretical prediction of thermoplastic material properties by developing an expeditious method for parameterizing a simple yet surprisingly powerful coarse-grained bisphenol-A polycarbonate model which goes beyond previous coarse-grained models and successfully reproduces the thermal expansion behavior, the glass transition temperature as a function of the molecular weight, and several elastic properties.

  15. High-frequency characteristics of glass/ceramic composite and alumina multilayer structures

    Niwa, K.; Suzuki, H.; Yokoyama, H.; Kamechara, N.; Tsubone, K.; Tanisawa, H.; Sugiki, H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the transmission characteristics of glass/ceramic composite (borosilicate glass/alumina) and alumina multilayer structures examined. The triplate stripline formed in the glass/ceramic multilayer shows low conductor and dielectric loss. Alumina multilayer, however, has twice the transmission loss at 10 GHz, because the resistivity of W in the alumina multilayer is higher than the Cu in the glass/ceramic multilayer. Crosstalk between striplines in the glass/ceramics is less than -80 dB up to 11 GHz and 9 GHz for alumina

  16. Hybrid composite laminates reinforced with Kevlar/carbon/glass woven fabrics for ballistic impact testing.

    Randjbaran, Elias; Zahari, Rizal; Jalil, Nawal Aswan Abdul; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  17. Hybrid Composite Laminates Reinforced with Kevlar/Carbon/Glass Woven Fabrics for Ballistic Impact Testing

    Elias Randjbaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current study reported a facile method to investigate the effects of stacking sequence layers of hybrid composite materials on ballistic energy absorption by running the ballistic test at the high velocity ballistic impact conditions. The velocity and absorbed energy were accordingly calculated as well. The specimens were fabricated from Kevlar, carbon, and glass woven fabrics and resin and were experimentally investigated under impact conditions. All the specimens possessed equal mass, shape, and density; nevertheless, the layers were ordered in different stacking sequence. After running the ballistic test at the same conditions, the final velocities of the cylindrical AISI 4340 Steel pellet showed how much energy was absorbed by the samples. The energy absorption of each sample through the ballistic impact was calculated; accordingly, the proper ballistic impact resistance materials could be found by conducting the test. This paper can be further studied in order to characterise the material properties for the different layers.

  18. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  19. Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fibre-reinforced polypropylene composite

    Phiri, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?C). Figure 1 shows the processing steps followed to produce composite samples. Up to 15% fibre loading could be achieved and the sisal fibres were coated with water glass to improve fire resistance. In order to improve the adhesion between sisal... preparation process: (A) WG coated fibre, (B) High speed granulator, (C) Composite granules, (D) Single screw extruder, (E) Injection moulder and (F) Composite samples (dumbbells) Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fi bre...

  20. Effects of composition on properties in an 11-component nuclear waste glass system

    Chick, L.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Mellinger, G.B.; May, R.P.; Gray, W.J.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1981-09-01

    Ninety simplified nuclear waste glass compositions within an 11-component oxide composition matrix were tested for crystallinity, viscosity, volatility, and chemical durability. Empirical models of property response as a function of glass composition were developed using statistical experimental design and modeling techniques. A new statistical technique was developed to calculate the effects of oxide components on each property. Independent melts were used to check the prediction accuracy of the models

  1. In vitro bioactivity of glass-ceramic/fibroin composites

    Lachezar Radev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive composite materials were prepared by mixing 20 wt.% of silk fibroin (SF and 80 wt.% of glassceramics from CaO-SiO2-P2O5-MgO system. In vitro bioactivity of the prepared composites was evaluated in 1.5 simulated body fluid (1.5 SBF in static conditions. The obtained samples before and after in vitro tests were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The changes in 1.5 SBF solutions after soaking the samples were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES. MG63 osteosarcoma cells were used for the biological experiments. The obtained experimental data proved that the synthesized composites exhibit excellent in vitro bioactivity.

  2. The glass furnace of the 17th Century of Sa Gerreria (Palma, Mallorca): Historical context and preliminary analysis of the materials

    Capella Galmes, M. A.; Albero Santacreu, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the materials of the glass furnace of Sa Gerreria (Palma) dated in the second half of the 17th Century A.D. are analysed. On the one hand, we discuss the available information regarding this glass workshop as well as the raw material management strategies made during the studied period. On the other hand, we focus on the materials produced by this workshop and we carry out a preliminary archaeometrical analysis of the glass lumps, frits and slags recovered as well as some glass pieces by means of scanning electron microscope and X-ray dispersive energy. The final aim is to characterise the chemical composition and the properties of the raw materials used in this workshop as well as to approach some of the technical processes put in practice by the glass makers who inhabited Mallorca during the 17th Century. (Author)

  3. Immobilization of heavy metals arising sludge galvanic, in glass ceramic material; Imobilizacao de metais pesados oriundos de lodo galvanico em material vitreo

    Felisberto, R., E-mail: regina.felisberto@poa.ifrs.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, M.C.; Basegio, T.; Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PPGEM/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The use of galvanic sludge in the glass-ceramic formulation for immobilizing environmentally harmful materials is consolidated in more developed countries as raw material in the formulation of new materials. In this work, we have used galvanic sludge provided by a metallurgical company located in Vale dos Sinos, RS. The sludge was dried at 105°C and mixed with soda-lime glass in proportions of 1, 5, 10 and 20%, relative to the glass mass. Its composition was determined by FRX, and evaluated for leaching (NBR 10005) and solubilization (NBR 10006). The specimens (CPs) were burned at temperatures 750, 800 and 850°C, also submitted to the tests. The sludge, Class I - dangerous, presented Se content greater than provisions of NBR 10004. It was possible to immobilize the heavy metals at a temperature of 850°C for specimens of the F1 formulation, having been thus classified as Class II B Inert Residue. (author)

  4. Isothermal and hygrothermal agings of hybrid glass fiber/carbon fiber composite

    Barjasteh, Ehsan

    New applications of fiber-reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) are arising in non-traditional sectors of industry, such as civil infrastructure, automotive, and power distribution. For example, composites are being used in place of steel to support high-voltage overhead conductors. In this application, conductive strands of aluminum are wrapped around a solid composite rod comprised of unidirectional carbon and glass fibers in an epoxy matrix, which is commercially called ACCC conductor. Composite-core conductors such as these are expected to eventually replace conventional steel-reinforced conductors because of the reduced sag at high temperatures, lower weight, higher ampacity, and reduced line losses. Despite the considerable advantages in mechanical performance, long-term durability of composite conductors is a major concern, as overhead conductors are expected to retain properties (with minimal maintenance) over a service life that spans multiple decades. These concerns stem from the uncertain effects of long-term environmental exposure, which includes temperature, moisture, radiation, and aggressive chemicals, all of which can be exacerbated by cyclic loads. In general, the mechanical and physical properties of polymer composites are adversely affected by such environmental factors. Consequently, the ability to forecast changes in material properties as a function of environmental exposure, particularly bulk mechanical properties, which are affected by the integrity of fiber-matrix interfaces, is required to design for extended service lives. Polymer composites are susceptible to oxidative degradation at high temperatures approaching but not quite reaching the glass transition temperature ( Tg). Although the fibers are stable at such temperatures, the matrix and especially the fiber-matrix interface can undergo degradation that affects the physical and mechanical properties of the structure over time. Therefore, as a first step, the thermal aging of an

  5. Application of sandwich honeycomb carbon/glass fiber-honeycomb composite in the floor component of electric car

    Sukmaji, I. C.; Wijang, W. R.; Andri, S.; Bambang, K.; Teguh, T.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays composite is a superior material used in automotive component due to its outstanding mechanical behavior. The sandwich polypropylene honeycomb core with carbon/glass fiber composite skin (SHCG) as based material in a floor component of electric car application is investigated in the present research. In sandwich structure form, it can absorb noise better compare with the conventional material [1]. Also in present paper, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of SHCG as based material for floor component of the electric car is analyzed. The composite sandwich is contained with a layer uniform carbon fiber and mixing non-uniform carbon-glass fiber in upper and lower skin. Between skins of SHCG are core polypropylene honeycomb that it have good flexibility to form following dies profile. The variables of volume fraction ratio of carbon/glass fiber in SHCG skin are 20/80%, 30/70%, and 50/50%. The specimen of SHCG is tested using the universal testing machine by three points bending method refers to ASTM C393 and ASTM C365. The cross point between tensile strength to the volume fraction the mixing carbon/glass line and ratio cost line are the searched material with good mechanical performance and reasonable cost. The point is 30/70 volume fraction of carbon/glass fiber. The result of the testing experiment is become input properties of model structure sandwich in FEA simulation. FEA simulation approach is conducted to find critical strength and factor of complex safety geometry against varied distributed passenger loads of a floor component the electric car. The passenger loads variable are 80, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 kg.

  6. SEM-EDS analysis of ancient gold leaf glass mosaic tesserae. A contribution to the dating of the materials

    Conventi, A; Verità, M; Neri, E

    2012-01-01

    Metal leaf (gold, silver or their alloys) glass tesserae began to be used in wall mosaics in the first century AD (the first examples are in Rome) and their use has been uninterrupted up to day. The metal leaf could be obtained from circulating coins, jewellery or refining. According to various techniques that have changed over the centuries, the leaf was hot fixed between two glass layers. From an archaeological point of view, it is interesting to know when and where these tesserae were made, if they were new made or if they were reused tesserae recovered from earlier dismantled mosaics. The determination of the glass composition of the tesserae is not of great help in this connection, for the same kind of glass was used over long periods. Available information is still scanter for glasses produced between the 1st to 8th centuries when the batch of raw materials (a natural soda called natron and a silica-lime sand) was melted in large tank furnaces and chunks of raw glass were transported all over the Mediterranean to be remelted and shaped into manufacts in small pot furnaces. The SEM-EDS analysis is proposed in this study as a useful tool to investigate the composition of both the glass and the gold alloy in leaf tesserae from mosaics of the 1st - 9th centuries. The comparison of the composition of the gold leaf of the tesserae with that of circulating gold coins (for which an important analytical data base is available), adds further information to the glass analysis, allowing us to improve the dating of the tesserae and increase the knowledge that may result from scientific analyses. The results demonstrate that good quantitative analyses of the metal leaf can be performed and that metal leaves made of pure gold or gold-silver alloys were used.

  7. Microhardness of bulk-fill composite materials

    Kelić, Katarina; Matić, Sanja; Marović, Danijela; Klarić, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microhardness of high- and low-viscosity bulk-fill composite resins and compare it with conventional composite materials. Four materials of high-viscosity were tested, including three bulk-fills: QuiXfi l (QF), x-tra fil (XTF) and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEBCF), while nanohybrid composite GrandioSO (GSO) served as control. The other four were low-viscosity composites, three bulk-fill materials: Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF) and ...

  8. Comparison of glass surfaces as a countertop material to existing surfaces

    Turo, Laura A.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-09-01

    Gleen Glass, a small production glass company that creates countertops, was selected for the Technology Assistance Program through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Gleen Glass was seeking material property analysis comparing glass as a countertop material to current surfaces (i.e. marble, granite and engineered stone). With samples provided from Gleen Glass, testing was done on granite, marble, and 3 different glass surfaces ('Journey,' 'Pebble,' and 'Gleen'). Results showed the glass surfaces have a lower density, lower water absorption, and are stronger in compressive and flexural tests as compared to granite and marble. Thermal shock tests showed the glass failed when objects with a high thermal mass are placed directly on them, whereas marble and granite did not fracture under these conditions.

  9. Characterization of fly ash, slag and glass hull for the obtaining of vitreous materials

    Ayala Valderrama, D. M.; Gómez Cuaspud, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    This article presents the structural and thermal characterization of fly ash, the waste from blast furnace slag and the glass hull, generated as common residues in industry, which cannot be recycled easily or destroyed in a simple and fast way. In the particular case of fly ash, at present are being used as a lightweight aggregate in the production of cement, concrete and additive in the production of glass and glass ceramics. As far as the slag and hull, are being used as additives for the asphalt and concretes, however its use still is restricted, reason why its use in alternative ways are necessary. Initially the chemical composition of residues was established, determining that the fly ashes contains SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 oxides; 90% of the total composition, was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. As minor constituents, small percentages of Mg, P, S, K, Na and Ti were found. For the slag case, the phases of Fe3O4, Ca3Mg (SiO2)4 and Ca(MgAl)(Si,Al)2O6 were identified, observing the presence of amorphous phase higher than 94% of the total phase of the system. Meanwhile, the glass hull sample showed a higher percentage of 95% amorphicity, mainly identifying a weak signal associated with silicon oxide SiO2. The thermal analyses of the samples, exhibit a decrease in mass for samples between 25-1000°C was observed, which can be attributed to different physical-chemical events that occur in the materials. The heat flow for each sample is related with the removal of the water retained by the physisorption processes around 92-110°C in all cases. With this previous characterization of the precursors, a sample was composed using 70% fly ash, 10% slag and 20% of glass hull was composed and treated at 1200°C/1.5 hours, obtaining a dense black glassy material for potential applications in field of the glass ceramics.

  10. Mechanical and fracture properties of R-glass reinforced composites with pyrolysed polysiloxane resin as a matrix

    Černý, Martin; Bednářová, D.; Glogar, Petr; Dusza, J.; Rudnayová, E.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 290, - (2005), s. 344-347 ISSN 1013-9826. [International conference on fractography of advanced ceramics /2./. Stará Lesná, 03.10.2005-06.10.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2067107; GA ČR GA106/02/0177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : unidirectional composite * glass fiber reinforcement * pyrolysed polysiloxane resins Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  11. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  12. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  13. Ceramic composite resistors of B4C modified by TIO2 and glass phase

    Klimiec, E.; Zaraska, W.; Stobiecki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Technical progress in the manufacturing technology of composite materials resulted in arising of new generation of bulk resistors, resistant to high levels of overloads and high temperature. These resistors can be applied in extremely heavy working conditions, for instance in cooperation with ignition circuits. The resistors investigated in our research were performed on the basis of ceramic composite consisted of semiconductor boron carbide B 4 C as conductive phase, aluminium oxide Al 2 O 3 and non-alkali glass as insulators and titanium dioxide TiO 2 . The technological procedure of the fabrication of resistors and the results of the tests, such as temperature dependence of the electrical resistance exploitation trials, are presented. (author)

  14. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... to different levels of internal stresses. The mechanical properties, static strength and fatigue life time, are measured in three different directions of the material, i.e. the fiber direction, 0°, the 30° off axis direction, and the 90° direction transverse to the fiber direction. It is experimentally...... demonstrated that the resulting residual stresses barely influences the quasi-static mechanical properties of reinforced glass-fiber composites. It is found that the fatigue performance in the 0° direction is significantly influenced by the internal stresses, whereas the fatigue performance in the off axes...

  15. EFFECTS OF LIGHTWEIGHT MULLITE-SILICA RICH GLASS COMPOSITE AGGREGATES ON PROPERTIES OF CASTABLES

    Li Y.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mullite-silica rich glass (MSRG composite is a material which is more efficient than chamotte for refractory utilization of clay. The effects of lightweight MSRG composite aggregate on the properties of refractory castables were studied by XRD, SEM and EDS, etc. Comparing with a common lightweight chamotte aggregate, it was found that the hot modulus of rupture, refractoriness under load and thermal shock resistance of the castable with lightweight MSRG aggregate were higher than those of the castable with a common lightweight chamotte aggregate because MSRG did not contain silica crystalline phases and contained a liquid phase with very high viscosity at high temperature. The castables with lightweight chamotte aggregate have higher thermal expansion because of existence of cristobalite and quartz, and have lower thermal conductivity because of higher porosity.

  16. Study of the influence of chemical composition on the pozzolanicity of soda-lime glass microparticles; Estudo da influencia da composicao quimica na pozolanicidade de microparticulas de vidro soda-cal

    Sales, R.B.C. [Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (UEMG), MG (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Sales, F.A.; Correa, E.C.; Patricio, P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), MG (Brazil); Mohallem, N.D.S.; Aguilar, M.T.P., E-mail: teresa@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The use of residues presents interesting possibilities for obtaining eco-efficient concretes. Research has investigated the use of glass residue in Portland cement composite, whether as an aggregate or a supplementary material. However, there is still no consensus on the influence of the chemical composition of glass on the behaviour of the composites in which it is used. This paper aims to analyse the influence of this composition on the performance of cement composites produced with microparticles of colourless and amber glass. Pozzolanicity was assessed by means of direct tests (modified Chapelle and electrical conductivity) and indirect tests (chemical characterization, X-ray diffraction, thermo analysis and pozzolanic activity index). Most of the results show that microparticles of both types of glass display pozzolanic activity, with no significant differences between them. This indicates the potential for the use of glass microparticles as a supplementary material in cement composites. (author)

  17. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    Kelley, S.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  18. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  19. Studies on fabrication of glass fiber reinforced composites using polymer blends

    Patel, R. H.; Kachhia, P. H.; Patel, S. N.; Rathod, S. T.; Valand, J. K.

    2018-05-01

    Glass fiber reinforced PVC/NBR composites have been fabricated via hot compression moulding process. PVC is brittle in nature and thus lower thermal stability. Therefore, to improve the toughness of PVC, NBR was incorporated in certain proportions. As both are polar and thus they are compatible. To improve the strength property further, these blends were used to fabricate glass fiber reinforced composites. SEM micrograph shows good wettability of the blend with glass fibers resulting in proper bonding which increase the strength of the composites.

  20. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  1. Study on mechanical properties of fly ash impregnated glass fiber reinforced polymer composites using mixture design analysis

    Satheesh Raja, R.; Manisekar, K.; Manikandan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FRP with and without fly ash filler were prepared. • Mechanical properties of composites were analyzed. • Mixture Design Method was used to model the system. • Experimental and mathematical model results were compared. - Abstract: This paper describes the mechanical behavior of fly ash impregnated E-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite (GFRP). Initially the proportion of fiber and resin were optimized from the analysis of the mechanical properties of the GFRP. It is observed that the 30 wt% of E-glass in the GFRP without filler material yields better results. Then, based on the optimized value of resin content, the varying percentage of E-glass and fly ash was added to fabricate the hybrid composites. Results obtained in this study were mathematically evaluated using Mixture Design Method. Predictions show that 10 wt% addition of fly ash with fiber improves the mechanical properties of the composites. The fly ash impregnated GFRP yields significant improvement in mechanical strength compared to the GFRP without filler material. The surface morphologies of the fractured specimens were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemical composition and surface morphology of the fly ash is analyzed by using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning Electron Microscope

  2. Novel injectable gellan gum hydrogel composites incorporating Zn- and Sr-enriched bioactive glass microparticles: High-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography, antibacterial and in vitro testing.

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Dziadek, Michal; Gorodzha, Svetlana; Lišková, Jana; Brackman, Gilles; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Vervaet, Chris; Balcaen, Lieve; Del Rosario Florez Garcia, Maria; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Weinhardt, Venera; Baumbach, Tilo; Vanhaecke, Frank; Coenye, Tom; Bačáková, Lucie; Surmeneva, Maria A; Surmenev, Roman A; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna; Skirtach, Andre G

    2018-06-01

    Mineralization of hydrogel biomaterials is desirable to improve their suitability as materials for bone regeneration. In this study, gellan gum (GG) hydrogels were formed by simple mixing of GG solution with bioactive glass microparticles of 45S5 composition, leading to hydrogel formation by ion release from the amorphous bioactive glass microparticles. This resulted in novel injectable, self-gelling composites of GG hydrogels containing 20% bioactive glass. Gelation occurred within 20 min. Composites containing the standard 45S5 bioactive glass preparation were markedly less stiff. X-ray microcomputed tomography proved to be a highly sensitive technique capable of detecting microparticles of diameter approximately 8 μm, that is, individual microparticles, and accurately visualizing the size distribution of bioactive glass microparticles and their aggregates, and their distribution in GG hydrogels. The widely used melt-derived 45S5 preparation served as a standard and was compared with a calcium-rich, sol-gel derived preparation (A2), as well as A2 enriched with zinc (A2Zn5) and strontium (A2Sr5). A2, A2Zn, and A2Sr bioactive glass particles were more homogeneously dispersed in GG hydrogels than 45S5. Composites containing all four bioactive glass preparations exhibited antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Composites containing A2Zn5 and A2Sr5 bioactive glasses supported the adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like cells and were considerably more cytocompatible than 45S5. All composites underwent mineralization with calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite upon incubation in simulated body fluid. The extent of mineralization appeared to be greatest for composites containing A2Zn5 and 45S5. The results underline the importance of the choice of bioactive glass when preparing injectable, self-gelling composites. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of high impact hybrid matrix composites from thermoset resin and dyneema-glass fabric reinforcement

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Pansuriya, T.; Malgani, E. V.; Sevkani, V.

    2018-05-01

    Hybrid composites have been fabricated by hand lay-up technique with epoxy resin and diethylene tri amine as a hardener for high impact energy absorption with sandwich stacking of different reinforcements of dyneema and glass fabric. High impact grade composites are nowadays gaining a lot of importance in the field of high mechanical load bearing applications, ballistics and bulletproofing. The present work emphases on the fabrication and mechanical properties of the hybrid composites of cut resistant dyneema fabric along with glass fabric reinforced in the thermosetting resin. i.e. epoxy. The prime importance while fabricating such materials have been given to the processing along with selection of the raw materials. High impact resistive materials with low density and henceforth low weight have been manufactured and characterized by IZOD impact tester, UTM, Archimedes density meter and SEM. Throughout the work, satisfactory results have been obtained. Impact resistance was observed to be boosted three times as that of the reference sample of glass fabric and epoxy. The density of the hybrid composite is observed to be 25% as that of the reference sample.

  4. Correlation between nanostructural and electrical properties of barium titanate-based glass-ceramic nano-composites

    Al-Assiri, M.S., E-mail: msassiri@kku.edu.sa [Department of Physics, King Khaled University, P.O. Box 9003, Abha (Saudi Arabia); El-Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@gmail.com [Department of Physics, King Khaled University, P.O. Box 9003, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt)

    2011-09-08

    Highlights: > Glasses have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at crystallization temperature. > Glass-ceramic nano-composites are important because of their new physical. > Grain sizes are the most significant structural parameter in electronic nanocrystalline phases. > These phases are very high electrical conductivity. > Hence, glass-ceramic nanocrystals are expected to be used, as gas sensors. - Abstract: Glasses in the system BaTiO{sub 3}-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been transformed into glass-ceramic nano-composites by annealing at crystallization temperature T{sub cr} determined from DSC thermograms. After annealing they consist of small crystallites embedded in glassy matrix. The crystallization temperature T{sub cr} increases with increasing BaTiO{sub 3} content. XRD and TEM of the glass-ceramic nano-composites show that nanocrystals were embedded in the glassy matrix with an average grain size of 25 nm. The resulting materials exhibit much higher electrical conductivity than the initial glasses. It was postulated that the major role in the conductivity enhancement of these nanomaterials is played by the developed interfacial regions between crystalline and amorphous phases, in which the concentration of V{sup 4+}-V{sup 5+} pairs responsible for electron hopping, has higher than values that inside the glassy matrix. The experimental results were discussed in terms of a model proposed in this work and based on a 'core-shell' concept. From the best fits, reasonable values of various small polaron hopping (SPH) parameters were obtained. The conduction was attributed to non-adiabatic hopping of small polaron.

  5. Effects of neutron irradiation on glass ceramics as pressure-less joining materials for SiC based components for nuclear applications

    Ferraris, M.; Casalegno, V.; Rizzo, S.; Salvo, M.; Van Staveren, T.O.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 429, 1-3 (2012), s. 166-172 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : glass-ceramic * joining * SiC composites * fusion materials Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311512002668

  6. Composition Range and Glass Forming Ability of Ternary Ca-Mg-Cu Bulk Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    Senkov, O. N; Scott, J. M; Miracle, D. B

    2006-01-01

    .... The maximum thickness at which an alloy remains fully amorphous, glass transition temperature, crystallization temperature, temperature interval of the super-cooled region, solidus and liquidus...

  7. Chemical durability of glass and glass-ceramic materials, developed in laboratory scale, from industrial oil shale residue. Preliminary results

    Araujo Fonseca, M.V. de; Souza Santos, P. de

    1990-01-01

    Industrial developments frequently drive to the natural resources extinction. The recycling era has come out a long time ago and it has been evident that great part of industrial work's problems are related to the pollution and the raw materials extinction. These problems should be solved, with advantages, through industrial residues recycling. This study deals with glass and glass-ceramics materials obtained from oil shale (Irati Formation-Sao Mateus do Sul-Parana State) industrialization residues. The reached results show that a controled devitrification of retorted oil shale glass improves its performance related to chemical attack. The crystallinity caracterization of the oil shales glass-ceramic was made through X-ray diffraction. (author) [pt

  8. Composition dependence of the optical and structural properties of Eu-doped oxyfluoride glasses

    Zhu, Chaofeng; Wu, Dongqun; Zhang, Yanfei; Zhang, Meimei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Eu doped oxyfluoride glasses for LED applications are studied. • Conversion of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ is realized in the glasses prepared in air atmosphere. • CaF 2 crystals formed during melt cooling enhance the conversion of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ . • Content of CaF 2 crystals can be controlled by adjusting base glass compositions. - Abstract: Europium doped oxyfluoride glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method for the light emitting diodes applications. The optical and structural properties of these glasses were studied by means of photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage chromaticity coordinates, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectra. We find that the spontaneous reduction of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ is realized by Eu 3+ ions occupying the sites of Ca 2+ in the glasses prepared in air atmosphere. The Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ conversion efficiency, optical performances and structure of the glasses strongly depend on the base glass compositions. For certain base glass compositions, CaF 2 crystals can form during the melt cooling process, and thereby enhance the conversion from Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ . The formation of CaF 2 crystals can be suppressed by adding CaO, Al 2 O 3 and B 2 O 3 , but enhanced by adding Na 2 O and K 2 O in glass compositions. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain how the glass structure affects the reduction of Eu ions as well as optical properties of the glasses

  9. Nano-materials Enabled Thermoelectricity from Window Glasses

    Inayat, Salman Bin

    2012-11-13

    With a projection of nearly doubling up the world population by 2050, we need wide variety of renewable and clean energy sources to meet the increased energy demand. Solar energy is considered as the leading promising alternate energy source with the pertinent challenge of off sunshine period and uneven worldwide distribution of usable sun light. Although thermoelectricity is considered as a reasonable renewable energy from wasted heat, its mass scale usage is yet to be developed. Here we show, large scale integration of nano-manufactured pellets of thermoelectric nano-materials, embedded into window glasses to generate thermoelectricity using the temperature difference between hot outside and cool inside. For the first time, this work offers an opportunity to potentially generate 304 watts of usable power from 9 m2 window at a 206C temperature gradient. If a natural temperature gradient exists, this can serve as a sustainable energy source for green building technology.

  10. Mg- and/or Sr-doped tricalcium phosphate/bioactive glass composites: Synthesis, microstructure and biological responsiveness

    Bellucci, Devis, E-mail: devis.bellucci@unimore.it [Department of Engineering “E. Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy); Sola, Antonella [Department of Engineering “E. Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy); Cacciotti, Ilaria [University of Rome " Niccolò Cusano" , UdR INSTM, Via Don Carlo Gnocchi 3, 00166, Rome (Italy); Bartoli, Cristina; Gazzarri, Matteo [Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, UdR INSTM — Pisa, Via Risorgimento 35, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bianco, Alessandra [Department of Enterprise Engineering, INSTM RU “Rome-Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Chiellini, Federica [Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, UdR INSTM — Pisa, Via Risorgimento 35, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Cannillo, Valeria [Department of Engineering “E. Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2014-09-01

    Presently, there is an increasing interest towards the composites of calcium phosphates, especially β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), and bioactive glasses. In the present contribution, the recently developed BG{sub C}a/Mix glass has been used because its low tendency to crystallize allows to sinter the composites at relatively low temperature (i.e. 850 °C), thus minimizing the glass devitrification and the interaction with TCP. A further improvement is the introduction of lab-produced TCP powders doped with specific ions instead of non-doped commercial powders, since the biological properties of materials for bone replacement can be modulated by doping them with certain metallic ions, such as Mg and Sr. Therefore, novel binary composites have been produced by sintering the BG{sub C}a/Mix glass with the addition of pure, Mg-substituted, Sr-substituted or Mg/Sr bisubstituted TCP powders. After an accurate characterization of the starting TCP powders and of the obtained samples, the composites have been used as three-dimensional supports for the culture of mouse calvaria-derived pre-osteoblastic cells. The samples supported cell adhesion and proliferation and induced promising mechanisms of differentiation towards an osteoblastic phenotype. In particular, the Mg/Sr bi-doped samples seemed to better promote the differentiation process thus suggesting a combined stimulatory effect of Mg{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} ions.

  11. Interpenetrating Polymer Network (IPN with Epoxidized and Acrylated Bioresins and their Composites with Glass and Jute Fibres

    Francisco Cardona

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Epoxidized (EHO and acrylated (AEHO bio-resins from hemp oil were synthesized, and their interpenetrating networks (IPNs were investigated in reinforced bio-composites with natural jute fibres and glass fibres. The mechanical properties (tensile, flexural, Charpy impact, and inter-laminar shear and viscoelastic properties (glass transition temperature, storage modulus, and crosslink density of the bio-resins and their hybrid IPNs EHO/AEHO system were investigated as a function of the level of bio-resin hybridization. The hybrid bio-resins exhibited interpenetrating network (IPN behaviour. Composites prepared with the synthetic vinyl ester (VE and epoxy resins showed superior mechanical and viscoelastic properties compared with their bio-resins and IPNs-based counterparts. With glass fibre (GF reinforcement, increases in the EHO content of the IPNs resulted in increased stiffness of the composites, while the strength, inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS, and impact resistance decreased. However, in the jute fibre reinforced bio-composites, increases in AEHO content generated increased tensile modulus, ILSS, and mechanical strength of the bio-materials. Crosslink density and glass transition temperature (Tg were also higher for the synthetic resins than for the bio-resins. Increased AEHO content of the IPNs resulted in improved viscoelastic properties.

  12. Mg- and/or Sr-doped tricalcium phosphate/bioactive glass composites: Synthesis, microstructure and biological responsiveness

    Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Niccolò Cusano, UdR INSTM, Via Don Carlo Gnocchi 3, 00166, Rome (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (University of Rome Niccolò Cusano, UdR INSTM, Via Don Carlo Gnocchi 3, 00166, Rome (Italy))" >Cacciotti, Ilaria; Bartoli, Cristina; Gazzarri, Matteo; Bianco, Alessandra; Chiellini, Federica; Cannillo, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Presently, there is an increasing interest towards the composites of calcium phosphates, especially β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), and bioactive glasses. In the present contribution, the recently developed BG C a/Mix glass has been used because its low tendency to crystallize allows to sinter the composites at relatively low temperature (i.e. 850 °C), thus minimizing the glass devitrification and the interaction with TCP. A further improvement is the introduction of lab-produced TCP powders doped with specific ions instead of non-doped commercial powders, since the biological properties of materials for bone replacement can be modulated by doping them with certain metallic ions, such as Mg and Sr. Therefore, novel binary composites have been produced by sintering the BG C a/Mix glass with the addition of pure, Mg-substituted, Sr-substituted or Mg/Sr bisubstituted TCP powders. After an accurate characterization of the starting TCP powders and of the obtained samples, the composites have been used as three-dimensional supports for the culture of mouse calvaria-derived pre-osteoblastic cells. The samples supported cell adhesion and proliferation and induced promising mechanisms of differentiation towards an osteoblastic phenotype. In particular, the Mg/Sr bi-doped samples seemed to better promote the differentiation process thus suggesting a combined stimulatory effect of Mg 2+ and Sr 2+ ions

  13. Effects of roughness on interfacial performances of silica glass and non-polar polyarylacetylene resin composites

    Jiang, Z.X.; Huang, Y.D.; Liu, L.; Long, J.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of roughness on interfacial performances of silica glass/polyarylacetylene resin composites was investigated. In order to obtain different roughness, silica glass surface was abraded by different grits of abrasives and its topography was observed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. At the same time, the failure mechanisms of composites were analyzed by fracture morphologies and the interfacial adhesion was evaluated by shear strength test. The results indicated that shear strength of silica glass/polyarylacetylene resin composites firstly increased and then decreased with the surface roughness of silica glass increased. The best surface roughness range of silica glass was 40-60 nm. The main mechanism for the improvement of the interfacial adhesion was physical interlocking at the interface

  14. Preparation and bioactive properties of nano bioactive glass and segmented polyurethane composites.

    Aguilar-Pérez, Fernando J; Vargas-Coronado, Rossana F; Cervantes-Uc, Jose M; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V; Covarrubias, Cristian; Pedram-Yazdani, Merhdad

    2016-04-01

    Composites of glutamine-based segmented polyurethanes with 5 to 25 wt.% bioactive glass nanoparticles were prepared, characterized, and their mineralization potential was evaluated in simulated body fluid. Biocompatibility with dental pulp stem cells was assessed by MTS to an extended range of compositions (1 to 25 wt.% of bioactive glass nanoparticles). Physicochemical characterization showed that composites retained many of the matrix properties, i.e. those corresponding to semicrystalline elastomeric polymers as they exhibited a glass transition temperature (Tg) between -41 and -36℃ and a melting temperature (Tm) between 46 and 49℃ in agreement with X-ray reflections at 23.6° and 21.3°. However, with bioactive glass nanoparticles addition, tensile strength and strain were reduced from 22.2 to 12.2 MPa and 667.2 to 457.8%, respectively with 25 wt.% of bioactive glass nanoparticles. Although Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy did not show evidence of mineralization after conditioning of these composites in simulated body fluid, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed the formation of an apatite layer on the surface which increased with higher bioactive glass concentrations and longer conditioning time. Dental pulp stem cells proliferation at day 5 was improved in bioactive glass nanoparticles composites containing lower amounts of the filler (1-2.5 wt.%) but it was compromised at day 9 in composites containing high contents of nBG (5, 15, 25 wt.%). However, Runx2 gene expression was particularly upregulated for the dental pulp stem cells cultured with composites loaded with 15 and 25 wt.% of bioactive glass nanoparticles. In conclusion, low content bioactive glass nanoparticles and segmented polyurethanes composites deserve further investigation for applications such as guided bone regeneration membranes, where osteoconductivity is desirable but not a demanding mechanical performance. © The

  15. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  16. Composition dependence of the optical and structural properties of Eu-doped oxyfluoride glasses

    Zhu, C.F.; Wu, D.Q.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    Europium doped oxyfluoride glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method for the light emitting diodes applications. The optical and structural properties of these glasses were studied by means of photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates, X...... compositions. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain how the glass structure affects the reduction of Eu ions as well as optical properties of the glasses.......Europium doped oxyfluoride glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method for the light emitting diodes applications. The optical and structural properties of these glasses were studied by means of photoluminescence spectra, Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates, X...... on the base glass compositions. For certain base glass compositions, CaF2 crystals can form during the melt cooling process, and thereby enhance the conversion from Eu3+ to Eu2+. The formation of CaF2 crystals can be suppressed by adding CaO, Al2O3 and B2O3, but enhanced by adding Na2O and K2O in glass...

  17. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  18. Evolution of mechanical properties of silicate glasses: Impact of the chemical composition and effects of irradiation

    Barlet, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines: (1) how the chemical composition changes the hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior in model pristine and (2) how external irradiation impact these properties. It is to be incorporated in the context of the storage of nuclear waste in borosilicate glass matrix, the structural integrity of which should be assessed. Eight simplified borosilicate glasses made of 3 oxides with modulated proportions (SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (SBN) have been selected and their hardness, toughness, and stress corrosion cracking behavior have been characterized prior and after irradiation. The comparative study of the non-irradiated SBN glasses provides the role played by the chemical composition. The sodium content is found to be the key parameter: As it increases, the glass plasticity increases, leading to changes in the mechanical response to strain. Hardness (Hv) and toughness (Kc) decrease since the flow under indenter increases. The analysis of the stress corrosion behavior evidences a clear shift of the SCC curves linked also to the glass plasticity. Four of the 8 simplified SBN glass systems highlight the influence of electron, light and heavy ions irradiations on the mechanical properties. Once again, the sodium content is a key parameter. It is found to inhibit the glass modification: Glasses with high sodium content are more stable. Ions irradiations highlight the predominant role of nuclear interaction in changing the glass properties. Finally, electronic interaction induced by helium and electron irradiation does not lead to the same structural/mechanical glasses variations. (author) [fr

  19. Effect of fatigue testing on the properties of Glass-Epoxy composites using the acoustic tool

    Menail Younès

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the experimental results of the influence of mechanical fatigue on composite material. The plates of Glass fiber with SR 1500 epoxy resin with SD 2505 composite were realized by vacuum molding. Experimental tests were carried out on a standard hydraulic machine INSTRON 8516. The machine is interfaced with a dedicated computer for controlling and data acquisition. The fatigue tests were performed using sinusoidal type of waveform at a displacement control with frequency of 10 Hz. The evolution of Young’s modulus and strain based on fatigue gives us an idea about the resistance of the material. Degradation of mechanical properties was observed, and the results have showed that the Young’s modulus of plates undergo only minor changes. In fact, the residual stiffness and residual strength decrease when the cycle number of fatigue increase (100 to 50000 cycles, indicating that the studied composites have experienced some forms of mechanical damage.The mechanical tests were backed by Acoustic Emission Monitoring (AEM during the load cycle, in order to understand the nature of the failure process in the composites such as fiber breakage, matrix crazing, matrix debonding and delamination etc.

  20. Predicting glass-forming compositions in the Al-La and Al-La-Ni systems

    Gargarella, P.; de Oliveira, M.F.; Kiminami, C.S.; Pauly, S.; Kuehn, U.; Bolfarini, C.; Botta, W.J.; Eckert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The glass-forming ability of the Al-La and Al-La-Ni systems was studied using the λ* and the λ.Δe criteria. → Both criteria predicted with just 1% at. of error the best glass-former verified so far in the Al-La system. → Four new glass-former compositions could be predicted in the Al-La-Ni system using the λ.Δe criterion. → The best glass-former reported so far in the Al-La-Ni system was found. - Abstract: In this work, a criterion considering the topological instability (λ) and the differences in the electronegativity of the constituent elements (Δe) was applied to the Al-La and Al-Ni-La systems in order to predict the best glass-forming compositions. The results were compared with literature data and with our own experimental data for the Al-La-Ni system. The alloy described in the literature as the best glass former in the Al-La system is located near the point with local maximum for the λ.Δe criterion. A good agreement was found between the predictions of the λ.Δe criterion and literature data in the Al-La-Ni system, with the region of the best glass-forming ability (GFA) and largest supercooled liquid region (ΔT x ) coinciding with the best compositional region for amorphization indicated by the λ.Δe criterion. Four new glassy compositions were found in the Al-La-Ni system, with the best predicted composition presenting the best glass-forming ability observed so far for this system. Although the λ.Δe criterion needs further refinements for completely describe the glass-forming ability in the Al-La and Al-La-Ni systems, the results demonstrated that this criterion is a good tool to predict new glass-forming compositions.

  1. Mechanical Property Analysis on Sandwich Structured Hybrid Composite Made from Natural Fibre, Glass Fibre and Ceramic Fibre Wool Reinforced with Epoxy Resin

    Bharat, K. R.; Abhishek, S.; Palanikumar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibre composites find wide range of applications and usage in the automobile and manufacturing industries. They find lack in desired properties, which are required for present applications. In current scenario, many developments in composite materials involve the synthesis of Hybrid composite materials to overcome some of the lacking properties. In this present investigation, two sandwich structured hybrid composite materials have been made by reinforcing Aloe Vera-Ceramic Fibre Wool-Glass fibre with Epoxy resin matrix and Sisal fibre-Ceramic Fibre Wool-Glass fibre with Epoxy resin matrix and its mechanical properties such as Tensile, Flexural and Impact are tested and analyzed. The test results from the two samples are compared and the results show that sisal fibre reinforced hybrid composite has better mechanical properties than aloe vera reinforced hybrid composite.

  2. Composition/Property Relationships for the Phase 2 Am-Cm Glass Variability Study

    Peeler, D.

    2000-06-09

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of compositional uncertainties on the primary processing and product performance criteria for potential glasses to stabilize the Tank 17.1 Am-Cm solution and to identify the AGCR in which glasses simultaneously meet both process and product performance criteria as defined for Phase 2.

  3. Compositional dependences of average positron lifetime in binary As-S/Se glasses

    Ingram, A.; Golovchak, R.; Kostrzewa, M.; Wacke, S.; Shpotyuk, M.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2012-01-01

    Compositional dependence of average positron lifetime is studied systematically in typical representatives of binary As-S and As-Se glasses. This dependence is shown to be in opposite with molar volume evolution. The origin of this anomaly is discussed in terms of bond free solid angle concept applied to different types of structurally-intrinsic nanovoids in a glass.

  4. Compositional dependences of average positron lifetime in binary As-S/Se glasses

    Ingram, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Golovchak, R., E-mail: roman_ya@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Kostrzewa, M.; Wacke, S. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Shpotyuk, M. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12, Bandery str., Lviv, UA-79013 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    Compositional dependence of average positron lifetime is studied systematically in typical representatives of binary As-S and As-Se glasses. This dependence is shown to be in opposite with molar volume evolution. The origin of this anomaly is discussed in terms of bond free solid angle concept applied to different types of structurally-intrinsic nanovoids in a glass.

  5. The Glass Door: The Gender Composition of Newly-Hired Workers Across Hierarchical Job Levels

    Hassink, W.H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/090437411; Russo, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/124883206

    This paper examines the gender composition of the flow of new hirees along the organizational hierarchy of jobs. We find that women have a reduced chance to be hired at higher hierarchical levels. We refer to this phenomenon as the “glass door”. The glass door consists of an absolute and a relative

  6. Characterization of terahertz waves on foreign materials of composite materials

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Sun-Kyu; Chiou, Chien-Ping; Jung, Jong-An

    2018-04-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are widely utilized due to their comparatively high performance in engineering structures. It is well understood that a nondestructive technique would be very beneficial. A new terahertz radiation has been recognized for its importance in technological applications. Recently, T-ray (terahertz ray) advances in technology and instrumentation have provided a probing field on the electromagnetic spectrum. In carbon composites, the penetration characterization of T-ray waves was fundamentally investigated in order to measure the painting thickness. Also, another study dealt with THz scan images of honeycomb sandwich composite panels using a refractive index (n), an absorption coefficient (α), the electrical conductivity of glass fiber embedded epoxy matrix composites, and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) skin. For experiments, a method of detecting FRP composites with impact damage is presented, which utilizes aluminum wires intertwined with woven carbon fibers as they are inserted into the surface of the CFRP honeycomb sandwich panels. Intensive characterization of T-ray for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of carbon composite reinforced plastics (CFRP) composites is discussed in relation to the E-field influence with CFRP composite laminates.

  7. Nanocellulose based polymer composite for acoustical materials

    Farid, Mohammad; Purniawan, Agung; Susanti, Diah; Priyono, Slamet; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Rahmasita, Mutia E.

    2018-04-01

    Natural fibers are biodegradable materials that are innovatively and widely used for composite reinforcement in automotive components. Nanocellulose derived from natural fibers oil palm empty bunches have properties that are remarkable for use as a composite reinforcement. However, there have not been many investigations related to the use of nanocellulose-based composites for wideband sound absorption materials. The specimens of nanocellulose-based polyester composite were prepared using a spray method. An impedance tube method was used to measure the sound absorption coefficient of this composite material. To reveal the characteristics of the nanocellulose-based polyester composite material, SEM (scanning electron microscope), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red), TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis), and density tests were performed. Sound absorption test results showed the average value of sound absorption coefficient of 0.36 to 0,46 for frequency between 500 and 4000 Hz indicating that this nanocellulose-based polyester composite materials had a tendency to wideband sound absorption materials and potentially used as automotive interior materials.

  8. Effect of different glass and zeolite A compositions on the leach resistance of ceramic waste forms

    Lewis, M.A.; Hash, M.; Glandorf, D.

    1996-01-01

    A ceramic waste form is being developed for waste generated during electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste is generated when fission products are removed from the electrolyte, LiCl-KCl eutectic. The waste form is a composite fabricated by hot isostatic pressing a mixture of glass frit and zeolite occluded with fission products and salt. Normalized release rate is less than 1 g/m 2 d for all elements in MCC-1 leach test run for 28 days in deionized water at 90 C. This leach resistance is comparable to that of early Savannah River glasses. We are investigating how leach resistance is affected by changes in cationic form of zeolite and in glass composition. Composites were made with 3 forms of zeolite A and 6 glasses. We used 3-day ASTM C1220-92 (formerly MCC-1) leach tests to screen samples for development purposes only. The leach test results show that the glass composites of zeolites 5A and 4A retain fission products equally well. Loss of Cs is small (0.1-0.5 wt%), while the loss of divalent and trivalent fission products is one or more orders of magnitude smaller. Composites of 5A retain chloride ion better in these short-term screens than 4A and 3A. The more leach resistant composites were made with durable glasses rich in silica and poor in alkaline earth oxides. XRD show that a salt phase was absent in the leach resistant composites of 5A and the better glasses but was present in the other composites with poorer leach performance. Thus, absence of salt phase corresponds to improved leach resistance. Interactions between zeolite and glass depend on composition of both

  9. Comparison of Caries Prevention With Glass Ionomer and Composite Resin Fissure Sealants

    Aylin Akbay Oba

    2009-11-01

    Conclusion: Under field conditions in which moisture control was not effective, a high-viscosity and less technique-sensitive glass ionomer material can be used as an effective sealant material, rather than resin.

  10. Development of sugar palm yarn/glass fibre reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composites

    Nurazzi, N. Mohd; Khalina, A.; Sapuan, S. Mohd; Rahmah, M.

    2018-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of fibre hybridization for sugar palm yarn fibre with glass fibre reinforced with unsaturated polyester composites. In this work, unsaturated polyester resin are reinforced with fibre at a ratio of 70:30 wt% and 60:40 wt%. The hybrid composites were characterized in terms of physical (density and water absorption), mechanical (tensile, flexural and compression) and thermal properties through thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA). Density determination showed that density increased with higher wt% of glass fibre. The inherently higher density of glass fibre increased the density of hybrid composite. Resistance to water absorption is improved upon the incorporation of glass fibre and the hybrid composites were found to reach equilibrium absorption at days 4 and 5. As for mechanical performance, the highest tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus and compression strength were obtained from 40 wt% of fibres reinforcement with ratio of 50:50 wt% of sugar palm yarn fibre and glass fibre reinforced unsaturated polyester composites. The increase of glass fibre loading had a synergistic effect on the mechanical properties to the composites structure due to its superior strength and modulus. The thermal stability of hybrid composites was improved by the increase of onset temperature and the reduction of residues upon increase in temperature.

  11. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  12. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  13. Biomedical composites materials, manufacturing and engineering

    Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials are engineered materials, made from two or more constituents with significantly different physical or chemical properties which remain separate on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. Due to their special mechanical and physical properties they have the potential to replace conventional materials in various fields such as the biomedical industry.

  14. Wear of human enamel opposing monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, and composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Sripetchdanond, Jeerapa; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2014-11-01

    Demand is increasing for ceramic and composite resin posterior restorations. However, ceramics are recognized for their high abrasiveness to opposing dental structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear of enamel as opposed to dental ceramics and composite resin. Twenty-four test specimens (antagonists), 6 each of monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, composite resin, and enamel, were prepared into cylindrical rods. Enamel specimens were prepared from 24 extracted human permanent molar teeth. Enamel specimens were abraded against each type of antagonist with a pin-on-disk wear tester under a constant load of 25 N at 20 rpm for 4800 cycles. The maximum depth of wear (Dmax), mean depth of wear (Da), and mean surface roughness (Ra) of the enamel specimens were measured with a profilometer. All data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). A paired t test was used to compare the Ra of enamel at baseline and after testing. The wear of both the enamel and antagonists was evaluated qualitatively with scanning electron microscopic images. No significant differences were found in enamel wear depth (Dmax, Da) between monolithic zirconia (2.17 ±0.80, 1.83 ±0.75 μm) and composite resin (1.70 ±0.92, 1.37 ±0.81 μm) or between glass ceramic (8.54 ±2.31, 7.32 ±2.06 μm) and enamel (10.72 ±6.31, 8.81 ±5.16 μm). Significant differences were found when the enamel wear depth caused by monolithic zirconia and composite resin was compared with that of glass ceramic and enamel (Pglass ceramic, and enamel (Pglass ceramic and enamel. All test materials except composite resin similarly increased the enamel surface roughness after wear testing. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental Study on the Comparison of the Material Properties of Glass Wool Used as Building Materials

    Kyoung-Woo KIM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Artificial mineral fibers such as glass wool or stone wool are commonly used in building walls, ceilings and floors as a major insulation material for buildings. Among the material properties of building materials, thermal conductivity, the sound absorption coefficient, compressibility, and dynamic stiffness are regarded as important performance requirements since they directly affect the thermal and acoustic properties of the building. This study measured the changes of the thermal and acoustical performances of glass wool that was actually installed for a long time to the outer wall of a building as an insulation material through a comparison with recently produced glass wool. The results showed that the measured thermal conductivities of the old and the new specimens both rise with an increase of temperature, showing quite similar results in both specimens over temperature ranges of (0 – 20 ºC. The noise reduction coefficient decreased by 0.1 in the old specimen and the difference of the compressibilities in both specimens was shown to be 7.32 mm. The dynamic stiffness of the old specimen was found to be 1.28 MN/m3 higher than that of the new specimen.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3714

  16. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric behavior of banana–glass hybrid fiber reinforced polyester composites.

    Pothan, LA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites of glass and banana fiber (obtained from the pseudo stem of Musa sapientum) in polyester matrix, are subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis over a range of temperature and three different frequencies. The effect of temperature...

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Structural Glass/Fibre Epoxy Composite as a Function of Fibre Orientation

    Cugnet, D; Kuijper, A; Parma, Vittorio; Vandoni, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    The LHC, the new superconducting particle accelerator presently under construction at CERN, makes use of some 1200 dipole magnets for orbit bending and 500 quadrupole magnets for focusing/defocusing of the circulating high-energy proton beams. Two or three column-type support posts sustain each cryomagnet. The choice of a convenient material for these supports is critical, because of the required high positioning accuracy of the magnets in their cryostats and stringent thermal budget requirements imposed by the LHC cryogenic system. A glass-fibre/epoxy resin composite has been chosen for its good combination of high stiffness and low thermal conductivity over the 2-293 K temperature range. Plies of long glass-fibres are stacked optimally yielding the best mechanical behaviour. However, heat leaks from the supports are influenced by the thermal characteristics of the composite, which in turn depend on the orientation of the fibres. To study the dependence of the thermal conductivity on fibre's orientation, we ...

  18. Multifunctional glass fiber/polyamide composites with thermal energy storage/release capability

    G. Fredi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic composite laminates with thermal energy storage (TES capability were prepared by combining a glass fabric, a polyamide 12 (PA12 matrix and two different phase change materials (PCMs, i.e. a paraffinic wax microencapsulated in melamine-formaldehyde shells and a paraffin shape stabilized with carbon nanotubes. The melt flow index of the PA12/PCM blends decreased with the PCM concentration, especially in the systems with shape stabilized wax. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that, for the matrices with microcapsules, the values of enthalpy were approximately the 70% of the theoretical values, which was attributed to the fracture of some microcapsules. Nevertheless, most of the energy storage capability was preserved. On the other hand, much lower relative enthalpy values were measured on the composites with shape stabilized wax, due to a considerable paraffin leakage or degradation. The subsequent characterization of the glass fabric laminates highlighted that the fiber and void volume fractions were comparable for all the laminates except for that with the higher amount of shape stabilized wax, where the high viscosity of the matrix led to a low fiber volume fraction and higher void content. The mechanical properties of the laminates were only slightly impaired by PCM addition, while a more sensible drop of the elastic modulus, of the stress at break and of the interlaminar shear strength could be observed in the shape stabilized wax systems.

  19. Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials

    2016-05-24

    selected physical properties of nine contemporary and recently-marketed glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and four resin-modified glass-ionomer cement {RMGIC...stainless steel molds. Testing was completed on a universal testing machine unt il failure. Knoop Hardness was obtained using fai led fracture toughness...address caries, function, biocompatibility, and minimal environmental impact. 2·3 Glass-ionomer cements were invented and developed by Wilson and Kent

  20. Composition effect of potassium-borate glasses on their relaxation properties

    Lomovskoj, V.A.; Bartenev, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Relaxation processes in potassium-borate glasses have been investigated in detail for the first time. It is shown that low-temperature β-process of relaxation relating to rotational mobility of the B-O bond is the same for all potassium-borate glasses and B 2 O 3 . The process of β k -relaxation related to diffusion mobility of potassium ions depends on the composition of the glasses in the same way as α-relaxation (glass formation).12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Experimental Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Hemp/E-Glass Fabric Reinforced Polyester Hybrid Composites

    M R SANJAY

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research work has been focusing on Hemp fibers has an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites due to its eco-friendly and biodegradable characteristics. This work has been carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of hemp/E-glass fabrics reinforced polyester hybrid composites. Vacuum bagging method was used for the preparation of six different kinds of hemp/glass fabrics reinforced polyester composite laminates as per layering sequences. The tensile, flexural, impact and water absorption tests of these hybrid composites were carried out experimentally according to ASTM standards. It reveals that an addition of E-glass fabrics with hemp fabrics can increase the mechanical properties of composites and decrease the water absorption of the hybrid composites.

  2. Chemical composition of lunar material.

    Maxwell, J A; Abbey, S; Champ, W H

    1970-01-30

    Chemical and emission spectrographic analyses of three Apollo 11 samples, 10017-29, 10020-30, and 10084-132, are given. Major and minor constituents were determined both by conventional rock analysis methods and by a new composite scheme utilizing a lithium fluoborate method for dissolution of the samples and atomic absorption spectroscopy and colorimetry. Trace constituents were determined by optical emission spectroscopy involving a d-c arc, air-jet controlled.

  3. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  4. Chalcogenide glasses as optical and ion-conducting materials. Kogaku oyobi ion dendo zairyo toshite no chalcogenide glass

    Toge, N.; Minami, T. (Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Nonoxide glasses whose main constituent are chalcogen elements like S, Se, or Te etc. show a lot of various properties, for instance, high infrared transmittancy and semi-conductivity which are already well known. Additionally, the optical properties change a lot along with the phase transition's happening between crystal and noncrystal under comparative low temperature. Further, it is also observed that the glasses containing proper cation appear high ion-conductivity. This paper supplies a brief reviews of chalcogenide glasses used as materials for infrared fiber, phase transition optical memory and superionic conductor, wherein the former two have already on the stage of utilization, particularly the realization of a rewritable optical memory is possible by using chalcogenide glasses film, and ion-conductor is in the phase to have shown the possibility of high conductivity while the development thereof is being expected. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Piovesan, V. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Bardez-Giboire, I., E-mail: isabelle.giboire@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Perret, D. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France)

    2017-01-15

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO{sub 2} – Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} – B{sub 2}O{sub 3} – Na{sub 2}O – Li{sub 2}O – CaO – La{sub 2}O{sub 3} system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al{sup 3+} in comparison with modifier elements such as Na{sup +}, Li{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+}. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, T{sub g}), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties. - Highlights: • A Design of Experiment approach to link composition and glass properties. • Adding alkali decreases glass transition temperature. • Adding La{sub 2}O{sub 3} strongly decreases glass melt viscosity. • Adding La{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases density.

  6. Characterization of Fibre-Direction Dependent Damping of Glass-Fibre Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Frequencies

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Dannemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the fibre-direction dependent damping capability of glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP) to be used in electrical power transmission pylons. A fibre-direction dependent damping analysis of unidirectional (UD) GFRP samples was carried out using...... a Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) for five different fibre orientations (0˚ | 30˚ | 45˚ | 60˚ and 90˚) and two different matrix systems (epoxy and a vinyl ester resin). Based on the dynamic characteristics the damping performance of the various composite materials was studied at three temperatures (-10˚C......, 0˚C and 10˚C) and three vibration frequencies (1 Hz, 10 Hz and 30 Hz). It was observed that the loss factor of Glass Fibre Reinforced Vinyl-Ester (GF-VE) was in general slightly higher compared to the Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GF-EP). The loss factor increased slightly with temperature, while...

  7. Glass-ceramic materials of system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 from rice husk ash

    Martín Hernández, María Isabel; Rincón López, Jesús María; Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L.; Bondioli, F.; Lancellotti, I.; Romero, Maximina

    2011-01-01

    This wok shows the results of a valorisation study to use rice husk ash as raw material to develop glass-ceramic materials. An original glass has been formulated in the base system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 with addition of B2O3 and Na2O to facilitate the melting and poring processes. Glass characterization was carried out by determining its chemical composition. Sintering behaviour has been examined by Hot Stage Microscopy (HSM). Thermal stability and crystallization mechanism have been studied by Diff...

  8. Experimental Study of the Hygrothermal Effect on Wear Behavior of Composite Materials

    Fadhel Abbas. Abdulla; Katea L. Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The hygrothermal effect on the wear behavior of composite material (fiberglass and polyester resin vf=40%) was investigated experimentally in this work. The study includes manufacturing of test device (pin on disc) according to ASTM G 99. In order to study the hygrothermal effect on wear behavior of composite materials the hygrothermal chamber was manufactured. The experimental results show that the wear of glass fiber/polyester increased with increasing the load, sliding speed and sliding di...

  9. The manufacture and properties of a glass fabric/epoxy composite bellows

    Evans, D.; Langridge, J.U.D.; Morgan, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    This bellows is a small but critical part of a large bubble chamber at present being constructed. It forms a gas tight seal between the reciprocating piston and the stationary chamber walls separating the chamber liquid from the piston backing gas. It is tubular (800 mm diameter) containing only one convolution and operates at a temperature of 26K in a 3 tesla magnetic field. For this latter reason, a polymeric material is preferred since this avoids eddy current heating effects. During normal operation of the bubble chamber the bellows is required to accommodate the total stroke of the piston (+-3.5 mm) and to withstand a pressure swing of +-3 bar at a frequency of 30 Hz. Detailed consideration of these operating parameters confirms the need for high quality glass reinforced plastics material. This paper describes the moulding technique, first developed for a 300 mm diameter bellows successfully used in a similar application. It produces a composite of the complex shape required, to close dimensional tolerances and with a glass fabric content in excess of 60% by weight. (author)

  10. Chemical composition measurements of the low activity waste (LAW) EPA-Series glasses

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste glasses provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 100.2 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %.

  11. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Piovesan, V.; Bardez-Giboire, I.; Perret, D.; Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO2 - Al2O3 - B2O3 - Na2O - Li2O - CaO - La2O3 system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al3+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na+, Li+ or Ca2+. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, Tg), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties.

  12. Compositional dependence thermal and optical properties of a novel germanate glass

    El-Rabaie, S.; Taha, T.A.; Higazy, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of zinc lithium germanate glasses of the composition (45−x)Li 2 O–xZnO–55GeO 2 have been synthesized via melt quenching technique. Dependencies of their thermal and optical properties on composition were investigated. It is found that the gradual replacement of Li 2 O by ZnO, decreases the glass transition temperature from 430 to 280 °C and increases the thermal stability (ΔT) of the studied glasses. The optical band gap E opt also decreases from 2.31 to 1.40 eV with increasing the mole content of ZnO

  13. Flow and Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys and their Composites

    Flores, K M; Suh, D; Howell, R; Asoka-Kumar, P; Dauskardt, R H

    2001-01-01

    The fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms of a Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass and a composite utilizing a crystalline reinforcement phase are reviewed. The relationship between stress state, free volume and shear band formation are discussed. Positron annihilation techniques were used to confirm the predicted increase in free volume after plastic straining. Strain localization and failure were examined for a wide range of stress states. Finally, methods for toughening metallic glasses are considered. Significant increases in toughness are demonstrated for a composite bulk metallic glass containing a ductile second phase which stabilizes shear band formation and distributes plastic deformation

  14. Effect of glass microfibre addition on the mechanical performances of fly ash-based geopolymer composites

    Thamer Alomayri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, various amounts of glass microfibres were introduced into a geopolymer for reinforcement purposes. The influence of these microfibres on the performance of the geopolymer composites was investigated. Results show that the appropriate addition of glass microfibres can improve the mechanical properties of geopolymer composites. In particular, the flexural strength, flexural modulus and impact strength increase at an optimum fibre content of 2 wt%. Further, adding glass microfibres to a plain geopolymer matrix has a significant effect on the pre-cracking behaviour. It substantially enhances the post-cracking response.

  15. Mechanics of composite materials: Unified micromechanical approach

    Aboundi, J.

    1991-01-01

    Although many books have been written on the mechanics of composite materials, only a vew few have been devoted almost exclusively to the micromechanics aspects. The present monograph is devoted primarily to the micromechanics of fiber and particle reinforced composites with some additional treatment of laminates as well. Thus, this book would probably be more suitable as a reference book than a textbook

  16. Studies on mechanical properties of aluminium 6061 reinforced with titanium and E glass fibre metal matrix hybrid composites

    Kumar, B. N. Ravi; Vidyasagar, H. N.; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    2Development of the mmc with fibers and filler materials as a replacement material for some engineering purpose such as automobiles, aerospace are indispensable. Therefore, the studies related to hybrid mmc's of Al6061 were noted in this paper. In this work, Al6061 reinforced with E glass fibers and micro Titanium particles. Hybrid composites was prepared by very feasible and commercially used technique Stir casting and by varying composition of Al6061, Titanium and E-glass fibre. Experiments were done by varying weight fraction of Titanium (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) and E glass fibre (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%). Wire EDM were used to prepare the specimens required for tensile and hardness according to standards and tests conducted. The proportion of elements which are present the mmc's are identified by EDAX. Optical microscopy were conducted by SU3500 machine Scanning Electron Microscope and Microstructure shows the distribution of reinforced Ti particles and E glass fibres. The characterization of Al6061 hybrid mmc's is having significant impact on the mechanical properties.

  17. Curing potential of experimental resin composites with systematically varying amount of bioactive glass: Degree of conversion, light transmittance and depth of cure.

    Par, Matej; Spanovic, Nika; Bjelovucic, Ruza; Skenderovic, Hrvoje; Gamulin, Ozren; Tarle, Zrinka

    2018-06-17

    The aim of this work was to investigate the curing potential of an experimental resin composite series with the systematically varying amount of bioactive glass 45S5 by evaluating the degree of conversion, light transmittance and depth of cure. Resin composites based on a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin with a total filler load of 70 wt% and a variable amount of bioactive glass (0-40 wt%) were prepared. The photoinitiator system was camphorquinone and ethyl-4-(dimethylamino) benzoate. The degree of conversion and light transmittance were measured by Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. The depth of cure was evaluated according to the classical ISO 4049 test. The initial introduction of bioactive glass into the experimental series diminished the light transmittance while the further increase in the bioactive glass amount up to 40 wt% caused minor variations with no clear trend. The curing potential of the experimental composites was similar to or better than that of commercial resin composites. However, unsilanized bioactive glass fillers demonstrated the tendency to diminish both the maximum attainable conversion and the curing efficiency at depth. Experimental composite materials containing bioactive glass showed a clinically acceptable degree of conversion and depth of cure. The degree of conversion and depth of cure were diminished by bioactive glass fillers in a dose-dependent manner, although light transmittance was similar among all of the experimental composites containing 5-40 wt% of bioactive glass. Reduced curing potential caused by the bioactive glass has possible consequences on mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tribological and mechanical behaviors of polyamide 6/glass fiber composite filled with various solid lubricants.

    Li, Duxin; Xie, Ying; Li, Wenjuan; You, Yilan; Deng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), graphite, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and their compounds on mechanical and tribological properties of glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6/GF) were studied. The polymeric materials were blended using twin-screw extruder and subsequently injection molded for test samples. Mechanical properties were investigated in terms of hardness, tensile strength, and impact strength. Friction and wear experiments were run under ambient conditions at a rotating speed of 200 rpm and load of 100 N. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were also observed with scanning electron microscope. The results showed that graphite could increase the tensile strength of PA6/GF-15 composite, but the material became soft. Graphite/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were effective in increasing the already high impact strength of PA6/GF-15 composite. 5% PTFE gave the maximum reduction in the coefficient of friction. However, PTFE/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were the best choice for improving both friction and wear behaviors due to the lower friction coefficient and mass wear rate. Moreover, the worn surface of PA6 composites revealed that adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and fatigue wear occurred in this study.

  19. Effects of consolidation process on microstructure and mechanical properties of commingled glass/polypropylene composites

    Tufail, M.; Long, A.C.; Rudd, C.D.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal history of a thermoplastic composite material during forming and consolidation is critical to the quality of the component. Attempts to process outside the normal melt region will result in incomplete consolidation and voidage. Clearly then, the preheat phase plays a key role in successful processing. Too low a preheat temperature results in insufficient matrix flow while, if the temperature is increased too much, degradation of the matrix occurs, again resulting in poor quality of the composite. In particular polypropylene has poor chemical (oxidative) resistance, and oxidative degradation reduces the average molecular weight of the materials. If excessive, this can result in a dramatic reduction in mechanical properties. Flat plaques of braided, commingled glass/polypropylene yarn were produced to examine these effects using both isothermal and non-isothermal consolidation. Woven plaques were also produced from commingled yarn in a similar fashion as control samples in order to identify any effects specific to the braiding process. This paper describes the effect of heating and stamping cycles on the properties of these composites, concentrating on the effects of temperature, heating time and compaction rate. (author)

  20. Tribological and Mechanical Behaviors of Polyamide 6/Glass Fiber Composite Filled with Various Solid Lubricants

    Duxin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, graphite, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE, and their compounds on mechanical and tribological properties of glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6/GF were studied. The polymeric materials were blended using twin-screw extruder and subsequently injection molded for test samples. Mechanical properties were investigated in terms of hardness, tensile strength, and impact strength. Friction and wear experiments were run under ambient conditions at a rotating speed of 200 rpm and load of 100 N. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were also observed with scanning electron microscope. The results showed that graphite could increase the tensile strength of PA6/GF-15 composite, but the material became soft. Graphite/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were effective in increasing the already high impact strength of PA6/GF-15 composite. 5% PTFE gave the maximum reduction in the coefficient of friction. However, PTFE/UHMWPE complex solid lubricants were the best choice for improving both friction and wear behaviors due to the lower friction coefficient and mass wear rate. Moreover, the worn surface of PA6 composites revealed that adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and fatigue wear occurred in this study.

  1. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    Marioli-Riga Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  2. Characterization of raw materials to obtain the mass for white ware, using waste glass

    Cavalcanti, M.S.L.; Porto, V.S.; Meneses, R.L; Albuquerque, A.V.; Guedes, B.F.R.; Morais, C.R.S.; Santana, L.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem faced in the post modern society is the huge amount of glass, accumulated in landfills cities. The glass material is one hundred percent recyclable and has the property to act as fluxes as well as feldspar. Given this premise, this study aimed to characterize materials - raw materials and waste glass regional plan for development of ceramic bodies with the similar behavior produced industrially, using shards of glass to partially replace the feldspar. The materials - raw materials used were clay, ball clay, kaolin, quartz, feldspar and shard of glass, being characterized by the techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, differential thermal analysis vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared region, the Ray-Diffraction X and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the waste had higher rates of vitreous oxides fluxes and similar. (author)

  3. New compositions of fluoroindate glasses with higher chemical resistance

    B. J. Costa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, glasses in the systems In-Ba-Mg and In-Ba-Zn-Sr-Mg were water leachead at 80ºC showing surface degradation after 72 hours of leaching. The extent of such degradation is determined by the solubility and the concentration of the elemental fluorides that constitute the glasses. The formation of a layer of crystallized phases on the surface of the samples was observed. Small weight losses were registered and the absence of water on the glass matrix after the attack suggested that the use of MgF2 in the systems studied can lead to better results against moisture corrosion when compared to other fluoride glasses such as the fluorozirconates.

  4. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  5. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Powell, Howard T.; Riley, Michael O.; Wolfe, Charles R.; Lyon, Richard E.; Campbell, John H.; Jessop, Edward S.; Murray, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  6. [Influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder for infiltrating ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting].

    Jin, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-fei; Yang, Zheng-yu; Tong, Yi-ping; Zhu, Li; Ma, Jian-feng

    2012-10-01

    The influence of La2O3 and Li2O on glass powder was studied in this paper, which is to infiltrate ZTA all-ceramic dental material formed by gel-casting. The performance of different component was analyzed to optimize glass formula. Six groups of glass powder were designed and prepared by conventional melt-quenching method. ZTA ceramic blocks were covered with glass paste, which were formed by gel-casting and sintered in 1200 degrees centigrade, then infiltrated in 1150 degrees centigrade for twice to make glass/ZTA ceramic composites. By detecting differential thermal analysis and melting range of infiltration glass power, as well as flexural strength, linear shrinkage, SEM and EDS of glass/ZTA ceramic composites, the optimized glass group was determined out. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package by means of paired t test or one way ANOVA. The bending strength of group Li1 was (291.2±27.9) MPa, significantly higher than group Li2 and group La2(Pglass of group Li1 can lubricate ZTA ceramics well, their structure was compact and had a few small pores. Intergranular fracture existed on cross surface as well as transgranular fracture. The results showed that Li1(30%La2O3-15%Al2O3-15%SiO2-15%B2O3-5%Li2O) glass infiltrated ZTA ceramic composite had the best capability. Glass/ZTA composite material can be prepared by gel-casting and infiltrating way, and this process is simple and economically suitable for general dental laboratory.

  7. Different in vitro behavior of two Ca3(PO42 based biomaterials, a glass-ceramic and a ceramic, having the same chemical composition

    M. Cristina Guerrero-Lecuona

    2015-09-01

    The reactivity in simulated body fluid and Tris–HCl solutions was studied. Both materials showed bioactive behavior, but the glass-ceramic dissolved faster, releasing large proportion of Ca and P ions, which afterwards nucleated and precipitated. However, the ceramic was more stable under the same conditions in these solutions. Glass-ceramic composite has a more open structure and allowed the faster formation of a bone-like apatite layer than the ceramic.

  8. Glass transition and degree of conversion of a light-cured orthodontic composite

    Michela M. D. S. Sostena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the glass transition temperature (Tg and degree of conversion (DC of a light-cured (Fill Magic versus a chemically cured (Concise orthodontic composite. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anelastic relaxation spectroscopy was used for the first time to determine the Tg of a dental composite, while the DC was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. The light-cured composite specimens were irradiated with a commercial LED light-curing unit using different exposure times (40, 90 and 120 s. RESULTS: Fill Magic presented lower Tg than Concise (35-84ºC versus 135ºC, but reached a higher DC. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Fill Magic has lower Tg than Concise due to its higher organic phase content, and that when this light-cured composite is used to bond orthodontic brackets, a minimum energy density of 7.8 J/cm² is necessary to reach adequate conversion level and obtain satisfactory adhesion.

  9. Microstructural evaluation and flexural mechanical behavior of pultruded glass fiber composites

    Chacon, Y.G.; Paciornik, S.; D'Almeida, J.R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mosaic images fully characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous materials. → Mosaic images have advantages over microscopy techniques using single fields. → UV and water immersion aging are minimized at the fibers' direction. → UV radiation produced marked changes on the composite surface. - Abstract: The microstructure of a pultruded glass fiber-reinforced composite was fully characterized using digital image analysis. A mosaic technique was used to analyze the entire thickness along specimens' cross-sections, enabling the visualization of the fiber, resin and filler spatial distribution. The advantages of this technique over the usual analysis on single fields, is presented and discussed. The fiber spatial distribution was correlated with flexural mechanical properties as a function of the specimens' position along the length and across the cross section of the composite. The influence of aging by immersion in distilled water and by UV radiation on flexural properties was also analyzed. Minor variation due to aging occurred when longitudinal specimens were tested. Transversally to the fibers, the matrix-dominated composite properties were more affected.

  10. Examining porous bio-active glass as a potential osteo-odonto-keratoprosthetic skirt material.

    Huhtinen, Reeta; Sandeman, Susan; Rose, Susanna; Fok, Elsie; Howell, Carol; Fröberg, Linda; Moritz, Niko; Hupa, Leena; Lloyd, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Bio-active glass has been developed for use as a bone substitute with strong osteo-inductive capacity and the ability to form strong bonds with soft and hard tissue. The ability of this material to enhance tissue in-growth suggests its potential use as a substitute for the dental laminate of an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A preliminary in vitro investigation of porous bio-active glass as an OOKP skirt material was carried out. Porous glass structures were manufactured from bio-active glasses 1-98 and 28-04 containing varying oxide formulation (1-98, 28-04) and particle size range (250-315 μm for 1-98 and 28-04a, 315-500 μm for 28-04b). Dissolution of the porous glass structure and its effect on pH was measured. Structural 2D and 3D analysis of porous structures were performed. Cell culture experiments were carried out to study keratocyte adhesion and the inflammatory response induced by the porous glass materials. The dissolution results suggested that the porous structure made out of 1-98 dissolves faster than the structures made from glass 28-04. pH experiments showed that the dissolution of the porous glass increased the pH of the surrounding solution. The cell culture results showed that keratocytes adhered onto the surface of each of the porous glass structures, but cell adhesion and spreading was greatest for the 98a bio-glass. Cytokine production by all porous glass samples was similar to that of the negative control indicating that the glasses do not induce a cytokine driven inflammatory response. Cell culture results support the potential use of synthetic porous bio-glass as an OOKP skirt material in terms of limited inflammatory potential and capacity to induce and support tissue ingrowth.

  11. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  12. Phase 2B experimental design for the INEEL glass composition variation study

    Peeler, D.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Science and Technology (through the Tanks Focus Area [TFA]) and Waste Management are sponsoring a partnership among Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for a collaborative glass composition variation study (CVS). The purpose of the CVS is to investigate property - composition relationships within a glass-composition region compatible with the expected range of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) high-activity wastes (HAWs). The CVS has been conducted in phases to allow INEEL, PNNL, and SRTC researchers to adjust the glass composition region of interest as flowsheet options are refined and/or waste-stream compositions become more defined

  13. Influence of citric acid on the surface texture of glass ionomer restorative materials

    Reddy, Dappili Swami Ranga; Kumar, Ramachandran Anil; Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Duraivel, Dasarathan; Indra, Rajamani

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study determined the effectiveness of G-coat plus surface protective agent over petroleum jelly on the surface texture of conventional Glass ionomer restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Three chemically cured conventional glass ionomer restorative materials type II, type IX and ketac molar were evaluated in this study. Sixty specimens were made for each restorative material. They were divided into two groups of thirty specimens each. Of the sixty specimens, thirty were...

  14. Porous glasses as a host of luminescent materials, their applications and site selective determination

    Reisfeld, Renata, E-mail: renata.reisfeld@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Jasinska, Bozena [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Skłodowsskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Levchenko, Viktoria [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Gorgol, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Skłodowsskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Saraidarov, Tsiala; Popov, Inna [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Antropova, Tatiana [I. V. Grebenshchikov Institute of the Chemistry of Silicates, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nab. Makarova, 2, Liter B, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, Ewa [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, W. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    The site selective distribution of pore sizes in pure porous glasses and glasses doped by a luminescent colorant is determined by luminescent spectroscopy, SEM, SAXS and PALS. The potential applications of the studied materials as environmental and biological sensors are outlined. We suggest how luminescent porous glasses doped by complexes of Gd can act as solid scintillators in tracing elementary particles like neutrino. - Highlights: • Porous glasses are a medium for large number of luminescent materials. • Size distribution of empty and filled pores is studied. • The validity of data obtained by different methods is analyzed.

  15. Radiation Processing of Advanced Composite Materials

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Jeun, Joonpyo; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics, are being used widely for many applications. Carbon fiber/epoxies composites have attracted special attention from the aircraft, aerospace, marine engineering, sporting goods and transportation industries, because they have useful mechanical properties including high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, a corrosion resistant, impact and damage tolerance characteristics and wear properties. Thermal curing has been the dominant industrial process for advanced composites until now, however, a radiation curing process using UV, microwave x-ray, electron-beam(E-beam) and {gamma}-ray has emerged as a better alternative in recent years. These processes are compatible with the manufacturing of composites using traditional fabrication methods including a filament/tape winding, pultrusion, resin transfer moulding and hand lay-up. In this study, E-beam curable carbon fiber/epoxy composites were manufactured, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Two epoxy resins (bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F) containing photo-initiators (tri aryl sulfonium hexafluorophosphate, tri aryl sulfonium hexafluoroantimonate) were used as a matrix and a 4H-satin carbon woven fabric was used as a reinforcement. And then an electron beam irradiated the composites up to 200 kGy in a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The cure cycle was optimized and the properties of composites were evaluated and analyzed via a differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, sol-gel extractions, FT-NIR, universal test machine, and an impact tester. The gel content, glass transition temperature and mechanical strength of the irradiated composites were increased with an increasing radiation dose.

  16. The Effect of a Glass Ceramic Insert in Sandwich Technique on Microleakage in Class II Composite Resin Restorations

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of glass ceramic insert in the sandwich technique to reduce microleakage in class II composite resin restorations. Methods: Sixty sound human upper second premolars were selected and randomly divided into six groups (n=10. Class II box-only cavities were prepared in distal aspects of each tooth with gingival margin located approximately 0.5 mm below the CEJ. Group A (Control was restored incrementally with Tetric Ceram and a total-etch bonding technique. Group B and C were restored with sandwich technique using a compomer (Compoglass F or flowable composite resin (Tetric Flow as the lining material at gingival floor, respectively. Group D, E and F were represented in the same way as group A, B and C and a glass ceramic insert was added to the composite bulk. The specimens were thermo-mechanically cycled, and then immersed in 0.5 % basic fuschin for 24 hours. Dye penetration was detected using a sectioning technique. Results: No significant difference was found between total-etch bonding and sandwich techniques. The placement of an insert caused an increase in   microleakage in all groups significantly (P < 0.05. Group D (no liner/ with glass insert showed the highest amount of microleakage and Group A (no liner/ without glass insert resulted in the lowest amount of total microleakage. Conclusion: Placement of glass ceramic insert could not decrease gingival leakage. According to the limitation of this study a composite resin restorations with incremental technique is recommended

  17. Composite materials for wind power turbine blades

    Brøndsted, P.; Lilholt, H.; Lystrup, Aa.

    2005-01-01

    , and industrial potential. The important technologies of today are prepreg (pre-impregnated) technology and resin infusion technology. The mechanical properties of fiber composite materials are discussed, with a focus on fatigue performance. Damage and materials degradation during fatigue are described. Testing...

  18. Direct conversion of plutonium-containing materials to borosilicate glass for storage or disposal

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

    1995-01-01

    A new process, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), has been invented for the direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, and residue into borosilicate glass. The glass should be acceptable for either the long-term storage or disposition of plutonium. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into homogeneous glass (1) simplifies safeguards and security; (2) creates a stable chemical form that meets health, safety, and environmental concerns; (3) provides an easy storage form; (4) may lower storage costs; and (5) allows for future disposition options. In the GMODS process, mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids containing plutonium are fed directly into a glass melter where they are directly converted to glass. Conventional glass melters can accept materials only in oxide form; thus, it is its ability to accept materials in multiple chemical forms that makes GMODS a unique glass making process. Initial proof-of-principle experiments have converted cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, and other materials to glass. Significant technical uncertainties remain because of the early nature of process development

  19. Application of multi-criteria material selection techniques to constituent refinement in biobased composites

    Miller, Sabbie A.; Lepech, Michael D.; Billington, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Biobased composites have the potential to replace certain engineered materials. • Woven reinforcement can provide better material properties in biobased composites. • Short fiber filler can provide lower environmental impact in biobased composites. • Per function, different fibers are desired to lower composite environmental impact. - Abstract: Biobased composites offer a potentially low environmental impact material option for the construction industries. Designing these materials to meet both performance requirements for an application and minimize environmental impacts requires the ability to refine composite constituents based on environmental impact and mechanical properties. In this research, biobased composites with varying natural fiber reinforcement in a poly(β-hydroxybutyrate)-co-(β-hydroxyvalerate) matrix were characterized based on material properties through experiments and environmental impact through life cycle assessments. Using experimental results, these biobased composites were found to have competitive flexural properties and thermal conductivity with certain short-chopped glass fiber reinforced plastics. Multi-criteria material selection techniques were applied to weigh desired material properties with greenhouse gas emissions, fossil fuel demand, and Eco-Indicator ’99 score. The effects of using different reinforcing fibers in biobased composites were analyzed using the developed selection scheme as a tool for choosing constituents. The use of multi-criteria material selection provided the ability to select fiber reinforcement for biobased composites and showed when it would be more appropriate to use a novel biobased composite or a currently available engineered material

  20. Mesomorphic glass nanocomposites made of metal alkanoates and nanoparticles as emerging nonlinear-optical materials

    Garbovskiy, Y.; Klimusheva, G.; Mirnaya, T.

    2016-09-01

    Mesomorphic metal alkanoates is very promising yet overlooked class of nonlinear-optical materials. Metal alkanoates can exhibit a broad variety of condensed states of matter including solid crystals, plastic crystals, lyotropic and thermotropic ionic liquid crystals, liquids, mesomorphic glasses, and Langmuir-Blodgett films. Glass-forming properties of metal alkanoates combined with their use as nano-reactors and anisotropic host open up simple and efficient way to design various photonic nanomaterials. Despite very interesting physics, the experimental data on optical and nonlinearoptical properties of such materials are scarce. The goal of the present paper is to fill the gap by discussing recent advances in the field of photonic materials made of metal alkanoates, organic dyes, and nanoparticles. Optical and nonlinear-optical properties of the following materials are reviewed: (i) mesomorphic glass doped with organic dyes; (ii) smectic glass composed of cobalt alkanoates; (iii) semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in a glassy host; (iv) metal nanoparticles - glass (the cobalt octanoate) nanocomposites.

  1. Damping in aerospace composite materials

    Agneni, A.; Balis Crema, L.; Castellani, A.

    Experimental results are presented on specimens of carbon and Kevlar fibers in epoxy resin, materials used in many aerospace structures (control surfaces and wings in aircraft, large antennas in spacecraft, etc.). Some experimental methods of estimating damping ratios are first reviewed, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain. Some damping factor estimates from experimental tests are then shown; in order to evaluate the effects of the aerospace environment, damping factors have been obtained in a typical range of temperature, namely between +120 C and -120 C, and in the pressure range from room pressure to 10 exp -6 torr. Finally, a theoretical approach for predicting the bounds of the damping coefficients is shown, and prediction data are compared with experimental results.

  2. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites.

    Khanolkar, Gauri R; Rauls, Michael B; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Hodge, Andrea M; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-03-02

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding.

  3. Structural characterization and anti-cancerous potential of gallium bioactive glass/hydrogel composites.

    Keenan, T J; Placek, L M; Coughlan, A; Bowers, G M; Hall, M M; Wren, A W

    2016-11-20

    A bioactive glass series (0.42SiO2-0.10Na2O-0.08CaO-(0.40-X)ZnO-(X)Ga2O3) was incorporated into carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/dextran (Dex) hydrogels in three different amounts (0.05, 0.10, and 0.25m(2)), and the resulting composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP MAS-NMR). Composite extracts were also evaluated in vitro against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. TEM confirmed glass distribution throughout the composites, although some particle agglomeration was observed. DSC revealed that glass composition and content did have small effects on both Tg and Tm. MAS-NMR revealed that both CMC and Dex were successfully functionalized, that cross-linking occurred, and that glass addition did slightly alter bonding environments. Cell viability analysis suggested that extracts of the glass and composites with the largest Ga-content significantly decreased MG-63 osteosarcoma viability after 30days. This study successfully characterized this composite series, and demonstrated their potential for anti-cancerous applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Composition - structure - properties relationships of peraluminous glasses for nuclear waste containment

    Piovesan, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste conditioning aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of homogeneity, thermal stability, long term behavior and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al"3"+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na"+, Li"+ or Ca"2"+. A Design of Experiment approach has been employed to determine relationships between composition of simplified peraluminous glasses (SiO_2 - B_2O_3 - Al_2O_3 - Na_2O - Li_2O - CaO - La_2O_3) and their physical properties such as viscosity, glass transition temperature and glass homogeneity. Moreover, some structural investigation (NMR) was performed in order to better understand the structural role of Na"+, Li"+ and Ca"2"+ and the structural organization of peraluminous glasses. Then, physical and chemical properties of fully simulated peraluminous glasses were characterized to evaluate transposition between simplified and fully simulated glasses and also to put forward the potential of peraluminous glasses for nuclear waste containment. (author) [fr

  5. Glasses

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  6. Radio frequency shielding behaviour of silane treated Fe2O3/E-glass fibre reinforced epoxy hybrid composite

    Arun prakash, V. R.; Rajadurai, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, radio frequency shielding behaviour of polymer (epoxy) matrixes composed of E-glass fibres and Fe2O3 fillers have been studied. The principal aim of this project is to prepare suitable shielding material for RFID application. When RFID unit is pasted on a metal plate without shielding material, the sensing distance is reduced, resulting in a less than useful RFID system. To improve RF shielding of epoxy, fibres and fillers were utilized. Magnetic behaviour of epoxy polymer composites was measured by hysteresis graphs (B-H) followed by radio frequency identifier setup. Fe2O3 particles of sizes 800, 200 and 100 nm and E-glass fibre woven mat of 600 g/m2 were used to make composites. Particle sizes of 800 nm and 200 nm were prepared by high-energy ball milling, whereas particles of 100 nm were prepared by sol-gel method. To enhance better dispersion of particles within the epoxy matrix, a surface modification process was carried out on fillers by an amino functional coupling agent called 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized Fe2O3 particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Variable quantity of E-glass fibre (25, 35, and 45 vol%) was laid down along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of 800, 200, and 100 nm size Fe2O3 particles into the matrix, to fabricate the hybrid composites. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images reveal the shape and size of Fe2O3 particles for different milling times and particle dispersion in the epoxy matrix. The maximum improved sensing distance of 45.2, 39.4 and 43.5 % was observed for low-, high-, and ultra-high radio frequency identifier setup along with shielding composite consist of epoxy, 1 vol% 200 nm Fe2O3 particles and 45 vol% of E-glass fibre.

  7. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glass fibre composite for adhesion improvement

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, H.; Stenum, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Glass-fibre-reinforced polyester composite plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge. Synthetic air was used as the treatment gas. The water contact angle dropped markedly from 84 to 22° after a 2-s treatment, and decreased to 0° when the composite plates were...

  9. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  10. Chemical composition analysis of simulated waste glass T10-G-16A

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical composition analyses of a simulated LAW glass designated T10-G-16A.The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component. No issues were identified in reviewing the analytical data.

  11. Mechanical Characterization and Fractography of Glass Fiber/Polyamide (PA6) Composites

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Pillai, Saju; Charca, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the glass fiber reinforced Polyamide (PA6) composites made by prepreg tapes and commingled yarns were studied by in-plane compression, short-beam shear, and flexural tests. The composites were fabricated with different fiber volume contents (prepregs—47%, 55%, 60%, an...

  12. Tensile and Compressive Properties of Woven Kenaf/Glass Sandwich Hybrid Composites

    Mohaiman J. Sharba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monotonic (tensile and compression properties of woven kenaf/glass reinforced unsaturated polyester sandwich hybrid composites have been experimentally investigated. Five types of composites laminates were fabricated using a combination of hand lay-up and cold press techniques, postcured for two hours at 80°C and left for 48 hours at room temperature. The hybrid composites contained fixed six layers of glass as a shell, three on each side, whereas the number of core kenaf layers was changed in three stages to get S1, S2, and S3 hybrid composites. Composites specimens with pure glass and kenaf were also fabricated for comparison. It was found that one kenaf layer replaced about 20% of total fiber weight fraction of the composite; this leads to reducing the density of final hybrid composite by 13%. Besides, in mechanical properties perspective, there are less than 1% reduction in compression strength and 40% in tensile strength when compared to pure glass composite. Generally, the results revealed that the best performance was observed in S1, which showed a good balance of all mechanical properties determined in this work.

  13. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design concepts used for metal-lined glass-fiber composite pressure vessels are described, comparing the structural characteristics of the composite designs with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. The discussion centers around two distinctly different design concepts, which provide the basis for defining metal lined composite vessels as either (1) thin-metal lined, or (2) glass fiber reinforced (GFR). Both concepts are described and associated development problems are identified and discussed. Relevant fabrication and testing experience from a series of NASA-Lewis Research Center development efforts is presented.

  14. A study of thermal diffusivity of carbon-epoxy and glass-epoxy composites using the modified pulse method

    Terpiłowski Janusz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient heat transfer is studied and compared in two planeparallel composite walls and one EPIDIAN 53 epoxy resin wall acting as a matrix for both composites. The first of the two walls is made of carbonepoxy composite; the other wall is made of glass-epoxy composite, both with comparable thickness of about 1 mm and the same number of carbon and glass fabric layers (four layers. The study was conducted for temperatures in the range of 20-120 °C. The results of the study of thermal diffusivity which characterizes the material as a heat conductor under transient conditions have a preliminary character. Three series of tests were conducted for each wall. Each series took about 24 h. The results from the three series were approximated using linear functions and were found between (0.7-1.35×10−7m2/s. In the whole range of temperature variation, the thermal diffusivity values for carbon-epoxy composite are from 1.2 to 1.5 times higher than those for the other two materials with nearly the same thermal diffusivity characteristics.

  15. Effect of composition and technique of production, on the mechanical behaviour of based-zirconium metallic glasses

    Nowak, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    The metallic glasses are relatively new materials (50 years), produced by quenching a molten alloy. The amorphous structure of these materials gives them unique properties: very high strength (fracture stress is about 1.7 GPa for Zr based alloys), an elastic deformation reaching 2%, but little or no ductility. The compositions, which could produce both amorphous and bulk samples, are limited. The work, detailed in this manuscript, shows the possibility of sintering using SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering) amorphous powders obtained by atomization (Φaverage = 70 microns). The result is a fully densified and near fully amorphous sample. The optimization of this technique, with the composition Zr 57 Cu 20 Al 10 Ni 8 Ti 5 , gave samples for which mechanical behaviour is close to the bulk metallic glass behaviour. However, partial crystallization of the material occurs, localized at the contact points of particles, but could be reduced by deepening the sintering model outlined in this manuscript. In view of these results, new compositions are designed, and the production of ribbons was conducted. The characterization by nano-indentation estimates reliably the mechanical properties of these alloys. Finally, a new method, evaluating the activation volume, which is the elementary volume initiating plastic deformation, is presented. This technique is a statistical analysis of pseudo-creep tests performed by nano-indentation, at room temperature. In conclusion, this work opens new perspectives to develop bulk samples in broad range of compositions. (author)

  16. Preparation and Dynamic Mechanical Properties at Elevated Temperatures of a Tungsten/Glass Composite

    Gao, Chong; Wang, Yingchun; Ma, Xueya; Liu, Keyi; Wang, Yubing; Li, Shukui; Cheng, Xingwang

    2018-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to prepare a borosilicate glass matrix composite containing 50 vol.% tungsten and examine its dynamic compressive behavior at elevated temperatures in the range of 450-775 °C. The results show that the homogenous microstructure of the tungsten/glass composite with relative density of 97% can be obtained by hot-pressing sintering at 800 °C for 1 h under pressure of 30 MPa. Dynamic compressive testing was carried out by a separate Hopkinson pressure bar system with a synchronous device. The results show that the peak stress decreases and the composite transforms from brittle to ductile in nature with testing temperature increasing from 450 to 750 °C. The brittle-ductile transition temperature is about 500 °C. Over 775 °C, the composite loses load-bearing capacity totally because of the excessive softening of the glass phase. In addition, the deformation and failure mechanism were analyzed.

  17. Investigation of mechanical properties of kenaf, hemp and E-glass fiber reinforced composites

    Dinesh, Veena; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.; Chari, V. Srinivasa

    2018-04-01

    Recently the use of fiber reinforced polymer composite in the automobile, aerospace overwhelming designing sectors has increased tremendously due to the ecological issues and health hazard possessed by the synthetic fiber during disposal and manufacturing. The paper presents tensile strength, flexural strength and hardness of kenaf-E glass-kenaf, hemp-E glass-hemp and kenaf-E glass-hemp fiber reinforced polyester composites. The composite plates are shaped according to the standard geometry and uni-axially loaded in order to investigate the tensile responses of each combination. In addition to the physical and mechanical properties, processing methods and application of kenaf and hemp fiber composites is also discussed.

  18. Strontium chloroapatite based glass-ceramics composites for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Jena, Hrudananda; Maji, Binoy Kumar; Asuvathraman, R.; Govindan Kutty, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    Apatites are naturally occurring minerals with a general formula of M 10 (PO 4 ) 6 X 2 , (M= Ca, Sr, Ba, X= OH, Cl, F) with a hexagonal crystal structure (S.G :P6 3 /m) and can accommodate alkaline earth and various other aliovalent cations and anions into its crystal structure. Apatites are also known to have high resistance to leaching of the constituent elements under geological conditions. It may not often be possible to immobilize the whole spectrum of the radioactive waste in a single phase M 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 , then a combination of M-chloroapatite encapsulated in borosilicate glass (BSG) can immobilize most of the radwaste elements in the composite glass-ceramic matrix (glass bonded chloroapatite), thus utilizing the immobilizing efficiency of both the ceramic phase and glass. In the present study, the synthesis, characterization and thermo-physical property measurements of the Sr-chloroapatite (SrApCI) and some glass-bonded composites based on it have been investigated. The Sr-chloroapatite glass-ceramics were prepared by solid state reactions among stoichiometric concentrations of apatite forming reagents, 20 wt. % borosilicate glass (BSG), and known concentrations (10, 13 and 16 wt. %) of a simulated waste in chloride form. The products were characterized by XRD to confirm the formation of Sr 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 and glass bonded-chloroapatite composites. The surface morphology and qualitative chemical composition of the powders were examined by SEM and EDX. Thermal expansion and glass transition temperature of the matrices were measured by dilatometry. Glass transition temperature of the glass-bonded composites was also examined by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis. The 10-16 wt.% waste loaded matrices showed similar thermal expansion as that of SrApCI, indicating the thermal stability of the matrix to chloride waste immobilization. The glass transition temperature of the waste loaded matrices decreases on increasing the

  19. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  20. Radiographic testing of glass fiber reinforced plastic materials

    Babylas, E.

    1976-01-01

    The microradiography of glass fiber reinforced polymers allowed to obtain informations on the growth of defects during molding. A relation was established between microstructure and routine radiography. The conditions needed for obtaining good quality radiograms are analyzed [fr