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Sample records for giant squid architeuthis

  1. Mitochondrial genome diversity and population structure of the giant squid Architeuthis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Inger Eleanor Hall; Campos, Paula; Strugnell, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Despite its charismatic appeal to both scientists and the general public, remarkably little is known about the giant squid Architeuthis, one of the largest of the invertebrates. Although specimens of Architeuthis are becoming more readily available owing to the advancement of deep-sea fishing...

  2. Squid Giant Axons Synthesize NF Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Marianna; Chun, Jong Tai; Giuditta, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Squid giant axon has been an excellent model system for studying fundamental topics in neurobiology such as neuronal signaling. It has been also useful in addressing the questions of local protein synthesis in the axons. Incubation of isolated squid giant axons with [ 35 S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with a rabbit antibody against all squid neurofilament (NF) proteins demonstrates the local synthesis of a major 180 kDa NF protein and of several NF proteins of lower molecular weights. Their identification as NF proteins is based on their absence in the preimmune precipitates. Immunoprecipitates washed with more stringent buffers confirmed these results. Our data are at variance with a recent study based on the same experimental procedure that failed to visualize the local synthesis of NF proteins by the giant axon and thereby suggested their exclusive derivation from nerve cell bodies (as reported by Gainer et al. in Cell Mol Neurobiol 37:475-486, 2017). By reviewing the pertinent literature, we confute the claims that mRNA translation is absent in mature axons because of a putative translation block and that most proteins of mature axons are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. Given the intrinsic axonal capacity to synthesize proteins, we stress the glial derivation of axonal and presynaptic RNAs and the related proposal that these neuronal domains are endowed with largely independent gene expression systems (as reported by Giuditta et al. in Physiol Rev 88:515-555, 2008).

  3. Active polysomes in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, A; Menichini, E; Perrone Capano, C; Langella, M; Martin, R; Castigli, E; Kaplan, B B

    1991-01-01

    Axons and axon terminals are widely believed to lack the capacity to synthesize proteins, relying instead on the delivery of proteins made in the perikaryon. In agreement with this view, axoplasmic proteins synthesized by the isolated giant axon of the squid are believed to derive entirely from periaxonal glial cells. However, squid axoplasm is known to contain the requisite components of an extra-mitochondrial protein synthetic system, including protein factors, tRNAs, rRNAs, and a heterogeneous family of mRNAs. Hence, the giant axon could, in principle, maintain an endogenous protein synthetic capacity. Here, we report that the squid giant axon also contains active polysomes and mRNA, which hybridizes to a riboprobe encoding murine neurofilament protein. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence that proteins (including the putative neuron-specific neurofilament protein) are also synthesized de novo in the axonal compartment.

  4. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  5. Origin of axoplasmic RNA in the squid giant fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillo, V; Montagnese, P; Gremo, F; Casola, L; Giuditta, A

    1983-12-01

    The origin of axoplasmic RNA in the squid giant fiber was investigated after exposure of the giant axon or of the giant fiber lobe to [3H]uridine. The occurrence of a local process of synthesis was indicated by the accumulation of labeled axoplasmic RNA in isolated axons incubated with the radioactive precursor. Similar results were obtained in vivo after injection of [3H]uridine near the stellate nerve at a sizable distance from the ganglion. Exposure of the giant fiber lobe to [3H]uridine under in vivo and in vitro conditions was followed by the appearance of labeled RNA in the axoplasm and in the axonal sheath. While the latter process is attributed to incorporation of precursor by sheath cells, a sizable fraction of the radioactive RNA accumulating in the axoplasmic is likely to originate from neuronal perikarya by a process of axonal transport.

  6. Differential compartmentalization of mRNAs in squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of mRNAs that includes beta-actin, beta-tubulin, kinesin, neurofilament proteins, and enolase. To define the absolute levels and relative distribution of these mRNAs, we have used competitive reverse transcription-PCR to quantify the levels of five mRNAs present in the giant axon and giant fiber lobe (GFL), the location of the parental cell soma. In the GFL, the number of transcripts for these mRNAs varied over a fourfold range, with beta-tubulin being the most abundant mRNA species (1.25 x 10(9) molecules per GFL). Based on transcript number, the rank order of mRNA levels in the GFL was beta-tubulin > beta-actin > kinesin > enolase > microtubule-associated protein (MAP) H1. In contrast, kinesin mRNA was most abundant in the axon (4.1 x 10(7) molecules per axon) with individual mRNA levels varying 15-fold. The rank order of mRNA levels in the axon was kinesin > beta-tubulin > MAP H1 > beta-actin > enolase. The relative abundance of the mRNA species in the axon did not correlate with the size of the transcript, nor was it directly related to their corresponding levels in the GFL. Taken together, these findings confirm that significant amounts of mRNA are present in the giant axon and suggest that specific mRNAs are differentially transported into the axonal domain.

  7. Squid Giant Axon Contains Neurofilament Protein mRNA but does not Synthesize Neurofilament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Harold; House, Shirley; Kim, Dong Sun; Chin, Hemin; Pant, Harish C

    2017-04-01

    When isolated squid giant axons are incubated in radioactive amino acids, abundant newly synthesized proteins are found in the axoplasm. These proteins are translated in the adaxonal Schwann cells and subsequently transferred into the giant axon. The question as to whether any de novo protein synthesis occurs in the giant axon itself is difficult to resolve because the small contribution of the proteins possibly synthesized intra-axonally is not easily distinguished from the large amounts of the proteins being supplied from the Schwann cells. In this paper, we reexamine this issue by studying the synthesis of endogenous neurofilament (NF) proteins in the axon. Our laboratory previously showed that NF mRNA and protein are present in the squid giant axon, but not in the surrounding adaxonal glia. Therefore, if the isolated squid axon could be shown to contain newly synthesized NF protein de novo, it could not arise from the adaxonal glia. The results of experiments in this paper show that abundant 3H-labeled NF protein is synthesized in the squid giant fiber lobe containing the giant axon's neuronal cell bodies, but despite the presence of NF mRNA in the giant axon no labeled NF protein is detected in the giant axon. This lends support to the glia-axon protein transfer hypothesis which posits that the squid giant axon obtains newly synthesized protein by Schwann cell transfer and not through intra-axonal protein synthesis, and further suggests that the NF mRNA in the axon is in a translationally repressed state.

  8. Ribosomes and polyribosomes are present in the squid giant axon: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, J R; Kun, A; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A; Morillas, J; Benech, C R

    1999-05-01

    Ribosomes and polyribosomes were detected by immuno-electron microscopy in the giant axon and small axons of the squid using a polyclonal antibody against rat brain ribosomes. The ribosomal fraction used as antigen was purified by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient and shown to contain ribosomal RNAs and native ribosomes. The polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits reacted with at least ten proteins on immunoblots of purified rat brain ribosomes as well as with a set of multiple ribosomal proteins prepared from the squid giant fiber lobe. Immunoreactions were performed on cryostat sections of the stellate nerve cut at a distance of more than 3 cm from the stellate ganglion, using pre-embedding techniques. Ribosomes and polyribosomes were identified within the giant axon and small axons using electron microscopic methods, following binding of peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG secondary antibody. Polysomes were more frequently localized in peripheral axoplasm, including the cortical layer of the giant axon, and were generally associated with unidentified cytoskeletal filaments or with dense matrix material. The immunochemical demonstration of ribosomes and polyribosomes in the giant axon and small axons of the squid confirms similar observations in the squid and the goldfish obtained with the method of electron spectroscopic imaging, and strongly supports the view that a local system of protein synthesis is present in axons. The immunochemical method here described offers an alternative tool for the selective identification of ribosomes, and is likely to prove of value in the analyses of other axonal systems.

  9. The genus Architeuthis was erected, without giving any diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Sci. 20: 37–40. PÉREZ-GÁNDARAS, G. and A. GUERRA 1978 — Nueva cita de Architeuthis (Cephalopoda: Teuthoidea): descripción y alimentación. Investigación pesq., Barcelona 42(2):. 401–414. PÉREZ-GÁNDARAS, G. and A. GUERRA 1989 — Architeuthis de Sudáfrica: nuevas citas y consideraciones biológicas.

  10. Kinesin mRNA is present in the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioio, A E; Chun, J T; Crispino, M; Capano, C P; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1994-07-01

    Recently, we reported the construction of a cDNA library encoding a heterogeneous population of polyadenylated mRNAs present in the squid giant axon. The nucleic acid sequencing of several randomly selected clones led to the identification of cDNAs encoding beta-actin and beta-tubulin, two relatively abundant axonal mRNA species. To continue characterization of this unique mRNA population, the axonal cDNA library was screened with a cDNA probe encoding the carboxy terminus of the squid kinesin heavy chain. The sequencing of several positive clones unambiguously identified axonal kinesin cDNA clones. The axonal localization of kinesin mRNA was subsequently verified by in situ hybridization histochemistry. In addition, the presence of kinesin RNA sequences in the axoplasmic polyribosome fraction was demonstrated using PCR methodology. In contrast to these findings, mRNA encoding the squid sodium channel was not detected in axoplasmic RNA, although these sequences were relatively abundant in the giant fiber lobe. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that kinesin mRNA is a component of a select group of mRNAs present in the squid giant axon, and suggest that kinesin may be synthesized locally in this model invertebrate motor neuron.

  11. Characteristics regarding the consumer of giant squid from Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Enriqueta Montaño Méndez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The catch of the giant squid (Dosidicus gigas, represents de second fishing activity most important in volume in Baja California Sur, Mexico; is an essential specie not only at the state level but at the pacific and even the national level. Mexico occupies in the world the eight level in the production of squid, but the national consumption, even though the low price of the product and the high nutritional level, is approximately 0.53 kg per year, very low compared to countries like Japan, Korea and Spain (average consumption per capita is of 3.5 kg . In this context, the objective of this article is to caracterize the sudcalifornia consumer preference; determine the buying habits and the consumption; and also to establish the market areas of the squid in Baja California Sur, which allows the introduction of actions for its commercialization, in order to strengthen the market of this product and its general activity. This is why in 2012 a questioner of 1066 consumers was distribute around the five counties of the state, according to the population density. The results indicate that the principal motive why there is not consumption is the difficulty to find places where to buy it, together with the problems of cooking it. Also, it can be seen the high level of ignorance the consumer has regarding the nutritional level this food has. For this reason, future strategies for the commercialization must be focus on better distribution and new form of presenting this product which facilitates its preparation and consumption, and at the same time create campaign which increase awareness of the nutrition level this product has.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel mRNA present in the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Eyman, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1997-07-15

    Previously, we reported the presence of a heterogeneous population of mRNAs in the squid giant axon. The construction of a cDNA library to this mRNA population has facilitated the identification of several of the constituent mRNAs which encode several cytoskeletal and motor proteins as well as enolase, a glycolytic enzyme. In this communication, we report the isolation of a novel mRNA species (pA6) from the axonal cDNA library. The pA6 mRNA is relatively small (550 nucleotides in length) and is expressed in both nervous tissue and skeletal muscle. The axonal localization of pA6 mRNA was unequivocally established by in situ hybridization histochemistry. The results of quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicate that there are 1.8 x 10(6) molecules of pA6 mRNA (approximately 0.45 pg) in the analyzed segment of the giant axon and suggest that the level of pA6 mRNA in the axonal domain of the giant fiber system might be equal to or greater than the level present in the parental cell soma. Sequence analysis of pA6 suggests that the mRNA encodes an integral membrane protein comprising 84 amino acids. The putative protein contains a single transmembrane domain located in the middle of the molecule and a phosphate-binding loop situated near the N terminus. The C-terminal region of the protein contains two potential phosphorylation sites. These four structural motifs manifest striking similarity to domains present in the ryanodine receptor, raising the possibility that pA6 represents a cephalopod intracellular calcium release channel protein.

  13. beta-Actin and beta-Tubulin are components of a heterogeneous mRNA population present in the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, B B; Gioio, A E; Capano, C P; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A

    1992-04-01

    Previously, we have reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of polyadenylated mRNAs, as well as biologically active polyribosomes. To define the composition of this unique mRNA population, cDNA libraries were constructed to RNA obtained from the axoplasm of the squid giant axon and the parental cell bodies located in the giant fiber lobe. Here, we report that the giant axon contains mRNAs encoding beta-actin and beta-tubulin. The axonal location of these mRNA species was confirmed by in situ hybridization histochemistry, and their presence in the axoplasmic polyribosome fraction was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction methodology. Taken together, these findings establish the identity of two relatively abundant members of the axonal mRNA population and suggest that key elements of the cytoskeleton are synthesized de novo in the squid giant axon.

  14. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Segal

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  15. Exponentiated exponential model (Gompertz kinetics) of Na+ and K+ conductance changes in squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, D M

    1978-04-01

    The conductance changes, gK(t) and gNa(t), of squid giant axon under voltage clamp (Hodgkin and Huxley, 1952) may be modeled by exponentiated exponential functions (Gompertz kinetics) from any holding potential VO to any membrane clamp potential V. The equation constants are set by the membrane potential V, and include, for any voltage step in the case of gK, the initial conductance, gO, the asymptote conductance g, and rate constant k: gK = g exp(-be-kt) where b = 1n g/gO. Equations of similar form relate g and k to the voltage V, and govern the corresponding parameters of the gNa system. For the gNa, the fast phase y = y exp (-be-kt) is cut down in proportion to a slow process p = (1 - p)e-k't + p, and thus gNa = py. The expo-exponential functions involve fewer constants than the Hodgkin-Huxley model. In particular, the role of the n, m, h parameters appears to be filled largely by 1n (g/gO) in the case of gK and by 1n (y/yO) in the case of gNa. Membrane action potentials during current clamp may be computed from the conductances generated by use of the appropriate differential forms of the equations; diverse other membrane behaviors may be predicted.

  16. Effects of channel blocking on information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujiang; Yue, Yuan; Yu, Yuguo; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Lianchun

    2018-04-01

    Action potentials are the information carriers of neural systems. The generation of action potentials involves the cooperative opening and closing of sodium and potassium channels. This process is metabolically expensive because the ions flowing through open channels need to be restored to maintain concentration gradients of these ions. Toxins like tetraethylammonium can block working ion channels, thus affecting the function and energy cost of neurons. In this paper, by computer simulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model, we studied the effects of channel blocking with toxins on the information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons. We found that gradually blocking sodium channels will sequentially maximize the information transmission and energy efficiency of the axons, whereas moderate blocking of potassium channels will have little impact on the information transmission and will decrease the energy efficiency. Heavy blocking of potassium channels will cause self-sustained oscillation of membrane potentials. Simultaneously blocking sodium and potassium channels with the same ratio increases both information transmission and energy efficiency. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that information processing capacity and energy efficiency can be maximized by regulating the number of active ion channels, and this indicates a viable avenue for future experimentation.

  17. Effect of Bovine Plasma Protein on Autolysis and Gelation of Protein Extracted from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Raquel Marquez-Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bovine plasma protein (BPP on the inhibition of autolytic activity and its effect on the gelling properties of a protein concentrate (PC obtained from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas mantle were investigated. Sols and gels were prepared from the PC by adding different amounts of BPP (0, 1, and 2%. Dynamic oscillatory measurements indicated that systems with 1% BPP had a higher elastic modulus (G′, in which hydrophobic interactions were favored. Concerning the technological and textural quality of the gels, BPP caused a greater water holding capacity (WHC, force, cohesiveness, and elasticity, probably due to improvement of the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions during gel formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM allowed visualization of the formation of more rigid and ordered gels with less porosity when BPP was added. Therefore, the addition of BPP improved the gelling capacity of proteins extracted from giant squid.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of the squid mantle muscles and giant axon during slow swimming and jet escape propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalçınkaya, Bahar Hazal; Erikli, Şükrü; Özilgen, Burak Arda; Olcay, Ali Bahadır; Sorgüven, Esra; Özilgen, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Squids have two substantially different types of muscle fibers: superficial mitochondria rich fibers, which perform aerobic respiration during slow swimming, and central mitochondria poor fibers, which perform anaerobic respiration during jet escape. A detailed thermodynamic analysis shows that during slow swimming, 3.82 J/(kg s) of chemical exergy is consumed, and a total muscle work of 0.28 J/(kg s) is produced. 0.27 J/(kg s) of this is produced by the fin to generate lift, and the rest by the mantle volume contraction. During the jet escape at a speed of 3 mantle length/s, squid consumes an exergy of 9.97 J/(kg s) and produces a muscle work of 0.16 J/(kg s). Exergy destruction rates during slow swimming and jet escape modes are 3.54 and 9.81 J/(kg s), respectively. Exergy destroyed because of the action potential propagation in the squid giant axon is calculated as 0.03 and 0.10 J/(kg s) for the slow and fast swimming modes, respectively. - Highlights: • Slow and fast swimming modes of a squid is thermodynamically analyzed. • As swimming speed increases, respiration mode switches from aerobic to anaerobic, and respiration efficiency decreases. • During fast swimming ca. 2.6 times more chemical exergy is consumed. • Both muscles and giant axon destroy nearly 3 times more exergy during jet escape. • Contraction efficiency decreases from 36.8% to 4.7% as the volume of the passive tissue increases from 5% to 95%.

  19. A comparison of radioactive thallium and potassium fluxes in the giant axon of the squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landowne, D

    1975-01-01

    1. The influx and the efflux of 204Tl and 42K were measured in intact squid giant axons. 2. The resting efflux of 204Tl was found to be about one half of 42K and to have a temperature coefficient (Q10) of 1-3 as compared to 1-1 for K. 3. The extra efflux of 204Tl associated with nerve impulses was 30% greater than 42K. 4. From either Cl or NO3 sea water, the resting influx of 204Tl was about three times that of 42K. Ouabain reduced the influx of either isotope by about two thirds without changing the Tl/K ratio of the fluxes. This indicates that the Na pump can transport Tl. 5. From NO3 sea water the extra influx of 204Tl assoicated with nerve impulses was about the same as 42K. From Cl sea water there was no detectable extra influx of 204Tl. 6. The flux ratio, ouabain-insensitive influx/efflux, was different for the two ions. The resting flux ratio for Tl was consistent with a passive non-interacting flux, whereas K movements were consistent with 'single file' passage through the membrane. 7. The extra flux associated with nerve impulses is different from the resting flux both in Tl/K selectivity and in the effect of anion in the sea water. There is also a much higher flux per unit time during the nerve impulse. These differences suggest differences in the mechanisms underlying ion permeability at rest and during nervous activity. PMID:1202199

  20. Batrachotoxin uncouples gating charge immobilization from fast Na inactivation in squid giant axons

    OpenAIRE

    Tanguy, J.; Yeh, J.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The fast inactivation of sodium currents and the immobolization of sodium gating charge are thought to be closely coupled to each other. This notion was tested in the squid axon in which kinetics and steady-state properties of the gating charge movement were compared before and after removal of the Na inactivation by batrachotoxin (BTX), pronase, or chloramine-T. The immobilization of gating charge was determined by measuring the total charge movement (QON) obtained by integrating the ON gati...

  1. The complete mitochondrial genomes of deep-sea squid (Bathyteuthis abyssicola), bob-tail squid (Semirossia patagonica) and four giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama, S. latimanus, S. lycidas and S. pharaonis), and their application to the phylogenetic analysis of Decapodiformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yuumi; Nishihara, Hidenori; Akasaki, Tetsuya; Nikaido, Masato; Tsuchiya, Kotaro; Segawa, Susumu; Okada, Norihiro

    2013-12-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the deep-sea squid (Bathyteuthis abyssicola; supperfamily Bathyteuthoidea), the bob-tail squid (Semirossia patagonica; order Sepiolida) and four giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama, S. latimanus, S. lycidas and S. pharaonis; order Sepiida). The unique structures of the mt genomes of Bathyteuthis and Semirossia provide new information about the evolution of decapodiform mt genomes. We show that the mt genome of B. abyssicola, like those of other oegopsids studied so far, has two long duplicated regions that include seven genes (COX1-3, ATP6 and ATP8, tRNA(Asn), and either ND2 or ND3) and that one of the duplicated COX3 genes has lost its function. The mt genome of S. patagonica is unlike any other decapodiforms and, like Nautilus, its ATP6 and ATP8 genes are not adjacent to each other. The four giant cuttlefish have identical mt gene order to other cuttlefish determined to date. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods suggest that traditional order Sepioidea (Sepiolida+Sepiida) is paraphyletic and Sepia (cuttlefish) has the sister-relationship with all other decapodiforms. Taking both the phylogenetic analyses and the mt gene order analyses into account, it is likely that the octopus-type mt genome is an ancestral state and that it had maintained from at least the Cephalopoda ancestor to the common ancestor of Oegopsida, Myopsida and Sepiolida. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. First SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Arnold

    2014-03-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is the most sensitive magnetic flux sensor and the most widely applied superconductor electronic device, whose applications range from magnetocardiography to picovoltmeters, from digital logic to quantum computing, and from non-destructive testing to Gravity Probe B, a spaceborne test of Einstein's theory of gravity. In this presentation, I describe the initial experiments and device modeling at the Ford Scientific Laboratory that produced the early versions of the SQUID during the 1960's. That history originated in an anomalous observation during microwave ENDOR experiments and led to the first report of macroscopic quantum interference in superconductors in 1964 [Phys. Rev. Letters 12 (1964)]. The SQUID is based on London's electrodynamic theory of multiply-connected superconductors [Superfluids Wiley, New York (1950)], the magnetic flux quantum (h/2e=2.07E-15 Wb), and Josephson's theory of weakly-connected superconductors [Phys. Lett. 1 (1962)]. Physically, it incorporates Josephson tunnel junctions in a low inductance, superconducting ring. Two distinct types of SQUIDs were demonstrated: first the ``dc SQUID'' and then the ``rf SQUID.'' The former has two Josephson junctions and produces a dc frequency response; the latter has only one junction and responds only at rf and microwave frequencies. The first phase, conducted by Lambe, Jaklevic, Mercereau, and Silver, used type I thin film superconductors and Josephson tunnel junctions. The second phase, conducted by Silver and Zimmerman, used bulk niobium structures with ``cat whisker'' junction technology [Phys.Rev. 157 (1967)].

  3. Pygmy squids and giant brains: mapping the complex cephalopod CNS by phalloidin staining of vibratome sections and whole-mount preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollesen, T; Loesel, R; Wanninger, A

    2009-01-01

    Among bilaterian invertebrates, cephalopod molluscs (e.g., squids, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a central nervous system (CNS) that rivals in complexity that of the phylogenetically distant vertebrates (e.g., mouse and human). However, this prime example of convergent evolution has rarely been...... experiments are less time-consuming and allow a high throughput of samples. Besides other advantages summarized here, phalloidin reliably labels the entire neuropil of the CNS of all squids, cuttlefish and octopuses investigated. This facilitates high-resolution in toto reconstructions of the CNS...

  4. Energy landscape of the reactions governing the Na+ deeply occluded state of the Na+/K+-ATPase in the giant axon of the Humboldt squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Juan P; De Giorgis, Daniela; Basilio, Daniel; Gadsby, David C; Rosenthal, Joshua J C; Latorre, Ramon; Holmgren, Miguel; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2011-12-20

    The Na(+)/K(+) pump is a nearly ubiquitous membrane protein in animal cells that uses the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to alternatively export 3Na(+) from the cell and import 2K(+) per cycle. This exchange of ions produces a steady-state outwardly directed current, which is proportional in magnitude to the turnover rate. Under certain ionic conditions, a sudden voltage jump generates temporally distinct transient currents mediated by the Na(+)/K(+) pump that represent the kinetics of extracellular Na(+) binding/release and Na(+) occlusion/deocclusion transitions. For many years, these events have escaped a proper thermodynamic treatment due to the relatively small electrical signal. Here, taking the advantages offered by the large diameter of the axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas, we have been able to separate the kinetic components of the transient currents in an extended temperature range and thus characterize the energetic landscape of the pump cycle and those transitions associated with the extracellular release of the first Na(+) from the deeply occluded state. Occlusion/deocclusion transition involves large changes in enthalpy and entropy as the ion is exposed to the external milieu for release. Binding/unbinding is substantially less costly, yet larger than predicted for the energetic cost of an ion diffusing through a permeation pathway, which suggests that ion binding/unbinding must involve amino acid side-chain rearrangements at the site.

  5. Incorporation of 3H-amino acids into proteins in a partially purified fraction of axoplasm: evidence for transfer RNA-mediated, post-translational protein modification in squid giant axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingoglia, N A; Giuditta, A; Zanakis, M F; Babigian, A; Tasaki, I; Chakraborty, G; Sturman, J A

    1983-12-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) has been demonstrated to be present in axons of both invertebrates and the higher vertebrates, but nothing is known of its role in the metabolism of the axon. The present experiments were performed to determine whether tRNA functions in axons as a participant in post-translational protein modification of endogenous proteins. RNA was extracted from the axoplasm of squid giant axons and incubated with a variety of 3H-amino acids, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (obtained from squid optic lobe), and an appropriate reaction mixture. All of the amino acids tested were bound to an RNA fraction, but this reaction did not occur when samples were incubated in the presence of ribonuclease or in the absence of axoplasmic RNA. When radioactive RNA was chromatographed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the radioactivity comigrated with known tRNA markers, suggesting the presence of 3H-aminoacylated tRNA. Aminoacylation of RNA could also be demonstrated by incubating fresh axoplasm with labeled amino acids and a reaction mixture, minus exogenous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These findings indicate the presence in axoplasm of a variety of species of aminoacyl-tRNAs as well as their corresponding synthetase enzymes. In the latter experiment no radioactivity was found associated with the protein fraction. This was also the finding when 3H-aminoacylated tRNA was either injected directly into the axon or incubated with extruded axoplasm. Thus, under the conditions described above, there is no evidence of transfer of amino acids from tRNA to proteins. In other experiments, axoplasm was pooled to a volume of 50 to 100 microliters, homogenized gently, and centrifuged at 150,000 X g for 1 hr. Some of the high speed supernatant was incubated with labeled amino acids and an appropriate reaction mixture, and the remainder was passed through an S-200 Sephacryl column before incubation with the same reaction mixture. There was no incorporation of amino acids into protein in

  6. The Kraken: when myth encounters science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvador, Rodrigo B.; Tomotani, Barbara M.

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of years ago, sailors were terrified by the Kraken, a dreadful sea monster capable of sinking ships and with a taste for human flesh. Today we know the legends of this monster were based on sightings of giant squids. This animal belongs to the genus Architeuthis and was the subject of many

  7. The SQUID Handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Braginski, Alex I

    2006-01-01

    This two-volume handbook offers a comprehensive and well coordinated presentation of SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices), including device fundamentals, design, technology, system construction and multiple applications. It is intended to bridge the gap between fundamentals and applications, and will be a valuable textbook reference for graduate students and for professionals engaged in SQUID research and engineering. It will also be of use to specialists in multiple fields of practical SQUID applications, from human brain research and heart diagnostics to airplane and nuclear

  8. An improved dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Ketchen, M.B.

    1975-01-01

    Cylindrical thin film dc SQUIDS that make use of resistively shunted Nb-NbOx-Pb tunnel junctions have been constructed and tested. These junctions are very robust: the SQUIDs can be thermally cycled repeatedly and stored at room temperature indefinitely. The weak temperature dependence of the critical current allows SQUID operation at any temperature below about 6K. The resolution is typically 4x10 -5 phi 0 /√Hz above 2x10 -2 Hz; at lower frequencies the noise power spectrum is 1/f. The long-term drift is less than 2x10 -5 phi 0 /hr. The 1/f noise and drift are lower than any values reported for other types of SQUIDs. (Auth.)

  9. Vortex electronis and squids

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the nature of vortices in high-Tc superconductors is a crucial subject for research on superconductive electronics, especially for superconducting interference devices (SQUIDs), it is also a fundamental problem in condensed-matter physics. Recent technological progress in methods for both direct and indirect observation of vortices, e.g. scanning SQUID, terahertz imaging, and microwave excitation, has led to new insights into vortex physics, the dynamic behavior of vortices in junctions and related questions of noise. This book presents the current status of research activity and provides new information on the applications of SQUIDs, including magnetocardiography, immunoassays, and laser-SQUID microscopes, all of which are close to being commercially available.

  10. Market Squid Ecology Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains ecological information collected on the major adult spawning and juvenile habitats of market squid off California and the US Pacific Northwest....

  11. Market Squid Population Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains population dynamics data on paralarvae, juvenile and adult market squid collected off California and the US Pacific Northwest. These data were...

  12. The SQUID handbook. Vol. 2. Applications of SQUIDs and SQUID systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Division; Braginski, A.I. [Research Center Juelich (Germany). IBN-2

    2006-07-01

    This two-volume handbook offers a comprehensive and coordinated presentation of SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices), including device fundamentals, design, technology, system construction and multiple applications. In Volume II the following topics were dealth with: SQUID Amplifiers (Clarke, Lee, Mueck, Richards); SQUIDs for Standards (Gallop, Piquemal); Generic Inverse Problem (Wikswo); Biomagnetism (Nenonen, Trahms, Vrba); Magnetic Measurements and Microscopy Using SQUIDs (Wellstood, Black); Nondestructive Evaluation of Materials and Structures Using SQUIDs (Donaldson, Krause); Geomagnetic and Ordnance Prospecting (Clem, Foley, Keene); and Gravity and Motion Detection (Paik).

  13. Rapid important paper Messenger RNA in squid axoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, A; Hunt, T; Santella, L

    1986-01-01

    Using a translation assay we have shown that the axoplasm of the squid giant axon contains significant amounts of mRNA coding for a heterogeneous group of prot sets of proteins specified by glial and neuronal perikaryal mRNA. Messenger RNA is associated with the "microsomal" fraction of the axoplasm. The possible involvement of axoplasmic mRNA in protein synthesis remains to be ascertained. It is known that axoplasmic proteins are synthesized by the isolated giant axon, presumably by the surrounding glia cells.

  14. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  15. Tracking Electromagnetic Energy With SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a gadget used to measure extremely weak signals, specifically magnetic flux. It can detect subtle changes in energy, up to 100 billion times weaker than the electromagnetic energy required to move a compass needle. SQUIDs are used for a variety of testing procedures where extreme sensitivity is required and where the test instrument need not come into direct contact with the test subject. NASA uses SQUIDs for remote, noncontact sensing in a variety of venues, including monitoring the Earth s magnetic field and tracking brain activity of pilots. Scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have been making extensive use of this technology, from astrophysical research, to tracking the navigational paths of bees in flight to determine if they are using internal compasses. These very sensitive measurement devices have a wide variety of uses within NASA and even more uses within the commercial realm.

  16. Protein synthesis in a synaptosomal fraction from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Castigli, E; Perrone Capano, C; Martin, R; Menichini, E; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1993-08-01

    A synaptosomal fraction from squid brain containing a large proportion of well-presarved nerve terminals displays a high rate of [(35)S]methionine incorporation into protein. The reaction is dependent on time and protein concentration, is strongly inhibited by hypo-osmotic shock and cycloheximide, and is not affected by RNase. Chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis, partially inhibits the reaction. The ionic composition of the incubation medium markedly modulates the rate of [(35)S]methionine incorporation. Na(+) and K(+) ions are required for maximal activity, while complete inhibition is achieved by addition of the calcium ionophore A23187 and, to a substantial extent, by tetraethylammonium, ouabain, and high concentrations K(+). A thermostable inhibitor of synaptosomal protein synthesis is also present in the soluble fraction of squid brain. Using sucrose density gradient sedimentation procedures, cytoplasmic polysomes associated with nascent radiolabeled peptide chains have been identified in the synaptosomal preparation. Newly synthesized synaptosomal proteins are largely associated with a readily sedimented particulate fraction and may be resolved by gel electrophoresis into more than 30 discrete bands ranging in size from about 14 to 200 kDa. The electrophoretic pattern of the newly synthesized synaptosomal proteins is significantly different from the corresponding patterns displayed by the giant axon's axoplasm and by glial and nerve cell bodies (in the stellate nerve and ganglion, respectively). On the whole, these observations suggest that the nerve endings from squid brain are capable of protein synthesis.

  17. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.S.C.; Lawrence Berkeley national Lab., CA

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-T c ) and high-T c Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-T c superconductors using two low-T c SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-T c SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity

  18. SQUID-based measuring systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field produced by a given two-dimensional current density distribution is inverted using the Fourier transform technique. Keywords ... Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are the most sensitive detectors for measurement of ... omagnetic prospecting, detection of gravity waves etc. Judging the importance ...

  19. SQUID-based measuring systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cryostats and precision X-Y table with stepper motor for accurate positioning for the re- construction of electrical current density from measured spatial variation of magnetic field. A planar gradiometric DC SQUID sensor for NDE has been designed and developed to be used in relatively unshielded environment and is shown ...

  20. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley national Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  1. High-Tc SQUID biomagnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faley, M. I.; Dammers, J.; Maslennikov, Y. V.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Winkler, D.; Koshelets, V. P.; Shah, N. J.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we review the preparation technology, integration in measurement systems and tests of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) intended for biomagnetic applications. A focus is on developments specific to Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Chalmers University of Technology, MedTech West, and the University of Gothenburg, while placing these results in the perspective of those achieved elsewhere. Sensor fabrication, including the deposition and structuring of epitaxial oxide heterostructures, materials for substrates, epitaxial bilayer buffers, bicrystal and step-edge Josephson junctions, and multilayer flux transformers are detailed. The properties of the epitaxial multilayer high-Tc direct current SQUID sensors, including their integration in measurement systems with special electronics and liquid nitrogen cryostats, are presented in the context of biomagnetic recording. Applications that include magnetic nanoparticle based molecular diagnostics, magnetocardiography, and magnetoencephalography are presented as showcases of high-Tc biomagnetic systems. We conclude by outlining future challenges.

  2. Applications of Josephson junction squids and arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, A. H.

    1983-03-01

    This report covers the period from 1 October 1982 to 28 February 1983 following the period covered by the last annual progress report. This period included the preparation and submission of the draft of the annual report, presentation of the paper SQUID Voltage-Controlled-Oscillator to the 1982 Applied Superconductivity Conference, continued fabrication and measurement of the 9GHz SQUID VCO, and design of the DC SQUID and SQUID array configuration. In addition, a number of important additions and modifications were made in the basic laboratory facilities. Work has continued on fabrication and measurements of the single resistive SQUID VCO with the 50/1 transformer ratio operating near 9GHz. Four chips are fabricated on a wafer, with different damping resistors for each one of the four devices.

  3. Protein synthesizing units in presynaptic and postsynaptic domains of squid neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R; Vaida, B; Bleher, R; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A

    1998-11-01

    Putative protein synthesizing domains, called plaques, are characterized in the squid giant synapse and axon and in terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons. Plaques are oval-shaped formations of about 1 microm in size, which (1) generate signals that have spectroscopic electron energy loss characteristics of ribosomes, (2) exhibit ribonuclease-sensitive binding of YOYO-1, a fluorescent RNA/DNA dye, and (3) in part hybridize with a poly(dT) oligonucleotide. In the giant synapse plaques are abundant in the postsynaptic area, but are absent in the presynaptic terminal. In the cortical layer of the optic lobes, plaques are localized in the large carrot-shaped presynaptic terminals of photoreceptor neurons, where they are surrounded by synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. Biochemical and autoradiographic data have documented that the protein synthetic activity of squid optic lobe synaptosomes is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neurons. The identification of ribosomes and poly(A+)-mRNA in the plaques indicates that these structures are sites of local protein synthesis in synaptic domains.

  4. First demonstration of transcontinental SQUID magnetometry (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, C.; Febvre, P.; Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Waysand, G.; Gouws, D.; Saunderson, E.; Henry, S.; Gaffet, S.; Janse van Vuuren, L.; Lochner, E. T.; Matladi, T.; Kwisanga, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first simultaneous measurements from an ultra-sensitive dual-node transcontinental SQUID magnetometer network, available in real time on the internet. A three-axis low temperature SQUID sensor at LSBB Underground Research Laboratory, Rustrel, France (43.841 N, 5.484 E) and a two-axis high temperature SQUID sensor at SANSA Space Science in Hermanus, South Africa (34.424 S, 19.223 E), form the sensitive nodes of the network. Data are measured and GPS time stamped continuously at 125 Hz. The low-Tc SQUID at LSBB URL (known as a [SQUID]2 system) is inside a shielded steel capsule underneath 500 meters of karstic rock, which allows a low magnetic noise floor. The less sensitive high-Tc SQUID at SANSA Space Science is completely unshielded, and housed only in a magnetically neutral hut, 50 metres from a calibrated fluxgate node of the INTERMAGNET network, to protect it against the weather. The network, which is more sensitive than observatory fluxgate magnetometers, detects Earth's magnetosphere pulsations, Schumann waves, mesopause resonance, breathing modes of the Earth and oceanic swell. Our goal is further to extract directional or polarization information if earthquake precursors are observed again, as with the Sichuan-Wenchuan earthquake on 12 May 2008. In the medium term, we are exploring the possibility to extend the network with more spatially distributed SQUID sensors, such as at the South African National Antarctic Expedition's SANAE IV base in Antarctica.

  5. Review of SQUID Sensors for Measuring Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Kim, J. M.; Yu, K. K.; Kim, K.; Kwon, H. [Brain and Cognition Measurement Lab, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Measurement of magnetic signals generated from electric activity of myocardium provides useful information for the functional diagnosis of heart diseases. Key technical component of the magnetocardiography (MCG) technology is SQUID. To measure MCG signals with high signal-to-noise ratio, sensitive SQUID magnetic field sensors are needed. Present magnetic field sensors based on Nb SQUIDs have field sensitivity good enough to measure most of MCG signals. However, for accurate measurement of fine signal pattern or detection of local atrial fibrillation signals, we may need higher field sensitivity. In addition to field sensitivity, economic aspect of the SQUID system is also important. To simplify the SQUID readout electronics, the output voltage or flux-to-voltage transfer of SQUID should be large enough so that direct measurement of SQUID output can be done using room-temperature preamplifiers. Double relaxation oscillation SQUID (DROS), having about 10 times larger flux-to-voltage transfers than those of DC-SQUIDs, was shown to be a good choice to make the electronics compact. For effective cancellation of external noise inside a thin economic shielded room, first-order axial gradiometer with high balance, simple structure and long-baseline is needed. We developed a technology to make the axial gradiometer compact using direct bonding of superconductive wires between pickup coil and input coil. Conventional insert has mechanical support to hold the gradiometer array, and the dewar neck has equal diameter with the dewar bottom. Boiling of the liquid He can generate mechanical vibrations in the gradiometer array due to mechanical connection structure. Elimination of the mechanical support, and direct mounting of the gradiometer array into the dewar bottom can reduce the dewar neck diameter, resulting in the reduction of liquid He consumption.

  6. North Pacific High Seas Squid Jig Logbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a federally mandated logbook program high seas squid jig fishing, and it is required to be mailed in to PIFSC after a fishing trip. Fishing occurs in the...

  7. New version of toroidal SQUID sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembinski, S.; Kachniarz, J.

    1983-01-01

    A report is given on the design and fabrication of a mechanically stable and thermal shock resistant SQUID sensor. The sensor is vacuum sealed while the access to the adjustment of its point contact is left open

  8. A multichannel double relaxation oscillation SQUID magnetometer system for magnetoencephalogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chan Seok [Biomagnetism Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea); Department of Applied Physics, Korea University, 208 Seochang-dong, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-800 (Korea); Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan; Kim, Jin-Mok; Kim, Kiwoong; Park, Yong-Ki [Biomagnetism Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea); Lee, Soon Gul [Department of Applied Physics, Korea University, 208 Seochang-dong, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-800 (Korea)

    2004-06-01

    We developed multichannel SQUID magnetometer and gradiometer systems based on double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROS) for use in biomagnetic studies, such as magnetoencephalogram (MEG). DROS consists of two SQUIDs (signal SQUID and reference SQUID) in series, and a relaxation circuit of an inductor and a resistor. Specially, we used single reference junction instead of the reference SQUID. Since DROS magnetometer has about 10 times lager flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient than dc SQUID, we can use simple flux-locked loop electronics for SQUID operation. The measured noise at 100 Hz was 3 fT/{radical}(Hz) for the magnetometer and 4 fT/{radical}(Hz) for the planar gradiometer, which are low enough for neuromagnetic measurements. We also constructed two kinds of multichannel SQUID systems, 40-channel and 37-channel system. Using this system, we measured several MEG signals. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. YBCO SQUIDs with unconventional current phase relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauch, T.; Johansson, J.; Cedergren, K.; Lindstroem, T.; Lombardi, F.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) dc sperconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) characterized by an unconventional Josephson current phase relation (CPR). We have focused on SQUID configurations with Josephson junctions where the lobe of the order parameter in one electrode is facing a node in the other electrode. This order parameter arrangement should enhance the appearance of a sin(2φ) term in the CPR. The response of the critical current of the dc SQUID, under the effect of an external magnetic field, has been measured in temperature, down to 20 mK. Our experimental data have been compared with numerical simulations of the SQUIDs dynamics by considering a CPR of a single junction of the form I(φ) = I I sin(φ) - I II sin(2φ) where I I and I II are, respectively, the first and second harmonic component. In our devices the values of the sin(2φ) term are such that the fundamental state of the SQUID is naturally double degenerate. This is of great relevance for applications of d-wave SQUIDs in quantum information processing

  10. Giant grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch-Devlin, M.A.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared observations of the Orion nebula have been interpreted by Rowan-Robinson (1975) to imply the existence of 'giant' grains, radius approximately 10 -2 cm, throughout a volume about a parsec in diameter. Although Rowan-Robinson's model of the nebula has been criticized and the presence of such grains in Orion is disputed, the proposition is accepted, that they exist, and in this paper situations in which giant grains could arise are examined. It is found that, while a giant-grain component to the interstellar grain density may exist, it is difficult to understand how giant grains arise to the extent apparently required by the Orion nebula model. (Auth.)

  11. Squid – a simple bioinformatics grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Miranda Antonio B

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BLAST is a widely used genetic research tool for analysis of similarity between nucleotide and protein sequences. This paper presents a software application entitled "Squid" that makes use of grid technology. The current version, as an example, is configured for BLAST applications, but adaptation for other computing intensive repetitive tasks can be easily accomplished in the open source version. This enables the allocation of remote resources to perform distributed computing, making large BLAST queries viable without the need of high-end computers. Results Most distributed computing / grid solutions have complex installation procedures requiring a computer specialist, or have limitations regarding operating systems. Squid is a multi-platform, open-source program designed to "keep things simple" while offering high-end computing power for large scale applications. Squid also has an efficient fault tolerance and crash recovery system against data loss, being able to re-route jobs upon node failure and recover even if the master machine fails. Our results show that a Squid application, working with N nodes and proper network resources, can process BLAST queries almost N times faster than if working with only one computer. Conclusion Squid offers high-end computing, even for the non-specialist, and is freely available at the project web site. Its open-source and binary Windows distributions contain detailed instructions and a "plug-n-play" instalation containing a pre-configured example.

  12. Dc-SQUIDs for the readout of magnetic microcalorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferring, Anna; Fleischmann, Andreas; Wegner, Mathias; Kempf, Sebastian; Enss, Christian [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage current-sensing dc-SQUIDs are presently the devices of choice to read out single-channel magnetic microcalorimeters (MMCs) since they provide quantum-limited noise performance, large system bandwidth and are compatible with operation temperatures well below 100 mK. However, it is very well known that parasitic inductances in the SQUID input circuitry lead to a reduction of the signal size of the detector and that SQUID noise often sets a limit to the energy resolution. In order to minimize these effects, we develop two-stage current-sensing dc-SQUIDs optimized for MMC readout as well as dc-SQUIDs suited for direct temperature sensor readout. In this contribution we discuss our SQUID designs including single second-order gradiometric SQUIDs, N-SQUID series arrays as well as SQUIDs with meander-shaped SQUID inductance that are eligible for direct temperature sensor readout. We show that our SQUIDs exhibit exceptional small low-frequency excess flux noise and are hence very well suited for MMC readout. We further present an integrated setup in which detector and SQUID are located on the same chip to maximize the coupling efficiency of the superconducting flux transformer. Finally, we discuss experimental data of a detector setup with direct temperature sensor readout and prove that this strategy should allow for reaching a sub-eV energy resolution.

  13. The chokka squid Loligo vulgaris reynaudii is widely distributed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    estimated wholesale value at first sale in 1995 was close to R104 million or US $22 million in 1997. (Cochrane et al. ... farther offshore where adult squid are also found. (G. Christy, South African Squid Management In- .... a variable smaller peak in autumn or winter (Au- gustyn 1990, Sauer 1991). Monthly chokka squid.

  14. Rectification effect in Majorana fermion SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Qi-Feng; Hu, Xiao

    2013-03-01

    We investigated a SQUID structure formed by a spin-orbit coupling nanowire Josephson junction which contains Majorana fermions, and a conventional superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction, motivated by a recent experimental progress in realizing Majorana fermions in a heterostructure of a spin-orbit coupling nanowire and superconductor. It is shown that the critical current of the SQUID is different for two flowing directions, due to the unconventional current-phase relation of the nanowire junction. This asymmetric critical current serves as a simple and direct signature of the Majorana fermion existence. Since the asymmetric Josephson current forms a ratchet potential for the dynamics of superconducting phase, a rectification effect is expected when the SQUID is driven by an ac current. That is, a rectified dc voltage appears when a pure ac current is applied. This rectification effect is expected to be useful for probing the Majorana fermion dynamics.

  15. Characterization of squid enolase mRNA: sequence analysis, tissue distribution, and axonal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1995-08-01

    Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme whose amino acid sequence is highly conserved across a wide range of animal species. In mammals, enolase is known to be a dimeric protein composed of distinct but closely related subunits: alpha (non-neuronal), beta (muscle-specific), and gamma (neuron-specific). However, little information is available on the primary sequence of enolase in invertebrates. Here we report the isolation of two overlapping cDNA clones and the putative primary structure of the enzyme from the squid (Loligo pealii) nervous system. The composite sequence of those cDNA clones is 1575 bp and contains the entire coding region (1302 bp), as well as 66 and 207 bp of 5' and 3' untranslated sequence, respectively. Cross-species comparison of enolase primary structure reveals that squid enolase shares over 70% sequence identity to vertebrate forms of the enzyme. The greatest degree of sequence similarity was manifest to the alpha isoform of the human homologue. Results of Northern analysis revealed a single 1.6 kb mRNA species, the relative abundance of which differs approximately 10-fold between various tissues. Interestingly, evidence derived from in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction experiments indicate that the mRNA encoding enolase is present in the squid giant axon.

  16. High Tc Josephson Junctions, SQUIDs and magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.

    1991-01-01

    There has recently been considerable progress in the state-of-the-art of high-T c magnetometers based on dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices). This progress is due partly to the development of more manufacturable Josephson junctions, making SQUIDs easier to fabricate, and partly to the development of multiturn flux transformers that convert the high sensitivity of SQUIDs to magnetic flux to a correspondingly high sensitivity to magnetic field. Needless to say, today's high-T c SQUIDs are still considerably less sensitive than their low-T c counterparts, particularly at low frequencies (f) where their level of 1/f noise remains high. Nonetheless, the performance of the high-T c devices has now reached the point where they are adequate for a number of the less demanding applications; furthermore, as we shall see, at least modest improvements in performance are expected in the near future. In this article, the author outlines these various developments. This is far from a comprehensive review of the field, however, and, apart from Sec. 2, he describes largely his own work. He begins in Sec. 2 with an overview of the various types of Josephson junctions that have been investigated, and in Sec. 3, he describes some of the SQUIDs that have been tested, and assess their performance. Section 4 discuss the development of the multilayer structures essential for an interconnect technology, and, in particular, for crossovers and vias. Section 5 shows how this technology enables one to fabricate multiturn flux transformers which, in turn, can be coupled to SQUIDs to make magnetometers. The performance and possible future improvements in these magnetometers are assessed, and some applications mentioned

  17. Experiments with double-SQUID qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerling, Bernhard; Poletto, Stefano; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Instituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Roma (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    A double-SQUID qubit (flash-qubit) allows the manipulation of quantum states by very short pulses of magnetic flux, without using microwaves. It consists of an rf-SQUID with a dc-SQUID replacing the single Josephson junction. The energy potential profile is controllable by dc bias fluxes threading the two loops. The initial qubit state in a double well is prepared by applying a dc flux pulse to one loop, thereby tilting the double well so that only one of the two states remains stable. To manipulate the state of the qubit a dc flux pulse is applied to the other loop to change the potential into a single well, where coherent Larmor oscillations between the two lowest eigenstates take place. Reading out the state is once again performed in the double well situation, where our readout dc-SQUID is able to discriminate between the two computational states due to their flux difference. We hope to present measurements done on a new sample, fabricated using shadow evaporation of aluminium and silicon nitride as the dielectric.

  18. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  19. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  20. EFFECT OF DETERGENT ON ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF SQUID AXON MEMBRANE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KISHIMOTO, U; ADELMAN, W J

    1964-05-01

    The effects of detergents on squid giant axon action and resting potentials as well as membrane conductances in the voltage clamp have been studied. Anionic detergents (sodium lauryl sulfate, 0.1 to 1.0 mM; dimethyl benzene sulfonate, 1 to 20 mM, pH 7.6) cause a temporary increase and a later decrease of action potential height and the value of the resting potential. Cationic detergent (cetyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, 6 x 10(-5)M or more, pH 7.6) generally brings about immediate and irreversible decreases in the action and resting potentials. Non-ionic detergent (tween 80, 0.1 M, pH 7.6) causes a slight reversible reduction of action potential height without affecting the value of the resting potential. Both anionic and cationic detergents generally decrease the sodium and potassium conductances irreversibly. The effect of non-ionic detergent is to decrease the sodium conductance reversibly, leaving the potassium conductance almost unchanged.

  1. SISTEM OTENTIKASI UNTUK SQUID BERBASIS WEB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Dalam sebuah jaringan komputer terdapat bermacam-macam tipe user dengan berbagi tingkatan yang berbeda yang juga dibutuhkan perlakuan yang berbeda pada tiap user yang disesuaikan dengan kebutuhan dalam menggunakan akses web, baik berupa http, ftp, gopher, dan lain-lain. Dimana masing-masing user memiliki skala prioritas dalam penggunaan bandwidth, jumlah koneksi maksimum, waktu koneksi, ukuran file maksimum, situs yang tidak boleh diakses dan lain-lain. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah membuat sebuah perangkat lunak yang dapat melakukan otentikasi user berdasarkan data konfigurasi yang disimpan dalam basisdata. Selain itu, perangkat lunak yang dibuat dapat memproses request dari client berdasarkan data konfigurasi dengan lebih cepat. Permasalahan yang mucul adalah bagaimana merancang dan membuat suatu perangkat lunak yang dapat melakukan otentikasi user berdasarkan data konfigurasi yang diambil dari basisdata, serta dapat memproses request dari client dengan lebih cepat berdasarkan hak akses yang dimilikinya.Dalam penelitian ini didesain dan diimplementasikan suatu sistem otentikasi user dengan mengambil data user yang tersimpan dalam basisdata MySQL. Disamping itu, dilakukan rekayasa pada beberapa rutin proses yang terdapat dalam squid proxy, supaya proses-proses dapat melakukan pengambilan data konfigurasi yang dialihkan dan disimpan dalam basisdata MySQL. Data konfigurasi ini didasarkan pada pembagian hak akses yang dimiliki oleh masing-masing grup user. Antarmuka berbasis web digunakan sebagai salah satu layanan bagi admin untuk mempermudah pengelolaan dan pengolahan data konfigurasi yang dibuat.Berdasarkan uji coba yang telah dilakukan, terbukti sistem yang dibuat dapat bekerja dengan baik dan tidak melenceng dari fungsi asli sebelum dilakukan perubahan. Bahkan pada penanganan request client yang berukuran besar, kinerja squid mengalami peningkatan dalam hal kecepatan proses yang dibutuhkan. Sebagai contoh, request client pada  file

  2. Giant Magnetoresistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 4. Giant Magnetoresistance - Nobel Prize in Physics 2007. Debakanta Samal P S Anil Kumar. General Article Volume 13 Issue 4 April 2008 pp 343-354. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Biomagnetism using SQUIDs: status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternickel, Karsten [CardioMag Imaging, Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Braginski, Alex I [Research Center Juelich, ISG-2, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Biomagnetism involves the measurement and analysis of very weak local magnetic fields of living organisms and various organs in humans. Such fields can be of physiological origin or due to magnetic impurities or markers. This paper reviews existing and prospective applications of biomagnetism in clinical research and medical diagnostics. Currently, such applications require sensitive magnetic SQUID sensors and amplifiers. The practicality of biomagnetic methods depends especially on techniques for suppressing the dominant environmental electromagnetic noise, and on suitable nearly real-time data processing and interpretation methods. Of the many biomagnetic methods and applications, only the functional studies of the human brain (magnetoencephalography) and liver susceptometry are in clinical use, while functional diagnostics of the human heart (magnetocardiography) approaches the threshold of clinical acceptance. Particularly promising for the future is the ongoing research into low-field magnetic resonance anatomical imaging using SQUIDs.

  4. Scanning SQUID microscopy for magnetic flux systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J I; Hata, Y

    2003-01-01

    Recently, vortices confined into micro-scale superconductors with shapes like a disk, triangle, square, etc., have attracted much attention because of the quantum phase transition of the self-organized vortex arrangement occurring within such geometrical constraints. Such a transition can be observed using a scanning SQUID microscope with high spatial resolution. We have successfully improved spatial resolution by incorporating a microfabrication technique that reduces both the size of the pick-up coil of the micro DC-SQUID and the standoff distance between the pick-up coil and the sample surface. Using this microscope, we have studied vortex arrangements in micro-scale superconductors made of Nb and YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta films with various sizes and geometrical shapes. A peculiar oscillating behavior of diamagnetic magnetization corresponding to the particular vortex state was observed.

  5. Investigation of noise sources in SQUID electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clem, T.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Purpura, J.W.; Allen, L.H.; Claassen, J.H.; Gubser, D.U.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of SQUID-based electronics outside a laboratory-controlled environment may be degraded from that found in laboratory operation. Investigations on superconducting tubes, wires, and sheets have been conducted to identify contributions to such noise. Results have been obtained for bulk and thin film samples utilizing both the conventional low temperature materials, as well as the new high temperature oxide materials. Experiments have been conducted to quantify flux redistribution and flux motion in superconducting samples subjected to temperature changes, temperature gradients, and magnetic field gradients. These investigations have been conducted at magnetic fields typical of many SQUID applications, with field intensities much smaller than the critical values H/sub cl/. Penetration depth effects, flux pinning effects, and flux motion effects have been observed. The various types of experiments conducted along with specific results are described.

  6. Real time SQUID dynamics revealed using high resolution cryogenic sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S.M.; Pedersen, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Real time measurements of SQUID dynamics have been performed using a fast cryogenic sampler based on Josephson junction electronics. Complex waveforms representing the switching of a SQUID from one voltage state to another are obtained with time and current resolution of 10 ps and 1 μA, respectively. With this setup, it is possible to demonstrate the interaction between the internal SQUID dynamics (resonances) and the load. The interaction depends on the details of the bias and control currents. (orig.)

  7. Performance of multiplexed SQUID readout for Cryogenic Sensor Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervenak, J.A.; Grossman, E.N.; Irwin, K.D.; Martinis, John M.; Reintsema, C.D.; Allen, C.A.; Bergman, D.I.; Moseley, S.H.; Shafer, R.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the implementation of a multiplexer that uses superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to read out low-impedance cryogenic detectors. Using prototype chips, a circuit was built which interfaces eight input SQUID channels with a close-packed array of eight transition-edge sensor (TES) infrared bolometers. Circuit elements were measured and crosstalk specifications are reported. Digital feedback is employed to flux-lock a single element in the array of SQUIDs

  8. SQUIDs for the readout of metallic magnetic calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferring, Anna; Wegner, Mathias; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gastaldo, Loredana; Kempf, Sebastian; Enss, Christian [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are the devices of choice to read out metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs). Here, the temperature change of the detector upon the absorption of an energetic particle is measured as a magnetization change of a paramagnetic temperature sensor that is situated in a weak magnetic field. Driven by the need for devices that allow for the readout of large-scale detector arrays with hundreds or even thousands of individual detectors as well as of single channel detectors with sub-eV energy resolution, we have recently started the development of low-T{sub c} current-sensing SQUIDs. In particular, we are developing cryogenic frequency-domain multiplexers based on non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs for detector array readout as well as dc-SQUIDs for single channel detector readout. We discuss our SQUID designs and the performance of prototype SQUIDs. We particularly focus on the frequency and temperature dependence of the SQUID noise as well as the reliability of our SQUID fabrication process for Nb/Al-AlO{sub x}/Nb Josephson junctions. Additionally, we demonstrate experimentally that state-of-the-art MMCs can successfully be read out with our current devices. Finally, we discuss different strategies to improve the SQUID and detector performance aiming to reach sub-eV energy resolution for individual detectors as well as for detector arrays.

  9. Development and applications of the tunnel junction dc squid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchen, M.B.

    1977-05-01

    The thesis is divided into three principle areas. Chapters II through VII are concerned with the theory, fabrication, operation, and performance of thin-film tunnel junction dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device). Chapters VIII, IX, and X describe the development of a planar dc SQUID and the incorporation of this SQUID into thin-film magnetic field gradiometers. Chapters XI through XIII discusses the application of a cylindrical dc SQUID to the measurement of thermal fluctuations in freely-suspended tin fibers at the superconducting transition

  10. Preliminary report on the PIXE analysis of the squid statoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yuzuru; Arai, Nobuaki; Sakamoto, Wataru; Murayama, Tatsuro; Maeda, Kuniko; Yoshida, Koji.

    1996-01-01

    Micro trace elements in the squid statolith, a calcareous stone which acts as a balancer and hearing, was analyzed with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) for the Japanese common squid for the first time. Calcium is the main component of the squid statoliths, which means that squid statolith is the pure calcified structure similar to the fish otolith. Beside Ca, Sr was detected with strong dosage, and some other elements as Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and As were also detected. Possible assumption of intake of microelements to the statoliths and the suitability of PIXE for statoliths analysis are discussed. (author)

  11. Single SQUID frequency-domain multiplexer for large bolometer arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Skidmore, J.T.; Richards, P.L.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the development of a frequency-domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. We have built an eight-channel prototype and demonstrated channel separation and signal recovery

  12. Analysis of Squid Net Fisheries Business Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herna Octivia Damayanti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Squid net is one of alternatives to replace trawl net in Pati regency. The purposes of the research are 1 to determine the influence factors, 2 to analyze the return to scale, 3 to analyze cost and return.The research location in Juwana Subdistrict particularly Bakaran Kulon, Dukutalit, Bajomulyo and Bendar Villages. The research conducted on October 2015 to June 2016. The number of final samples was 36, while the formulation of management strategies used 15 samples by snowball sampling. Data analysis techniques used 1 Cobb Douglas production function, 2 revenue-cost ratio analysis. The results of the research are 1 significant inputs for production factor are long trip, Solar fuel, the number of crew and lights. 2 the return to scale of squid net bussiness in Juwana subdistrict Pati regency is -0.231 means decreasing to scale. 3 the R/C ratio of scenario II more profitable for squid net crews than  scenario I.

  13. Directly coupled YBCO dc SQUID magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, P.R.E.; Shen, Y.Q.; Holst, T.; Larsen, B.H.; Sager, M.P.; Bindslev Hansen, J.

    1999-01-01

    YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- x magnetometers have been made on 10mmx10mm MgO substrates by directly coupling the magnetometer pick-up loop to a dc SQUID with narrow strip lines. The dc SQUIDs were made with YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x step-edge Josephson junctions. The layout of the magnetometer pick-up loop was chosen as a compromise between maximizing the loop effective area and minimizing the loop inductance. The SQUID was designed to have L S ∼100 pH in order to obtain β L =2I 0 L S /Φ 0 approx.= 1 with the single-junction critical current I 0 ∼10 μA. We have made magnetometers with white noise levels down to 55 fT Hz -1/2 and a 1/f knee at 1 Hz (ac biased). Noise measurements were made on a field-cooled magnetometer. The noise measured at 1 Hz when cooled in 'zero field' was 175 fT Hz -1/2 . When cooled in magnetic fields of B = 50 μT and B = 100 μT we measured the noise at 1 Hz to be 430 fT Hz -1 2 and 1.3 pT Hz -1/2 , respectively. (author)

  14. Recent advancements in the SQUID magnetospinogram system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Jun; Haruta, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Masakazu; Kawabata, Shigenori; Sekihara, Kensuke; Uehara, Gen

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a new superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetic measurement system known as magnetospinogram (MSG) is developed. The MSG system is used for observation of a weak magnetic field distribution induced by the neural activity of the spinal cord over the body surface. The current source reconstruction for the observed magnetic field distribution provides noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord, which enables medical personnel to diagnose spinal cord diseases more accurately. The MSG system is equipped with a uniquely shaped cryostat and a sensor array of vector-type SQUID gradiometers that are designed to detect the magnetic field from deep sources across a narrow observation area over the body surface of supine subjects. The latest prototype of the MSG system is already applied in clinical studies to develop a diagnosis protocol for spinal cord diseases. Advancements in hardware and software for MSG signal processing and cryogenic components aid in effectively suppressing external magnetic field noise and reducing the cost of liquid helium that act as barriers with respect to the introduction of the MSG system to hospitals. The application of the MSG system is extended to various biomagnetic applications in addition to spinal cord functional imaging given the advantages of the MSG system for investigating deep sources. The study also includes a report on the recent advancements of the SQUID MSG system including its peripheral technologies and wide-spread applications.

  15. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  16. SQUID current amplifiers for sub-kelvin operation temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleikies, J.; Usenko, O.; Frossati, G.; Flokstra, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Extremely sensitive current sensors are being developed by integrating input coils on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and optimizing them for being cooled to the mK temperature range. The most important effects for this type of sensors are investigated in this paper. SQUID

  17. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  18. Application of SQUID for NDE and biomagnetism measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Ki; Kim, In Seon; Lee, Yong Ho; Kwon, Hyuck Chan; Kim, Jin Mok; Kim, Ki Woong [Kore Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-15

    SQUID is the most sensitive magnetic sensor known. It is able to detect the magnetic field as small as few femto Tesla (fT), which is equivalent to one of 10 billionth of earth magnetic field (about 50μT). SQUID can be applied in the various fields and its need will be increased greatly in the future. If SQUID is applied in the medical technology, there will be improvement in accurate diagnosis of brain and heart by supplying more information about the functions of such human organs. The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of deep-lying flaws in the inner layer of lab jointed structures of aircraft, which is very difficult with the existing method became possible using high T{sub c}. SQUID. In this paper, the current status of SQUID applications in both medical and NDE fields will be reviewed.

  19. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid’s different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin. The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid’s mantle cavity.

  20. Capacitively-Coupled SQUID Bias for Time Division Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.; Martino, J.; Decourcelle, T.; Chapron, C.

    2014-08-01

    The multiplexing scheme presented in this paper is part of the readout chain of the QUBIC instrument devoted to cosmic microwave background polarization observations. It is based on time domain multiplexing using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to read out a large array of superconducting bolometers. The originality of the multiplexer presented here lies in the use of capacitors for the SQUID addressing. Capacitive coupling allows us to bias many SQUIDs in parallel (in a 2D topology), with low crosstalk and low power dissipation of the cryogenic front-end readout. However, capacitors in series with the SQUID require a modification of the addressing strategy. This paper presents a bias reversal technique adopted to sequentially address the SQUIDs through capacitors using a cryogenic SiGe integrated circuit. We further present the different limitations of this technique and how to choose the proper capacitance for a given multiplexing frequency and current source compliance.

  1. Current-phase relations and noise in rf biased SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackel, L.D.; Clark, T.D.; Buhrman, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of the weak link current-phase relation on noise in rf biased SQUIDs. Non-sinusoidal current-phase relations were observed in various weak links, and these non-sinusoidal relations were correlated with significantly increased intrinsic noise in the SQUID ring. The current-phase relation was also found to affect the amplitude of the rf SQUID ring dissipation. The result of an rf SQUID system noise analysis shows that, due to increased intrinsic noise and reduced ring dissipation, the minimum attainable noise for a SQUID ring having a very non-sinusoidal current-phase relation is considerably greater than for a ring with a sinusoidal relation

  2. Universal mechanisms of decoherence of qubit states in a SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklov, A. B.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2003-03-01

    Fundamental conservation laws mandate parameter-free generic mechanisms of decoherence of quantum oscillations of the superconducting current in a SQUID [1]. The very fact that the current flows with respect to the ion lattice is shown to result in a decoherence via emission of the transverse sound at the oscillation frequency. For SQUIDs larger than the wavelength of the phonons, this effect can significantly limit the quality factor. The decohering effects of the external mechanical and magnetic noise are shown to be proportional to the total magnetic moment of the SQUID, making small SQUIDs less susceptible to the noise than large SQUIDs. Decoherence due to the emission of photons into the open space and in the presence of the metal shielding has been studied as well. Suggestions of experimental setups with low decoherence have been made. [1] E. M. Chudnovsky and A. B. Kuklov, arXiv:cond-mat/0211246.

  3. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Crispino, Marianna; Squillace, Angela; van Minnen, Jan; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells and presynaptic RNAs derive from nearby cells, presumably glial cells. Indeed, in perfused squid giant axons, delivery of newly synthesized RNA to the axon perfusate is strongly stimulated by axonal depolarization or agonists of glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors. Likewise, incubation of squid optic lobe slices with [3H]uridine leads to a marked accumulation of [3H]RNA in the large synaptosomes derived from the nerve terminals of retinal photoreceptor neurons. As the cell bodies of these neurons lie outside the optic lobe, the data demonstrate that presynaptic RNA is locally synthesized, presumably by perisynaptic glial cells. Overall, our results support the view that axons and presynaptic regions are endowed with local systems of gene expression which may prove essential for the maintenance and plasticity of these extrasomatic neuronal domains.

  4. Identification and quantification of calcium-binding proteins in squid axoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinks, M.H.; Klee, C.B.; Pant, H.C.; Gainer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The identities and quantities of calcium-binding proteins were determined in axoplasm isolated from the squid giant axon. 45 Ca-binding assays on nitrocellulose filters containing axoplasm proteins separated by SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis revealed 4 major calcium-binding bands. These included the high-molecular-weight (Mr greater than 330 and 220 X 10(3] neurofilament proteins, an unidentified protein band that migrated around Mr 55,000, and a diverse group of proteins that migrated together around Mr 17,000. The low-molecular-weight (Mr 17,000) calcium-binding proteins could be resolved into calmodulin (ca. 120 mumol/kg axoplasm), 2 other Mr 17,000 calcium-binding proteins, and a small amount of calcineurin B. It is estimated that these calcium-binding proteins in squid axoplasm could theoretically bind about 1 mmol Ca 2+ /kg axoplasm. 125 I-Calmodulin overlay and Western blot analyses disclosed a number of calmodulin-binding proteins in axoplasm. These included fodrin, calcineurin A, and Ca 2+ /CaM protein kinase II subunits

  5. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-01-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6 2 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis

  6. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of squid ink powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Zaharah, M.Y.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic development in Malaysia has led to increasing quantity and complexity of generated waste or by-product. The main objective of this study is to investigate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of squid ink powder. The squid ink was collected from fresh squid and dried using freeze dryer before it was ground into powder. The yield of squid ink was 22.82% after freeze-drying which was 69.37g in amount. Proximate composition analysis as well as two total antioxidant activity assays named 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP assay, and antimicrobial analysis were done on the powdered squid ink. The proximate results of squid ink powder were 4.43 ± 0.29% moisture, 62.46 ± 0.62% protein, 3.96 ± 0.08% fat, and 9.29 ± 0.05% ash. Results of DPPH assay showed that water extraction of squid ink powder has the highest 94.87 ± 4.87%, followed by ethanol 67.57 ± 7.55%, and hexane extract 2.10 ± 1.18%. FRAP assay result presented the same trend with water extraction had the highest value of 929.67 ± 2.31 μmol Fe (II / g of sample extract, followed by ethanol extract 201.00 ± 26.29 μmol Fe (II per gram sample and hexane 79.67 ± 12.66 μmol Fe (II / g of sample extract. Both water and ethanol extract showed antimicrobial properties with inhibition range of 7 to 15 mm, respectively. Fresh squid ink had 1.254 × 103 colony forming unit per gram of sample of microbial content. Squid ink powder had protein as major compound and microbial content was below from standard value of fisheries products as stated in Food Act 1983 and Regulation 1985.

  7. Resonances in superconducting quantum interference devices: SQUID's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S.M.; Valsamakis, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Resonances in asymmetric two junction SQUID's are analyzed. The distinction between current-controlled and voltage-controlled cases is found to be crucial to the full understanding of the device dynamics. In the current-controlled case, three modes of oscillation are predicted at frequencies [(L 1 +L 2 )C 1 ]/sup -1/2/, [(L 1 +L 2 )C 2 ]/sup -1/2/, and [(L 1 +L 2 )C 1 +C 2 /(C 1 +C 2 )]/sup -1/2/, and confirmed experimentally. In the voltage-controlled case only two modes are predicted at frequencies (L 1 C 1 )/sup -1/2/ and (L 2 C 2 )/sup -1/2/, which in practice are difficult to observe. We show that such a distinction leads to a better interpretation of experimental observations

  8. Temperature dependence of microwave SQUID response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, A.; Deaver, B.S. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The response of a microwave SQUID using a Ta point contact has been measured at various temperatures giving a progression of operating conditions from the nonhysteretic to the hysteretic mode. The responses calculated by Soerensen and by Burhman and Jackel are in good qualitative agreement with the measurements. However, these theories do not appear to account for the response reported by Rachford, Wolf, Nisenoff, and Huang for thin-film bridges. We present a calculation that exhibits explicitly the dependence of the response on Ω=Phi 0 ν/I/sub c/R, where ν is the microwave frequeny, I/sub c/ and R are the critical current and resistance of the junction, and Phi 0 is the fluxoid quantum, and that agrees with their data and their interpretation of it in terms of a limiting time tau for the supercurrent response with tauproportionalΔ (T) -1 where Δ (T) is the BCS gap parameter

  9. Dc-SQUID sensor system for multichannel neuromagnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houwman, E.P.; Veldhuis, D.; Flokstra, ter Brake, H.J.M.; Jaszczuk, W.; Rogalla, H. (Univ. of Twente, Faculty of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (NL)); Martinez, A. (Universidad de Zaragoza, E.T.S.I.I. Maria Zambrano 50, 50015 Zaragoza (ES))

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on various DC-SQUID sensor configurations developed for use in the authors' 19-channel neuromagetometer. Apart from the standard type, resistively and indictively shunted SQUIDs were made, allowing for a large screening factor {beta} ({gt}1). In this way signal coupling from the pick-up coil to the SQUID is facilitated and capactive coupling between the input coil and the SQUID washer can be decreased. The number of turns of the input coil is decreased further by allowing for an inductance mismatch in the input circuit. Although theoretically both measures give rise to an increased field noise of the sensor, they may lead to a reduction of the excess noise and the noise balance may become positive.

  10. Application of SQUID for NDE and Biomagnetism measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Ki; Kim, In Seon; Lee, Yong Ho; Kwon, Hyuck Chan; Kim, Jin Mok; Kim, Ki Woong [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    SQUID is the most sensitive magnetic sensor known. It is able to detect the magnetic field as small as few femto Tesla (fT), which is equivalent to one of 10 billionth of earth magnetic field (about 50 muT). SQUID can be applied in the various fields and its need will be increased greatly in the future. If SQUID is applied in the medical technology, there will be important in accurate diagnosis of brain and heart by supplying more information about the functions of such human organs. The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of deep-lying flaws in the inner layer of lab jointed structures of aircraft, which is very difficult with the existing method became possible using high T{sub c} SQIUD. In this paper, the current status of SQUID application in both medical and NDE fields will be reviewed.

  11. Reactive probing of macroscopically quantum mechanical SQUID rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prance, R.J.; Clark, T.D.; Whiteman, R.; Diggins, J.; Ralph, J.F.; Prance, H.; Spiller, T.P.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the energy level structure of ultra small capacitance SQUID rings can be probed adiabatically at radio frequency using both dynamical and quasistatic reactive techniques. ((orig.))

  12. Gear Selectivity of a Longfin Squid Bottom Trawl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Loligo pealeii (longfin inshore squid) co-occurs with Atlantic butterfish (Peprilus triacanthus) throughout the year and discarding in the L. pealeii bottom trawl...

  13. Negative inductance SQUID qubit operating in a quantum regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Y.; Su, F. F.; Xu, H. K.; Li, Z. Y.; Tian, Ye; Zhu, X. B.; Lu, Li; Han, Siyuan; Zhao, S. P.

    2018-04-01

    Two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms, called nSQUIDs, have been proposed for significantly improving quantum information transfer but their quantum nature has not been experimentally demonstrated. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized superconducting nSQUID qubits. Our results provide clear evidence of the quantum coherence of the device, whose properties are well described by theoretical calculations using parameters determined from spectroscopic measurement. In addition to their future application for fast quantum information transfer, the nSQUID qubits exhibit rich characteristics in their tunable two-dimensional (2D) potentials, energy levels, wave function symmetries, and dipole matrix elements, which are essential to the study of a wide variety of macroscopic quantum phenomena such as tunneling in 2D potential landscapes.

  14. Symposium on applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The abstracts are given of thirteen papers presented at a ''SQUID Symposium'' organized by the Division of Materials Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy and held March 23--25, 1978, at the University of Virginia. Since SQUID systems have already been utilized in feasibility demonstration in geothermal reservoir exploration, it was recognized that these devices also hold great potential for many other important scientific measurements. Many of these are energy-related, and others include forefront investigations in a diverse group of scientific areas, from biomedical to earthquake monitoring. Research in SQUIDs has advanced so rapidly in recent years that it was felt that a symposium to review the current status and future prospects of the devices would be timely. The abstracts given present an overview of work in this area and hopefully provide an opportunity to increase awareness among basic and applied scientists of the inherent implications of the extreme measurement sensitivity in advanced SQUID systems

  15. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantsker, E.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO 3 -YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room

  16. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  17. Single-layer and integrated YBCO gradiometer coupled SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, L.R.; Daalmans, G.M.; Barthel, K.H.; Ferchland, L.; Selent, M.; Kuehnl, M.; Uhl, D. [Siemens AG, Central Research and Development, Paul-Gossen-Strasse 100, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    For many SQUID applications such as biomagnetism or non-destructive evaluation it is convenient or even necessary to work without the restrictions of a magnetically shielded room. This contribution deals with two sensors appropriate for this purpose. In the first concept we present a flip chip arrangement of a single-layer flux transformer and a single-layer SQUID, taking advantage of a simple technology. The SQUID was prepared on a 15x15 mm{sup 2} SrTiO{sub 3} 24 deg. bicrystal and located in the common line of two-parallel-loop arrangements. The flipped antenna was designed as a two-parallel-loop gradiometer with 26 mm baseline on a 10x40 mm{sup 2} LaAlO{sub 3} single-crystal substrate. A field gradient sensitivity of 1 nT cm{sup -1}{phi}{sub 0} was obtained. We could demonstrate a field gradient resolution of 20 fT cm{sup -1} Hz{sup 1/2} at 1 kHz in an unshielded environment. In the second concept we integrated both the flux antenna and the SQUID on a SrTiO{sub 3} bicrystal. The tighter coupling scheme results in smaller devices for similar field gradient sensitivities. The integrated SQUID is designed as a 3x8 mm{sup 2} device on a 10x10 mm{sup 2} bicrystal substrate. The remaining space is used for test structures and SQUIDs without antennae, in order to control the technology as well as the SQUID design. Parallel processed dummy substrates were used to monitor the quality of film growth by x-ray analysis. The quality of our SQUID design will be discussed on the basis of the measured field gradient sensitivity and noise. The reliability of the devices is demonstrated by an NDE type measurement. (author)

  18. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging

  19. High-T(c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    In our laboratory of high-T(sub c), a one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of a 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet, a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which the superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet, a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  20. Ratchet potential and rectification effect in Majorana fermion SQUID

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Qi-Feng; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by a recent experimental progress in realizing Majorana fermions (MFs) in a heterostructure of a spin-orbit coupling nanowire and superconductor (V. Mourik et al., Science.1222360), we investigate a SQUID formed by the novel superconductor-nanowire-superconductor Josephson junction which contains MFs and a conventional superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction. It is shown that the critical current of the SQUID is different for the two current directions. Since the asymmetric...

  1. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  2. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  3. Giant congenital nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... the spine) Involvement of the membranes of the brain and spinal cord when the nevus affects a ...

  4. SQUID use for Geophysics: finding billions of dollars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Soon after their discovery, Jim Zimmerman saw the potential of using Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, SQUIDs, for the study of Geophysics and undertook experiments to understand the magnetic phenomena of the Earth. However his early experiments were not successful. Nevertheless up to the early 1980's, some research effort in the use of SQUIDs for geophysics continued and many ideas of how you could use SQUIDs evolved. Their use was not adopted by the mining industry at that time for a range of reasons. The discovery of high temperature superconductors started a reinvigoration in the interest to use SQUIDs for mineral exploration. Several groups around the world worked with mining companies to develop both liquid helium and nitrogen cooled systems. The realisation of the achievable sensitivity that contributed to successful mineral discoveries and delineation led to real financial returns for miners. By the mid 2000's, SQUID systems for geophysics were finally being offered for sale by several start-up companies. This talk will tell the story of SQUID use in geophysics. It will start with the early work of the SQUID pioneers including that of Jim Zimmerman and John Clarke and will also cover the development since the early 1990's up to today of a number of magnetometers and gradiometers that have been successfully commercialised and used to create significant impact in the global resources industry. The talk will also cover some of the critical technical challenges that had to be overcome to succeed. It will focus mostly on magnetically unshielded systems used in the field although some laboratory-based systems will be discussed.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaney, M.B.

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al 2 O 3 /Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 10 17 in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO 3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies

  6. Retrapping Current in Bridge-Type Nano-SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, D.; Kirtley, J. R.; Hasselbach, K.

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to fabricate bridge-type nano-superconducting quantum interference devices (bridge-type nano-SQUIDs) that operate without hysteresis over a broad temperature range. Hysteresis—defined by the difference between switching and retrapping current—is one of the foremost constraints to operating nano-SQUIDs with low noise. The quantum behavior of the switching current has been explored in bridge-type nano-SQUIDs, but studies exploring the parameters ruling the retrapping current are rare. Here, we study the temperature and magnetic-field dependence of the retrapping current in two different kinds of bridge-type nano-SQUID: trilayer aluminum-niobium-tungsten bridge-type nano-SQUIDs and suspended-bridge nano-SQUIDs. Our study confirms previous works showing that the retrapping current decreases as the bath temperature increases and is insensitive to the magnetic field. Using a thermal model originally proposed by Skocpol, Beasley, and Tinkham [J. Appl. Phys. 45, 4054 (1974)], we account for, and suggest a simple formula which describes, the temperature dependence of the retrapping current. Our calculations show that the magnitude of the retrapping current is mainly dependent on the superconducting transition temperature and the effective resistance of the weak link and that the temperature dependence of the retrapping current is ruled by the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in the normal and superconducting state. Finally, we apply our calculation to newly fabricated shunted bridge-type nano-SQUIDs, which show nonhysteretic current-voltage characteristics down to at least 250 mK and display systematic voltage modulations as a function of externally applied magnetic fields.

  7. High-Tc SQUIDs: Noise and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hsiao-Mei [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2001-08-01

    A major challenge in the design and operation of high transition temperature (Tc ) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) is their potential to exhibit substantially higher levels of noise at low frequency f when exposed to earth’s magnetic field. To investigate this problem, we studied the noise of high-Tc SQUIDs, directly coupled magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers in both static and changing magnetic fields. The directly coupled magnetometer consists of a dc SQUID connected to a large area pickup loop in parallel. The multilayer magnetometer involves a multiturn flux transformer inductively coupled to a dc SQUID on a separate substrate. All the devices are made of thin films of the high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ, patterned into 4 μm linewidths. After cooling in a magnetic field, the devices showed no increase in 1/f noise for fields up to threshold values well above the earth’s magnetic field. The devices were also cooled in a magnetic field that was subsequently turned off. The 1/f noise of bare SQUIDs was unchanged for fields up to 12 μT. The addition of the flux transformer containing flux dams increased the sensitivity to magnetic field by a factor of 43 while reducing the threshold field only moderately, to 5 μT. This result implies that the multilayer magnetometer can be rotated in the earth’s magnetic field through an angle of up to 26o without increasing the low frequency noise. The results of these studies were incorporated into a 5-channel high-Tc magnetocardiography system involving two first-derivative SQUID gradiometers and three reference SQUIDs. Each planar gradiometer consists of a directly coupled SQUID magnetometer inductively coupled to the smaller coil of an asymmetric, two-loop flux transformer. The reference SQUIDs are patterned into 4 μm lines. The outputs of the five channels were subtracted in software to form a second-derivative gradiometer. Its

  8. SQUIDs De-fluxing Using a Decaying AC Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Semenov, Vasili Kirilovich [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States); Anderson, Bill [Senior Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Flux trapping is the Achilles’ heel of all superconductor electronics. The most direct way to avoid flux trapping is a prevention of superconductor circuits from exposure to magnetic fields. Unfortunately this is not feasible if the circuits must be exposed to a strong DC magnetic field even for a short period of time. For example, such unavoidable exposures take place in superparamagnetic relaxation measurements (SPMR) and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) using unshielded thin-film SQUID-based gradiometers. Unshielded SQUIDs stop working after being exposed to DC magnetic fields of only a few Gauss in strength. In this paper we present experimental results with de-fluxing of planar thin-film LTS SQUID-based gradiometers using a strong decaying AC magnetic field. We used four commercial G136 gradiometers for SPMR measurements with up to a 10 mT magnetizing field. Strong 12.9 kHz decaying magnetic field pulses reliably return SQUIDs to normal operation 50 ms after zeroing the DC magnetizing field. This new AC de-fluxing method was also successfully tested with seven other different types of LTS SQUID sensors and has been shown to dissipate extremely low energy.

  9. Two-stage SQUID system and transducers development for MiniGrail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottardi, L.; Podt, M.; Flokstra, Jakob; Bassan, M.; Karbalai-Sadegh, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Reinke, W.; Shumack, A.; Srinivas, S.; de Waard, A.; de Waard, A.; Frossati, G.

    2004-01-01

    We present measurements on a two-stage SQUID system based on a dc-SQUID as a sensor and a DROS as an amplifier. We measured the intrinsic noise of the dc-SQUID at 4.2 K. A new dc-SQUID has been fabricated. It was specially designed to be used with MiniGRAIL transducers. Cooling fins have been added

  10. Batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels from squid optic nerve in planar bilayers. Ion conduction and gating properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Squid optic nerve sodium channels were characterized in planar bilayers in the presence of batrachotoxin (BTX). The channel exhibits a conductance of 20 pS in symmetrical 200 mM NaCl and behaves as a sodium electrode. The single-channel conductance saturates with increasing the concentration of sodium and the channel conductance vs. sodium concentration relation is well described by a simple rectangular hyperbola. The apparent dissociation constant of the channel for sodium is 11 mM and the maximal conductance is 23 pS. The selectivity determined from reversal potentials obtained in mixed ionic conditions is Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+. Calcium blocks the channel in a voltage-dependent manner. Analysis of single-channel membranes showed that the probability of being open (Po) vs. voltage relation is sigmoidal with a value of 0.5 between -90 and -100 mV. The fitting of Po requires at least two closed and one open state. The apparent gating charge required to move through the whole transmembrane voltage during the closed-open transition is four to five electronic charges per channel. Distribution of open and closed times are well described by single exponentials in most of the voltage range tested and mean open and mean closed times are voltage dependent. The number of charges associated with channel closing is 1.6 electronic charges per channel. Tetrodotoxin blocked the BTX-modified channel being the blockade favored by negative voltages. The apparent dissociation constant at zero potential is 16 nM. We concluded that sodium channels from the squid optic nerve are similar to other BTX- modified channels reconstituted in bilayers and to the BTX-modified sodium channel detected in the squid giant axon. PMID:2536797

  11. Squid photoreceptor terminals synthesize calexcitin, a learning related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Crispino, Marianna; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2003-08-14

    Nerve endings of squid photoreceptor neurons generate large synaptosomes upon homogenization of the optic lobe. Using several independent methods, these presynaptic structures have been shown to synthesize a wealth of soluble, cytoskeletal and nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins, and to account for essentially all the translation activity of the synaptosomal fraction. We are now presenting evidence that calexcitin, a learning related, Ca(2+)-binding protein of the B photoreceptors of Hermissenda crassicornis (a mollusk), is synthesized and subjected to post-translational modifications in the squid photoreceptor terminals. In view of the essential role of presynaptic protein synthesis in long-term memory formation in Aplysia, our data suggest that a comparable role may be played by calexcitin synthesized in the squid photoreceptor terminals.

  12. Neurofilament proteins are synthesized in nerve endings from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Capano, C P; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1993-09-01

    It is generally believed that the proteins of the nerve endings are synthesized on perikaryal polysomes and are eventually delivered to the presynaptic domain by axoplasmic flow. At variance with this view, we have reported previously that a synaptosomal fraction from squid brain actively synthesizes proteins whose electrophoretic profile differs substantially from that of the proteins made in nerve cell bodies, axons, or glial cells, i.e., by the possible contaminants of the synaptosomal fraction. Using western analyses and immunoabsorption methods, we report now that (a) the translation products of the squid synaptosomal fraction include neurofilament (NF) proteins and (b) the electrophoretic pattern of the synaptosomal newly synthesized NF proteins is drastically different from that of the NF proteins synthesized by nerve cell bodies. The latter results exclude the possibility that NF proteins synthesized by the synaptosomal fraction originate in fragments of nerve cell bodies possibly contaminating the synaptosomal fraction. They rather indicate that in squid brain, nerve terminals synthesize NF proteins.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of hybrid Nb-YBCO dc SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frack, E.K.; Drake, R.E.; Patt, R.; Radparvar, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication of hybrid low T c /high T c dc SQUIDs of two flavors. The first kind utilizes niobium tunnel junctions and a YBCO film strip as the most inductive portion of the SQUID loop. This configuration allows a direct measurement of the inductance of the YBCO microstrip from which the effective penetration depth can be calculated. The successful fabrication of these SQUIDs has required 1. superconducting Nb-to-YBCO contacts, 2. deposition and patterning of an SiO 2 insulation layer over YBCO, and 3. selective patterning of niobium and SiO 2 relative to YBCO. All these process steps are pertinent to the eventual use of YBCO thin films in electronic devices

  14. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  15. Dipole location using SQUID based measurements: Application to magnetocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyappa, N.; Parasakthi, C.; Sengottuvel, S.; Gireesan, K.; Patel, Rajesh; Janawadkar, M. P.; Sundar, C. S.; Radhakrishnan, T. S.

    2012-07-01

    We report a method of inferring the dipole location using iterative nonlinear least square optimization based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, wherein, we use different sets of pseudo-random numbers as initial parameter values. The method has been applied to (i) the simulated data representing the calculated magnetic field distribution produced by a point dipole placed at a known position, (ii) the experimental data from SQUID based measurements of the magnetic field distribution produced by a source coil carrying current, and (iii) the actual experimentally measured magnetocardiograms of human subjects using a SQUID based system.

  16. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two HTS SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-12-31

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. Analog gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  17. Giant squid-hidden canard: the 3D geometry of the Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jonathan; Wechselberger, Martin

    2007-07-01

    This work is motivated by the observation of remarkably slow firing in the uncoupled Hodgkin-Huxley model, depending on parameters tau( h ), tau( n ) that scale the rates of change of the gating variables. After reducing the model to an appropriate nondimensionalized form featuring one fast and two slow variables, we use geometric singular perturbation theory to analyze the model's dynamics under systematic variation of the parameters tau( h ), tau( n ), and applied current I. As expected, we find that for fixed (tau( h ), tau( n )), the model undergoes a transition from excitable, with a stable resting equilibrium state, to oscillatory, featuring classical relaxation oscillations, as I increases. Interestingly, mixed-mode oscillations (MMO's), featuring slow action potential generation, arise for an intermediate range of I values, if tau( h ) or tau( n ) is sufficiently large. Our analysis explains in detail the geometric mechanisms underlying these results, which depend crucially on the presence of two slow variables, and allows for the quantitative estimation of transitional parameter values, in the singular limit. In particular, we show that the subthreshold oscillations in the observed MMO patterns arise through a generalized canard phenomenon. Finally, we discuss the relation of results obtained in the singular limit to the behavior observed away from, but near, this limit.

  18. Microwave SQUID multiplexing of large MMC detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, M.; Wegner, M.; Kempf, S.; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C. [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are the devices of choice for many spectroscopic applications since they provide a very good energy resolution, a very fast intrinsic signal rise time as well as an excellent linearity. While single MMCs or small detector arrays are typically read out by dc-SQUIDs, the readout of very large arrays requires a cryogenic multiplexing technique to limit the parasitic heat load to the cold stage of the cryostat, the system complexity as well as cost. A very promising approach for the readout of very large MMC arrays is microwave SQUID multiplexing. Here, the initial detector signal is transduced into a resonance frequency shift of a related superconducting λ/4 microwave resonator by means of a non-hysteretic, unshunted rf-SQUID. By coupling many resonators - each with unique resonance frequency - to a common transmission line, this frequency domain multiplexing technique allows for the readout of hundreds or thousand pixels with only one HEMT amplifier and two coaxial cables. In this contribution we discuss the performance of a recently developed 64 pixel MMC detector array that is read out by means of an on-chip multiplexer. For the very first time we demonstrate the simultaneous readout of two MMCs by means of a microwave SQUID multiplexer.

  19. Forecasting chokka squid Loligo vulgaris reynaudii catches and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... the methodology, and it is currently being used in a new series of experiments. Transforming the conceptual model into a numerical model, supported by an under- standing of squid spawning processes, will follow when sufficient data have been collected. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCIENTIFIC. METHOD.

  20. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtley, John R., E-mail: jkirtley@stanford.edu; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Moler, Kathryn A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Paulius, Lisa [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Spanton, Eric M. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Schiessl, Daniel [Attocube Systems AG, Königinstraße 11A, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Fung, Y.-K.K.; Gibson, Gerald W. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Huber, Martin E. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (United States); Ralph, Daniel C. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ketchen, Mark B. [OcteVue, Hadley, Massachusetts 01035 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2}. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  1. Squid are important components of foodwebs in most marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    trawl and the stomach contents of 47 potential predators, including stranded penguins and marine mammals as well as fish and cephalopods caught with diverse fishing gears in the region. Of 313 long-finned squid stomachs containing food, fish occurred in 36.4% of stomachs, crustaceans in 23.3% and cephalopods in ...

  2. A mass stranding of the squid martialia hyadesi Rochebrune and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-02-11

    Feb 11, 1997 ... All animals were immature, with females in lower stages of maturity than males. No predatory marine mammals were seen in the area during or after the stranding event. An interpretation of the stranding is presented with reference to historical reports of squid strandings worldwide. Evidence suggests some ...

  3. A contribution to the biology of the ommastrephid squid Martialia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Updated knowledge on the distribution and biology of the ommastrephid squid Martialia hyadesi in the South-West Atlantic Ocean is presented. Although the species has an Antarctic circumpolar distribution, its most frequent area of appearance is in the South-West Atlantic, where commercial catches have been made.

  4. Can understanding squid life-history strategies and recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current views of the links between life-history strategies and recruitment processes in fish are contrasted with the pattern emerging for squid. A general perspective is that the roles of space and time are reversed in the two groups, suggesting that management strategies also should differ. The space/time reversal appears to ...

  5. Tunnel junction dc SQUID: fabrication, operation, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Ketchen, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory, fabrication, operation, and performance of a dc SQUID that makes use of two shunted Nb-NbO/sub x/-Pb tunnel junctions are described. The junctions have predictable characteristics, can be stored for long periods at room temperature, and can be cycled between room and liquid helium temperatures repeatedly

  6. Trophic relationships of the long-finned squid loligo Sanpaulensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diet and predators of Loligo sanpaulensis (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae) on the southern Brazilian shelf were studied by examining the stomach contents of 668 long-finned squid (12–184 mm mantle length) caught by bottom trawl and the stomach contents of 47 potential predators, including stranded penguins and ...

  7. Strongly coupled, low noise DC-SQUID amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleikies, J.

    2009-01-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (dc-SQUID) is one of the most sensitive magnetic field sensors available. In this thesis we concentrate on its application as an amplifier. In this configuration, an input circuit of interest can be connected by means of a coupling coil. The

  8. A 128 Multiplexing Factor Time-Domain SQUID Multiplexer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.; Decourcelle, T.; Perbost, C.; Chapron, C.; Rambaud, D.; Maestre, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.

    2016-07-01

    A cryogenic 128:1 Time-Domain Multiplexer (TDM) has been developed for the readout of kilo-pixel Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays dedicated to the Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology (QUBIC) instrument which aims to measure the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are usually used to read out TESs. Moreover, SQUIDs are used to build TDM by biasing sequentially the SQUIDs connected together—one for each TES. In addition to this common technique which allows a typical 32 multiplexing factor, a cryogenic integrated circuit provides a 4:1 second multiplexing stage. This cryogenic integrated circuit is one of the original part of our TDM achieving an unprecedented 128 multiplexing factor. We present these two dimension TDM stages: topology of the SQUID multiplexer, operation of the cryogenic integrated circuit, and integration of the full system to read out a TES array dedicated to the QUBIC instrument. Flux-locked loop operation in multiplexed mode is also discussed.

  9. Dynamics of a SQUID ratchet coupled to a nanomechanical resonator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pugnetti, S.; Blanter, Y.M.; Dolcini, F.; Fazio, R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a superconducting rectifying circuit, namely, a three-junction superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), where one arm of the superconducting loop consists of a nanomechanical resonator. We find that the dc characteristic curve of the system displays

  10. Quantum behavior of a SQUID qubit manipulated with fast pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele; Messina, Antonino; Napoli, Anna [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma (Italy); Migliore, Rosanna [Institute of Biophysics, National Research Council, via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    A SQUID qubit manipulated with fast variation of the energy potential is analyzed. Varying the potential shape from a single to a double-well configuration, quantum behaviors are brought into light and discussed. We show that the presence of quantum coherences in the initial state of the system plays a central role in the appearance of these quantum effects.

  11. Statolith comparison of two south-west Atlantic Loliginid squid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The statoliths of two South-West Atlantic loliginid squid, Loligo gahi and Loligo sanpaulensis, were studied to determine if they could be a useful tool for species differentiation. Allometric equations were employed to examine differences in statolith shape and growth. Statolith dimensions were standardized by total length ...

  12. SQUID developments for the gravitational wave antenna MiniGRAIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleikies, J.; Usenko, O.; Kuit, K.H.; Flokstra, Jakob; de Waard, A.; de Waard, A.; Frossati, G.

    2007-01-01

    We designed two different sensor SQUIDs for the readout of the resonant mass gravitational wave detector MiniGRAIL. Both designs have integrated input inductors in the order of 1.5 muH and are planned for operation in the mK temperature range. Cooling fins were added to the shunt resistors. The

  13. The bigfin reef squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Lesson, 1830) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    The bigfin reef squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Lesson,. 1830) is an important fisheries species throughout much of its range, from central Japan and the Red Sea in the north, through South and South-East Asia, to. Queensland, Australia, and North Island, New Zealand, in the south (Roper et al. 1984). In the Philippines, S.

  14. Stocks of the Argentine shortfin squid Illex argentinus support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Developmental stages were described on the basis of morphological features. Most hatchlings from the least ... 1: Embryonic development of Illex argentinus from unfertilized egg to Stage 15. The chorion is omitted after Stage 6. ..... and abundance of early life stages of squid (Illex argentinus) in the south-west Atlantic.

  15. Bias Reversal Technique in SQUID Bootstrap Circuit (SBC) Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Liangliang; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Guofeng; Wu, Jun; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Longqing; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhüusser, Andreas

    Recently, a SQUID direct readout scheme called voltage-biased SQUID Bootstrap Circuit (SBC) is introduced to reduce preamplifier noise contribution. In this paper, we describe a concept of SBC with bias reversal technique which can suppress SQUID intrinsic 1/f noise. When applying a symmetrically rectangular voltage across SBC, two I-Φ characteristics appear at the amplifier output. In order to return to one I - Φ curve, a demodulation technique is required. Because of the asymmetry of typical SBC I-Φ curve, the demodulation method is realized by using a flux compensation of one half Φ0 flux shift. The output signal is then filtered and returned to one I-Φ curve for ordinary FLL readout. It was found, the reversal frequency fR can be dramatically enhanced when using a preamplifier consisting of two operational amplifiers. A planar Nb SQUID magnetometer with a loop-inductance of 350 pH, fR =50 kHz and a second order low pass filter with 10 kHz cut off frequency was employed in our experiment. Results prove the feasibility of SBC bias reversal method. Comparative experiment on noise performance will be carried out in further studies.

  16. Squid as trophic bridges for parasite flow within marine ecosystems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Squid as trophic bridges for parasite flow within marine ecosystems: The case of anisakis simplex (nematoda: Anisakidae), or when the wrong way can be right. E Abollo, C Gestal, A López, AF González, A Guerra, S Pascual ...

  17. Flicker (1/f) noise in tunnel junction DC SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Martinis, J.M.; Pegrum, C.M.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the spectral density of the 1/f voltage noise in current-biased resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions and dc SQUIDs. A theory in which fluctuations in the temperature give rise to fluctuations in the critical current and hence in the voltage predicts the magnitude of the noise quite accurately for junctions with areas of about 2 x 10 4 μm 2 , but significantly overestimates the noise for junctions with areas of about 6 μm 2 . DC SQUIDs fabricated from these two types of junctions exhibit substantially more 1/f voltage noise than would be predicted from a model in which the noise arises from critical current fluctuations in the junctions. This result was confirmed by an experiment involving two different bias current and flux modulation schemes, which demonstrated that the predominant 1/f voltage noise arises not from critical current fluctuations, but from some unknown source that can be regarded as an apparent 1/f flux noise. Measurements on five different configurations of dc SQUIDs fabricated with thin-film tunnel junctions and with widely varying areas, inductances, and junction capacitances show that the spectral density of the 1/f equivalent flux noise is roughtly constant, within a factor of three of (10 -10 /f)phi 2 0 Hz -1 . It is emphasized that 1/f flux noise may not be the predominant source of 1/f noise in SQUIDS fabricated with other technologies

  18. spawning grounds for chokka squid Loligo vulgaris reynaudii, using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    Swimming movements in relation to egg beds have been studied using acoustic micro-electronic transmitters implanted in squid and tracked via 3-D radio-linked acoustic positioning telemetry (O'Dor et al. 1996, 1998, Sauer et al. 1997). Most of these methods are either impractical or would be severely limited on the deeper ...

  19. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal ...

  20. Development of robust HTS-SQUID for non-destructive inspection system in unshielded environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K; Kage, T; Suzuki, T; Hatsukade, Y; Tanaka, S

    2014-01-01

    Cross-shaped YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−x (YBCO) film was overlapped on directly-coupled multi-pickup-coil HTS-dc-SQUID magnetometer in flip-chip configuration as a superconducting shield, and the characterestics of the SQUID were examined in DC and AC magnetic fields. We created slots in the YBCO film and pickup-coil of HTS-SQUID magnetometer for suppression of flux trapping. In low magnetic field environment, we measured the characteristics of the SQUID without and with HTS film. The most of the parameters were same with and without the HTS films, while S 1/2 φ with the HTS film was a bit smaller than that of the bare SQUID. In the DC field, I c of the HTS-SQUID covered with the HTS film did not change until a DC field over 140 μT was applied to the SQUID, while the bare SQUID's I c decreased with the increase of the applied DC field. In the AC fields at 10 MHz, the SQUID with the HTS film showed degradation of the parameters such as V pp and S 12 φ at lower field amplitude than the bare SQUID.

  1. The pace of life in deep-dwelling squids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, H. J. T.; Robison, B. H.

    2017-08-01

    Coastal and epipelagic cephalopods are among the fastest growing invertebrates, with life cycles of typically 1 year or less. Evidence is accumulating that deep-sea taxa often live longer and grow slower than their shallow water relatives. We test the hypothesis that deep-sea squid show increased longevity and reduced growth rates compared to coastal and epipelagic species, by validation experiments and quantification of statolith increments of three deep-sea squids from the Monterey Submarine Canyon. The periodicity of statolith increment formation in coastal species is daily, but is unknown for deep-sea squid. Between 2010 and 2013, specimens of Chiroteuthis calyx, Galiteuthis phyllura and Octopoteuthis deletron were captured by remotely operated vehicles and trawl nets off California. ROV-captured living squid were immersed in tetracycline and kept alive in the lab for between 3 and 14 days. Correlating the number of elapsed days with the number of newly deposited statolith increments, and statolith growth after the fluorescent tetracycline mark, provided evidence of regular and daily increment deposition, in C. calyx and O. deletron. This relationship was less strong in G. phyllura and the one-increment-per-day hypothesis was not accepted for this species. Reconstructing growth rates based on statolith counts and wet weights from animals of a wide size range suggest that O. deletron is a slower growing squid (0.59% BW/day) than C. calyx (1.3% BW/day) and G. phyllura (1.2% BW/day). Octopoteuthis deletron matures at around two years, the oldest C. calyx was a mature male of 1.5 years and the eldest G. phyllura was 10 months and still immature. Maximum reported sizes for G. phyllura and C. calyx exceed those of our examined specimens, and therefore their longevity likely exceeds 2 years, in particular if the females brood their eggs. Our study supports the hypothesis that deeper living squid exhibit reduced growth rates and an increased longevity compared to

  2. SQUIDs in biomagnetism: a roadmap towards improved healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Rainer; Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Seton, Hugh; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Paetau, Ritva; Parkkonen, Lauri; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Riaz, Bushra; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Dong, Hui; Hwang, Seong-min; You, Lixing; Inglis, Ben; Clarke, John; Espy, Michelle A.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Magnelind, Per E.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Volegov, Petr L.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Höfner, Nora; Burghoff, Martin; Enpuku, Keiji; Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, Jen-Jei; Knuutila, Jukka; Laine, Petteri; Nenonen, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Globally, the demand for improved health care delivery while managing escalating costs is a major challenge. Measuring the biomagnetic fields that emanate from the human brain already impacts the treatment of epilepsy, brain tumours and other brain disorders. This roadmap explores how superconducting technologies are poised to impact health care. Biomagnetism is the study of magnetic fields of biological origin. Biomagnetic fields are typically very weak, often in the femtotesla range, making their measurement challenging. The earliest in vivo human measurements were made with room-temperature coils. In 1963, Baule and McFee (1963 Am. Heart J. 55 95-6) reported the magnetic field produced by electric currents in the heart (‘magnetocardiography’), and in 1968, Cohen (1968 Science 161 784-6) described the magnetic field generated by alpha-rhythm currents in the brain (‘magnetoencephalography’). Subsequently, in 1970, Cohen et al (1970 Appl. Phys. Lett. 16 278-80) reported the recording of a magnetocardiogram using a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). Just two years later, in 1972, Cohen (1972 Science 175 664-6) described the use of a SQUID in magnetoencephalography. These last two papers set the scene for applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, the subject of this roadmap. The SQUID is a combination of two fundamental properties of superconductors. The first is flux quantization—the fact that the magnetic flux Φ in a closed superconducting loop is quantized in units of the magnetic flux quantum, Φ0 ≡ h/2e, ≈ 2.07 × 10-15 Tm2 (Deaver and Fairbank 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 43-6, Doll R and Näbauer M 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 51-2). Here, h is the Planck constant and e the elementary charge. The second property is the Josephson effect, predicted in 1962 by Josephson (1962 Phys. Lett. 1 251-3) and observed by Anderson and Rowell (1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 230-2) in 1963. The Josephson junction consists of two weakly coupled superconductors

  3. Magnetic evaluation of a solar panel using HTS-SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiwa, Toshihiko; Fukudome, Yohei; Miyazaki, Shingo; Saari, Mohd Mawardi; Sakai, Kenji; Tsukada, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The magnetic evaluation system of a solar panel using HTS-SQUID has been developed. •The electric circuits made by the discrete devices on the circuit board were visualized. •The electric properties of the commercial solar panels were demonstrated. -- Abstract: The magnetic evaluation system of a solar panel using HTS-SQUID has been proposed and developed. A normal pick-up coil was applied to detect the tangential magnetic field to the panel surface. Since the detected field could be related to the currents of the solar panels, the electric properties of the solar panels could be evaluated. In this work, the evaluation of the electric properties of the commercial solar panels as well as the electric circuits made by the discrete devices on the circuit board was visualized

  4. Size increment of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas mature females in Peruvian waters, 1989-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Juan; Tafur, Ricardo; Taipe, Anatolio; Villegas, Piero; Keyl, Friedeman; Dominguez, Noel; Salazar, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Changes in population structure of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas in Peruvian waters were studied based on size-at-maturity from 1989 to 2004. From 1989 to 1999, mature squid belonging to the medium-sized group prevailed, but from 2001 on, mature squids were larger. This change is not related to the changes in sea surface temperature and we hypothesized that it was caused by the population increase of mesopelagic fishes as prey.

  5. Symplectin evolved from multiple duplications in bioluminescent squid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Warren R.; Christianson, Lynne M.; Haddock, Steven H.D.

    2017-01-01

    only as sequence isolates with few identifiable homologs. As the distribution of the symplectin/pantetheinase protein family in Metazoa remains mostly unexplored, we have sequenced the transcriptomes of four additional luminous squid, and make use of publicly available but unanalyzed data of other...... functions including hydrolase activity, and that the evolution of the luminous phenotype required other changes in the protein outside of the main binding pocket....

  6. Modelling in vivo action potential propagation along a giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stuart; Foster, Jamie M; Richardson, Giles

    2015-01-01

    A partial differential equation model for the three-dimensional current flow in an excitable, unmyelinated axon is considered. Where the axon radius is significantly below a critical value R(crit) (that depends upon intra- and extra-cellular conductivity and ion channel conductance) the resistance of the intracellular space is significantly higher than that of the extracellular space, such that the potential outside the axon is uniformly small whilst the intracellular potential is approximated by the transmembrane potential. In turn, since the current flow is predominantly axial, it can be shown that the transmembrane potential is approximated by a solution to the one-dimensional cable equation. It is noted that the radius of the squid giant axon, investigated by (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e), lies close to R(crit). This motivates us to apply the three-dimensional model to the squid giant axon and compare the results thus found to those obtained using the cable equation. In the context of the in vitro experiments conducted in (Hodgkin and Huxley 1952e) we find only a small difference between the wave profiles determined using these two different approaches and little difference between the speeds of action potential propagation predicted. This suggests that the cable equation approximation is accurate in this scenario. However when applied to the it in vivo setting, in which the conductivity of the surrounding tissue is considerably lower than that of the axoplasm, there are marked differences in both wave profile and speed of action potential propagation calculated using the two approaches. In particular, the cable equation significantly over predicts the increase in the velocity of propagation as axon radius increases. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary costs associated with increasing the speed of action potential propagation by increasing axon radius.

  7. Silvics of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillip Weatherspoon

    1986-01-01

    Ecological relationships-including habitat and life history---of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) in natural stands are summarized. Such silvical information provides an important foundation for sound management of the species.

  8. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  9. Giant Earlobe Epidermoid Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Scilletta, Alessandra; Cabrera-Sánchez, Emilio; Rioja, Luis F; Perrotta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts represent the most common cutaneous cysts. They are usually small and benign; however, sometimes they can grow to giant epidermoid cists, and occasionally malignancies develop. Giant epidermoid cysts at the earlobe have never been described but in other locations. We describe a case of a giant epidermoid cyst at the earlobe, a location where such a large cyst has never been reported before. The mass was completely resected and the wound of the pedunculated base was sutured with four stitches of nylon 5/0. Histopathology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. Six months after the resection, the patient did not have any relapse of the epidermoid cyst. The earlobe is a potential location for giant epidermoid cysts. Although the clinical diagnosis could be enough, due to the possibility of malignancy and to ensure appropriate diagnosis, we consider that all cysts should be sent to the anatomic pathology laboratory for histological evaluation. PMID:22557855

  10. Giant earlobe epidermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Pérez-Guisado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts represent the most common cutaneous cysts. They are usually small and benign; however, sometimes they can grow to giant epidermoid cists, and occasionally malignancies develop. Giant epidermoid cysts at the earlobe have never been described but in other locations. We describe a case of a giant epidermoid cyst at the earlobe, a location where such a large cyst has never been reported before. The mass was completely resected and the wound of the pedunculated base was sutured with four stitches of nylon 5/0. Histopathology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. Six months after the resection, the patient did not have any relapse of the epidermoid cyst. The earlobe is a potential location for giant epidermoid cysts. Although the clinical diagnosis could be enough, due to the possibility of malignancy and to ensure appropriate diagnosis, we consider that all cysts should be sent to the anatomic pathology laboratory for histological evaluation.

  11. Giant distal humeral geode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, M.M.; Kennedy, J.; Hynes, D.; Murray, J.G.; O'Connell, D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.)

  12. Trophic niche of squids: Insights from isotopic data in marine systems worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Joan; Coll, Marta; Somes, Christoper J.; Olson, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    Cephalopods are an important prey resource for fishes, seabirds, and marine mammals, and are also voracious predators on crustaceans, fishes, squid and zooplankton. Because of their high feeding rates and abundance, squids have the potential to exert control on the recruitment of commercially important fishes. In this review, we synthesize the available information for two intrinsic markers (δ15N and δ13C isotopic values) in squids for all oceans and several types of ecosystems to obtain a global view of the trophic niches of squids in marine ecosystems. In particular, we aimed to examine whether the trophic positions and trophic widths of squid species vary among oceans and ecosystem types. To correctly compare across systems, we adjusted squid δ15N values for the isotopic variability of phytoplankton at the base of the food web provided by an ocean circulation-biogeochemistry-isotope model. Studies that focused on the trophic ecology of squids using isotopic techniques were few, and most of the information on squids was from studies on their predators. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic positions and exploit a large range of trophic resources, reflecting the versatility of their feeding behavior and confirming conclusions from food-web models. Clear differences in both trophic position and trophic width were found among oceans and ecosystem types. The study also reinforces the importance of considering the natural variation in isotopic values when comparing the isotopic values of consumers inhabiting different ecosystems.

  13. Effects of dietary defatted squid on cholesterol metabolism and hepatic lipogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Ikeda, I; Yoshida, H; Imaizumi, K

    2001-05-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a cholesterol-free (Exp. 1) or cholesterol-supplemented (Exp. 2) diet containing 20% casein (control group) or 15% defatted squid and 5% casein (defatted squid group), as protein, for 14 d. Serum and hepatic cholesterol concentrations were lower in rats fed defatted squid than in those fed casein in both cholesterol-free (-20%, P enzymes, malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, in the liver were lower in the defatted squid than in the control groups in both cholesterol-free (-21%, Plipogenesis.

  14. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. SQUID sensor application for small metallic particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor. Since the performance of the SQUID is improved and stabilized, now it is ready for application. One strong candidate for application is a detection system of magnetic foreign matters in industrial products or beverages. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products such as lithium ion batteries. If this happens, the manufacturer of the product suffers a great loss recalling products. The outer dimension of metallic particles less than 100 μm cannot be detected by an X-ray imaging, which is commonly used for the inspection. Ionization of the material is also a big issue for beverages in the case of the X-ray imaging. Therefore a highly sensitive and safety detection system for small foreign matters is required. We developed detection systems based on high-Tc SQUID with a high-performance magnetic shield. We could successfully measure small iron particles of 100 μm on a belt conveyer and stainless steel balls of 300 μm in water. These detection levels were hard to be achieved by a conventional X-ray detection or other methods

  16. Magnetic properties of the SiO2(Co)/GaAs interface: Polarized neutron reflectometry and SQUID magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukleev, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Dyadkina, E. A.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Lott, D.; Lutsev, L. V.; Stognij, A. I.; Novitskiy, N. N.; Mistonov, A. A.; Menzel, D.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of giant injection magnetoresistance (GIMR) was recently observed in a granular SiO2/(54-75 at. % Co) film on a semiconductor GaAs substrate in a temperature range near T=300 K. The magnetoresistance coefficient reaches a value of 105% in a magnetic field of 1.9 T and at a voltage of 90 V. A structural model of the film was proposed based on the results of the grazing-incidence small-angle scattering (GISAXS) and x-ray reflectivity, which showed a specific interface layer 70-75 Å thick separating bulk SiO2(Co) granular film from the semiconductor substrate. This layer is formed by a monolayer of flattened Co particles which are laterally spaced apart much further than the particles in the bulk film. In the present work, using polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR), we study both the structural and magnetic properties of SiO2(Co) film separately in the bulk and in the interface layer, which is possible due to the depth resolution of the method. Temperature-dependent PNR and magnetization measurements performed by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) revealed the occurrence of two types of magnetic nanoparticles with different blocking temperatures and magnetization. The magnetization hysteresis curve demonstrated specific two-loop structure in fields 0.5-2 T. Thus our self-consistent results of PNR, GISAXS, and SQUID measurements emphasize the role of the interface features in the SiO2(Co)/GaAs heterostructures and show a direction for further development of the GIMR theory.

  17. Squid traps are a small type of fishing gear, but they represent one ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Cephalopod Biodiversity, Ecology and Evolution. Payne, A. I. L., Lipinski, M. R., Clarke, M. R. and M. A. C. Roeleveld (Eds). S. Afr. J. mar. Sci. 20: 285–291. 1998. 285. TRAP FISHERIES FOR SQUID AND THEIR IMPACT ON SPAWNING. C. CHOTIYAPUTTA* and A. YAMRUNGREUNG*. The squid trap is an artisanal type of ...

  18. The stability of dc and rf SQUIDs in static ambient fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glyantsev, V.N.; Tavrin, Y.; Zander, W.; Schubert, J.; Siegel, M. [Institut fuer Schicht und Ionentechnik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    For real applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, geomagnetism and NDE, SQUID devices are required which are stable in a magnetically unshielded environment. We have developed dc and rf SQUID devices with different layouts and widths of Josephson junctions, and have studied their operation in static magnetic fields and unshielded space. Additionally, the noise performance of these SQUID devices has been studied to determine whether there is an influence of the layout or the junction width on noise. Using a 0.3 {mu}m wide step-edge junction the transfer function of a washer-type SQUID was not depressed by external magnetic fields up to 3 G. The same stability was obtained using a direct-coupled layout for rf and dc SQUIDs with junctions of 1 {mu}m width. The best field sensitivity we obtained using a pick-up loop of 8 mm in diameter which was coupled directly to a dc SQUID having an inductance of 150 pH. In magnetic shielding, the field resolution of a SQUID with a single junction resistance of 10{omega} was 20 fT Hz{sup -1/2} at 77K and 1 kHz. (author)

  19. Noise properties of dc-SQUID with quasiplanar YBa2Cu3O7 Josephson junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faley, M.I.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Hemmes, Herman K.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Aarnink, W.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst

    1995-01-01

    We describe the noise performance of dc SQUIDs fabricated with quasiplanar ramp‐type Josephson junctions on the basis of c‐axis‐oriented YBa2Cu3O7/PrBa2Cu3O7 thin‐film heterostructures. The noise spectrum of the dc SQUIDs was measured with dc‐ and ac‐bias schemes at different temperatures and showed

  20. Low-frequency flux noise in YBCO dc SQUIDs cooled in static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, M.P.; Bindslev Hansen, J.; Petersen, P.R.E.; Holst, T.; Shen, Y.Q.

    1999-01-01

    The low-frequency flux noise in bicrystal and step-edge YBa 2 Cu 3 O x dc SQUIDs has been investigated. The width, w, of the superconducting strips forming the SQUID frame was varied from 4 to 42 μm. The SQUIDs were cooled in static magnetic fields up to 150 μT. Two types of low-frequency noise dominated, namely 1/f-like noise and random telegraph noise giving a Lorentzian frequency spectrum. The 1/f noise performance of the w = 4, 6 and 7 μm SQUIDs was almost identical, while the SQUIDs with w = 22 and 42 μm showed an order of magnitude higher noise level. Our analysis of the data suggests an exponential increase of the 1/f noise versus the cooling field, exhibiting a characteristic magnetic field around 40 μT. (author)

  1. Multiplexing of Hot-Electron Nanobolometers Using Microwave SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Day, Peter K.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    2009-12-01

    We have obtained the first data on the multiplexed operation of titanium hot-electron bolometers (HEB). Because of their low thermal conductance and small electron heat capacity nanobolometers are particularly interesting as sensors for far-infrared spectroscopy and mid- and near-IR calorimetry. However, the short time constant of these devices (˜μs at 300-400 mK) makes time domain or audio-frequency domain multiplexing impractical. The Microwave SQUID (MSQUID) approach pursued in this work uses dc SQUIDs coupled to X-band microresonators which are, in turn, coupled to a transmission line. We used a 4-element array of Ti HEBs operated at 415 mK in a He3 dewar with an optical fiber access. The microwave signal exhibited 10-MHz wide resonances at individual MSQUD frequencies between 9 GHz and 10 GHz. The resonance depth is modulated by the current through the bolometer via a change of the SQUID flux state. The transmitted signal was amplified by a cryogenic amplifier and downconverted to baseband using an IQ mixer. A 1-dB per Ω0/2 responsivity was sufficient for keeping the system noise at the level of ˜2 pA/Hz1/2. This is more than an order of magnitude smaller than phonon noise in the HEB. The devices were able to detect single near-IR photons (1550 nm) with a time constant of 3.5 μs. Follow-on work will scale the array to larger size and will address the microwave frequency signal generation and processing using a digital transceiver.

  2. Congenital giant melanocytic nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Khan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nevi are common skin tumors caused by abnormal overgrowth of cells from the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin. Most nevi are benign, but some pre-cancerous nevi must be monitored or removed. The giant congenital nevus is greater than 10 cm in size, pigmented and often hairy. Between 4% and 6% of these lesions will develop into a malignant melanoma. Since approximately 50% of the melanoma develop by the age of two, and 80% by the age of seven, early removal is recommended. The objective of this paper is to present a unique case of giant nevi and their surgical management.

  3. Thermal activation and macroscopic quantum tunneling in a DC SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, F.; Gavilano, J.L.; VanHarlingen, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report measurements of the transition rate from metastable minima in the two-dimensional 1 of a dc SQUID as a function of applied flux temperature. The authors observe a crossover from energy-activated escape to macroscopic quantum tunneling at a critical temperature. The macroscopic quantum tunneling rate is substantially reduced by damping, and also broadens the crossover region. Most interestingly, the authors observe thermal rates that are suppressed from those predicted by the two-dimensional thermal activation model. The authors discuss possible explanations for this based on the interaction of the macroscopic degree of freedom in the device and energy level effects

  4. 3D Inversion of SQUID Magnetic Tensor Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu; Wilson, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Developments in SQUID-based technology have enabled direct measurement of magnetic tensor data for geophysical exploration. For quantitative interpretation, we introduce 3D regularized inversion for magnetic tensor data. For mineral exploration-scale targets, our model studies show that magnetic...... tensor data have significantly improved resolution compared to magnetic vector data for the same model. We present a case study for the 3D regularized inversion of magnetic tensor data acquired over a magnetite skarn at Tallawang, Australia. The results obtained from our 3D regularized inversion agree...

  5. Issues relating to airborne applications of HTS SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, C P; Leslie, K E; Binks, R A; Lam, S H K; Du, J; Tilbrook, D L; Mitchell, E E; Macfarlane, J C; Lee, J B; Turner, R; Downey, M; Maddever, A

    2002-01-01

    Airborne application of HTS SQUIDs is the most difficult environment for their successful deployment. In order to operate with the sensitivity required for a particular application, there are many issues to be addressed such as the need for very wide dynamic range electronics, motion noise elimination, immunity to large changing magnetic fields and cultural noise sources. This paper reviews what is necessary to achieve an airborne system giving examples in geophysical mineral exploration. It will consider issues relating to device design and fabrication, electronics, dewar design, suspension system requirements and noise elimination methods

  6. Waking the Sleeping Giant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollenburger, Mary H.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crane, Todd A.; Sanogo, Ousmane M.; Giller, Ken E.

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank argued that West Africa's Guinea Savannah zone forms part of “Africa's Sleeping Giant,” where increases in agricultural production could be an engine of economic growth, through expansion of cultivated land in sparsely populated areas. The district of Bougouni, in southern Mali,

  7. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  8. from the Giant Panda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... RPS28 is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS28 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS28 were cloned successfully from the Giant. Panda using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. Both sequences were ...

  9. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  10. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    But the main limitation of the composite materials is its use in nanodevices. Therefore, few efforts have been ... an enormously high permittivity value of a sufficiently minute metal particle having discrete energy levels ... the present article is to assemble works on nanodielectrics with giant permittivity value, which have been ...

  11. Giant vesical calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesical calculus. A case report. H. H. LAUBSCHER. Summary. An exceptional case of bladder stone is presented. The case is unusual as regards the size of the stone and the fact that the patient did··not seek medical assistance much earlier, as this was readily avail- able. Furthermore, recovery after removal of the.

  12. Graphenes–Aromatic Giants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphenes - Aromatic Giants. Ivan Gutman Boris Furtula. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1238-1245. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1238-1245. Keywords. Graphenes; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; polyphenyls; condensed benzenes.

  13. Giant peritoneal loose bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-27

    Mar 27, 2015 ... Giant peritoneal loose bodies are rare lesions, originating from auto-amputated appendices epiploicae. They may cause urinary or gastrointestinal obstruction and, should the radiologist not be familiar with the entity, can potentially be confused with malignant or parasitic lesions. Familiarity with their ...

  14. Giant resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, O.

    1980-01-01

    The giant resonances: electric dipolar E1, T=1, isoscalar electric quadrupolar E2, T=0 and isoscalar electric monopolar E0, T=0 are presented. The experimental facts are reviewed and some examples are given of the kind of information supplied by experimental data [fr

  15. Superconductive combinational logic circuit using magnetically coupled SQUID array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Y.; Umeda, K.; Sai, K.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we propose the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits. One of the difficulties in designing superconductive single-flux-quantum (SFQ) digital circuits can be attributed to the fundamental nature of the SFQ circuits, in which all logic gates have latching functions and are based on sequential logic. The design of ultralow-power superconductive digital circuits can be facilitated by the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits in which the output is a function of only the present input. This is because superconductive combinational logic circuits do not require determination of the timing adjustment and clocking scheme. Moreover, semiconductor design tools can be used to design digital circuits because CMOS logic gates are based on combinational logic. The proposed superconductive combinational logic circuits comprise a magnetically coupled SQUID array. By adjusting the circuit parameters and coupling strengths between neighboring SQUIDs, fundamental combinational logic gates, including the AND, OR, and NOT gates, can be built. We have verified the accuracy of the operations of the fundamental logic gates by analog circuit simulations.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Melanin from Cuttlefish and Squid Ink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuspihana Fitrial

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine environment comprises of many organism which are known to posses bioactive compound as a common means of self-defense or for the protection of eggs and embryos. Class Cephalopods (such as squidand cuttlefish are notable for their defences, such as jetting escape movements, changes in colouration, toxic venom and inking.This study aims to compare the antibacterial activity of melanin from cuttlefish ink (Sepia sp. with squid ink (Loligo sp. against E. coli. Extraction and purification studies were carried out on Sepia and Loligo melanin using a hydrochloric acid 0,5M treatment under mechanical.The melanins were obtained and further evaluated their activity by direct contact methods between melanin and E. coli in nutrient broth.Total microbes was counted by total plate count.Both inks also was tested their activity against E. coli. The results showed that melanin from cuttlefish and squid inks had inhibitory activity at concentrations of 10 mg / ml and 20 mg / mL, respectively reaching 99.99% against E. coli.The inks of both Cephalopods at the same concentration as melanin, did not show any inhibitory activity against E. coli.  The melanin of Sepia sp. have a higher antibacterial activity than the melanin of Loligo sp.

  17. Symplectin evolved from multiple duplications in bioluminescent squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren R. Francis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The squid Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis, formerly Symplectoteuthis oualaniensis, generates light using the luciferin coelenterazine and a unique enzyme, symplectin. Genetic information is limited for bioluminescent cephalopod species, so many proteins, including symplectin, occur in public databases only as sequence isolates with few identifiable homologs. As the distribution of the symplectin/pantetheinase protein family in Metazoa remains mostly unexplored, we have sequenced the transcriptomes of four additional luminous squid, and make use of publicly available but unanalyzed data of other cephalopods, to examine the occurrence and evolution of this protein family. While the majority of spiralians have one or two copies of this protein family, four well-supported groups of proteins are found in cephalopods, one of which corresponds to symplectin. A cysteine that is critical for symplectin functioning is conserved across essentially all members of the protein family, even those unlikely to be used for bioluminescence. Conversely, active site residues involved in pantetheinase catalysis are also conserved across essentially all of these proteins, suggesting that symplectin may have multiple functions including hydrolase activity, and that the evolution of the luminous phenotype required other changes in the protein outside of the main binding pocket.

  18. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, Stefania; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population.

  19. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penna, Stefania Della; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population. (paper)

  20. Development of an image processing system in splendid squid quality classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunee, Niyada; Chaiprapat, Supapan; Waiyagan, Kriangkrai

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural products typically exhibit high variance in quality characteristics. To assure customer satisfaction and control manufacturing productivity, quality classification is necessary to screen off defective items and to grade the products. This article presents an application of image processing techniques on squid grading and defect discrimination. A preliminary study indicated that surface color was an efficient determinant to justify quality of splendid squids. In this study, a computer vision system (CVS) was developed to examine the characteristics of splendid squids. Using image processing techniques, squids could be classified into three different quality grades as in accordance with an industry standard. The developed system first sifted through squid images to reject ones with black marks. Qualified squids were graded on a proportion of white, pink, and red regions appearing on their bodies by using fuzzy logic. The system was evaluated on 100 images of squids at different quality levels. It was found that accuracy obtained by the proposed technique was 95% compared with sensory evaluation of an expert.

  1. Characteristics of an HTS-SQUID gradiometer with ramp-edge Josephson junctions and its application on robot-based 3D-mobile compact SQUID NDE system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukade, Y., E-mail: hatukade@ens.tut.ac.jp [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Hayashi, K.; Shinyama, Y.; Kobayashi, Y. [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Adachi, S.; Tanabe, K. [International Superconductivity Technology Center/Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 10-13, Shinonome 1-chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Tanaka, S. [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    We investigated behavior of HTS-dc-SQUID gradiometers with ramp-edge Josephson junctions (JJs) in ac and dc magnetic fields. In the both fields, the gradiometers show higher durability against entry of flux vortices than SQUIDs with bicrystal JJs. A robot-based SQUID NDE system utilizing the gradiometer was developed in an unshielded environment. Detectability of the system to detect non-through cracks in double-layer structures was demonstrated. A new excitation coil was applied to detect cracks that oriented vertical and parallel to the baseline of the gradiometer. In this paper, we investigated detailed behavior of novel HTS-dc-SQUID gradiometers with ramp-edge Josephson junctions (JJs) in both an ac magnetic field and a dc magnetic field. In the both fields, the novel gradiometers shows the superior performance to the conventional YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) HTS-dc-SQUID gradiometer and a bare HTS-dc-SQUID ring with bicrystal JJs concerning durability against entry and hopping of flux vortices, probably due to their differential pickup coils without a grain boundary and multilayer structure of the ramp-edge JJs. A robot-based compact HTS-SQUID NDE system utilizing the novel gradiometer was reviewed, and detectability of the system to detect non-through cracks in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP)/Al double-layer structure was demonstrated. A new excitation coil in which the supplied currents flowed in the orthogonal directions was applied to detect cracks that oriented vertical and parallel to the baseline of the gradiometer.

  2. Analisis Perbandingan Respons Time Squid Proxy Pada Windows Server dan Linux Server

    OpenAIRE

    Sirait, Parulian

    2016-01-01

    In the development of information technology, information is obtained quickly through technology computer network known as the Internet. The use bandwidth for Internet access can be maximized by using a proxy server. One of the proxy server is squid. The use squid as the proxy server need to consider the operating system on the server and have not known its best performance on any operating system yet. For that it is necessary to analyze the performance of squid proxy server on a different op...

  3. In vitro antioxidant, antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities of collagen hydrolysates of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Miroslava Suárez-Jiménez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHydrolysates from two different jumbo squid byproducts (fins and arms, produced by trypsin and protease type XIV were compared on the basis of their antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays, antimutagenic (Ames test and antiproliferative (Transformation cell proliferation in M12.C3F6 murine cells activities. Jumbo squid arms had higher content of collagen than fins, and their hydrolysates had the highest antioxidant activity. Also, jumbo squid arm-derived collagen hydrolyzed with protease XIV showed the highest antimutagenic activity. The four hydrolysates obtained showed low antiproliferative activity, however they are susceptible for further studies to be applied as food additives.

  4. Magnetic imaging of unconventional superconductors by scanning SQUID microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykel, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the development of a scanning SQUID/AFM microscope and measurements performed on different samples. The microscope can take topographic and magnetic images simultaneously. The magnetic resolution is of the order of 10 -4 Φ 0 √Hz and the spatial resolution of the SQUIDs used in this thesis goes up to 600 nm. The scanning range is 70 μm * 85 μm. The temperature range accessible is between 200 mK and 10 K at the time of writing. Measurements on a thin rhenium film (80 nm) give an estimate of the minimal pinning force of a vortex of about 3.9 * 10 -16 N. Furthermore, the penetration depth λ on this sample was determined as a function of temperature. For T → 0, λ →79 nm. We have for the first time shown local measurements of the domain structure of the superconducting ferromagnet UCoGe and determined the average domain size in the virgin state (10 μm). By magnetic imaging we were capable of determining the magnetic field difference above opposite domains along the c-axis to be 45 G and 16 G along the b-axis. Due to these magnetic field measurements we were able to give an upper limit for the domain wall width (∼ 1μm) and domain reconstruction depth (100 nm). This is supported by simple calculations leading to a domain wall width of several angstroms. Thus UCoGe can be considered an ideal Ising ferromagnet. Different possible domain structures for an Ising ferromagnet have been discussed. The complicated domain structure found in the zero field cooled virgin state corresponds to up domains embedded in larger down domains and vice versa. We have shown evidence for coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The weak Meissner effect can be explained by a spontaneous vortex state, put forward by other groups. Numerical simulations suggest that the strong magnetic background signal and the limited spatial and magnetic resolution of the used SQUID made it difficult to resolve the expected spontaneous vortex state. The relaxation of the

  5. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  6. Intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum is reported in a 50- year- old Indian. He did not respond to topical application of podophyllin 20% but responded partially to electric cauterisation. Surgical excision was done to get rid of the warty growh completely. Since there were no skin or genital lesions and no history of marital or extramarital sexual contact the lesion was probably acquired from environmental sources. Nonsexual transmission should be considered especially when the lesions are extragenital.

  7. Giant prolactinomas in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgrange, Etienne; Raverot, Gerald; Bex, Marie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg/l and id......OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg....../l and identified 19 similar cases from the literature; a gender-based comparison of the frequency and age distribution was obtained from a literature review. RESULTS: The initial PubMed search using the term 'giant prolactinomas' identified 125 patients (13 women) responding to the inclusion criteria. The female......:male ratio was 1:9. Another six female patients were found by extending the literature search, while our own series added 15 patients. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years in women compared with 35 years in men (Pwomen (n=34), we...

  8. NMR and MRI obtained with high transition temperature dc SQUIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza R.E. de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have measured nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR signals from several samples at room temperature in magnetic fields ranging from about 0.05 mT to 2 mT using a spectrometer based on a high-Tc dc SQUID (high transition temperature dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. We are able to observe proton signals from 1 mL of mineral oil in 2 mT in a single transient. The sensitivity of this system has also allowed the detection of proton NMR at magnetic fields as low as 0.059 mT, which is comparable to the Earth?s field. Such results make possible a number of new experiments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We present a two-dimensional image of a phantom filled with mineral oil obtained in a field of 2 mT.

  9. Eye patches: Protein assembly of index-gradient squid lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J.; Townsend, J. P.; Dodson, T. C.; Heiney, P. A.; Sweeney, A. M.

    2017-08-10

    A parabolic relationship between lens radius and refractive index allows spherical lenses to avoid spherical aberration. We show that in squid, patchy colloidal physics resulted from an evolutionary radiation of globular S-crystallin proteins. Small-angle x-ray scattering experiments on lens tissue show colloidal gels of S-crystallins at all radial positions. Sparse lens materials form via low-valence linkages between disordered loops protruding from the protein surface. The loops are polydisperse and bind via a set of hydrogen bonds between disordered side chains. Peripheral lens regions with low particle valence form stable, volume-spanning gels at low density, whereas central regions with higher average valence gel at higher densities. The proteins demonstrate an evolved set of linkers for self-assembly of nanoparticles into volumetric materials.

  10. Investigation of niobium structures for micro-SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwals, Sandra [Institut fuer Physik, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Heyroth, Frank [Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, MLU Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Schmidt, Georg [Institut fuer Physik, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, MLU Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of the Spin-Nernst-Effect a temperature gradient generates spin accumulations in a metal film. The magnetic moment of these accumulations causes a magnetic field. We intend to measure these low magnetic fields using Nb-based micro-SQUIDs. Superconducting Niobium layers are deposited by e-beam evaporation and protected by capping layers either from Ru or Si. The Niobium layers are patterned by e-beam lithography. We have fabricated test stripes with different width varying from 1000 nm to 20 nm. We will present structural and electrical characterization of Nb stripes patterned by different etching processes. Most of the structures show Ohmic behavior at room temperature. At low temperature a transition to the superconducting state is observed with a transition temperature depending on layer thickness and structures size.

  11. Dynamic Characteristics of S-band DC SQUID Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopenko, G. V.; Shitov, S. V.; Koshelets, I. L. L. V. P.

    2003-01-01

    A low-noise rf amplifier based on a de SQUID (SQA) has been tested in the frequency range 3.0-4.6 GHz in the open-loop configuration. The following parameters have been measured for the single-stage balanced type SQA at 4.0 GHz: gain (12 +/- 1) dB, 3 dB bandwidth of 500 MHz and noise temperature (1.......0 +/- 0.25) K. For the nonbalanced type SQA at 4.0 GHz gain was (15 +/-1) dB, 3 dB bandwidth 200 MHz and noise temperature (0.5 +/- 0.25) K. The improved performance is obtained due to the increased characteristic voltage (approximate to 420 muV) of the small-area (down to 0.7-0.9 mum(2)) high-quality Nb...

  12. From Gauss graphs to giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; Nkumane, Lwazi

    2018-02-01

    We identify the operators in N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory that correspond to 1/8 -BPS giant gravitons in AdS5 × S 5. Our evidence for the identification comes from (1) counting these operators and showing agreement with independent counts of the number of giant graviton states, and (2) by demonstrating a correspondence between correlation functions of the super Yang-Mills operators and overlaps of the giant graviton wave functions.

  13. Giant oilfields and civil conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hsiang Lei; Guy Michaels

    2012-01-01

    We use new data to examine the effects of giant oilfield discoveries around the world since 1946. On average, these discoveries increase per capita oil production and oil exports by up to 50 percent. But these giant oilfield discoveries also have a dark side: they increase the incidence of internal armed conflict by about 5-8 percentage points. This increased incidence of conflict due to giant oilfield discoveries is especially high for countries that had already experienced armed conflicts o...

  14. Detection of Rapid Atrial Arrhythmias in SQUID Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Woong; Kwon, Hyuk Chan; Kim, Ki Dam; Lee, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Mok; Kim, In Seon; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Park, Yong Ki [Biomagnetism Research, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doo Sang [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seung Pyung [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-15

    We propose a method to measure atrial arrhythmias (AA) such as atrial fibrillation (Afb) and atrial flutter (Afl) with a SQUID magnetocardiograph (MCG) system. To detect AA is one of challenging topics in MCG. As the AA generally have irregular rhythm and atrio-ventricular conduction, the MCG signal cannot be improved by QRS averaging; therefore a SQUID MCG system having a high SNR is required to measure informative atrial excitation with a single scan. In the case of Afb, diminished f waves are much smaller than normal P waves because the sources are usually located on the posterior wall of the heart. In this study, we utilize an MCG system measuring tangential field components, which is known to be more sensitive to a deeper current source. The average noise spectral density of the whole system in a magnetic shielded room was 10 fT/Hz(a) 1 Hz and 5 fT/Hz(a) 100 Hz. We measured the MCG signals of patients with chronic Afb and Afl. Before the AA measurement, the comparison between the measurements in supine and prone positions for P waves has been conducted and the experiment gave a result that the supine position is more suitable to measure the atrial excitation. Therefore, the AA was measured in subject's supine position. Clinical potential of AA measurement in MCG is to find an aspect of a reentry circuit and to localize the abnormal stimulation noninvasively. To give useful information about the abnormal excitation, we have developed a method, separative synthetic aperture magnetometry (sSAM). The basic idea of sSAM is to visualize current source distribution corresponding to the atrial excitation, which are separated from the ventricular excitation and the Gaussian sensor noises. By using sSAM, we localized the source of an Afl successfully.

  15. 78 FR 14230 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... recommended and NMFS implemented on January 16, 2013, (78 FR 3346) a much higher butterfish quota for the 2013... that the cap estimation would include a number of trips that are not truly targeting longfin squid. In...

  16. Analysis of the ac SQUID with low inductance and low critical current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. H.

    1976-01-01

    of the screening current circulating in the SQUID ring as well as of the SQUID-ring time constant, tau-Lr/R9 are taken into account. Here LR IS THE SQUID-ring inductance, and R is the shunt resistance in the shunted junction model assumed to describe the weak link. It is shown that for finite values of omegatau...... constriuctively with the result that the optimal response occurs at a definite and finite value of omegatau. If omegatau is increased beyond this optimal value the weak link behavior is dominated by the Ohmic current channel implying that only if the shunt conductance contains a term depending...... omegatau. It is, however, also shown that it is nontrivial to ext ract its magnitude from experiments based on the behavior of the ac SQUID, and that the recently published observations using this technique must be reinterpreted. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute...

  17. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    amplitude in MRI using laser polarized noble gases such as {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe (10-12). Hyperpolarized gases were used successfully to image the human lung in fields on the order of several mT (13-15). To overcome the sensitivity loss of Faraday detection at low frequencies, ultrasensitive magnetometers based on the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) (16) are used to detect NMR and MRI signals (17-24). Recently, SQUID-based MRI systems capable of acquiring in vivo images have appeared. For example, in the 10-mT system of Seton et al. (18) signals are coupled to a SQUID via a superconducting tuned circuit, while Clarke and coworkers (22, 25, 26) developed a system at 132 {micro}T with an untuned input circuit coupled to a SQUID. In a quite different approach, atomic magnetometers have been used recently to detect the magnetization (27) and NMR signal (28) of hyperpolarized gases. This technique could potentially be used for low-field MRI in the future. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of MRI in microtesla fields detected with SQUIDs. The principles of SQUIDs and NMR are briefly reviewed. We show that very narrow NMR linewidths can be achieved in low magnetic fields that are quite inhomogeneous, with illustrative examples from spectroscopy. After describing our ultralow-field MRI system, we present a variety of images. We demonstrate that in microtesla fields the longitudinal relaxation T{sub 1} is much more material dependent than is the case in high fields; this results in a substantial improvement in 'T{sub 1}-weighted contrast imaging'. After outlining the first attempts to combine microtesla NMR with magnetoencephalography (MEG) (29), we conclude with a discussion of future directions.

  18. The bases for the development of high-temperature integrated SQUID-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    The current state of high-T c superconducting thin-film Josephson junctions and SQUIDs developing is reviewed. The prospects of application of new devices in supersensitive measurement apparatus are analyzed. It is shown that high T c SQUIDs are able seriously to influence further development of information and measurement engineering as on their base the series of microelectronic elements and devices of new generation can be built. 55 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. The bases for the development of high-temperature integrated squid-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    The current state of high-Tc superconducting thinfilm Josepson junctions and SQUIDs developing is reviewed. The prospects of application of new devices in supersensitive measurement apparatus are analyzed. It is shown that high T c SQUIDs are able seriously to influence further development of information and measurement engineering as on their base the series of microelectronic elements and devices of new generation can be built. 84 refs.; 16 figs.; 3 tabs

  20. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  1. Full noise characterization of a low-noise two-stage SQUID amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falferi, P [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38100 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Sezione di Padova, 38100 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vinante, A [INFN, Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: falferi@science.unitn.it

    2009-07-15

    From measurements performed on a low-noise two-stage SQUID amplifier coupled to a high- Q electrical resonator we give a complete noise characterization of the SQUID amplifier around the resonator frequency of 11 kHz in terms of additive, back action and cross-correlation noise spectral densities. The minimum noise temperature evaluated at 135 mK is 10 {mu}K and corresponds to an energy resolution of 18{Dirac_h}.

  2. High-T(sub c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1990-01-01

    In the Laboratory a high-T(sub c) one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  3. Effect of voltage source internal resistance on the SQUID bootstrap circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Yongliang; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Xiaoming; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The voltage-biased SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC) is suitable for achieving simple and low-noise direct readout of dc SQUIDs. In practice, an ideal voltage bias is difficult to realize because of non-zero internal resistance Rin of the bias voltage source. In order to clearly observe the influence of Rin on the SBC parameters (namely the flux-to-current transfer coefficient (∂I/∂Φ)SBC and the dynamic resistance Rd(SBC)) and the noise performance, we introduced an additional adjustable resistor Rad at room temperature to simulate a variable Rin between the SQUID and the preamplifier. We found that the measured SQUID flux noise does not rise, even though Rad increases significantly. This result demonstrates that a highly resistive connection can be inserted between the liquid-helium-cooled SQUID and the room-temperature readout electronics in the SBC scheme, thus reducing the conductive heat loss of the system. This work will be significant for developing multichannel SBC readout systems, e.g. for biomagnetism, and systems using SQUIDs as amplifiers, for example, in TES-array readout.

  4. Single SQUID multiplexer for arrays of voltage-biased superconducting bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Richards, P.L.; Skidmore, J.T.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a frequency domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. In order to avoid the accumulation of Johnson noise in the summing loop, a tuned bandpass filter is inserted in series with each sensor. For a 32-channel multiplexer for Voltage-biased Superconducting Bolometer (VSB) with a time constant(approx)1msec, we estimate that bias frequencies in the range from(approx)500kHz to(approx)600kHz are practical. The major limitation of our multiplexing scheme is in the slew rate of a readout SQUID. We discuss a ''carrier nulling'' technique which could be used to increase the number of sensors in a row or to multiplex faster bolometers by reducing the required slew rate for a readout SQUID

  5. Identification of four squid species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaona; Dai, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Squids are distributed worldwide, including many species of commercial importance, and they are often made into varieties of flavor foods. The rapid identification methods for squid species especially their processed products, however, have not been well developed. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) systems based on specific primers and TaqMan probes have been established for rapid and accurate identification of four common squid species (Ommastrephes bartramii, Dosidicus gigas, Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus) in Chinese domestic market. After analyzing mitochondrial genes reported in GenBank, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene was selected for O. bartramii detection, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for D. gigas and T. Pacificus detection, ATPase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene for I. Argentinus detection, and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA) gene for designing Ommastrephidae-specific primers and probe. As a result, all the TaqMan systems are of good performance, and efficiency of each reaction was calculated by making standard curves. This method could detect target species either in single or mixed squid specimen, and it was applied to identify 12 squid processed products successfully. Thus, it would play an important role in fulfilling labeling regulations and squid fishery control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on two calcium-binding proteins from squid optic lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, A.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations focused on the physicochemical and functional properties of squid calcium-binding protein (SCaBP) and squid calmodulin (SCaM). The physiochemical studies included characterization of Ca 2+ - and Mg 2+ -binding properties, and the effects of metal ion-binding on protein conformation. These studies were performed using various ionic conditions, including those physiological for the squid. Ca 2+ -binding by SCaBP, SCaM, and bovine brain calmodulin (BCaM) (for comparison) was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three proteins bound 4 Ca 2+ per mol protein under each set of ionic conditions. Under conditions physiological for the squid, both the squid proteins bound Ca 2+ over a similar range of free Ca 2+ concentrations. Ca 2+ - and Mg 2+ -induced changes in the conformation of the proteins were studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, fluphenazine-Sepharose affinity chromatography, and ultraviolet absorption difference spectroscopy. The functional studies focused on the identification of squid optic lobe proteins which interacted with SCaBP and SCaM in a Ca 2+ - dependent manner. These proteins were identified by SCaBP- and SCaM-Sepharose affinity chromatography, an immunoblotting technique using a polyclonal anti-SCaBP antibody, and a 125 I-calmodulin overlay procedure

  7. Giant paraganglioma in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma is a rare neuroendocrine catecholamine producing tumour in childhood which arises outside the adrenal medulla. We present a 12 year old girl with giant paraganglioma with severe hypertension and end organ damage. Diagnosis was confirmed with 24 h urinary Vanillymandelic Acid (VMA and CT scan. Preoperative blood pressure was controlled with intravenous nitroprusside, and oral prazosin, amlodepine, labetalol and metoprolol. General anaesthesia with epidural analgesia was given. Intra operative blood pressure rise was managed with infusion of nitriglycerine (NTG, esmolol, nitroprusside and propofol.

  8. GIANT INTRACANALICULAR FIBROADENOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyn; Parsons, Robert J.; Bogart, William M.

    1951-01-01

    Five cases of giant intracanalicular fibroadenoma (“cystosarcoma phylloides”) were observed at one hospital in a period of three years. In a search of the literature, additional reports of breast tumors of this kind, not included in previous reviews, were noted. As there is record of 229 cases, it would appear that this rapidly growing benign tumor should be kept in mind in the diagnosis of masses in the breast. If removal is incomplete, there may be recurrence. Simple mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Radical mastectomy should be avoided. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2.Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:14848732

  9. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  10. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  11. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  12. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications......% versus 44% required unplanned additional surgery, respectively. Complications were noted in 25% and 67% of the patients, respectively. Cosmetic result was satisfying in 76% of patients without difference between the groups. No malignant transformation was found during a mean follow-up of 11 years....... Curettage is a gentle alternative to excision with a lower complication rate and good cosmetic outcome....

  13. A digital flux-locked loop for high temperature SQUID magnetometer and gradiometer systems with field cancellation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Bracht, R.; Flynn, E.R. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The SQUID sensor is typically operated in a null detector mode where an analogue flux-locked-loop, FLL, provides a negative feedback to maintain linear operation. The modulated SQUID signal is amplified, filtered, demodulated, and integrated in the FLL. The resulting analog signal is a measure of the magnetic field and noise at the SQUID and is also fed back to the modulation and feedback (M & F) coil to null the flux at the SQUID to maintain the linear operating point. Thus, the FLL output signal is proportional to the change in magnetic field at the SQUID pickup coil, provided the slew rate and dynamic range of the SQUID and FLL system are not exceeded. The goal of the work is to advance technologies needed for a practical fieldable SQUID biomagnetic sensor. We used HTC SQUIDs to realize the benefits noted above. We also implemented the FLL algorithm on a digital-signal-processor (DSP) to realize a number of benefits including (1) software control of noise filtering and background rejection to enable unshielded use of SQUID sensors, (2) flux quanta countin and resetting SQUID operating point to increase system slew rate and dynamic range, (3) programmable FLL adaptable to numerous specific applications, (4) digital signal output (up to 32-bit precision), and (5) reduced FLL package cost. This paper presents results of external signal rejection for a sensor system using HTC SQUIDs, preamplifier circuit, and DSP FLL designed and built at our laboratory. We also note a companion paper in these proceedings and other references to the use of DSP in SQUID applications.

  14. Removal Process of Heavy Metal Ions from Squid Gut Wastes with Dilute Suluric Acid Leaching and Electrowinning Methods

    OpenAIRE

    嶋影, 和宜; 平井, 伸治; 戸田, 茂雄; 山本, 浩

    2003-01-01

    In order to remove heavy metal ions contained in organic squid gut waste, a novel process has been developed with both dilute suluric acid leaching and electrowinning methods. This process was consisted of three procedures, which are the elimination of greasy component in squid gut wastes, the dissolution of heavy metal ions and the electro-deposition of heavy metal ions. Heavy metal ions contained in organic squid gut wastes are zinc, cadmium and copper ions. Heavy metal ions are leached eas...

  15. Influence of inductance induced noise in an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID at high operation temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P. Å.; Claeson, T.; Hansen, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The voltage modulation depth of a high T(c) dc-SQUID was measured at temperatures close to T(c) and compared to a model by Enpuku et al. where the flux noise from the SQUID inductance is taken into account. The device was an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID made on a bicrystal substrate of SrTiO3. The design w...

  16. Microwave SQUID multiplexer demonstration for cosmic microwave background imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dober, B.; Becker, D. T.; Bennett, D. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gard, J. D.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubmayr, J.; Mates, J. A. B.; Reintsema, C. D.; Vale, L. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Key performance characteristics are demonstrated for the microwave superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer (μmux) coupled to transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers that have been optimized for cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. In a 64-channel demonstration, we show that the μmux produces a white, input referred current noise level of 29 pA/ √{H z } at a microwave probe tone power of -77 dB, which is well below the expected fundamental detector and photon noise sources for a ground-based CMB-optimized bolometer. Operated with negligible photon loading, we measure 98 pA/ √{H z } in the TES-coupled channels biased at 65% of the sensor normal resistance. This noise level is consistent with that predicted from bolometer thermal fluctuation (i.e., phonon) noise. Furthermore, the power spectral density is white over a range of frequencies down to ˜100 mHz, which enables CMB mapping on large angular scales that constrain the physics of inflation. Additionally, we report cross-talk measurements that indicate a level below 0.3%, which is less than the level of cross-talk from multiplexed readout systems in deployed CMB imagers. These measurements demonstrate the μmux as a viable readout technique for future CMB imaging instruments.

  17. SQUID biosusceptometry in the measurement of hepatic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, Sujit [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Harkness Pavilion, Room HP570, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, NY 10032, New York (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Individuals with primary or secondary abnormalities of iron metabolism, such as hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusional iron loading, may develop potentially lethal systemic iron overload. Over time, this excess iron is progressively deposited in the liver, heart, pancreas, and other organs, resulting in cirrhosis, heart disease, diabetes and other disorders. Unless treated, death usually results from cardiac failure. The amount of iron in the liver is the best indicator of the amount of iron in the whole body. At present, the only sure way to measure the amount of iron in the liver is to remove a sample of the liver by biopsy. Iron stored in the liver can be magnetized to a small degree when placed in a magnetic field. The amount of magnetization is measured by our instrument, called a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) susceptometer. In patients with iron overload, our previous studies have shown that magnetic measurements of liver iron in patients with iron overload are quantitatively equivalent to biochemical determinations on tissue obtained by biopsy. The safety, ease, rapidity, and comfort of magnetic measurements make frequent, serial studies technically feasible and practically acceptable to patients. (orig.)

  18. Deep-well ultrafast manipulation of a SQUID flux qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, M G; Chiarello, F; Mattioli, F; Torrioli, G [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dip. Ingegneria Elettrica e dell' Informazione, Universita dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Cosmelli, C, E-mail: mgcastellano@ifn.cnr.i [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Superconducting devices based on the Josephson effect are effectively used for the implementation of qubits and quantum gates. The manipulation of superconducting qubits is generally performed by using microwave pulses with frequencies from 5 to 15 GHz, obtaining a typical operating frequency from 100 MHz to 1 GHz. A manipulation based on simple pulses in the absence of microwaves is also possible. In our system, a magnetic flux pulse modifies the potential of a double SQUID qubit from a symmetric double well to a single deep-well condition. By using this scheme with a Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb system, we obtained coherent oscillations with sub-nanosecond period (tunable from 50 to 200 ps), very fast with respect to other manipulating procedures, and with a coherence time up to 10 ns, of the order of that obtained with similar devices and technologies but using microwave manipulation. We introduce ultrafast manipulation, presenting experimental results, new issues related to this approach (such as the use of a compensation procedure for canceling the effect of 'slow' fluctuations) and open perspectives, such as the possible use of RSFQ logic for qubit control.

  19. A tunable rf SQUID manipulated as flux and phase qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, S; Lisenfeld, J; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chiarello, F; Castellano, M G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, 00156 Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Universita dell' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio (Italy)], E-mail: ustinov@physik.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2009-12-15

    We report on two different manipulation procedures of a tunable rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). First, we operate this system as a flux qubit, where the coherent evolution between the two flux states is induced by a rapid change of the energy potential, turning it from a double well into a single well. The measured coherent Larmor-like oscillation of the retrapping probability in one of the wells has a frequency ranging from 6 to 20 GHz, with a theoretically expected upper limit of 40 GHz. Furthermore, here we also report a manipulation of the same device as a phase qubit. In the phase regime, the manipulation of the energy states is realized by applying a resonant microwave drive. In spite of the conceptual difference between these two manipulation procedures, the measured decay times of Larmor oscillation and microwave-driven Rabi oscillation are rather similar. Due to the higher frequency of the Larmor oscillations, the microwave-free qubit manipulation allows for much faster coherent operations.

  20. Squid Pen Chitin Chitooligomers as Food Colorants Absorbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Wen Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising applications of chitosanase is the conversion of chitinous biowaste into bioactive chitooligomers (COS. TKU033 chitosanase was induced from squid pen powder (SPP-containing Bacillus cereus TKU033 medium and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography. The enzyme was relatively more thermostable in the presence of the substrate and had an activity of 93% at 50 °C in a pH 5 buffer solution for 60 min. Furthermore, the enzyme used for the COS preparation was also studied. The enzyme products revealed various mixtures of COS that with different degrees of polymerization (DP, ranging from three to nine. In the culture medium, the fermented SPP was recovered, and it displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 96% for the disperse dyes than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40 and Tartrazne (Y4. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR analysis proved that the adsorption of the dyes onto fermented SPP was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that fermented SPP was a favorable adsorber and could be employed as low-cost alternative for dye removal in wastewater treatment.

  1. Opportunistic acoustic recordings of (potential) orangeback flying squid Sthenoteuthis pteropus in the Central Eastern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Marian; Villanueva, Roger; Escánez, Alejandro; Ariza, Alejandro

    2018-03-01

    Squids are fast swimmers that are difficult to catch by nets and to record with echosounders in the open ocean. A rare detection of orangeback flying squid Sthenoteuthis pteropus in the Central Eastern Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Senegal was accomplished during the MAFIA oceanographic survey carried out between Brazil and the Canary Islands in April 2015. Although net sampling did not yield any subadult or adult individuals, dozens were visually detected from the vessel jumping out of the water at night and displaying their characteristic dorsal photophore patch. A few squids were caught with fishing lines and identified at the species level. The acoustic echograms revealed distinctive previously unobserved acoustic echotraces that seemed to be caused by those squids, which were the only new species detected at that station (over a bottom depth ranging from 4010 to 5215 m, between 10° 45‧ N 22° 41‧ W and 10° 53‧ N 22° 40‧ W). The acoustic response and swimming behaviour shown by those echotraces reinforced this hypothesis. The (potentially) squid recordings dove rapidly (0.19 m/s to 0.48 m/s) from around 10 m below the mesopelagic fish layer, which had migrated to the subsurface at night (35 m depth), to depths of 70-95 m, and swam upward, apparently attacking fish from below. The morning squid migration to deeper waters (250-300 m) was also recorded acoustically. Downward movements of squid swimming at speeds of 0.22 m/s were calculated from the echogram, while the mesopelagic migrating fish swam at 0.27 m/s reaching 250 m depth. Sv120 - Sv38 averaged 2.7 ± 3.2 dB for the squid echotraces while the mesopelagic layer showed values of -8.8 ± 0.9 dB. These ranges agreed with values in the literature and from theoretical models. This study provides more insight into the migrating behaviour of oceanic squids, a species group that is poorly represented in the acoustic literature due to challenges in studying them.

  2. Recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. King

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast masses in children, though rare, present a difficult clinical challenge as they can represent a wide variety of entities from benign fibroadenomas to phyllodes tumors. Rapidly growing or recurrent masses can be particularly concerning to patients, families and physicians alike. Clinical examination and conventional imaging modalities are not efficacious in distinguishing between different tumor types and surgical excision is often recommended for both final diagnosis and for treatment of large or rapidly growing masses. While surgical excision can result in significant long-term deformity of the breast there are some surgical techniques that can be used to limit deformity and/or aid in future reconstruction. Here we present a case of recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma with a review of the clinical presentation, diagnostic tools and treatment options.

  3. A giant testicular teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangana, Abdulqadir M.; Razak, Awodan B.

    2007-01-01

    We report a giant testicular in a 36-year-old farmer man, of 18-month duration admitted to the Surgical Department Erbil Teaching Hospital, Iraq. The tumor was invading the penis and lower part of abdominal wall including bilateral groin lymph nodes. Histological examination revealed mature and immature teratoma. Further investigations showed no evidence of any metastatic lesions apart from a solitary pulmonary nodule on the right side of the chest which proved by ultra sonic guide fine needle aspiration biopsy. Radical excisions of the tumor including the shaft of the penis, combined with bilateral block dissection of the inguinal nodes and resection of the lower anterior abdominal wall was performed. Six weeks later after a course of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the patient underwent resection of metastatic lung lesion. (author)

  4. Quantification of L-Dopa and Dopamine in Squid Ink: Implications for Chemoreception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, M T; Farrington, H; Gilly, W F

    1994-08-01

    Squid ink is an alarm substance that both confuses predators and alerts conspecifics to the presence of danger. Although the ejection of ink is a powerful visual stimulus, studies also indicate a chemical component to the signal. Squid ink is composed mainly of melanin pigments, but the nonpigmented portion of the ink contains the enzymes and precursors of melanin synthesis. Our previous behavioral studies showed that squid olfactory organs detect L-dopa, a key chemical in melanogenesis. Squid olfactory neurons also respond to dopamine, a biogenic amine not previously described in squid ink. We performed HPLC on ink taken from the ink sacs of adult Loligo opalescens. The ink was conjugated with orthophthaldialdehyde (OPA) and injected into the HPLC, and amine-containing compounds were detected fluorometrically. Standard curves constructed for L-dopa and dopamine allowed quantitation from individual ink sacs. We found that L-dopa was present in undiluted ink at a mean concentration of 1.15 mM and was significantly greater than the mean dopamine concentration of 0.19 mM. These values are greater than those at which both compounds are effective in behavioral and electrophysiological experiments. In addition we found that an unidentified antioxidant in the ink may prevent rapid oxidation of L-dopa and dopamine following dilution in seawater.

  5. Closed-cycle cryocooled SQUID system with superconductive shield for biomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lee, Yong Ho; Lee, Seong Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Seong min; Kim, Jin Mok; Kwon, Hyuckchan; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-10-01

    We developed a cryocooled SQUID system with which human magnetocardiogram (MCG) and possibly magnetoenceparogram (MEG) can be measured. To reduce cyclic magnetic noises originating from the regenerator of the cold heads of the cryocooler, a superconductive shield (99.5% Pb) was used to protect the SQUID sensors, and a ferromagnetic shield (78% Ni alloy) was used to screen the cold head. In addition, the SQUID sensors’ chamber was placed at a distance of 1.8 m from the cold head chamber to install the cold-head chamber outside the magnetically shielded room (MSR) for future development. The loss in cooling power due to the increased distance was compensated by increasing the number of thermal rods, and thus the SQUID sensor and superconductive shield could be refrigerated to 4.8 K and 5 K, respectively. The superconductive shield successfully rejected thermal noise emitted from metallic blocks used to improve thermal conduction. The noise of the SQUID system was 3 fT/Hz1/2, and the cyclic magnetic noise could be reduced to 1.7 pT. We could obtain a clear MCG signal while the entire cryogenics was in operation without any special digital processing.

  6. Behavioral ecology of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in relation to oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Field, John C.; Markaida, Unai; Gilly, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Habitat utilization, behavior and food habits of the jumbo or Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, were compared between an area recently inhabited in the northern California Current System (CCS) and a historically established area of residence in the Gulf of California (GOC). Low dissolved oxygen concentrations at midwater depths define the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), an important environmental feature in both areas. We analyzed vertical diving behavior and diet of D. gigas and hydrographic properties of the water column to ascertain the extent to which squid utilized the OMZ in the two areas. The upper boundary of the OMZ has been shoaling in recent decades in the CCS, and this phenomenon has been proposed to vertically compress the pelagic environment inhabited by aerobic predators. A shoaling OMZ will also bring mesopelagic communities into a depth range with more illumination during daytime, making these organisms more vulnerable to predation by visual predators (i.e. jumbo squid). Because the OMZ in the GOC is considerably shallower than in the CCS, our study provides insight into the behavioral plasticity of jumbo squid and how they may respond to a shoaling OMZ in the CCS. We propose that shoaling OMZs are likely to be favorable to jumbo squid and could be a key indirect factor behind the recent range expansion of this highly migratory predator.

  7. Environmental influences on commercial oceanic ommastrephid squids: a stock assessment perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ommastrephid squids are short-lived ecological opportunists and their recruitment is largely driven by the surrounding environment. While recent studies suggest that recruitment variability in several squid species can be partially explained by environmental variability derived from synoptic oceanographic data, assessment of ommastrephid stocks using environmental variability is rare. In thisstudy, we modified asurplus production model to incorporate environmental variability into the assessment of threeommastrephid squids (Ommastrephes bartramii in the northwest Pacific, Illex argentinus in the southwest Atlantic and Dosidicus gigas in the southwest Pacific. We assumed that the key environmental variables—suitable sea surface temperature on spawning grounds during the spawning seasons and feeding grounds during the feeding seasons—have effects on the carrying capacity and the instantaneous population growth rate, respectively, in the surplus production model. For each squid stock, the assessment model with environmental variability had the highest fitting accuracy and the lowest mean squared error and coefficient of variation, and the management reference points based on the optimal model were more precautionary. This study advances our understanding of the interactions between the environment and ommastrephid squid population dynamics and can therefore improve the management of these commercially valuable stocks with a short life cycle.

  8. Microbial Experimental Evolution as a Novel Research Approach in the Vibrionaceae and Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eSoto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists. The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to a solid substrate such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study.

  9. Quality changes in squid (Loligo duvaucelli) tubes chilled with dry ice and water ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasekaran, G; Jeya Shakila, R; Sukumar, D; Ganesan, P; Anandaraj, R

    2010-08-01

    Squid tubes were packed with 100% (w/w of squid) dry ice (PI), 20% dry ice and 50% water ice (PII) and 50% water ice (PIII) in polyethylene bags and store in thermocole boxes at room temperature (32 ± 2°C) for 24 h. Quality changes curing storage were studied. Lowest temperature of -30.3°C was attained in PI while it was 15-16°C in PII and PIII at 1 h of storage. The gas compositions in packages initially were 21% O2, 0.4% CO2 and 78.1% N2 in PI, PII and PIII, respectively. During storage for 24 h highest level of 82.5% CO2 was noticed in PII. Fresh squid tubes had bacterial flora of Hafnia, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Flavobacterium and Alcaligens. Hafnia constituted 74% of the flora. Alcaligenes (47%), Alteromonas (30%) and Alcaligenes (56%) were dominant in squid tubes stored in 100% dry ice, in the combination package, and in 100% water ice, respectively. Increase in total volatile base nitrogen and trimethylamine nitrogen, no definite trend in free fatty acid values in all packages while increase in pH in PI and PIII and no consistent changes in PI were noticed during storage for 24 h. The PI had lowest bacterial counts and PIII the highest. Squids stored in PI and PII were sensorily acceptable after 24 and 18 h, respectively.

  10. SQUID magnetometer using sensitivity correction signal for non-magnetic metal contaminants detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Toshifumi, E-mail: sakuta.k@usp.ac.jp; Ohashi, Masaharu; Sakuta, Ken

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A high-frequency excitation is necessary to detect nonmagnetic metals using SQUID. • It is possible to detect a high-frequency magnetic field using the open loop technique. • Open loop operation leads to a change in the conversion factor. • Conversion between voltage and magnetic field for open loop operation are examined. - Abstract: Measurement methods with SQUID can accurately detect small magnetic metal contaminants based on their magnetic remanence. But, a high-frequency excitation is necessary to detect nonmagnetic metals, on the base of contrasts in electric conductivity. In this work, an open loop technique is introduced to facilitate this. The SQUID is negative feedback controlled (flux locked loop (FLL) operation) for the low frequency range, which includes significant noise due to the movement of the magnetic body or the change of the ambient magnetic field composed of the geomagnetic field and technical signals, and it operates in an open loop configuration for the high frequency range. When using the open loop technique, negative feedback is not applied to the high frequency range. Consequently, the V–Φ characteristic changes due to various causes, which leads to variations in the conversion factor between the SQUID output voltage and the magnetic field. In this study, conversion techniques for the magnetic field for open loop operation of SQUID in the high frequency range are examined.

  11. 76 FR 3044 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ..., Squid, and Octopus in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... prohibiting directed fishing for sculpins, sharks, squid, and octopus in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action..., and octopus in the GOA. DATES: Effective 1200 hrs, Alaska local time (A.l.t.), January 13, 2011...

  12. A 64-channel whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, H. [Communications Research Laboratory, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunication, Nukuikitamachi 4-2-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184 (Japan); The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Matsui, T. [Communications Research Laboratory, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunication, Nukuikitamachi 4-2-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184 (Japan); Aono, M. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Uchikawa, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Tanabe, K.; Takeuchi, S. [Tokyo Denki University, Oaza-Ishizaka, Hatoyama-cho, Hiki-gun, Saitama 350-03 (Japan); Narasaki, K.; Tsunematsu, S.; Koyabu, Y.; Kamekawa, Y. [Sumitomo Heavy Industry, Soukai-cho 5-2, Niihama-shi, Ehime 792-8588 (Japan); Nakayama, K.; Shimizu, T. [Nihonkeiki Corporation, Goshogaoka 4-3-5, Moriyacho, Kitasoma-gun, Ibaraki 302-0119 (Japan); Koike, J.; Hoshino, K.; Kotaka, H.; Sudoh, E.; Takahara, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co, Ltd., Corporate R and D Centre, Haraichi 1333-2, Ageo, Saitama 362 (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [National Research Institute of Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Shinada, K.; Takahata, M.; Yamaga, Y. [Shimadzu Corporation, Keihanna Research Laboratory, Inuidani-Sunagatani, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-02 (Japan); Kamijo, K. [NEC Fundamental Research Laboratory, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 273-2310 (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    A superconducting magnetic shield of high-T{sub c} superconductor Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O{sub x} has been constructed whose diameter is 65 cm and length is 160 cm. We have successfully observed magnetic fields from somatosensory-evoked human brains in the superconducting magnetic shield by stimulating the median nerves of patients by current pulses. We made a 64-channel whole-head SQUID magnetometer of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) junctions which do not show low-frequency telegraph noise. The sensitivities of the dc SQUID mesoscopic SNS junctions are around 5 fT Hz{sup -1/2} even in rather unfavourable surroundings. The magnetic shield can reduce a magnetic field by around -80 dB or a factor of 10{sup -4} even at as low a frequency as 0.05 Hz. Therefore SQUIDs of SNS junctions and a superconducting magnetic shield are a good combination. (author)

  13. Range-finding in squid using retinal deformation and image blur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen-Sung; Marshall, Justin

    2014-01-20

    Squid and other cephalopods catch prey with remarkable speed and precision [1]. Before the strike occurs, they encounter the difficult task of judging an object's distance and size in the contrast-poor world of the mid-water environment [1-4]. Here we describe a solution to this common problem underwater, where a large portion of a squid's dorso-temporal retina is intentionally blurred. This apparently counter-adaptive 'retinal bump' is combined with a vertical bobbing behavior that scans objects of interest from focused to defocused retinal regions. The image focus differential changes sharply at precisely the distance equivalent to tentacle length and enables the squid, Sepioteuthis lessoniana, to capture prey. This unique range-finding mechanism is an adaptation to hunting, defense, and object size identification in an environment where the depth cues found on land are less reliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Research on Intelligent Control System of DC SQUID Magnetometer Parameters for Multi-channel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Yang, Kang; Lu, Li; Kong, Xiangyan; Wang, Hai; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yongliang

    2018-03-01

    In a multi-channel SQUID measurement system, adjusting device parameters to optimal condition for all channels is time-consuming. In this paper, an intelligent control system is presented to determine the optimal working point of devices which is automatic and more efficient comparing to the manual one. An optimal working point searching algorithm is introduced as the core component of the control system. In this algorithm, the bias voltage V_bias is step scanned to obtain the maximal value of the peak-to-peak current value I_pp of the SQUID magnetometer modulation curve. We choose this point as the optimal one. Using the above control system, more than 30 weakly damped SQUID magnetometers with area of 5 × 5 mm^2 or 10 × 10 mm^2 are adjusted and a 36-channel magnetocardiography system perfectly worked in a magnetically shielded room. The average white flux noise is 15 μΦ_0/Hz^{1/2}.

  15. Squid measurement of the Verwey transition on epitaxial (1 0 0) magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dediu, V.; Arisi, E.; Bergenti, I.; Riminucci, A.; Solzi, M.; Pernechele, C.; Natali, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report results on epitaxial magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) thin films grown by electron beam ablation on (1 0 0) MgAl 2 O 4 substrates. At 120 K magnetite undergoes a structural and electronic transition, the so-called Verwey transition, at which magnetic and conducting properties of the material change. We observed the Verwey transition on epitaxial films with a thickness of 50 nm by comparing zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) curves measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Observation of the Verwey transition by SQUID measurements in the films is sign of their high crystalline quality. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been found by magneto-optical Kerr rotation (MOKE) and confirmed by SQUID measurements, with a hysteresis loop showing a coercive field of hundreds of Oe

  16. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TonThat, Dinh M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  17. Routine clinical heart examinations using SQUID magnetocardiography at University of Tsukuba Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, T.; Nakazawa, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Kato, Y.; Hattori, A.; Kimura, T.; Hoshi, T.; Ishizu, T.; Seo, Y.; Sato, A.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Nogami, A.; Watanabe, S.; Horigome, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Aonuma, K.

    2017-11-01

    A 64-channel Nb-based DC-SQUID magnetocardiography (MCG) system was installed at the University of Tsukuba Hospital (UTH) in March 2007 after obtaining Japanese pharmaceutical approval and insurance reimbursement approval. In the period between 2008 and 2016, the total number of patients was 10 085. The heart diseases diagnosed in fetuses as well as adults are mainly atrial arrhythmia, abnormal repolarization, ventricular arrhythmia, and fetal arrhythmia. In most cases of insufficient diagnostic accuracy with electrocardiography, SQUID MCG precisely revealed these heart diseases as an abnormal electrical current distribution. Based on success in routine examinations, SQUID MCG is now an indispensable clinical instrument with diagnostic software tuned up during routine use at UTH.

  18. Monitoring geomagnetic signals of groundwater movement using multiple underground SQUID magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater can influence the geomagnetic field measured underground in at least two key ways. The water levels in rock will determine its electrical conductivity, and thus change the magnitude of the telluric currents induced in the rock by changing magnetic fields generated in the ionosphere. This can be studied by using multiple magnetometers at different underground locations. Secondly the flow of water through rock will generate a small magnetic signal, of unknown magnitude, through the electrokinetic effect. SQUID magnetometry has the potential to allow passive studies of groundwater changes in complex systems such as karst. We have monitored geomagnetic signals using two SQUID magnetometers at the LSBB underground laboratory, and set an initial limit on the magnitude of the electrokinetic signal. We now plan to carry out a longer term measurement using three SQUID systems as well as fluxgate sensors to track changes in the gradient of the magnetic field across the underground complex.

  19. Direct readout flux locked loop circuit with automatic tuning of bias current and bias flux for high-Tc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, T.; Nagaishi, T.; Itozaki, H.

    1999-01-01

    Measurement of high-frequency magnetic signals has been required from some SQUID applications. We fabricated a high-T c SQUID magnetic sensor system that can treat high-frequency signals. This system is composed of a SQUID, a preamplifier circuit, a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit with I/O and a personal computer and a PC card. We used the FLL circuit with no modulation to treat the high-frequency signal and to simplify the circuit. This system can treat a signal from dc to 1 MHz. All the sequence from tuning the SQUID to data acquisition can be done by a personal computer. This system successfully realized easy operation of SQUID measurement. (author)

  20. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D. F.; Fan, Chang-Xin; Ruan, J. Z.; Han, S. G.; Wong, K. W.; Sun, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A nondestructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUID's and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUID's. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  1. Phase dependent impedance and temperature dependent response of microwave SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    We report measurements of the microwave impedance of superconducting point contacts as a function of the quantum mechanical phase difference phi. They yield a conductance of the form G(phi) = G/sub o/(1+alpha cos phi) where alpha is a dimensionless parameter reflecting an interference between the Cooper pairs and the quasiparticles. Experimental results agree with a negative alpha approximately equal to -.5 which can be interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model that follows essentially the Time Dependent Landau Ginzburg theory (TDLG). In the second part we report measurements of the response of a microwave SQUID using a Ta point contact at various temperatures. They give a progression of operating conditions from the non-hysteretic to the hysteretic mode. The responses calculated by Soerensen and by Burhman and Jackel are in qualitative agreement with the measurements. We also present a theory based on a calculation of the reflection coefficient from the point contact. This theory reproduces the results of Bunhman and Jackel and Soerensen and is directly adaptable to our microwave geometry. In the last chapter we present a calculation that exhibits explicitly the dependence of the response on OMEGA = PHI/sub o/nu/I/sub X sub/R where nu is the microwave frequency, I/sub c/ and R the critical current and resistance of the junction and PHI/sub o/ fluxoid quantum, and that agrees with their data and their interpretation of it in terms of a limiting time tau for the supercurrent response with tau varies as DELTA(T)/sup -1/ where DELTA (T) is the BCS gap parameter

  2. Scanning high-T{sub c} SQUID imaging system for magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H-C [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, T-Y [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Normal Taiwan University 116, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, H-E [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Normal Taiwan University 116, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, C-C [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University School of Medicine, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, S Y [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Normal Taiwan University 116, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liao, S-H [Department of Physics, National Normal Taiwan University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Wu, C-H [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jeng, J T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, 105, Taiwan (China); Chen, J C [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuen-Lin [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, M J [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-05-15

    A scanning magnetocardiography (MCG) system constructed from SQUID sensors offers potential to basic or clinical research in biomagnetism. In this work, we study a first order scanning electronic high-T{sub c} (HTS) SQUID MCG system for biomagnetic signals. The scanning MCG system was equipped with an x-y translation bed powered by step motors. Using noise cancellation and {mu}-metal shielding, we reduced the noise level substantially. The established scanning HTS MCG system was used to study the magnetophysiology of hypercholesterolaemic (HC) rabbits. The MCG data of HC rabbits were analysed. The MCG contour map of HC rabbits provides experimental models for the interpretation of human cardiac patterns.

  3. Numerical restoration of surface vortices in Nb films measured by a scanning SQUID microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Atsuki; Thanh Huy, Ho; Dang, Vu The; Miyoshi, Hiroki; Hayashi, Masahiko; Ishida, Takekazu

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated a vortex profile appeared on a pure Nb film (500 nm in thickness, 10 mm x 10 mm) by using a scanning SQUID microscope. We found that the local magnetic distribution thus observed is broadened compared to a true vortex profile in the superconducting film. We therefore applied the numerical method to improve a spatial resolution of the scanning SQUID microscope. The method is based on the inverse Biot-Savart law and the Fourier transformation to recover a real-space image. We found that the numerical analyses give a smaller vortex than the raw vortex profile observed by the scanning microscope.

  4. Giant high occipital encephalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Encephaloceles are rare embryological mesenchymal developmental anomalies resulting from inappropriate ossification in skull through with herniation of intracranial contents of the sac. Encephaloceles are classified based on location of the osseous defect and contents of sac. Convexity encephalocele with osseous defect in occipital bone is called occipital encephalocele. Giant occipital encephaloceles can be sometimes larger than the size of baby skull itself and they pose a great surgical challenge. Occipital encephaloceles (OE are further classified as high OE when defect is only in occipital bone above the foramen magnum, low OE when involving occipital bone and foramen magnum and occipito-cervical when there involvement of occipital bone, foramen magnum and posterior upper neural arches. Chiari III malformation can be associated with high or low occipital encephaloceles. Pre-operatively, it is essential to know the size of the sac, contents of the sac, relation to the adjacent structures, presence or absence of venous sinuses/vascular structures and osseous defect size. Sometimes it becomes imperative to perform both CT and MRI for the necessary information. Volume rendered CT images can depict the relation of osseous defect to foramen magnum and provide information about upper neural arches which is necessary in classifying these lesions.

  5. Bringing Low the Giants

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Their work goes on unseen, because they a hundred metres beneath your feet. But while the race against the clock to build the LHC has begun on the surface, teams underground are feverishly engaged to dismantle LEP and its experiments. Four months after the start of dismantling, the technical coordinators of the different experiments discuss the progress of work. Little men attack the giant ALEPH. The barrel and its two endcaps have been removed to the end of the cavern and stripped of their cables. The breaking up of the detector can now begin. At ALEPH, counting rooms removed all in one go Jean-Paul Fabre, technical coordinator at ALEPH:'After making safe the structure, the first step was to remove the wiring and cables. Some 210 cubic metres were brought out. Then the counting rooms all round the detector were taken out. They were brought up from the cavern all in one go, up through the shaft, which is 10 metres wide and 150 metres deep. They made it with 15 centimetres to spare. They have been emptied of...

  6. Giant necrotic pituitary apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Andrew A; Quigley, Edward P; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2013-10-01

    Apoplexy of the pituitary gland is a rare complication of pituitary adenomas, involving hemorrhage with or without necrosis within the tumor. This condition may be either asymptomatic or may present with severe headache, visual impairment, ophthalmoplegia, and pituitary failure. Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is usually required to ensure reversal of visual impairment. Reports of pituitary apoplectic lesions exceeding 60.0mm in diameter are very rare. A 39-year-old man with long-standing history of nasal congestion, decreased libido and infertility presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and diplopia. MRI of the head demonstrated a massive skull base lesion of 70.0 × 60.0 × 25.0mm, compatible with a giant pituitary macroadenoma. The lesion failed to enhance after administration of a contrast agent, suggesting complete necrotic apoplexy. Urgent surgical decompression was performed, and the lesion was resected via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathological analysis revealed evidence of necrotic pituitary apoplexy. At the 2 month follow-up, the patient had near-complete to complete resolution of his visual impairment. To the authors' knowledge, this report is unique as the patient demonstrated complete necrotic apoplexy and it underlines the diagnostic dilemma in such a case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Formation of the giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  8. Modeling the Effects of Varying the Capacitance, Resistance, Temperature, and Frequency Dependence for HTS Josephson Junctions, DC SQUIDs and DC bi-SQUIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Relationship,” Technical Physics Letters 33:723. 7. R. Gross and A. Marx . 2005. “Chapter 4: Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices , Applied...explore the effects of altering the third junction in an array of bi-superconducting quantum interference devices (bi-SQUIDs) on the overall performance...temperature and capacitance terms on the bisecting junctions only. This setup represents a device with traditional main junctions and different third junction

  9. Verification of the weak equivalence principle of supports and heavy masses using SQUIDs; Ueberpruefung des schwachen Aequivalenzprinzips von Traegern und schwerer Masse mittels Squids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W.; Nietzsche, S.; Neubert, R. [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Dittus, H. [Univ. Bremen (Germany). Zentrum fuer angewandte Raumfahrttechnologie und Mikrogravitation

    2003-07-01

    The weak equivalence principle is one of the fundamental hypotheses of general relativity and one of the key elements of our physical picture of the world, but since Galileo there has been no satisfactory way of verifying it. The new SQUID technology may offer a solution. The contribution presents the experiments of Jena University. Applications are envisaged, e.g., in the STEP space mission of the NASA/ESA. [German] Das Schwache Aequivalenzprinzip ist eine der grundlegenden Hypothesen der Allgemeinen Relativitaetstheorie und damit einer der Grundpfeiler unseres physikalischen Weltbildes. Obwohl es seit den ersten Experimenten von Galileo Galilei am Schiefen Turm zu Pisa im Jahre 1638 bis heute schon zahlreiche und immer praeziser werdende Messungen zur Ueberpruefung der Aequivalenz von schwerer und traeger Masse gegeben hat, ist die strenge Gueltigkeit dieses fundamentalen Prinzips experimentell vergleichsweise unzureichend bestimmt. Neuere Methoden, wie der Einsatz SQUID-basierter Messtechnik und die Durchfuehrung von Experimenten auf Satelliten, lassen Verbesserungen schon in naher Zukunft erwarten, so dass theoretische Ueberlegungen zur Vereinigung aller uns bekannten physikalischen Wechselwirkungen, die eine Verletzung des Schwachen Aequivalenzprinzips voraussagen, experimentell eingegrenzt werden koennten. Der Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick ueber die an der Universitaet Jena entwickelte SQUID-basierte Messtechnik zum Test des Aequivalenzprinzips und fasst die bisher bei Freifallversuchen am Fallturm Bremen erzielten experimentellen Ergebnisse zusammen. Ein Ausblick auf die geplante Raumfahrtmission STEP der NASA/ESA zum Praezisionstest des Schwachen Aequivalenzprinzips schliesst den Beitrag ab. (orig.)

  10. Formation of giant planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perri, F.

    1975-01-01

    When a planetary core composed of condensed matter is accumulated in the primitive solar nebula, the gas of the nebula becomes gravitationally concentrated as an envelope surrounding the planetary core. Models of such gaseous envelopes have been constructed subject to the assumption that the gas everywhere is on the same adiabat as that in the surrounding nebula. The gaseous envelope extends from the surface of the core to the distance at which the gravitational attraction of core plus envelope becomes equal to the gradient of the gravitational potential in the solar nebula; at this point the pressure and temperature of the gas in the envelope are required to attain the background values characteristic of the solar nebula. In general, as the mass of the condensed core increases, increasing amounts of gas became concentrated in the envelope, and these envelopes are stable against hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the core mass then goes through a maximum and starts to decrease. In most of the models tested the envelopes were hydrodynamically unstable beyond the peak in the core mass. An unstable situation was always created if it was insisted that the core mass contain a larger amount of matter than given by these solutions. For an initial adiabat characterized by a temperature of 450 0 K and a pressure of 5 x 10 -6 atmospheres, the maximum core mass at which instability occurs is approximately 115 earth masses. It is concluded that the giant planets obtained their large amounts of hydrogen and helium by a hydrodynamic collapse process in the solar nebula only after the nebula had been subjected to a considerable period of cooling

  11. The effects of jig color and lunar bright on coastal squid jigging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    General linear model results proved that lunar brightness of full moon phase showed positive effects to squid catching (p < 0.01). The differences between jigs were statistically significant except between blue and green. In addition, the relationship between dorsal mantle length of captured specimens and color of jigs were ...

  12. SQUID Measurements of the Magnetic Field Distribution from Ionic Currents in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazbinsek, Vojko; Thiel, Gerhard; Zorec, Robert; Mueller, Wolfgang; Baudenbacher, Franz; Fong, Luis; Holzer, Jenny; Wikswo, John; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2001-03-01

    SQUIDs, the most sensitive magnetic flux sensor, are often a useful tool in the biophysical and biomedical research. Our aim was to use a multi-channel SQUID system and a SQUID microscope in a magnetically shielded room to obtain the noninvasive information on (i) ionic currents in green algae Chara corallina under either electric field excitation or illumination with visible light, and (ii) injury-induced ionic currents in the higher-developed plant Vicia faba. For the green algae Chara corallina, we found that the action potential spread with the velocity of 3-4 cm/s, that the intracellular current was up to 1 μ A and that the magnetic field distribution was altered by the ifluence of light. For the wounded bean plant Vicia faba, the measured magnetic field distribution adjacent to the injury demonstrated that the injury-related ionic current decays with τ of 10 min. These results demonstrate the value od SQUID-based measuring systems for noninvasive research of ionic currents in the slowest cells and living tissues in nature.

  13. Acoustical Scattering, Propagation, and Attenuation Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake Kelly J. Benoit- Bird College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences 104...surrounding these aggregations to identify key parameters related to the distribution and behavior of these animals. These parameters will be used to...large sample size combined with careful measures of swimbladder shape, reproductive condition, stomach fullness, and other independent variables will

  14. Conversion of Squid Pens to Chitosanases and Proteases via Paenibacillus sp. TKU042

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien Thang Doan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosanases and proteases have received much attention due to their wide range of applications. Four kinds of chitinous materials, squid pens, shrimp heads, demineralized shrimp shells and demineralized crab shells, were used as the sole carbon and nitrogen (C/N source to produce chitosanases, proteases and α-glucosidase inhibitors (αGI by four different strains of Paenibacillus. Chitosanase productivity was highest in the culture supernatants using squid pens as the sole C/N source. The maximum chitosanase activity of fermented squid pens (0.759 U/mL was compared to that of fermented shrimp heads (0.397 U/mL, demineralized shrimp shells (0.201 U/mL and demineralized crab shells (0.216 U/mL. A squid pen concentration of 0.5% was suitable for chitosanase, protease and αGI production via Paenibacillus sp. TKU042. Multi-purification, including ethanol precipitation and column chromatography of Macro-Prep High S as well as Macro-Prep DEAE (diethylaminoethyl, led to the isolation of Paenibacillus sp. TKU042 chitosanase and protease with molecular weights of 70 and 35 kDa, respectively. For comparison, 16 chitinolytic bacteria, including strains of Paenibacillus, were investigated for the production of chitinase, exochitinase, chitosanase, protease and αGI using two kinds of chitinous sources.

  15. Reversible stress softening of collagen based networks from the jumbo squid mantle (Dosidicus gigas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, F.G.; Troncoso, O.P.; Rivas, E.R.; Gomez, C.G.; Lopez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Dosidicus gigas is the largest and one of the most abundant jumbo squids in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In this paper we have studied the muscle of the mantle of D. gigas (DGM). Morphological, thermal and rheological properties were assessed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and oscillatory rheometry. This study allowed us to assess the morphological and rheological properties of a collagen based network occurring in nature. The results showed that the DGM network displays a nonlinear effect called reversible stress softening (RSS) that has been previously described for other types of biological structures such as naturally occurring cellulose networks and actin networks. We propose that the RSS could play a key role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure. The results presented here confirm that this phenomenon occurs in a wider number of materials than previously thought, all of them exhibiting different size scales as well as physical conformation. - Highlights: • We studied the structure property relationships of the jumbo squid mantle. • Rheological tests showed that such a mantle exhibits reversible stress softening (RSS). • RSS could also play a role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure

  16. Reversible stress softening of collagen based networks from the jumbo squid mantle (Dosidicus gigas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.G., E-mail: fgtorres@pucp.edu.pe [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Catholic University of Peru, Lima 32 (Peru); Troncoso, O.P.; Rivas, E.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Catholic University of Peru, Lima 32 (Peru); Gomez, C.G. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de València, Dr. Moliner 50, Burjassot, E-46100 Valencia (Spain); Lopez, D. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, C.S.I.C., Calle Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Dosidicus gigas is the largest and one of the most abundant jumbo squids in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In this paper we have studied the muscle of the mantle of D. gigas (DGM). Morphological, thermal and rheological properties were assessed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and oscillatory rheometry. This study allowed us to assess the morphological and rheological properties of a collagen based network occurring in nature. The results showed that the DGM network displays a nonlinear effect called reversible stress softening (RSS) that has been previously described for other types of biological structures such as naturally occurring cellulose networks and actin networks. We propose that the RSS could play a key role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure. The results presented here confirm that this phenomenon occurs in a wider number of materials than previously thought, all of them exhibiting different size scales as well as physical conformation. - Highlights: • We studied the structure property relationships of the jumbo squid mantle. • Rheological tests showed that such a mantle exhibits reversible stress softening (RSS). • RSS could also play a role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure.

  17. Symposium on applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). [Abstracts of 13 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The abstracts are given of thirteen papers presented at a ''SQUID Symposium'' organized by the Division of Materials Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy and held March 23--25, 1978, at the University of Virginia. Since SQUID systems have already been utilized in feasibility demonstration in geothermal reservoir exploration, it was recognized that these devices also hold great potential for many other important scientific measurements. Many of these are energy-related, and others include forefront investigations in a diverse group of scientific areas, from biomedical to earthquake monitoring. Research in SQUIDs has advanced so rapidly in recent years that it was felt that a symposium to review the current status and future prospects of the devices would be timely. The abstracts given present an overview of work in this area and hopefully provide an opportunity to increase awareness among basic and applied scientists of the inherent implications of the extreme measurement sensitivity in advanced SQUID systems.

  18. Rotational population patterns and searches for the nuclear SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.J.; Farhan, A.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Ring, P.; Stoyer, M.A.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents new theoretical results for rotational population patterns in the nuclear SQUID effect. (The term nuclear SQUID is in analogy to the solid-state Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices.) The SQUID effect is an interesting new twist to an old quest to understand Coriolis anti-pairing (CAP) effects in nuclear rotational bands. Two-neutron transfer reaction cross sections among high-spin states have long been touted as more specific CAP probes than other nuclear properties. Heavy projectiles like Sn or Pb generally are recommended to pump the deformed nucleus to as high spin as possible for transfer. The interference and sign reversal of 2n transfer amplitudes at high spin, as predicted in the early SQUID work imposes the difficult requirement of Coulomb pumping to near back-bending spins at closest approach. For Pb on rare earths we find a dramatic departure from sudden-approximation, so that the population depression occurs as low as final spin 10h. 14 refs., 8 figs

  19. Cooling fins to limit the hot-electron effect in dc SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falferi, P; Vinante, A [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-FBK, Povo, I-38050 Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Sezione di Padova, Povo, I-38050 Trento (Italy); Mueck, M [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)], E-mail: falferi@science.unitn.it

    2008-02-15

    The generally accepted noise theory of the dc SQUID predicts that the energy resolution scales as the electron temperature in the Josephson junction shunt resistors. As in metals at low temperature the electron-phonon coupling becomes very weak, the electron gas of the thin film shunt resistors undergoes a Joule heating due to the bias current and its temperature can be significantly higher than that of the thermal bath. This heating, the hot-electron effect, causes a deviation from the linear behaviour of noise versus temperature and a saturation of the SQUID noise, typically at temperatures of about 200 mK. This effect can be reduced considerably by increasing the effective volume available for the electron-phonon interaction by attaching 'large' cooling fins to the shunt resistors. Our measurements have been performed on two thin film devices made with the same design of a dc SQUID but without the Josephson junctions: one device with standard shunt resistors, the other with shunt resistors with cooling fins. From these measurements one can expect for the SQUID with cooling fins an improvement of the noise saturation temperature of at most a factor 2, from 200 mK to about 100 mK.

  20. Rapid single-flux quantum control of the energy potential in a double SQUID qubit circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio; Leoni, Roberto; Torrioli, Guido; Carelli, Pasquale; Cosmelli, Carlo; Khabipov, Marat; Zorin, Alexander B; Balashov, Dmitri

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development and test of an integrated system composed of a flux qubit and a rapid single-flux quantum (RSFQ) circuit that allows qubit manipulation. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of control electronics integrated on the same chip as the qubit, in view of the application in quantum computation with superconducting devices. RSFQ logic relies on the storage and transmission of magnetic flux quanta and can be profitably used with superconducting qubits because of the speed, scalability, compatibility with the qubit fabrication process and low temperature environment. While standard RSFQ circuitry is well assessed, the application to quantum computing requires a complete rescaling of parameter values, in order to preserve the qubit coherence and reduce the power dissipation. In the system presented in this paper, the qubit role is played by a superconducting loop interrupted by a small dc SQUID, usually called a double SQUID, which behaves as a tunable rf-SQUID. Its energy potential has the shape of a double well, with the barrier between the wells controlled by magnetic flux applied to the inner dc SQUID. Here for the first time we report measurements at a base temperature of 370 mK in which flux control pulses with desired characteristics were supplied by a RSFQ circuit fabricated using non-standard parameters in the same chip as the qubit

  1. Rapid Associative Learning and Stable Long-Term Memory in the Squid Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Emily A; Veline, Robert J; Crook, Robyn J

    2017-06-01

    Learning and memory in cephalopod molluscs have received intensive study because of cephalopods' complex behavioral repertoire and relatively accessible nervous systems. While most of this research has been conducted using octopus and cuttlefish species, there has been relatively little work on squid. Euprymna scolopes Berry, 1913, a sepiolid squid, is a promising model for further exploration of cephalopod cognition. These small squid have been studied in detail for their symbiotic relationship with bioluminescent bacteria, and their short generation time and successful captive breeding through multiple generations make them appealing models for neurobiological research. However, little is known about their behavior or cognitive ability. Using the well-established "prawn-in-the-tube" assay of learning and memory, we show that within a single 10-min trial E. scolopes learns to inhibit its predatory behavior, and after three trials it can retain this memory for at least 12 d. Rapid learning and very long-term retention were apparent under two different training schedules. To our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration of learning and memory in this species as well as the first demonstration of associative learning in any squid.

  2. Sensory, chemical and bacteriological changes during storage of iced squid ( Todaropsis eblanae )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paarup, T.; Sanchez, J.A.; Moral, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To relate sensory shelf-life of iced whole and gutted squid to bacterial growth and chemical changes. Methods and Results: Cooked mantles from whole and gutted individuals were rejected after 10 and 12 days of storage, respectively, due to ammoniacal off-odours. Rate of production of both...

  3. Temporal and spatial patterns in the distribution of squid Loligo spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test hypotheses regarding the spatial distribution of the squid Loligo forbesi and Loligo vulgaris vulgaris in the northern North-East Atlantic during the years 1989-1994. Loligo spp. were present throughout coastal waters of the United Kingdom, but distribution was patchy ...

  4. Analysis of metal catalyst content in magnetically filtered SWCNTs by SQUID magnetometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Komínková, Zuzana; Vejpravová, Jana; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2015), s. 2544-2553 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : single-wall carbon nanotubes * nanoparticles * magnetic filtration * SQUID Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2015

  5. Comparison live adult Artemia and squid meat on the growth of Penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.R.S.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Royan, J.P.

    An experiment lasting 14 weeks was conducted to compare the efficiency of live adult Artemia with fresh squid meat on growth of penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus dobsoni. The shrimps were found actively feeding on live Artemia and grew 84% more than those...

  6. Bathyal feasting: post-spawning squid as a source of carbon for deep-sea benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, H J T; Bush, S L; Haddock, S H D; Robison, B H

    2017-12-20

    In many oceanic carbon budgets there is a discrepancy between the energetic requirements of deep-sea benthic communities and the supply of organic matter. This suggests that there are unidentified and unmeasured food sources reaching the seafloor. During 11 deep-sea remotely operated vehicle (ROV) surveys in the Gulf of California, the remains (squid carcasses and hatched-out egg sheets) of 64 post-brooding squid were encountered. As many as 36 remains were encountered during a single dive. To our knowledge this is one of the largest numbers of natural food falls of medium-size deep-sea nekton described to date. Various deep-sea scavengers (Ophiuroidea, Holothuroidea, Decapoda, Asteroidea, Enteropneusta) were associated with the remains. Although many of the 80 examined ROV dives did not encounter dead squids or egg sheets ( n = 69), and the phenomenon may be geographically and temporally restricted, our results show that dead, sinking squid transport carbon from the water column to the seafloor in the Gulf of California. Based on food fall observations from individual dives, we estimate that annual squid carcass depositions may regionally contribute from 0.05 to 12.07 mg C m -2 d -1 to the seafloor in the areas where we observed the remains. The sinking of squid carcasses may constitute a significant but underestimated carbon vector between the water column and the seafloor worldwide, because squid populations are enormous and are regionally expanding as a result of climate change and pressure on fish stocks. In the future, standardized methods and surveys in geographical regions that have large squid populations will be important for investigating the overall contribution of squid falls to regional carbon budgets. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. SQUIDs as detectors in a new experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-01-01

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4x10 -28 ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large (∼100 cm 2 ) pick-up coils to measure the precision frequency of the spin-polarized 3 He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the 3 He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of ∼2x10 -16 Tm 2 (0.1 Φ 0 ) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of dΦ SQ = 2x10 -6 Φ 0 /√Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application the authors designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and they developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. They present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. The authors also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID readout technique

  8. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Givnish Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution.

  9. Giant fields in southwest Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-20

    According to Petroleos Mexicanos southeastern Mexico's Isthmus Saline basin holds five new giant fields - Tonala-El Burro, El Plan, Cinco Presidentes, Oraggio, and Magallanes - producing oil and gas from Tertiary sandstones. Numerous normal faults resulting from salt intrusion have given rise to multiple blocks, each with its own reservoir conditions. Previously discovered basins in the area include the Macuspana, which holds three giant gas- and condensate-producing fields: Jose Colomo, Chilapilla, and Hormiquero. The 3100-mi/sup 2/ Campeche marine platform, extending offshore nearby, contains the Cantarell complex, Mexico's most productive hydrocarbon province.

  10. Percolation with multiple giant clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2005-01-01

    We study mean-field percolation with freezing. Specifically, we consider cluster formation via two competing processes: irreversible aggregation and freezing. We find that when the freezing rate exceeds a certain threshold, the percolation transition is suppressed. Below this threshold, the system undergoes a series of percolation transitions with multiple giant clusters ('gels') formed. Giant clusters are not self-averaging as their total number and their sizes fluctuate from realization to realization. The size distribution F k , of frozen clusters of size k, has a universal tail, F k ∼ k -3 . We propose freezing as a practical mechanism for controlling the gel size. (letter to the editor)

  11. Giant resonances: reaction theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de; Foglia, G.A.

    1989-09-01

    The study of giant resonances through the use of reaction theory approach is presented and discussed. Measurements of cross-sections to the many available decay channels following excitation of giant multipole resonances (GMR) led one to view these phenomena as complicated dynamical syndromes so that theoretical requirements for their study must be extended beyond the traditional bounds of nuclear structure models. The spectra of decay products following GMR excitation in heavy nuclei are well described by statistical model (Hauser-Feshback, HF) predictions indicated that spreading of the collective modes plays a major role in shaping exclusive cross-sections. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Awakening a sleeping coal giant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, B.

    2007-08-15

    Botswana, a southern African country that in the 1980s could not economically land a tonne of coal at the closest export terminal and even today mines no more than 1 million tpa, is to increase production to beyond 30 million tpa. A first ever coal conference in Gaborone called it the awakening of a coal giant. The alarm call for the coal giant is the realisation that without more generating capacity than its power utility Eskom can itself build in time, South Africa will in four to five years face a severe shortage of power. 1 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Nerve terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons contain a heterogeneous population of mRNAs and translate a transfected reporter mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioio, Anthony E; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Jurkovicova, Dana; Zhang, Hengshan; Eyman, Maria; Giuditta, Antonio; Kaplan, Barry B

    2004-08-01

    It is now well established that the distal structural/functional domains of the neuron contain 2a diverse population of mRNAs that program the local synthesis of protein. However, there is still a paucity of information on the composition and function of these mRNA populations in the adult nervous system. To generate empirically, hypotheses regarding the function of the local protein synthetic system, we have compared the mRNAs present in the squid giant axon and its parental cell bodies using differential mRNA display as an unbiased screen. The results of this screen facilitated the identification of 31 mRNAs that encoded cytoskeletal proteins, translation factors, ribosomal proteins, molecular motors, metabolic enzymes, nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs, and a molecular chaperone. Results of cell fractionation and RT-PCR analyses established that several of these mRNAs were present in polysomes present in the presynaptic nerve terminal of photoreceptor neurons, indicating that these mRNAs were being actively translated. Findings derived from in vitro transfection studies established that these isolated nerve terminals had the ability to translate a heterologous reporter mRNA. Based upon these data, it is hypothesized that the local protein synthetic system plays an important role in the maintenance/remodelling of the cytoarchitecture of the axon and nerve terminal, maintenance of the axon transport and mRNA translation systems, as well as contributing to the viability and function of the local mitochondria.

  14. Charting the Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  15. Giant gravitons-with strings attached (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the free field theory limit of operators dual to giant gravitons with open strings attached, are studied. We introduce a graphical notation, which employs Young diagrams, for these operators. The computation of two point correlation functions is reduced to the application of three simple rules, written as graphical operations performed on the Young diagram labels of the operators. Using this technology, we have studied gravitational radiation by giant gravitons and bound states of giant gravitons, transitions between excited giant graviton states and joining of open strings attached to the giant

  16. Pathogenesis of giant colonic diverticula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhletaler, C.A.; Berger, J.L.; Robinette, C.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings of 3 patients with giant colonic diverticula are presented. Although several theories have been proposed for the formation of these diverticula, they have not been fully documented. One of our cases illustrates the evolution of this disorder following typical colonic diverticulitis. The pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of this unusual entity are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  18. Determination of giant resonance strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serr, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Using theoretical strength functions to describe the different giant resonances expected at excitation energies of the order of (60-85)/Asup(1/3) MeV, we calculate the double differential cross sections d 2 sigma/dΩ dE associated with the reactions 208 Pb(α, α') and 90 Zr(α, α') (Esub(α) = 152 MeV). The angular distributions for the giant quadrupole and giant monopole resonances obtained from fits to these spectra, making simple, commonly used assumptions for the peak shapes and background, are compared to the original angular distributions. The differences between them are an indication of some of the uncertainties affecting the giant resonance strengths extracted from hadron inelastic scattering data. Fits to limited angular regions lead to errors of up to 50% in the value of the energy-weighted sum rule, depending on the angles examined. While it seems possible to extract the correct EWSR for the GMR by carrying out the analyses at 0 0 , no single privileged angle seems to exist in the case of the GQR. (orig.)

  19. Michigan has a sleeping giant

    CERN Multimedia

    Brock, Raymond; Nichols, Sue

    2007-01-01

    "That giant is 750 miles of fiber optic cable that lassoes its three biggest research universities and Van Andel Institute to the future. Its mission: to uncover the nature of the Big Bang by connecton U.S. physicists to their huge experiment ATLAS in Geneva.." (4 pages)

  20. A Giant or a Dwarf?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Herman

    2005-01-01

    EU may appear to be a giant when it can act on behalf of a united Europe, but usually it is hampered by conflicting member state interests. The EU economic and administrative resources for foreign and trade policy are quite small (on level with one of its major member states) and the hopes in man...

  1. Giant lipomas of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Giant lipomas of the hand are very rare and may cause compressions and other complications. Thus, they require a careful preoperative evaluation in order to make a proper differential diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 8-11

  2. Studies on the effect of low dose gamma irradiation on the chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of squid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojayanaik, Manjanaik; Naroth, Kavya; Shetty, Veena; Hiriyur, Somashekarappa

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the combined effect of low dose gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at refrigeration (+4℃) and frozen (-18℃) temperatures, on the shelf life extension of fresh squid. The study was based on microbiological and physico-chemical changes occurring in the squid samples. The biochemical parameters such as total volatile base nitrogen and trimethyl amine nitrogen values for irradiated squid samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose of 3 and 5 kGy (p<0.05). pH values of squid samples were affected by both irradiation dose and storage temperature (p<0.05). Total microbial load for non- irradiated (control) squid samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures. The results revealed that the combination of irradiation and low temperature storage resulted in a significant reduction of microbial growth and extend the shelf life of squid at refrigeration and frozen temperature to about 12 and 90 days respectively. (author)

  3. Ultra-sensitive sensors for weak electromagnetic fields using high-{Tc} SQUIDS for biomagnetism, NDE, and corrosion currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.; Jia, Q.X.; Wu, X.D.; Reagor, D.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The research has directly contributed to a new DOE supported project, three patents (one granted and two submitted), and several potential opportunities for new program funding at the Laboratory. The authors report significant developments extending from basic understanding of and fabrication techniques for high critical-temperature (high-{Tc}) SQUID devices to the development of high-level applications such as the SQUID Microscope. The development of ramp edge geometry and silver-doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) electrodes has tremendously improved the performance of high-{Tc} SQUIDS. Recent experiments have proven and quantified the LANL-patented superconducting imaging plane gradiometry concept. A SQUID microscope, developed largely under this project, has recently acquired data that demonstrated exceptional sensitivity a nd resolution. New techniques for background noise suppression, needed to use the extraordinarily sensitive SQUID sensors in unshielded environments, have also been developed. Finally, initial investigations to use SQUIDs in a basic physics experiment to measure the electric dipole moment of the neutron were very successful.

  4. Influence of gamma irradiation and low temperature storage on the quality and shelf life of squid (Doryteuthis sibogae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjanaik, B.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation is considered as an efficient method for the reduction of microorganisms in food. It has been used to improve the safety and shelf life of food products. The present investigation is aimed at studying the influence of gamma irradiation (3 and 5 kGy and subsequent storage at refrigeration temperature (4oC on the chemical, microbial qualities and extended shelf life of squid (Doryteuthis sibogae. The total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N and trimethyl amine nitrogen values (TMA-N of the irradiated squid samples significantly decreased in comparison with the control (non-irradiated stored at 4oC. The thiobarbituric acid values for the irradiated squid was significantly lower than of the non-irradiated samples stored at 4oC (p<0.05. The pH value of the squid was affected significantly by both, irradiation dose and storage temperature (p<0.05. The total microbial load for the non-irradiated squid samples was higher than those of irradiated samples at 4oC temperature. The results revealed that the combination of irradiation and refrigerated storage resulted in a significant reduction of microbial growth and stabilized the biochemical characteristics of squid.

  5. Ultra-sensitive sensors for weak electromagnetic fields using high-Tc SQUIDS for biomagnetism, NDE, and corrosion currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.; Jia, Q.X.; Wu, X.D.; Reagor, D.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The research has directly contributed to a new DOE supported project, three patents (one granted and two submitted), and several potential opportunities for new program funding at the Laboratory. The authors report significant developments extending from basic understanding of and fabrication techniques for high critical-temperature (high-T c ) SQUID devices to the development of high-level applications such as the SQUID Microscope. The development of ramp edge geometry and silver-doped YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) electrodes has tremendously improved the performance of high-T c SQUIDS. Recent experiments have proven and quantified the LANL-patented superconducting imaging plane gradiometry concept. A SQUID microscope, developed largely under this project, has recently acquired data that demonstrated exceptional sensitivity and resolution. New techniques for background noise suppression, needed to use the extraordinarily sensitive SQUID sensors in unshielded environments, have also been developed. Finally, initial investigations to use SQUIDs in a basic physics experiment to measure the electric dipole moment of the neutron were very successful

  6. Development of a Microwave SQUID-Multiplexed TES Array for MUSTANG-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchfield, S. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, J.; Brevik, J. A.; Cho, H. M.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Dober, B.; Egan, D.; Ford, P.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Marganian, P.; Mason, B. S.; Mates, J. A. B.; McMahon, J.; Mello, M.; Mroczkowski, T.; Romero, C.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L.; White, S.; Whitehead, M.; Young, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    MUSTANG-2 is a 90 GHz feedhorn-coupled, microwave SQUID-multiplexed TES bolometer array in the final stages of development for operation on the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. We present the camera design and report the performance during the first season of observation, in which 64 of the available 215 pixels in the focal plane were populated. We highlight the microwave multiplexing readout technology, which is envisioned as a path to read out the next generation of large pixel-count cryogenic focal planes. In this regard, MUSTANG2 is a pathfinder for this multiplexing technology. We present noise spectra which show no detector noise degradation when read out with microwave SQUID multiplexing, and we present first light images of Jupiter and M87, which demonstrate the end-to-end system performance.

  7. MgB2 junctions and SQUIDs fabricated by focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnell, G; Kang, D-J; Ansell, D A; Lee, H N; Moon, S H; Oh, B; Tarte, E J; Blamire, M G

    2003-01-01

    We have recently developed a technique for fabricating SNS junctions in MgB 2 thin films using a focused ion beam. These junctions show a strong modulation of the critical current by applied magnetic field and microwaves. They also show large I c R N products in excess of 1 mV at 4.2 K making them attractive candidates for a range of superconducting electronics applications. We have made SQUIDs with directly coupled pick-up loops using this technique which show large voltage modulations (175 μV at 10 K) and noise comparable to HTS SQUIDs. Here we will present an overview of our devices along with our latest results

  8. Limits to the observation of coherent oscillations in a SQUID ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diggins, J.

    1995-01-01

    Using the quantum mechanical, lumped component model of a SQUID ring we compute the onset of tunnelling and macroscopic superposition behaviour in the parameter space of the ring. In addition, we make a quantitative estimate of the stability required in the environmental flux to sustain a superposition state. Both these features are of crucial importance to the realisation of experiments aimed at revealing such behaviour. (orig.)

  9. SiGe Integrated Circuit Developments for SQUID/TES Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Beillimaz, C.; Chen, S.; Piat, M.; Goldwurm, A.; Laurent, P.

    2018-03-01

    SiGe integrated circuits dedicated to the readout of superconducting bolometer arrays for astrophysics have been developed since more than 10 years at APC. Whether for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations with the QUBIC ground-based experiment (Aumont et al. in astro-ph.IM, 2016. arXiv:1609.04372) or for the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme with the X-IFU instrument on-board of the ATHENA space mission (Barret et al. in SPIE 9905, space telescopes & instrumentation 2016: UV to γ Ray, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2232432), several kinds of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) (Irwin and Hilton, in ENSS (ed) Cryogenic particle detection, Springer, Berlin, 2005) arrays have been investigated. To readout such superconducting detector arrays, we use time or frequency domain multiplexers (TDM, FDM) (Prêle in JINST 10:C08015, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-0221/10/08/C08015) with Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUID). In addition to the SQUID devices, low-noise biasing and amplification are needed. These last functions can be obtained by using BiCMOS SiGe technology in an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). ASIC technology allows integration of highly optimised circuits specifically designed for a unique application. Moreover, we could reach very low-noise and wide band amplification using SiGe bipolar transistor either at room or cryogenic temperatures (Cressler in J Phys IV 04(C6):C6-101, 1994. https://doi.org/10.1051/jp4:1994616). This paper discusses the use of SiGe integrated circuits for SQUID/TES readout and gives an update of the last developments dedicated to the QUBIC telescope and to the X-IFU instrument. Both ASIC called SQmux128 and AwaXe are described showing the interest of such SiGe technology for SQUID multiplexer controls.

  10. Design and Performance of the Multiplexed SQUID/TES Array at Ninety Gigahertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchfield, Sara; Ade, Peter; Aguirre, James; Brevik, Justus A.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Datta, Rahul; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon R.; Dober, Bradley; Duff, Shannon M.; Egan, Dennis; Ford, Pam; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent; Knowles, Kenda; Marganian, Paul; Mason, Brian Scott; Mates, John A. B.; McMahon, Jeff; Mello, Melinda; Mroczkowski, Tony; Romero, Charles; Sievers, Jonathon; Tucker, Carole; Vale, Leila R.; Vissers, Michael; White, Steven; Whitehead, Mark; Ullom, Joel; Young, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We present the array performance and astronomical images from early science results from MUSTANG-2, a 90 GHz feedhorn-coupled, microwave SQUID-multiplexed TES bolometer array operating on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). MUSTANG-2 was installed on the GBT on December 2, 2016 and immediately began commissioning efforts, followed by science observations, which are expected to conclude June 2017. The feedhorn and waveguide-probe-coupled detector technology is a mature technology, which has been used on instrument including the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the Atacama B-mode Search telescope. The microwave SQUID readout system developed for MUSTANG-2 currently reads out 66 detectors with a single coaxial cable and will eventually allow thousands of detectors to be multiplexed. This microwave SQUID multiplexer combines the proven abilities of millimeterwave TES detectors with the multiplexing capabilities of KIDs with no degradation in noise performance of the detectors. Each multiplexing device is read out using warm electronics consisting of a commercially available ROACH board, a DAC/ADC card, and an Intermediate Frequency mixer circuit. The hardware was originally developed by the UC Berkeley Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronic Research (CASPER) group, whose primary goal is to develop scalable FPGA-based hardware with the flexibility to be used in a wide range of radio signal processing applications. MUSTANG-2 is the first on-sky instrument to use microwave SQUID multiplexing and is available as a shared-risk/PI instrument on the GBT. In MUSTANG-2's first season 7 separate proposals were awarded a total of 230 hours of telescope time.

  11. Giant first-forbidden resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krmpotic, F.; Nakayama, K.; Sao Paulo Univ.; Pio Galeao, A.; Sao Paulo Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on first-forbidden charge-exchange resonances are discussed in the framework of a schematic model. We also evaluate the screening of the weak coupling constants induced by both the giant resonances and the δ-isobar. It is shown that the last effect does not depend on the multipolarity of the one-particle moment. Due to the same reason, the fraction of the reaction strength pushed up into the δ-resonance region is always the same regardless of the quantum numbers carried by the excitation. Simple expressions are derived for the dependence of the excitation energies of the first-forbidden giant resonances on the mass number and isospin of the target. The model reproduces consistently both the Gamow-Teller and the first-forbidden resonances. (orig.)

  12. Spinal cord giant arteriovenous fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymard, A.; Reizine, D.; Marciano, S.; Cervigon, E.G.; Gelbert, F.; Merland, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Giant extramedullary arteriovenous fistulas fed by spinal arteries are a rare type of spinal cord arteriovenous malformation. Among 11 patient (mean age, 20 years) with spinal hemorrhage in childhood, progressive paraplegia, and myelographic and angiographic diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the precised extramedulary location and complications (thrombosis 1). Angiography showed dilated spinal arteries feeding giant, high flow fistulas with much venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was performed in 11 cases, with balloons in seven, particulate embolization in three, and polymerizing agents in one. Complete closures of the shunt with clinical improvement was achieved in seven cases and partial closure with partial clinical recovery in two; there was one case each of paraplegia due to involuntary venous blockage by the balloon, and fatal bulbomedullary stroke in particulate embolization of cervical location. Careful endovascular techniques represent a valuable treatment in this severe pathology

  13. Giant condyloma acuminatum of vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ramiz Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, A 23 year old married woman who was diagnosed as a case of giant condyloma acuminatum of vulva measuring about 15 x 8 x 3 cm, irregular surface with multiple projections, oval in shape, firm to hard in consistency, mildly tender, exophytic, cauliflower like growth involving the whole vulva (lower part of mons pubis, labia, vestibule, clitoris, around vaginal opening. Another multiple small lesions were present at perineal region but there was no inguinal lymphadenopathy. She underwent a combined electro cauterization and cryotherapy for small to moderate size multiple primary and recurrent warty lesions and wide surgical excision with fasciocutaneous advancement flaps procedure for a giant lesions in the vulva. Excisional biopsies were performed to detect potential malignancy but malignancy was not found histologically. The patient was advised to first follow-up 1 month after operation when multiple small warty lesions were developed and treated and the subsequent follow-ups for 3 months.

  14. SQUID magnetometry and magneto-optics of epitaxial EuS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, K.; Granitzer, P.; Krenn, H.; Kellner, W.; Pascher, H.; Kirchschlager, R.; Janecek, S.

    2004-01-01

    The complicated (H,T)-magnetic phase diagram of EuS is caused by the critical balance between nearest and next nearest neighbour exchange interaction (J NN = 0.119 K and J NNN =-0.1209 K) and leads to various spin arrangements NNSS..., NSN..., NNS, NNN... [NS denotes opposite ferromagnetic order in adjacent (111) planes]. Beside the subtle local exchange of 5d-t 2g electrons and localized holes with neighbouring Eu-4f spins, obviously also the strain status influences the occurrence of these different phases. We investigate the magnetic ordering phenomenon in a strained 2.5 μm EuS film on BaF 2 substrate by SQUID magnetometry and magneto-optics like spectral Faraday- and Kerr-effect measurements for temperatures from 2 K up to 200 K and for magnetic field up to 5 T. The magneto-optical probe monitors the local environment of the photoexcited electron-hole pair, called magnetic exciton, located within a ferromagnetic surrounding (photoinduced magnetic polaron), whereas the integral magnetization measured by SQUID is most sensitive to long-range magnetic ordering. In spite of the dissimilarity of measurement techniques we find an influence of the long-range magnetic order (e.g. of the NNS- or NNN-matrix) on the non-resonant Kerr reflection. The complementarity of SQUID and magneto-optical methods is stringent only in the (resonant) spectral range, where magnetic polarons are formed. (author)

  15. Ultraviolet Laser SQUID Microscope for GaN Blue Light Emitting Diode Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daibo, M; Kamiwano, D; Kurosawa, T; Yoshizawa, M; Tayama, N

    2006-01-01

    We carried out non-contacting measurements of photocurrent distributions in GaN blue light emitting diode (LED) chips using our newly developed ultraviolet (UV) laser SQUID microscope. The UV light generates the photocurrent, and then the photocurrent induces small magnetic fields around the chip. An off-axis arranged HTS-SQUID magnetometer is employed to detect a vector magnetic field whose typical amplitude is several hundred femto-tesla. Generally, it is difficult to obtain Ohmic contacts for p-type GaN because of the low hole concentration in the p-type epitaxial layer and the lack of any available metal with a higher work function compared with the p-type GaN. Therefore, a traditional probecontacted electrical test is difficult to conduct for wide band gap semiconductors without an adequately annealed electrode. Using the UV-laser SQUID microscope, the photocurrent can be measured without any electrical contact. We show the photocurrent vector map which was reconstructed from measured magnetic fields data. We also demonstrate how we found the position of a defect of the electrical short circuits in the LED chip

  16. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kraus, Robert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sayukov, Igor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Larry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wurden, Caroline J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  17. Growth and optical development of the ocular lens of the squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, J G; West, J A; Campbell, M C

    1994-09-01

    Lens focal properties (spherical aberration), diameter and relative anterior/posterior proportions were measured photographically for Japanese squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) at ages 4-6 weeks, 7-9 weeks and 7-8 months. The measures involved photographing the refractive effects of lenses in a physiological solution, with and without an index matching fluid (polyvinylpyrroloidone solution), on a parallel array of fine helium-neon laser beams. Spherical aberration was determined from measurement of back vertex distance. Similar measurements were made on lenses from the eyes of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis). The cephalopod lens develops as hemispheric halves from separate ectodermal sources. The posterior component contributes, on average, about 60% of axial lens diameter in S. lessoniana of all ages and 55% in S. officinalis. However, these proportions vary widely in both species. All lenses of both species show that spherical aberration is neutralized, although small variations in back vertex distance (positive and negative spherical aberration) were measured. Preliminary measures indicate that the refractive index distribution within the cephalopod lens varies in a manner reminiscent of teleost lenses. Squid lenses from animals 7-9 weeks of age were optimally corrected for spherical aberration. Some squid of this age, from a separate tank, showed a high incidence of cataract development. In each case, lens opacification was caused by deterioration of the posterior lens component.

  18. Greatly improved cache update times for conditions data with Frontier/Squid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Dave; Lueking, Lee

    2010-04-01

    The CMS detector project loads copies of conditions data to over 100,000 computer cores worldwide by using a software subsystem called Frontier. This subsystem translates database queries into HTTP, looks up the results in a central database at CERN, and caches the results in an industry-standard HTTP proxy/caching server called Squid. One of the most challenging aspects of any cache system is coherency, that is, ensuring that changes made to the underlying data get propagated out to all clients in a timely manner. Recently, the Frontier system was enhanced to drastically reduce the time for changes to be propagated everywhere without heavily loading servers. The propagation time is now as low as 15 minutes for some kinds of data and no more than 60 minutes for the rest of the data. This was accomplished by taking advantage of an HTTP and Squid feature called If-Modified-Since. In order to use this feature, the Frontier server sends a Last-Modified timestamp, but since modification times are not normally tracked by Oracle databases, a PL/SQL program was developed to track the modification times of database tables. We discuss the details of this caching scheme and the obstacles overcome including database and Squid bugs.

  19. Greatly improved cache update times for conditions data with Frontier/Squid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykstra, Dave; Lueking, Lee; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The CMS detector project loads copies of conditions data to over 100,000 computer cores worldwide by using a software subsystem called Frontier. This subsystem translates database queries into HTTP, looks up the results in a central database at CERN, and caches the results in an industry-standard HTTP proxy/caching server called Squid. One of the most challenging aspects of any cache system is coherency, that is, ensuring that changes made to the underlying data get propagated out to all clients in a timely manner. Recently, the Frontier system was enhanced to drastically reduce the time for changes to be propagated everywhere without heavily loading servers. The propagation time is now as low as 15 minutes for some kinds of data and no more than 60 minutes for the rest of the data. This was accomplished by taking advantage of an HTTP and Squid feature called If-Modified-Since. In order to use this feature, the Frontier server sends a Last-Modified timestamp, but since modification times are not normally tracked by Oracle databases, a PL/SQL program was developed to track the modification times of database tables. We discuss the details of this caching scheme and the obstacles overcome including database and Squid bugs.

  20. Ribosomal RNAs synthesized by isolated squid nerves and ganglia differ from native ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone-Capano, C; Crispino, M; Menichini, E; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-01

    The large rRNA of the squid comprises two chains that may be dissociated by heating at 65 degrees C. A single chain constitutes the small rRNA. Surprisingly, the RNAs synthesized by dissected squid fin nerves and stellate nerves and ganglia differed in size from native rRNAs and did not manifest thermal instability. Nonetheless, they resembled native rRNAs in relative abundance, subcellular distribution, lack of poly(A), and metabolic stability. In addition, newly synthesized RNA was localized in nerve and glial cells, as shown by autoradiographic analysis, and was assembled into 80S ribosomes, which supported the synthesis of neuron-specific neurofilament proteins. Following incubation of nerves and ganglia for >10 h, native rRNAs started to disappear, while two major newly synthesized RNAs progressively accumulated. As a result, after 20 h, native rRNAs were substituted by the two novel RNAs. With use of 32P-cDNA synthesized from the latter RNAs as a probe, the novel RNAs demonstrated a considerable degree of homology with native rRNA in northern analysis. Taken together, the data suggest that in dissected squid nerves and ganglia, the synthesis of native rRNAs is gradually terminated while two novel rRNAs are being synthesized, presumably as a correlate of reactive gliosis and/or neuronal degeneration/regeneration.

  1. SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator for Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Neubert, R; Nietzsche, S

    2005-01-01

    This contribution presents a LTS-SQUID based Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) for detecting dark currents, generated e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming X-FEL project at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradients of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The measurement of the undesired field emission of electrons (the so-called dark current) in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a high performance LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the extracted dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil (inner diameter: about 100 mm) for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz was achieved without the pick-up coil. Now, ...

  2. Hypoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense system of juvenile jumbo squids in oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) is a large oceanic squid endemic off the Eastern Tropical Pacific that undertakes diel vertical migrations into mesopelagic oxygen minimum zones. One of the expected physiological effects of such migration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the surface, promoted by the transition between hypoxia and reoxygenation states. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy expenditure rates and the antioxidant stress strategies of juvenile D. gigas under normoxia and hypoxia, namely by quantifying oxygen consumption rates, antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], heat shock protein expression (Hsp70/Hsc70), and lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. A high significant decrease (68%) in squid's metabolic rates was observed during hypoxia (p0.05), with the latter indicating no enhancement of lipid peroxidation (i.e. cellular damage) at the warmer and normoxic surface waters. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how this species is quickly responding to the impacts of environmental stressors coupled with global climate change.

  3. SQUID microscopy of magnetic field induced in solar cell by laser spot irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Tadayuki; Miyato, Yuji; Itozaki, Hideo

    A solar cell with surface stripe electrodes was investigated by laser-superconducting quantum interference device microscopy (laser-SQUID microscopy) using two scan methods: the standard method and our new approach. In the standard method, the sample was raster scanned while the positions of the laser irradiation spot and the SQUID were fixed. The resulting magnetic images reflected some defects related to the grain boundaries on the solar cell. Background contrast fluctuations also exist in the images. For a better understanding of these fluctuations, we developed a method to investigate the photocurrent distributions on the solar cell around the laser spot. In this method, the sample was raster scanned with the laser spot fixed to a certain position by means of an optical fiber. We converted the magnetic images of the sample to photocurrent images. The results showed that the anisotropic photocurrent mainly flowed along the electrode near the laser spot rather than in the area around the spot. Therefore, the arrangement of the surface stripe electrodes affected the magnetic images obtained by the standard method in laser-SQUID microscopy.

  4. Scanning SQUID microscope with an in-situ magnetization/demagnetization field for geological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Liu, Xiaohong; Qin, Huafeng; Wei, Zhao; Kong, Xiangyang; Liu, Qingsong; Song, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic properties of rocks are crucial for paleo-, rock-, environmental-magnetism, and magnetic material sciences. Conventional rock magnetometers deal with bulk properties of samples, whereas scanning microscope can map the distribution of remanent magnetization. In this study, a new scanning microscope based on a low-temperature DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) equipped with an in-situ magnetization/demagnetization device was developed. To realize the combination of sensitive instrument as SQUID with high magnetizing/demagnetizing fields, the pick-up coil, the magnetization/demagnetization coils and the measurement mode of the system were optimized. The new microscope has a field sensitivity of 250 pT/√Hz at a coil-to-sample spacing of ∼350 μm, and high magnetization (0-1 T)/ demagnetization (0-300 mT, 400 Hz) functions. With this microscope, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition and the according alternating field (AF) demagnetization curves can be obtained for each point without transferring samples between different procedures, which could result in position deviation, waste of time, and other interferences. The newly-designed SQUID microscope, thus, can be used to investigate the rock magnetic properties of samples at a micro-area scale, and has a great potential to be an efficient tool in paleomagnetism, rock magnetism, and magnetic material studies.

  5. Trace element concentrations in the top predator jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) from the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Rosa, Rui

    2014-04-01

    Jumbo (or Humboldt) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a large jet-propelled top oceanic predator off the Eastern Pacific. The present study reports, for the first time, concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb in gills, mantle and digestive gland of this powerful pelagic squid in the Gulf of California. Zinc and Cu were the most abundant elements. All elements, with the exception of As, were largely stored in digestive gland; particularly Cd that reached concentrations between 57 and 509 µg g(-1). Significant relationships between tissues were found for Co (digestive gland-gills), As (gills-mantle) and Cd (digestive gland-mantle). Proportionality of Cd concentrations between mantle and digestive gland suggested that detoxification capacity by digestive gland was insufficient to avoid the transfer of this element to mantle and other tissues. Nonetheless, Cd concentrations in the mantle were always below the regulatory limit and, therefore lack of constraints for human consumption. On the basis of the fishery landings, one may estimate that up to 1t of Cd can be annually removed by jumbo squid fisheries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and Characterization of Low-noise Dewar for High-sensitivity SQUID Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; Kim, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated the low noise liquid helium(LHe) dewar with a different shape of thermal shield to apply the 64-channel SQUID(Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) gradiometer. The first shape of thermal shield was made of an aluminum plate with a wide width of 100 mm slit and the other shape was modified with a narrow width of 20 mm slit. The two types of dewars were estimated by comparing the thermal noise and the signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) of magnetocardiography(MCG) using the 1st order SQUID gradiometer system cooled each dewar. The white noise was different as a point of the dewar. The noise was increased as close as the edge of dewar, and also increased at the thermal shield with the more wide width slit. The white noise of the dewar with thermal shield of 100 mm slit was 6.5 fT/Hz 1/2 at the center of dewar and 25 fT/Hz 1/2 at the edge, and the white noise of the other one was 3.5 - 7 fT/Hz 1/2 . We measured the MCG using 64-channel SQUID gradiometer cooled at each LHe dewar and compared the SNR of MCG signal. The SNR was improved of 10 times at the LHe dewar with a modified thermal shield.

  7. HTS-SQUID NDE Technique for Pipes based on Ultrasonic Guided Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsukade, Y; Masutani, N; Teranishi, S; Masamoto, K; Kanenaga, S; Adachi, S; Tanabe, K

    2017-01-01

    This article describes research on the novel high-temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for metallic pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves. We constructed HTS-SQUID NDE system for pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves, which were generated and received by means of the magnetostrictive effects. Using the system, we measured magnetic signals due to T (0, 1) mode ultrasonic guided waves that transmitted on aluminium pipe, and investigated influences of measurement parameters to the magnetic signals, such as direction of a HTS-SQUID gradiometer, lift-off distance, and intensity and frequency of input current fed to a magnetostrictive transmitter. With the gradiometer oriented parallel to the pipe axis, more than 10 times larger signals were measured compared with that oriented perpendicular to the pipe axis. Magnetic signals measured by the gradiometer were inverse proportional to the power of the list- off distance, and proportional to the intensity of the input current up to 1 A pp . Relation between the frequency of the input current and the measured signal was shown and discussed. (paper)

  8. Preparation and evaluation of squid ink polysaccharide-chitosan as a wound-healing sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Lin, Jiali; Li, Sidong; Deng, Yifeng; Kong, Songzhi; Hong, Pengzhi; Yang, Ping; Liao, Mingneng; Hu, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    A new type of wound healing agent was developed using two marine biomaterials (squid ink polysaccharide and chitosan) as carriers and calcium chloride as an initiator for coagulation. Based on central composite design-response surface methodology, comprehensive evaluation of appearance quality for composite sponges and water absorbency were used as evaluation indices to identify the optimized preparation conditions and further evaluate the performance of the squid ink polysaccharide-chitosan sponge (SIP-CS). The optimized formulation of SIP-CS was as follows: chitosan concentration, 2.29%; squid ink polysaccharide concentration, 0.55%; and calcium chloride concentration, 2.82%, at a volume ratio of 15:5:2. SIP-CS was conducive to sticking on the wound, characterized by the spongy property, strong absorptivity, and tackiness. Rabbit ear arterial, hepatic, and femoral artery hemorrhage experiments indicated that, compared with chitosan dressings and absorbable gelatin, the hemostatic times were shorter and the bleeding volume was smaller. Furthermore, SIP-CS absorbed a large amount of hemocytes, leading to rapid hemostasis. The healing areas and wound pathological sections in scalded New Zealand rabbits indicated that SIP-CS promoted wound healing more rapidly than chitosan and better than commercially available burn cream. Thus, SIP-CS is a good wound healing agent for rapid hemostasis, promoting burn/scalded skin healing, and protecting from wound infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Utilization of squid pen for the efficient production of chitosanase and antioxidants through prolonged autoclave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, San-Lang; Wu, Pei-Chen; Liang, Tzu-Wen

    2009-05-26

    We have developed a culture system for efficient production of chitosanase by Bacillus sp. TKU004. TKU004 was cultivated by using squid pen powder as the sole carbon/nitrogen source. The effects of autoclave treatments of the medium on the production of chitosanase were investigated. Autoclave treatment of squid pen powder for 45 min remarkably promoted enzyme productivity. When the culture medium containing an initial squid pen powder concentration of 3% was autoclaved for 45 min, the chitosanase activity was optimal and reached 0.14-0.16 U/mL. In addition, extracellular surfactant-stable chitosanase was purified from the TKU004 culture supernatant. The antioxidant activity of TKU004 culture supernatant was determined through the scavenging ability of DPPH, with 70% per mL. With this method, we have shown that marine wastes can be utilized efficiently through prolonged autoclave treatments to generate a high value-added product, and have revealed its hidden potential in the production of functional foods.

  10. HTS-SQUID NDE Technique for Pipes based on Ultrasonic Guided Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukade, Y.; Masutani, N.; Teranishi, S.; Masamoto, K.; Kanenaga, S.; Adachi, S.; Tanabe, K.

    2017-07-01

    This article describes research on the novel high-temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for metallic pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves. We constructed HTS-SQUID NDE system for pipes based on ultrasonic guided waves, which were generated and received by means of the magnetostrictive effects. Using the system, we measured magnetic signals due to T (0, 1) mode ultrasonic guided waves that transmitted on aluminium pipe, and investigated influences of measurement parameters to the magnetic signals, such as direction of a HTS-SQUID gradiometer, lift-off distance, and intensity and frequency of input current fed to a magnetostrictive transmitter. With the gradiometer oriented parallel to the pipe axis, more than 10 times larger signals were measured compared with that oriented perpendicular to the pipe axis. Magnetic signals measured by the gradiometer were inverse proportional to the power of the list- off distance, and proportional to the intensity of the input current up to 1 App. Relation between the frequency of the input current and the measured signal was shown and discussed.

  11. Optimization of a digital SQUID magnetometer in terms of noise and distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkamp, I; Toepfer, H; Wetzstein, O; Kunert, J; Stolz, R; Meyer, H-G; Ortlepp, T

    2012-01-01

    The digital SQUID magnetometer takes advantage of flux quantization in a superconducting loop in order to measure magnetic fields. The core element of the digital SQUID is a Josephson comparator with a superconducting antenna loop attached to one of its junctions. Evaluation of the circuit from the system’s point of view requires an analysis in the frequency domain. In order to obtain a high-resolution fast Fourier transform, large datasets are necessary which are difficult to generate with transient simulation tools. In this work we derive a behavioural model for the digital SQUID in order to overcome restrictions imposed by transient simulation. By means of this model the influence of the comparator grey zone and the input loop inductance on the system performance was analysed. In order to assess the system, evaluation criteria based on the power spectral density were applied, which are commonly used for characterization of semiconductor analogue to digital converters. As a result of this study, design guidelines for an optimum antenna inductance depending on the comparator grey zone are derived, allowing us to achieve an optimum system performance in terms of noise and distortion. (paper)

  12. Chitinolytic Bacteria-Assisted Conversion of Squid Pen and Its Effect on Dyes and Pigments Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Wen Liang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to produce chitosanase by fermenting from squid pen, and recover the fermented squid pen for dye removal by adsorption. One chitosanase induced from squid pen powder (SPP-containing medium by Bacillus cereus TKU034 was purified in high purification fold (441 and high yield of activity recovery (51% by ammonium sulfate precipitation and combined column chromatography. The SDS-PAGE results showed its molecular mass to be around 43 kDa. The TKU034 chitosanase used for the chitooligomers preparation was studied. The enzyme products revealed that the chitosanase could degrade chitosan with various degrees of polymerization, ranging from 3 to 9, as well as the chitosanase in an endolytic manner. Besides, the fermented SPP was recovered and displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 99.5% for the disperse dyes (red, yellow, blue, and black than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40 and Tartrazine (Y4. The adsorbed R40 on the unfermented SPP and the fermented SPP was eluted by distilled water and 1 M NaOH to confirm the dye adsorption mechanism. The fermented SPP had a slightly higher adsorption capacity than the unfermented, and elution of the dye from the fermented SPP was easier than from the unfermented. The main dye adsorption mechanism of fermented SPP was physical adsorption, while the adsorption mechanism of unfermented SPP was chemical adsorption.

  13. Chitinolytic Bacteria-Assisted Conversion of Squid Pen and Its Effect on Dyes and Pigments Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Lo, Bo-Chang; Wang, San-Lang

    2015-07-23

    The aim of this work was to produce chitosanase by fermenting from squid pen, and recover the fermented squid pen for dye removal by adsorption. One chitosanase induced from squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium by Bacillus cereus TKU034 was purified in high purification fold (441) and high yield of activity recovery (51%) by ammonium sulfate precipitation and combined column chromatography. The SDS-PAGE results showed its molecular mass to be around 43 kDa. The TKU034 chitosanase used for the chitooligomers preparation was studied. The enzyme products revealed that the chitosanase could degrade chitosan with various degrees of polymerization, ranging from 3 to 9, as well as the chitosanase in an endolytic manner. Besides, the fermented SPP was recovered and displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 99.5%) for the disperse dyes (red, yellow, blue, and black) than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazine (Y4). The adsorbed R40 on the unfermented SPP and the fermented SPP was eluted by distilled water and 1 M NaOH to confirm the dye adsorption mechanism. The fermented SPP had a slightly higher adsorption capacity than the unfermented, and elution of the dye from the fermented SPP was easier than from the unfermented. The main dye adsorption mechanism of fermented SPP was physical adsorption, while the adsorption mechanism of unfermented SPP was chemical adsorption.

  14. Chitinolytic Bacteria-Assisted Conversion of Squid Pen and Its Effect on Dyes and Pigments Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Lo, Bo-Chang; Wang, San-Lang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to produce chitosanase by fermenting from squid pen, and recover the fermented squid pen for dye removal by adsorption. One chitosanase induced from squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium by Bacillus cereus TKU034 was purified in high purification fold (441) and high yield of activity recovery (51%) by ammonium sulfate precipitation and combined column chromatography. The SDS-PAGE results showed its molecular mass to be around 43 kDa. The TKU034 chitosanase used for the chitooligomers preparation was studied. The enzyme products revealed that the chitosanase could degrade chitosan with various degrees of polymerization, ranging from 3 to 9, as well as the chitosanase in an endolytic manner. Besides, the fermented SPP was recovered and displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 99.5%) for the disperse dyes (red, yellow, blue, and black) than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazine (Y4). The adsorbed R40 on the unfermented SPP and the fermented SPP was eluted by distilled water and 1 M NaOH to confirm the dye adsorption mechanism. The fermented SPP had a slightly higher adsorption capacity than the unfermented, and elution of the dye from the fermented SPP was easier than from the unfermented. The main dye adsorption mechanism of fermented SPP was physical adsorption, while the adsorption mechanism of unfermented SPP was chemical adsorption. PMID:26213948

  15. Giant Magnetoresistance in Nanogranular Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Glatz, A.; Beloborodov, I. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    We study the giant magnetoresistance of nanogranular magnets in the presence of an external magnetic field and finite temperature. We show that the magnetization of arrays of nanogranular magnets has hysteretic behaviour at low temperatures leading to a double peak in the magnetoresistance which coalesces at high temperatures into a single peak. We numerically calculate the magnetization of magnetic domains and the motion of domain walls in this system using a combined mean-field approach and...

  16. Giant thermoelectric effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.

    2007-11-01

    The paper predicts a giant thermoelectric coefficient in a nanostructure consisting of metallic electrodes periodically patterned over graphene, which is deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate. The Seebeck coefficient in this device attains 30mV/K, this value being among the largest reported ever. The calculations are based on a transfer matrix approach that takes a particular form for graphene-based devices. The results are important for future nanogenerators with applications in the area of sensors, energy harvesting, and scavenging.

  17. Giant pediatric cervicofacial lymphatic malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzou, Salma; Boulaadas, Malik; Essakalli, Leila

    2013-07-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are benign lesions. Most of them are found in head and neck regions as asymptomatic mass, but giant lymphangiomas may affect breathing or swallowing and constitute a major therapeutic challenge. A retrospective analysis of giant head and neck LMs with impairment of respiration or swallow for the past 11 years was performed in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and ENT of the Avicenne Medical University Center. Seven patients with large and extensive LMs of the head and neck were identified. There were 3 males and 4 females with a mean age of 6 years. The predominant reason for referral was airway compromise necessitating tracheostomy (57%) and dysphagia (43%). Three patients had macrocystic lesions; others were considered mixed or microcystic. All the patients underwent surgical excision as a primary treatment modality. Complete surgical resection was realized in 4 patients, and subtotal resection in 3 patients. Of 7 patients, 4 patients had complications including nerve damage and recurrence of the disease. The majority of the patients underwent only a single surgical procedure. Cervicofacial LMs in children should be managed in multidisciplinary setting. Surgery remains the first treatment for managing giant, life-threatening lesions.

  18. Guiding the Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination project is known as the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). It is supervised by a Working Group with members from the European astronomical community ( [1]) that has been responsible for defining the survey strategy and for monitoring the progress. It has been a major challenge to carry out such a public survey in the very short time available. The work by the EIS Team has involved the survey observations at the NTT, development of a pipeline to process the raw data, advanced data reduction, identification of large samples of astronomically "interesting" targets and, not least, the

  19. Giant Planets: Good Neighbors for Habitable Worlds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Eggl, Siegfried; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2018-04-01

    The presence of giant planets influences potentially habitable worlds in numerous ways. Massive celestial neighbors can facilitate the formation of planetary cores and modify the influx of asteroids and comets toward Earth analogs later on. Furthermore, giant planets can indirectly change the climate of terrestrial worlds by gravitationally altering their orbits. Investigating 147 well-characterized exoplanetary systems known to date that host a main-sequence star and a giant planet, we show that the presence of “giant neighbors” can reduce a terrestrial planet’s chances to remain habitable, even if both planets have stable orbits. In a small fraction of systems, however, giant planets slightly increase the extent of habitable zones provided that the terrestrial world has a high climate inertia. In providing constraints on where giant planets cease to affect the habitable zone size in a detrimental fashion, we identify prime targets in the search for habitable worlds.

  20. Solitary ulcerated congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yuen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient with a giant ulcerated nodule over the back since birth was diagnosed as congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG based on clinical and histopathological examination. Congenital giant JXG with ulceration at birth is a rare presentation of JXG and commonly misdiagnosed. This case emphasizes the importance of being aware of the myriad presentations of JXG in order to make a correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary investigations or treatment.

  1. Emulsifying and gelling properties of weakfish myofibrillar proteins as affected by squid mantle myofibrillar proteins in a model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mariel Suarez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to investigate the physicochemical, biochemical and functional characteristics of both the myofibrils (MF and actomyosin (AM of squid mantle (Illex argentinus and weakfish (Cynoscion guatucupa muscles, and evaluate the influence of the addition of myofibrilar proteins from the squid mantle on the physicochemical and functional properties of those of the weakfish. After extraction, purification and characterization of the MF and AM of both species, emulsions of each protein fraction from each muscle were formulated. Mixtures of the MF or AM of both species were also analyzed. The emulsifying properties were monitoring using the Emulsifying Activity Index (EAI and Emulsion Stability (ES. In addition, gel pastes were formulated from the squid mantle, weakfish muscle and the mixture of both species, and the following functional properties of the gels assessed: water holding capacity, colour, textural profile analysis (TPA (hardness, elasticity, cohesiveness, gumminess and gel strength. The EAI values of emulsions formulated with the MF of the mantle were significantly (p<0.05 higher than those formulated from those of weakfish. The incorporation of squid MF in the mixture increased the EAI values. Conversely, the highest ES values were obtained with weakfish MF, and the incorporation of MF weakfish in the mixture increased the ES values. Similar EAI and ES behaviours were observed for the AM of the corresponding species. Irrespective of the thermal treatment, the gel strength of the gelled paste of squid muscle was significantly (p<0.05 lower than that of weakfish muscle and of those obtained with the different mixtures. The behaviours of the expressible moisture (EM from the gelled pastes were similar to those of gel strength. Irrespective of the thermal treatment, the pastes formulated with a high weakfish: mantle ratio showed less water loss. The gelled pastes of squid mantle showed the highest values for whiteness

  2. Giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    Giant resonances built on an excited state of the nucleus at a finite temperature T are studied. The following questions are investigated: how long such collective effects occur in a nucleus when T increases. How the properties of the giant resonances vary when the temperature increases. How the study of giant resonances in hot nuclei can give information on the structure of the nucleus in a highly excited state. The special case of the giant dipole resonance is studied. Some of the experimental results are reviewed and in their theoretical interpretation is discussed. (K.A.). 56 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Seasonal Habitat Patterns of Japanese Common Squid (Todarodes Pacificus Inferred from Satellite-Based Species Distribution Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene D. Alabia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the spatio-temporal distributions of the species habitat in the marine environment is central to effectual resource management and conservation. Here, we examined the potential habitat distributions of Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus in the Sea of Japan during a four-year period. The seasonal patterns of preferential habitat were inferred from species distribution models, built using squid occurrences detected from night-time visible images and remotely-sensed environmental factors. The predicted squid habitat (i.e., areas with high habitat suitability revealed strong seasonal variability, characterized by a reduction of potential habitat, confined off of the southern part of the basin during the winter–spring period (December–May. Apparent expansion of preferential habitat occurred during summer–autumn months (June–November, concurrent with the formation of highly suitable habitat patches in certain regions of the Sea of Japan. These habitat distribution patterns were in response to changes in oceanographic conditions and synchronous with seasonal migration of squid. Moreover, the most important variables regulating the spatio-temporal patterns of suitable habitat were sea surface temperature, depth, sea surface height anomaly, and eddy kinetic energy. These variables could affect the habitat distributions through their impacts on growth and survival of squid, local nutrient transport, and the availability of favorable spawning and feeding grounds.

  4. Extreme plasticity in life-history strategy allows a migratory predator (jumbo squid) to cope with a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Gilly, William F; Markaida, Unai; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; -Brown, Zachary W; Daniel, Patrick; Field, John C; Parassenti, Liz; Liu, Bilin; Campos, Bernardita

    2013-07-01

    Dosidicus gigas (jumbo or Humboldt squid) is a semelparous, major predator of the eastern Pacific that is ecologically and commercially important. In the Gulf of California, these animals mature at large size (>55 cm mantle length) in 1-1.5 years and have supported a major commercial fishery in the Guaymas Basin during the last 20 years. An El Niño event in 2009-2010, was accompanied by a collapse of this fishery, and squid in the region showed major changes in the distribution and life-history strategy. Large squid abandoned seasonal coastal-shelf habitats in 2010 and instead were found in the Salsipuedes Basin to the north, an area buffered from the effects of El Niño by tidal upwelling and a well-mixed water column. The commercial fishery also relocated to this region. Although large squid were not found in the Guaymas Basin from 2010 to 2012, small squid were abundant and matured at an unusually small mantle-length (climate-driven switch in size-at-maturity may allow D. gigas to rapidly adapt to and cope with El Niño. This ability is likely to be an important factor in conjunction with longerterm climate-change and the potential ecological impacts of this invasive predator on marine ecosystems. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Pre-polarization enhancement by dynamic nuclear polarization in SQUID-based ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Kim, Kiwoong; Kang, Chan Seok; Hwang, Seong-min; Lee, Yong-Ho, E-mail: kwkim@kriss.re.k [Brain and Cognition Measurement Laboratory, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Doryong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We achieved enhanced pre-polarization in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based microtesla nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The pre-polarization field is necessary to provide enough signal to noise to perform SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. However, it is quite tricky to deal with the strong transient magnetic field when operating the SQUID in a magnetically shielded room (MSR); besides the direct interference with the sensitive SQUID sensor, the strong magnetic field and its abrupt change generate magnetization in local areas in the MSR and eddy currents along the wall, which makes the NMR measurement difficult. The enhanced {sup 1}H NMR signals of water in TEMPOL and TEMPO solutions were obtained with a relatively weak radio-frequency (rf) field and double-relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROS) at a few mT pre-polarization fields. In our experimental condition, the enhancement factor was near ten in spite of the rf power far below the saturation in both samples.

  6. Pre-polarization enhancement by dynamic nuclear polarization in SQUID-based ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Kim, Kiwoong; Kang, Chan Seok; Hwang, Seong-min; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2010-11-01

    We achieved enhanced pre-polarization in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based microtesla nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The pre-polarization field is necessary to provide enough signal to noise to perform SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. However, it is quite tricky to deal with the strong transient magnetic field when operating the SQUID in a magnetically shielded room (MSR); besides the direct interference with the sensitive SQUID sensor, the strong magnetic field and its abrupt change generate magnetization in local areas in the MSR and eddy currents along the wall, which makes the NMR measurement difficult. The enhanced 1H NMR signals of water in TEMPOL and TEMPO solutions were obtained with a relatively weak radio-frequency (rf) field and double-relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROS) at a few mT pre-polarization fields. In our experimental condition, the enhancement factor was near ten in spite of the rf power far below the saturation in both samples.

  7. Giant magneto-resistance devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Eiichi; Inomata, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    This book deals with the application of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) effects to electronic devices. It will appeal to engineers and graduate students in the fields of electronic devices and materials. The main subjects are magnetic sensors with high resolution and magnetic read heads with high sensitivity, required for hard-disk drives with recording densities of several gigabytes. Another important subject is novel magnetic random-access memories (MRAM) with non-volatile non-destructive and radiation-resistant characteristics. Other topics include future GMR devices based on bipolar spin transistors, spin field-effect transistors (FETs) and double-tunnel junctions.

  8. Analysis of giant electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngwook P; Seo, Yongsok

    2013-07-15

    The yield stress dependence on electric field strength for giant electrorheological (GER) fluids over the full range of electric fields was examined using Seo's scaling function which incorporated both the polarization and the conductivity models. If a proper scaling was applied to the yield stress data to collapse them onto a single curve, the Seo's scaling function could correctly fit the yield stress behavior of GER suspensions, even at very high electric field strengths. The model predictions were also compared with recently proposed Choi et al.'s model to allow a consideration of the universal framework of ER fluids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of alternative HTSC Josephson junctions based on weak links across artificial barriers and their application in DC-SQUIDs with adapted incoupling systems. Final report; Schaffung alternativer HTSL-Josephsonkontakte auf Basis von schwach supraleitenden Verbindungen ueber kuenstlich erzeugte Barrieren sowie deren Einsatz in DC-SQUIDs mit angepassten Einkoppelsystemen (Alternative HTSL-Josephsonkontakte und DC-SQIDs). Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Schmidl, F.; Schneidewind, H.; Linzen, S.; Doerrer, L.; Pfuch, A.; Schmauder, T.; Kaiser, G.; Matthes, A.; Machalett, F.; Barholz, K.U.; Brabetz, S.

    1996-06-01

    Based on improved thin film technologies for high-Tc superconductors (YBCO, Bi-2212) Josephson junctions and DC-SQUIDs were developed. A lot of different kinds of junctions (bicrystal, step-edge, SNS-like, biepitaxial etc.) were investigated for comparison. DC-SQUIDs and planar SQUID-gradiometers with these junctions show parameters to realize first applications in nondestructive evaluation or biomagnetism, respectively. (orig.) [Deutsch] Auf Grundlage von verbesserten Duennschichttechnologien fuer Hochtemperatursupraleiter (YBCO, Bi-2212) wurden Josephsonkontake und DC-SQUIDs entwickelt. Eine Vielzahl von Kontaktypen (Bikristall, Step-Edge, SNS-artige, biepitaktische etc.) wurden vergleichend untersucht. Die damit realisierten DC-SQUIDs und planarer SQUID-Gradiometer zeigen Parameter, die erste Anwendungen in der zerstoerungsfreien Werkstoffpruefung oder dem Biomagnetismus ermoeglichen. (orig.)

  10. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.

  11. Giant Cell Tumor of the Infratemporal Fossa

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Kevin; Singh, Anand; Kuriakose, M. Abraham; Loree, Thom R.; Harris, Kenneth; Rubenfeld, Ari; Goodloe, Samuel; Hicks, Wesley L.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are an uncommon neoplasm; most are found in the long bones, formed by endochondral ossification. This article presents a case of giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa, which by radiographic and clinical examination appears to have originated in the squamous portion of the temporal bone.

  12. Giant Cell Tumor of the Infratemporal Fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Kevin; Singh, Anand; Kuriakose, M. Abraham; Loree, Thom R.; Harris, Kenneth; Rubenfeld, Ari; Goodloe, Samuel; Hicks, Wesley L.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are an uncommon neoplasm; most are found in the long bones, formed by endochondral ossification. This article presents a case of giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa, which by radiographic and clinical examination appears to have originated in the squamous portion of the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171141

  13. Evolution and history of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Thomas Harvey

    1986-01-01

    Ancient ancestors of the giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) were widespread throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere during the late Mesozoic Period. Climatic conditions changed, forcing the more recent ancestors of present giant sequoia into the southwestern United States. The native range is now restricted to the west slope of the Sierra...

  14. Giant bladder diverticulum in a boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ozcakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the bladder diverticula in children are seen commonly which is association with infravesical obstruction or neurogenic bladder function, the case of giant congenital bladder diverticula are rare. In this paper, an 11 years old boy with giant bladder diverticula presenting urinary infections is evaluated in terms of diagnosis and management by current literature.

  15. Nutritional evaluation of the giant grassropper (Zonocerus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biological value of giant grasshopper protein (Zonocerus variegatus) was evaluated by comparing the weight gained, food efficiency ratio (FER), protein efficiency ratio (PER) of rats fed standard laboratory chow with that of rats fed giant grasshopper, Soyabean(Glycine max) and crayfish. The effect of high fibre content ...

  16. Giant lower oesophageal ulcer Bushman baby

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... Giant lower oesophageal ulcer. Bushman baby. A case report. J. J. HEYDENRYCH, A. D. KEET. •. ID a. Summary. The case of a giant, penetrating lower oesophageal ulcer in a 14-month-old Bushman baby is reported. ... crying precluded a thorough systematic examination. Food was immediately rejected.

  17. Effect of Melanin Free Ink Extracted From Squid (Loligo sp.) on Proximate and Sensory Characteristics of Soft-Bone Milkfish (Chanos chanos) During Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarni Agustini, Tri; Hadiyanto; Wijayanti, Ima; Amalia, Ulfah; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2018-02-01

    Antioxidant could be extracted and isolated from squid inks. Squid ink in the form of melanin free ink (MFI) could be act as an electron donor which can stabilize free radicals in lipid oxidation. This study was carried out to assess the antioxidant activity of squid inks converted into MFI in different dilution and to optimize the extraction conditions for the application of MFI as an antioxidative agent on fish product. Three different types of MFI extracts i.e : pure squid ink, squid ink with 5 times dilution and squid ink with 10 times dilutions by using cooled ionized water (4°C). The ink was then centrifuged at 18.000 x g for 30 minutes at cooled centrifuge (4°C) followed by DPPH analysis. The results showed that the IC50 of MFI extracts were 2.84 ppm; 1.11 ppm and 0.34 ppm, respectively (p < 0.05). The results indicated that squid ink with 10 times dilution in extraction of MFI had the highest value in free radical inhibitory. Although the IC50 of three different dilutions are equally low, and are considered as very strong antioxidative agent, however, it showed that the MFI extracted from squid ink had the ability to prevent free radical

  18. From red giants to planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, S.

    1982-01-01

    The transition from red giants to planetary nebulae is studied by comparing the spectral characteristics of red giant envelopes and planetary nebulae. Observational and theoretical evidence both suggest that remnants of red giant envelopes may still be present in planetary nebula systems and should have significant effects on their formation. The dynamical effects of the interaction of stellar winds from central stars of planetary nebulae with the remnant red giant envelopes are evaluated and the mechanism found to be capable of producing the observed masses and momenta of planetary nebulae. The observed mass-radii relation of planetary nebulae may also be best explained by the interacting winds model. The possibility that red giant mass loss, and therefore the production of planetary nebulae, is different between Population I and II systems is also discussed

  19. Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Maria; Hanlon, R.T.; Tyack, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    an evolutionary selection pressure on cephalopods to develop a mechanism for detecting and evading sound-emitting toothed whale predators. Ultrasonic detection has evolved in some insects to avoid echolocating bats, and it can be hypothesized that cephalopods might have evolved similar ultrasound detection......Toothed whales use intense ultrasonic clicks to echolocate prey and it has been hypothesized that they also acoustically debilitate their prey with these intense sound pulses to facilitate capture. Cephalopods are an important food source for toothed whales, and there has probably been...... as an anti-predation measure. We test this hypothesis in the squid Loligo pealeii in a playback experiment using intense echolocation clicks from two squid-eating toothed whale species. Twelve squid were exposed to clicks at two repetition rates (16 and 125 clicks per second) with received sound pressure...

  20. Highly balanced single-layer high-temperature superconductor SQUID gradiometer freely movable within the Earth's magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, Volkmar; IJsselsteijn, Rob; May, Torsten; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2003-01-01

    We developed a gradiometer system based on a single-layer high-temperature superconductor dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), which can be freely moved within the Earth's magnetic field during measurement. The problem of circumferential shielding currents in the parallel gradiometer pick-up loop is solved by the use of an appropriately designed magnetometer SQUID integrated on the gradiometer chip. The magnetometer's feedback coil of the flux-locked loop is laid out as a small Helmholtz coil pair, thus keeping the homogeneous magnetic field constant for both the magnetometer and the gradiometer. Therefore, the balance of the directly coupled gradiometer SQUID is enhanced from 100 up to 3800. The noise limited magnetic field gradient resolution of 45 pT m -1 Hz -1/2 is preserved down to frequencies of several Hz even after strong motion in the Earth's magnetic field

  1. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments were done to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. We have determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to approx.15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. Other observations in 208 Pb include the absence of a significant branch from the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) to the 3 - state at 2.6 MeV, a strong branch to a 3 - state at 4.97 MeV from the same region, and transitions to various 1 - states between 5 to 7 MeV from the E* approx. 14 MeV region (EO resonance)

  2. Seasonal Changes of Relationship Between Marine Environment and Squid Fishing Resources in North Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Feng-hua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship of marine environment and squid fishing fluctuation in North Pacific Ocean was analyzed with the method of production gravity center and generalized additive model(GAM, through the surface temperature, sea chlorophyll and ocean current data got by satellite remote sensing inversion technology, and the statistic of boat fishing in the North Pacific from 2002 to 2012. The results showed that gravity center of fisheries was located in the eastern and central fishing grounds in May and June. The range was 168°~171°E, 38°~39°N. Gravity center of fisheries was located in western traditional fishing grounds from July to November with range of 150°~160°E, 40°~44°N. Gravity center of fisheries had obvious seasonal changes. GAM module analysis indicated that appropriate sea surface temperature scope of high squid fisheries was 14~19 ℃. The appropriate chlorophyll concentration scope of high squid fisheries was 0.22~0.55 mg·m-3. The distribution range was 154°~157°E in longitude, and 41°~44°N in latitude. There was a feeding migration to north and spawning migration to south every year, its relationship with environmental factors showed different characteristics, especially the best correlation of sea surface temperature. The gravity center of fisheries and sea surface temperature were positively correlated during the northward migration from May to September, while negatively correlated during the south migration from September to November. It showed obvious seasonal changes. Current also had an important impact on fisheries. Under the interaction of Kuroshio and Oyashio, high catch fishing grounds usually located in the forward of Kuroshio and nearby the northern side of Oyashio, with the shift of warm and cold current changing.

  3. Development of transition edge sensors with rf-SQUID based multiplexing system for the HOLMES experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, A.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fowler, J.; Gard, J.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Hilton, G.; Giachero, A.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Nucciotti, A.; Schmidt, D.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the neutrino mass is one the most compelling issue in particle physics. HOLMES is an experiment funded by the European Research Council for a direct measurement of neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a precise measurement of the end point of the Electron Capture decay spectrum of 163Ho in order to extract information on neutrino mass with a sensitivity as low as 1 eV. HOLMES, in its final configuration will deploy a 1000 pixel array of low temperature microcalorimeters: each calorimeter consists of an absorber, where the Ho atoms will be implanted, coupled to a Transition Edge Sensor thermometer. The detectors will be kept at the working temperature of ˜70 mK using a dilution refrigerator. In order to gather the required 3 × 1013 events in a three year long data taking with a pile up fraction as low as 10-4, detectors must fulfill rather high speed and resolution requirements, i.e. 10 µs rise time and 4 eV resolution. To ensure such performances with an efficient read out technique for very large detectors array kept at low temperature inside a cryostat is no trivial matter: at the moment, the most appealing read out technique applicable to large arrays of Transition Edge Sensors is rf-SQUID multiplexing. It is based on the use of rf-SQUIDs as input devices with flux ramp modulation for linearisation purposes; the rf-SQUID is then coupled to a super-conductive λ/4-wave resonator in the GHz range, and the modulated signal is finally read out using the homodyne technique.

  4. A novel squid pen chitosan/hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate composite for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavandi, Amin, E-mail: amin.shavandi@postgrad.otago.ac.nz [Department of Food Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Department of Applied Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A. [Department of Food Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Sun, Zhifa; Ali, Azam [Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Gould, Maree [Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2015-10-01

    Squid pen chitosan was used in the fabrication of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) obtained from waste mussel shells were used as the calcium phosphate source. The composite was prepared using 2.5% tripolyphosphate (TPP) and 1% glycerol as a cross-linker and plasticizer, respectively. The weight percent (wt.%) ratios of the ceramic components in the composite were 20/10/70, 30/20/50 and 40/30/30 (HA/β-TCP/Chi). The biodegradation rate and structural properties of the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microCT(μCT) results indicated that the composites have a well defined lamellar structure with an average pore size of 200 μm. The porosity of the composites decreased from 88 to 56% by increasing the ratio of HA/β-TCP from 30 to 70%. After 28 days of incubation in a physiological solution, the scaffolds were degraded by approximately 30%. In vitro investigations showed that the composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. The obtained data suggests that the squid pen chitosan composites are potential candidates for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • Biocomposite scaffolds were made from mussel shells HA and β-TCP, and squid pin chitosan. • The porosity of the composites decreased with an increase in HA/β-TCP ratio. • Composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. • Composite containing 50% HA and β-TCP had the best mechanical properties.

  5. CO2-level Dependent Effects of Ocean Acidification on Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, Early Life History

    KAUST Repository

    Zakroff, Casey J.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to lead to global oceanic decreases in pH of up to 0.3 units within the next 100 years. However, those levels are already being reached currently in coastal regions due to natural CO2 variability. Squid are a vital component of the pelagic ecosystem, holding a unique niche as a highly active predatory invertebrate and major prey stock for upper trophic levels. This study examined the effects of a range of ocean acidification regimes on the early life history of a coastal squid species, the Atlantic longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. Eggs were raised in a flow-through ocean acidification system at CO2 levels ranging from ambient (400ppm) to 2200ppm. Time to hatching, hatching efficiency, and hatchling mantle lengths, yolk sac sizes, and statoliths were all examined to elucidate stress effects. Delays in hatching time of at least a day were seen at exposures above 1300ppm in all trials under controlled conditions. Mantle lengths were significantly reduced at exposures above 1300 ppm. Yolk sac sizes varied between CO2 treatments, but no distinct pattern emerged. Statoliths were increasingly porous and malformed as CO2 exposures increased, and were significantly reduced in surface area at exposures above 1300ppm. Doryteuthis pealeii appears to be able to withstand acidosis stress without major effects up to 1300ppm, but is strongly impacted past that threshold. Since yolk consumption did not vary among treatments, it appears that during its early life stages, D. pealeii reallocates its available energy budget away from somatic growth and system development in order to mitigate the stress of acidosis.

  6. Proteomics analysis of crude squid ink isolated from Sepia esculenta for their antimicrobial, antibiofilm and cytotoxic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ponnuchamy; Kannan, Mani; ArunPrasanna, Vimalanathan; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Vijayakumar, Sekar

    2018-03-01

    The present study deals with the proteomics analysis of crude squid ink isolated from Sepia esculenta for their antibacterial, antifungal, antibiofilm and cytotoxic properties. To achieve this, SDS-PAGE was used to separate proteins as bands, In-gel trypsin digested and analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A total of 4 bands were identified by MASCOT search analysis namely astacin-like squid metalloprotease type I (ASMT-I), 70 kDa neurofilament protein (NP), uncharacterized protein LOC106181966 isoform X1 (UP-Iso-X1) and Ommochrome-binding protein (Oc-BP). Further, the obtained crude squid proteins were subjected to antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities against pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains respectively. Further, MTT assay was also carried out to deliberately explain the cytotoxic ability of crude squid ink protein against MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. The results from the study revealed that, the proteins are shown to be toxic against pathogenic strains and breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. More importantly, the proteins are well enough to eradicate biofilms substantiated by light and confocal laser scanning microscopic observations. Altogether, the crude squid ink proteins hampered the growth of breast cancer cells with an IC 50 value of 65.3 ± 0.46 μg mL -1 . In conclusion, it is believed that the proteins from crude squid ink will provide new insights in hampering bacterial biofilms and cancer in near future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fishing ground distribution of neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) in relation to oceanographic conditions in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2017-12-01

    Neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, is a squid species of the North Pacific Ocean, which plays an important economical role in the international fishery. Logbook data for Chinese squid-jigging fishery over 2004-2011 were used to evaluate the relationship between the fishing grounds of the squid and the convergent frontal areas, which were defined by the contour lines of specific sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll- a (Chl- a) concentration. Our results indicate that the SST in the range of 15 to 19°C and the Chl- a concentration in the range of 0.1 to 0.4 mg m-3 are the favorable conditions for the aggregation of the squid. Additionally, we deduced that the SST at 17.5°C and the Chl- a concentration at 0.25 mg m-3 are the optimal environmental conditions for the aggregation of O. bartramii. In August, the annual CPUE is positively correlated with the proportion of the fishing grounds with favorable SST and Chl- a concentration, as well as the combination of the two variables, implying that the abundance of the squid annually is largely depending on the presence of the favorable environmental conditions for fishery in August. Minor spatial difference between mean latitudinal location of the 17.5°C SST and 0.25 mg m-3 Chl- a fronts can increase the CPUEs of O. bartramii. Furthermore, the monthly latitudinal gravity centers of the CPUE closely followed the mean latitudinal position of the contour lines of the 17.5°C SST and the 0.25 mg m-3 Chl- a concentration. Our findings suggest the convergent oceanographic features (fronts) play significant roles in regulating the distribution and abundance of the western stock of the winter-spring cohort of O. bartramii, which can help people to improve their ability to discover the O. bartramii fishing grounds with higher productivity.

  8. Underground measurements of artificial radioactivity in squids from the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi; Mi, Yu-Hao; He, Jian-Hua; Ma, Hao; Cheng, Jian-Ping

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident's radiological effect on marine ecosystem, ash samples of squids from the western Pacific Ocean were collected in May 2014 and measured using an underground gamma-ray spectrometer in the underground laboratory JinPing. Low levels of 108m Ag, 110m Ag, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were detected, which indicates that the influence of the FDNPP accident on marine ecosystem is lasting but decreasing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Research Update: Programmable tandem repeat proteins inspired by squid ring teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Domeradzka, Natalia E.; Jung, Huihun; Barbu, Benjamin; Vural, Mert; Kikuchi, Yusuke; Allen, Benjamin D.; Demirel, Melik C.

    2018-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved many interesting features that can serve as inspiration. Repetitive squid ring teeth (SRT) proteins from cephalopods exhibit properties such as strength, self-healing, and biocompatibility. These proteins have been engineered to design novel adhesives, self-healing textiles, and the assembly of 2d-layered materials. Compared to conventional polymers, repetitive proteins are easy to modify and can assemble in various morphologies and molecular architectures. This research update discusses the molecular biology and materials science of polypeptides inspired by SRT proteins, their properties, and perspectives for future applications.

  10. Study on the Formulation of Squid (Loligosp) Nugget Added with Yellow Pumpkin (Curcubitamoschata) Flour

    OpenAIRE

    Nurharyati, Lisa; ', Suparmi; Sari, N Ira

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the squid nugget formulation with the addition of pumpkin flour. It was evaluated for the organoleptic value and the proximate composition. The method used was an experimental method and designed as non-factorial completely randomized design (CRD). The treatments were addition of pumpkin flour into the mix, consisting of four levels, namely: N0 (without the addition of pumpkin flour), N1 (pumpkin flour 50 g), N2 (pumpkin flour 75 g) and N3 (pumpkin flour 100 g).B...

  11. Intraspecific Competition Impacts Vibrio fischeri Strain Diversity during Initial Colonization of the Squid Light Organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; LaSota, Elijah D; Cecere, Andrew G; LaPenna, Kyle B; Larios-Valencia, Jessie; Wollenberg, Michael S; Miyashiro, Tim

    2016-05-15

    Animal development and physiology depend on beneficial interactions with microbial symbionts. In many cases, the microbial symbionts are horizontally transmitted among hosts, thereby making the acquisition of these microbes from the environment an important event within the life history of each host. The light organ symbiosis established between the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a model system for examining how hosts acquire horizontally transmitted microbial symbionts. Recent studies have revealed that the light organ of wild-caught E. scolopes squid contains polyclonal populations of V. fischeri bacteria; however, the function and development of such strain diversity in the symbiosis are unknown. Here, we report our phenotypic and phylogenetic characterizations of FQ-A001, which is a V. fischeri strain isolated directly from the light organ of an E. scolopes individual. Relative to the type strain ES114, FQ-A001 exhibits similar growth in rich medium but displays increased bioluminescence and decreased motility in soft agar. FQ-A001 outcompetes ES114 in colonizing the crypt spaces of the light organs. Remarkably, we find that animals cocolonized with FQ-A001 and ES114 harbor singly colonized crypts, in contrast to the cocolonized crypts observed from competition experiments involving single genotypes. The results with our two-strain system suggest that strain diversity within the squid light organ is a consequence of diversity in the single-strain colonization of individual crypt spaces. The developmental programs and overall physiologies of most animals depend on diverse microbial symbionts that are acquired from the environment. However, the basic principles underlying how microbes colonize their hosts remain poorly understood. Here, we report our findings of bacterial strain competition within the coevolved animal-microbe symbiosis composed of the Hawaiian squid and bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri

  12. Optical extinction of size-controlled aerosols generated from squid chromatophore pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinneen, Sean R.; Greenslade, Margaret E.; Deravi, Leila F.

    2017-10-01

    Nanophotonic granules populate the interior of cephalopod chromatophores, contributing to their visible color by selectively absorbing and scattering light. Inspired by the performance of these granules, we fabricated nanostructured aerosols by nebulizing a pigment solution extracted from native squid chromatophores. We determined their optical extinction using cavity ring-down spectroscopy and show how extinction cross section is dependent on both particle concentration and size. This work not only advances the fundamental knowledge of the optical properties of chromatophore pigments but also serves as a proof-of-concept method that can be adapted to develop coatings derived from these pigmentary aerosols.

  13. SQUID based resistance bridge for shot noise measurement on low impedance samples

    OpenAIRE

    Jehl, X.; Payet-Burin, P.; Baraduc, C.; Calemczuk, R.; Sanquer, M.

    1999-01-01

    We present a resistance bridge which uses a SQUID to measure the shot noise in low impedance samples. The experimental requirements are high DC bias currents (typically 10mA) together with high AC sensitivity (pA/VHz). This system is used to investigate the shot noise in Superconductor/Normal/Superconductor junctions where Andreev reflection enhanced shot noise is expected. Because our setup has an intrinsic noise much smaller than the thermal noise of the resistance bridge at 4.2K, reliable ...

  14. Fecundity of the squid Loligo vulgaris, Lamarck, 1798 (Myopsida, Loliginidae off northwest Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Laptikhovsky

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Egg dimensions were 2.0-2.2 x 1.5-1.6 mm. Potential fecundity (all oocyte stock of mature female L. vulgaris was estimated as 28,500-74,200 oocytes, including 3,500-30,500 yolk oocytes, 1,300-8,000 of those were ripe eggs in the oviduct. Relative fecundity was 114-251 (mean 211.3, SD=48.7, the index of Potential Reproductive Investment was 0.29-0.71 (mean 0.566, SD=0.151. Ovary maturation was similar to that observed in other loliginid squid, when small protoplasmic oocytes predominate throughout the life cycle.

  15. Administration et sécurisation d'un servise mandataire squid et un serveur web sur une machine virtuelle.

    OpenAIRE

    benais, faiza

    2015-01-01

    Le serveur squid est la solution de proxy cache le web la plus utilisée.L’internet majeur d'un proxy,sur un réseau local est de permettre de donner la connectivité Internet à l'ensemble des machines locales tout en les maintenant invisible de l'extérieur.Cette centralisation permet de contrôler le trafic web et de filtrer les protocoles. nous sommes intéressés dans notre mémoire par la configuration et administration d'un proxy squid dans un environnement virtuel.Il donne des performances ...

  16. Development and testing of high temperature-vector-SQUID conductor-magnetometers for the electro-magnetic exploration of our deposits. Final report; SQUID-Anwendungen - Entwicklung und Erprobung von Hochtemperatur-Vektor-Supraleiter SQUID-Magnetometern fuer die elektromagnetische Exploration von Lagerstaetten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzander, U.; Friedrichs, B.

    2000-03-01

    Aim of the was the development of a prototype of a 3 axis HTc SQUID magnetometer for the geophysical exploration. The prototype was tested during the project in Germany and in China. Metronix task was the supervision of the development with the direction that the sensor can be used for field measurements and that the manufacturing costs will be acceptable. For magnetotelluric measurements (MT/CSAMT) further development is required to enhance the drift and noise properties of the sensor. The advantages in the geophysical TEM exploration are: greater sounding depth and good conductors (ore bodies) can be penetrated completely; the thickness of the resource can be estimated this way. At the same time the measuring time can be reduced tremendously because of the better signal to noise ratio. The productivity of the measuring campaign increases. If due to further developments coils systems can be replaced in total by the SQUID, SQUID systems will dominate the TEM market. (orig.) [German] Ziel des Projektes war es, einen Prototyp eines 3-achsigen HTc SQUIDS zur Verfuegung zu haben, welcher die Anforderungen fuer geophysikalische Messungen erfuellt. Dieser Prototyp wurde im Laufe des Projektes in Deutschland und China getestet. Die Rolle der Firma Metronix in diesem Projekt war die Einflussnahme auf die Entwicklung in der Form, dass zum einen die aus der Feldmesstechnik resultierenden Anforderungen beruecksichtigt werden, zum anderen auf eine spaetere kostenguenstige Herstellung geachtet wird. Bei magnetotellurischen Messungen (MT/CSAMT) besteht weiterer Bedarf an Verbesserungen hinsichtlich der Drift- und Rauscheigenschaften des Sensors. Fuer die geophysikalische Exploration in der TEM ergeben sich folgende Vorteile: die Erkundungstiefe ist groesser und gute Leiter (Erzkoerper) koennen vollstaendig durchteuft werden; damit kann die Maechtigkeit des Vorkommens bestimmt werden. Gleichzeitig kann auf Grund des besseren Signal / Rauschverhaeltnisses die Messzeit deutlich

  17. Giant Leiomyoma of the Oesophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Dhamodaran; Kannan, Sujatha; Samuel, Vasundaran

    2017-01-01

    Leiomyomas are rare benign tumours of the oesophagus that remain silent in more than 50% of the cases. Giant leiomyomas measuring more than 5 cm are very rare. A 47-year-old female presented with chest pain, cough and dysphagia for two months. Imaging studies were indicative of a 12.1x11.9 cm mass lesion in the distal oesophagus, CT guided biopsy confirmed leiomyoma. The patient being taken up for surgery was found to have a 20x19x17 cm irregular lobulated and encapsulated mass lesion arising from distal oesophagus encapsulating submucosally. En bloc resection of the tumour along with distal oesophagus with a clearance of 4 cm above and below the oesophagogastric junction was done followed by gastro-oesophageal anastomosis. Histopathologically, leiomyoma was confirmed. The patient had a smooth postoperative recovery. PMID:28571208

  18. Giant trichobezoar mimicking gastric tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.A.; Soomro, A.G.; Jarwar, M.; Memon, A.S.; Siddiqui, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of giant gastric trichobezoar retrieved through a long gastrotomy in a 40 years old married women from rural Sindh with unreported psychological disturbance. Trichobezoar almost exclusively occur in females with an underlying psychiatric disorder. It has an insidious development of symptoms which accounts for its delayed presentation and large size at the time of diagnosis. They are associated with trichophagia (habit of compulsive hair eating) and are usually diagnosed on CT Scans or upper GI Endoscopy. They can give rise to complications like gastro-duodenal ulceration, haemorrhage, perforation, peritonitis or obstruction with a high rate of mortality. The treatment is endoscopic, laparoscopic or surgical removal and usually followed by psychiatric opinion. (author)

  19. Multipole giant resonances in highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Keding; Cai Yanhuang

    1989-01-01

    The isoscalar giant surface resonance and giant dipole resonance in highly excited nuclei are discussed. Excitation energies of the giant modes in 208 Pb are calculated in a simplified model, using the concept of energy wieghted sum rule (EWSR), and the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation at the finite temperature is employed to describe the finite temperature is employed to describe the finite temperature equilibrium state. It is shown that EWSR and the energy of the resonance depend only weakly on temperature in the system. This weak dependence is analysed

  20. Revised Stroemgren metallicity calibration for red giants

    OpenAIRE

    Hilker, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A new calibration of the Stroemgren (b-y),m_1 diagram in terms of iron abundance of red giants is presented. This calibration is based on a homogeneous sample of giants in the globular clusters omega Centauri, M22, and M55 as well as field giants from the list of Anthony-Twarog & Twarog (1998). Towards high metallicities, the new calibration is connected to a previous calibration by Grebel & Richtler (1992), which was unsatisfactory for iron abudances lower than -1.0 dex. The revised calibrat...

  1. Giant flexoelectricity in polyvinylidene fluoride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Sivapalan; Ramachandran, Narayanan; He Xiangtong; Thiruvannamalai, Sankar; Lee, Ho Joon; Heo, Hyun [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Chen Qin [GE Global Research Center, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States); Fu, John Y., E-mail: youweifu@buffalo.ed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2011-05-16

    Recent studies have shown that giant flexoelectricity may exist in certain elastomers with bent-core molecular structures, which contradicts the previous theoretical estimation that the flexoelectric coupling is small in those materials. In this Letter, we report an analogous phenomenon, i.e., the giant direct flexoelectric effect, observed in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. Our experimental studies indicate that such an enhanced flexoelectric effect might be induced by the interaction between the energy couplings of the apolar and the polar molecular structures of the polymer film under elastic deformation. - Highlights: Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with not fully crystallized {alpha}- and {beta}-phases. Flexoelectric measurement. Giant direct flexoelectric effect in PVDF.

  2. Foetal magnetocardiography with a multi-channel HTS rf SQUID gradiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Wolters, N [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Lomparski, D [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Zander, W [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Banzet, M [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Schubert, J [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Krause, H-J [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Geue, D [Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Universitaetsstrasse 142, D-44799 Bochum (Germany); Leeuwen, P van [Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Universitaetsstrasse 142, D-44799 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Foetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is a promising technique for prenatal cardiac diagnosis. In this paper, we discuss the special requirements of a system for fMCG measurements. A SQUID system incorporating five HTS rf SQUID magnetometers has been developed and constructed. Four magnetometers are arranged at the bottom of the cryostat in a 4 cm x 4 cm square configuration. One reference magnetometer is located 20 cm above the plane to form four first-order axial gradiometers with the four bottom magnetometers. The magnetometer with a 18 mm diameter flux focuser, which reaches a field sensitivity of 20-30 fT Hz{sup -1/2}, proved sufficient for recording foetal magnetocardiograms in a magnetically shielded room. The cardiac activities of two foetuses (31st and 33rd weeks of gestation) were recorded in 90 Hz bandwidth. The foetal QRS peak signals ranged from 4 to 7 pT and could easily be identified in the real-time gradiometer outputs with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to five. Furthermore, the averaged fMCG data enabled the determination of de- and repolarization time intervals. Overall, the fMCG signals proved of sufficient quality to perform foetal heart diagnostics.

  3. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in the microtesla range using a high Tc dc-SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ning; Jin Yirong; Li Shao; Ren Yufeng; Tian Ye; Chen Yingfei; Li Jie; Chen Genghua; Zheng Dongning

    2012-01-01

    We have detected the ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance signal from water samples using a high-T c dc-SQUID sensor. The measurements were carried out in a homemade magnetically shielded room. Resonance spectra of 1 H from tap water and other substance samples were obtained in the field range from 7-110μT corresponding to resonance frequency 300-4.68kHz. Two kind of experimental systems were built, the first one is a directly coupled system, its signal to noise ratio in a single-shot measurement is around 4 for about 15 ml water. The second one used a Cu coil to transfer the flux to the SQUID sensor. Signal to noise ratio was improved to about 20 in a single-shot measurement for 5ml water, which benefits from the improvement of coupling efficiency. The effect of residual gradient in the magnetically shielded room was also investigated. J-coupling of 2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl alcohol was measured, the peaks are consistent with high field results.

  4. The effect of sampling methods on the apparent constituents of ink from the squid Sepioteuthis australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras, F; Gerber, J P; Peddie, F; Kokkinn, M J

    2010-11-01

    Results of experiments conducted on ink recovered from the squid Sepioteuthis australis indicate that there is no epinephrine or protein naturally present in the ink as it would be ejected in vivo. Protein content was effectively zero when ink was syringed from the duct end of the ink sac of freshly killed animals. By contrast, there were proteins in samples collected from dead specimens where ink was collected by a stripping method. From these samples, a single large molecular weight protein was identified as having tyrosinase activity. Digestion of syringed ink did not yield signs of melanin-bound proteins. Analysis of supernatants after centrifugation of squid ink consistently revealed the presence of DOPA, dopamine, and taurine, whereas epinephrine and nor-epinephrine were recorded from what was believed to be contaminated ink. Histological investigations of the ink sac revealed a compartmentalised glandular structure distal to the duct end. Closer observation of the glandular tissue showed that compartments increased in size as they matured and moved further into the lumen. It was concluded that the presence of epinephrine and tyrosinase (or a related protein) in the ink of S. australis could be attributed to rupturing of basal glandular compartments or contamination from other sources during the extraction process.

  5. Nondestructive evaluation of braided carbon fiber composites with artificial defect using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinyama, Y.; Yamaji, T.; Hatsukade, Y.; Takai, Y.; Aly-Hassan, M.S.; Nakai, A.; Hamada, H.; Tanaka, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a current-injection-based NDE method using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer to a braided CFRP with artificial cracks. Current distributions in the braided CFRP were estimated from measured field gradient distributions. A small crack, in which a few carbon-fiber bundles were cut, was well detected from the current distributions. A cross-section of the CFRP showed that a density of the bundles at edges is higher than the other part. The experimental results demonstrated the capability of the method to detect sub-mm cracks. Braided carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) are one of multifunctional materials with superior properties such as mechanical strength to normal CFRPs since the braided CFRPs have continuous fiber bundles. In this paper, we applied the current-injection-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer to the braided CFRP for the detection of the breakage of the bundles. We prepared planar braided CFRP samples with and without artificial cracks of 1 and 2 mm lengths, and measured the current density distribution above the samples using the NDE method. In the measurement results, not only a few completely-cut bundles but also the additional partially-cut bundles were detected from decrease in the measured current density along the cut bundle around the cracks. From these results, we showed that it is possible to inspect a few partially-cut bundles in the braided CFRPs by the NDE method.

  6. Lateral line analogue aids vision in successful predator evasion for the brief squid, Lolliguncula brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Carly A; Bartol, Ian K

    2014-07-15

    Cephalopods have visual and mechanoreception systems that may be employed to sense and respond to an approaching predator. While vision presumably plays the dominant role, the importance of the lateral line analogue for predator evasion has not been examined in cephalopods. To test the respective roles of vision and the lateral line analogue, brief squid, Lolliguncula brevis, were observed in the presence of summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, under light and dark conditions with their lateral line analogue intact and ablated. Hair cell ablation was achieved through a pharmacological technique used for the first time on a cephalopod. The proportion of predator-prey interactions survived was significantly higher in the light non-ablated and light ablated groups compared with the dark ablated group. The mean number of interactions survived varied across treatment groups with the light non-ablated group having significantly more success than the light ablated, dark non-ablated and dark ablated groups. These findings demonstrate that although vision is the primary sense, the lateral line analogue also contributes to predator evasion in squid. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Compensation for longitudinal chromatic aberration in the eye of the firefly squid, Watasenia scintillans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Ronald H H; Gislén, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The camera eyes of fishes and cephalopods have come forth by convergent evolution. In a variety of vertebrates capable of color vision, longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the optical system is corrected for by the exactly tuned longitudinal spherical aberration (LSA) of the crystalline lens. The LSA leads to multiple focal lengths, such that several wavelengths can be focused on the retina. We investigated whether that is also the case in the firefly squid (Watasenia scintillans), a cephalopod species that is likely to have color vision. It was found that the lens of W. scintillans is virtually free of LSA and uncorrected for LCA. However, the eye does not suffer from LCA because of a banked retina. Photoreceptors sensitive to short and long wavelengths are located at appropriate distances from the lens, such that they receive well-focused images. Such a design is an excellent solution for the firefly squid because a large area of the retina is monochromatically organized and it allows for double use of the surface area in the dichromatically organized part of the retina. However, it is not a universal solution since compensation for LCA by a banked retina requires that eye size and/or spectral separation between photopigments is small.

  8. Greatly improved cache update times for conditions data with Frontier/Squid

    CERN Document Server

    Dykstra, Dave

    2009-01-01

    The CMS detector project loads copies of conditions data to over 100,000 computer cores worldwide by using a software subsystem called Frontier. This subsystem translates database queries into HTTP, looks up the results in a central database at CERN, and caches the results in an industry-standard HTTP proxy/caching server called Squid. One of the most challenging aspects of any cache system is coherency, that is, ensuring that changes made to the underlying data get propagated out to all clients in a timely manner. Recently, the Frontier system was enhanced to drastically reduce the time for changes to be propagated everywhere without heavily loading servers. The propagation time is now as low as 15 minutes for some kinds of data and no more than 60 minutes for the rest of the data. This was accomplished by taking advantage of an HTTP and Squid feature called If-Modified-Since. In order to use this feature, the Frontier server sends a Last-Modified timestamp, but since modification times are not normally trac...

  9. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in the microtesla range using a high Tc dc-SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Jin, Yirong; Li, Shao; Ren, Yufeng; Tian, Ye; Chen, Yingfei; Li, Jie; Chen, Genghua; Zheng, Dongning

    2012-12-01

    We have detected the ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance signal from water samples using a high-Tc dc-SQUID sensor. The measurements were carried out in a homemade magnetically shielded room. Resonance spectra of 1H from tap water and other substance samples were obtained in the field range from 7-110μT corresponding to resonance frequency 300-4.68kHz. Two kind of experimental systems were built, the first one is a directly coupled system, its signal to noise ratio in a single-shot measurement is around 4 for about 15 ml water. The second one used a Cu coil to transfer the flux to the SQUID sensor. Signal to noise ratio was improved to about 20 in a single-shot measurement for 5ml water, which benefits from the improvement of coupling efficiency. The effect of residual gradient in the magnetically shielded room was also investigated. J-coupling of 2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl alcohol was measured, the peaks are consistent with high field results.

  10. Material Structure of a Graded Refractive Index Lens in Decapod Squid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Heiney, Paul; Sweeney, Alison

    2013-03-01

    Underwater vision with a camera-type eye that is simultaneously acute and sensitive requires a spherical lens with a graded distribution of refractive index. Squids have this type of lens, and our previous work has shown that its optical properties are likely achieved with radially variable densities of a single protein with multiple isoforms. Here we measure the spatial organization of this novel protein material in concentric layers of the lens and use these data to suggest possible mechanisms of self-assembly of the proteins into a graded refractive index structure. First, we performed small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to study how the protein is spatially organized. Then, molecular dynamic simulation allowed us to correlate structure to the possible dynamics of the system in different regions of the lens. The combination of simulation and SAXS data in this system revealed the likely protein-protein interactions, resulting material structure and its relationship to the observed and variable optical properties of this graded index system. We believe insights into the material properties of the squid lens system will inform the invention of self-assembling graded index devices.

  11. Improved tunable microstrip SQUID amplifier for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Hansen, Jorn; Mol, Jan-Michael; Hilton, Gene; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of tunable microstrip SQUID amplifiers (MSAs) for use in ADMX. The axion dark matter candidate is detected via Primakoff conversion to a microwave photon in a high-Q (~ 105) tunable microwave cavity, cooled to 1.6 K or lower, in the presence of a 7-tesla magnetic field. The microwave photon frequency is a function of the unknown axion mass, so that the cavity and amplifier must be scanned over a broad frequency range. An MSA is constructed by flux-coupling a resonant microstrip to a resistively-shunted SQUID biased into the voltage state. We demonstrate gains exceeding 20 dB, at frequencies above 900 MHz. Tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with a low inductance GaAs varactor diode that operates at cryogenic temperatures. By varying the voltage bias of the varactor we vary its capacitance, allowing a reflected phase varying from nearly 0 to π at the end of the microstrip, and thus a standing wave tunable from nearly λ/2 to λ/4. With proper design of the microwave environment, a noise temperature of 1/2 to 1/4 of the physical temperature is demonstrated.

  12. High critical current density YBCO films and fabrication of dc-SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Kuriki, S; Kawaguchi, Y; Matsuda, M; Otowa, T

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity of SQUID magnetometers made of high-T sub c films, we have studied the conditions of pulsed-laser deposition of YBCO films. Among the different deposition parameters examined, extensive degassing of the vacuum chamber before and precise control of the substrate temperature during the film deposition were found effective for obtaining high critical temperature T sub c and high critical current density J sub c. It was also found that the residual-resistance ratio has a clear correlation with J sub c , indicating that it can be a good, and easy to measure, index of the film quality. Films having T sub c approx 89-90 K and J sub c >= 5x10 sup 6 A cm sup - sup 2 at 77 K were used to fabricate SQUIDs without a pickup loop. Grain-boundary junctions formed on bicrystal substrates with a 30 deg. misorientation angle exhibited I sub c R sub n values of more than 100 mu V at 77 K. The well-known scaling behaviour of the relation I sub c R sub n propor to (J sup G sup B sub c) sup 1 su...

  13. The voltage-current characteristic of high-T C DC SQUID: Theory, simulation, experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, Ya.S.; Novikov, I.L.

    2006-01-01

    The analytical theory for the voltage-current characteristics of the large inductance (L > 100 pH) high-T C DC SQUIDs that has been developed previously is consistently compared with the computer simulations and the experiment. The theoretical voltage modulation for symmetric junctions is shown to be in a good agreement with the results of known computer simulations. It is shown that the asymmetry of the junctions results in the increase of the voltage modulation if the critical current is in excess of some threshold value (about 8 μA). Below this value the asymmetry leads to the reduction of the voltage modulation as compared to the symmetric case. The comparison with the experiment shows that the asymmetry can explain a large portion of experimental values of the voltage modulation which lie above the theoretical curve for symmetric DC SQUID. It also explains experimental points which lie below the curve at low critical currents. However, a significant portion of these values which lie below the curve cannot be explained by the junction asymmetry

  14. [Trace elements in the statoliths of neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii in the Northwest Pacific Ocean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hua-Jie; Chen, Xin-Jun; Ma, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Statolith is one of the most important hard tissues of cephalopods which is widely used in the research of fisheries ecology including population structure, life history reconstruction and so on. Trace elements of 18 statoliths of neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii collected in the Northwest Pacific Ocean in 2007 by Chinese jigging fishing fleets were analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The results indicated that the statoliths of O. bartramii mainly contained 55 elements, and calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), sodium (Na), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), silicon (Si), magnesium (Mg), boron (B), iron (Fe), barium (Ba) were the 10 most abundant elements. The analysis of variance showed that there was no significant difference in each element distribution between different sexual squid except for P, Si and B. Significant differences existed in the contents of Sr and Na but no significant difference was found in the contents of Ca, P, K, Si, Mg, B, Fe and Ba between different hatching populations. There were significant differences in the contents of Ca, Sr, Na, P, Mg and Ba, but no significant difference was found in the contents of K, Fe, B and Si in the statoliths among different growth zones. This study presented Sr and Na could be the best two trace elements used in the research on the population structure and life history reconstruction for O. bartramii.

  15. Squids, snakes, and polarimeters: A new technique for measuring the magnetic moments of polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, P.R.; Luccio, A.U.; Shea, T.J.; Tsoupas, N.; Goldberg, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective polarimetry at high energies in hadron and lepton synchrotrons has been a long-standing and difficult problem. In synchrotrons with polarized beams it is possible to cause the direction of the polarization vector of a given bunch to alternate at a frequency which is some subharmonic of the rotation frequency. This can result in the presence of lines in the beam spectrum which are due only to the magnetic moment of the beam and which are well removed from the various lines due to the charge of the beam. The magnitude of these lines can be calculated from first principles. They are many orders of magnitude weaker than the Schottky signals. Measurement of the magnitude of one of these lines would be an absolute measurement of beam polarization. For measuring magnetic field, the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device, or squid, is about five orders of magnitude more sensitive than any other transducer. Using a squid, such a measurement might be accomplished with the proper combination of shielding, pickup loop design, and filtering. The resulting instrument would be fast, non-destructive, and comparatively cheap. In addition, techniques developed in the creation of such an instrument could be used to measure the Schottky spectrum in unprecedented detail. We present specifics of a polarimeter design for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and briefly discuss the possibility of using this technique to measure polarization at high-energy electron machines like LEP and HERA. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Ocean acidification responses in paralarval squid swimming behavior using a novel 3D tracking system

    KAUST Repository

    Zakroff, Casey J.

    2017-08-22

    Chronic embryonic exposure to ocean acidification (OA) has been shown to degrade the aragonitic statolith of paralarval squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, a key structure for their swimming behavior. This study examined if day-of-hatching paralarval D. pealeii from eggs reared under chronic OA demonstrated measurable impairments to swimming activity and control. This required the development of a novel, cost-effective, and robust method for 3D motion tracking and analysis. Squid eggs were reared in pCO2 levels in a dose-dependent manner ranging from 400 to 2200 ppm. Initial 2D experiments showed paralarvae in higher acidification environments spent more time at depth. In 3D experiments, velocity, particularly positive and negative vertical velocities, significantly decreased from 400 to 1000 ppm pCO2, but showed non-significant decreases at higher concentrations. Activity and horizontal velocity decreased linearly with increasing pCO2, indicating a subtle impact to paralarval energetics. Patterns may have been obscured by notable individual variability in the paralarvae. Responses were also seen to vary between trials on cohort or potentially annual scales. Overall, paralarval swimming appeared resilient to OA, with effects being slight. The newly developed 3D tracking system provides a powerful and accessible method for future studies to explore similar questions in the larvae of aquatic taxa.

  17. Squid-inspired vehicle design using coupled fluid-solid analytical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio-Serchi, Francesco; Weymouth, Gabriel

    2017-11-01

    The need for enhanced automation in the marine and maritime fields is fostering research into robust and highly maneuverable autonomous underwater vehicles. To address these needs we develop design principles for a new generation of soft-bodied aquatic vehicles similar to octopi and squids. In particular, we consider the capability of pulsed-jetting bodies to boost thrust by actively modifying their external body-shape and in this way benefit of the contribution from added-mass variation. We present an analytical formulation of the coupled fluid-structure interaction between the elastic body and the ambient fluid. The model incorporates a number of new salient contributions to the soft-body dynamics. We highlight the role of added-mass variation effects of the external fluid in enhancing thrust and assess how the shape-changing actuation is impeded by a confinement-related unsteady inertial term and by an external shape-dependent fluid stiffness contribution. We show how the analysis of these combined terms has guided us to the design of a new prototype of a squid-inspired vehicle tuning of the natural frequency of the coupled fluid-solid system with the purpose of optimizing its actuation routine.

  18. Adverse effects of ocean acidification on early development of squid (Doryteuthis pealeii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell B Kaplan

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 is being absorbed into the ocean, altering seawater chemistry, with potentially negative impacts on a wide range of marine organisms. The early life stages of invertebrates with internal and external aragonite structures may be particularly vulnerable to this ocean acidification. Impacts to cephalopods, which form aragonite cuttlebones and statoliths, are of concern because of the central role they play in many ocean ecosystems and because of their importance to global fisheries. Atlantic longfin squid (Doryteuthis pealeii, an ecologically and economically valuable taxon, were reared from eggs to hatchlings (paralarvae under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations in replicated experimental trials. Animals raised under elevated pCO2 demonstrated significant developmental changes including increased time to hatching and shorter mantle lengths, although differences were small. Aragonite statoliths, critical for balance and detecting movement, had significantly reduced surface area and were abnormally shaped with increased porosity and altered crystal structure in elevated pCO2-reared paralarvae. These developmental and physiological effects could alter squid paralarvae behavior and survival in the wild, directly and indirectly impacting marine food webs and commercial fisheries.

  19. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possess...

  20. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 4. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time: Response to Sheth's comments and some additional thoughts. Gautam Sen. Volume 111 Issue 4 December 2002 pp 487-488 ...

  1. Recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenomas with hemihypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrige, Priyan Maleuwe; Hassanally, Delilah

    2011-01-01

    Giant juvenile fibroadenomas in patients with hemihypertrophy are exceptionally rare. We present a very interesting case of a 13 year old girl with hemihypertrophy of the left side presenting with recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenomas of the left breast. The giant fibroadenomas occurred twice in the left breast over two years. The first had a diameter of 12 cm and was excised through an inframammary incision. The second occurred a year later, had a diameter of 11 cm, and was associated with three smaller fibroadenomas. These lesions were removed through a single periareolar incision. The procedures were complicated by keloid scarring but the results were improved with steroid impregnated tape dressing and local methylprednisolone injection. This report adds to our experience in managing patients with recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenomas complicated by hemihypertrophy and raises awareness to anticipate keloid scarring.

  2. Giant Omental Lipoma in a Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Narula, Mahender Kaur; Anand, Rama; Gupta, Isha; Kaur, Gurmeen; Kalra, Kanika

    2011-01-01

    Omental lipomas are extremely rare tumors of childhood. We report a case of solitary giant lipoma of the omentum in a child, successfully managed by complete excision, without any recurrence on follow-up study

  3. AFSC/ABL: Female Giant Grenadier maturity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Giant grenadiers Albatrossia pectoralis are caught as bycatch in deep-sea commercial fisheries in relatively large numbers. The population appears to be stable,...

  4. Enhanced recovery after giant ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Brøndum, T L; Harling, H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Giant ventral hernia repair is associated with a high risk of postoperative morbidity and prolonged length of stay (LOS). Enhanced recovery (ERAS) measures have proved to lead to decreased morbidity and LOS after various surgical procedures, but never after giant hernia repair. The current...... study prospectively examined the results of implementation of an ERAS pathway including high-dose preoperative glucocorticoid, and compared the outcome with patients previously treated according to standard care (SC). METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent giant ventral hernia repair were included......-dose glucocorticoid may lead to low scores of pain, fatigue and nausea after giant ventral hernia repair with reduced LOS compared with patients treated according to SC....

  5. Red giants as precursors of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzini, A.

    1981-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Planetary Nebulae are produced by asymptotic giant-branch stars. Therefore, several properties of planetary nebulae are discussed in the framework of the current theory of stellar evolution. (Auth.)

  6. Blood Lead Levels in Captive Giant Pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintle, Nathan J P; Martin-Wintle, Meghan S; Zhou, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hemin

    2018-01-01

    Fifteen giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) from the Chinese Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Bifengxia, Sichuan, China were analyzed for blood lead concentrations (Pb-B) during the 2017 breeding season. Thirteen of the 15 bears showed Pb-B below the method detection limit (MDL) of 3.3 µg/dL. The two remaining bears, although above the MDL, contained very low concentrations of lead of 3.9 and 4.5 µg/dL. All 15 giant pandas in this analysis had Pb-B concentrations that were within normal background concentrations for mammals in uncontaminated environments. For a threatened species, whose native country is plagued by reports of extremely high air pollution, our findings suggest that giant pandas at the CCRCGP are not absorbing lead at concentrations that would adversely affect their health.

  7. Innate predator recognition in giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiping; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Yang, Bo; Wei, Ming; Zhou, Yingmin; Liu, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Innate predator recognition confers a survival advantage to prey animals. We investigate whether giant pandas exhibit innate predator recognition. We analyzed behavioral responses of 56 naive adult captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), to urine from predators and non-predators and water control. Giant pandas performed more chemosensory investigation and displayed flehmen behaviors more frequently in response to predator urine compared to both non-predator urine and water control. Subjects also displayed certain defensive behaviors, as indicated by vigilance, and in certain cases, fleeing behaviors. Our results suggest that there is an innate component to predator recognition in captive giant pandas, although such recognition was only slight to moderate. These results have implications that may be applicable to the conservation and reintroduction of this endangered species.

  8. Stability of the physical properties of plasticized edible films from squid (Todarodes pacificus) mantle muscle during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerahawong, Akasith; Tanaka, Munehiko; Okazaki, Emiko; Osako, Kazufumi

    2012-06-01

    Edible films from squid mantle muscle plasticized with different plasticizers were stored at 25 °C, 50% RH before the determination of physical properties. The results showed that tensile strength significantly increased (P film plasticized with glucose, while there was no significant change (P ≥ 0.05) in elongation at break of all plasticized films. Water vapor permeability of glucose-plasticized film significantly decreased (P films became significantly higher (P films plasticized with fructose and glucose. SDS-PAGE and protein solubility in SDS solution showed a possibility of protein aggregation throughout the storage. From these results, it is suggested that the changes in physical properties of the films were caused by the progress of Maillard reaction. In this study, squid mantle muscle was used as an edible film-forming material. By mixing with Na-citrate, squid mantle muscle possessed the ability to form transparent films with an excellent UV barrier property. Glycerol was found to be the most effective and stable plasticizer for the films. Edible films represent an option for the utilization of discarded squid during the fishing process. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Interference characterisation of a commercial Joule-Thomson cooler to be used in a SQUID-based heart monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bangma, M.R.; Bangma, M.R.; Rijpma, A.P.; de Vries, E.; Reincke, H.A.; Holland, Herman J.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Rogalla, Horst

    2001-01-01

    At the University of Twente, a foetal heart monitor based on a high-TC SQUID magnetometer system is under development. The purpose of this system is to measure a foetal heart signal in a clinical environment. For cooling a first demonstrator version, a closed-cycle Joule–Thomson cooler from APD

  10. Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake L. Spady

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels projected to occur in the oceans by the end of this century cause a range of behavioural effects in fish, but whether other highly active marine organisms, such as cephalopods, are similarly affected is unknown. We tested the effects of projected future CO2 levels (626 and 956 µatm on the behaviour of male two-toned pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus. Exposure to elevated CO2 increased the number of active individuals by 19–25% and increased movement (number of line-crosses by nearly 3 times compared to squid at present-day CO2. Squid vigilance and defensive behaviours were also altered by elevated CO2 with >80% of individuals choosing jet escape responses over defensive arm postures in response to a visual startle stimulus, compared with 50% choosing jet escape responses at control CO2. In addition, more escape responses were chosen over threat behaviours in body pattern displays at elevated CO2 and individuals were more than twice as likely to use ink as a defence strategy at 956 µatm CO2, compared with controls. Increased activity could lead to adverse effects on energy budgets as well as increasing visibility to predators. A tendency to respond to a stimulus with escape behaviours could increase survival, but may also be energetically costly and could potentially lead to more chases by predators compared with individuals that use defensive postures. These results demonstrate that projected future ocean acidification affects the behaviours of a tropical squid species.

  11. Application of a SQUID to Measurement of Somatically Evoked Fields: Transient Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Median Nerve,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-15

    such as the movement of ions in the intercellular space along apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, may be res- ponsible for the SEF. In the light of its...D.: Biomagnetism , in B.B. Schwartz and S. Foner, Eds., Superconductor Applications: SQUIDs and Machines. Plenum, New York (1977). 4. Gray, H

  12. Magnetic properties of Fe/ZnSe and Fe/GaAs heterostructures investigated by ferromagnetic resonance and SQUID measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meckenstock, R.; Spodding, D.; Himmelbauer, K.; Krenn, H.; Doi, M.; Keune, W.; Frait, Zdeněk; Pelzl, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 240, - (2002), s. 410-413 ISSN 0304-8853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : ferromagnetic resonance * squid * anisotropy-growth-induced * relaxation-magnetic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  13. The cytology of giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Jayashree

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant solitary trichoepithelioma (GST is a rare trichogenic tumor, which may present as a pigmented lesion. An 80-year-old man was diagnosed to have giant solitary trichoepithelioma on fine-needle aspiration cytology. The cytological findings represented the histological features. The recognition of GST is important because of its close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically and histologically.

  14. Giant Planet Interior Structure and Thermal Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Militzer, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the interior structure and composition of giant planets, and how this structure changes as these planets cool and contract over time. Here we define giant planets as those that have an observable hydrogen-helium envelope, which includes Jupiter-like planets, which are predominantly H/He gas, and Neptune-like planets which are predominantly composed of elements heavier than H/He. We describe the equations of state of planetary materials and the construction of static structural mode...

  15. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Sahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  16. Swiss roll operation for giant fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Saleem A; Memon, Sohail A; Mohammad, Noor; Maher, Mumtaz

    2009-01-01

    Fibroadenoma 5 cm or more is called giant fibroadenoma. Giant fibroadenoma can distort the shape of breast and causes asymmetry, so it should be excised. There are several techniques for excision of giant fibroadenoma. In our technique we remove them through cosmetically acceptable circumareolar incision to maintain the shape and symmetry of breast. The objectives were to assess the cosmetic results of Swiss roll operation for giant fibroadenoma. The study was conducted for six years from January, 2002 to December, 2007. Seventy patients of giant fibroadenoma were included in this study. They were diagnosed on history and clinical examination supported by ultrasound and postoperative histopathological examination. Data were collected from outpatient department and operation theatre. Swiss roll operation was performed under general anaesthesia. Mean tumor size was 6.38 cm. Three cm and 4 cm incisions were used for tumour 6 cm in size respectively. Skin closed with Vicryl 3/0 subcuticular stitches. Sixteen out of 70 patients had no scar while others hadminimal scar. All patients had normal shape and symmetry of breast. On histopathology fibroadenoma was confirmed. Giant fibroadenoma should be removed through cosmetically acceptable cicumareolar incision especially in unmarried young females who have small breast. Swiss-roll operation is superior in maintaining the shape and symmetry of breast. No major complication was found in our series except seroma formation in 10 patients.

  17. Macroscopic description of isoscalar giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a simple macroscopic model, we calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance energy as a function of mass number and multipole degree. The restoring force is determined from the distortion of the Fermi surface, and the inertia is determined for the incompressible, irrotational flow of nucleons with unit effective mass. With no adjustable parameters, the resulting closed expression reproduces correctly the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole energy and the magnitude of the giant octupole energy for 208 Pb. We also calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance width as a function of mass number and multipole degree for various macroscopic damping mechanisms, including two-body viscosity, one-body dissipation, and modified one-body dissipation. None of these damping mechanisms reproduces correctly all features of the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole width and the magnitude of the giant octupole width for 208 Pb

  18. Magnetorelaxometry of few Fe3O4 nanoparticles at 77 K employing a self-compensated SQUID magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, Alexander; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Lak, Aidin; Kassner, Alexander; Ludwig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of great interest for industrial and medical applications. Therefore, the properties of the particles have to be well controlled. Several magnetic measurement schemes have been developed in order to determine particle parameters such as size distribution and structural properties. In general, systems are designed either for the analysis of large amounts of MNP (≫1000) or for single particle investigation. Up to now, the region in between has been less studied. However, small and well defined amounts of MNPs are of high interest, e.g. for the systematic investigation of particle–particle interactions. In this paper, we present a method using electron beam lithographic preparation of small amounts of MNPs directly on a self-compensating high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with micrometer dimensions which is insensitive to homogeneous fields and first order gradients but very sensitive to internal magnetic dipole fields. Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) measurements were carried out at 77 K sample temperature in a magnetically shielded room in order to analyze the dynamic behavior of MNP samples and to evaluate the detection limit of our SQUID sensors. Calculations based on the magnetic moment superposition model (MSM) and finite element simulations (FEM) indicate that the MNP samples can be fabricated in a well-defined way by the presented method. Based on MRX measurements of a sample with 200 single-core magnetite MNPs with core diameters of 12 nm, we estimate the detection limit of our SQUID MRX setup as 70 MNPs. - Highlights: • Novel self-compensated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). • Electron-beam lithographical patterning of magnetic nanoparticles directly on SQUID. • Magnetorelaxometric detection of 200 nanoparticles with diameter of 12 nm at 77 K. • FEM simulations provide detection limit of less than 100 nanoparticles.

  19. Evaluation of High-resolution Geomagnetic Field Observation System Using HTS-SQUID Magnetometer and its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Y.; Okubo, K.; Hato, T.; Tsukamoto, A.; Tanabe, K.; Onishi, N.; Furukawa; Isogami, S.; Takeuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field changes associated with earthquakes have been investigated previously (1964 Stacey, 1994 Johnston et al.). Our research group also reported successful observation of "co-faulting" Earth's magnetic field changes due to piezomagnetic effects caused by earthquake rupturing in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake of M7.2 (2011 Okubo et al.) using optoelectronic observation system with flux-gate magnetometers. This is an important finding; the electromagnetic fields originating from such sources satisfy the Maxwell equations and hence they propagate from the sources to the observation site at a speed of light in the crustal materials. Further efforts could lead us to a new system for super-early warning of destructive earthquakes with the magnetic measurements. On the other hand, the observed result in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake was suggested that the geomagnetic variation signal accompanying fault movement, whose sources are the piezomagnetic effects, is very small; therefore development of a high-sensitive magnetometer system is very important. To solve this problem, we introduce long-term precise geomagnetic observations using high-temperature-superconductor based superconducting-quantum-interference-device (HTS-SQUID) magnetometer system. That is, our research group developed the HTS-SQUID magnetometer system for high-resolution observation of Earth's magnetic field. Since March 2012, we have observed the geomagnetic field using a HTS-SQUID magnetometer at Iwaki observation site (IWK) in Fukushima, Japan. The sampling interval of the magnetometer is 0.04 sec. The observation clock has been synchronized by use of GPS signals. An accelerometer is also installed at observation point. Additionally, in the next stage, we develop the HTS- SQUID magnetometer system Unit No.2 (mark II). In the present study, we show the results observed by our HTS-SQUID magnetometer system and make an evaluation of our geomagnetic field observation system.

  20. A modular, extendible and field-tolerant multichannel vector magnetometer based on current sensor SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J.-H.; Drung, D.; Burghoff, M.; Körber, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present the prototype module of our extendible and robust multichannel SQUID magnetometer system. A large multi-module arrangement can be implemented by using up to 7 modules. The system is intended for high-precision measurements of biomagnetism and spin precession. Further demanding applications are magnetorelaxometry and ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF NMR), where pulsed magnetic fields of up to 100 mT are typically applied. The system is operated inside the Berlin magnetically shielded room (BMSR-2) and equipped with 18 magnetometers consisting of niobium (Nb) wire-wound pick-up coils. A total of 16 small pick-up coils with 17.1 mm diameter form a regular grid with individual channels arranged to ensure system sensitivity covers all three orthogonal spatial directions. Two large hexagonal pick-up coils with an equivalent diameter of 74.5 mm sensitive in z-direction surround the grid at two different heights and are suitable for the detection of deep sources. Each pick-up coil is connected to the input of a thin-film Nb SQUID current sensor via a detachable superconducting contact. The SQUIDs are equipped with integrated input current limiters. Feedback into the pick-up coils is employed to minimise crosstalk between channels. The current sensor chip package includes a superconducting shield of Nb. The field distortion of the prototype and a multi-module arrangement was analysed by numerical simulation. The measured noise of the small magnetometers was between 0.6 and 1.5 fT {{Hz}}-1/2, and well below 1 fT {{Hz}}-1/2 for the large ones. Using a software gradiometer, we achieved a minimum noise level of 0.54 fT {{Hz}}-1/2. We performed ULF NMR experiments, verifying the system’s robustness against pulsed fields, and magnetoencephalographgy (MEG) on somatosensory evoked neuronal activity. The low noise performance of our 18-channel prototype enabled the detection of high-frequency components at around 1 kHz by MEG.

  1. SQUID-magnetometry on Fe monolayers on GaAs(001) in UHV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebe, T.

    2006-12-11

    This thesis deals with the characterization of the growth and of the magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe films on GaAs(001). In particular, a scanning SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) magnetometer was used in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), whose performance has been improved within the scope of this thesis. By probing the magnetic stray field of a magnetized film, the absolute remanent magnetization can be determined with submonolayer sensitivity. In the context of this thesis the magnetic stray field has been calculated analytically. The combined use of SQUID and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) on the same film in UHV allows for the independent determination of the magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constants as a function of temperature, film thickness, topography of the substrate and oxygen exposure. The results of this thesis are: 1. The thickness dependent remanent magnetization from 2 to 20 monolayer (ML) Fe on GaAs(001) without cap layer was measured as a function of temperature. 2. The continuous in-plane reorientation of the magnetization (from [1 1 0] to [1 0 0]) of Fe films with increasing film thickness was observed using the scanning SQUID technique and showed good agreement with FMR measurements. 3. The influence of controlled oxygen exposure on the remanent magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constants of 5 to 16 ML Fe was investigated. A faster reduction of the magnetization is found for the thinner Fe films when the volume of the Fe oxide is taken into consideration. At low oxygen exposure (<10 Langmuir), the perpendicular uniaxial anisotropy constant K{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} is reduced by about 40% whereas other anisotropy contributions remain virtually unchanged. In addition, structural investigations using IV-LEED during the oxygen exposure were carried out. 4. An 8.6 ML Fe/GaAs(001) film which was exposed to 25000 L O{sub 2} exhibits a spontaneous magnetization perpendicular to the film plane at low

  2. Giant hepatocellular adenoma; case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitella, F.A.; Coutinho, A.M.N.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Costa, P.L.A.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Sapienza, M.T.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Radiologia. Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatocellular adenoma is a benign hepatic tumor identified mainly in women during fertility age, with estimated incidence of 4/1000 inhabitants. It is usually unique, well circumscribed, with or without a capsule, size varying from 1 to 30 cm, with possible central areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Case Report: A 37-year-old female patient presenting with no comorbities, use of hormonal birth control pills for 18 years, a condition of reduction in the consistency of feces, increase in number of daily defecations, abdominal cramps, and a stuffed sensation after meals for two years. A palpable abdominal mass extending from the right hypochondriac to the right iliac fossa was noticed four months ago. A computerized tomography (CT) showed an extensive hepatic mass on the right which was considered, within the diagnostic hypotheses, hepatic adenomatosis, without ruling out secondary lesions. A hepatic scintillography with {sup 99m}Tc-DISIDA showed an extensive exophytic area from segment V to the right iliac fossa with arterialized blood flow and hepatocytic activity, as well as a hepatic nodule in segment VII with hepatocytic activity consistent with the hepatic adenomas hypothesis. The biopsy confirmed the hepatic adenoma diagnosis and the patient was submitted to a partial hepatectomy and cholecystectomy with good clinical evolution. Conclusion: Nuclear Medicine may supplement the assessment of hepatic nodules, including giant masses, thus suggesting new hypotheses and direction to therapeutic conduct. (author)

  3. Infiltrating giant cellular blue naevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, A L; Monteiro, D A; De Pretto, O J

    2007-01-01

    Cellular blue naevi (CBN) measure 1-2 cm in diameter and affect the dermis, occasionally extending into the subcutaneous fat. The case of a 14-year-old boy with a giant CBN (GCBN) involving the right half of the face, the jugal mucosa and the lower eyelid with a tumour that had infiltrated the bone and the maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses is reported. Biopsies were taken from the skin, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus. The following markers were used in the immunohistochemical evaluation: CD34, CD56, HMB-45, anti-S100, A-103, Melan A and MIB-1. The biopsy specimens showed a biphasic pattern affecting the lower dermis, subcutaneous fat, skeletal muscle, bone, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus, but there was no histological evidence of malignancy. The tumour cells were CD34-, CD56-, HMB45+, anti-S100+ and A-103+. Melan A was focally expressed. No positive MIB-1 cells were identified. The present case shows that GCBN may infiltrate deeply, with no evidence of malignancy.

  4. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., Io, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  5. Atmospheres of the Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    The giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, are fluid objects. They have no solid surfaces because the light elements constituting them do not condense at solar-system temperatures. Instead, their deep atmospheres grade downward until the distinction between gas and liquid becomes meaningless. The preceding chapter delved into the hot, dark interiors of the Jovian planets. This one focuses on their atmospheres, especially the observable layers from the base of the clouds to the edge of space. These veneers arc only a few hundred kilometers thick, less than one percent of each planet's radius, but they exhibit an incredible variety of dynamic phenomena. The mixtures of elements in these outer layers resemble a cooled-down piece of the Sun. Clouds precipitate out of this gaseous soup in a variety of colors. The cloud patterns are organized by winds, which are powered by heat derived from sunlight (as on Earth) and by internal heat left over from planetary formation. Thus the atmospheres of the Jovian planets are distinctly different both compositionally and dynamically from those of the terrestrial planets. Such differences make them fascinating objects for study, providing clues about the origin and evolution of the planets and the formation of the solar system.

  6. Nebulin--a giant chameleon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2008-01-01

    Nebulin is an enormous protein of the muscle sarcomere. It is a determinant of thin filament length, Z-disk structure and fiber contractility. The nebulin gene contains four regions of alternative splicing, providing a wealth of different isoforms of the protein. The precise function of these numerous isoforms in various types of muscle tissue remains to be elucidated, as does their role in the maintenance of normal muscle strength and activity. Understanding these basic mechanisms is a prerequisite for the development of specific therapies for the disorders caused by mutations in the nebulin gene. Such mutations are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline (rod) myopathy, especially of the typical form of this congenital myopathy. Further known disorders caused by nebulin mutations are several other subcategories of recessively inherited nemaline myopathy and a novel distal myopathy caused byhomozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene. Because of the giant size of the gene, molecular genetic testing methods are difficult to design for routine diagnostic use.

  7. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  8. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  9. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-06

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  10. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-01-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ∼15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  11. Young Solar System's Fifth Giant Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-12-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ~15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  12. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  13. Neuromagnetic recordings of the human peripheral nerve with planar SQUID gradiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, G.; Maas, P.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Shahani, U.; Weir, A.I. [Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF (United Kingdom)

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic fields produced by a travelling volley in the human ulnar nerve have been successfully measured in a lightly shielded environment. Recordings of the tangential component of the magnetic field were made using a planar second-order gradiometer integrated with a first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Devices were fabricated in our clean-room facility at the University of Strathclyde and measurements taken in an eddy-current shielded room at the Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit. We use no additional shielding and no electronic differencing or field-nulling techniques. Evoked magnetic fields of 60 fT peak-to-peak were obtained after 1536 averages but they could be seen easily as early as 512 averages. Measurements were made over four points above the ulnar nerve on the upper arm and from these the conduction velocity was calculated as 60 m s{sup -1}. (author)

  14. Neuromagnetic recordings of the human peripheral nerve with planar SQUID gradiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, G; Shahani, U; Weir, A I; Maas, P; Pegrum, C M; Donaldson, G B

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic fields produced by a travelling volley in the human ulnar nerve have been successfully measured in a lightly shielded environment. Recordings of the tangential component of the magnetic field were made using a planar second-order gradiometer integrated with a first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Devices were fabricated in our clean-room facility at the University of Strathclyde and measurements taken in an eddy-current shielded room at the Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit. We use no additional shielding and no electronic differencing or field-nulling techniques. Evoked magnetic fields of 60 fT peak-to-peak were obtained after 1536 averages but they could be seen easily as early as 512 averages. Measurements were made over four points above the ulnar nerve on the upper arm and from these the conduction velocity was calculated as 60 m s(-1).

  15. SQUID based cryogenic current comparator for measurements of the dark current of superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W.; Nietzsche, S.; Neubert, R.; Nawrodt, R. [Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Peters, A. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Knaack, K.; Wendt, M.; Wittenburg, K. [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The linear accelerator technology, based on super-conducting L-band (1.3 GHz) is currently under study at DESY (Hamburg, Germany). The two 10 km long main Linacs will be equipped with a total of nearly 20.000 cavities. The dark current due to the emission of electrons in these high gradient field super-conducting cavities is an unwanted particle source. A newly high performance SQUID based measurement system for detecting dark currents is proposed. It makes use of the Cryogenic Current Comparator principle and senses dark currents in the pA range with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz. The use of a cryogenic current comparator as dark current sensor has some important advantages: -) the measurement of the absolute value of the dark current, -) the non-dependence on the electron trajectories, -) the accurate absolute calibration with an additional wire loop, and -) extremely high resolution.

  16. Magnetoencephalography: From SQUIDs to neuroscience. Neuroimage 20th anniversary special edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Riitta; Salmelin, Riitta

    2012-06-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), with its direct view to the cortex through the magnetically transparent skull, has developed from its conception in physics laboratories to a powerful tool of basic and clinical neuroscience. MEG provides millisecond time resolution and allows real-time tracking of brain activation sequences during sensory processing, motor planning and action, cognition, language perception and production, social interaction, and various brain disorders. Current-day neuromagnetometers house hundreds of SQUIDs, superconducting quantum interference devices, to pick up signals generated by concerted action of cortical neurons. Complementary MEG measures of neuronal involvement include evoked responses, modulation of cortical rhythms, properties of the on-going neural activity, and interareal connectivity. Future MEG breakthroughs in understanding brain dynamics are expected through advanced signal analysis and combined use of MEG with hemodynamic imaging (fMRI). Methodological development progresses most efficiently when linked with insightful neuroscientific questions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Concentrations of biogenic amines in fish, squid and octopus and their changes during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Jian; Yang, Hong

    2012-12-15

    The concentrations of seven biogenic amines (BA) were simultaneously determined in 74 samples of fish, squid and octopus, by the method of HPLC coupled with pre-column derivatisation. The relationship between the formation of BA in aquatic products and the growth of microbial flora during storage was also investigated. Results showed that putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were the dominant BA in the studied samples, but the concentrations of histamine and tyramine were mostly less than 50 and 100 mgkg(-1), respectively. Freezing can effectively prevent the formation of BA, but the levels of putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine significantly increased (poctopus strongly and positively correlated with the formation of amines (such as putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine) during storage, except for histamine in octopus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation and characterization of high purity β-chitin from squid pens (Loligo chenisis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, Hoang Ngoc; Minh, Nguyen Cong; Van Hoa, Nguyen; Trung, Trang Si

    2016-12-01

    Squid pens were extracted by a NaOH solution at 80°C for 10h to remove protein and minerals. The as-prepared β-chitin had a high molecular weight (8.5±0.1×10 3 kDa), a low protein content (0.63±0.02wt.%), and a negligible amount of minerals. This method avoids the conventional method for the removal of minerals from shrimp and crab shells by HCl. The purity of resulting products was measured by NMR and FTIR. Moreover, the morphology and crystallinity of β-chitin was characterized by SEM and XRD. The β-chitin with long chains and high purity is suitable for producing high quantity β-chitosan for various potential applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Customizing Properties of β-Chitin in Squid Pen (Gladius by Chemical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ianiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The squid pen (gladius from the Loligo vulgaris was used for preparation of β-chitin materials characterized by different chemical, micro- and nano-structural properties that preserved, almost completely the macrostructural and the mechanical ones. The β-chitin materials obtained by alkaline treatment showed porosity, wettability and swelling that are a function of the duration of the treatment. Microscopic, spectroscopic and synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques showed that the chemical environment of the N-acetyl groups of the β-chitin chains changes after the thermal alkaline treatment. As a consequence, the crystalline packing of the β-chitin is modified, due to the intercalation of water molecules between β-chitin sheets. Potential applications of these β-chitin materials range from the nanotechnology to the regenerative medicine. The use of gladii, which are waste products of the fishing industry, has also important environmental implications.

  20. A squid-based beam current monitor for FAIR/CRYRING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geithner, Rene; Stöhlker, Thomas; Kurian, Febin; Reeg, Hansjörg; Schwickert, Marcus; Neubert, Ralf; Seidel, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A SQUID-based beam current monitor was developed for the upcoming FAIR-Project, providing a non-destructive online monitoring of the beam currents in the nA-range. The cryogenic current comparator (CCC) was optimized for lowest possible noise-limited current resolution together with a high system bandwidth. This CCC is foreseen to be installed in the CRYRING facility (CRYRING@ESR: A study group report www.gsi.de/fileadmin/SPARC/documents/Cryring/ReportCryring-40ESR.PDF), working as a test bench for FAIR. In this contribution we present results of the completed CCC for FAIR/CRYRING and also arrangements that have been done for the installation of the CCC at CRYRING, regarding the cryostat design. (paper)

  1. DC current distribution mapping system of the solar panels using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Shingo; Kasuya, Syohei; Saari, Mohd Mawardi; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukada, Keiji; Tsukamoto, Akira; Adachi, Seiji; Tanabe, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Solar panels are expected to play a major role as a source of sustainable energy. In order to evaluate solar panels, non-destructive tests, such as defect inspections and response property evaluations, are necessary. We developed a DC current distribution mapping system of the solar panels using a High Critical Temperature Superconductor Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (HTS-SQUID) gradiometer with ramp edge type Josephson junctions. Two independent components of the magnetic fields perpendicular to the panel surface (∂Bz/∂x, ∂Bz/∂y) were detected. The direct current of the solar panel is visualized by calculating the composition of the two signal components, the phase angle, and mapping the DC current vector. The developed system can evaluate the uniformity of DC current distributions precisely and may be applicable for defect detection of solar panels.

  2. Characterization of the seascape used by juvenile and wintering adult Southern Giant Petrels from Patagonia Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Gabriela S.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Quintana, Flavio

    2015-02-01

    The characterization of the seascape used by marine top predators provides a wide perspective of pelagic habitat use and it is necessary to understand the functioning of marine systems. The goal of this study was to characterize the oceanographic and biological features of marine areas used by adult and first year juvenile southern giant petrels (SGP, Macronectes giganteus) from northern Patagonian colonies (Isla Arce and Gran Robredo) during the austral fall and winter (2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008). The marine environment exploited by the SGP was characterized using sea surface temperature (SST), SST gradients, chlorophyll-a concentration, water depth, oceanographic regimes, and ocean surface winds. In addition, the biological seascape was defined by considering the distribution of squid during the months of study. Juveniles SGP exploited a wide range of environments focusing mainly on productive neritic waters using a variety of oceanographic regimes. Juveniles were exposed to eutrophic and enriched waters, probably because of the frequent presence of thermal fronts in their utilization areas. Adults' environments lacked of thermal fronts remaining the majority of their time within the oceanographic regime "Continental Shelf", in water depths of 100-200 m, exploiting mesotrophic and eutrophic environments, and remaining in areas of known food resources related to the presence of squid. For the most part, juveniles were exposed to westerly winds, which may have helped them in their initial flight to the shelf break, east of the colony. Wintering adults SGP also explored areas characterized by westerly winds but this did not play a primary role in the selection of their residence areas. Juveniles during their first year at sea have to search for food exploring a variety of unknown environments. During their search, they remained in productive environments associated to fronts and probably also associated to fisheries operating in their foraging areas. The

  3. Asymmetric nanowire SQUID: Linear current-phase relation, stochastic switching, and symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A.; Bezryadin, A.

    2017-09-01

    We study nanostructures based on two ultrathin superconducting nanowires connected in parallel to form a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The measured function of the critical current versus magnetic field, IC(B ) , is multivalued, asymmetric, and its maxima and minima are shifted from the usual integer and half integer flux quantum points. We also propose a low-temperature-limit model which generates accurate fits to the IC(B ) functions and provides verifiable predictions. The key assumption of our model is that each wire is characterized by a sample-specific critical phase ϕC defined as the phase difference at which the supercurrent in the wire is the maximum. For our nanowires ϕC is much greater than the usual π /2 , which makes a qualitative difference in the behavior of the SQUID. The nanowire current-phase relation is assumed linear, since the wires are much longer than the coherence length. The model explains single-valuedness regions where only one vorticity value nv is stable. Also, it predicts regions where multiple vorticity values are stable because the Little-Parks (LP) diamonds, which describe the region of stability for each winding number nv in the current-field diagram, can overlap. We also observe and explain regions in which the standard deviation of the switching current is independent of the magnetic field. We develop a technique that allows a reliable detection of hidden phase slips and use it to determine the boundaries of the LP diamonds even at low currents where IC(B ) is not directly measurable.

  4. A numerical and experimental investigation of planar asymmetric SQUID gradiometer characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, U.; Walker, M.E.; Cochran, A.; Hutson, D.; Lang, G.; Weston, R.G.; Pegrum, C.M. [University of Strathclyde, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    A low-cost, high-performance magnetic field sensor for applications such as biomagnetism and nondestructive evaluation can be fabricated by integrating a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and a gradiometer on a single chip. Conventionally, the gradiometric pick-up loop would have a rectangular outline divided symmetrically about the midpoint of its length so that its spatial response was also symmetrical. However, it is also possible to divide the same outline asymmetrically, maintaining the field rejection order of the gradiometer by adding an extra crossover. The spatial response of this arrangement will also be asymmetric, which may be exploited to reduce the effects of the nearby SQUID as a magnetic anomaly or to enhance the sensitivity of the device to magnetic sources at a particular distance. The techniques to calculate the crossover positions are well established. Here we outline how different designs may be evaluated theoretically and report on first experimental results for three simple designs. Several devices have been fabricated using a well established Nb/Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb trilayer process with high yields. The measurement of the spatial response of an asymmetric first-order gradiometer shows the expected magnetometer characteristics for a magnetic dipole source in the near field and first-order gradiometric characteristics for a far-field source. The balance of the integrated gradiometer appears to be better than one part in 10{sup 4}, and the magnetic field gradient sensitivity has been measured to be 100 fT cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}. (author)

  5. A comparative study of spatially clustered distribution of jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) offshore Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongjiu; Cui, Li; Chen, Xinjun; Liu, Yu

    2017-06-01

    We examined spatially clustered distribution of jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) in the offshore waters of Peru bounded by 78°-86°W and 8°-20°S under 0.5°×0.5° fishing grid. The study is based on the catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and fishing effort from Chinese mainland squid jigging fleet in 2003-2004 and 2006-2013. The data for all years as well as the eight years (excluding El Niño events) were studied to examine the effect of climate variation on the spatial distribution of D. gigas. Five spatial clusters reflecting the spatial distribution were computed using K-means and Getis-Ord Gi* for a detailed comparative study. Our results showed that clusters identified by the two methods were quite different in terms of their spatial patterns, and K-means was not as accurate as Getis-Ord Gi*, as inferred from the agreement degree and receiver operating characteristic. There were more areas of hot and cold spots in years without the impact of El Niño, suggesting that such large-scale climate variations could reduce the clustering level of D. gigas. The catches also showed that warm El Niño conditions and high water temperature were less favorable for D. gigas offshore Peru. The results suggested that the use of K-means is preferable if the aim is to discover the spatial distribution of each sub-region (cluster) of the study area, while Getis-Ord Gi* is preferable if the aim is to identify statistically significant hot spots that may indicate the central fishing ground.

  6. Multiple Mating, Paternity and Complex Fertilisation Patterns in the Chokka Squid Loligo reynaudii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jose Naud

    Full Text Available Polyandry is widespread and influences patterns of sexual selection, with implications for sexual conflict over mating. Assessing sperm precedence patterns is a first step towards understanding sperm competition within a female and elucidating the roles of male- and female-controlled factors. In this study behavioural field data and genetic data were combined to investigate polyandry in the chokka squid Loligo reynaudii. Microsatellite DNA-based paternity analysis revealed multiple paternity to be the norm, with 79% of broods sired by at least two males. Genetic data also determined that the male who was guarding the female at the moment of sampling was a sire in 81% of the families tested, highlighting mate guarding as a successful male tactic with postcopulatory benefits linked to sperm deposition site giving privileged access to extruded egg strings. As females lay multiple eggs in capsules (egg strings wherein their position is not altered during maturation it is possible to describe the spatial / temporal sequence of fertilisation / sperm precedence There were four different patterns of fertilisation found among the tested egg strings: 1 unique sire; 2 dominant sire, with one or more rare sires; 3 randomly mixed paternity (two or more sires; and 4 a distinct switch in paternity occurring along the egg string. The latter pattern cannot be explained by a random use of stored sperm, and suggests postcopulatory female sperm choice. Collectively the data indicate multiple levels of male- and female-controlled influences on sperm precedence, and highlights squid as interesting models to study the interplay between sexual and natural selection.

  7. Understanding the Role of Host Hemocytes in a Squid/Vibrio Symbiosis Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Collins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between the squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, serves as a model for understanding interactions between beneficial bacteria and animal hosts. The establishment and maintenance of the association is highly specific and depends on the selection of V. fischeri and exclusion of non-symbiotic bacteria from the environment. Current evidence suggests that the host’s cellular innate immune system, in the form of macrophage-like hemocytes, helps to mediate host tolerance of V. fischeri. To begin to understand the role of hemocytes in this association, we analyzed these cells by high-throughput 454 transcriptomic and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses. 454 high-throughput sequencing produced 650,686 reads totaling 279.9 Mb while LC-MS/MS analyses of circulating hemocytes putatively identified 702 unique proteins. Several receptors involved with the recognition of microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs were identified. Among these was a complete open reading frame (ORF to a putative peptidoglycan recognition protein (EsPGRP5 that has conserved residues for amidase activity. Assembly of the hemocyte transcriptome showed EsPGRP5 had high coverage, suggesting it is among the 5% most abundant transcripts in circulating hemocytes. Other transcripts and proteins identified included members of the conserved NFκB signaling pathway, putative members of the complement pathway, the carbohydrate binding protein galectin, and cephalotoxin. Quantitative PCR of complement-related genes, cephalotoxin, EsPGRP5, and a nitric oxide synthase showed differential expression in circulating hemocytes isolated from adult squid with colonized light organs compared to those for which the symbionts were removed. These data suggest that the presence of the symbiont influences gene expression of the cellular innate immune system of the host.

  8. Food web and fish stock changes in central Chile: comparing the roles of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) predation, the environment, and fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Sergio; Arancibia, Hugo

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed recent food web and fish stock changes in the central Chile marine ecosystem, comparing the roles of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) as predator, the environment, and fishing. To accomplish this we used food web modeling and the Ecopath with Ecosim software (EwE). The principal fish stocks have experienced wide decadal fluctuations in the past 30 years, including stock collapses of horse mackerel (Trachurus murphyi) and hake (Merluccius gayi), and there was a large influx of jumbo squid during the mid-2000s. We used two EwE models representing the food web off central Chile to test the hypothesis that predation by jumbo squid has been significant in explaining the dynamics of the main fishing resources and other species in the study area. Results indicate that predation by jumbo squid on fish stocks is lower than that of other predators (e.g. hake) and the fishery. Long-term fluctuations (1978-2004) in the biomass of the main fish stocks (as well as other components of the food web) seem to be related to fishing and to variation in primary production, rather than to predation by jumbo squid alone. Jumbo squid seems to play a role as predator rather than prey in the system, but its impacts are low when compared with the impacts of other predators and fishing. Therefore, we conclude that jumbo squid predation on its prey was not the primary force behind the collapse of important fish stocks off central Chile. Future efforts should be directed to better understanding factors that trigger sudden increases in jumbo squid abundance off central Chile, as well as modeling its trophic impacts.

  9. Baseband Feedback Frequency-Division Multiplexing with Low-Power dc-SQUIDs and Digital Electronics for TES X-Ray Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K.; Takei, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Kohjiro, S.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-08-01

    We are developing frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) systems with baseband feedback for TES X-ray microcalorimeter arrays for use with the DIOS mission. To meet the requirement of limited cooling capacity at cryogenic temperatures, we developed low-power and FDM-optmized dc-SQUIDs. To make maximum use of the SQUIDs, we also developed digital electronics using FPGA evaluation boards and ADC/DAC FMC daughter cards, and evaluated signal-to-noise ratios and gain-bandwidth products.

  10. Asteroseismology of Red Giants and Galactic Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekker, Saskia

    From the oscillations in red-giant stars measured in time-series data it is possible to derive more accurate stellar parameters (e.g., mass, radius and age) as can be done using only single-epoch spectroscopy or photometry. These stellar parameters combined with chemical composition and the position, distance and velocity of the stars play an important role in studying the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. In this chapter we discuss some key physical phenomena that are at play in (red-giant) stars as well as some important phases in red-giant evolution. Subsequently, oscillation characteristics that are of importance for the determination of stellar parameters (as indicated above) of red-giant stars are introduced followed by a description of the main components of the Milky Way. Finally, the role red giants can play in creating a detailed observational picture of the Milky Way and deciphering the formation and evolution of the Milky Way is discussed.

  11. Low-frequency noise in high-Tc superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklich, Andrew Hostetler [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-Tc dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUEDs), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDS; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5 x 10-30 J Hz-1 at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)2 pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz-1/2 down to frequencies below I Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz-1/2 in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm)2 pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz-1/2. High-Tc SQUIDs exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10--20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV.Hz-1/2 at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz) is described.

  12. Environmental pH, O2 and Capsular Effects on the Geochemical Composition of Statoliths of Embryonic Squid Doryteuthis opalescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Navarro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spawning market squid lay embryo capsules on the seafloor of the continental shelf of the California Current System (CCS, where ocean acidification, deoxygenation and intensified upwelling lower the pH and [O2]. Squid statolith geochemistry has been shown to reflect the squid’s environment (e.g., seawater temperature and elemental concentration. We used real-world environmental levels of pH and [O2] observed on squid-embryo beds to test in the laboratory whether or not squid statolith geochemistry reflects environmental pH and [O2]. We asked whether pH and [O2] levels might affect the incorporation of element ratios (B:Ca, Mg:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca, Pb:Ca, U:Ca into squid embryonic statoliths as (1 individual elements and/or (2 multivariate elemental signatures, and consider future applications as proxies for pH and [O2] exposure. Embryo exposure to high and low pH and [O2] alone and together during development over four weeks only moderately affected elemental concentrations of the statoliths, and uranium was an important element driving these differences. Uranium:Ca was eight-times higher in statoliths exposed to low pHT (7.57–7.58 and low [O2] (79–82 µmol·kg−1 than those exposed to higher ambient pHT (7.92–7.94 and [O2] (241–243 µmol·kg−1. In a separate experiment, exposure to low pHT (7.55–7.56 or low [O2] (83–86 µmol·kg−1 yielded elevated U:Ca and Sr:Ca in the low [O2] treatment only. We found capsular effects on multiple elements in statoliths of all treatments. The multivariate elemental signatures of embryonic statoliths were distinct among capsules, but did not reflect environmental factors (pH and/or [O2]. We show that statoliths of squid embryos developing inside capsules have the potential to reflect environmental pH and [O2], but that these “signals” are generated in concert with the physiological effects of the capsules and embryos themselves.

  13. A rapid analytical and quantitative evaluation of formaldehyde in squid based on Tri-step IR and partial least squares (PLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dong-Chen; Zou, Meng-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Xi; Yu, Pan; Lin, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Tu; Wu, Ya-Fen; Liu, Yuan; Gan, Jian-Hong; Sun, Su-Qin; Wang, Xi-Chang; Xu, Chang-Hua

    2017-08-15

    Formaldehyde abuse for retaining squid freshness is detrimental to public health. The aim is to establish a rapid and quantitative detection method of formaldehyde in squid for screening massive samples. A linear relationship between formaldehyde concentration in squid and formaldehyde concentration in squid soaked water was observed using HPLC. Chemical profile variances of squids were rapidly analyzed by Tri-step infrared spectroscopy. Specifically, with increasing formaldehyde concentration, peak intensities of 2927cm -1 (v as (CH 2 )), 1081cm -1 (glycogen), 1631cm -1 (β-sheet proteins) decreased while 1655cm -1 (α-helix proteins) increased. Spectral curve-fitting results further disclosed that β-sheet proteins were transformed to α-helix and β-turn conformations. Furthermore, a quantitative prediction model based on IR spectra was established by PLS (R 2 , 0.9787; RMSEC, 5.51). The developed method was applicable for rapid (c.a. 5min) and quantitative analysis of formaldehyde in squids with LOD of 15mg/kg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A GIANT SAMPLE OF GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Langston, G. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Bilous, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Kondratiev, V. I. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lyutikov, M. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43 m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hr of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95,000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hr. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43 m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39,900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43 m GPs were also correlated with Fermi {gamma}-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92,022 GPs and 393 {gamma}-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and {gamma}-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.

  15. A GIANT SAMPLE OF GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N.; Langston, G. I.; Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Lyutikov, M.; Ransom, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43 m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hr of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95,000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hr. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43 m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39,900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43 m GPs were also correlated with Fermi γ-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92,022 GPs and 393 γ-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and γ-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.

  16. Giant bladder lithiasis: case report and bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Vilar, Daniel; Beltran Persiva, José; Pérez Mestre, Mateo; Povo Martin, Iván José; Miralles Aguado, Jaume; Garau Perelló, Carmen; De Francia, Jose Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a very frequent urological disease but bladder lithiasis is very uncommon.Patients usually refer voiding symptoms and hematuria. The diagnosis is made after imaging tests. We report a clinical case describing a giant bladder stone and perform a bibliographic review. A 43 year old man with the diagnosis of giant bladder stone (more than 10 cm diameter). We searched Medline using the terms: giant bladder stone, giant bladder lithiasis, bladder lithiasis, giant bladder lithiasis. We made the diagnosis of giant bladder stone after a simple kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) X Ray. The treatment for this patient was a cystolithotomy. We found more than 230 reports at Medline and chose the most referred ones and the last 10 years reports. Giant bladder lithiasis is a very rare pathology. The gold standard for diagnosis is cystoscopy but sometimes with a KUB Xray or an ultrasound is enough. Because of its size, cistolitotomy is the correct treatment for giant bladder stone.

  17. Giant pseudopolyps in the colon transversum in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, W.; Fobbe, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of giant pseudopolyps in the colon transversum in histologically verified Crohn's disease is presented. Giant pseudopolyps are a very rare manifestation in granulomatous colitis. Differential diagnosis espec. for polypous adenocarcinoma is discussed. (orig.) [de

  18. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  19. Giant flexoelectricity in polyvinylidene fluoride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskaran, Sivapalan; Ramachandran, Narayanan; He Xiangtong; Thiruvannamalai, Sankar; Lee, Ho Joon; Heo, Hyun; Chen Qin; Fu, John Y.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that giant flexoelectricity may exist in certain elastomers with bent-core molecular structures, which contradicts the previous theoretical estimation that the flexoelectric coupling is small in those materials. In this Letter, we report an analogous phenomenon, i.e., the giant direct flexoelectric effect, observed in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. Our experimental studies indicate that such an enhanced flexoelectric effect might be induced by the interaction between the energy couplings of the apolar and the polar molecular structures of the polymer film under elastic deformation. - Highlights: → Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with not fully crystallized α- and β-phases. → Flexoelectric measurement. → Giant direct flexoelectric effect in PVDF.

  20. Bilateral Giant Juvenile Fibroadenoma of Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Nikhil; Singh, Sumitoj; Paul, Surinder; Sandhu, Mandeep Singh; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign lesions of breast commonly found in young age group. These focal tumours contain both mesenchymal and glandular tissue. Giant juvenile fibroma of breast is rare variant of fibroadenoma found usually in less than 20 years of age. They present with rapid enlargement of single or multiple, discrete, painless large nodule of breast. A 14-years-old premenarche girl presented with large bilateral breast lumps for two months. FNAC showed features of juvenile fibroadenoma. Breast conserving surgical excision of lumps was performed and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile fibroadenoma. Giant juvenile fibroadenomas are characterised by rapid enlargement of encapsulated mass. The aetiology is unknown, although end-organ hypersensitivity to normal level of estrogen is postulated. We present a case of bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenoma for its rarity.

  1. Red-giant stars in eccentric binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red-giant stars and binary stars. We discuss the characterization of known eccentric system, containing a solar-like oscillating red-giant primary component. We also report several new binary systems that are candidates for hosting an oscillating companion. A powerful approach to study binary stars is to combine asteroseimic techniques with light curve fitting. Seismology allows us to deduce the properties of red giants. In addition, by modeling the ellipsoidal modulations we can constrain the parameters of the binary system. An valuable independent source are ground-bases, high-resolution spectrographs.

  2. Excitation of giant resonances through inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kailas, S.

    1981-01-01

    In the last few years, exciting developments have taken place in the study of giant resonances (GR). In addition to the already well known gjant dipole resonance (GDR), the presence of at least two more new GRs viz. giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) and giant monopole resonance (GMR) has been experimentally established. The systematics covering these GRs is found to be consistent with the theoretical expectation. Though the existence of higher multipoles has been predjcted by theory, so far only some of these have been found to be excited experimentally. Various probe particles - electrons, protons (polarized and unpolarized), light and heavy ions and pions - at different bombarding energies have been used to excite the GR region, primarily through the inelastic scattering process. Detailed experiments, looking at the decay modes of GR region, have also been performed. These studies have contributed significantly to a better understanding of the phenomenon of nuclear collective excitation. In this report, the current status of 'GR' research is reviewed. (author)

  3. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zhang, Andrew J. [The Harker School, 500 Saratoga Avenue, San Jose, CA 95129 (United States); Hong, Jerry [Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 (United States); Guo, Michelle [Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Guo, Rachel [Irvington High School, 41800 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  4. Kepler Asteroseismology of Red-giant Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler mission, launched in March 2009, has revolutionized asteroseismology, providing detailed observations of thousands of stars. This has allowed in-depth analyses of stars ranging from compact hot subdwarfs to red giants, and including the detection of solar-like oscillations in hundreds...... of stars on or near the main sequence. Here I mainly consider solar-like oscillations in red giants, where Kepler observations are yielding results of a perhaps unexpected richness. In addition to giving a brief overview of the observational and numerical results for these stars, I present a simple...

  5. Photon decay of giant multipole resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review of the excitation of giant multipole resonances via Coulomb excitation is given which emphasizes the very large cross sections that can be realized through this reaction for both isoscalar and isovector resonances. Discussion and results where available, are provided for the measurement of the photon decay of one and two phonon giant resonances. It is pointed out throughout the presentation that the use of E1 photons as a tag'' provides a means to observe weakly excited resonances that cannot be observed in the shingles spectra. 26 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  7. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  8. Giant Epidermoid Cyst of the Thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NH Mohamed Haflah

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cyst is a common benign cutaneous swelling frequently encountered in surgical practice. It usually presents as a painless lump frequently occurring in hairbearing areas of the body particularly the scalp, scrotum, neck, shoulder and back. Giant epidermoid cysts commonly occur in hairy areas such as the scalp. We present here the case of a rare occurrence of a giant epidermoid cyst in the less hairy area of the right upper thigh mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma. Steps are highlighted for the management of this unusual cyst.

  9. Core Formation in Giant Gaseous Protoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Helled, Ravit; Schubert, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Sedimentation rates of silicate grains in gas giant protoplanets formed by disk instability are calculated for protoplanetary masses between 1 M_Saturn to 10 M_Jupiter. Giant protoplanets with masses of 5 M_Jupiter or larger are found to be too hot for grain sedimentation to form a silicate core. Smaller protoplanets are cold enough to allow grain settling and core formation. Grain sedimentation and core formation occur in the low mass protoplanets because of their slow contraction rate and l...

  10. Giant flexoelectric effect through interfacial strain relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daesu; Noh, Tae Won

    2012-10-28

    Interfacial strain gradients in oxide epitaxial thin films provide an interesting opportunity to study flexoelectric effects and their potential applications. Oxide epitaxial thin films can exhibit giant and tunable flexoelectric effects, which are six or seven orders of magnitude larger than those in conventional bulk solids. The strain gradient in an oxide epitaxial thin film can generate an electric field above 1 MV m(-1) by flexoelectricity, large enough to affect the physical properties of the film. Giant flexoelectric effects on ferroelectric properties are discussed in this overview of recent experimental observations.

  11. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  12. [Bilateral giant scrotal hydrocele in an adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masue, Naruyasu; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu

    2008-07-01

    Bilateral giant hydrocele in an adult is a rare clinical entity. A 31-year-old man presented with painless bilateral scrotal swelling that had appeared at age 13 years and had increased very slowly since. Computed tomography and ultrasonography revealed collection of fluid on both sides of the scrotum. Giant scrotal hydrocele were diagnosed, and surgical excision was performed. The fluid volume was 1,050 ml in right, 645 ml in left. No inguinal hernia was found. Pathologic examination of the resected portion of the tunica vaginalis testis revealed inflammatory changes, and fluid cytology was negative. Eight months has passed, and there has been no evidence of recurrence.

  13. Giant Spermatocele Mimicking Hydrocele: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chih Yeh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Spermatoceles are usually asymptomatic and often found incidentally during physical examination. We report a case of giant spermatocele that mimicked a hydrocele. A 55-year-old man suffered from right scrotal enlargement for several years. As the heavy sensation and scrotal soreness worsened in recent months, he came to our outpatient clinic for help. Hydrocele was suspected due to transilluminating appearance of the scrotal content. Surgical exploration was arranged and a giant spermatocele was found. Total excision of the spermatocele was performed and the patient recovered well. The specimen was sent for pathology and spermatocele with spermatozoa was noted.

  14. Development of a remanence measurement-based SQUID system with in-depth resolution for nanoparticle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Song; Shi, Xiangyang; Baker, James R; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Orr, Bradford G

    2009-05-21

    We present a remanence measurement method using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect trace amounts of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Based on this method, a one-dimensional scanning system was established for imaging. The system was calibrated with 25 nm diameter Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs), and the sensitivity of the NPs was found to be 10 ng at a distance of 1.7 cm and the spatial resolution was approximately 1 cm. A theoretical model of this system was developed and applied to the deconvolution of scanned images of phantoms with two NP injection spots. Using the developed SQUID system, we were able to determine not only the amount and horizontal positions of the injections, but also their depths in the phantoms.

  15. Description of the first Lessepsian squid migrant, Sepioteuthis lessoniana (CEPHALOPODA: Loliginidae, in the Aegean Sea (Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. LEFKADITOU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Loliginid squids of the Sepioteuthis lessoniana complex are widely spread in the Indo-Pacific Ocean, where they constitute a commercially important resource for neritic fisheries. Sepioteuthis lessoniana is the only Lessepsian squid migrant till now, recorded for the first time in the Mediterranean in 2002 along the Turkish Levantine coasts. Two maturing males, with mantle lengths 193 mm and 244 mm, have been recently caught near the coasts of Rhodes Island (SE Aegean, extending the species distribution northward, into Hellenic waters. Their identity was confirmed by comparison of the main body, beak characteristics and morphometric measurements with those available in the literature for this species. Suspected expansion of the Lessepsian loliginid into the Aegean Sea, due to the gradual warming of the sea, is discussed.

  16. Observing giant panda habitat and forage abundance from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, T.

    2009-01-01

    Giant pandas are obligate bamboo grazers. The bamboos favoured by giant pandas are typical forest understorey plants. Therefore, the availability and abundance of understorey bamboo is a key factor in determining the quantity and quality of giant panda food resources. However, there is little or

  17. Giant Anal Condyloma Acuminatum in Childhood: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant Anal Condyloma Acuminatum in Childhood: A Case Report. K. Attipou, K. Yawovi, N. James, G. A. Napo-Koura, A. Tchangaï-Walla, K James. Abstract. The authors report a case of anal giant condyloma acuminatum present for 10 years in a 14 year old. The giant tumor was responsible for difficulty in the sitting and ...

  18. Patient with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy and Two Giant Stones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant urinary bladder stones are very rare; very few cases have been reported in English literature and only one case from Africa. Multiple giant bladder stones are extremely rare; no single case report has been found documenting this occasion. This report presents a patient of benign prostatic hypertrophy with two giant ...

  19. Giant Panda habitat selection in the Foping Nature Reserve, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Toxopeus, A.G.; Skidmore, A.K.; Shao, X.; Dang, D.; Wang, T.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about habitat selection of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), especially about the relationship between giant panda presence and bamboo and tree structures. We presented data on giant panda habitat use and selection in Foping Nature Reserve (NR), China. We used 1,066

  20. Observing giant panda habitat and forage abundance from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, T.

    2009-01-01

    Giant pandas are obligate bamboo grazers. The bamboos favoured by giant
    pandas are typical forest understorey plants. Therefore, the availability and
    abundance of understorey bamboo is a key factor in determining the quantity
    and quality of giant panda food resources. However,

  1. Giant urinary bladder calculus: Case report | Otieno | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A vertical calculus weighing more than 100 g is categorised as a giant urinary bladder stone. Giant urinary bladder stones are very rare and very few cases have been reported in English literature and only one case from Africa. This is a case report of a patient with a giant urinary bladder calculus presenting as a rectal ...

  2. In vivo and real-time measurement of magnetic nanoparticles distribution in animals by scanning SQUID biosusceptometry for biomedicine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh, J J; Tseng, W K; Horng, H E; Hong, C Y; Yang, H C; Wu, C C

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely applied to biomagnetism, such as drug deliver, magnetic labeling, and contrast agent for in vivo image, etc. To localize the distribution of these magnetic particles in living organism is the first important issue to confirm the effects of magnetic nanoparticles and also evaluate the possible untoward effects. In this study, a scanning high T(c) rf-SQUID superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) biosusceptometry, composed of static SQUID unit and scanning coil sets, is developed for biomedicine study with the advantages of easy operation and unshielded environment. The characteristics tests showed that the system had the low noise of 8 pT/Hz at 400 Hz and the high sensitivity with the minimum detectable magnetization around 4.5 × 10(-3) EMU at distance of 13 mm. A magnetic nanoparticle detection test, performed by ex vivo scanning of the magnetic fluids filled capillary under swine skin for simulation of blood vessels in living bodies, confirmed that the system is feasible for dynamic tracking of magnetic nanoparticles. Based on this result, we performed further studies in rats to clarify the dynamic distribution of magnetic nanoparticle in living organism for the pharmacokinetics analysis like drug delivers, and propose the possible physiological metabolism of intravenous magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. Characterizing the host and symbiont proteomes in the association between the Bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler R Schleicher

    Full Text Available The beneficial symbiosis between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, provides a unique opportunity to study host/microbe interactions within a natural microenvironment. Colonization of the squid light organ by V. fischeri begins a lifelong association with a regulated daily rhythm. Each morning the host expels an exudate from the light organ consisting of 95% of the symbiont population in addition to host hemocytes and shed epithelial cells. We analyzed the host and symbiont proteomes of adult squid exudate and surrounding light organ epithelial tissue using 1D- and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT in an effort to understand the contribution of both partners to the maintenance of this association. These proteomic analyses putatively identified 1581 unique proteins, 870 proteins originating from the symbiont and 711 from the host. Identified host proteins indicate a role of the innate immune system and reactive oxygen species (ROS in regulating the symbiosis. Symbiont proteins detected enhance our understanding of the role of quorum sensing, two-component signaling, motility, and detoxification of ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS inside the light organ. This study offers the first proteomic analysis of the symbiotic microenvironment of the adult light organ and provides the identification of proteins important to the regulation of this beneficial association.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of the white body of the squid Euprymna tasmanica with emphasis on immune and hematopoietic gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A Salazar

    Full Text Available In the mutualistic relationship between the squid Euprymna tasmanica and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, several host factors, including immune-related proteins, are known to interact and respond specifically and exclusively to the presence of the symbiont. In squid and octopus, the white body is considered to be an immune organ mainly due to the fact that blood cells, or hemocytes, are known to be present in high numbers and in different developmental stages. Hence, the white body has been described as the site of hematopoiesis in cephalopods. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies showing any molecular evidence of such functions. In this study, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of white body tissue of the Southern dumpling squid, E. tasmanica. Our primary goal was to gain insights into the functions of this tissue and to test for the presence of gene transcripts associated with hematopoietic and immune processes. Several hematopoiesis genes including CPSF1, GATA 2, TFIID, and FGFR2 were found to be expressed in the white body. In addition, transcripts associated with immune-related signal transduction pathways, such as the toll-like receptor/NF-κβ, and MAPK pathways were also found, as well as other immune genes previously identified in E. tasmanica's sister species, E. scolopes. This study is the first to analyze an immune organ within cephalopods, and to provide gene expression data supporting the white body as a hematopoietic tissue.

  5. Magnetorelaxometry of few Fe3O4 nanoparticles at 77 K employing a self-compensated SQUID magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Alexander; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Lak, Aidin; Kassner, Alexander; Ludwig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of great interest for industrial and medical applications. Therefore, the properties of the particles have to be well controlled. Several magnetic measurement schemes have been developed in order to determine particle parameters such as size distribution and structural properties. In general, systems are designed either for the analysis of large amounts of MNP (≫1000) or for single particle investigation. Up to now, the region in between has been less studied. However, small and well defined amounts of MNPs are of high interest, e.g. for the systematic investigation of particle-particle interactions. In this paper, we present a method using electron beam lithographic preparation of small amounts of MNPs directly on a self-compensating high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with micrometer dimensions which is insensitive to homogeneous fields and first order gradients but very sensitive to internal magnetic dipole fields. Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) measurements were carried out at 77 K sample temperature in a magnetically shielded room in order to analyze the dynamic behavior of MNP samples and to evaluate the detection limit of our SQUID sensors. Calculations based on the magnetic moment superposition model (MSM) and finite element simulations (FEM) indicate that the MNP samples can be fabricated in a well-defined way by the presented method. Based on MRX measurements of a sample with 200 single-core magnetite MNPs with core diameters of 12 nm, we estimate the detection limit of our SQUID MRX setup as 70 MNPs.

  6. Highly sensitive YBa2Cu3O7 dc SQUID magnetometer with thin-film flux transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundler, D.; David, B.; Eckart, R.; Dössel, O.

    1993-11-01

    We have designed and fabricated a thin-film flux transformer by a YBa2Cu3O7/SrTiO3 (YBCO/STO) multilayer process. The flux transformer consists of a 20-turn input coil of 10 μm linewidth and a single-turn pickup loop surrounding an area of 7.5 by 7.5 mm2. All device levels are patterned by standard photolithography and Ar-ion-beam etching. The flux transformer has been combined in flip-chip configuration with the square washer of a low-noise YBCO dc SQUID. The dc SQUID magnetometer exhibits a magnetic field sensitivity of 1.4 nT/Φ0. The intrinsic white flux noise level of 70μΦ0/√Hz at 77 K is mainly dominated by the SQUID corresponding to a magnetic field resolution of the magnetometer of 100 fT/√Hz for frequencies above 40 Hz. At 1 Hz we measured 200 fT/√Hz. Biomagnetic measurements were performed in a magnetically shielded chamber.

  7. Expression of CD34 and CD68 in peripheral giant cell granuloma and central giant cell granuloma: An immunohistochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    VK, Varsha; Hallikeri, Kaveri; Girish, HC; Murgod, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Central and Peripheral giant cell granulomas of jaws are uncommon, benign, reactive disorders that are characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells within a stroma. The origin of the multinucleated giant cells is controversial; probably originating from fusion of histiocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Objective: To assess the expression of CD34 and CD68 in central and peripheral giant cell granulomas to understand the origin of these multinucleated giant cells. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases of Central and Peripheral giant cell granulomas were evaluated immunohistochemically for CD34 and CD68 proteins expression. Results: Immunopositivity for CD34 was seen only in cytoplasm of endothelial cells of blood vessels; whereas, consistent cytoplasmic immunopositivity for CD68 was seen in few stromal cells. Statistical significance was seen in mean number of multinucleated giant cells, mean number of nuclei in multinucleated giant cells, CD68 expression and ratio of macrophages to multinucleated giant cells among two lesions. Conclusion: Although the central giant cell granulomas share some clinical and histopathological similarities with peripheral giant cell granulomas, differences in mean number of nuclei in multinucleated giant cells and CD68 immunoreactivity may underlie the distinct clinical behavior. PMID:25948986

  8. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-01

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z ∼> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z ∼> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  9. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golka Dariusz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  10. Kinematics of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, TE; Davies, JI; Impey, C; Phillipps, S

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity H I observations now exist for six giant low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies including the two prototypes, Malin 1 (Bothun et al. 1987; Impey & Bothun 1989) and F568-6 (also known as Malin 2; Bothun et al. 1990). Their H I surface brightnesses are generally low, but

  11. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  12. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  13. Giant Retroperitoneal Lipoma in an Infant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-29

    Jun 29, 2010 ... We are reporting the case of a six-month-old child who presented with a giant retroperitoneal lipoma that was successfully managed by complete ... Retroperitoneal lipoma is an unusual entity that is most often found in adults between 40 and 60 years of age and rarely occurs in the first decade of life.

  14. Study of giant resonances with pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results on giant resonances obtained with pion-inelastic scattering and with single- and double-charge-exchange scattering are reviewed. The states discussed are isobaric analog states, double-isobaric analog states, and isovector L = 0, 1, and 2 collective states. 36 references

  15. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    can traps; Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 180 13–27. Hooper P R and others 1988 The Giant Plagioclase Basalts. (GPBs) of the Western Ghats, Deccan Traps; Mem. Geol. Soc. India 43 153–65. Khadri S F R and 3 others 1988 Stratigraphy of Thakurvadi. Formation, Western Deccan Basalt Province, India: In. Deccan Flood Basalts ...

  16. Giant viruses of amoebas: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eAherfi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the 12 past years, five new or putative virus families encompassing several members, namely Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, pandoraviruses, faustoviruses, and virophages were described. In addition, Pithovirus sibericum and Mollivirus sibericum represent type strains of putative new giant virus families. All these viruses were isolated using amoebal coculture methods. These giant viruses were linked by phylogenomic analyses to other large DNA viruses. They were then proposed to be classified in a new viral order, the Megavirales, on the basis of their common origin, as shown by a set of ancestral genes encoding key viral functions, a common virion architecture, and shared major biological features including replication inside cytoplasmic factories. Megavirales is increasingly demonstrated to stand in the tree of life aside Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and the megavirus ancestor is suspected to be as ancient as cellular ancestors. In addition, giant amoebal viruses are visible under a light microscope and display many phenotypic and genomic features not found in other viruses, while they share other characteristics with parasitic microbes. Moreoever, these organisms appear to be common inhabitants of our biosphere, and mimiviruses and marseilleviruses were isolated from human samples and associated to diseases. In the present review, we describe the main features and recent findings on these giant amoebal viruses and virophages.

  17. Giant resonances in the deformed continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsukasa, T.; Yabana, K.

    2004-01-01

    Giant resonances in the continuum for deformed nuclei are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory in real time and real space. The continuum effect is effectively taken into account by introducing a complex Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC). (orig.)

  18. Total hip arthroplasty for giant cell tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni S

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 month follow up of an uncommon case of a Giant Cell Tumour affecting the proximal end of femur is presented. Following a wide excision, the hip was reconstructed using Charnley type of low friction total hip arthroplasty. At a 32 month review, there was no recurrence and the function was good.

  19. Giant dipole resonance by many levels theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondaini, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    The many levels theory is applied to photonuclear effect, in particular, in giant dipole resonance. A review about photonuclear dipole absorption, comparing with atomic case is done. The derivation of sum rules; their modifications by introduction of the concepts of effective charges and mass and the Siegert theorem. The experimental distributions are compared with results obtained by curve adjustment. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Giant melanoma of the left thumb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeebregts, CJAM; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    A 74-year-old female patient is described with a giant melanoma of the left thenar and concomitant bilateral pulmonary metastases. Palliative treatment consisted of a two-staged procedure in order to save the limb from amputation. Firstly, perfusion with gamma-interferon, tumour necrosis

  1. Giant cell arteritis: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Romero, J M

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in adults. The condition is granulomatous arteritis of large and medium vessels, which occurs almost exclusively in patients aged 50 years or more. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  2. Surgical treatment for giant incisional hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, A; Rosenberg, J; Bisgaard, T

    2014-01-01

    , and the sublay position may have advantages over onlay positioning. To avoid tension, it may be advisable to use a mesh in combination with a component separation technique. Inlay positioning of the mesh and repair without a mesh should be avoided. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence to optimise repair for giant hernias...

  3. Reading on the Shoulders of Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chaim, Michael; Riendeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting on his successful scientific career, Isaac Newton highlighted his intellectual debt to his predecessors. "If I have seen further," he wrote, "it was "only" by standing on the shoulders of giants." The authors have chosen the title of their article as a token of recognition of their debt to the teachings of…

  4. Geology and geochemistry of giant quartz veins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    They show imprints of strong brittle to ductile–brittle deformation, and in places are associated with base metal and gold incidences, and pyrophyllite-diaspore mineralization. The geochemistry of giant quartz veins were studied. Apart from presenting new data on the geology and geochemistry of these veins, an attempt has ...

  5. Robust giant magnetoresistive effect type multilayer sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenssen, K.M.H.; Kuiper, A.E.T.; Roozeboom, F.

    2002-01-01

    A robust Giant Magneto Resistive effect type multilayer sensor comprising a free and a pinned ferromagnetic layer, which can withstand high temperatures and strong magnetic fields as required in automotive applications. The GMR multi-layer has an asymmetric magneto-resistive curve and enables

  6. Nitrogen depletion in field red giants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masseron, T.; Lagarde, N.; Miglio, A.

    2017-01-01

    , the behaviour of nitrogen data along the evolution confirms the existence of non-canonical extramixing on the red giant branch (RGB) for all low-mass stars in the field. But more surprisingly, the data indicate that nitrogen has been depleted between the RGB tip and the red clump. This may suggest that some...

  7. Giant light enhancement in atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomsky, O. N.; Gadomskaya, I. V.; Altunin, K. K.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the polarizing effect of the atoms in an atomic cluster can lead to full compensation of the radiative damping of excited atomic states, a change in the sign of the dispersion of the atomic polarizability, and giant light enhancement by the atomic cluster.

  8. Growth and yield of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Dulitz

    1986-01-01

    Very little information exists concerning growth and yield of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz). For old-growth trees, diameter growth is the single factor adding increment since maximum height has been obtained. Diameter growth averages 0.04 inches per year in normal old-growth trees but will fluctuate with changes in the...

  9. Diseases and insects of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr. Parmeter

    1986-01-01

    Giant sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) are susceptible to a number of diseases and insects at each state of development from seeds to overmature trees. We presently have little more than a catalog of occurrences. The impacts and the management implications of disease and insect losses have scarcely been investigated or evaluated...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: giant congenital melanocytic nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Cancer Institute: What is Melanoma Educational Resources (10 links) Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: ... Large congenital melanocytic nevus Seattle Children's Hospital: Birthmarks What is a Large/Giant Congenital Melanocytic ... Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Nevus Outreach ...

  11. Air pollution effects on giant sequoia ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.R. Miller; Nancy Grulke; K.W. Stolte

    1994-01-01

    Giant sequoia [Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchholz] groves are found entirely within the Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer type. Several of its companion tree species, mainly ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) and Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi Grev. & Balf.), show foliar injury after...

  12. Giant pubertal prolactinoma: Complete resolution following short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-06

    Apr 6, 2016 ... 23.9 kg/m2, axillary‑pubic hair growth was at tanner stage. 1, right and left testis volume of 8 mL, and penis size was. 6.5 cm. In laboratory examinations, hyperprolactinemia. (>200 ng/mL), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism,. Giant pubertal prolactinoma: Complete resolution following short term carbegoline ...

  13. Sir Bob Edwards: Salute to a Giant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 10. Sir Bob Edwards: Salute to a Giant. Kamal Ahuja ... Clinic, Harley Street, London, W1G 6AP. Chairman and Company Secretary, Reproductive BioMedicine Online (RBMO) Duck End Farm, Park Lane, Dry Drayton, Cambridge, CB23 8DB.

  14. Giant Mucinous Cystadenoma in Nnewi, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovarian mucinous cystadenoma is a benign tumor that arises from the surface ... abdomen. On vaginal examination, the vulva, vaginal and cervix ... Multilocular cyst. Discussion. Giant ovarian tumors have become rare in recent times because most of them are discovered early during routine medical check or incidental ...

  15. Antiproliferative heparin (glycosaminoglycans) isolated from giant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Heparin was isolated from two bivalve mollusks, Tridacna maxima (giant clam) and Perna viridis (green mussel). The isolated heparin was quantified in crude as well as purified samples and they were estimated as 2.72 and 2.2 g/kg (in crude) and 260 and 248 mg/g (in purified samples) in T. maxima and.

  16. Think big--giant genes in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Oleg; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2008-03-01

    Long genes should be rare in archaea and eubacteria because of the demanding costs of time and resources for protein production. The search in 580 sequenced prokaryotic genomes, however, revealed 0.2% of all genes to be longer than 5 kb (absolute number: 3732 genes). Eighty giant bacterial genes of more than 20 kb in length were identified in 47 taxa that belong to the phyla Thermotogae (1), Chlorobi (3), Planctomycetes (1), Cyanobacteria (2), Firmicutes (7), Actinobacteria (9), Proteobacteria (23) or Euryarchaeota (1) (number of taxa in brackets). Giant genes are strain-specific, differ in their tetranucleotide usage from the bulk genome and occur preferentially in non-pathogenic environmental bacteria. The two longest bacterial genes known to date were detected in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 encoding proteins of 36 806 and 20 647 amino acids, being surpassed in length only by the human titin coding sequence. More than 90% of bacterial giant genes either encode a surface protein or a polyketide/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase. Most surface proteins are acidic, threonine-rich, lack cystein and harbour multiple amino acid repeats. Giant proteins increase bacterial fitness by the production of either weapons towards or shields against animate competitors or hostile environments.

  17. Antiproliferative heparin (glycosaminoglycans) isolated from giant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heparin was isolated from two bivalve mollusks, Tridacna maxima (giant clam) and Perna viridis (green mussel). The isolated heparin was quantified in crude as well as purified samples and they were estimated as 2.72 and 2.2 g/kg (in crude) and 260 and 248 mg/g (in purified samples) in T. maxima and P. viridis, ...

  18. An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Hunaina; George, Mina; Malhotra, Gopal; Al-Muzahmi, Khamis

    2011-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor. PMID:22125733

  19. Polarization Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present simulated spectra of the flux and degree of polarization of starlight that is reflected by extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular the polarization depends strongly on the structure of the planetary atmosphere, and appears to be a valuable tool for the characterization of EGPs.

  20. Asteroseismic Diagram for Subgiants and Red Giants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Ning; Tang, Yanke [College of Physics and Electronic information, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Yu, Peng [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Dou, Xianghua, E-mail: ning_gai@163.com, E-mail: tyk450@163.com [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biophysics, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China)

    2017-02-10

    Asteroseismology is a powerful tool for constraining stellar parameters. NASA’s Kepler mission is providing individual eigenfrequencies for a huge number of stars, including thousands of red giants. Besides the frequencies of acoustic modes, an important breakthrough of the Kepler mission is the detection of nonradial gravity-dominated mixed-mode oscillations in red giants. Unlike pure acoustic modes, mixed modes probe deeply into the interior of stars, allowing the stellar core properties and evolution of stars to be derived. In this work, using the gravity-mode period spacing and the large frequency separation, we construct the ΔΠ{sub 1}–Δ ν asteroseismic diagram from models of subgiants and red giants with various masses and metallicities. The relationship ΔΠ{sub 1}–Δ ν is able to constrain the ages and masses of the subgiants. Meanwhile, for red giants with masses above 1.5 M {sub ⊙}, the ΔΠ{sub 1}–Δ ν asteroseismic diagram can also work well to constrain the stellar age and mass. Additionally, we calculate the relative “isochrones” τ , which indicate similar evolution states especially for similar mass stars, on the ΔΠ{sub 1}–Δ ν diagram.