WorldWideScience

Sample records for giant magnetoresistive sensors

  1. Robust giant magnetoresistive effect type multilayer sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenssen, K.M.H.; Kuiper, A.E.T.; Roozeboom, F.

    2002-01-01

    A robust Giant Magneto Resistive effect type multilayer sensor comprising a free and a pinned ferromagnetic layer, which can withstand high temperatures and strong magnetic fields as required in automotive applications. The GMR multi-layer has an asymmetric magneto-resistive curve and enables

  2. Magnetic Field Sensors Based on Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR Technology: Applications in Electrical Current Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Càndid Reig

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics can be understood as a global recognition to the rapid development of the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR, from both the physics and engineering points of view. Behind the utilization of GMR structures as read heads for massive storage magnetic hard disks, important applications as solid state magnetic sensors have emerged. Low cost, compatibility with standard CMOS technologies and high sensitivity are common advantages of these sensors. This way, they have been successfully applied in a lot different environments. In this work, we are trying to collect the Spanish contributions to the progress of the research related to the GMR based sensors covering, among other subjects, the applications, the sensor design, the modelling and the electronic interfaces, focusing on electrical current sensing applications.

  3. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damhuji Rifai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper.

  4. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  5. Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors from basis to state-of-the-art applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, Candid; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in 1988, spintronics has been presented as a new technology paradigm, awarded by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2007. Initially used in read heads of hard disk drives, and while disputing a piece of the market to the flash memories, GMR devices have broadened their range of usage by growing towards magnetic field sensing applications in a huge range of scenarios. Potential applications at the time of the discovery have become real in the last two decades. Definitively, GMR was born to stand. In this sense, selected successful approaches of GMR based sensors in different applications: space, automotive, microelectronics, biotechnology … are collected in the present book. While keeping a practical orientation, the fundamentals as well as the current trends and challenges of this technology are also analyzed. In this sense, state of the art contributions from academy and industry can be found through the contents. This book can be used by starting ...

  6. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-11-09

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  7. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection.

  8. Giant magneto-resistance devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Eiichi; Inomata, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    This book deals with the application of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) effects to electronic devices. It will appeal to engineers and graduate students in the fields of electronic devices and materials. The main subjects are magnetic sensors with high resolution and magnetic read heads with high sensitivity, required for hard-disk drives with recording densities of several gigabytes. Another important subject is novel magnetic random-access memories (MRAM) with non-volatile non-destructive and radiation-resistant characteristics. Other topics include future GMR devices based on bipolar spin transistors, spin field-effect transistors (FETs) and double-tunnel junctions.

  9. A Miniaturized Force Sensor Based on Hair-Like Flexible Magnetized Cylinders Deposited Over a Giant Magnetoresistive Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Ribeiro, Pedro

    2017-06-13

    The detection of force with higher resolution than observed in humans (similar to 1 mN) is of great interest for emerging technologies, especially surgical robots, since this level of resolution could allow these devices to operate in extremely sensitive environments without harming these. In this paper, we present a force sensor fabricated with a miniaturized footprint (9 mm(2)), based on the detection of the magnetic field generated by magnetized flexible pillars over a giant magnetoresistive sensor. When these flexible pillars deflect due to external loads, the stray field emitted by these will change, thus varying the GMR sensor resistance. A sensor with an array of five pillars with 200 mu m diameter and 1 mm height was fabricated, achieving a 0 to 26 mN measurement range and capable of detecting a minimum force feature of 630 mu N. A simulation model to predict the distribution of magnetic field generated by the flexible pillars on the sensitive area of the GMR sensor in function of the applied force was developed and validated against the experimental results reported in this paper. The sensor was finally tested as a texture classification system, with the ability of differentiating between four distinct surfaces varying between 0 and 162 mu m root mean square surface roughness.

  10. A Miniaturized Force Sensor Based on Hair-Like Flexible Magnetized Cylinders Deposited Over a Giant Magnetoresistive Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Kosel, Jü rgen; Franco, Fernando; Cardoso, Susana; Bernardino, Alexandre; Santos-Victor, Jose; Jamone, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The detection of force with higher resolution than observed in humans (similar to 1 mN) is of great interest for emerging technologies, especially surgical robots, since this level of resolution could allow these devices to operate in extremely sensitive environments without harming these. In this paper, we present a force sensor fabricated with a miniaturized footprint (9 mm(2)), based on the detection of the magnetic field generated by magnetized flexible pillars over a giant magnetoresistive sensor. When these flexible pillars deflect due to external loads, the stray field emitted by these will change, thus varying the GMR sensor resistance. A sensor with an array of five pillars with 200 mu m diameter and 1 mm height was fabricated, achieving a 0 to 26 mN measurement range and capable of detecting a minimum force feature of 630 mu N. A simulation model to predict the distribution of magnetic field generated by the flexible pillars on the sensitive area of the GMR sensor in function of the applied force was developed and validated against the experimental results reported in this paper. The sensor was finally tested as a texture classification system, with the ability of differentiating between four distinct surfaces varying between 0 and 162 mu m root mean square surface roughness.

  11. On-line irradiation testing of a Giant Magneto-Resistive (GMR) sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfert, J.; Luloff, B.; MacDonald, D.; Lumsden, R., E-mail: jeff.olfert@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Magneto-resistive sensors are rapidly gaining favour for magnetic field sensing applications owing to their high sensitivity, small size, and low cost. Their metallic, nonsemiconductor construction makes them excellent candidates for use in the harsh environments present in nuclear and space applications. In this work, a commercially available magneto-resistive sensor was irradiated up to a total gamma dose of 2 MGy (200 Mrad), and online testing was performed to monitor the sensor throughout the irradiation to detect any degradation. No significant evidence of degradation of the sensor characteristics was observed. A very small (< 1%) change in the bridge balance of the sensor as a function of accumulated dose was detected. (author)

  12. A giant magnetoresistance ring-sensor based microsystem for magnetic bead manipulation and detection

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2011-03-28

    In this paper a novel spin valvegiant magnetoresistance(GMR) ring-sensor integrated with a microstructure is proposed for concentrating, trapping, and detecting superparamagnetic beads (SPBs). Taking advantage of the fact that SPBs can be manipulated by an external magnetic field, a unique arrangement of conducting microrings is utilized to manipulate the SPBs toward the GMR sensing area in order to increase the reliability of detection. The microrings are arranged and activated in such a manner so as to enable the detection of minute concentrations of SPBs in a sample. Precise manipulation is achieved by applying current sequentially to the microrings. The fabricated ring-shaped GMR element is located underneath the innermost ring and has a magnetoresistance of approximately 5.9%. By the performed experiments it was shown that SPBs could be successfully manipulated toward the GMR sensing zone.

  13. A giant magnetoresistance ring-sensor based microsystem for magnetic bead manipulation and detection

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Liang, Cai; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a novel spin valvegiant magnetoresistance(GMR) ring-sensor integrated with a microstructure is proposed for concentrating, trapping, and detecting superparamagnetic beads (SPBs). Taking advantage of the fact that SPBs can be manipulated by an external magnetic field, a unique arrangement of conducting microrings is utilized to manipulate the SPBs toward the GMR sensing area in order to increase the reliability of detection. The microrings are arranged and activated in such a manner so as to enable the detection of minute concentrations of SPBs in a sample. Precise manipulation is achieved by applying current sequentially to the microrings. The fabricated ring-shaped GMR element is located underneath the innermost ring and has a magnetoresistance of approximately 5.9%. By the performed experiments it was shown that SPBs could be successfully manipulated toward the GMR sensing zone.

  14. Wheatstone bridge-giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors based on Co/Cu multilayers for bio-detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antarnusa, G.; Elda Swastika, P.; Suharyadi, E.

    2018-04-01

    A Wheatstone bridge-giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor was successfully developed for a potential biomaterial detection. In order to achieve this, a giant magnetoresistive [Co(1.5nm/Cu(1.0nm)]20 multilayer structures have been fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering method, showing a magnetoresistance (MR) of 2.7%. The X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that Co/Cu film multilayer has a high degree of crystallinity with a single peak corresponding to face-centered cubic (111) structure at 2θ = 44.1°. Co/Cu multilayers exhibit a soft magnetic behavior with the saturation magnetization (Ms) of 1489 emu/cc and the coercivity (Hc) of 11.2 Oe. The magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles used as a bimolecular labels (nanotags) were synthesized via co-precipitation method, exhibiting a soft magnetic behavior with Ms of 77.16 emu/g and Hc of 49 Oe. XRD patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that Fe3O4 was well crystallized and it grew in their inverse spinel structure with an average size of around 10 nm. The GMR sensor design was used to detect a biomolecules of streptavidin magnetic particles with concentration 10, 20, 30, and 40 μl/ml and α-amylase enzyme with consentration 10, 20, 30, and 40 μl/ml captured using polyethylene glycol (PEG)/Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Various applied magnetic fields of 0-650 Gauss have been performed using electromagnetic with the various currents of 0-5 A. Here, the final value of the output voltage signals for the streptavidin magnetic particles concentration is 1.2 mV (10 μl/ml). The output voltage changes with the increase of concentration. It was reported that the output voltage signal of the Wheatstone bridge exhibits log-linear function in real time measurement of the concentration of streptavidin magnetic particles and α-amylase enzyme respectively, making the sensor suitable for use as a biomolecule concentration detector. Thus, the combination of Co/Cu multilayer, Wheatstone bridge, magnetite and PEG polymer

  15. Controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles by a magnetic microactuator and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an integrated micro-chip for the controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A unique magnetic micro-actuator consisting of square-shaped conductors is used to manipulate the MPs towards a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing element which rapidly detects the majority of MPs trapped around the square-shaped conductors. The ability to precisely transport a small number of MPs in a controlled manner over long distances by magnetic forces enables the rapid concentration of a majority of MPs to the sensing zone for detection. This is especially important in low concentration samples. The conductors are designed in such a manner so as to increase the capture efficiency as well as the precision and speed of transportation. By switching current to different conductors, MPs can be manipulated and immobilized on the innermost conductor where the GMR sensor is located. This technique rapidly guides the MPs towards the sensing zone. Secondly, for optimum measurement capability with high spatial resolution the GMR sensor is fabricated directly underneath and all along the innermost conductor to detect the stray fields originating from the MPs. Finally, a microfluidic channel is fabricated on top of this micro-chip. Experiments inside the microchannel were carried out and the MPs were successfully trapped at the sensing area. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications.

  16. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-06-17

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors.

  17. Eddy Current Testing with Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) Sensors and a Pipe-Encircling Excitation for Evaluation of Corrosion under Insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Joseph; Long, Nicholas; Hunze, Arvid

    2017-09-28

    This work investigates an eddy current-based non-destructive testing (NDT) method to characterize corrosion of pipes under thermal insulation, one of the leading failure mechanisms for insulated pipe infrastructure. Artificial defects were machined into the pipe surface to simulate the effect of corrosion wall loss. We show that by using a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor array and a high current (300 A), single sinusoidal low frequency (5-200 Hz) pipe-encircling excitation scheme it is possible to quantify wall loss defects without removing the insulation or weather shield. An analysis of the magnetic field distribution and induced currents was undertaken using the finite element method (FEM) and analytical calculations. Simple algorithms to remove spurious measured field variations not associated with defects were developed and applied. The influence of an aluminium weather shield with discontinuities and dents was ascertained and found to be small for excitation frequency values below 40 Hz. The signal dependence on the defect dimensions was analysed in detail. The excitation frequency at which the maximum field amplitude change occurred increased linearly with the depth of the defect by about 3 Hz/mm defect depth. The change in magnetic field amplitude due to defects for sensors aligned in the azimuthal and radial directions were measured and found to be linearly dependent on the defect volume between 4400-30,800 mm³ with 1.2 × 10 -3 -1.6 × 10 -3 µT/mm³. The results show that our approach is well suited for measuring wall loss defects similar to the defects from corrosion under insulation.

  18. Magnetic giant magnetoresistance commercial off the shelf for space applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelena, M.D.; Oelschlägel, Wulf; Arruego, I.

    2008-01-01

    The increase of complexity and miniaturizing level of Aerospace platforms make use of commercial off the shelf (COTS) components constitute a plausible alternative to the use of military or rad-tolerant components. In this work, giant magnetoresistance commercial sensors are studied to be used as......-375 mu T biasing field. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  19. The Detection and Discrimination of Small Munitions using Giant Magnetoresistive (OMR) Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Suffield, Canada. McGlone, D.T., 1998, Magnetometer Comparison Smoke Creek Instruments’ GMR SCIMAG- 01 & Bartington Fluxgate MAG-03MC70, A...a magnetometer and frequency domain or time domain electromagnetic induction sensor. Both the Honeywell and NVE GlvlR sensors studied have si.m ilar...field sensor. In p0ssive mode, the GMR sensor, which has a resolution of Jess than l 0 nT, perfom1ed similarly to a cesium vapor magnetometer . When

  20. Current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance treated with unified model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, PAE

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual similarity between current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is exploited by utilizing a unified single-particle model accounting for both types of magnetoresistance. By defining structures composed of ferromagnetic,

  1. Detection of leakage magnetic flux from near-side and far-side defects in carbon steel plates using a giant magneto-resistive sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, W Sharatchandra; Rao, B P C; Vaidyanathan, S; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev

    2008-01-01

    Giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors are attractive for magnetic flux leakage measurements, especially for the detection of shallow near-side cracks and deeply located defects. An optimized measurement system with magnetic yoke, GMR sensor and selective amplifier has been devised to detect the tangential component of leakage flux from various near-side notches and far-side notches (widths 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively) in 12 mm thick carbon steel plates. Far-side notches located at nearly 11 mm below the measurement surface have been detected with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The performance of the GMR sensor with lift off has also been studied for possible non-contact examination of hot surfaces and a lift off of 2 mm is expected to ensure the saturation-free detection of near-side as well as far-side notches

  2. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  3. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance.

  4. Biomolecule detection using wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors based on CoFeB spin-valve thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elda Swastika, P.; Antarnusa, G.; Suharyadi, E.; Kato, T.; Iwata, S.

    2018-04-01

    A potential wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor have been successfully developed for biomolecule detection. [IrMn(10 nm)/CoFe(3 nm)/Cu(2.2 nm)/CoFeB(10 nm)] spin-valve structure has been chosen as the magnetic sensing surface, showing a magnetoresistance (MR) of 6% fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering method. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles used as biomolecular labels (nanotags) was synthesized by co-precipitation method, exhibiting soft magnetic behavior with saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) is 77.2 emu/g, 7.8 emu/g and 51 Oe, respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that Fe3O4 was well crystallized and grew in their inverse spinel structure, highly uniform morphology with an average grain size was about 20 nm. Fe3O4 was coated with polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-4000 for surface functionalization. Detection of biomolecule such as formalin, gelatin from bovine-skin and porcine-skin were dispersed in ethanol at room temperature. Induction would cause a shift in output voltage with a minimum delta output voltage (ΔV) 4.937 mV (10%) for formalin detection, 2.268 mV (7%) for bovine-skin gelatin and 2.943 mV (7%) for porcine-skin gelatin detection. The ΔV of the wheatstone bridge in real-time measurement decrease by increase in biomolecules concentration. The change of ΔV with various concentration of biomolecule indicates that the spin-valve thin film with wheatstone-bridge circuit is potential as a biosensor.

  5. Giant magnetoresistance and extraordinary magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous semiconducting DyNiBi

    OpenAIRE

    Casper, Frederick; Felser, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The semiconducting half-Heulser compound DyNiBi shows a negative giant magnetoresistance (GMR) below 200 K. Except for a weak deviation, this magnetoresistance scales roughly with the square of the magnetization in the paramagnetic state, and is related to the metal-insulator transition. At low temperature, a positive magnetoresistance is found, which can be suppressed by high fields. The magnitude of the positive magnetoresistance changes slightly with the amount of impurity phase.

  6. A Novel Ternary CoFe2O4/CuO/CoFe2O4 as a Giant Magnetoresistance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a study relating to the synthesis of a novel ternary CoFe2O4/CuO/CoFe2O4 thin film as a giant magnetoresistance (GMR sensor. The CoFe2O4/CuO/CoFe2O4 thin film was prepared onto silicon substrate via DC magnetron sputtering with the targets facing each other. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the structure of the thin film and a 4-point method was used to measure the MR ratio. The GMR ratio is highly dependent on the ferrimagnetic (CoFe2O4 and nonmagnetic (CuO layer thickness. The maximum GMR ratio at room temperature obtained in the CoFe2O4/CuO/CoFe2O4 thin film was 70% when the CoFe2O4 and the CuO layer had a thickness of 62.5 nm and 14.4 nm respectively.

  7. Giant magnetoresistance in CrFeMn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.M.; Zheng, P.; Chen, Z.J.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical resistance and longitudinal magnetoresistance of Cr 75 (Fe x Mn 1-x ) 25 alloys, x=0.64, 0.72, are studied in the temperature range 1.5-270 K in applied field up to 7.5 T. The magnetoresistance is negative and strongly correlated with the spin reorientation. In the temperature range where the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic domains coexist, the samples display giant magnetoresistance which follows a H n -law at high field. (orig.)

  8. Room temperature giant and linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-29

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi(2)Te(3) topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  9. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Cardoso, Susana; Leitao, Diana; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  10. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-05-07

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  11. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alfadhel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature.

  12. Integrated Giant Magnetoresistance Technology for Approachable Weak Biomagnetic Signal Detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Min; Hu, Liang; Fu, Xin

    2018-01-07

    With the extensive applications of biomagnetic signals derived from active biological tissue in both clinical diagnoses and human-computer-interaction, there is an increasing need for approachable weak biomagnetic sensing technology. The inherent merits of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and its high integration with multiple technologies makes it possible to detect weak biomagnetic signals with micron-sized, non-cooled and low-cost sensors, considering that the magnetic field intensity attenuates rapidly with distance. This paper focuses on the state-of-art in integrated GMR technology for approachable biomagnetic sensing from the perspective of discipline fusion between them. The progress in integrated GMR to overcome the challenges in weak biomagnetic signal detection towards high resolution portable applications is addressed. The various strategies for 1/ f noise reduction and sensitivity enhancement in integrated GMR technology for sub-pT biomagnetic signal recording are discussed. In this paper, we review the developments of integrated GMR technology for in vivo/vitro biomagnetic source imaging and demonstrate how integrated GMR can be utilized for biomagnetic field detection. Since the field sensitivity of integrated GMR technology is being pushed to fT/Hz 0.5 with the focused efforts, it is believed that the potential of integrated GMR technology will make it preferred choice in weak biomagnetic signal detection in the future.

  13. Giant magnetoresistance in lateral metallic nanostructures for spintronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnd, G; Vila, L; Pham, V T; Marty, A; Beigné, C; Vergnaud, C; Attané, J P

    2017-08-25

    In this letter, we discuss the shift observed in spintronics from the current-perpendicular-to-plane geometry towards lateral geometries, illustrating the new opportunities offered by this configuration. Using CoFe-based all-metallic LSVs, we show that giant magnetoresistance variations of more than 10% can be obtained, competitive with the current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance. We then focus on the interest of being able to tailor freely the geometries. On the one hand, by tailoring the non-magnetic parts, we show that it is possible to enhance the spin signal of giant magnetoresistance structures. On the other hand, we show that tailoring the geometry of lateral structures allows creating a multilevel memory with high spin signals, by controlling the coercivity and shape anisotropy of the magnetic parts. Furthermore, we study a new device in which the magnetization direction of a nanodisk can be detected. We thus show that the ability to control the magnetic properties can be used to take advantage of all the spin degrees of freedom, which are usually occulted in current-perpendicular-to-plane devices. This flexibility of lateral structures relatively to current-perpendicular-to-plane structures is thus found to offer a new playground for the development of spintronic applications.

  14. Wheatstone bridge giant-magnetoresistance based cell counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiun-Peng; Lai, Mei-Feng; Huang, Hao-Ting; Lin, Chi-Wen; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2014-07-15

    A Wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor was proposed here for the detection and counting of magnetic cells. The biosensor was made of a top-pinned spin-valve layer structure, and it was integrated with a microchannel possessing the function of hydrodynamic focusing that allowed the cells to flow in series one by one and ensured the accuracy of detection. Through measuring the magnetoresistance variation caused by the stray field of the magnetic cells that flowed through the microchannel above the GMR biosensor, we can not only detect and count the cells but we can also recognize cells with different magnetic moments. In addition, a magnetic field gradient was applied for the separation of different cells into different channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutual influence between current-induced giant magnetoresistance and radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2DES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaraweera, R L; Liu, H-C; Wang, Z; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Mani, R G

    2017-07-11

    Radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations are examined in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D system in the regime where an observed concurrent giant magnetoresistance is systematically varied with a supplementary dc-current, I dc . The I dc tuned giant magnetoresistance is subsequently separated from the photo-excited oscillatory resistance using a multi-conduction model in order to examine the interplay between the two effects. The results show that the invoked multiconduction model describes the observed giant magnetoresistance effect even in the presence of radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations, the magnetoresistance oscillations do not modify the giant magnetoresistance, and the magnetoresistance oscillatory extrema, i.e., maxima and minima, disappear rather asymmetrically with increasing I dc . The results suggest the interpretation that the I dc serves to suppress scattering between states near the Fermi level in a strong magnetic field limit.

  16. Current perpendicular to plane giant magnetoresistance in laminated nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedyayev, A.; Zhukov, I.; Dieny, B.

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically studied spin-dependent electron transport perpendicular-to-plain (CPP) in magnetic laminated multilayered structures by using Kubo formalism. We took into account not only bulk scattering, but the interface resistance due to both specular and diffuse reflection and also spin conserving and spin-flip processes. It was shown that spin-flip scattering at interfaces substantially reduces the value of giant magnetoresistance (GMR). This can explain the experimental observations that the CPP GMR ratio for laminated structures only slightly increases as compared to non-laminated ones even though lamination induces a significant increase in CPP resistance

  17. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  18. Mutual influence between current-induced giant magnetoresistance and radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2DES

    OpenAIRE

    Samaraweera, R. L.; Liu, H.-C.; Wang, Z.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations are examined in the GaAs/AlGaAs 2D system in the regime where an observed concurrent giant magnetoresistance is systematically varied with a supplementary dc-current, I dc . The I dc tuned giant magnetoresistance is subsequently separated from the photo-excited oscillatory resistance using a multi-conduction model in order to examine the interplay between the two effects. The results show that the invoked multiconduction model describes the obs...

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection on a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We present a magnetoresistive sensor platform for hybridization assays and demonstrate its applicability on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The sensor relies on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a new geometry with a local negative reference and uses the magnetic field from...... the sensor bias current to magnetize magnetic beads in the vicinity of the sensor. The method allows for real-time measurements of the specific bead binding to the sensor surface during DNA hybridization and washing. Compared to other magnetic biosensing platforms, our approach eliminates the need...... for external electromagnets and thus allows for miniaturization of the sensor platform....

  20. Tunneling magnetoresistance sensor with pT level 1/f magnetic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, James G.; Zhou, Zhimin; Shen, Weifeng

    2017-05-01

    Magnetoresistive devices are important components in a large number of commercial electronic products in a wide range of applications including industrial position sensors, automotive sensors, hard disk read heads, cell phone compasses, and solid state memories. These devices are commonly based on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR), but over the past few years tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) has been emerging in more applications. Here we focus on recent work that has enabled the development of TMR magnetic field sensors with 1/f noise of less than 100 pT/rtHz at 1 Hz. Of the commercially available sensors, the lowest noise devices have typically been AMR, but they generally have the largest die size. Based on this observation and modeling of experimental data size and geometry dependence, we find that there is an optimal design rule that produces minimum 1/f noise. This design rule requires maximizing the areal coverage of an on-chip flux concentrator, providing it with a minimum possible total gap width, and tightly packing the gaps with MTJ elements, which increases the effective volume and decreases the saturation field of the MTJ freelayers. When properly optimized using this rule, these sensors have noise below 60 pT/rtHz, and could possibly replace fluxgate magnetometers in some applications.

  1. Passive wireless strain measurement based upon the Villari effect and giant magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windl, Roman; Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Huber, Thomas; Oezelt, Harald; Suess, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    A passive wireless radio frequency-identification (RFID) stress/strain sensor is presented. Stress is transformed into a change of magnetic field by utilizing an amorphous metal ribbon. This magnetic field change is measured by a giant magnetoresistance magnetic field sensor and converted into a digital value with a RFID chip for wireless access. Standard metal foil strain gauges have a gauge factor GF from around 2 to 5 and suffer from the disadvantage of a physically connected power supply and measurement equipment. For the presented sensor, a strain range of -10 μm/m to 190 μm/m results in a linear sensor response, a gauge factor of GF ≈ 245, and a detectivity of 4.10 nm/m 1/√{Hz } . The detectivity of the presented sensor is similar to the detectivity of a reference metal foil strain gauge. Due to low power consumption and easy signal analysis, this sensor is well suited for long term strain measurement inside closed spaces. RFID adds features like multiple tag detection, wireless passive operation and a user data storage.

  2. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Ravelo Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function  is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current,[PLEASE CHECK FORMULA IN THE PDF]. The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR, giant magnetoresistance (GMR, spin-valve (GMR-SV and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications.

  3. Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandala, Abhinav; Richardella, Anthony; Kempinger, Susan; Liu, Chao-Xing; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)2−xTe3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer–Büttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization. PMID:26151318

  4. X-ray scattering in giant magneto-resistive multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulthorpe, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    The scattering mechanisms responsible for Giant Magneto-Resistance (GMR) in magnetic multilayers are believed to be related to many aspects of the multilayer structure. X-ray scattering techniques provide a powerful method with which to study the bulk and interface morphology in these systems, and are therefore crucial in developing an understanding of the dominant factors influencing the magnitude of the GMR. Reflectivity measurements performed on a series of Co/Cu multilayers, sputter deposited onto etched silicon, reveal no variation in the interface roughness with etching voltage, the thickness of the individual layers also remaining constant. The observed decrease in the GMR cannot, therefore, be attributed to variations in spacer thickness or interfacial spin-independent scattering. Electron and X-ray Diffraction measurements suggest the reduction in GMR is due to a loss of antiferromagnetic coupling associated with a transformation of the texture from a randomly oriented to well oriented (111) polycrystalline texture, and subsequent reduction in the volume fraction of (100) oriented grains. Interfaces within Co/Cu are found to propagate with a high degree of conformality with increasing bilayer number, with an out-of-plane correlation length well in excess of 300A. In contrast, the Co/Pt system exhibits a limiting out-of-plane correlation length of the order of 350A arising from a columnar growth mode. X-ray Reflectivity and Diffraction measurements provide' no structural interpretation for the 3-fold enhancement in the rate of increase of the saturation conductivity, as a function of spacer thickness, in Fe/Au (100) compared to Fe/Au (111), or why large oscillations in the GMR occur for the (100) orientation only. Such observations are, however, consistent with the existence of a channelling mechanism in Fe/Au (100). Grazing Incidence Fluorescence data indicates that Nb acts as a surfactant in Fe/Au (111) growth on sapphire. The influence of different

  5. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  6. Giant Magnetoresistance-based Biosensor for Detection of Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Venkatramana D; Wu, Kai; Perez, Andres M; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and sensitive method for the detection of influenza A virus based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor. This assay employs monoclonal antibodies to viral nucleoprotein (NP) in combination with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Presence of influenza virus allows the binding of MNPs to the GMR sensor and the binding is proportional to the concentration of virus. Binding of MNPs onto the GMR sensor causes change in the resistance of sensor, which is measured in a real time electrical readout. GMR biosensor detected as low as 1.5 × 10(2) TCID50/mL virus and the signal intensity increased with increasing concentration of virus up to 1.0 × 10(5) TCID50/mL. This study showed that the GMR biosensor assay is relevant for diagnostic application since the virus concentration in nasal samples of influenza virus infected swine was reported to be in the range of 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50/mL.

  7. Magnetoresistive sensor for real-time single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dufva, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a magnetoresistive sensor platform that allows for the real-time detection of point mutations in DNA targets. Specifically, we detect point mutations at two sites in the human beta globin gene. For DNA detection, the present sensor technology has a detection limit of about 160p...... of magnetic beads, which enables real-time quantification of the specific binding of magnetic beads to the sensor surface under varying experimental conditions....

  8. Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall effect in the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Huan-Wen; He, Hongtao; Wang, Jiannong; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2018-05-01

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance is the change tendency of resistance of a material on the mutual orientation of the electric current and the external magnetic field. Here, we report experimental observations in the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 of giant anisotropic magnetoresistance and its transverse version, called the planar Hall effect. The relative anisotropic magnetoresistance is negative and up to -68% at 2 K and 10 T. The high anisotropy and the minus sign in this isotropic and nonmagnetic material are attributed to a field-dependent current along the magnetic field, which may be induced by the Berry curvature of the band structure. This observation not only reveals unusual physical phenomena in Weyl and Dirac semimetals, but also finds additional transport signatures of Weyl and Dirac fermions other than negative magnetoresistance.

  9. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meier, Tobias; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Reiss, Günter; Meyners, Dirk

    2016-11-11

    Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ)s with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of -3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and -311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and -260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a -3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  10. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tavassolizadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner–Wohlfarth (SW model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of −3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and −311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and −260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a −3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  11. Giant magnetoresistance in melt spun Cu85Co10Ni5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curiotto, Stefano; Johnson, Erik; Celegato, Federica

    2009-01-01

    CuCoNi rapidly solidified alloys are interesting because they display giant magnetoresistance (GMR). In the present work a Cu85Co10Ni5 alloy has been synthesized by melt spinning and analysed for GMR. The ribbons obtained have been annealed at different temperatures and the evolution of the crystal...... structure with annealing has been studied by X-ray diffraction. The. ne microstructure has been observed by TEM and related to the magnetic properties, investigated in a vibrating sample magnetometer. In the studied composition the magnetoresistance was found to be lower than in binary CuCo alloys without...

  12. Giant negative magnetoresistance in Ni(quinoline-8-selenoate)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nicholas; Daiki, Tonouchi; Matsushita, Michio M; Woollins, J Derek; Awaga, Kunio; Robertson, Neil

    2017-12-20

    The magnetic, structural, conductivity and magnetoresistance properties of [Ni(quinoline-8-selenoate) 2 ] ([Ni(qs) 2 ]) have been studied. Despite the insolubility of the material necessitating its study as a powdered sample, a remarkably high conductivity has been measured. The conductivity is an order of magnitude greater than the thin-film processable thiol analogue previously reported and has been interpreted through the same space-charge limited conduction mechanism with charges injected from the electrodes. The introduction of selenium, results in a material with conductivity approaching metallic due to the enhanced interaction between adjacent molecules. Additionally, under an applied magnetic field, the material displays a negative magnetoresistance effect above 35% at 2 K. The effect can still be observed at 200 K and is interpreted in terms of a double-exchange mechanism.

  13. Influence of interfacial scattering and surface roughness on giant magnetoresistance in Fe/Cr trilayers using ab initio layer potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereiro, M.; Botana, J.; Baldomir, D.; Warda, K.; Wojtczak, L.; Man'kovsky, S.V.; Iglesias, M.; Pardo, V.; Arias, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Ab initio full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method combined with the semiclassical Boltzmann formalism was employed to calculate the giant magnetoresistance ratio in the trilayers nFe/3Cr/nFe (1=< n=<8). The present results emphasize the very important role of the ferromagnetic layer as well as the interfacial scattering and surface roughness on the giant magnetoresistance effect

  14. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic field response of the transport properties of novel materials and then the large magnetoresistance effects are of broad importance in both science and application. We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 105% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 106% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal-semiconductor-like transition, in NbSb2 single crystal. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed to the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field which is related to the Dirac-like point, in addition to orbital MR expected for high mobility metals. PMID:25476239

  15. Highly Sensitive Flexible Magnetic Sensor Based on Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Menghui; Gao, Yuan; Hu, Zhongqiang; Nan, Tianxiang; Liang, Xianfeng; Chen, Huaihao; Yang, Jia; Cash, Syd; Sun, Nian-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    A highly sensitive flexible magnetic sensor based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect is fabricated. A limit of detection of 150 nT is observed and excellent deformation stability is achieved after wrapping of the flexible sensor, with bending radii down to 5 mm. The flexible AMR sensor is used to read a magnetic pattern with a thickness of 10 μm that is formed by ferrite magnetic inks. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Efficient spin injection and giant magnetoresistance in Fe / MoS 2 / Fe junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Dolui, Kapildeb

    2014-07-02

    We demonstrate giant magnetoresistance in Fe/MoS2/Fe junctions by means of ab initio transport calculations. We show that junctions incorporating either a monolayer or a bilayer of MoS2 are metallic and that Fe acts as an efficient spin injector into MoS2 with an efficiency of about 45%. This is the result of the strong coupling between the Fe and S atoms at the interface. For junctions of greater thickness, a maximum magnetoresistance of ∼300% is obtained, which remains robust with the applied bias as long as transport is in the tunneling limit. A general recipe for improving the magnetoresistance in spin valves incorporating layered transition metal dichalcogenides is proposed. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  17. Tailoring anisotropic magnetoresistance and giant magnetoresistance hysteresis loops with spin-polarized current injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegrowe, J.-E.; Kelly, D.; Hoffer, X.; Guittienne, Ph.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2001-01-01

    Current pulses were injected into magnetic nanowires. Their effect on the magnetoresistance hysteresis loops was studied for three morphologies: homogeneous Ni wires, copper wires containing five cobalt/copper bilayers, and hybrid structures composed of a homogeneous Ni half wire and a multilayered Co/Cu half wire. The characteristic features of the action of the current on the magnetization are shown and discussed. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  18. Towards sub-200 nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low μm range. Deposition of a protective layer (50 nm SiO 2 ) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ∼300 nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures

  19. Giant magnetoresistance, three-dimensional Fermi surface and origin of resistivity plateau in YSb semimetal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Swatek, Przemysław; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2016-12-09

    Very strong magnetoresistance and a resistivity plateau impeding low temperature divergence due to insulating bulk are hallmarks of topological insulators and are also present in topological semimetals where the plateau is induced by magnetic field, when time-reversal symmetry (protecting surface states in topological insulators) is broken. Similar features were observed in a simple rock-salt-structure LaSb, leading to a suggestion of the possible non-trivial topology of 2D states in this compound. We show that its sister compound YSb is also characterized by giant magnetoresistance exceeding one thousand percent and low-temperature plateau of resistivity. We thus performed in-depth analysis of YSb Fermi surface by band calculations, magnetoresistance, and Shubnikov-de Haas effect measurements, which reveals only three-dimensional Fermi sheets. Kohler scaling applied to magnetoresistance data accounts very well for its low-temperature upturn behavior. The field-angle-dependent magnetoresistance demonstrates a 3D-scaling yielding effective mass anisotropy perfectly agreeing with electronic structure and quantum oscillations analysis, thus providing further support for 3D-Fermi surface scenario of magnetotransport, without necessity of invoking topologically non-trivial 2D states. We discuss data implying that analogous field-induced properties of LaSb can also be well understood in the framework of 3D multiband model.

  20. Pressure induced giant magnetoresistance in Ce.sub.2./sub.Fe.sub.17./sub. compound

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arnold, Zdeněk; Honda, F.; Oomi, G.; Eto, T.; Prokhnenko, Olexandr; Kamarád, Jiří

    242-245, - (2002), s. 797-802 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0183; GA AV ČR IAA1010018; GA MŠk ME 165 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : intemetallic compounds * pressure effect * magnetoresistance-giant Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  1. Theoretical Prediction of a Giant Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Carbon Nanoscrolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Hao; Ortix, Carmine

    2017-05-10

    Snake orbits are trajectories of charge carriers curving back and forth that form at an interface where either the magnetic field direction or the charge carrier type are inverted. In ballistic samples, their presence is manifested in the appearance of magnetoconductance oscillations at small magnetic fields. Here we show that signatures of snake orbits can also be found in the opposite diffusive transport regime. We illustrate this by studying the classical magnetotransport properties of carbon tubular structures subject to relatively weak transversal magnetic fields where snake trajectories appear in close proximity to the zero radial field projections. In carbon nanoscrolls, the formation of snake orbits leads to a strongly directional dependent positive magnetoresistance with an anisotropy up to 80%.

  2. On the importance of sensor height variation for detection of magnetic labels by magnetoresistive sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Wang, Shan Xiang; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistive sensors are widely used for biosensing by detecting the signal from magnetic labels bound to a functionalized area that usually covers the entire sensor structure. Magnetic labels magnetized by a homogeneous applied magnetic field weaken and strengthen the applied field when...

  3. Thermal stability of Py/Cu and Co/Cu giant magnetoresistance (GMR) multilayer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovk, Vitaliy

    2007-07-01

    NiFe/Cu and Co/Cu multilayer systems have been studied regarding the mechanisms of thermal degradation of the giant magnetoresistance effect (GMR). The different thermodynamics of the studied systems results in different mechanisms of the GMR degradation as shown by highest resolution nanoanalysis using the three dimensional wide angle tomographic atom probe. According to the TAP analysis, GMR deterioration in Py/Cu system occurs due to the broadening of the layer interfaces observed at 250 C. In contrast, due to the strong demixing tendency, Co/Cu multilayers remain stable up to 450 C. At higher temperatures ferromagnetic bridging of the neighboring Co layers takes place leading to the GMR breakdown. In both Py/Cu and Co/Cu systems recrystallization is induced at 350-450 C, which is accompanied by a change in the crystallographic orientation from <111> to <100> wire texture. The reaction may be utilized to produce GMR sensor layers of remarkable thermal stability. Although the systems of interest are equivalent in respect of the observed phenomenon, the Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}/Cu system is chosen for a detailed analysis because it allows a precise control of the lattice constant by varying the Fe content in the Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x} layer. It is shown that the crystallographic reorientation is triggered by the minimization of lattice mismatch elastic energy. Moreover, the counteraction between the elastic and interfacial energy minimizations exerts a critical influence on the recrystallization probability. (orig.)

  4. The effect of magnetic ordering on the giant magnetoresistance of Cr-Fe-V and Cr-Fe-Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somsen, Ch.; Acet, M.; Nepecks, G.; Wassermann, E.F.

    2000-01-01

    Cr-rich Cr 1-x Fe x alloys with compositions in the vicinity of mixed ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange (x=0.18) exhibit giant magnetoresistance. In order to understand the influence of the antiferromagnetism of Cr on the giant magnetoresistance one can manipulate the antiferromagnetic exchange either by adding vanadium, which destroys the antiferromagnetism of Cr, or by adding manganese, which enhances it. Cr-Fe-V and Cr-Fe-Mn alloys also have Curie temperatures that lie between low temperatures and room temperature in the concentration region where giant magnetoresistance is observed. Therefore, they are also used as samples to study the magnetoresistance as a function of the strength of FM exchange. We discuss these points in the light of temperature and concentration-dependent magnetoresistance experiments on Cr 0.99-x Fe x V 0.01 , Cr 0.96-x Fe x V 0.04 , Cr 0.90-x Fe x Mn 0.10 and Cr 0.55 Fe x Mn 0.45-x alloys. Results indicate that the most favorable condition for a large magnetoresistance in these alloys occurs at temperatures near the Curie temperature

  5. Giant magnetoresistance and magnetostriction in Mn1.8Co0.2Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Lakhani, Archna; Rawat, R.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the first order ferrimagnetic (FRI) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition in Mn l.8 Co 0.2 Sb by resistivity, magneto resistance and magnetostriction. With the application of magnetic field FRI to AFM transition temperature (T N ) decreases monotonically and hysteresis across the transition increases. Below T N FRI to AFM transition can be induced with the application of magnetic field which results in giant magnetoresistance and magnetostriction. The magnetostriction is found to be anomalous in this compound showing a small negative minimum close to critical field required for AFM to FRI transition. (author)

  6. Atomistic switch of giant magnetoresistance and spin thermopower in graphene-like nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the giant magnetoresistance can be switched off (on) in even- (odd-) width zigzag graphene-like nanoribbons by an atomistic gate potential or edge disorder inside the domain wall in the antiparallel (ap) magnetic configuration. A strong magneto-thermopower effect is also predicted that the spin thermopower can be greatly enhanced in the ap configuration while the charge thermopower remains low. The results extracted from the tight-binding model agree well with those obtained by first-principles simulations for edge doped graphene nanoribbons. Analytical expressions in the simplest case are obtained to facilitate qualitative analyses in general contexts. PMID:27857156

  7. Recent results on the giant magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayers (anisotropy, thermal variation and CCP-GMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieny, B.; Granovsky, A.; Vedyaev, A.; Ryzhanova, N.; Cowache, C.; Pereira, L. G.

    1995-12-01

    We present some recent results obtained on the electrical transport properties in magnetic multilayers. Three points are addressed. The first one is an experimental demonstration of the existence of an intrinsic anisotropy of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR). The experiments have been carried out on spin-valve samples for which there is no contribution of the usual anisotropic magnetoresistance to the observed magnetoresistance. The GMR amplitude is found to be larger (lower) in the direction perpendicular (parallel) to the sensing current. The second point concerns a quantitative analysis of the thermal variation of the CIP (current-in-plane) GMR in magnetic multilayers. This analysis is based on a semi-classical theory including the spin-intermixing due to spin-flip scattering by magnons. This approach allows quantitatively evaluation of the respective weights of the various contributions to the thermal decrease in GMR: (i) scattering by magnons in the bulk of the ferromagnetic layers; (ii) phonon scattering in the non-magnetic spacer layer; and (iii) interfacial scattering by paramagnetic interfacial layers which may form as the temperature is increased. The third point is a theoretical investigation of the CPP (current perpendicular to the plane) electrical transport through an interface between two semi-infinite metallic materials. It is shown that when a potential step U exists at such an interface, this step gives rise to an interfacial resistance proportional to U2. It also leads to the existence of large oscillations in the electric fields on both sides of the interface.

  8. Damping constant measurement and inverse giant magnetoresistance in spintronic devices with Fe4N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fe4N is one of the attractive materials for spintronic devices due to its large spin asymmetric conductance and negative spin polarization at the Fermi level. We have successfully deposited Fe4N thin film with (001 out-of-plane orientation using a DC facing-target-sputtering system. A Fe(001/Ag(001 composite buffer layer is selected to improve the (001 orientation of the Fe4N thin film. The N2 partial pressure during sputtering is optimized to promote the formation of Fe4N phase. Moreover, we have measured the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR of the (001 oriented Fe4N thin film using coplanar waveguides and microwave excitation. The resonant fields are tested under different microwave excitation frequencies, and the experimental results match well with the Kittel formula. The Gilbert damping constant of Fe4N is determined to be α = 0.021±0.02. We have also fabricated and characterized the current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP giant magnetoresistance (GMR device with Fe4N/Ag/Fe sandwich. Inverse giant magnetoresistance is observed in the CPP GMR device, which suggests that the spin polarization of Fe4N and Fe4N/Ag interface is negative.

  9. Tunable electron heating induced giant magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Samaraweera, R L; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Mani, R G

    2016-12-07

    Electron-heating induced by a tunable, supplementary dc-current (I dc ) helps to vary the observed magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. The magnetoresistance at B = 0.3 T is shown to progressively change from positive to negative with increasing I dc , yielding negative giant-magnetoresistance at the lowest temperature and highest I dc . A two-term Drude model successfully fits the data at all I dc and T. The results indicate that carrier heating modifies a conductivity correction σ 1 , which undergoes sign reversal from positive to negative with increasing I dc , and this is responsible for the observed crossover from positive- to negative- magnetoresistance, respectively, at the highest B.

  10. Spatial mobility fluctuation induced giant linear magnetoresistance in multilayered graphene foam

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2016-07-05

    Giant, positive, and near-temperature-independent linear magnetoresistance (LMR), as large as 340%, was observed in graphene foam with a three-dimensional flexible network. Careful analysis of the magnetoresistance revealed that Shubnikov–de Haas (SdH) oscillations occurred at low temperatures and decayed with increasing temperature. The average classical mobility ranged from 300 (2 K) to 150 (300 K) cm2V−1s−1, which is much smaller than that required by the observed SdH oscillations. To understand the mechanism behind the observation, we performed the same measurements on the microsized graphene sheets that constitute the graphene foam. Much more pronounced SdH oscillations superimposed on the LMR background were observed in these microscaled samples, which correspond to a quantum mobility as high as 26,500cm2V−1s−1. Moreover, the spatial mobility fluctuated significantly from 64,200cm2V−1s−1 to 1370cm2V−1s−1, accompanied by a variation of magnetoresistance from near 20,000% to less than 20%. The presence of SdH oscillations actually excludes the possibility that the observed LMR originated from the extreme quantum limit, because this would demand all electrons to be in the first Landau level. Instead, we ascribe the large LMR to the second case of the classical Parish and Littlewood model, in which spatial mobility fluctuation dominates electrical transport. This is an experimental confirmation of the Parish and Littlewood model by measuring the local mobility randomly (by measuring the microsized graphene sheets) and finding the spatial mobility fluctuation.

  11. Giant magnetoresistance and anomalous transport in phosphorene-based multilayers with noncollinear magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Moslem; Majidi, Leyla; Asgari, Reza

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the unusual features of the magnetotransport in a monolayer phosphorene ferromagnetic/normal/ferromagnetic (F/N/F) hybrid structure. We find that the charge conductance can feature a minimum at parallel (P) configuration and a maximum near the antiparallel (AP) configuration of magnetization in the F/N/F structure with n -doped F and p -doped N regions and also a finite conductance in the AP configuration with the N region of n -type doping. In particular, the proposed structure exhibits giant magnetoresistance, which can be tuned to unity. This perfect switching is found to show strong robustness with respect to increasing the contact length and tuning the chemical potential of the N region with a gate voltage. We also explore the oscillatory behavior of the charge conductance or magnetoresistance in terms of the size of the N region. We further demonstrate the penetration of the spin-transfer torque into the right F region and show that, unlike graphene structure, the spin-transfer torque is very sensitive to the chemical potential of the N region as well as the exchange field of the F region.

  12. Tuning giant magnetoresistance in rolled-up Co-Cu nanomembranes by strain engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian; Bof Bufon, Carlos Cesar; Makarov, Denys; Fernandez-Outon, Luis E; Macedo, Waldemar A A; Schmidt, Oliver G; Mosca, Dante Homero

    2012-11-21

    Compact rolled-up Co-Cu nanomembranes of high quality with different numbers of windings are realized by strain engineering. A profound analysis of magnetoresistance (MR) is performed for tubes with a single winding and a varied number of Co-Cu bilayers in the stack. Rolled-up nanomembranes with up to 12 Co-Cu bilayers are successfully fabricated by tailoring the strain state of the Cr bottom layer. By carrying out an angular dependent study, we ruled out the contribution from anisotropic MR and confirm that rolled-up Co-Cu multilayers exhibit giant magnetoresistance (GMR). No significant difference of MR is found for a single wound tube compared with planar devices. In contrast, MR in tubes with multiple windings is increased at low deposition rates of the Cr bottom layer, whereas the effect is not observable at higher rates, suggesting that interface roughness plays an important role in determining the GMR effect of the rolled-up nanomembranes. Furthermore, besides a linear increase of the MR with the number of windings, the self-rolling of nanomembranes substantially reduces the device footprint area.

  13. Study of annealing effects on the giant magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Sheng; Li Zhenya

    2005-01-01

    A self-consistent macroscopic theory is developed to improve on that of Gu et al (1996 Phys. Rev. B 53 11685) and to provide a physical understanding of some new experimental observations in ferromagnetic alloys. For composites with non-spherical inclusions, which is the general case in artificial granular systems, previous models based on the calculation of a spherical particle in the dilute limit are inadequate. By considering the particle shape distribution and its evolution with annealing effects, we have studied the shape dependence of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in ferromagnetic alloys. It is found that both the particle shape and its orientation are effective factors in determining the magnitude of the GMR. Based on a comparison between our calculations and experimental data, a comprehensive picture of the effects of annealing on GMR is obtained

  14. Magnetic detection of mercuric ion using giant magnetoresistance-based biosensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Klein, Todd; Feng, Yinglong; Li, Qin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a novel sensing strategy employing a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor and DNA chemistry for the detection of mercuric ion (Hg(2+)). This assay takes advantages of high sensitivity and real-time signal readout of GMR biosensor and high selectivity of thymine-thymine (T-T) pair for Hg(2+). The assay has a detection limit of 10 nM in both buffer and natural water, which is the maximum mercury level in drinking water regulated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The magnitude of the dynamic range for Hg(2+) detection is up to three orders (10 nM to 10 μM). Herein, GMR sensing technology is first introduced into a pollutant monitoring area. It can be foreseen that the GMR biosensor could become a robust contender in the areas of environmental monitoring and food safety testing.

  15. High Field Linear Magnetoresistance Sensors with Perpendicular Anisotropy L10-FePt Reference Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High field linear magnetoresistance is an important feature for magnetic sensors applied in magnetic levitating train and high field positioning measurements. Here, we investigate linear magnetoresistance in Pt/FePt/ZnO/Fe/Pt multilayer magnetic sensor, where FePt and Fe ferromagnetic layers exhibit out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively. Perpendicular anisotropy L10-FePt reference layer with large coercivity and high squareness ratio was obtained by in situ substrate heating. Linear magnetoresistance is observed in this sensor in a large range between +5 kOe and −5 kOe with the current parallel to the film plane. This L10-FePt based sensor is significant for the expansion of linear range and the simplification of preparation for future high field magnetic sensors.

  16. Optimization of magnetoresistive sensor current for on-chip magnetic bead detection using the sensor self-field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the self-heating of magnetoresistive sensors used for measurements on magnetic beads in magnetic biosensors. The signal from magnetic beads magnetized by the field due to the sensor bias current is proportional to the bias current squared. Therefore, we aim to maximize the bias...... current while limiting the sensor self-heating. We systematically characterize and model the Joule heating of magnetoresistive sensors with different sensor geometries and stack compositions. The sensor heating is determined using the increase of the sensor resistance as function of the bias current......, thus the heat conductance is proportional to the sensor area and inversely proportional to the oxide thickness. This simple heat conductance determines the relationship between bias current and sensor temperature, and we show that View the MathML source25μm wide sensor on a View the MathML source1μm...

  17. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling in giant-magnetoresistive devices on spin diode effect in wide frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziętek, Sławomir, E-mail: zietek@agh.edu.pl; Skowroński, Witold; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Ogrodnik, Piotr [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Barnaś, Józef [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-09-21

    Spin diode effect in a giant magnetoresistive strip is measured in a broad frequency range, including resonance and off-resonance frequencies. The off-resonance dc signal is relatively strong and also significantly dependent on the exchange coupling between magnetic films through the spacer layer. The measured dc signal is described theoretically by taking into account magnetic dynamics induced by Oersted field created by an ac current flowing through the system.

  18. Giant magnetoresistance effect in CoZr/Cu/Co spin-valve films (abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Youssef, J. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France)]|[LPM Universite Mohammed V, Rabat (Morocco); Koshkina, O.; Le Gall, H. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France); Harfaoui, M.E. [LPMC Universite Ibn Tofail Kenitra (Morocco); Bouziane, K. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France); Yamani, M.E. [LPM Universite Mohammed V, Rabat (Morocco); Desvignes, J.M. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France)

    1997-04-01

    A high sensitivity of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) has been observed recently from soft magnetic layers such as NiFe, NiFeCo, and FeCoB. Amorphous CoZr alloys present ultrasoft properties compared to NiFe. GMR has been investigated for amorphous CoZr/Cu/Co thin films grown by rf diode sputtering using a target consisting of a Co disk partially covered with a Zr foil. The influence of the argon pressure on Cu layer deposition, Cu thickness, and Zr content on magnetic and transport properties was analyzed. The highest value of transverse GMR obtained along the easy axis is 3.6{percent} and the MR curve was saturated in a magnetic field of 100 Oe at room temperature. GMR shows scaling behavior with the sample composition. Very high sensitivity, around 1{endash}2{percent}/Oe was observed in a CoZr (3 nm)/Cu (3 nm)/Co (2 nm) sandwich. This study shows a large dependence of GMR on Cu thickness and the maximum of magnetoresistance strongly depending on the Ar pressure which modifies the interface roughness. The Zr content also influences the magnetotransport properties ({Delta}R/R and {Delta}R/R{Delta}H). The difference in coercivity between soft magnetic CoZr and hard magnetic Co layers induces antiferromagnetic alignment. Therefore a high MR ratio and field sensitivity are achieved by improving the magnetic properties of the CoZr layer.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Recent progress in experiment and theory of giant magnetoresistance in magnetic nanocontacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagirov, L. R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The experiment and theory of magnetoresistance (MR) in nanosize point contacts made of ferromagnetic metals is reviewed. The story begins from the series of experiments on Ni-Ni and Co-Co nanocontacts [1,2] in which an extraordinary high MR, 200-300%, has been observed at room temperature (see also the review [3] and references therein). Two basic mechanisms of nanosize contact MR have been proposed: enhancement of impurity scattering in the domain wall [2] and scattering of electrons by the geometrically constrained domain wall [4]. The theories were able to explain the values of magnetoresistance observed in the experiments. Very shortly afterwards further experiments raised the size of the effect till few thousand percents [5,6]. There was a discussion in the literature and scientific meetings that the observed giant MR was an artefact caused by the magneto-mechanical effect, but not true electronic MR. Indeed, some geometries of experiments could be doubted. However, a constructive development has been proposed by theory and carefully designed experiments. The theory predicted even higher magnetoresistance in the regime of conductance quantization through the magnetic nanocontact [7-10]. It seems that MR in conduction quantization regime has been observed in an experiment [11,12]. The work was supported by the RFBR grant No 03-02-17656. [1] N. Garcia, M. Munoz, and Y.-W. Zhao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2923 (1999). [2] G. Tatara, Y.-W. Zhao, M. Munoz, and N. Garcia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2030 (1999). [3] N. Garcia, M. Munoz, V.V. Osipov, et al., Journ. Magn. Magn. Mater. 240, 92-99 (2002). [4] L.R. Tagirov, B.P. Vodopyanov, K.B. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 63, 104428 (2001). [5] H.D. Chopra, S.Z. Hua, Phys. Rev. B 66, 020403 (2002). [6] Hai Wang, H. Cheng, N. Garcia, cond-mat/0207516 (22 Jul 2002). [7] L.R. Tagirov, B.P. Vodopyanov, K.B. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 65, 214419 (2002). [8] M.Ye. Zhuravlev, E.Y. Tsymbal, S.S. Jaswal et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 3534 (2003

  20. Analysis of the distribution of magnetic fluid inside tumors by a giant magnetoresistance probe

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2013-11-29

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. 2013 Gooneratne et al.

  1. Analysis of the distribution of magnetic fluid inside tumors by a giant magnetoresistance probe

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. 2013 Gooneratne et al.

  2. Giant magnetoresistance in cluster-assembled nanostructures: on the influence of inter-particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarzún, Simón; Domingues Tavares de Sa, Artur; Tuaillon-Combes, Juliette; Tamion, Alexandre; Hillion, Arnaud; Boisron, Olivier; Mosset, Alexis; Pellarin, Michel; Dupuis, Véronique; Hillenkamp, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance response of granular systems has since its discovery been described by a simple model based on the geometric orientation of the magnetic moments of adjacent nanoparticles. This model has been proven quite successful in many cases but its being based on decoupled neighboring grains has never been verified as all available studies rely on samples with too high concentration. Here we report on magnetic and magnetotransport measurements of cluster-assembled nanostructures with cobalt clusters around 2.3 nm diameter embedded in copper matrices at different concentrations. The thorough magnetic characterization based on the recently developed “triple fit” method allows the detection of measurable inter-particle interactions and thus assures true superparamagnetic behavior in the most dilute sample. The spintronic response is compared to theory and we show that only at low concentration (0.5 at.% Co) all experiments are consistent and the common theoretical description is appropriate. Increasing the concentration to 2.5 and 5 at.% implies deviations between magnetometry and magnetotransport

  3. Analysis of the distribution of magnetic fluid inside tumors by a giant magnetoresistance probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka P Gooneratne

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42 °C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe.

  4. Giant Magnetoresistance in Carbon Nanotubes with Single-Molecule Magnets TbPc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainov, Igor V; Klier, Janina; Dmitriev, Alexander P; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Gornyi, Igor V

    2017-07-25

    We present experimental results and a theoretical model for the gate-controlled spin-valve effect in carbon nanotubes with side-attached single-molecule magnets TbPc 2 (Terbium(III) bis-phthalocyanine). These structures show a giant magnetoresistance up to 1000% in experiments on single-wall nanotubes that are tunnel-coupled to the leads. The proposed theoretical model combines the spin-dependent Fano effect with Coulomb blockade and predicts a spin-spin interaction between the TbPc 2 molecules, mediated by conducting electrons via the charging effect. This gate-tuned interaction is responsible for the stable magnetic ordering of the inner spins of the molecules in the absence of magnetic field. In the case of antiferromagnetic arrangement, electrons with either spin experience the scattering by the molecules, which results in blocking the linear transport. In strong magnetic fields, the Zeeman energy exceeds the effective antiferromagnetic coupling and one species of electrons is not scattered by molecules, which leads to a much lower total resistance at the resonant values of gate voltage, and hence to a supramolecular spin-valve effect.

  5. Giant Hall Resistivity and Magnetoresistance in Cubic Chiral Antiferromagnet EuPtSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakihana, Masashi; Aoki, Dai; Nakamura, Ai; Honda, Fuminori; Nakashima, Miho; Amako, Yasushi; Nakamura, Shota; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2018-02-01

    EuPtSi crystallizes in the cubic chiral structure (P213, No. 198), which is the same as the non-centrosymmetric space group of MnSi with the skyrmion structure, and orders antiferromagnetically below a Néel temperature TN = 4.05 K. The magnetization at 2 K for the [111] direction indicates two metamagnetic transitions at the magnetic fields HA1 = 9.2 kOe and HA2 = 13.8 kOe and saturates above Hc = 26.6 kOe. The present magnetic phase between HA1 and HA2 is most likely closed in the (H,T) phase and is observed in a wide temperature range from 3.6 to 0.5 K. In this magnetic phase known as the A-phase, we found giant additional Hall resistivity ΔρH(H) and magnetoresistance Δρ(H), reaching ΔρH(H) = 0.12 µΩ·cm and Δρ(H) = 1.4 µΩ·cm, respectively. These findings are obtained for H || [111] and [100], but not for H || [110] and [112], revealing an anisotropic behavior in the new material EuPtSi.

  6. Roll Attitude Determination of Spin Projectile Based on GPS and Magnetoresistive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in attack accuracy of the spin projectiles is a very significant objective, which increases the overall combat efficiency of projectiles. The accurate determination of the projectile roll attitude is the recent objective of the efficient guidance and control. The roll measurement system for the spin projectile is commonly based on the magnetoresistive sensor. It is well known that the magnetoresistive sensor produces a sinusoidally oscillating signal whose frequency slowly decays with time, besides the possibility of blind spot. On the other hand, absolute sensors such as GPS have fixed errors even though the update rates are generally low. To earn the benefit while eliminating weaknesses from both types of sensors, a mathematical model using filtering technique can be designed to integrate the magnetoresistive sensor and GPS measurements. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to integrate the magnetoresistive sensor and GPS measurements in order to get an accurate prediction of projectile roll attitude in a real flight time. The proposed model is verified using numerical simulations, which illustrated that the accuracy of the roll attitude measurement is improved.

  7. A device model framework for magnetoresistive sensors based on the Stoner–Wohlfarth model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Bergmair, Bernhard; Brueckl, Hubert; Palmesi, Pietro; Buder, Anton; Satz, Armin; Suess, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The Stoner–Wohlfarth (SW) model provides an efficient analytical model to describe the behavior of magnetic layers within magnetoresistive sensors. Combined with a proper description of magneto-resistivity an efficient device model can be derived, which is necessary for an optimal electric circuit design. Parameters of the model are determined by global optimization of an application specific cost function which contains measured resistances for different applied fields. Several application cases are examined and used for validation of the device model. - Highlights: • An efficient device model framework for various types of magnetoresistive sensors is presented. • The model is based on the analytical solution of the Stoner–Wohlfarth model. • Numerical optimization methods provide optimal model parameters for a different application cases. • The model is applied to several application cases and is able to reproduce measured hysteresis and swiching behavior

  8. Two-dimensional salt and temperature DNA denaturation analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-01-01

    We present a microfluidic system and its use to measure DNA denaturation curves by varying the temperature or salt (Na+) concentration. The readout is based on real-time measurements of DNA hybridization using magnetoresistive sensors and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as labels. We report the first...... melting curves of DNA hybrids measured as a function of continuously decreasing salt concentration at fixed temperature and compare them to the corresponding curves obtained vs. temperature at fixed salt concentration. The magnetoresistive sensor platform provided reliable results under varying....... The results demonstrate that concentration melting provides an attractive alternative to temperature melting in on-chip DNA denaturation experiments and further show that the magnetoresistive platform is attractive due to its low cross-sensitivity to temperature and liquid composition....

  9. A Wideband Magnetoresistive Sensor for Monitoring Dynamic Fault Slip in Laboratory Fault Friction Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D

    2017-12-02

    A non-contact, wideband method of sensing dynamic fault slip in laboratory geophysical experiments employs an inexpensive magnetoresistive sensor, a small neodymium rare earth magnet, and user built application-specific wideband signal conditioning. The magnetoresistive sensor generates a voltage proportional to the changing angles of magnetic flux lines, generated by differential motion or rotation of the near-by magnet, through the sensor. The performance of an array of these sensors compares favorably to other conventional position sensing methods employed at multiple locations along a 2 m long × 0.4 m deep laboratory strike-slip fault. For these magnetoresistive sensors, the lack of resonance signals commonly encountered with cantilever-type position sensor mounting, the wide band response (DC to ≈ 100 kHz) that exceeds the capabilities of many traditional position sensors, and the small space required on the sample, make them attractive options for capturing high speed fault slip measurements in these laboratory experiments. An unanticipated observation of this study is the apparent sensitivity of this sensor to high frequency electomagnetic signals associated with fault rupture and (or) rupture propagation, which may offer new insights into the physics of earthquake faulting.

  10. Colossal magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontcuberta, J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1986 Alex Mueller and Georg Bednorz of IBM Zurich discovered high-temperature superconductivity in copper-based oxides. This finding, which was rewarded with the Nobel Prize for Physics in the following year, triggered intense research into the properties of the transition metal oxides. Since then scientists have questioned the very nature of the metallic state in these materials. A few years after the initial discovery, in 1993, more excitement greeted reports that certain manganese oxides showed a huge change in electrical resistivity when a magnetic field was applied. This effect is generally known as magnetoresistance, but the resistivity change observed in these oxides was so large that it could not be compared with any other forms of magnetoresistance. The effect observed in these materials the manganese perovskites was therefore dubbed ''colossal'' magnetoresistance to distinguish it from the giant magnetoresistance observed in magnetic multilayers. In this article the author explains why magnetoresistance is an expanding field of physics research. (UK)

  11. Giant current-perpendicular-to-plane magnetoresistance in multilayer graphene as grown on nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodepudi, S C; Singh, A P; Pramanik, S

    2014-05-14

    Strong magnetoresistance effects are often observed in ferromagnet-nonmagnet multilayers, which are exploited in state-of-the-art magnetic field sensing and data storage technologies. In this work we report a novel current-perpendicular-to-plane magnetoresistance effect in multilayer graphene as grown on a catalytic nickel surface by chemical vapor deposition. A negative magnetoresistance effect of ∼10(4)% has been observed, which persists even at room temperature. This effect is correlated with the shape of the 2D peak as well as with the occurrence of D peak in the Raman spectrum of the as-grown multilayer graphene. The observed magnetoresistance is extremely high as compared to other known materials systems for similar temperature and field range and can be qualitatively explained within the framework of "interlayer magnetoresistance" (ILMR).

  12. Measuring Dynamic Signals with Direct Sensor-to-Microcontroller Interfaces Applied to a Magnetoresistive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sifuentes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the performance of direct interface circuits (DIC, where the sensor is directly connected to a microcontroller, when a resistive sensor subjected to dynamic changes is measured. The theoretical analysis provides guidelines for the selection of the components taking into account both the desired resolution and the bandwidth of the input signal. Such an analysis reveals that there is a trade-off between the sampling frequency and the resolution of the measurement, and this depends on the selected value of the capacitor that forms the RC circuit together with the sensor resistance. This performance is then experimentally proved with a DIC measuring a magnetoresistive sensor exposed to a magnetic field of different frequencies, amplitudes, and waveforms. A sinusoidal magnetic field up to 1 kHz can be monitored with a resolution of eight bits and a sampling frequency of around 10 kSa/s. If a higher resolution is desired, the sampling frequency has to be lower, thus limiting the bandwidth of the dynamic signal under measurement. The DIC is also applied to measure an electrocardiogram-type signal and its QRS complex is well identified, which enables the estimation, for instance, of the heart rate.

  13. Measuring Dynamic Signals with Direct Sensor-to-Microcontroller Interfaces Applied to a Magnetoresistive Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes, Ernesto; Gonzalez-Landaeta, Rafael; Cota-Ruiz, Juan; Reverter, Ferran

    2017-05-18

    This paper evaluates the performance of direct interface circuits (DIC), where the sensor is directly connected to a microcontroller, when a resistive sensor subjected to dynamic changes is measured. The theoretical analysis provides guidelines for the selection of the components taking into account both the desired resolution and the bandwidth of the input signal. Such an analysis reveals that there is a trade-off between the sampling frequency and the resolution of the measurement, and this depends on the selected value of the capacitor that forms the RC circuit together with the sensor resistance. This performance is then experimentally proved with a DIC measuring a magnetoresistive sensor exposed to a magnetic field of different frequencies, amplitudes, and waveforms. A sinusoidal magnetic field up to 1 kHz can be monitored with a resolution of eight bits and a sampling frequency of around 10 kSa/s. If a higher resolution is desired, the sampling frequency has to be lower, thus limiting the bandwidth of the dynamic signal under measurement. The DIC is also applied to measure an electrocardiogram-type signal and its QRS complex is well identified, which enables the estimation, for instance, of the heart rate.

  14. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-01-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP. - Highlights: • We apply magnetoresistive sensors to study solid-surface hybridization kinetics of DNA. • We measure DNA melting profiles for perfectly matching DNA duplexes and for a single base mismatch. • We present a procedure to correct for temperature dependencies of the sensor output. • We reliably extract melting temperatures for the DNA hybrids. • We demonstrate direct measurement of differential binding signal for two probes on a single sensor

  15. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Henriksen, Anders Dahl

    2014-01-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches....... The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover...

  16. Efficient spin injection and giant magnetoresistance in Fe / MoS 2 / Fe junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Dolui, Kapildeb; Narayan, Awadhesh; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    bias as long as transport is in the tunneling limit. A general recipe for improving the magnetoresistance in spin valves incorporating layered transition metal dichalcogenides is proposed. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  17. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Wang, Xianghao; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 104 J/m3 and 10 × 104 J/m3, the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between -330 Oe and 330 Oe to between -650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2-20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance.

  18. Magnetoresistive logic and biochip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckl, Hubert; Brzeska, Monika; Brinkmann, Dirk; Schotter, J.Joerg; Reiss, Guenter; Schepper, Willi; Kamp, P.-B.; Becker, Anke

    2004-01-01

    While some magnetoresistive devices based on giant magnetoresistance or spin-dependent tunneling are already commercialized, a new branch of development is evolving towards magnetoresistive logic with magnetic tunnel junctions. Furthermore, the new magnetoelectronic effects show promising properties in magnetoresistive biochips, which are capable of detecting even single molecules (e.g. DNA) by functionalized magnetic markers. The unclear limits of this approach are discussed with two model systems

  19. Giant Negative Magnetoresistance Driven by Spin-Orbit Coupling at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, M; Monteiro, A M R V L; Mattoni, G; Cobanera, E; Hyart, T; Mulazimoglu, E; Bovenzi, N; Beenakker, C W J; Caviglia, A D

    2015-07-03

    The LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface hosts a two-dimensional electron system that is unusually sensitive to the application of an in-plane magnetic field. Low-temperature experiments have revealed a giant negative magnetoresistance (dropping by 70%), attributed to a magnetic-field induced transition between interacting phases of conduction electrons with Kondo-screened magnetic impurities. Here we report on experiments over a broad temperature range, showing the persistence of the magnetoresistance up to the 20 K range--indicative of a single-particle mechanism. Motivated by a striking correspondence between the temperature and carrier density dependence of our magnetoresistance measurements we propose an alternative explanation. Working in the framework of semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory we demonstrate that the combination of spin-orbit coupling and scattering from finite-range impurities can explain the observed magnitude of the negative magnetoresistance, as well as the temperature and electron density dependence.

  20. Giant magnetoresistive properties of FexAu100-x alloys produced by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socolovsky, L.M.; Sanchez, F.H.; Shingu, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    The Fe x Au 100- x alloys were produced for the first time by mechanical alloying. Resistance of samples with iron concentrations of x=15, 20, 25, and 30 at% were measured at 77 K under an applied field of 14 kOe. A maximum in magnetoresistive ratio (Δρ/ρ) of 3.5% was obtained for Fe 25 Au 75 . Samples were annealed in order to enhance magnetoresistive properties. These samples exhibit larger ratios, primarily due to the elimination of defects. X-ray diffraction Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetoresistance measurements were performed, in order to correlate bulk and hyperfine magnetic properties with crystalline structure. X-ray diffractograms show an FCC structure, with no evidence for a BCC one

  1. Configurational Statistics of Magnetic Bead Detection with Magnetoresistive Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect magnetic beads that, mediated by a target, have bound to a functionalized area. This area is often larger than the area of the sensor. Both the sign and magnitude of the average magnetic field experienced by the sensor from a magnetic bead depends on the location...... of the bead relative to the sensor. Consequently, the signal from multiple beads also depends on their locations. Thus, a given coverage of the functionalized area with magnetic beads does not result in a given detector response, except on the average, over many realizations of the same coverage. We present...... a systematic theoretical analysis of how this location-dependence affects the sensor response. The analysis is done for beads magnetized by a homogeneous in-plane magnetic field. We determine the expected value and standard deviation of the sensor response for a given coverage, as well as the accuracy...

  2. Magnetoresistive sensors for measurements of DNA hybridization kinetics - effect of TINA modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-01-01

    We present the use of magnetoresistive sensors integrated in a microfluidic system for real-time studies of the hybridization kinetics of DNA labeled with magnetic nanoparticles to an array of surface-tethered probes. The nanoparticles were magnetized by the magnetic field from the sensor current....... A local negative reference ensured that only the specific binding signal was measured. Analysis of the real-time hybridization using a two-compartment model yielded both the association and dissociation constants kon, and koff. The effect of probe modifications with ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic...

  3. Size-dependent giant-magnetoresistance in millimeter scale GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Large changes in the electrical resistance induced by the application of a small magnetic field are potentially useful for device-applications. Such Giant Magneto-Resistance (GMR) effects also provide new insights into the physical phenomena involved in the associated electronic transport. This study examines a “bell-shape” negative GMR that grows in magnitude with decreasing temperatures in mm-wide devices fabricated from the high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2-Dimensional Electron System (2DES). Experiments show that the span of this magnetoresistance on the magnetic-field-axis increases with decreasing device width, W, while there is no concurrent Hall resistance, Rxy, correction. A multi-conduction model, including negative diagonal-conductivity, and non-vanishing off-diagonal conductivity, reproduces experimental observations. The results suggest that a size effect in the mm-wide 2DES with mm-scale electron mean-free-paths is responsible for the observed “non-ohmic” size-dependent negative GMR. PMID:24067264

  4. Bead magnetorelaxometry with an on-chip magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Donolato, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Magnetorelaxometry measurements on suspensions of magnetic beads are demonstrated using a planar Hall effect sensor chip embedded in a microfluidic system. The alternating magnetic field used for magnetizing the beads is provided by the sensor bias current and the complex magnetic susceptibility...... spectra are recorded as the 2nd harmonic of the sensor response. The complex magnetic susceptibility signal appears when a magnetic bead suspension is injected, it scales with the bead concentration, and it follows the Cole-Cole expression for Brownian relaxation. The complex magnetic susceptibility...... signal resembles that from conventional magnetorelaxometry done on the same samples apart from an offset in Brownian relaxation frequency. The time dependence of the signal can be rationalized as originating from sedimented beads....

  5. Ternary NiFeX as soft biasing film in a magnetoresistive sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao-Min; Gharsallah, Neila; Gorman, Grace L.; Latimer, Jacquie

    1991-04-01

    The properties of NiFeX ternary films (X being Al, Au, Nb, Pd, Pt, Si, and Zr) have been studied for soft-film biasing of the magnetoresistive (MR) trilayer sensor. In general, the addition of the element X into the NiFe alloy film decreases the saturation magnetization Bs and magnetoresistance coefficient of the film, while increasing the film's electrical resistivity ρ. One of the desirable properties of a soft film for biasing is high sheet resistance for minimum current flow. A figure of merit Bsρ that takes into account both the rate of increase in Bs and the rate of decrease in ρ when adding X element was derived to compare the effectiveness of various X elements in reducing the current shunting through the soft-film layer. Using this criterion, NiFeNb and NiFeZr emerge as good soft-film materials having a maximum sheet resistance relative to the MR layer. Other critical properties such as magnetoresistance coefficient, magnetostriction, coercivity, and anisotropy field were also examined and are discussed in this paper.

  6. Open-loop magneto-resistance sensor-based DC current transformer for FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, Eman; Hofmann, Klaus [Technical University Darmstadt (Germany); Reeg, Hansjoerg; Schwickert, Marcus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A Novel DC Current Transformer (N-DCCT) is currently under development for FAIR. The N-DCCT is going to be installed inside the SIS100 synchrotron. The proposed system is no longer based on magnetic modulation principle of the conventional DCCT. Instead, a Magneto-resistance sensor is utilized to detect the magnetic field of the ion-beam. For a first prototype the N-DCCT is realized as an open-loop system. It consists of a high permeability slotted ring core and up to two MR sensors. The maximum ion-beam current magnetic field is concentrated inside the ring core air gaps. MR sensors are placed inside the core air gaps. The sensor output voltage is directly proportional to the ion-beam current. The system is implemented using commercial Tunneling MR sensors. Measurements using one single sensor, as well as the application of two sensors are presented in this work. The sensitivity of the proposed N-DCCT is 0.566 [V/A] for one single MR sensor and 1.56 [V/A] when two sensors are implemented.

  7. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei, E-mail: hust-yangxiaofei@163.com [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Xianghao [School of Information Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-01-28

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 10{sup 4 }J/m{sup 3} and 10 × 10{sup 4 }J/m{sup 3}, the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between −330 Oe and 330 Oe to between −650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2–20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance.

  8. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xianghao

    2016-01-01

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 10 4  J/m 3 and 10 × 10 4  J/m 3 , the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between −330 Oe and 330 Oe to between −650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2–20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance

  9. Large positive spin polarization and giant inverse tunneling magnetoresistance in Fe/PbTiO3/Fe multiferroic tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Jian-Qing; Zhang, Hu; Song, Yu-Min

    2014-01-01

    We perform first-principles electronic structure and spin-dependent transport calculations of a multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) with an epitaxial Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe heterostructure. We predict a large positive spin-polarization (SP) and an intriguing giant inverse tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio in this tunnel junction. We demonstrate that the tunneling properties are determined by ferroelectric (FE) polarization screening and electronic reconstruction at the interface with lower electrostatic potential. The intricate complex band structure of PbTiO 3 , in particular the lowest decay rates concerning Pb 6p z and Ti 3d z2 states near the Γ ¯ point, gives rise to the large positive SP of the tunneling current in the parallel magnetic configuration. However, the giant inverse TMR ratio is attributed to the minority-spin electrons of the interfacial Ti 3d xz +3d yz orbitals which have considerably weight in the extended area around the Γ ¯ point at the Fermi energy and causes remarkable contributions to the conductance in the antiparallel magnetic configuration. - Highlights: • We study spin-dependent tunneling in Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe multiferroic tunnel junction. • We find a large positive spin polarization in the parallel magnetic configuration. • An intriguing giant inverse TMR ratio (about −2000%) is predicted. • Complex band structure of PbTiO 3 causes the large positive spin polarization. • Negative TMR is due to minority-spin electrons of interfacial Ti d xz +d yz orbitals

  10. Development of Magneto-Resistive Angular Position Sensors for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Robert; Langendorf, Sven; Seifart, Klaus; Slatter, Rolf; Olberts, Bastian; Romera, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic microsystems in the form of magneto- resistive (MR) sensors are firmly established in automobiles and industrial applications. They measure path, angle, electrical current, or magnetic fields. MR technology opens up new sensor possibilities in space applications and can be an enabling technology for optimal performance, high robustness and long lifetime at reasonable costs. In a recent assessment study performed by HTS GmbH and Sensitec GmbH under ESA Contract a market survey has confirmed that space industry has a very high interest in novel, contactless position sensors based on MR technology. Now, a detailed development stage is pursued, to advance the sensor design up to Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) level and to perform qualification testing for a representative pilot space application.The paper briefly reviews the basics of magneto- resistive effects and possible sensor applications and describes the key benefits of MR angular sensors with reference to currently operational industrial and space applications. The results of the assessment study are presented and potential applications and uses of contactless magneto-resistive angular sensors for spacecraft are identified. The baseline mechanical and electrical sensor design will be discussed. An outlook on the EQM development and qualification tests is provided.

  11. Giant magnetoresistance effect in nanostructures consisting of magnetic-electric barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Wei-Hua; Li, Chun-Shu; Kong, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Gui-Lian

    2007-01-01

    The GMR effect in magnetic-electric barrier nanostructure, which can be realized experimentally by depositing two parallel metallic ferromagnetic strips with an applied voltage on the top of heterostructure, is investigated theoretically. It is shown that a considerable GMR effect can be achieved in such nanosystems due to the significant transmission difference for electrons tunneling through parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is also shown that the magnetoresistance ratio is strongly dependent upon the applied voltage to metallic ferromagnetic strips in nanosystems, thus may leading to voltage-tunable GMR devices

  12. A method to design high SNR nanoscale magnetic sensors using an array of tunnelling magneto-resistance (TMR) devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, P; Litvinov, D; Khizroev, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic method to design and calculate tunnelling magneto-resistance (TMR) sensors with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The sensing module consists of four TMR devices arranged in a Wheatstone-bridge configuration. Closed-form equations were obtained to calculate TMR sensor current, array output voltage, magneto-resistance ratio, overall noise (thermal and shot) and SNR for a given bandwidth. Using this technique we were able to maximize the SNR by tuning the many parameters of the TMR devices. Typical SNR values are in excess of 45 dB

  13. Hall effect enhanced low-field sensitivity in a three-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-06-06

    An extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device with a 3-contact geometry has been fabricated and characterized. A large enhancement of the output sensitivity at low magnetic fields compared to the conventional EMR device has been found, which can be attributed to an additional influence coming from the Hall effect. Output sensitivities of 0.19 mV/T at zero-field and 0.2 mV/T at 0.01 T have been measured in the device, which is equivalent to the ones of the conventional EMR sensors with a bias of ∼0.04 T. The exceptional performance of EMR sensors in the high field region is maintained in the 3-contact device.

  14. Spin-filtering and giant magnetoresistance effects in polyacetylene-based molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Yan, Shenlang; Xu, Liang; Liu, Desheng; Li, Quan; Wang, Lingling; Long, Mengqiu

    2017-07-01

    Using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with density functional theory, we performed ab initio calculations of spin-dependent electron transport in molecular devices consisting of a polyacetylene (CnHn+1) chain vertically attached to a carbon chain sandwiched between two semi-infinite zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon electrodes. Spin-charge transport in the device could be modulated to different magnetic configurations by an external magnetic field. The results showed that single spin conduction could be obtained. Specifically, the proposed CnHn+1 devices exhibited several interesting effects, including (dual) spin filtering, spin negative differential resistance, odd-even oscillation, and magnetoresistance (MR). Marked spin polarization with a filtering efficiency of up to 100% over a large bias range was found, and the highest MR ratio for the CnHn+1 junctions reached 4.6 × 104. In addition, the physical mechanisms for these phenomena were also revealed.

  15. Structure and giant magnetoresistance of carbon-based amorphous films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.; He, M.F.; Liu, Z.W.; Zeng, D.C.; Gu, Z.F.; Cheng, G.

    2014-01-01

    Pure amorphous carbon (a-C) and Co-doped Co x C 1−x films were prepared on n-Si(100) substrates by dc magnetron sputtering. In Co–C films, the nano-sized amorphous Co particles were homogeneously dispersed in the amorphous cross-linked carbon matrix. The structures of a-C and Co x C 1−x films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the a-C films were diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. After doping cobalt into DLC film, the sp 3 -hybridized carbon content in DLC composite films almost had no change. The as-deposited Co x C 1−x granular films had larger value of magnetoresistance (MR) than the amorphous carbon film. A very high positive MR, up to 15.5% at magnetic field B = 0.8 T and x = 2.5 at.% was observed in a Co x C 1−x granular film with thickness of 80 nm at room temperature when the external magnetic field was perpendicular to the electric current and the film surface. With increase of the film thickness and Co-doped content, the MR decreased gradually. It remains a challenge to well explain the observed MR effect in the Co x C 1−x granular films. - Highlights: • The amorphous carbon films were diamond-like carbon films. • No carbide appearing, the Co–C composite films form a good metal/insulator system. • A high positive magnetoresistance, up to 15.5% at B = 0.8 T was observed in Co–C films

  16. An efficient biosensor made of an electromagnetic trap and a magneto-resistive sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2014-09-01

    Magneto-resistive biosensors have been found to be useful because of their high sensitivity, low cost, small size, and direct electrical output. They use super-paramagnetic beads to label a biological target and detect it via sensing the stray field. In this paper, we report a new setup for magnetic biosensors, replacing the conventional "sandwich" concept with an electromagnetic trap. We demonstrate the capability of the biosensor in the detection of E. coli. The trap is formed by a current-carrying microwire that attracts the magnetic beads into a sensing space on top of a tunnel magneto-resistive sensor. The sensor signal depends on the number of beads in the sensing space, which depends on the size of the beads. This enables the detection of biological targets, because such targets increase the volume of the beads. Experiments were carried out with a 6. μm wide microwire, which attracted the magnetic beads from a distance of 60. μm, when a current of 30. mA was applied. A sensing space of 30. μm in length and 6. μm in width was defined by the magnetic sensor. The results showed that individual E. coli bacterium inside the sensing space could be detected using super-paramagnetic beads that are 2.8. μm in diameter. The electromagnetic trap setup greatly simplifies the device and reduces the detection process to two steps: (i) mixing the bacteria with magnetic beads and (ii) applying the sample solution to the sensor for measurement, which can be accomplished within about 30. min with a sample volume in the μl range. This setup also ensures that the biosensor can be cleaned easily and re-used immediately. The presented setup is readily integrated on chips via standard microfabrication techniques. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Synthesis of Ruthenium(III Phthalocyanine with Di-axial Bromo Ligands - A Promising Molecular Conductor with Giant Negative Magnetoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A.V. Gamboa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron transport of Phthalocyanines (Pc with central metal and di-axial ligands (such as FeIII(PcL2; where L = CN, Cl, Br originates from its intermolecular Pc π-π orbital overlap while its giant negative magnetoresistance (GNMR arises from its intramolecular Pc-π(HOMO and Fe-d (s=1/2 interaction. However, the π-d interaction tends to localize itinerant electrons resulting in the decrease in the conductivity of the FeIII(PcL2 series compared to the non-magnetic CoIII(PcL2 where π-d interaction is absent. More so, the axial ligand field energy of the FeIII(PcL2 system is found to have the ability to proportionally modulate the π-d interaction. In reference thereof, theoretical calculations point that isostructural RuIII(PcBr2 would provide the best balance of π-d orbital energy interplay. That is, RuIII(PcBr2 is expected to be a molecule with high electrical conductivity and GNMR which would make it an ideal magnetic molecular conductor. This paper reports on the synthesis of RuIII(PcBr2.

  18. Coexistance of Giant Tunneling Electroresistance and Magnetoresistance in an All-Oxide Composite Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    KAUST Repository

    Caffrey, Nuala Mai

    2012-11-30

    We propose, by performing advanced abinitio electron transport calculations, an all-oxide composite magnetic tunnel junction, within which both large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and tunneling electroresistance (TER) effects can coexist. The TMR originates from the symmetry-driven spin filtering provided by an insulating BaTiO3 barrier to the electrons injected from the SrRuO3 electrodes. Following recent theoretical suggestions, the TER effect is achieved by intercalating a thin insulating layer, here SrTiO3, at one of the SrRuO3/BaTiO3 interfaces. As the complex band structure of SrTiO3 has the same symmetry as that of BaTiO3, the inclusion of such an intercalated layer does not negatively alter the TMR and in fact increases it. Crucially, the magnitude of the TER also scales with the thickness of the SrTiO3 layer. The SrTiO3 thickness becomes then a single control parameter for both the TMR and the TER effect. This protocol offers a practical way to the fabrication of four-state memory cells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  19. Coexistance of Giant Tunneling Electroresistance and Magnetoresistance in an All-Oxide Composite Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    KAUST Repository

    Caffrey, Nuala Mai; Archer, Thomas; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We propose, by performing advanced abinitio electron transport calculations, an all-oxide composite magnetic tunnel junction, within which both large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and tunneling electroresistance (TER) effects can coexist. The TMR originates from the symmetry-driven spin filtering provided by an insulating BaTiO3 barrier to the electrons injected from the SrRuO3 electrodes. Following recent theoretical suggestions, the TER effect is achieved by intercalating a thin insulating layer, here SrTiO3, at one of the SrRuO3/BaTiO3 interfaces. As the complex band structure of SrTiO3 has the same symmetry as that of BaTiO3, the inclusion of such an intercalated layer does not negatively alter the TMR and in fact increases it. Crucially, the magnitude of the TER also scales with the thickness of the SrTiO3 layer. The SrTiO3 thickness becomes then a single control parameter for both the TMR and the TER effect. This protocol offers a practical way to the fabrication of four-state memory cells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  20. Thermal spin filtering effect and giant magnetoresistance of half-metallic graphene nanoribbon co-doped with non-metallic Nitrogen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Zheng, Anmin; Gao, Guoying; Yao, Kailun

    2018-03-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function are performed to investigate the thermal spin transport properties of single-hydrogen-saturated zigzag graphene nanoribbon co-doped with non-metallic Nitrogen and Boron in parallel and anti-parallel spin configurations. The results show that the doped graphene nanoribbon is a full half-metal. The two-probe system based on the doped graphene nanoribbon exhibits various excellent spin transport properties, including the spin-filtering effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the single-spin negative differential thermal resistance effect and the sign-reversible giant magnetoresistance feature. Excellently, the spin-filtering efficiency can reach nearly 100% in the parallel configuration and the magnetoresistance ratio can be up to -1.5 × 1010% by modulating the electrode temperature and temperature gradient. Our findings indicate that the metal-free doped graphene nanoribbon would be a promising candidate for spin caloritronic applications.

  1. Giant room-temperature magnetoresistance in La0.8Tb0.2MnO3 under the low magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingtang; Chen Ziyu; Wang Chunchang; Jie Qiu; Lue Huibin

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline perovskite La 0.8 Tb 0.2 MnO 3 (LTMO) with an orthorhombic phase was synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction. The magnetic and electric properties of La 0.8 Tb 0.2 MnO 3 were examined. The striking finding is that the material exhibits giant magnetoresistance at room temperature as high as -31.8% and -35.7% under the low magnetic fields of 100 and 1000 Oe, respectively. This result suggests that La 0.8 Tb 0.2 MnO 3 has a promising potential in future device developments

  2. Magnetoresistance sensitivity mapping of the localized response of contiguous and lead-overlaid sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoresistance sensitivity mapping (MSM) was used to investigate the local response of magnetic recording sensors without convolution of the writer, magnetic media and data channel. From a 2D map of the local sensor response, the intrinsic pulse shape and magnetic track profile are readily obtained. Pulse-width is a concern for high data rate since if pulse-width is too broad, individual transitions become difficult to distinguish. Track profiles are important because due to the small difference between magnetic write-width and magnetic read-width, side reading will lead to an increase in noise. Three experiments are discussed: the dependence of the pulse-width (PW50) of the standard contiguous junction (CJ) design on shield-to-shield spacing; a comparison of the pulse shape of lead-overlaid (LOL) and CJ designs; and a comparison of the magnetic track profile (including track-width and skirt ratio) of LOL and CJ designs. The LOL design offers an increased sensitivity; however, as seen from MSM, the penalties are broadening of the track and pulse profiles. These are a direct result of the finite current in the lead overlay region and an increased shield-to-shield spacing in that region. The MSM image shows a curvature, which is associated with the topography of the top shield due to the lead overlay

  3. Cold-Rolled Strip Steel Stress Detection Technology Based on a Magnetoresistance Sensor and the Magnetoelastic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ben; Zang, Yong; Han, Xiaohui; Zheng, Kailun

    2018-05-21

    Driven by the demands for contactless stress detection, technologies are being used for shape control when producing cold-rolled strips. This paper presents a novel contactless stress detection technology based on a magnetoresistance sensor and the magnetoelastic effect, enabling the detection of internal stress in manufactured cold-rolled strips. An experimental device was designed and produced. Characteristics of this detection technology were investigated through experiments assisted by theoretical analysis. Theoretically, a linear correlation exists between the internal stress of strip steel and the voltage output of a magneto-resistive sensor. Therefore, for this stress detection system, the sensitivity of the stress detection was adjusted by adjusting the supply voltage of the magnetoresistance sensor, detection distance, and other relevant parameters. The stress detection experimental results showed that this detection system has good repeatability and linearity. The detection error was controlled within 1.5%. Moreover, the intrinsic factors of the detected strip steel, including thickness, carbon percentage, and crystal orientation, also affected the sensitivity of the detection system. The detection technology proposed in this research enables online contactless detection and meets the requirements for cold-rolled steel strips.

  4. Design and Performance of GMR Sensors for the Detection of Magnetic Microbeads in Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rife, J. C; Miller, M. M; Sheehan, P. E; Tamanaha, C. R; Tondra, M; Whitman, L. J

    2003-01-01

    We are developing a biosensor system, the Bead ARray Counter (BARC), based on the capture and detection of micron-sized, paramagnetic beads on a chip containing an array of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors...

  5. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Hieu Tran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an “MR reader” stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs. The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB over the input range of 0.5–2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm2, while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL is −0.79–0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL is −0.68–0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement

  6. Rapid DNA multi-analyte immunoassay on a magneto-resistance biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koets, M.; Wijk, van der T.; Eemeren, van J.T.W.M.; Amerongen, van A.; Prins, M.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the rapid and sensitive detection of amplified DNA on a giant magneto-resistance sensor using superparamagnetic particles as a detection label. The one-step assay is performed on an integrated and miniaturized detection platform suitable for application into point-of-care devices. A

  7. Reversal of the sign of giant magnetoresistance upon boron filling in RPd{sub 3} compounds (R=Tb,Er)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Abhishek [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata-700098 (India); Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R, E-mail: abhishek.phy@gmail.co, E-mail: chandan.mazumar@saha.ac.i, E-mail: r.ranganathan@saha.ac.i [Experimental Condensed Matter Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2010-01-01

    We report the study of magnetic and transport properties of binary intermetallic compounds RPd{sub 3} (R: Tb and Er) and boron-filled perovskite compounds RPd{sub 3}B. Our results suggest that the magnetic and transport behavior of boron-filled compositions is substantially different compared to that of undoped compounds. For example, TbPd{sub 3} and ErPd{sub 3} exhibit negative magnetoresistance, while boron-filled TbPd{sub 3}B and ErPd{sub 3}B shows positive magnetoresistance. In addition, our results also suggest that there exists a strong correlation between magnetic and electrical-transport behavior of these systems.

  8. A top-contacted extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor fabricated with an unpatterned semiconductor epilayer

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2013-01-01

    An extraordinary magnetoresistance device is developed from an unpatterned semiconductor epilayer onto which the metal contacts are fabricated. Compared with conventionally fabricated devices, for which semiconductor patterning and precise alignment

  9. Optimization of an extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor in the semiconductor-metal hybrid structure

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian; Kosel, Jü rgen; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Soh, Yeongah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show by numerical computation how geometric parameters influence the Extraordinary Magnetoresistance (EMR) effect in an InAs-Au hybrid device. Symmetric IVVI and VIIV configurations were considered. The results show

  10. Origin of the negative giant magnetoresistance effect in Cosub1-x/subCrsubx/sub/Cu/Co (111) trilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bengone, O.; Eriksson, O.; Mirbt, S.; Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 9 (2004), s. 092406 ISSN 0163-1829 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0764 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : multilayers * magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2004

  11. Giant room-temperature magnetoresistance in La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} under the low magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yingtang [Physics of Department, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723003 (China)], E-mail: zhangyingtang76@sina.com; Chen Ziyu [Physics of Department, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: chenzy@buaa.edu.cn; Wang Chunchang; Jie Qiu; Lue Huibin [Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Polycrystalline perovskite La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LTMO) with an orthorhombic phase was synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction. The magnetic and electric properties of La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} were examined. The striking finding is that the material exhibits giant magnetoresistance at room temperature as high as -31.8% and -35.7% under the low magnetic fields of 100 and 1000 Oe, respectively. This result suggests that La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} has a promising potential in future device developments.

  12. Giant magnetoresistance associated with a first-order transition between two ferrimagnetic states in Mn2-xZnxSb (x < 0.3) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y Q; Li, Y B; Du, J; Feng, W J; Li, D; Zhang, Z D

    2008-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistance (GMR) is observed in the Mn 2-x Zn x Sb (x 1.9 Zn 0.1 Sb compound. Different from other Mn 2 Sb-based compounds, the GMR in Mn 2-x Zn x Sb is closely correlated with a field-induced transition from a weak ferrimagnetic (WFI) state to a ferrimagnetic (FI) state. It is understood that the influences of both super-zone gap and spin-dependent scattering are responsible for GMR in the present system. Magnetic hysteresis and phase coexistence of the WFI and the FI phases suggest that this WFI-FI transition is of first order. The different mechanisms responsible for butterfly loops of magnetization/resistivity curves in different magnetic states are discussed

  13. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong; Morsy, Ahmed Mohamed Aly; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  15. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  16. A top-contacted extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor fabricated with an unpatterned semiconductor epilayer

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2013-04-01

    An extraordinary magnetoresistance device is developed from an unpatterned semiconductor epilayer onto which the metal contacts are fabricated. Compared with conventionally fabricated devices, for which semiconductor patterning and precise alignment are required, this design is not only easier from a technological point of view, but it also has the potential to reduce damage introduced to the semiconductor during fabrication. The device shows a similar magnetoresistance ratio as a conventional one but it has a lower sensitivity. Because of the reduced resistance, and hence less noise, high magnetic field resolution is maintained. © 1980-2012 IEEE.

  17. Design of Tunnel Magnetoresistive-Based Circular MFL Sensor Array for the Detection of Flaws in Steel Wire Rope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiucheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel magnetoresistive (TMR devices have superior performances in weak magnetic field detection. In this study, TMR devices were first employed to form a circular magnetic flux leakage (MFL sensor for slight wire rope flaw detection. Two versions of this tailor-made circular TMR-based sensor array were presented for the inspection of wire ropes with the diameters of 14 mm and 40 mm, respectively. Helmholtz-like coils or a ferrite magnet-based magnetizer was selected to provide the proper magnetic field, in order to meet the technical requirements of the TMR devices. The coefficient of variance in the flaw detection performance of the sensor array elements was experimentally estimated at 4.05%. Both versions of the MFL sensor array were able to detect multiple single-broken wire flaws in the wire ropes. The accurate axial and circumferential positions of these broken wire flaws were estimated from the MFL scanning image results. In addition, the proposed TMR-based sensor array was applied to detect the MFL signal induced by slight surface wear defects. A mutual correlation analysis method was used to distinguish the signals caused by the lift-off fluctuation from the MFL scanning image results. The MFL sensor arrays presented in this study provide inspiration for the designing of tailor-made TMR-based circular sensor arrays for cylindrical ferromagnetic structural inspections.

  18. Flexible magnetoimpidence sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Kavaldzhiev, Mincho

    2015-05-01

    Recently, flexible electronic devices have attracted increasing interest, due to the opportunities they promise for new applications such as wearable devices, where the components are required to flex during normal use[1]. In this light, different magnetic sensors, like microcoil, spin valve, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), magnetoimpedance (MI), have been studied previously on flexible substrates.

  19. Correlations between atomic structure and giant magnetoresistance ratio in Co2(Fe,Mn)Si spin valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L; Sizeland, J; Gilks, D; Uddin, G M; Nedelkoski, Z; Hasnip, P J; Lazarov, V K; Yoshida, K; Galindo, P L; Sato, J; Oogane, M; Ando, Y; Hirohata, A

    2014-01-01

    We show that the magnetoresistance of Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si-based spin valves, over 70% at low temperature, is directly related to the structural ordering in the electrodes and at the electrodes/spacer (Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si/Ag) interfaces. Aberration-corrected atomic resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy of device structures reveals that annealing at 350 °C and 500 °C creates partial B2/L2 1 and fully L2 1 ordering of electrodes, respectively. Interface structural studies show that the Ag/Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si interface is more ordered compared to the Co 2 Fe x Mn 1−x Si/Ag interface. The release of interface strain is mediated by misfit dislocations that localize the strain around the dislocation cores, and the effect of this strain is assessed by first principles electronic structure calculations. This study suggests that by improving the atomic ordering and strain at the interfaces, further enhancement of the magnetoresistance of CFMS-based current-perpendicular-to-plane spin valves is possible. (fast track communication)

  20. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  1. Lateral electric-field control of giant magnetoresistance in Co/Cu/Fe/BaTiO{sub 3} multiferroic heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savitha Pillai, S.; Kojima, H.; Itoh, M.; Taniyama, T., E-mail: taniyama.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    We report lateral electric-field-driven sizable changes in the magnetoresistance of Co/Cu/Fe tri-layered wires on BaTiO{sub 3} single crystal. While the observed change is marginal in the tetragonal phase of BaTiO{sub 3}, it reaches over 40% in the orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases with an electric field of 66 kV/cm. We attribute it to possible electric-field-induced variations of the spin-dependent electronic structures, i.e., spin polarization, of the Fe via interfacial strain transfer from BaTiO{sub 3}. The contrasting results for the different phases of BaTiO{sub 3} are discussed, associated with the distinct aspects of the ferroelectric polarization switching processes in each phase.

  2. Lateral electric-field control of giant magnetoresistance in Co/Cu/Fe/BaTiO3 multiferroic heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitha Pillai, S.; Kojima, H.; Itoh, M.; Taniyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report lateral electric-field-driven sizable changes in the magnetoresistance of Co/Cu/Fe tri-layered wires on BaTiO 3 single crystal. While the observed change is marginal in the tetragonal phase of BaTiO 3 , it reaches over 40% in the orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases with an electric field of 66 kV/cm. We attribute it to possible electric-field-induced variations of the spin-dependent electronic structures, i.e., spin polarization, of the Fe via interfacial strain transfer from BaTiO 3 . The contrasting results for the different phases of BaTiO 3 are discussed, associated with the distinct aspects of the ferroelectric polarization switching processes in each phase

  3. Lateral electric-field control of giant magnetoresistance in Co/Cu/Fe/BaTiO3 multiferroic heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha Pillai, S.; Kojima, H.; Itoh, M.; Taniyama, T.

    2015-08-01

    We report lateral electric-field-driven sizable changes in the magnetoresistance of Co/Cu/Fe tri-layered wires on BaTiO3 single crystal. While the observed change is marginal in the tetragonal phase of BaTiO3, it reaches over 40% in the orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases with an electric field of 66 kV/cm. We attribute it to possible electric-field-induced variations of the spin-dependent electronic structures, i.e., spin polarization, of the Fe via interfacial strain transfer from BaTiO3. The contrasting results for the different phases of BaTiO3 are discussed, associated with the distinct aspects of the ferroelectric polarization switching processes in each phase.

  4. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-06-16

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment.

  5. Effect of interface intermixing on giant magnetoresistance in NiFe/Cu and Co/NiFe/Co/Cu multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, L.C.C.M.; Biondo, A.; Pereira, L.G.; Mello, A.; Schmidt, J.E.; Chimendes, T.W.; Cunha, J.B.M.; Saitovitch, E.B.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on the important influence of the spontaneously built-in paramagnetic interfacial layers on the magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of NiFe/Cu and Co/NiFe/Co/Cu multilayers grown by magnetron sputtering. A computational simulation, based on a semiclassical model, has been used to reproduce the variations of the resistivity and of the magnetoresistance (MR) amplitude with the thickness of the NiFe, Cu, and Co layers. We showed that the compositionally intermixed layers at NiFe/Cu interfaces, which are paramagnetic, reduce the flow of polarized electrons and produce a masking on the estimated mean-free path of both types of electrons due to the reduction of their effective values, mainly for small NiFe thickness. Moreover, the transmission coefficients for the electrons decrease when Fe buffer layers are replaced by NiFe ones. This result is interpreted in terms of the variations of the interfacial intermixing and roughness at the interfaces, leading to an increase of the paramagnetic interfacial layer thickness. The effect provoked by Co deposition at the NiFe 16 A/Cu interfaces has also been investigated. The maximum of the MR amplitudes was found at 5 A of Co, resulting in the quadruplication of the MR amplitude. This result is partially attributed to the interfacial spin-dependent scattering due to the increase of the magnetic order at interfaces. Another effect observed here was the increase of the spin-dependent scattering events in the bulk NiFe due to a larger effective NiFe thickness, since the paramagnetic interfacial layer thickness is decreased

  6. Enhanced current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance effect in half-metallic NiMnSb based nanojunctions with multiple Ag spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Zhenchao; Yamamoto, Tatsuya [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kubota, Takahide; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Research Network (CSRN), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2016-06-06

    Current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) heterostructure devices using half-metallic NiMnSb Heusler alloy electrodes with single, dual, and triple Ag spacers were fabricated. The NiMnSb alloy films and Ag spacers show (001) epitaxial growth in all CPP-GMR multilayer structures. The dual-spacer CPP-GMR nanojunction exhibited an enhanced CPP-GMR ratio of 11% (a change in the resistance-area product, ΔRA, of 3.9 mΩ μm{sup 2}) at room temperature, which is approximately twice (thrice) of 6% (1.3 mΩ μm{sup 2}) in the single-spacer device. The enhancement of the CPP-GMR effects in the dual-spacer devices could be attributed to improved interfacial spin asymmetry. Moreover, it was observed that the CPP-GMR ratios increased monotonically as the temperatures decreased. At 4.2 K, a CPP-GMR ratio of 41% (ΔRA = 10.5 mΩ μm{sup 2}) was achieved in the dual-spacer CPP-GMR device. This work indicates that multispacer structures provide an efficient enhancement of CPP-GMR effects in half-metallic material-based CPP-GMR systems.

  7. Effect of nano-oxide layers on giant magnetoresistance in pseudo-spin-valves using Co2FeAl electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.L.; Xu, X.G.; Wu, Y.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the pseudo-spin-valves (PSVs) with a structure of Ta/Co 2 FeAl/NOL 1 /Co 2 FeAl/Cu/Co 2 FeAl/NOL 2 /Ta, where NOL represents the nano-oxide layer. Compared with the normal Co 2 FeAl (CFA) PSV with a structure of Ta/Co 2 FeAl/Cu/Co 2 FeAl/Ta, which shows only a current-in-plane (CIP) giant magnetoresistance (GMR) of 0.03%, the CFA PSV with NOLs shows a large CIP-GMR of 5.84%. The enhanced GMR by the NOLs inserted in the CFA PSV is due to the large specular reflection caused by [(CoO)(Fe 2 O 3 )(Al 2 O 3 )] in NOL 1 and [(Fe 2 O 3 )(Al 2 O 3 )(Ta 2 O 5 )] in NOL 2 . Another reason is that the roughness of the interface between Ta and CFA is improved by the oxidation procedure. - Research highlights: → Nano-oxide layers are applied in the pseudo-spin-valves with the Heusler alloy. → The CIP-GMR of pseudo-spin-valves is improved from 0.03% to 5.84%. → The GMR ratio is decided by the position of nano-oxide layers.

  8. Two Stage Growth of Dispersed Nanoparticle Layers Suitable for Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kummel, Andrews

    1999-01-01

    .... Since silver is much more difficult to etch than iron due to the lack of volatile silver halides, this spontaneous coating of Fe by Ag explains the difficulty etching Fe particles deposited on Ag substrates. (b...

  9. Optimization of an extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor in the semiconductor-metal hybrid structure

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show by numerical computation how geometric parameters influence the Extraordinary Magnetoresistance (EMR) effect in an InAs-Au hybrid device. Symmetric IVVI and VIIV configurations were considered. The results show that the width and the length-width ratio of InAs are important geometrical parameters for the EMR effect along with the placement of the leads. Approximately the same EMR effect was obtained for both IVVI and VIIV configurations when the applied magnetic field ranged from -1T to 1T. In an optimized geometry the EMR effect can reach 43000% at 1Tesla for IVVI and 42700% at 1 Tesla for the VIIV configuration. ©2010 IEEE.

  10. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) Sensors in Differential Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huaming; Wang, Kan; Ji, Xiaojun; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-12-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs). The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line) while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction.

  11. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR Sensors in Differential Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaming Lei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs. The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction.

  12. Magnetoresistive multilayers deposited on the AAO membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkinski, Leszek M.; Chalastaras, Athanasios; Vovk, Andriy; Jung, Jin-Seung; Kim, Eun-Mee; Jun, Jong-Ho; Ventrice, Carl A.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon and GaAs wafers are the most commonly used substrates for deposition of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) multilayers. We explored a new type of a substrate, prepared electrochemically by anodization of aluminum sheets, for deposition of GMR multilayers. The surface of this AAO substrate consists of nanosized hemispheres organized in a regular hexagonal array. The current applied along the substrate surface intersects many magnetic layers in the multilayered structure, which results in enhancement of giant magnetoresistance effect. The GMR effect in uncoupled Co/Cu multilayers was significantly larger than the magnetoresistance of similar structures deposited on Si

  13. Finite element analysis on the influence of contact resistivity in an extraordinary magnetoresistance magnetic field micro sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2011-08-06

    In this paper, an extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device made of an InSb/Au hybrid structure was investigated. Those devices have a large potential in becoming a new generation of highly sensitive and cheap magnetic micro sensors. A crucial factor for the performance is the interface between the InSb and Au, which suffers from a certain contact resistivity. The Finite Element Method (FEM) was employed to simulate the current redistribution in the device, under an applied magnetic field. Specifically, the influence of the contact resistivity between the InSb bulk and Au shunt was studied. In a device with optimized geometry and without contact resistivity between the layers of InSb and Au, the EMR effect and the sensitivity show values of 1.89 × 104% and 0.02%/(10-4 T), respectively, at 1 Tesla. For values of contact resistivity up to 10-8cm2 the EMR effect is almost constant, while for higher values the EMR effect decreases exponentially. However, the sensitivity of the device does not decrease until 5 × 10-6 cm2 of contact resistivity. Only beyond this value the sensitivity, which in most cases is associated with the performance of the device, will deteriorate. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  14. Deposition temperature influence on sputtered nanogranular magnetoresistive composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujika, M.; Arana, S.; Castano, E.

    2007-01-01

    Among different physical principles magnetic sensors for low magnetic field detection can be based on, granular giant magnetoresistances have been studied due to their high sensitivity to small field changes and gradual magnetoresistance change at low fields. Following this aim, nanogranular Ag-Co thin films, deposited by DC co-sputtering from Ag and Co targets at different deposition temperatures have been tested. Samples have been grown at room temperature, 100 and 200 deg. C and annealed in a mixture of N 2 and H 2 at 200 and 300 deg. C for 45 min. The samples that have shown the best performance have been subjected to two sets of measurements where an external field has been applied in-plane and perpendicular to the film plane. The best performance has been shown by the samples deposited at room temperature and annealed at 300 deg. C, reporting a maximum value of magnetoresistance of 16.7% at 1.4 T and a linear sensitivity of 63%/T between 0.04 and 0.07 T within a magnetoresistance range varying from 1.5% to 3% when subjected to an in-plane external field

  15. Hall effect enhanced low-field sensitivity in a three-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    be attributed to an additional influence coming from the Hall effect. Output sensitivities of 0.19 mV/T at zero-field and 0.2 mV/T at 0.01 T have been measured in the device, which is equivalent to the ones of the conventional EMR sensors with a bias of ∼0.04 T

  16. Application of magnetic sensors in automation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Chunhong [AMETEK Inc., Paoli, PA 19301 (United States); Qian Zhenghong, E-mail: zqian@hdu.edu.cn [Center For Integrated Spintronic Devices (CISD), Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, ZJ 310018 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Controls in automation need speed and position feedback. The feedback device is often referred to as encoder. Feedback technology includes mechanical, optical, and magnetic, etc. All advance with new inventions and discoveries. Magnetic sensing as a feedback technology offers certain advantages over other technologies like optical one. With new discoveries like GMR (Giant Magneto-Resistance), TMR (Tunneling Magneto-Resistance) becoming feasible for commercialization, more and more applications will be using advanced magnetic sensors in automation. This paper offers a general review on encoder and applications of magnetic sensors in automation control.

  17. Large, Linear, and Tunable Positive Magnetoresistance of Mechanically Stable Graphene Foam-Toward High-Performance Magnetic Field Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Wan, Caihua; Shehzad, Khurram; Navale, Sachin T; Anwar, Tauseef; Mane, Rajaram S; Piao, Hong-Guang; Ali, Abid; Stadler, Florian J

    2017-01-18

    Here, we present the first observation of magneto-transport properties of graphene foam (GF) composed of a few layers in a wide temperature range of 2-300 K. Large room-temperature linear positive magnetoresistance (PMR ≈ 171% at B ≈ 9 T) has been detected. The largest PMR (∼213%) has been achieved at 2 K under a magnetic field of 9 T, which can be tuned by the addition of poly(methyl methacrylate) to the porous structure of the foam. This remarkable magnetoresistance may be the result of quadratic magnetoresistance. The excellent magneto-transport properties of GF open a way toward three-dimensional graphene-based magnetoelectronic devices.

  18. Development of micronic GMR-magnetoresistive sensors for non-destructive sensing applications (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrès, Henri; LeMaitre, Yves; Collin, Sophie; Nguyen Vandau, Frédéric; Sergeeva-Chollet, Natalia; Decitre, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    We will present our last development of GMR-based magnetic sensors devoted to sensing application for non-destructive control application. In these first realizations, we have chosen a so-called shape anisotropy - exchange biased strategy to fulfill the field-sensing criteria in the μT range in devices made of micronic single elements. Our devices realized by optical lithography, and whose typical sizes range from 150 μm x 150 μm to 500 μm x 500 μm elements, are made of trilayers GMR-based technology and consist of several circuitries of GMR elements of different lengths, widths and gaps. To obtain a full sensing linearity and reversibility requiring a perpendicular magnetic arrangement between both sensitive and hard layer, the magnetization of the latter have been hardened by pinning it with an antiferromagnetic material. The specific geometry of the design have been engineered in order to optimize the magnetic response of the soft layer via the different magnetic torques exerted on it essentially played by the dipolar fields or shape anisotropy, and the external magnetic field to detect. The smaller dimensions in width and in gap are then respectively of 2 μm and 3 μm to benefit of the full shape anisotropy formatting the magnetic response.

  19. Perpendicular-current giant magnetoresistance of M/Cu/M(001) junctions (M=Fe, Co, or Ni): An ab initio study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlaic, P.; Alouani, M.; Dreysse, H.; Bengone, O.; Turek, Ilja

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 8 (2004), s. 4352-4356 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : metallic multilayers * magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2004

  20. Relation of Giant Thermo-EMF, Magnetothermo-EMF, Magnetoresistance, and Magnetization to Magnetic Impurity States in Manganites Nd(1- x)Sr x MnO3 and Sm(1- x)Sr x MnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, L. I.; Batashev, I. K.; Morozov, A. S.; Balbashov, A. M.; Szymczak, H.; Slawska-Waniew, A.

    2018-02-01

    Thermo-EMF, magnetothermo-EMF, magnetoresistance, and magnetization of single-crystal samples of Nd(1- x)Sr x MnO3 and Sm(1- x)Sr x MnO3 with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3 have been studied experimentally. A sharp increase in the thermo-EMF and giant magnetothermo-EMF and magnetoresistance has been observed near the Curie point T C in compounds with 0.15 ≤ x ≤ 0.3. At the same time, no peculiarities have been found in compositions with x = 0. Since compounds with x > 0 consist of ferromagnetic clusters of the ferron type that reside in an antiferromagnetic A-type matrix, this means that the sharp increase in the thermo-EMF near T C is caused by ferrons. Indeed, the disappearance of ferrons due to a magnetic field or heating above T C leads to an abrupt decrease in the thermo-EMF. Therefore, thermo-EMF in alloyed magnetic semiconductors has been determined by the impurity concentration and the sample volume.

  1. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L.; Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF 2 exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF 2 doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  2. Feedback-type giant magneto-impedance sensor based on longitudinal excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wen; Bu Xiongzhu; Yu Geliang; Xiang Chao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of Fe-based amorphous ribbon based on the longitudinal excitation are investigated with assistance of the theory of the giant magneto-impedance (GMI) effect. A feedback-type GMI micro-magnetic sensor is designed with regard to the design of the sensing element, the excitation circuit, the conditional circuit and the feedback circuit. With the analysis of the dynamic and static characteristics of the feedback-type GMI sensor, it is concluded that the designed feedback-type GMI sensor has higher linearity, stability and dynamic characteristics than non-feedback-type GMI sensor in −2.5 to +2.5 Oe. - Highlights: ► A feedback-type GMI micro-magnetic sensor is designed. ► Excitation coil and feedback coil of the sensor is designed to be in one. ► The feedback-type sensor has higher linearity and stability than non-feedback type. ► The feedback-type sensor has better dynamic characteristics than non-feedback type.

  3. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y B; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-27

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~10(5)%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2.

  4. Integration of thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-03-09

    Passive and remote sensing technology has many potential applications in implantable devices, automation, or structural monitoring. In this paper, a tri-layer thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor with the maximum sensitivity of 16%/Oe and GMI ratio of 44% was combined with a two-port surface acoustic wave(SAW) transponder on a common substrate using standard microfabrication technology resulting in a fully integrated sensor for passive and remote operation. The implementation of the two devices has been optimized by on-chip matching circuits. The measurement results clearly show a magnetic field response at the input port of the SAW transponder that reflects the impedance change of the GMI sensor.

  5. Integration of thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong; Salem, Nedime Pelin M. H.; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    Passive and remote sensing technology has many potential applications in implantable devices, automation, or structural monitoring. In this paper, a tri-layer thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor with the maximum sensitivity of 16%/Oe and GMI ratio of 44% was combined with a two-port surface acoustic wave(SAW) transponder on a common substrate using standard microfabrication technology resulting in a fully integrated sensor for passive and remote operation. The implementation of the two devices has been optimized by on-chip matching circuits. The measurement results clearly show a magnetic field response at the input port of the SAW transponder that reflects the impedance change of the GMI sensor.

  6. Development of chipless, wireless current sensor system based on giant magnetoimpedance magnetic sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondalkar, Vijay V; Li, Xiang; Park, Ikmo; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Keekeun

    2018-02-05

    A chipless, wireless current sensor system was developed using a giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) magnetic sensor and one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line for real-time power monitoring in a current-carrying conductor. The GMI sensor has a high-quality crystalline structure in each layer, which contributes to a high sensitivity and good linearity in a magnetic field of 3-16 Oe. A 400 MHz RF energy generated from the interdigital transducer (IDT)-type reflector on the one-port SAW delay line was used as an activation source for the GMI magnetic sensor. The one-port SAW delay line replaces the presently existing transceiver system, which is composed of thousands of transistors, thus enabling chipless and wireless operation. We confirmed a large variation in the amplitude of the SAW reflection peak with a change in the impedance of the GMI sensor caused by the current flow through the conductor. Good linearity and sensitivity of ~0.691 dB/A were observed for currents in the range 1-12 A. Coupling of Mode (COM) modeling and impedance matching analysis were also performed to predict the device performance in advance and these were compared with the experimental results.

  7. DC and AC linear magnetic field sensor based on glass coated amorphous microwires with Giant Magnetoimpedance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Chocano, Víctor Manuel; García-Miquel, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Giant Magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect has been studied in amorphous glass-coated microwires of composition (Fe 6 Co 94 ) 72.5 Si 12.5 B 15 . The impedance of a 1.5 cm length sample has been characterized by using constant AC currents in the range of 400 µA–4 mA at frequencies from 7 to 15 MHz and DC magnetic fields from −900 to 900 A/m. Double peak responses have been obtained, showing GMI ratios up to 107%. A linear magnetic field sensor for DC and AC field has been designed, using two microwires connected in series with a magnetic bias of 400 A/m with opposite direction in each microwire in order to obtain a linear response from ±70 (A/m) rms for AC magnetic field, and ±100 A/m for DC magnetic field. A closed loop feedback circuit has been implemented to extend the linear range to ±1 kA/m for DC magnetic field. - Highlights: • Giant Magneto Impedance phenomenon has been studied in amorphous microwires. • A combination of two microwires with a bias field has been developed to get a linear response. • An electronic circuit has been developed to obtain a sensor with a linear response. • A feedback coil have been added to increase the measurable range of the sensor

  8. Giant magnetoresistance on low field in non-stoichiometric La2/3Ca1/3Mn1-xO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lifeng; Chen Wei; Shang Jingling; Chen Lei; Liu Sheng; Xia Zhengcai; Yuan Songliu

    2005-01-01

    Electrical transport and low field magnetoresistance (MR) are reported in the La 2/3 Ca 1/3 Mn 1-x O 3 (x = 0-0.16) samples, which are prepared by the sol-gel method followed by a sintering treatment at 1100 0 C. Experimental results show, for x = 0.06, an MR platform is observed in a temperature ∼200 K under the magnetic field of 0.5 T. With an increase in x, the MR effect gets augmented. For the sample with x = 0.16, its MR peak is as high as 50%

  9. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Mitsunobu, E-mail: okuda.m-ky@nhk.or.jp; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto [NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  10. Controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles by a magnetic microactuator and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kokkinis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an integrated micro-chip for the controlled trapping and detection of magnetic particles (MPs). A unique magnetic micro-actuator consisting of square-shaped conductors is used to manipulate the MPs

  11. Room temperature giant positive junction magnetoresistance of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/n-Si heterojunction for spintronics application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, J.; Saha, S.N.; Nath, T.K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2014-09-01

    Electronic- and magnetic-transport properties of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NFO)–SiO{sub 2}–Si heterojunction fabricated by depositing NFO thin films on silicon substrates with the intermediate native oxide (SiO{sub 2}) layer have been investigated in details. The current–voltage (I–V) characteristics across the junction have been recorded in the temperature range of 10–300 K. All I–V curves show non-linear behavior throughout the temperature range. The dominating current transport mechanism is found to be temperature dependent tunneling assisted by Frenkel–Poole type emission. In this paper, we report the junction magnetoresistance (JMR) properties of this heterojunction in the temperature range of 10–300 K. With increasing temperature, the JMR of the heterojunction increases accordingly. The high positive JMR (∼54%) has been observed at room temperature (RT). The origin of high positive JMR at RT is attributed to efficient spin-polarized carrier transport across the junction.

  12. Spin valve-like magnetic tunnel diode exhibiting giant positive junction magnetoresistance at low temperature in Co2MnSi/SiO2/p-Si heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Nilay; Kar, Uddipta; Nath, T. K.

    2018-02-01

    The rectifying magnetic tunnel diode has been fabricated by growing Co2MnSi (CMS) Heusler alloy film carefully on a properly cleaned p-Si (100) substrate with the help of electron beam physical vapor deposition technique and its structural, electrical and magnetic properties have been experimentally investigated in details. The electronic- and magneto-transport properties at various isothermal conditions have been studied in the temperature regime of 78-300 K. The current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics of the junction show an excellent rectifying magnetic tunnel diode-like behavior throughout that temperature regime. The current ( I) across the junction has been found to decrease with the application of a magnetic field parallel to the plane of the CMS film clearly indicating positive junction magnetoresistance (JMR) of the heterostructure. When forward dc bias is applied to the heterostructure, the I- V characteristics are highly influenced on turning on the field B = 0.5 T at 78 K, and the forward current reduces abruptly (99.2% current reduction at 3 V) which is nearly equal to the order of the magnitude of the current observed in the reverse bias. Hence, our Co2MnSi/SiO2/p-Si heterostructure can perform in off ( I off)/on ( I on) states with the application of non-zero/zero magnetic field like a spin valve at low temperature (78 K).

  13. The effect of shape anisotropy in giant magnetostrictive fiber Bragg grating sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, C J; Bruno, A C

    2010-01-01

    We study the role of shape anisotropy on the strain response of magnetic field sensors based on square cuboids with giant magnetostriction and fiber Bragg gratings. We measured a maximum sensitivity of 18 µε mT −1 when a biasing uniform field of 15 mT was applied to a Tb 0.3 Dy 0.7 Fe 1.92 cuboid with an aspect ratio of 5.0. When gradient fields were applied, we were able to measure a significant change in the magnetostrictive response at different positions, attaching fiber Bragg gratings along the cuboid face containing the main magnetostrictive axis. Depending on the magnitude of the applied gradient, the magnetostrictive response was reduced by up to 34%

  14. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kodzius, Rimantas; Li, Fuquan; Foulds, Ian G.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads® demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead® SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads® travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device

  15. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2016-08-26

    The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA) for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs), and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads® demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead® SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads® travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device

  16. On-Chip Magnetic Bead Manipulation and Detection Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor-Based Micro-Chip: Design Considerations and Experimental Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka P. Gooneratne

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable advantages micro-chip platforms offer over cumbersome, time-consuming equipment currently in use for bio-analysis are well documented. In this research, a micro-chip that includes a unique magnetic actuator (MA for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs, and a magnetoresistive sensor for the detection of SPBs is presented. A design methodology, which takes into account the magnetic volume of SPBs, diffusion and heat transfer phenomena, is presented with the aid of numerical analysis to optimize the parameters of the MA. The MA was employed as a magnetic flux generator and experimental analysis with commercially available COMPEL™ and Dynabeads® demonstrated the ability of the MA to precisely transport a small number of SPBs over long distances and concentrate SPBs to a sensing site for detection. Moreover, the velocities of COMPEL™ and Dynabead® SPBs were correlated to their magnetic volumes and were in good agreement with numerical model predictions. We found that 2.8 μm Dynabeads® travel faster, and can be attracted to a magnetic source from a longer distance, than 6.2 μm COMPEL™ beads at magnetic flux magnitudes of less than 10 mT. The micro-chip system could easily be integrated with electronic circuitry and microfluidic functions, paving the way for an on-chip biomolecule quantification device.

  17. Large magnetoresistance tunnelling through a magnetically modulated nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Maowang; Zhang Lide

    2003-01-01

    Based on a combination of an inhomogeneous magnetic field and a two-dimensional electron gas, we have constructed a giant magnetoresistance nanostructure, which can be realized experimentally by the deposition of two parallel ferromagnetic strips on top of a semiconductor heterostructure. We have theoretically studied the magnetoresistance for electrons tunnelling through this nanostructure. It is shown that there exists a significant transmission difference between the parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations, which leads to a large magnetoresistance. It is also shown that the magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends not only on incident electronic energy but also on the ferromagnetic strips, and thus a much larger magnetoresistance ratio can be obtained by properly fabricating the ferromagnetic strips in the system

  18. New type magnetoresistance in Co/Si systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Takai, K.; Mitarai, Y.; Harada, H.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) properties in both the sputter-deposited Co/Si multilayers and the system consisting of Co evaporated on the anodized Si have been examined. In the Co/Si multilayers, at room temperature both the sharp ordinary magnetoresistance (OMR) and the negative granular-type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) appear, while at low temperatures only the large OMR of about 3.5% is observed for in-plane field. In the Co/anodized-Si system, at room temperature the MR is negligibly small, while it increases steeply with decreasing temperature and very large OMR of about 22% is obtained at 110 K for perpendicular field

  19. Anomalous magnetisation process in UFe4Al8 probed by magnetisation and magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinho, M.; Estrela, P.; Goncalves, A.P.; Almeida, M.; Spirlet, J.C.; Bonfait, G.

    1996-01-01

    A strong anisotropic magnetoresistance has been measured in a single crystal of UFe 4 Al 8 and has been used to prove the ferromagnetic order of the U lattice. The giant anomaly detected in the magnetoresistance curves is interpreted as two 90 rotations of the magnetisation. This interpretation has been confirmed by magnetisation measurements. (orig.)

  20. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina

    2017-01-01

    specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection...

  1. The Impact of Bending Stress on the Performance of Giant Magneto-Impedance (GMI Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nabias

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The flexibility of amorphous Giant Magneto-Impedance (GMI micro wires makes them easy to use in several magnetic field sensing applications, such as electrical current sensing, where they need to be deformed in order to be aligned with the measured field. The present paper deals with the bending impact, as a parameter of influence of the sensor, on the GMI effect in 100 µm Co-rich amorphous wires. Changes in the values of key parameters associated with the GMI effect have been investigated under bending stress. These parameters included the GMI ratio, the intrinsic sensitivity, and the offset at a given bias field. The experimental results have shown that bending the wire resulted in a reduction of GMI ratio and sensitivity. The bending also induced a net change in the offset for the considered bending curvature and the set of used excitation parameters (1 MHz, 1 mA. Furthermore, the field of the maximum impedance, which is generally related to the anisotropy field of the wire, was increased. The reversibility and the repeatability of the bending effect were also evaluated by applying repetitive bending stresses. The observations have actually shown that the behavior of the wire under the bending stress was roughly reversible and repetitive.

  2. Colossal magnetoresistance manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Manganites; colossal magnetoresistance; strongly correlated electron systems; metal-insulator transitions and other electronic transitions; Jahn-Teller polarons and electron-phonon interaction.

  3. Thin-film magnetoresistive absolute position detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, J.P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of a digital absolute posi- tion-detection system, which is based on a position-information carrier (i.e. a magnetic tape) with one single code track on the one hand, and an array of magnetoresistive sensors for the detection of the information on the

  4. Magnetoresistive biosensors for quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahan; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hall, Drew A.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics, as a developing method for study of proteins and identification of diseases, reveals more comprehensive and accurate information of an organism than traditional genomics. A variety of platforms, such as mass spectrometry, optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, magnetic sensors, etc., have been developed for detecting proteins quantitatively. The sandwich immunoassay is widely used as a labeled detection method due to its high specificity and flexibility allowing multiple different types of labels. While optical sensors use enzyme and fluorophore labels to detect proteins with high sensitivity, they often suffer from high background signal and challenges in miniaturization. Magnetic biosensors, including nuclear magnetic resonance sensors, oscillator-based sensors, Hall-effect sensors, and magnetoresistive sensors, use the specific binding events between magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and target proteins to measure the analyte concentration. Compared with other biosensing techniques, magnetic sensors take advantage of the intrinsic lack of magnetic signatures in biological samples to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity, and are compatible with semiconductor-based fabrication process to have low-cost and small-size for point-of-care (POC) applications. Although still in the development stage, magnetic biosensing is a promising technique for in-home testing and portable disease monitoring.

  5. Dependence of Fe/Cr superlattice magnetoresistance on orientation of external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustinov, V.V.; Romashev, L.N.; Minin, V.I.; Semerikov, A.V.; Del', A.R.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into giant magnetoresistance of [Fe/Cr] 30 /MgO superlattices obtained using molecular-beam epitaxy under various orientations of magnetic field relatively to the layers of superlattice and to the direction of current flow. Theory of orientation dependence of superlattice magnetoresistance enabling to describe satisfactorily behaviour of magnetoresistance at arbitrary direction of magnetic field on the ground of results of magnetoresistance measurements in magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to plane of layers, is elaborated. It is pointed out that it is possible to obtain field dependence of superlattice magnetization on the ground of measurement results. 9 refs., 6 figs

  6. Magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistance in Co-based multilayers: a polarised neutron reflectivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects by carrying out magnetization, magnetoresistance and polarized neutron reflectivity measurements on epitaxial Co/Re multilayers. Polarized neutron reflectivity study with polarization analysis gives a direct way to sense the direction of sublattice magnetization and coupling between magnetic layers. The evolution of magnetic structure as a function of the strength and direction of the applied magnetic field has been studied. The AMR effect observed in magnetoresistance study has been explained in the light of observed magnetic structure. (author)

  7. Rancang Bangun Sistem Pengukur Kecepatan Kendaraan Menggunakan Sensor Magnetik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Ramdhani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Data kecepatan kendaran di jalan raya sangat berpengaruh bagi keamanan dan keselamatan pengguna jalan raya. Kemajuan tekhnologi sensor sangat membantu dalam mengukur kecepatan kendaraan dengan otomatis. Metode yang umum dipakai ialah metode dengan menggunakan dua buah rangkaian sensor yang sudah diatur pada jarak tertentu. Sensor digunakan sebagai pendeteksi keberadaan kendaraan. Data kecepatan kendaraan didapatkan dengan mencari selang waktu yang dibutuhkan kendaraan melaju dari sensor pertama menuju sensor kedua. Saat kendaraan melaju melewati sensor maka sinyal keluaran sensor menjadi acuan perhitungan waktu start dan stop. Berbagai jenis sensor yang sudah digunakan ialah sensor LDR, sensor ultrasonic, sensor laser, sensor loop induktif dan sensor kamera. Setiap sensor yang sudah dipergunakan memiliki berbagai jenis kekurangan dalam mendeteksi kendaraan pada jalan raya. Oleh karena itu penulis memunculkan ide baru dengan menggunakan sensor magnetik yang memiliki faktor gangguan eksternal yang rendah. Sensor magnetik yang digunakan ialah sensor Giant MagnetoResistance (GMR. Perancangan sistem pengukur kecepatan kendaraan yang penulis lakukan berupa sebuah prototype. Hasil pengujian sistem pengukur kecepatan kendaraan menggunakan sensor magnetik GMR menunjukan respon yang bagus saat pengujian dilakukan pada jarak 30cm dan 70cm antara dua buah sensor GMR. Data speed of vehicles on the highway are very influential to the security and safety of users of the highway. Advances in sensor technology is very helpful in measuring the speed of vehicles with automatic. A common method used is the method by using two sensor circuit which is set at a certain distance. The sensor is used as a detector for the exixtance of the vehicle. Vehicle speed data obtained by finding the time required vehicles drove from the first sensor to the second sensor. When the vehicle drove past the sensor, the sensor output signal to be a reference calculation start and stop

  8. Big magnetoresistance: magnetic polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresa, J.M. de; Ibarra, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    By using several macro and microscopic experimental techniques we have given evidence for magnetoresistance in manganese oxides caused by the effect of the magnetic field on the magnetic polarons. (Author) 3 refs

  9. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felber, F.S.; Hunter, R.O. Jr.; Pereira, N.R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-01-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed

  10. Eddy current probe development based on a magnetic sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacher, F.

    2007-06-01

    This research deals with in the study of the use of innovating magnetic sensors in eddy current non destructive inspection. The author reports an analysis survey of magnetic sensor performances. This survey enables the selection of magnetic sensor technologies used in non destructive inspection. He presents the state-of-the-art of eddy current probes exploiting the qualities of innovating magnetic sensors, and describes the methods enabling the use of these magnetic sensors in non destructive testing. Two main applications of innovating magnetic sensors are identified: the detection of very small defects by means of magneto-resistive sensors, and the detection of deep defects by means of giant magneto-impedances. Based on the use of modelling, optimization, signal processing tools, probes are manufactured for these both applications

  11. Large linear magnetoresistivity in strongly inhomogeneous planar and layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgadaev, S.A.; Kusmartsev, F.V.

    2005-01-01

    Explicit expressions for magnetoresistance R of planar and layered strongly inhomogeneous two-phase systems are obtained, using exact dual transformation, connecting effective conductivities of in-plane isotropic two-phase systems with and without magnetic field. These expressions allow to describe the magnetoresistance of various inhomogeneous media at arbitrary concentrations x and magnetic fields H. All expressions show large linear magnetoresistance effect with different dependencies on the phase concentrations. The corresponding plots of the x- and H-dependencies of R(x,H) are represented for various values, respectively, of magnetic field and concentrations at some values of inhomogeneity parameter. The obtained results show a remarkable similarity with the existing experimental data on linear magnetoresistance in silver chalcogenides Ag 2+δ Se. A possible physical explanation of this similarity is proposed. It is shown that the random, stripe type, structures of inhomogeneities are the most suitable for a fabrication of magnetic sensors and a storage of information at room temperatures

  12. Modeling the planar configuration of extraordinary magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ahmar, S; Pozniak, A A

    2015-01-01

    Recently the planar version of the extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) magnetic field sensor has been constructed and verified in practice. Planar configuration of the EMR device gives many technological advantages, it is simpler than the classic and allows one to build the sensor using electric materials of the new type (such as graphene or topological insulators) much easier. In this work the planar configuration of the EMR sensor is investigated by performing computational simulations using the finite element method (FEM). The computational comparison of the planar and classic configurations of EMR is presented using three-dimensional models. Various variants of the geometry of EMR sensor components are pondered and compared in the planar and classic version. Size of the metal overlap is considered for sensor optimization as well as various semiconductor-metal contact resistance dependences of the EMR signal. Based on computational simulations, a method for optimal placement of electric terminals in a planar EMR device is proposed. (paper)

  13. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamopoulos, D; Aristomenopoulou, E

    2015-08-26

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent 'on' and 'off', thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  14. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mazhar N; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D; Schoop, Leslie M; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-10-09

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity.

  15. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-09

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform.

  16. Rancang Bangun Prototype Counter Mobil Menggunakan Sensor Giant Magnetic Resistance (Gmr Berbasis Mikrokontroler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Ardiansyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kapadatan lalu lintas salah satunya diakibatkan pertambahan jumlah mobil yang tidak seimbang dengan pertambahan panjang jalan. Data kepadatan lalu lintas dapat menjadi informasi yang berguna untuk statistik pengembangan jalan dan pengguna jalan. Data tersebut didapatkan dengan cara menghitung manual ataupun dengan detektor yang ditanam pada jalan atau kamera CCTV. Namun, cara tersebut tidak efisien karena data yang didapat membutuhkan sumber daya manusia dan sumber dana yang besar. Pada penelitian ini, telah dirancang sistem sederhana yang dapat mendeteksi frekuensi atau jumlah kepadatan mobil tiap satuan waktu. Data diperoleh dengan mikrokontroler berbasis arduino yang menggunakan sensor magnet GMR sebagai input. Ketika kendaraan diatas telah melewati sistem, mikrokontroler memproses sinyal yang diterima dari sensor untuk mendapatkan data jumlah kendaraan. Serta LCD karakter 2x16 sebagai penampil data. Data yang diperoleh kemudian dapat digunakan untuk otomatisasi penggukur kemacetan dan sistem kontrol lalu lintas lainnya, menggantikan sistem detektor yang ditanam pada jalan raya dan video kamera dimalam hari dan untuk menutupi daerah yang tidak terjangkau. Hasil penelitian menujukan bahwa sensor mempunyai tingkat akurasi pengukuran 94,66%, serta mempunyai tingkat presisi yang cukup baik. Traffic data frequency can be beneficial for statistic extended road method and road user. Data may be found from manual counter or using detector implanted to the road or CCTV camera. However, that method not efficient because need operator in order to obtained the data and expensive cost. In this research, already planned a simple systemtraffic vehicle counter or vehicle quantity by the time. Data obtained by microcontroller Arduino UNO with magnetic sensor (GMR attached as input. When a vehicle passes above the circuit system, a microcontroller processes signal of sensor to obtain data quantity of vehicle. And also character LCD 2x16 as display data

  17. Anomalous magnetoresistance in amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menko, V.M.; Vladychkin, A.N.; Mel'nikov, V.I.; Sudovtsev, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of amorphous Bi, Ca, V and Yb films is investigated in fields up to 4 T at low temperatures. For all metals the magnetoresistance is positive, sharply decreases with growth of temperature and depends anomalously on the magnetic field strength. For amorphous superconductors the results agree satisfactorily with the theory of anomalous magnetoresistance in which allowance is made for scattering of electrons by the superconducting fluctuations

  18. Superconducting Film Flux Transformer for a Sensor of a Weak Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichkitidze, L; Mironyuk, A

    2012-01-01

    The object of study is a superconducting film flux transformer in the form of a square shaped loop with the tapering operative strip used in a sensor of a weak magnetic field. The magnetosensitive film element based on the giant magnetoresistance effect is overlapped with the tapering operative strip of the flux transformer; it is separated from the latter by the insulator film. It is shown that the topological nanostructuring of the operative strip of the flux transformer increases its gain factor by one or more orders of magnitude, i.e. increases its efficiency, which leads to a significant improvement of important parameters of a magnetic-field sensor.

  19. Effects of the thermal and magnetic paths on first order martensite transition of disordered Ni45Mn44Sn9In2 Heusler alloy exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect and magnetoresistance near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabri, T.; Ghosh, A.; Nair, Sunil; Awasthi, A. M.; Venimadhav, A.; Nath, T. K.

    2018-05-01

    The existence of a first order martensite transition in off-stoichiometric Ni45Mn44Sn9In2 ferromagnetic shape memory Heusler alloy has been clearly observed by thermal, magnetic, and magneto-transport measurements. Field and thermal path dependence of the change in large magnetic entropy and negative magnetoresistance are observed, which originate due to the sharp change in magnetization driven by metamagnetic transition from the weakly magnetic martensite phase to the ferromagnetic austenite phase in the vicinity of the martensite transition. The noticeable shift in the martensite transition with the application of a magnetic field is the most significant feature of the present study. This shift is due to the interplay of the austenite and martensite phase fraction in the alloy. The different aspects of the first order martensite transition, e.g. broadening of the martensite transition and the field induced arrest of the austenite phase are mainly related to the dynamics of coexisting phases in the vicinity of the martensite transition. The alloy also shows a second order ferromagnetic  →  paramagnetic transition near the Curie temperature of the austenite phase. A noticeably large change in magnetic entropy (ΔS M   =  24 J kg‑1 K‑1 at 298 K) and magnetoresistance (=  ‑33% at 295 K) has been observed for the change in 5 and 8 T magnetic fields, respectively. The change in adiabatic temperature for the change in a magnetic field of 5 T is found to be  ‑3.8 K at 299 K. The low cost of the ingredients and the large change in magnetic entropy very near to the room temperature makes Ni45Mn44Sn9In2 alloy a promising magnetic refrigerant for real technological application.

  20. Percolative Theory of Organic Magnetoresistance and Fringe-Field Magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    2013-03-01

    A recently-introduced percolation theory for spin transport and magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors describes the effects of spin dynamics on hopping transport by considering changes in the effective density of hopping sites, a key quantity determining the properties of percolative transport. Increases in the spin-flip rate open up ``spin-blocked'' pathways to become viable conduction channels and hence, as the spin-flip rate changes with magnetic field, produce magnetoresistance. Features of this percolative magnetoresistance can be found analytically in several regimes, and agree with measurements of the shape and saturation of measured magnetoresistance curves. We find that the threshold hopping distance is analogous to the branching parameter of a phenomenological two-site model, and that the distinction between slow and fast hopping is contingent on the threshold hopping distance. Regimes of slow and fast hopping magnetoresistance are uniquely characterized by their line shapes. Studies of magnetoresistance in known systems with controllable positional disorder would provide an additional stringent test of this theory. Extensions to this theory also describe fringe-field magnetoresistance, which is the influence of fringe magnetic fields from a nearby unsaturated magnetic electrode on the conductance of an organic film. This theory agrees with several key features of the experimental fringe-field magnetoresistance, including the applied fields where the magnetoresistance reaches extrema, the applied field range of large magnetoresistance effects from the fringe fields, and the sign of the effect. All work done in collaboration with N. J. Harmon, and fringe-field magnetoresistance work in collaboration also with F. Macià, F. Wang, M. Wohlgenannt and A. D. Kent. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.

  1. Transverse thermal magnetoresistance of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newrock, R.S.; Maxfield, B.W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of extensive thermal magnetoresistance measurements on single-crystal and polycrystalline specimens of potassium having residual resistance ratios (RRR) ranging from 1100 to 5300. Measurements were made between 2 and 9 0 K for magnetic fields up to 1.8 T. The observed thermal magnetoresistance cannot be understood on the basis of either semiclassical theories or from the electrical magnetoresistance and the Wiedemann-Franz law. A number of relationships are observed between the thermal and electrical magnetoresistances, many of which are not immediately obvious when comparing direct experimental observations. The thermal magnetoresistance W(T,H) is given reasonably well by W(T,H)T = W(T,0)T + AH + BH 2 , where both A and B are temperature-dependent coefficients. Results show that A = A 0 + A 1 T 3 , while B(T) cannot be expressed as any simple power law. A 0 is dependent on the RRR, while A 1 is independent of the RRR. Two relationships are found between corresponding coefficients in the electrical and thermal magnetoresistance: (i) the Wiedmann--Franz law relates A 0 to the Kohler slope of the electrical magnetoresistance and (ii) the temperature-dependent portions of the electrical and thermal Kohler slopes are both proportional to the electron--phonon scattering contribution to the corresponding zero-field resistance. The latter provides evidence that inelastic scattering is very important in determining the temperature-dependent linear magnetoresistances. Part, but by no means all, of the quadratic thermal resistance is accounted for by lattice thermal conduction. It is concluded that at least a portion of the anomalous electrical and thermal magnetoresistances is due to intrinsic causes and not inhomogeneities or other macroscopic defects

  2. Eddy current probe development based on a magnetic sensor array; Developpement d'un imageur magnetique pour le controle non destructif par courants de Foucault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacher, F

    2007-06-15

    This research deals with in the study of the use of innovating magnetic sensors in eddy current non destructive inspection. The author reports an analysis survey of magnetic sensor performances. This survey enables the selection of magnetic sensor technologies used in non destructive inspection. He presents the state-of-the-art of eddy current probes exploiting the qualities of innovating magnetic sensors, and describes the methods enabling the use of these magnetic sensors in non destructive testing. Two main applications of innovating magnetic sensors are identified: the detection of very small defects by means of magneto-resistive sensors, and the detection of deep defects by means of giant magneto-impedances. Based on the use of modelling, optimization, signal processing tools, probes are manufactured for these both applications.

  3. Extremely large and significantly anisotropic magnetoresistance in ZrSiS single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Yao, Shu-Hua, E-mail: shyao@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: zhoujian@nju.edu.cn; Zhou, Jian, E-mail: shyao@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: zhoujian@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Ming-Hui [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Xiao; Chen, Y. B., E-mail: shyao@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: zhoujian@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chen, Yan-Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructure, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-06-13

    Recently, the extremely large magnetoresistance (MR) observed in transition metal telluride, like WTe{sub 2}, attracted much attention because of the potential applications in magnetic sensor. Here, we report the observation of extremely large magnetoresistance as 3.0 × 10{sup 4}% measured at 2 K and 9 T magnetic field aligned along [001]-ZrSiS. The significant magnetoresistance change (∼1.4 × 10{sup 4}%) can be obtained when the magnetic field is titled from [001] to [011]-ZrSiS. These abnormal magnetoresistance behaviors in ZrSiS can be understood by electron-hole compensation and the open orbital of Fermi surface. Because of these superior MR properties, ZrSiS may be used in the magnetic sensors.

  4. Noncontact vibration measurements using magnetoresistive sensing elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.

    2016-06-01

    Contactless instrumentations is more and more used in turbomachinery testing thanks to the non-intrusive character and the possibility to monitor all the components of the machine at the same time. Performances of blade tip timing (BTT) measurement systems, used for noncontact turbine blade vibration measurements, in terms of uncertainty and resolution are strongly affected by sensor characteristics and processing methods. The sensors used for BTT generate pulses, used for precise measurements of turbine blades time of arrival. Nowadays proximity sensors used in this application are based on optical, capacitive, eddy current and microwave measuring principle. Pressure sensors has been also tried. This paper summarizes the results achieved using a novel instrumentation based on the magnetoresistive sensing elements. The characterization of the novel probe has been already published. The measurement system was validated in test benches and in a real jet-engine comparing different sensor technologies. The whole instrumentation was improved. The work presented in this paper focuses on the current developments. In particular, attention is given to the data processing software and new sensor configurations.

  5. Anomalous magnetoresistance in Fibonacci multilayers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, L. D.; Bezerra, C. G.; Correa, M. A.; Chesman, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A. (Materials Science Division); (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte)

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigated magnetoresistance curves in quasiperiodic magnetic multilayers for two different growth directions, namely, [110] and [100]. We considered identical ferromagnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers with two different thicknesses chosen based on the Fibonacci sequence. Using parameters for Fe/Cr multilayers, four terms were included in our description of the magnetic energy: Zeeman, cubic anisotropy, bilinear coupling, and biquadratic coupling. The minimum energy was determined by the gradient method and the equilibrium magnetization directions found were used to calculate magnetoresistance curves. By choosing spacers with a thickness such that biquadratic coupling is stronger than bilinear coupling, unusual behaviors for the magnetoresistance were observed: (i) for the [110] case, there is a different behavior for structures based on even and odd Fibonacci generations, and, more interesting, (ii) for the [100] case, we found magnetic field ranges for which the magnetoresistance increases with magnetic field.

  6. Magnetoresistive magnetometer for space science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P; Beek, T; Carr, C; O’Brien, H; Cupido, E; Oddy, T; Horbury, T S

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the in situ dc magnetic field on space science missions is most commonly achieved using instruments based on fluxgate sensors. Fluxgates are robust, reliable and have considerable space heritage; however, their mass and volume are not optimized for deployment on nano or picosats. We describe a new magnetometer design demonstrating science measurement capability featuring significantly lower mass, volume and to a lesser extent power than a typical fluxgate. The instrument employs a sensor based on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) achieving a noise floor of less than 50 pT Hz −1/2 above 1 Hz on a 5 V bridge bias. The instrument range is scalable up to ±50 000 nT and the three-axis sensor mass and volume are less than 10 g and 10 cm 3 , respectively. The ability to switch the polarization of the sensor's easy axis and apply magnetic feedback is used to build a driven first harmonic closed loop system featuring improved linearity, gain stability and compensation of the sensor offset. A number of potential geospace applications based on the initial instrument results are discussed including attitude control systems and scientific measurement of waves and structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. A flight version of the AMR magnetometer will fly on the TRIO-CINEMA mission due to be launched in 2012. (paper)

  7. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in a Fermi glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovadyahu, Z.; Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel 84120)

    1986-01-01

    Insulating thin films of indium oxide exhibit negative, anisotropic magnetoresistance. The systematics of these results imply that the magnetoresistance mechanism may give different weight to the distribution of the localization lengths than that given by the hopping conductivity

  8. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  9. Anomalous Hall effect and magnetoresistance behavior in Co/Pd1−xAgx multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Z. B.

    2013-02-13

    In this paper, we report anomalous Hall effect (AHE) correlated with the magnetoresistance behavior in [Co/Pd1-xAg x]n multilayers. For the multilayers with n = 6, the increase in Ag content from x = 0 to 0.52 induces the change in AHE sign from negative surface scattering-dominated AHE to positive interface scattering-dominated AHE, which is accompanied with the transition from anisotropy magnetoresistance (AMR) dominated transport to giant magnetoresistance (GMR) dominated transport. For n = 80, scaling analysis with Rs ∝ρ xx γ yields γ ∼ 3.44 for x = 0.52 which presents GMR-type transport, in contrast to γ ∼ 5.7 for x = 0 which presents AMR-type transport. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  10. A half-ring GMR sensor for detection of magnetic beads immobilized on a circular micro-trap

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2011-11-01

    Utilizing magnetic principles in biological immunoassays is an attractive option given its ability to remotely and non-invasively manipulate and detect cells tagged with micro/nano size superparamagnetic type beads and due to the fact that even the most complex biological immunoassays will have very little magnetic effect. The presence of magnetic beads can be detected by a magnetic sensor which quantifies the amount of target cells present in the immunoassay. In order to increase the detection rate a circular conducting micro-trap is employed to attract, trap and transport the magnetic beads to the sensing area. In this research we propose a half-ring spin valve type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor for the measurement of stray fields produced by 2 μm magnetic beads which are around the circular micro-trap. A couple of half-ring GMR sensors can be used to cover the entire circular border width, in order to detect the majority of the immobilized magnetic beads. Analytical and numerical analysis leading towards the fabrication of the half-ring GMR sensor are presented. DC characterization of the fabricated sensor showed a magnetoresistance of 5.9 %. Experimental results showed that the half-ring GMR sensor detected the presence of 2 μm magnetic beads. Hence, half-ring GMR sensors integrated with a circular micro-trap have great potential to be used as an effective disease diagnostic device. © 2011 IEEE.

  11. A half-ring GMR sensor for detection of magnetic beads immobilized on a circular micro-trap

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Liang, Cai; Useinov, Arthur; Kosel, Jü rgen; Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing magnetic principles in biological immunoassays is an attractive option given its ability to remotely and non-invasively manipulate and detect cells tagged with micro/nano size superparamagnetic type beads and due to the fact that even the most complex biological immunoassays will have very little magnetic effect. The presence of magnetic beads can be detected by a magnetic sensor which quantifies the amount of target cells present in the immunoassay. In order to increase the detection rate a circular conducting micro-trap is employed to attract, trap and transport the magnetic beads to the sensing area. In this research we propose a half-ring spin valve type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor for the measurement of stray fields produced by 2 μm magnetic beads which are around the circular micro-trap. A couple of half-ring GMR sensors can be used to cover the entire circular border width, in order to detect the majority of the immobilized magnetic beads. Analytical and numerical analysis leading towards the fabrication of the half-ring GMR sensor are presented. DC characterization of the fabricated sensor showed a magnetoresistance of 5.9 %. Experimental results showed that the half-ring GMR sensor detected the presence of 2 μm magnetic beads. Hence, half-ring GMR sensors integrated with a circular micro-trap have great potential to be used as an effective disease diagnostic device. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Magnetoresistance stories of double perovskites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-28

    May 28, 2015 ... Tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) in polycrystalline double perovskites has been an important research topic for more than a decade now, where the nature of the insulating tunnel barrier is the core issue of debate. Other than the nonmagnetic grain boundaries as conventional tunnel barriers, intragrain ...

  13. GMR sensors and magnetic nanoparticles for immuno-chromatographic assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquina, C.; Teresa, J.M. de; Serrate, D.; Marzo, J.; Cardoso, F.A.; Saurel, D.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional tests based on immunorecognition and on the use of coloured colloidal particles have still some drawbacks that limit their use: they do not provide a quantitative determination of the analyte, and their sensitivity is limited. Our strategy to overcome these disadvantages consists in the use of superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles to tag the analyte. The use of these magnetic labels allows us to quantify the amount of analyte present in our sample with a very high sensitivity, detecting their magnetic response by means of the suitable magnetic sensor. Our method is based on measuring the magnetoresistive response of a spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor placed in proximity to the magnetic nanoparticles present in the lateral flow strip. Here, a brief description of our prototype and of the measurement procedure will be presented, as well as preliminary assays using our biosensor to detect the hCG pregnancy hormone in a solution. A crucial aspect to take into account in order to increase the sensitivity is the proper functionalisation of the nanoparticle shell, in order to achieve an oriented immobilisation of the antibodies to be used in the immunorecognition process. Several strategies to further increase the sensor sensitivity are suggested.

  14. GMR sensors and magnetic nanoparticles for immuno-chromatographic assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquina, C., E-mail: clara@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Teresa, J.M. de [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Serrate, D. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Marzo, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon ICMA, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cardoso, F.A. [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Saurel, D. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, C/Mariano Esquillor s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P.P. [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); and others

    2012-10-15

    Conventional tests based on immunorecognition and on the use of coloured colloidal particles have still some drawbacks that limit their use: they do not provide a quantitative determination of the analyte, and their sensitivity is limited. Our strategy to overcome these disadvantages consists in the use of superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles to tag the analyte. The use of these magnetic labels allows us to quantify the amount of analyte present in our sample with a very high sensitivity, detecting their magnetic response by means of the suitable magnetic sensor. Our method is based on measuring the magnetoresistive response of a spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor placed in proximity to the magnetic nanoparticles present in the lateral flow strip. Here, a brief description of our prototype and of the measurement procedure will be presented, as well as preliminary assays using our biosensor to detect the hCG pregnancy hormone in a solution. A crucial aspect to take into account in order to increase the sensitivity is the proper functionalisation of the nanoparticle shell, in order to achieve an oriented immobilisation of the antibodies to be used in the immunorecognition process. Several strategies to further increase the sensor sensitivity are suggested.

  15. Magnetic Field Sensing by Exploiting Giant Nonstrain-Mediated Magnetodielectric Response in Epitaxial Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min Gyu; Kang, Han Byul; Clavel, Michael; Maurya, Deepam; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Hudait, Mantu; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Priya, Shashank

    2018-04-10

    Heteroepitaxial magnetoelectric (ME) composites are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional devices, such as sensors, tunable electronics, and energy harvesters. However, challenge remains in realizing practical epitaxial composite materials, mainly due to the interfacial lattice misfit strain between magnetostrictive and piezoelectric phases and strong substrate clamping that reduces the strain-mediated ME coupling. Here, we demonstrate a nonstrain-mediated ME coupling in PbZr 0.52 Ti 0.48 O 3 (PZT)/La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 (LSMO) heteroepitaxial composites that resolves these challenges, thereby, providing a giant magnetodielectric (MD) response of ∼27% at 310 K. The factors driving the magnitude of the MD response were found to be the magnetoresistance-coupled dielectric dispersion and piezoelectric strain-mediated modulation of magnetic moment. Building upon this giant MD response, we demonstrate a magnetic field sensor architecture exhibiting a high sensitivity of 54.7 pF/T and desirable linearity with respect to the applied external magnetic field. The demonstrated technique provides a new mechanism for detecting magnetic fields based upon the MD effect.

  16. Colossal Magnetoresistance Manganites and Related Prototype Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yukuai; Yin, Yuewei; Li, Xiaoguang

    2013-01-01

    We review colossal magnetoresistance in single phase manganites, as related to the field sensitive spin charge interactions and phase separation; the rectifying property and negative/positive magnetoresistance in manganite/Nb:SrTiO3 pn junctions in relation to the special interface electronic structure; magnetoelectric coupling in manganite/ferroelectric structures that takes advantage of strain, carrier density, and magnetic field sensitivity; tunneling magnetoresistance in tunnel junctions ...

  17. Fast Magnetoresistive Random-Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetoresistive binary digital memories of proposed new type expected to feature high speed, nonvolatility, ability to withstand ionizing radiation, high density, and low power. In memory cell, magnetoresistive effect exploited more efficiently by use of ferromagnetic material to store datum and adjacent magnetoresistive material to sense datum for readout. Because relative change in sensed resistance between "zero" and "one" states greater, shorter sampling and readout access times achievable.

  18. Integration of GMR Sensors with Different Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubells-Beltrán, María-Dolores; Reig, Càndid; Madrenas, Jordi; De Marcellis, Andrea; Santos, Joana; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P

    2016-06-22

    Less than thirty years after the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect was described, GMR sensors are the preferred choice in many applications demanding the measurement of low magnetic fields in small volumes. This rapid deployment from theoretical basis to market and state-of-the-art applications can be explained by the combination of excellent inherent properties with the feasibility of fabrication, allowing the real integration with many other standard technologies. In this paper, we present a review focusing on how this capability of integration has allowed the improvement of the inherent capabilities and, therefore, the range of application of GMR sensors. After briefly describing the phenomenological basis, we deal on the benefits of low temperature deposition techniques regarding the integration of GMR sensors with flexible (plastic) substrates and pre-processed CMOS chips. In this way, the limit of detection can be improved by means of bettering the sensitivity or reducing the noise. We also report on novel fields of application of GMR sensors by the recapitulation of a number of cases of success of their integration with different heterogeneous complementary elements. We finally describe three fully functional systems, two of them in the bio-technology world, as the proof of how the integrability has been instrumental in the meteoric development of GMR sensors and their applications.

  19. Integration of GMR Sensors with Different Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Dolores Cubells-Beltrán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Less than thirty years after the giant magnetoresistance (GMR effect was described, GMR sensors are the preferred choice in many applications demanding the measurement of low magnetic fields in small volumes. This rapid deployment from theoretical basis to market and state-of-the-art applications can be explained by the combination of excellent inherent properties with the feasibility of fabrication, allowing the real integration with many other standard technologies. In this paper, we present a review focusing on how this capability of integration has allowed the improvement of the inherent capabilities and, therefore, the range of application of GMR sensors. After briefly describing the phenomenological basis, we deal on the benefits of low temperature deposition techniques regarding the integration of GMR sensors with flexible (plastic substrates and pre-processed CMOS chips. In this way, the limit of detection can be improved by means of bettering the sensitivity or reducing the noise. We also report on novel fields of application of GMR sensors by the recapitulation of a number of cases of success of their integration with different heterogeneous complementary elements. We finally describe three fully functional systems, two of them in the bio-technology world, as the proof of how the integrability has been instrumental in the meteoric development of GMR sensors and their applications.

  20. Giant magnetoresistance and quantum transport in magnetic hybrid nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanvito, S.

    2000-01-01

    Technological advances in device micro- and nano-fabrication over the past decade has enabled a variety of novel heterojunction device structures to be made. Among these, magnetic multilayers, superconductor/normal metal junctions and carbon nanotubes exhibit a rich variety of features, with the potential for future generations of electronic devices with improved sensitivity and higher packing density. The modeling of such structures in a flexible and accurate way, with a predictive capability is a formidable theoretical challenge. In this thesis I will present a very general numerical technique to compute transport properties of heterogeneous systems, which can be used together with accurate spd tight-binding Hamiltonians or simpler models. I will then apply this technique to several transport problems in the mesoscopic regime. Firstly I will review the material dependence of CPP GMR in perfect crystalline magnetic multilayers, analyze their conductance oscillations and discuss some preliminary results of magnetic tunneling junctions. In the contest of the conductance oscillations I will introduce a simple Kroenig-Penney model which gives a full understanding of the relevant periods involved in the oscillations. I will then present a simple model, which can be used to study disordered magnetic systems and the cross-over from ballistic to diffusive transport. This model explains recent experiments on CPP GMR, which cannot be understood within the usual Boltzmann transport framework. Then I will present results for superconducting/ normal metal and for superconducting/multilayer junctions. In the case of multilayers I will show that in both the ballistic and diffusive regimes the GMR is expected to vanish if a superconducting contact is added and go on to show why this is not the case in practice. Finally I will present features of ballistic transport in multiwall carbon nanotubes and show how the inter-tube interaction can, not only block some of the scattering channels but also re-distribute non-uniformly the current across the tubes. The results explain an old open question concerning ballistic transport in Carbon nanotubes. (author)

  1. Magnetic multilayers and giant magnetoresistance fundamentals and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Magneto-electronics is certainly one of the most rapidly expanding fields in basic research and industrial application. Magnetic multilayers are the key devices in this field; they allow the utilization of unique micromagnetic, magneto-optic, and magneto-electronic phenomena which cannot be realized on the basis of conventional materials. This book provides a detailed and well-balanced introduction to both the underlying physical fundamentals and the technological applications in terms of devices that are just entering the market or are of high industrial relevance for the near future. In particular, the employment of magnetic multilayers in magneto-optical recording, in GMR and spin-valve devices, and as configurations yielding a striking nonlinear magneto-optical response is discussed in a comprehensive way. This state-of-the-art review involves an extensive list of key references to original work and thus makes the vast knowledge already accumulated in the field accessible to the reader.

  2. Spin valve sensor for biomolecular identification: Design, fabrication, and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanxiong

    Biomolecular identification, e.g., DNA recognition, has broad applications in biology and medicine such as gene expression analysis, disease diagnosis, and DNA fingerprinting. Therefore, we have been developing a magnetic biodetection technology based on giant magnetoresistive spin valve sensors and magnetic nanoparticle (developed for the magnetic nanoparticle detection, assuming the equivalent average field of magnetic nanoparticles and the coherent rotation of spin valve free layer magnetization. Micromagnetic simulations have also been performed for the spin valve sensors. The analytical model and micromagnetic simulations are found consistent with each other and are in good agreement with experiments. The prototype spin valve sensors have been fabricated at both micron and submicron scales. We demonstrated the detection of a single 2.8-mum magnetic microbead by micron-sized spin valve sensors. Based on polymer-mediated self-assembly and fine lithography, a bilayer lift-off process was developed to deposit magnetic nanoparticles onto the sensor surface in a controlled manner. With the lift-off deposition method, we have successfully demonstrated the room temperature detection of monodisperse 16-nm Fe3O 4 nanoparticles in a quantity from a few tens to several hundreds by submicron spin valve sensors, proving the feasibility of the nanoparticle detection. As desired for quantitative biodetection, a fairly linear dependence of sensor signal on the number of nanoparticles has been confirmed. The initial detection of DNA hybridization events labeled by magnetic nanoparticles further proved the magnetic biodetection concept.

  3. Giant grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch-Devlin, M.A.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared observations of the Orion nebula have been interpreted by Rowan-Robinson (1975) to imply the existence of 'giant' grains, radius approximately 10 -2 cm, throughout a volume about a parsec in diameter. Although Rowan-Robinson's model of the nebula has been criticized and the presence of such grains in Orion is disputed, the proposition is accepted, that they exist, and in this paper situations in which giant grains could arise are examined. It is found that, while a giant-grain component to the interstellar grain density may exist, it is difficult to understand how giant grains arise to the extent apparently required by the Orion nebula model. (Auth.)

  4. Magnetoresistance of nanogranular Ni/NiO controlled by exchange anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bianco, L.; Spizzo, F.; Tamisari, M.; Allia, P.

    2013-01-01

    A link between exchange anisotropy and magnetoresistance has been found to occur in a Ni/NiO sample consisting of Ni nanocrystallites (mean size ∼13 nm, Ni content ∼33 vol%) dispersed in a NiO matrix. This material shows metallic-type electric conduction and isotropic spin-dependent magnetoresistance as well as exchange bias effect. The latter is the outcome of an exchange anisotropy arising from the contact interaction between the Ni phase and the NiO matrix. Combined analysis of magnetization M(H) and magnetoresistance MR(H) loops measured in the 5–250 K temperature range after zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and after field-cooling (FC) from 300 K reveals that the magnetoresistance is influenced by exchange anisotropy, which is triggered by the FC process and can be modified in strength by varying the temperature. Compared to the ZFC case, the exchange anisotropy produces a horizontal shift of the FC MR(H) loop along with a reduction of the MR response associated to the reorientation of the Ni moments. A strict connection between magnetoresistance and remanent magnetization of FC loops on one side and the exchange field on the other, ruled by exchange anisotropy, is indicated. - Highlights: • Nanogranular Ni/NiO with giant magnetoresistance (MR) and exchange bias effect. • Exchange anisotropy produces a shift of the field-cooled MR(H) loop and reduces MR. • MR, remanence of field-cooled loops and exchange field are three correlated quantities. • It is possible to control MR of nanogranular systems through the exchange anisotropy

  5. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Panaccione, G.; Torelli, P.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe 1-x Ga x ) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude

  6. Magnetoresistive nanojunctions fabricated via focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanescu, E.; Hong, J.; Guduru, R. [Florida International University (United States); Lavrenov, A. [Hitachi Research (United States); Litvinov, D. [University of Houston, Center for Nanomagnetic Systems (United States); Khizroev, S., E-mail: khizroev@fiu.edu [Florida International University (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Focused ion beam (FIB) is used to implant Ga{sup +} ions into a 30-nm thick magnetoresistive element to effectively reduce the track width of the sensor from 1 Micro-Sign m to {approx}80 nm. Through magnetic recording industry-standard spinstand measurements, it is confirmed that a dose of {approx}10{sup 3} ions/cm{sup 2} at a 1-pA FIB current is sufficient to fully 'de-activate' magnetism in the exposed side regions. To record tracks required for spinstand tests, a FIB-trimmed ring type write head is used.

  7. Measurement of the Length of Installed Rock Bolt Based on Stress Wave Reflection by Using a Giant Magnetostrictive (GMS) Actuator and a PZT Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Fu, Qingqing; Song, Gangbing

    2017-02-23

    Rock bolts, as a type of reinforcing element, are widely adopted in underground excavations and civil engineering structures. Given the importance of rock bolts, the research outlined in this paper attempts to develop a portable non-destructive evaluation method for assessing the length of installed rock bolts for inspection purposes. Traditionally, piezoelectric elements or hammer impacts were used to perform non-destructive evaluation of rock bolts. However, such methods suffered from many major issues, such as the weak energy generated and the requirement for permanent installation for piezoelectric elements, and the inconsistency of wave generation for hammer impact. In this paper, we proposed a portable device for the non-destructive evaluation of rock bolt conditions based on a giant magnetostrictive (GMS) actuator. The GMS actuator generates enough energy to ensure multiple reflections of the stress waves along the rock bolt and a lead zirconate titantate (PZT) sensor is used to detect the reflected waves. A new integrated procedure that involves correlation analysis, wavelet denoising, and Hilbert transform was proposed to process the multiple reflection signals to determine the length of an installed rock bolt. The experimental results from a lab test and field tests showed that, by analyzing the instant phase of the periodic reflections of the stress wave generated by the GMS transducer, the length of an embedded rock bolt can be accurately determined.

  8. High density submicron magnetoresistive random access memory (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, S.; Chen, E.; Durlam, M.; DeHerrera, M.; Slaughter, J. M.; Shi, J.; Kerszykowski, G.

    1999-04-01

    Various giant magnetoresistance material structures were patterned and studied for their potential as memory elements. The preferred memory element, based on pseudo-spin valve structures, was designed with two magnetic stacks (NiFeCo/CoFe) of different thickness with Cu as an interlayer. The difference in thickness results in dissimilar switching fields due to the shape anisotropy at deep submicron dimensions. It was found that a lower switching current can be achieved when the bits have a word line that wraps around the bit 1.5 times. Submicron memory elements integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors maintained their characteristics and no degradation to the CMOS devices was observed. Selectivity between memory elements in high-density arrays was demonstrated.

  9. Rashba-Edelstein Magnetoresistance in Metallic Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Kanno, Yusuke; An, Hongyu; Tashiro, Takaharu; Haku, Satoshi; Nomura, Akiyo; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-09-09

    We report the observation of magnetoresistance originating from Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in a metallic heterostructure: the Rashba-Edelstein (RE) magnetoresistance. We show that the simultaneous action of the direct and inverse RE effects in a Bi/Ag/CoFeB trilayer couples current-induced spin accumulation to the electric resistance. The electric resistance changes with the magnetic-field angle, reminiscent of the spin Hall magnetoresistance, despite the fact that bulk SOC is not responsible for the magnetoresistance. We further found that, even when the magnetization is saturated, the resistance increases with increasing the magnetic-field strength, which is attributed to the Hanle magnetoresistance in this system.

  10. NbSe3: Fermi surface and magnetoresistance under uniaxial stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Kuh, J.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Bennett, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Fermi surface of NbSe 3 below the two CDW transitions is still not very clear. Large magnetoresistance and giant quantum oscillations have been seen at low temperature below the second CDW transition. The SdH oscillations are attributed to one or several small pieces of electron or hole pockets spared by the two CDW transitions at 145 and 59 K. In a previous low field study (μ 0 H<8 T) of the transverse magnetoresistance (H in the (b,c) plane) we have shown that the extremal area of one of these pockets decreases linearly with strain, ε, vanishing at ε = 2.5%. Here we extend our study into the high magnetic field regime (pulsed 60 T) and investigate the effect of uniaxial stress on the magnetoresistance (I//H). Our high field study is consistent with the fermiology study and shows that uniaxial stress leads to the obliteration of a small closed pocket. Above 1% strain the magnetoresistance is linear with H with no sign of saturation. (orig.)

  11. Artifacts that mimic ballistic magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, W.F. . E-mail : egelhoff@nist.gov; Gan, L.; Ettedgui, H.; Kadmon, Y.; Powell, C.J.; Chen, P.J.; Shapiro, A.J.; McMichael, R.D.; Mallett, J.J.; Moffat, T.P.; Stiles, M.D.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circumstances underlying recent reports of very large values of ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR) in nanocontacts between magnetic wires. We find that the geometries used are subject to artifacts due to motion of the wires that distort the nanocontact thereby changing its electrical resistance. Since these nanocontacts are often of atomic scale, reliable experiments would require stability on the atomic scale. No method for achieving such stability in macroscopic wires is apparent. We conclude that macroscopic magnetic wires cannot be used to establish the validity of the BMR effect

  12. Tunneling magnetoresistance from a symmetry filtering effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, William H

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the young, but rapidly growing field of spintronics. Its primary objective is to explain how as electrons tunnel through simple insulators such as MgO, wavefunctions of certain symmetries are preferentially transmitted. This symmetry filtering property can be converted into a spin-filtering property if the insulator is joined epitaxially to a ferromagnetic electrode with the same two-dimensional symmetry parallel to the interface. A second requirement of the ferromagnetic electrodes is that a wavefunction with the preferred symmetry exists in one of the two spin channels but not in the other. These requirements are satisfied for electrons traveling perpendicular to the interface for Fe-MgO-Fe tunnel barriers. This leads to a large change in the resistance when the magnetic moment of one of the electrodes is rotated relative to those of the other electrode. This large tunneling magnetoresistance effect is being used as the read sensor in hard drives and may form the basis for a new type of magnetic memory. (topical review)

  13. Cr doping induced negative transverse magnetoresistance in C d3A s2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanwen; Tiwari, Rajarshi; Narayan, Awadhesh; Jin, Zhao; Yuan, Xiang; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Feng; Li, Liang; Xia, Zhengcai; Sanvito, Stefano; Zhou, Peng; Xiu, Faxian

    2018-02-01

    The magnetoresistance of a material conveys various dynamic information about charge and spin carriers, inspiring both fundamental studies in physics and practical applications such as magnetic sensors, data storage, and spintronic devices. Magnetic impurities play a crucial role in the magnetoresistance as they induce exotic states of matter such as the quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulators and tunable ferromagnetic phases in dilute magnetic semiconductors. However, magnetically doped topological Dirac semimetals are hitherto lacking. Here, we report a systematic study of Cr-doped C d3A s2 thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. With the Cr doping, C d3A s2 thin films exhibit unexpected negative transverse magnetoresistance and strong quantum oscillations, bearing a trivial Berry's phase and an enhanced effective mass. More importantly, with ionic gating the magnetoresistance of Cr-doped C d3A s2 thin films can be drastically tuned from negative to positive, demonstrating the strong correlation between electrons and the localized spins of the Cr impurities, which we interpret through the formation of magnetic polarons. Such a negative magnetoresistance under perpendicular magnetic field and its gate tunability have not been observed previously in the Dirac semimetal C d3A s2 . The Cr-induced topological phase transition and the formation of magnetic polarons in C d3A s2 provide insights into the magnetic interaction in Dirac semimetals as well as their potential applications in spintronics.

  14. Effects of magnetic barriers on transport and magnetoresistance in a two-dimensional electronic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, H. L.; Zhang, X. W., E-mail: hedge80@sina.com.cn; Dai, B.; Ren, Y. [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wang, Z. P. [Institute of Chemical Materials, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We study theoretically the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect of 2-dimensional electron system (2DES) by the transfer matrix method. To produce the inhomogeneous magnetic field, two magnetic strips are pre-deposited on the surface of 2DES. In our work, we fix the magnetization M in one magnetic strip and adjust the tilting angle θ of magnetization in the other. The result shows that the electronic transmission and conductance vary significantly for different θ. The minimum conductance can be obtained at θ = π which corresponds to the magnetization anti-parallel alignment. The magnetoresistance ratio (MRR) calculation also indicates we would get the maximum in that case. Furthermore, we consider the magnetization M dependence of MRR in this work. When M increases, MRR peaks get higher and broader and more numbers of peaks can be observed. These results offer an alternative to get a tunable GMR device which can be controlled by adjusting the magnetization M and the magnetized angle θ.

  15. Magnetoresistance through spin-polarized p states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the ballistic magnetoresistance in Ni contacts using first-principles, atomistic, electronic structure calculations. In particular we investigate the role of defects in the contact region with the aim of explaining the recently observed spectacular magnetoresistance ratio. Our results predict that the possible presence of spin-polarized oxygen in the contact region could explain conductance changes by an order of magnitude. Electronic transport essentially occurs through spin-polarized oxygen p states, and this mechanism gives a much higher magnetoresistance than that obtained assuming clean atomically sharp domain walls alone

  16. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  17. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  18. Giant Magneto-Resistance in Epitaxial (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)0.5: (ZnO)0.5 Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, Y. X. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ihlefeld, Jon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Ping [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Stephen R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of research has been carried out in oxide material systems. Among them, ZnO and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) are of particular interest due to their superb optical properties and colossal magneto-resistive effect. Here, we report our recent results of magneto-transport studies in self-assembled, epitaxial (ZnO)0.5:(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)0.5 nanocomposite films.

  19. Resistance transition assisted geometry enhanced magnetoresistance in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Zhaochu; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) reported in some non-magnetic semiconductors (particularly silicon) has triggered considerable interest owing to the large magnitude of the effect. Here, we showed that MR in lightly doped n-Si can be significantly enhanced by introducing two diodes and proper design of the carrier path [Wan, Nature 477, 304 (2011)]. We designed a geometrical enhanced magnetoresistance (GEMR) device whose room-temperature MR ratio reaching 30% at 0.065 T and 20 000% at 1.2 T, respectively, approaching the performance of commercial MR devices. The mechanism of this GEMR is: the diodes help to define a high resistive state (HRS) and a low resistive state (LRS) in device by their openness and closeness, respectively. The ratio of apparent resistance between HRS and LRS is determined by geometry of silicon wafer and electrodes. Magnetic field could induce a transition from LRS to HRS by reshaping potential and current distribution among silicon wafer, resulting in a giant enhancement of intrinsic MR. We expect that this GEMR could be also realized in other semiconductors. The combination of high sensitivity to low magnetic fields and large high-field response should make this device concept attractive to the magnetic field sensing industry. Moreover, because this MR device is based on a conventional silicon/semiconductor platform, it should be possible to integrate this MR device with existing silicon/semiconductor devices and so aid the development of silicon/semiconductor-based magnetoelectronics. Also combining MR devices and semiconducting devices in a single Si/semiconductor chip may lead to some novel devices with hybrid function, such as electric-magnetic-photonic properties. Our work demonstrates that the charge property of semiconductor can be used in the magnetic sensing industry, where the spin properties of magnetic materials play a role traditionally

  20. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  1. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  2. Giant Chancroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of giant chancroid following rupture of inguinal bubo and having systemic symptoms is described. Response with sulfa and streptomycin combination was excellent and the lesion healed completely in 3 weeks. Early diagnosis and treatment of chancroid will prevent this debilitating complication.

  3. Giant microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Sala, D.; Privato, C.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Fortunato, G.

    1999-01-01

    Giant microelectronics, on which the technology of flat liquid-crystal screens is based, is an example of fruitful interaction among independently-developed technologies, in this case thin film micro devices and laser applications. It typifies the interdisciplinary approach needed to produce innovations in microelectronics [it

  4. Role of spin polarized tunneling in magnetoresistance and low

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Role of spin polarized tunneling in magnetoresistance and low temperature minimum of polycrystalline La1–KMnO3 ( = 0.05, 0.1, ... Manganites; magnetoresistance; low temperature resistivity; spin polarized tunneling. ... Current Issue

  5. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance Effect in Semiconductor/Metal Hybrid Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2013-06-27

    In this dissertation, the extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) effect in semiconductor/metal hybrid structures is studied to improve the performance in sensing applications. Using two-dimensional finite element simulations, the geometric dependence of the output sensitivity, which is a more relevant parameter for EMR sensors than the magnetoresistance (MR), is studied. The results show that the optimal geometry in this case is different from the geometry reported before, where the MR ratio was optimized. A device consisting of a semiconductor bar with length/width ratio of 5~10 and having only 2 contacts is found to exhibit the highest sensitivity. A newly developed three-dimensional finite element model is employed to investigate parameters that have been neglected with the two dimensional simulations utilized so far, i.e., thickness of metal shunt and arbitrary semiconductor/metal interface. The simulations show the influence of those parameters on the sensitivity is up to 10 %. The model also enables exploring the EMR effect in planar magnetic fields. In case of a bar device, the sensitivity to planar fields is about 15 % to 20 % of the one to perpendicular fields. 5 A “top-contacted” structure is proposed to reduce the complexity of fabrication, where neither patterning of the semiconductor nor precise alignment is required. A comparison of the new structure with a conventionally fabricated device shows that a similar magnetic field resolution of 24 nT/√Hz is obtained. A new 3-contact device is developed improving the poor low-field sensitivity observed in conventional EMR devices, resulting from its parabolic magnetoresistance response. The 3-contact device provides a considerable boost of the low field response by combining the Hall effect with the EMR effect, resulting in an increase of the output sensitivity by 5 times at 0.01 T compared to a 2-contact device. The results of this dissertation provide new insights into the optimization of EMR devices

  6. Resistive and magnetoresistive properties of BiSrCaCuO granulated films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tsev, V.A.; Kulikovskij, A.V.; Kustikov, E.V.; Morozov, D.Yu.; Sokolov, Yu.S.

    1995-01-01

    Transport properties of superconducting bridges produced by laser etching of granulated films BiSrCaCuO have been studied. Analysis of nonlinear voltammetric characteristics of the bridges permits making the conclusion on the change in the character of conductivity (two-dimensional-three dimensional system), when approaching the critical point. Measurements of magnetoresistance of the samples suggest a possibility of application of high-temperature superconducting bridges in Bi-system as sensors of weak magnetic fields. 11 refs.; 4 figs

  7. Huge magnetoresistance effect of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Youwei; Wang Zhiming; Ni Gang; Xing Dingyu; Xu Qingyu

    2004-01-01

    Graphite is a quasi-two-dimensional semimetal. However, for usual graphite the magnetoresistance is not so high due to its small crystal size and no preferred orientation. Huge positive magnetoresistance up to 85300% at 4.2 K and 4950% at 300 K under 8.15 T magnetic field was found in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The mechanism of huge positive magnetoresistance is not only due to ordinary magnetoresistance but also due to magnetic-field-driven semimetal-insulator transition

  8. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, and Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current volt...

  9. Magnetoresistance in terbium and holmium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.L.; Jericho, M.H.; Geldart, D.J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The longitudinal magnetoresistance of single crystals of terbium and holmium metals in their low-temperature ferromagnetic phase has been investigated in magnetic fields up to 80 kOe. Typical magnetoresistance isotherms exhibit a minimum which increases in depth and moves to higher fields as the temperature increases. The magnetoresistance around 1 0 K, where inelastic scattering is negligible, has been interpreted as the sum of a negative contribution due to changes in the domain structure and a positive contribution due to normal magnetoresistance. At higher temperatures, a phenomenological approach has been developed to extract the inelastic phonon and spin-wave components from the total measured magnetoresistance. In the temperature range 4--20 0 K (approximately), the phonon resistivity varies as T 3 . 7 for all samples. Approximate upper and lower bounds have been placed on the spin-wave resistivity which is also found to be described by a simple power law in this temperature range. The implications of this result for theoretical treatments of spin-wave resistivity due to s-f exchange interactions are considered. It is concluded that the role played by the magnon energy gap is far less transparent than previously suggested

  10. Anomalous giant piezoresistance in AlAs 2D electron systems with antidot lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, O; Gokmen, T; Shkolnikov, Y P; De Poortere, E P; Shayegan, M

    2008-01-25

    An AlAs two-dimensional electron system patterned with an antidot lattice exhibits a giant piezoresistance effect at low temperatures, with a sign opposite to the piezoresistance observed in the unpatterned region. We suggest that the origin of this anomalous giant piezoresistance is the nonuniform strain in the antidot lattice and the exclusion of electrons occupying the two conduction-band valleys from different regions of the sample. This is analogous to the well-known giant magnetoresistance effect, with valley playing the role of spin and strain the role of magnetic field.

  11. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface

  12. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobaut, B., E-mail: benoit.gobaut@elettra.eu [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 Km 163.5, Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Panaccione, G.; Torelli, P. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Rafaqat, H. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Roddaro, S. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza S. Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rossi, G. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Paris 06, CNRS-UMR 7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, 75005, Paris (France)

    2015-12-15

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  13. On the magnetoresistance of heavy fermion compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Chengchung; Chen Chung

    1992-09-01

    Starting from two-conduction-band Anderson lattice model, the magneto-transport properties of heavy fermion systems are studied in the slave boson mean field theory. The residual magnetoresistivity induced by different kinds of impurities is calculated, and the experimentally detected positive maximum structure in the residual magnetoresistance of heavy fermion systems is reproduced. The transition of field-dependent resistivity from nonmonotonic to monotonic behaviour with increasing temperature can be explained naturally by including the charge fluctuation effect. The influence of applied pressure is also investigated. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  14. Magnetoresistant Co/Cu multilayers: effect of crystallographic orientation of the layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boher, P.; Giron, F.; Houdy, P.; Beauvillain, P.; Chappert, C.; Veillet, P.

    1992-01-01

    In the last few years ferromagnetic/non-ferromagnetic multilayers have received considerable attention due to their great interest formagnetoresistive applications. Giant magnetoresistance has been observed in the Cu/Co system but with quite high saturation field (>>1 kOe). In this paper we report on an original way to enhance this characterisitc, using unusual fcc left angle 100 right angle cristallographic orientation. Special preparation of the right angle 100 right angle silicon substrates is investigated using in-situ kinetic ellipsometry, RHEED, grazing X-ray reflection and X-ray diffraction. We show that good quality fcc right angle 100 right angle pseudo-epitaxial copper surface can be obtained only when two conditions are fulfilled: first the silicon surface must be completely free of native oxide and second the copper buffer layer must be annealed under ultrahigh vacuum. Perfectly clean silicon surfaces are obtained by chemical etching followed by flash heating under ultrahigh vacuum. The copper buffer layer reacts with silicon and gives a textured fcc right angle 100 right angle Cu phase with a 45 rotation of the Cu left angle 100 right angle lattice with regards to the Si right angle 100 right angle one. Additional annealing leads to an homogencous interface silicide layer and improves the cristallinity of the Cu buffer layer. Cu/Co multilayers deposited on this kind of substrate show a well-defined fcc right angle 100 right angle texture for a large range of layer thickness. Oscillation of magnetoresistance with the copper thickness is observed with a period of about 10 A. The maximum of magnetoresistance is found for 20.9 A of Cu (ΔR/R∼6%), and the differential magnetoresistance is very high (ΔR/RΔH = 1.4 kOe -1 ). Combination of antiferromagnetic coupling and quadratic in-plane anisotropy of this special cristallographic orientation is responsible for this improvement. (orig.)

  15. Magnetoresistances in Ni80Fe20-ITO granular film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chunhong; Chen Ke; Yang Yanxia; Xiong Yuanqiang; Chen Peng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Magnetoresistance (MR) in Ni 80 Fe 20 -ITO granular film are investigated. ► MR is positive at high temperature, and is negative at low temperature. ► MR results from the competition among three mechanisms. - Abstract: The magnetic properties, electrical properties and magnetoresistance are investigated in Ni 80 Fe 20 -ITO granular film with various volume fractions V NF of Ni 80 Fe 20 . The room temperature magnetization hysteresis of sample with V NF = 25% shows superparamagnetic behavior. Current-voltage curve of sample with V NF = 25% at 175 K shows typical tunneling-type behavior. The magnetoresistances of samples with low V NF are positive at high temperature, and are negative at low temperature. The temperature-dependent magnetoresistances result from the competition among ordinary magnetoresistances, the granular-typed tunneling magnetoresistance and the spin-mixing induced magnetoresistances.

  16. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  17. Enhanced temperature-independent magnetoresistance below the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The film exhibits a large nearly temperature-independent magnetoresistance around 99% in the temperature regime below p. The zero field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization data at 50 Oe shows irreversibility between the ZFC and FC close to the ferromagnetic transition temperature c = 250 K. The ZFC ...

  18. Ultrasensitive detection and quantification of E. coli O157:H7 using a giant magneto impedance sensor in an open-surface micro fluidic cavity covered with an antibody-modified gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhen; Liu, Yan; Lei, Chong; Sun, Xue-cheng; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method for ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the pathogen Escherichia coli (E. coli), type O157:H7. It is using a tortuous-shaped giant magneto impedance (GMI) sensor in combination with an open-surface micro fluidic system coated with a gold film for performing the sandwich immuno binding on its surface. Streptavidin-coated super magnetic Dynabeads were loaded with biotinylated polyclonal antibody to capture E. coli O157:H7. The E. coli-loaded Dynabeads are then injected into the microfluidics system where it comes into contact with the surface of gold nanofilm carrying the monoclonal antibody to form the immuno complex. As a result, the GMI ratio is strongly reduced at high frequencies if E. coli O157:H7 is present. The sensor has a linear response in the 50 to 500 cfu·mL"−"1 concentration range, and the detection limit is 50 cfu·mL"−"1 at a working frequency of 2.2 MHz. In our perception, this method provides a valuable tool for developing GMI-based micro fluidic sensors systems for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of pathogenic bacteria. The method may also be extended to other sensing applications by employing respective immuno reagents. (author)

  19. Design and Fabrication of Full Wheatstone-Bridge-Based Angular GMR Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Yan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistive (GMR effect, GMR sensors have gained much attention in last decades due to their high sensitivity, small size, and low cost. The full Wheatstone-bridge-based GMR sensor is most useful in terms of the application point of view. However, its manufacturing process is usually complex. In this paper, we present an efficient and concise approach to fabricate a full Wheatstone-bridge-based angular GMR sensor by depositing one GMR film stack, utilizing simple patterned processes, and a concise post-annealing procedure based on a special layout. The angular GMR sensor is of good linear performance and achieves a sensitivity of 0.112 mV/V/Oe at the annealing temperature of 260 °C in the magnetic field range from −50 to +50 Oe. This work provides a design and method for GMR-sensor manufacturing that is easy for implementation and suitable for mass production.

  20. Rolled-up magnetic sensor: nanomembrane architecture for in-flow detection of magnetic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönch, Ingolf; Makarov, Denys; Koseva, Radinka; Baraban, Larysa; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Kaiser, Claudia; Arndt, Karl-Friedrich; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-09-27

    Detection and analysis of magnetic nanoobjects is a crucial task in modern diagnostic and therapeutic techniques applied to medicine and biology. Accomplishment of this task calls for the development and implementation of electronic elements directly in fluidic channels, which still remains an open and nontrivial issue. Here, we present a novel concept based on rolled-up nanotechnology for fabrication of multifunctional devices, which can be straightforwardly integrated into existing fluidic architectures. We apply strain engineering to roll-up a functional nanomembrane consisting of a magnetic sensor element based on [Py/Cu](30) multilayers, revealing giant magnetoresistance (GMR). The comparison of the sensor's characteristics before and after the roll-up process is found to be similar, allowing for a reliable and predictable method to fabricate high-quality ultracompact GMR devices. The performance of the rolled-up magnetic sensor was optimized to achieve high sensitivity to weak magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the rolled-up tube itself can be efficiently used as a fluidic channel, while the integrated magnetic sensor provides an important functionality to detect and respond to a magnetic field. The performance of the rolled-up magnetic sensor for the in-flow detection of ferromagnetic CrO(2) nanoparticles embedded in a biocompatible polymeric hydrogel shell is highlighted. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Bio-inspired ciliary force sensor for robotic platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ribeiro, Pedro

    2017-01-20

    The detection of small forces is of great interest in any robotic application that involves interaction with the environment (e.g., objects manipulation, physical human-robot interaction, minimally invasive surgery), since it allows the robot to detect the contacts early on and to act accordingly. In this letter, we present a sensor design inspired by the ciliary structure frequently found in nature, consisting of an array of permanently magnetized cylinders (cilia) patterned over a giant magnetoresistance sensor (GMR). When these cylinders are deformed in shape due to applied forces, the stray magnetic field variation will change the GMR sensor resistivity, thus enabling the electrical measurement of the applied force. In this letter, we present two 3 mm × 3 mm prototypes composed of an array of five cilia with 1 mm of height and 120 and 200 μm of diameter for each prototype. A minimum force of 333 μN was measured. A simulation model for determining the magnetized cylinders average stray magnetic field is also presented.

  2. Bio-inspired ciliary force sensor for robotic platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Kosel, Jü rgen; Franco, Fernando; Cardoso, Susana; Bernardino, Alexandre; Schmitz, Alexander; Santos-Victor, Jose; Jamone, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The detection of small forces is of great interest in any robotic application that involves interaction with the environment (e.g., objects manipulation, physical human-robot interaction, minimally invasive surgery), since it allows the robot to detect the contacts early on and to act accordingly. In this letter, we present a sensor design inspired by the ciliary structure frequently found in nature, consisting of an array of permanently magnetized cylinders (cilia) patterned over a giant magnetoresistance sensor (GMR). When these cylinders are deformed in shape due to applied forces, the stray magnetic field variation will change the GMR sensor resistivity, thus enabling the electrical measurement of the applied force. In this letter, we present two 3 mm × 3 mm prototypes composed of an array of five cilia with 1 mm of height and 120 and 200 μm of diameter for each prototype. A minimum force of 333 μN was measured. A simulation model for determining the magnetized cylinders average stray magnetic field is also presented.

  3. Magnetic and magnetoresistance studies of nanometric electrodeposited Co films and Co/Cu layered structures: Influence of magnetic layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zsurzsa, S., E-mail: zsurzsa.sandor@wigner.mta.hu; Péter, L.; Kiss, L.F.; Bakonyi, I.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the magnetoresistance behavior were investigated for electrodeposited nanoscale Co films, Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with individual Co layer thicknesses ranging from 1 nm to 20 nm. The measured saturation magnetization values confirmed that the nominal and actual layer thicknesses are in fairly good agreement. All three types of layered structure exhibited anisotropic magnetoresistance for thick magnetic layers whereas the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with thinner magnetic layers exhibited giant magnetoresistance (GMR), the GMR magnitude being the largest for the thinnest Co layers. The decreasing values of the relative remanence and the coercive field when reducing the Co layer thickness down to below about 3 nm indicated the presence of superparamagnetic (SPM) regions in the magnetic layers which could be more firmly evidenced for these samples by a decomposition of the magnetoresistance vs. field curves into a ferromagnetic and an SPM contribution. For thicker magnetic layers, the dependence of the coercivity (H{sub c}) on magnetic layer thickness (d) could be described for each of the layered structure types by the usual equation H{sub c}=H{sub co}+a/d{sup n} with an exponent around n=1. The common value of n suggests a similar mechanism for the magnetization reversal by domain wall motion in all three structure types and hints also at the absence of coupling between magnetic layers in the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited nanoscale Co films and Co/Cu layered structures. • Co layer thickness (d) dependence of coercivity (H{sub c}) and magnetoresistance. • H{sub c} depends on Co layer thickness according to H{sub c}=H{sub co}+a/d{sup n} with n around 1. • The common n value suggests a similar mechanism of magnetization reversal. • The common n value suggests the absence of coupling between magnetic layers.

  4. Estimation of Low Concentration Magnetic Fluid Weight Density and Detection inside an Artificial Medium Using a Novel GMR Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka GOONERATNE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia treatment has been gaining momentum in the past few years as a possible method to manage cancer. Cancer cells are different to normal cells in many ways including how they react to heat. Due to this difference it is possible for hyperthermia treatment to destroy cancer cells without harming the healthy normal cells surrounding the tumor. Magnetic particles injected into the body generate heat by hysteresis loss and temperature is increased when a time varying external magnetic field is applied. Successful treatment depends on how efficiently the heat is controlled. Thus, it is very important to estimate the magnetic fluid density in the body. Experimental apparatus designed for testing, numerical analysis, and results obtained by experimentation using a simple yet novel and minimally invasive needle type spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR sensor, to estimate low concentration magnetic fluid weight density and detection of magnetic fluid in a reference medium is reported.

  5. Semiclassical theory of magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, N. J.; Flatté, M. E.

    2012-02-01

    A recently introduced percolative theory of unipolar organic magnetoresistance is generalized by treating the hyperfine interaction semiclassically for an arbitrary hopping rate. Compact analytic results for the magnetoresistance are achievable when carrier hopping occurs much more frequently than the hyperfine field precession period. In other regimes the magnetoresistance can be straightforwardly evaluated numerically. Slow and fast hopping magnetoresistance are found to be uniquely characterized by their line shapes. We find that the threshold hopping distance is analogous a phenomenological two-site model's branching parameter, and that the distinction between slow and fast hopping is contingent on the threshold hopping distance.

  6. Magnetoresistance in RCo2 spin-fluctuation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, E.; Nowotny, H.; Enser, J.; Bauer, E.; Hense, K.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the spin fluctuations on the field and temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance in ScCo 2 and LuCo 2 was studied. The experimental data where explained assuming two competing mechanisms determining the magnetoresistance of these substances. One is the 'normal magnetoresistance' caused by the influence of the Lorentz force on conduction electron trajectories. The other is due to the suppression of the spin fluctuations caused by an external magnetic field. This interplay give rise to a pronounced drop of the magnetoresistance towards the lower temperature range

  7. Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, Helen; Dierking, Ingo; Grieve, Bruce; Woodyatt, Christopher; Brimicombe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An electrical temperature sensor (10) comprises a liquid crystalline material (12). First and second electrically conductive contacts (14), (16), having a spaced relationship there between, contact the liquid crystalline material (12). An electric property measuring device is electrically connected to the first and second contacts (14), (16) and is arranged to measure an electric property of the liquid crystalline material (12). The liquid crystalline material (12) has a transition temperatur...

  8. High magnetoresistance at low magnetic fields in self-assembled ZnO-Co nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrecy, N; Hamieh, M; Hebert, C; Perriere, J

    2017-07-27

    The solid phase growth of self-assembled nanocrystals embedded in a crystalline host matrix opens up wide perspectives for the coupling of different physical properties, such as magnetic and semiconducting. In this work, we report the pulsed laser growth at room temperature of thin films composed of a dispersed array of ferromagnetic Co (0001) nanoclusters with an in-plane mono-size width of 1.3 nm, embedded in a ZnO (0001) crystalline matrix. The as-grown films lead to very high values of magnetoresistance, ranging at 9 T from -11% at 300 K to -19% at 50 K, with a steep decrease of the magnetoresistance at low magnetic fields. We establish the relationship between the magnetoresistance behavior and the magnetic response of the Co nanocluster assembly. A spin-dependent tunneling of the electrons between the Co nanoclusters through and by the semi-insulating ZnO host is achieved in our films, promising with regard to magnetic field sensors or Si-integrated spintronic devices. The effects of thermal annealing are also discussed.

  9. Packaging of silicon sensors for microfluidic bio-analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimberger-Friedl, Reinhold; Prins, Menno; Megens, Mischa; Dittmer, Wendy; Witz, Christiane de; Nellissen, Ton; Weekamp, Wim; Delft, Jan van; Ansems, Will; Iersel, Ben van

    2009-01-01

    A new industrial concept is presented for packaging biosensor chips in disposable microfluidic cartridges to enable medical diagnostic applications. The inorganic electronic substrates, such as silicon or glass, are integrated in a polymer package which provides the electrical and fluidic interconnections to the world and provides mechanical strength and protection for out-of-lab use. The demonstrated prototype consists of a molded interconnection device (MID), a silicon-based giant magneto-resistive (GMR) biosensor chip, a flex and a polymer fluidic part with integrated tubing. The various processes are compatible with mass manufacturing and run at a high yield. The devices show a reliable electrical interconnection between the sensor chip and readout electronics during extended wet operation. Sandwich immunoassays were carried out in the cartridges with surface functionalized sensor chips. Biological response curves were determined for different concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on the packaged biosensor, which demonstrates the functionality and biocompatibility of the devices. The new packaging concept provides a platform for easy further integration of electrical and fluidic functions, as for instance required for integrated molecular diagnostic devices in cost-effective mass manufacturing

  10. Effects of magnetic barriers on transport and magnetoresistance in a two-dimensional electronic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically the giant magnetoresistance (GMR effect of 2-dimensional electron system (2DES by the transfer matrix method. To produce the inhomogeneous magnetic field, two magnetic strips are pre-deposited on the surface of 2DES. In our work, we fix the magnetization M in one magnetic strip and adjust the tilting angle θ of magnetization in the other. The result shows that the electronic transmission and conductance vary significantly for different θ. The minimum conductance can be obtained at θ = π which corresponds to the magnetization anti-parallel alignment. The magnetoresistance ratio (MRR calculation also indicates we would get the maximum in that case. Furthermore, we consider the magnetization M dependence of MRR in this work. When M increases, MRR peaks get higher and broader and more numbers of peaks can be observed. These results offer an alternative to get a tunable GMR device which can be controlled by adjusting the magnetization M and the magnetized angle θ.

  11. Anomalous magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic polycrystalline materials R2Ni3Si5 (R=rare earth)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, C.; Nigam, A.K.; Nagarajan, R.; Gupta, L.C.; Chandra, G.; Padalia, B.D.; Godart, C.; Vijayaraghaven, R.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) studies on polycrystalline R 2 Ni 3 Si 5 , (R=Y, rare earth) which order antiferromagnetically at low temperatures, are reported here. MR of the Nd, Sm, and Tb members of the series exhibit positive giant magnetoresistance, largest among polycrystalline materials (85%, 75%, and 58% for Tb 2 Ni 3 Si 5 , Sm 2 Ni 3 Si 5 , and Nd 2 Ni 3 Si 5 , respectively, at 4.4 K in a field of 45 kG). These materials have, to the best of our knowledge, the largest positive GMR reported ever for any bulk polycrystalline compounds. The magnitude of MR does not correlate with the rare earth magnetic moments. We believe that the structure of these materials, which can be considered as a naturally occurring multilayer of wavy planes of rare earth atoms separated by Ni endash Si network, plays a role. The isothermal MR of other members of this series (R=Pr,Dy,Ho) exhibits a maximum and a minimum, below their respective T N close-quote s. We interpret these in terms of a metamagnetic transition and short-range ferromagnetic correlations. The short-range ferromagnetic correlations seem to be dominant in the temperature region just above T N . copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Magnetoresistance of oblique angle deposited multilayered Co/Cu nanocolumns measured by a scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, P; Tang, X-T; Parker, T C; Shima, M; Wang, G-C

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present the first magnetoresistance measurements on multilayered vertical Co(∼6 nm)/Cu(∼6 nm) and slanted Co(x nm)/Cu(x nm) (with x∼6, 11, and 16 nm) nanocolumns grown by oblique angle vapour deposition. The measurements are performed at room temperature on the as-deposited nanocolumn samples using a scanning tunnelling microscope to establish electronic contact with a small number of nanocolumns while an electromagnet generates a time varying (0.1 Hz) magnetic field in the plane of the substrate. The samples show a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) response ranging from 0.2 to 2%, with the higher GMR values observed for the thinner layers. For the slanted nanocolumns, we observed anisotropy in the GMR with respect to the relative orientation (parallel or perpendicular) between the incident vapour flux and the magnetic field applied in the substrate plane. We explain the anisotropy by noting that the column axis is the magnetic easy axis, so the magnetization reversal occurs more easily when the magnetic field is applied along the incident flux direction (i.e., nearly along the column axis) than when the field is applied perpendicular to the incident flux direction

  13. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  14. Stripe domains and magnetoresistance in thermally deposited nickel films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, P.D.; Stern, N.P.; Snowden, D.S.; Kappus, B.A.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Harberger, S.S.; Fusello, A.M.; Eckert, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We report a study of the domain structure and magnetoresistance of thermally deposited nickel films. For films thicker than 17 nm, we observe striped domains with period varying with film thickness as a power law with exponent 0.21±0.02 up to 120 nm thickness. There is a negative magnetoresistance for fields out of the plane

  15. Stripe domains and magnetoresistance in thermally deposited nickel films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, P. D.; Stern, N. P.; Snowden, D. S.; Kappus, B. A.; Checkelsky, J. G.; Harberger, S. S.; Fusello, A. M.; Eckert, J. C.

    2004-05-01

    We report a study of the domain structure and magnetoresistance of thermally deposited nickel films. For films thicker than 17nm, we observe striped domains with period varying with film thickness as a power law with exponent 0.21+/-0.02 up to 120nm thickness. There is a negative magnetoresistance for fields out of the plane.

  16. Stripe domains and magnetoresistance in thermally deposited nickel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, P.D. E-mail: sparks@hmc.edu; Stern, N.P.; Snowden, D.S.; Kappus, B.A.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Harberger, S.S.; Fusello, A.M.; Eckert, J.C

    2004-05-01

    We report a study of the domain structure and magnetoresistance of thermally deposited nickel films. For films thicker than 17 nm, we observe striped domains with period varying with film thickness as a power law with exponent 0.21{+-}0.02 up to 120 nm thickness. There is a negative magnetoresistance for fields out of the plane.

  17. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by magnetic phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X Z; Feng, J F; Wang, Z C; Zhang, J; Zhong, X Y; Song, C; Jin, L; Zhang, B; Li, F; Jiang, M; Tan, Y Z; Zhou, X J; Shi, G Y; Zhou, X F; Han, X D; Mao, S C; Chen, Y H; Han, X F; Pan, F

    2017-09-06

    The independent control of two magnetic electrodes and spin-coherent transport in magnetic tunnel junctions are strictly required for tunneling magnetoresistance, while junctions with only one ferromagnetic electrode exhibit tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance dependent on the anisotropic density of states with no room temperature performance so far. Here, we report an alternative approach to obtaining tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in α'-FeRh-based junctions driven by the magnetic phase transition of α'-FeRh and resultantly large variation of the density of states in the vicinity of MgO tunneling barrier, referred to as phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. The junctions with only one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode show a magnetoresistance ratio up to 20% at room temperature. Both the polarity and magnitude of the phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance can be modulated by interfacial engineering at the α'-FeRh/MgO interface. Besides the fundamental significance, our finding might add a different dimension to magnetic random access memory and antiferromagnet spintronics.Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance is promising for next generation memory devices but limited by the low efficiency and functioning temperature. Here the authors achieved 20% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode.

  18. Magnetoresistance in molybdenite (MoS2) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, B.R.; Dutta, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    The principal magnetoresistance ratios of molybdenite (MoS 2 ), the naturally occurring semiconducting crystal, have been investigated at magnetic fields ranging from 4.5 KOe and within the temperature range 300 0 K to 700 0 K. Unlike some previous observations, magnetoresistance has been found to be negative. (author)

  19. Colossal Magnetoresistance in La-Y-Ca-Mn-O Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, L.H.; Tiefel, T.H.; Jin, S.; Palstra, T.T.M.; Ramesh, R.; Kwon, C.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetoresistance behavior of La0.60Y0.07CaMnOx, thin films epitaxially grown on LaAlO3 has been investigated. The films exhibit colossal magnetoresistance with the MR ratio in excess of 10^8% at ~60K, H = 7T, which is the highest ever reported for thin film manganites. The partial substitution of

  20. Oxidized Mn:Ge magnetic semiconductor: Observation of anomalous Hall effect and large magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc Dung, Dang; Choi, Jiyoun; Feng, Wuwei; Cao Khang, Nguyen; Cho, Sunglae

    2018-03-01

    We report on the structural and magneto-transport properties of the as-grown and oxidized Mn:Ge magnetic semiconductors. Based on X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, the samples annealed at 650 and 700 °C became fully oxidized and the chemical binding energies of Mn was found to be Mn3O4. Thus, the system became Mn3O4 clusters embedded in Ge1-yOy. The as-grown sample showed positive linear Hall effect and negligible negative magnetoresistance (MR), which trend remained for the sample annealed up to 550 °C. Interestingly, for the samples annealed at above 650 °C, we observed the anomalous Hall effect around 45 K and the giant positive MR, which are respectively 59.2% and 78.5% at 7 kOe annealed at 650 °C and 700 °C.

  1. Crossover of angular dependent magnetoresistance with the metal-insulator transition in colossal magnetoresistive manganite films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Sun, J.R.; Zhao, T.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature and magnetic field dependence of angular dependent magnetoresistance (AMR) along two orthogonal directions ([100] and [01]) was investigated in a charge-orbital-ordered Sm0.5Ca0.5MnO3 (SCMO) film grown on (011)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates. A dramatic decrease of AMR magnitude in bo...

  2. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance: A spin-valve-like tunnel magnetoresistance using a single magnetic layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gould, C.; Rüster, C.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Girgis, E.; Schott, G. M.; Giraud, R.; Brunner, K.; Schmidt, G.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 11 (2004), 117203/1-117203/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0912 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : semiconductor spintronics * tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.218, year: 2004

  3. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  4. Magnetoresistance effect in a both magnetically and electrically modulated nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Mao-Wang; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2007-01-01

    We propose a magnetoresistance device in a both magnetically and electrically modulated two-dimensional electron gas, which can be realized experimentally by the deposition, on the top and bottom of a semiconductor heterostructure, of two parallel metallic ferromagnetic strips under an applied voltage. It is shown that a considerable magnetoresistance effect can be achieved in such a device due to the significant transmission difference for electrons through parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is also shown that the magnetoresistance ratio depends strongly on the applied voltage to the stripe in the device. These interesting properties may provide an alternative scheme to realize magnetoresistance effect in hybrid ferromagnetic/semiconductor nanosystems, and this system may be used as a voltage-tunable magnetoresistance device

  5. Hopping magnetotransport via nonzero orbital momentum states and organic magnetoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Alexandre S; Dediu, Valentin A; Kabanov, Victor V

    2012-05-04

    In hopping magnetoresistance of doped insulators, an applied magnetic field shrinks the electron (hole) s-wave function of a donor or an acceptor and this reduces the overlap between hopping sites resulting in the positive magnetoresistance quadratic in a weak magnetic field, B. We extend the theory of hopping magnetoresistance to states with nonzero orbital momenta. Different from s states, a weak magnetic field expands the electron (hole) wave functions with positive magnetic quantum numbers, m>0, and shrinks the states with negative m in a wide region outside the point defect. This together with a magnetic-field dependence of injection/ionization rates results in a negative weak-field magnetoresistance, which is linear in B when the orbital degeneracy is lifted. The theory provides a possible explanation of a large low-field magnetoresistance in disordered π-conjugated organic materials.

  6. Large magnetoresistance effect in nitrogen-doped silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we reported a large magnetoresistance effect in silicon by ion implantation of nitrogen atoms. At room temperature, the magnetoresistance of silicon reaches 125 % under magnetic field 1.7 T and voltage bias -80 V. By applying an alternating magnetic field with a frequency (f of 0.008 Hz, we find that the magnetoresistance of silicon is divided into f and 2f two signal components, which represent the linear and quadratic magnetoresistance effects, respectively. The analysis based on tuning the magnetic field and the voltage bias reveals that electric-field-induced space-charge effect plays an important role to enhance both the linear and quadratic magnetoresistance effects. Observation as well as a comprehensive explanation of large MR in silicon, especially based on semiconductor CMOS implantation technology, will be an important progress towards magnetoelectronic applications.

  7. Spin-flip induced magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, N J; Flatté, M E

    2012-05-04

    A model for magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic materials is presented and solved using percolation theory. The model describes the effects of spin dynamics on hopping transport by considering changes in the effective density of hopping sites, a key quantity determining the properties of percolative transport. Faster spin-flip transitions open up "spin-blocked" pathways to become viable conduction channels and hence produce magnetoresistance. Features of this percolative magnetoresistance can be found analytically in several regimes, and agree with previous measurements, including the sensitive dependence of the magnetic-field dependence of the magnetoresistance on the ratio of the carrier hopping time to the hyperfine-induced carrier spin precession time. Studies of magnetoresistance in known systems with controllable positional disorder would provide an additional stringent test of this theory.

  8. Electrically tuned magnetic order and magnetoresistance in a topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Guo, Minghua; Li, Kang; Zhang, Jinsong; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Wang, Lili; Chen, Xi; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Wang, Yayu

    2014-09-15

    The interplay between topological protection and broken time reversal symmetry in topological insulators may lead to highly unconventional magnetoresistance behaviour that can find unique applications in magnetic sensing and data storage. However, the magnetoresistance of topological insulators with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the transport properties of a ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film fabricated into a field effect transistor device. We observe a complex evolution of gate-tuned magnetoresistance, which is positive when the Fermi level lies close to the Dirac point but becomes negative at higher energies. This trend is opposite to that expected from the Berry phase picture, but is intimately correlated with the gate-tuned magnetic order. The underlying physics is the competition between the topology-induced weak antilocalization and magnetism-induced negative magnetoresistance. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and magnetoresistance facilitates future topological insulator based spintronic devices.

  9. Large magnetoresistance in intercalated Cu oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryan, L.; Furusawa, M.; Hori, H.; Tokumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetism and electrical resistance as a function of magnetic field, temperature, and chemical composition are studied in Cu oxides intercalated with metal phthalocyanines MPc, where M is Fe or Ni, and Pc is C_H_N_. An unusually large positive magnetoresistance (MR) of ~ 1200% is observed in FePc-intercalated Bi_Sr_Ca_Cu_O_ samples with two Cu-O layers in the unit cell (n=2). The magnitude of the MR decreased to 40% and ~ 0% in the FePc-intercalated n=3 and n=4 samples, respectively, and to ~...

  10. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong [El Cerrito, CA; Choi, Heonjin [Seoul, KR; Lee, Sangkwon [Daejeon, KR; He, Rongrui [Albany, CA; Zhang, Yanfeng [El Cerrito, CA; Kuykendal, Tevye [Berkeley, CA; Pauzauskie, Peter [Berkeley, CA

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Tunneling magnetoresistance from a symmetry filtering effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Butler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief overview of the young, but rapidly growing field of spintronics. Its primary objective is to explain how as electrons tunnel through simple insulators such as MgO, wavefunctions of certain symmetries are preferentially transmitted. This symmetry filtering property can be converted into a spin-filtering property if the insulator is joined epitaxially to a ferromagnetic electrode with the same two-dimensional symmetry parallel to the interface. A second requirement of the ferromagnetic electrodes is that a wavefunction with the preferred symmetry exists in one of the two spin channels but not in the other. These requirements are satisfied for electrons traveling perpendicular to the interface for Fe–MgO–Fe tunnel barriers. This leads to a large change in the resistance when the magnetic moment of one of the electrodes is rotated relative to those of the other electrode. This large tunneling magnetoresistance effect is being used as the read sensor in hard drives and may form the basis for a new type of magnetic memory.

  12. Lab-on-a-Chip Magneto-Immunoassays: How to Ensure Contact between Superparamagnetic Beads and the Sensor Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hütten

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lab-on-a-chip immuno assays utilizing superparamagnetic beads as labels suffer from the fact that the majority of beads pass the sensing area without contacting the sensor surface. Different solutions, employing magnetic forces, ultrasonic standing waves, or hydrodynamic effects have been found over the past decades. The first category uses magnetic forces, created by on-chip conducting lines to attract beads towards the sensor surface. Modifications of the magnetic landscape allow for additional transport and separation of different bead species. The hydrodynamic approach uses changes in the channel geometry to enhance the capture volume. In acoustofluidics, ultrasonic standing waves force µm-sized particles onto a surface through radiation forces. As these approaches have their disadvantages, a new sensor concept that circumvents these problems is suggested. This concept is based on the granular giant magnetoresistance (GMR effect that can be found in gels containing magnetic nanoparticles. The proposed design could be realized in the shape of paper-based test strips printed with gel-based GMR sensors.

  13. Electrical properties and granular magnetoresistance in nanomanganite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    َAli Rostamnejadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research single phaseLa0.7(Sr 1-xBax0.3MnO3(x =0, 0.1 , 0.2 , 0.3 nanomanganite with crystalline size of 18-28 nm have been prepared by sol gel method. The structural properties have been studied using X-ray diffraction spectra with its Rietveld analysis and scaning electron microscope images. The magnetic and elctrical properties have been investigated by measuring the ac magnetic susceptibility and resistivity in the presence of magnetic fields in the range of 0-20 kOe. The obtained results from ac magnetic susceptibility show that the Curie temperture of the samples are above room temperture. The results of resistivity show that the metal-insulator phase transition temperture of and compounds are below room temperture. The resistivity of the samples strongly decreases and their magnetoresistance almost linearly increases by incrasing the applied magnetic field at different tempertures. The value of magnetoresistance for compound is 10 % and 14 % at 275 K and 200 K, and for compound is 13 %  and 27 % at 275 K and 100 K, respectively which are suitable for magnetic field sensing applications. The magneto-transport properties of nanomanganite are described in terms of spin dependent scattering of charge carriers from grain boundaries and their spin dependent tunneling between grains. 

  14. Large linear magnetoresistance and magnetothermopower in layered SrZnSb$_2$

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the large linear magnetoresistance ($\\sim 300\\%$ in 9 T field at 2 K) and magnetothermopower in layered SrZnSb$_2$ crystal with quasi-two-dimensional Sb layers. A crossover from the semiclassical parabolic field dependent magnetoresistance to linear field dependent magnetoresistance with increasing magnetic field is observed. The magnetoresistance behavior can be described very well by combining the semiclassical cyclotron contribution and the quantum limit magnetoresistance. Magnet...

  15. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B., E-mail: goennenwein@wmi.badw.de; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meißner-Str. 8, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meißner-Str. 8, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Althammer, Matthias [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meißner-Str. 8, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  16. Resistivity dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Li; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-06

    We report the dependence of magnetoresistance effect on resistivity (ρ) in Co/ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering at different sputtering pressures with different ZnO contents. The magnitude of the resistivity reflects different carrier transport regimes ranging from metallic to hopping behaviors. Large room-temperature magnetoresistance greater than 8% is obtained in the resistivity range from 0.08 to 0.5 Ω · cm. The magnetoresistance value decreases markedly when the resistivity of the films is less than 0.08 Ω · cm or greater than 0.5 Ω · cm. When 0.08 Ω · cm magnetoresistance effect. When ρ > 0.5 Ω · cm, the spin-independent higher-order hopping (N > 2) comes into play and decreases the tunneling magnetoresistance value. For the samples with ρ magnetoresistance is mainly ascribed to the formation of percolation paths through interconnected elongated metallic Co particles. This observation is significant for the improvement of room-temperature magnetoresistance value for future spintronic devices.

  17. Colossal magnetoresistance in manganites and related prototype devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yu-Kuai; Yin Yue-Wei; Li Xiao-Guang

    2013-01-01

    We review colossal magnetoresistance in single phase manganites, as related to the field sensitive spin-charge interactions and phase separation; the rectifying property and negative/positive magnetoresistance in manganite/Nb:SrTiO 3 p—n junctions in relation to the special interface electronic structure; magnetoelectric coupling in manganite/ferroelectric structures that takes advantage of strain, carrier density, and magnetic field sensitivity; tunneling magnetoresistance in tunnel junctions with dielectric, ferroelectric, and organic semiconductor spacers using the fully spin polarized nature of manganites; and the effect of particle size on magnetic properties in manganite nanoparticles. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  18. Large magnetoresistance in La-Ca-Mn-O films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.H.; Jin, S.; Tiefel, T.H.; Ramesh, R.; Schurig, D.

    1995-01-01

    A very large magnetoresistance value in excess of 10 6 % has been obtained at 110 K, H = 6 T in La-Ca-Mn-O thin films epitaxially grown on LaAlO 3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The as-deposited film exhibits a substantial magnetoresistance value of 39,000%, which is further improved by heat treatment. A strong dependence of the magnetoresistance on film thickness was observed, with the value reduced by orders of magnitude when the film is made thicker than ∼2,000 angstrom. This behavior is interpreted in terms of lattice strain in the La-Ca-Mn-O films

  19. Magnetoresistive properties of non-uniform state of antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchko, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model of magnetoresistive properties of magneto-non-single-phase state of alloyed magnetic semiconductors is considered using the concept derived for a description of magnetoresistive effects in layered and granular magnetic metals. By assuming that there exists a magneto-non-single state in the manganites having the perovskite structure, it is possible to describe, in the framework of above approach, large magnetoresistive effects of manganite phases with antiferromagnetic order and semiconductor-type conductivity as well as those with antiferromagnetic properties and metallic-type conductivity

  20. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity of semimetal WTe2 ultrathin flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Fang, Chi; Wan, Caihua; Cai, Jialin; Liu, Yong; Han, Xiufeng; Lu, Zhihong; Shi, Wenhua; Xiong, Rui; Zeng, Zhongming

    2017-04-07

    This article reports the characterization of WTe 2 thin flake magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity. We found it does not exhibit magnetoresistance saturation when subject to high fields, in a manner similar to their bulk characteristics. The linearity of Hall resistivity in our devices confirms the compensation of electrons and holes. By relating experimental results to a classic two-band model, the lower magnetoresistance values in our samples is demonstrated to be caused by decreased carrier mobility. The dependence of mobility on temperature indicates the main role of optical phonon scattering at high temperatures. Our results provide more detailed information on carrier behavior and scattering mechanisms in WTe 2 thin films.

  1. Significant enhancement of magnetoresistance with the reduction of particle size in nanometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kalipada; Dasgupta, P.; Poddar, A.; Das, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Physics of materials with large magnetoresistance (MR), defined as the percentage change of electrical resistance with the application of external magnetic field, has been an active field of research for quite some times. In addition to the fundamental interest, large MR has widespread application that includes the field of magnetic field sensor technology. New materials with large MR is interesting. However it is more appealing to vast scientific community if a method describe to achieve many fold enhancement of MR of already known materials. Our study on several manganite samples [La1−xCaxMnO3 (x = 0.52, 0.54, 0.55)] illustrates the method of significant enhancement of MR with the reduction of the particle size in nanometer scale. Our experimentally observed results are explained by considering model consisted of a charge ordered antiferromagnetic core and a shell having short range ferromagnetic correlation between the uncompensated surface spins in nanoscale regime. The ferromagnetic fractions obtained theoretically in the nanoparticles has been shown to be in the good agreement with the experimental results. The method of several orders of magnitude improvement of the magnetoresistive property will have enormous potential for magnetic field sensor technology. PMID:26837285

  2. Magnetoresistance and ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeink, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the combination of the magnetic patterning of the unidirectional anisotropy and the tunnel magnetoresistance effect is investigated. In my diploma thesis, it has been shown that it is in principle possible to use the magnetic patterning by ion bombardment to magnetically structure the pinned layer in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with alumina barrier. Furthermore, it has been shown that the side effects which have been observed after this treatment can be at least reduced by an additional heating step. Starting from this point, the applicability of ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP) in general and the combination of IBMP and MTJs in particular is investigated and new applications are developed. (orig.)

  3. Large magnetoresistance in Er7Rh3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Kaushik; Sampathkumaran, E.V.

    2005-01-01

    The compound Er 2 Rh 3 has been known to order antiferromagnetically below (T N =14K), and to exhibit a change in the sign of temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity (ρ) in the paramagnetic state around 120 K. Here we report the influence of external magnetic field (H) on the ρ(T) behavior of this compound (1.8-300 K). While the ρ behavior in the paramagnetic state, qualitatively speaking, is found to be robust to the application of H, the magnitude of the magnetoresistance (MR) is significant for moderate applications of H, even at temperatures for above T N untypical of metallic systems. In addition, large values are observed in the magnetically ordered state. (author)

  4. Enhanced magnetoresistance in graphene spin valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir, E-mail: zahir.upc@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering Sciences, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Hussain, Ghulam [Faculty of Engineering Sciences, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Siddique, Salma [Department of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas [Department of Physics, Riphah Institute of Computing and Applied Sciences (RICAS), Riphah International University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-05-01

    Graphene has been explored as a promising candidate for spintronics due to its atomically flat structure and novel properties. Here we fabricate two spin valve junctions, one from directly grown graphene on Ni electrode (DG) and other from transferred graphene (TG). The magnetoresistance (MR) ratio for DG device is found to be higher than TG device i.e. ~0.73% and 0.14%, respectively. Also the spin polarization of Ni electrode is determined to be 6.03% at room temperature in case of DG device, however it reduces to 2.1% for TG device. From this analysis, we infer how environmental exposure of the sample degrades the spin properties of the magnetic junctions. Moreover, the transport measurements reveal linear behavior for current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, indicating ohmic behavior of the junctions. Our findings unveil the efficiency of direct growth of graphene for spin filtering mechanism in spin valve devices.

  5. Evaluation of Magnetoresistive RAM for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is a non-volatile memory that exploits electronic spin, rather than charge, to store data. Instead of moving charge on and off a floating gate to alter the threshold voltage of a CMOS transistor (creating different bit states), MRAM uses magnetic fields to flip the polarization of a ferromagnetic material thus switching its resistance and bit state. These polarized states are immune to radiation-induced upset, thus making MRAM very attractive for space application. These magnetic memory elements also have infinite data retention and erase/program endurance. Presented here are results of reliability testing of two space-qualified MRAM products from Aeroflex and Honeywell.

  6. Tunnel magnetoresistance in double spin filter junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza

    2003-01-01

    We consider a new type of magnetic tunnel junction, which consists of two ferromagnetic tunnel barriers acting as spin filters (SFs), separated by a nonmagnetic metal (NM) layer. Using the transfer matrix method and the free-electron approximation, the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) on the thickness of the central NM layer, bias voltage and temperature in the double SF junction are studied theoretically. It is shown that the TMR and electron-spin polarization in this structure can reach very large values under suitable conditions. The highest value of the TMR can reach 99%. By an appropriate choice of the thickness of the central NM layer, the degree of spin polarization in this structure will be higher than that of the single SF junctions. These results may be useful in designing future spin-polarized tunnelling devices

  7. Longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnototermopower in Bi nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Para, G.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The galvanomagnetic effect of single crystals Bi nanowires have been studied in longitudinal magnetic fields up to 14 T. The influence of diameters, temperature and deformation extension on the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetotermopower (H||I, H||ΔT) of bismuth nanowires is studied. Elastic deformation measurements were conducted at maximum relative elongation 2 %. For the first time have been investigated the magnetotermopower of Bi nanowires with d=45 nm. Essentially non monotonic dependence H max on temperature in longitudinal thermopower in wires with d=45-60 nm is found out. Such difference in behavior of maximum on R(H) and on α(H) in wires with d<100nm says that the behavior of resistance is caused by other mechanism, then thermopower. (author)

  8. Optically Tunable Magnetoresistance Effect: From Mechanism to Novel Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pan; Lin, Xiaoyang; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Boyu; Si, Zhizhong; Cao, Kaihua; Wei, Jiaqi; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-12-28

    The magnetoresistance effect in sandwiched structure describes the appreciable magnetoresistance effect of a device with a stacking of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic layer (i.e., a sandwiched structure). The development of this effect has led to the revolution of memory applications during the past decades. In this review, we revisited the magnetoresistance effect and the interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) effect in magnetic sandwiched structures with a spacer layer of non-magnetic metal, semiconductor or organic thin film. We then discussed the optical modulation of this effect via different methods. Finally, we discuss various applications of these effects and present a perspective to realize ultralow-power, high-speed data writing and inter-chip connection based on this tunable magnetoresistance effect.

  9. Extraordinary magnetoresistance in semiconductor/metal hybrids: A review

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, J.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2013-01-01

    The Extraordinary Magnetoresistance (EMR) effect is a change in the resistance of a device upon the application of a magnetic field in hybrid structures, consisting of a semiconductor and a metal. The underlying principle of this phenomenon is a

  10. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur; Useinov, Niazbeck Kh H; Tagirov, Lenar R.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can

  11. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 ) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  12. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in lanthanum manganite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubkin, M.K.; Zalesskii, A.V.; Perekalina, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetoresistivity in the La0.9Na0.1Mn0.9(V,Co)0.1O3 and LaMnO3+δ ceramics was studied. The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in these specimens was found to differ qualitatively from that in the La0.9Na0.1MnO3 single crystal (the magnetoresistance value remains rather high throughout the measurement range below the Curie temperature), with the maximum values being about the same (20-40% in the field of 20 kOe). Previously published data on magnetization, high frequency magnetic susceptibility, and local fields at the 139La nuclei of the specimens with similar properties attest to their magnetic inhomogeneity. The computation of the conductivity of the nonuniformly ordered lanthanum manganite was performed according to the mean field theory. The calculation results allow one to interpret qualitatively various types of experimental temperature dependences of magnetoresistance

  13. Magnetoresistance anomaly in DyFeCo thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J. C.; Wu, C. S.; Wu, Te-ho; Chen, Bing-Mau; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2001-01-01

    Microstructured rare-earth - transition-metal DyFeCo films have been investigated using magnetoresistance and extraordinary Hall-effect measurements. The Hall loops reveal variation of coercive fields depending on the linewidth and the composition of the films. The magnetoresistance curves, with changes up to as high as 1.3%, show positive/negative magnetoresistance peaks centered on the coercive fields depending on the linewidth of the films only. The variation of the coercivity can be attributed to the magnetic moment canting between the Dy and FeCo subcomponents and the existence of the diverged magnetization on the edges, and the anomalous magnetoresistance peaks observed are discussed with the existing theories. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  14. Quantum conductance in electrodeposited nanocontacts and magnetoresistance measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhoussine, F.; Encinas, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The conductance and magnetoresistance measurements in magnetic Ni-Ni and Co-Ni nanocontacts prepared by electrodeposition within the pores of a track of track-etched polymer membrane were discussed. At room temperature, Ni-Ni constrictions were found to show broad quantization plateaus of conduct...... of conductance during their dissolution in units of e/h, as expected for ferromagnetic ballistic nanocontacts. The measurement of the positive and negative magnetoresistance in Co-Ni nanocontacts was also elaborated....

  15. Oscillations in magnetoresistance and interlayer coupling in magnetic sandwich structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnas, J.; Bulka, B.

    1997-01-01

    Kubo formalism is used to calculate the magnetoresistance due to magnetization rotation in a structure consisting two magnetic films separated by nonmagnetic layer. In the approximation of an uniform relaxation time of each layer, the oscillatory term in magnetoresistance corresponds to the oscillation period which depends on the potential barriers at the interfaces. This period is longer than the oscillation period observed in the coupling parameter. (author)

  16. Magnetoresistance and magnetic ordering in praseodymium and neodymium hexaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, M. A.; Bogach, A. V.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, N. A.; Filipov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Sluchanko, N. E.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetoresistance Δρ/ρ of single-crystal samples of praseodymium and neodymium hexaborides (PrB 6 and NdB 6 ) has been measured at temperatures ranging from 2 to 20 K in a magnetic field of up to 80 kOe. The results obtained have revealed a crossover of the regime from a small negative magnetoresistance in the paramagnetic state to a large positive magnetoresistive effect in magnetically ordered phases of the PrB 6 and NdB 6 compounds. An analysis of the dependences Δρ(H)/ρ has made it possible to separate three contributions to the magnetoresistance for the compounds under investigation. In addition to the main negative contribution, which is quadratic in the magnetic field (-Δρ/ρ ∝ H 2 ), a linear positive contribution (Δρ/ρ ∝ H) and a nonlinear ferromagnetic contribution have been found. Upon transition to a magnetically ordered state, the linear positive component in the magnetoresistance of the PrB 6 and NdB 6 compounds becomes dominant, whereas the quadratic contribution to the negative magnetoresistance is completely suppressed in the commensurate magnetic phase of these compounds. The presence of several components in the magnetoresistance has been explained by assuming that, in the antiferromagnetic phases of PrB 6 and NdB 6 , ferromagnetic nanoregions (ferrons) are formed in the 5d band in the vicinity of the rareearth ions. The origin of the quadratic contribution to the negative magnetoresistance is interpreted in terms of the Yosida model, which takes into account scattering of conduction electrons by localized magnetic moments of rare-earth ions. Within the approach used, the local magnetic susceptibility χ loc has been estimated. It has been demonstrated that, in the temperature range T N loc for the compounds under investigation can be described with good accuracy by the Curie-Weiss dependence χ loc ∝ (T - Θ p ) -1 .

  17. Fault-tolerant system for catastrophic faults in AMR sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano Constantini, A.C.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    Anisotropic Magnetoresistance angle sensors are widely used in automotive applications considered to be safety-critical applications. Therefore dependability is an important requirement and fault-tolerant strategies must be used to guarantee the correct operation of the sensors even in case of

  18. Underwater Animal Monitoring Magnetic Sensor System

    KAUST Repository

    Kaidarova, Altynay

    2017-10-01

    Obtaining new insights into the behavior of free-living marine organisms is fundamental for conservation efforts and anticipating the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems. Despite the recent advances in biotelemetry, collecting physiological and behavioral parameters of underwater free-living animals remains technically challenging. In this thesis, we develop the first magnetic underwater animal monitoring system that utilizes Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors, the most sensitive solid-state sensors today, coupled with flexible magnetic composites. The TMR sensors are composed of CoFeB free layers and MgO tunnel barriers, patterned using standard optical lithography and ion milling procedures. The short and long-term stability of the TMR sensors has been studied using statistical and Allan deviation analysis. Instrumentation noise has been reduced using optimized electrical interconnection schemes. We also develop flexible NdFeB-PDMS composite magnets optimized for applications in corrosive marine environments, and which can be attached to marine animals. The magnetic and mechanical properties are studied for different NdFeB powder concentrations and the performance of the magnetic composites for different exposure times to sea water is systematically investigated. Without protective layer, the composite magnets loose more than 50% of their magnetization after 51 days in seawater. The durability of the composite magnets can be considerably improved by using polymer coatings which are protecting the composite magnet, whereby Parylene C is found to be the most effective solution, providing simultaneously corrosion resistance, flexibility, and enhanced biocompatibility. A Parylene C film of 2μm thickness provides the sufficient protection of the magnetic composite in corrosive aqueous environments for more than 70 days. For the high level performance of the system, the theoretically optimal position of the composite magnets with respect to the sensing

  19. Giant magnetoimpedance intrinsic impedance and voltage sensitivity of rapidly solidified Co{sub 66}Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 4}Si{sub 13}B{sub 15} amorphous wire for highly sensitive sensors applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Tarun K.; Mandal, Sushil K. [CSIR - National Metallurgical Laboratory, NDE and Magnetic Materials Group, MST Division, Jamshedpur (India); Banerji, Pallab [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Materials Science Centre, Kharagpur (India)

    2016-11-15

    We report a systematic study of the influence of wire length, L, dependence of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) sensitivity of Co{sub 66}Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 4}Si{sub 13}B{sub 15} soft magnetic amorphous wire of diameter ∝ 100 μm developed by in-water quenching technique. The magnetization behaviour (hysteresis loops) of the wire with different length (L = 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and 10 cm) has been evaluated by fuxmetric induction method. It was observed that the behaviour of the hysteresis loops change drastically with the wire length, being attributed to the existence of a critical length, L{sub C}, found to be around 3 cm. GMI measurements have been taken using automated GMI measurement system and the GMI sensitivities in terms of intrinsic impedance sensitivity (S{sub Ω/Am}{sup -1}) and voltage sensitivity (S{sub V/Am}{sup -1}) of the wire have been evaluated under optimal bias field and excitation current. It was found that the maximum (S{sub Ω/Am}{sup -1}){sub max} ∼ 0.63 Ω/kAm{sup -1}/cm and (S{sub V/Am}{sup -1}){sub max} ∼ 3.10 V/kAm{sup -1}/cm were achieved at a critical length L{sub C} ∝ 3 cm of the wire for an AC current of 5 mA and a frequency of 5 MHz. These findings provide crucial insights for optimization of the geometrical dimensions of magnetic sensing elements and important practical guidance for designing high sensitive GMI sensors. The relevant combinations of magnetic material parameters and operating conditions that optimize the sensitivity are highlighted. (orig.)

  20. A {mu}SR study of the magnetoresistive ruthenocuprates RuSr{sub 2}Nd{sub 1.8-x}Y {sub 0.2}Ce{sub x}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 10-{delta}} (x = 0.95 and 0.80)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclaughlin, A C [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Attfield, J P [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, King' s Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Van Duijn, J [Instituto de Investigacion en EnergIas Renovables, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Albacete, E02006 (Spain); Hillier, A D, E-mail: a.c.mclaughlin@abdn.ac.uk [ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-14

    Zero field muon spin relaxation (ZF-{mu}SR) has been used to study the magnetic properties of the underdoped giant magnetoresistive ruthenocuprates RuSr{sub 2}Nd{sub 1.8-x}Y {sub 0.2}Ce{sub x}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 10-{delta}} (x = 0.95, 0.80). The magnetoresistance (MR) is defined so that MR = (({rho}{sub H}-{rho}{sub 0})/{rho}{sub 0}) and the giant magnetoresistive ruthenocuprates RuSr{sub 2}Nd{sub 1.8-x}Y {sub 0.2}Ce{sub x}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 10-{delta}} exhibit a large reduction in electronic resistivity upon application of a magnetic field. The ZF-{mu}SR results show a gradual loss of initial asymmetry A{sub 0} at the ruthenium spin transition temperature, T{sub Ru}. At the same time the electronic relaxation rate, {lambda}, shows a gradual increase with decreasing temperature below T{sub Ru}. These results have been interpreted as evidence for Cu spin cluster formation below T{sub Ru}. These magnetically ordered clusters grow as the temperature is decreased thus causing the initial asymmetry to decrease slowly. Giant magnetoresistance is observed over a wide temperature range in the materials studied and the magnitude increases as the temperature is reduced from T{sub Ru} to 4 K which suggests a relation between Cu spin cluster size and |-MR|. (paper)

  1. Magnetoresistivity and microstructure of YBa2Cu3Oy prepared using planetary ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamrita, A.; Ben Azzouz, F.; Madani, A.; Ben Salem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting properties of YBa 2 Cu 3 O y prepared using planetary ball milling were studied. Y-deficient YBa 2 Cu 3 O y nanoparticles are embedded in the superconducting matrix. Ball milled sample exhibits a large magnetoresistivity in weak magnetic fields at 77 K. We have studied the microstructure and the magnetoresistivity of polycrystalline YBa 2 Cu 3 O y (YBCO or Y-123 for brevity) embedded with nanoparticles of Y-deficient YBCO, generated by the planetary ball milling technique. Bulk samples were synthesized from a precursor YBCO powder, which was prepared from commercial high purity Y 2 O 3 , Ba 2 CO 3 and CuO via a one-step annealing process in air at 950 °C. After planetary ball milling of the precursor, the powder was uniaxially pressed and subsequently annealed at 950 °C in air. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), granular structure examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microstructure investigation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were carried out. TEM analyses show that nanoparticles of Y-deficient YBCO, generated by ball milling, are embedded in the superconducting matrix. Electrical resistance as a function of temperature, ρ(T), revealed that the zero resistance temperature, T co , is 84.5 and 90 K for the milled and unmilled samples respectively. The milled ceramics exhibit a large magnetoresistance in weak magnetic fields at liquid nitrogen temperature. This attractive effect is of high significance as it makes these materials promising candidates for practical application in magnetic field sensor devices.

  2. Characteristics of a Bulk High-Critical Temperature Superconductor Fabricated by the Shock Compaction Method: Possible Use as a Highly Sensitive Magnetic Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, H; Maeji, Y; Yamagata, K; Itoh, M; Kezuka, H; Kikuchi, M; Atou, T; Kawasaki, M; Fukuoka, K

    2006-01-01

    A magnetic sensor, constructed of bulk Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BPSCCO), was fabricated by use of the shock compaction method, employing a propellant gun-system, and then sintered under through use of an electronic furnace. The specimen as a magnetic sensor was maintained in the superconducting state at 77.4 K, under a current density J of approximately 40 A/cm 2 in the absence of an excitation magnetic field B ex . The superconducting state was then broken and the specimen exposed to a B ex value of 40x10 -4 T. That is, the resistance R meas of the specimen occurred when exposed to 40x10 -4 T under a constant J of 40 A/cm 2 . The magnetic sensitivity S of the specimen was approximately 13 %/(10 -4 T) over the range of measurement of the magnetic field B meas from 0 to ±5x10 -4 T, under a constant 40x10 -4 T for the value of B ex , being approximately 13 times greater than that of a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor. It was, consequently, determined that it was possible to apply the bulk BPSCCO specimen as a highly sensitive magnetic sensor

  3. Characteristics of a Bulk High-Critical Temperature Superconductor Fabricated by the Shock Compaction Method: Possible Use as a Highly Sensitive Magnetic Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H [Interdisci. Grad. School of Sci. and Engi., Grad. School of Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Maeji, Y [Interdisci. Grad. School of Sci. and Engi., Grad. School of Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamagata, K [Relia. Eval. Technol. Center, Nitto Denko Corp., Onomichi, Hiroshima 722-0212 (Japan); Itoh, M [Interdisci. Grad. School of Sci. and Engi., Grad. School of Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Kezuka, H [Faculty of Bionics, Tokyo University of Technol., Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0982 (Japan); Kikuchi, M [Kansen Fukushi Research Center, Tohoku Fukushi University Sendai, Miyagi 989-3201 (Japan); Atou, T [Insti. for Mate. Research, Tohoku University Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Kawasaki, M [Insti. for Mate. Research, Tohoku University Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Fukuoka, K [Insti. for Mate. Research, Tohoku University Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    A magnetic sensor, constructed of bulk Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BPSCCO), was fabricated by use of the shock compaction method, employing a propellant gun-system, and then sintered under through use of an electronic furnace. The specimen as a magnetic sensor was maintained in the superconducting state at 77.4 K, under a current density J of approximately 40 A/cm{sup 2} in the absence of an excitation magnetic field B{sub ex}. The superconducting state was then broken and the specimen exposed to a B{sub ex} value of 40x10{sup -4} T. That is, the resistance R{sub meas} of the specimen occurred when exposed to 40x10{sup -4} T under a constant J of 40 A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic sensitivity S of the specimen was approximately 13 %/(10{sup -4} T) over the range of measurement of the magnetic field B{sub meas} from 0 to {+-}5x10{sup -4} T, under a constant 40x10{sup -4} T for the value of B{sub ex}, being approximately 13 times greater than that of a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor. It was, consequently, determined that it was possible to apply the bulk BPSCCO specimen as a highly sensitive magnetic sensor.

  4. Giant Planar Hall Effect in the Dirac Semimetal ZrTe5

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2018-03-03

    Exploration and understanding of exotic topics in quantum physics such as Dirac and Weyl semimetals have become highly popular in the area of condensed matter. It has recently been predicted that a theoretical giant planar Hall effect can be induced by a chiral anomaly in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. ZrTe5 is considered an intriguing Dirac semimetal at the boundary of weak and strong topological insulators, though this claim is still controversial. In this study, we report the observation in ZrTe5 of giant planar Hall resistivity. We have also noted three different dependences of this resistivity on the magnetic field, as predicted by theory, maximum planar Hall resistivity occurs at the Lifshitz transition temperature. In addition, we have discovered a nontrivial Berry phase, as well as a chiral-anomaly-induced negative longitudinal and a giant in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance. All these experimental observations coherently demonstrate that ZrTe5 is a Dirac semimetal.

  5. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal ...

  6. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance and Anisotropic Tunneling Magnetoresistance due to Quantum Interference in Ferromagnetic Metal Break Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Ralph, D

    2006-01-01

    We measure the low-temperature resistance of permalloy break junctions as a function of contact size and the magnetic field angle in applied fields large enough to saturate the magnetization. For both nanometer-scale metallic contacts and tunneling devices we observe large changes in resistance w...... with the angle, as large as 25% in the tunneling regime. The pattern of magnetoresistance is sensitive to changes in bias on a scale of a few mV. We interpret the effect as a consequence of conductance fluctuations due to quantum interference....

  7. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Fe{sub 3}Si/MgO/Fe{sub 3}Si(001) magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, L. L.; Liang, S. H.; Liu, D. P.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Jian [Department of Physics and the Center of Theoretical and Computational Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-04-28

    We present a theoretical study of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin-polarized transport in Fe{sub 3}Si/MgO/Fe{sub 3}Si(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). It is found that the spin-polarized conductance and bias-dependent TMR ratios are rather sensitive to the structure of Fe{sub 3}Si electrode. From the symmetry analysis of the band structures, we found that there is no spin-polarized Δ{sub 1} symmetry bands crossing the Fermi level for the cubic Fe{sub 3}Si. In contrast, the tetragonal Fe{sub 3}Si driven by in-plane strain reveals half-metal nature in terms of Δ{sub 1} state. The giant TMR ratios are predicted for both MTJs with cubic and tetragonal Fe{sub 3}Si electrodes under zero bias. However, the giant TMR ratio resulting from interface resonant transmission for the former decreases rapidly with the bias. For the latter, the giant TMR ratio can maintain up to larger bias due to coherent transmission through the majority-spin Δ{sub 1} channel.

  8. Magnetoresistance and magnetization in submicron ferromagnetic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearwood, C.; Blundell, S. J.; Baird, M. J.; Bland, J. A. C.; Gester, M.; Ahmed, H.; Hughes, H. P.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for engineering micron and submicron scale structures from magnetic films of transition metals has been developed using a combination of electron- and ion-beam lithography enabling high-quality arrays of submicron magnetic Fe wires to be fabricated. This process can be used to fabricate novel devices from a variety of metal combinations which would not be possible by the usual liftoff metallization method. The structure and magnetic properties are reported of an epitaxial 25 nm Fe(001)/GaAs(001) film and the wire gratings which are fabricated from it. The width of the wires in the grating is 0.5 μm for all structures studied, but the separation of each wire is varied in the range 0.5 to 16 μm. An artificially induced shape anisotropy field of around 1 kG, consistent with a magnetostatic calculation, was observed for all separations studied. The field dependence of the magneto-optic Kerr effect and magnetoresistance (MR) data is consistent with a twisted magnetization configuration across the width of the sample beneath saturation for transverse applied fields. In this case, the detailed form of the field dependence of the MR is strikingly modified from that observed in the continuous film and is consistent with coherent rotation of the magnetization.

  9. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-01-01

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO 2 /FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO 2 /FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%

  10. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J., E-mail: J-haru@ee.aoyama.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Soriano, D. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Pedersen, J. G. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Micro-and Nanotechnology, DTU Nanotech, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Roche, S. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA - Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  11. Inverse Magnetoresistance in Polymer Spin Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuaishuai; Tian, Yuan; Li, Yang; Mi, Wenbo; Dong, Huanli; Zhang, Xiaotao; Hu, Wenping; Zhu, Daoben

    2017-05-10

    In this work, both negative and positive magnetoresistance (MR) in solution-processed regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) is observed in organic spin valves (OSVs) with vertical La 2/3 Sr 1/3 MnO 3 (LSMO)/P3HT/AlO x /Co configuration. The ferromagnetic (FM) LSMO electrode with near-atomic flatness is fabricated by a DC facing-target magnetron sputtering method. This research is focused on the origin of the MR inversion. Two types of devices are investigated in details: One with Co penetration shows a negative MR of 0.2%, while the other well-defined device with a nonlinear behavior has a positive MR of 15.6%. The MR measurements in LSMO/AlO x /Co and LSMO/Co junctions are carried to exclude the interference of insulating layer and two FM electrodes themselves. By examining the Co thicknesses and their corresponding magnetic hysteresis loops, a spin-dependent hybrid-interface-state model by Co penetration is induced to explain the MR sign inversion. These results proven by density functional theory (DFT) calculations may shed light on the controllable interfacial properties in designing novel OSV devices.

  12. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance of conducting filaments in NiO with different resistance states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Diyang; Qiao, Shuang; Luo, Yuxiang; Chen, Aitian; Zhang, Pengfei; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Zhong; Guo, Minghua; Chiang, F.-K.; Wu, Jian; Luo, Jianlin; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yayu; Zhao, Yonggang; Tsinghua University Team; Chinese Academy of Sciences Collaboration

    Resistive switching (RS) effect in conductor/insulator/conductor thin-film stacks has attracted much attention due to its interesting physics and potentials for applications. NiO is one of the most representative systems and its RS effect has been generally explained by the formation and rupture of Ni related conducting filaments, which are very unique since they are formed by electric forming process. We study the MR behaviors in NiO RS films with different resistance states. Rich and interesting MR behaviors were observed, including the normal and anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), etc., which provide new insights into the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the resistive switching process. First-principles calculation reveals the essential role of oxygen migration into the filaments during the RESET process and can account for the experimental results. Our work provides a new avenue for the exploration of the conducting filaments in RS materials, and is significant for understanding the RS mechanism as well as multifunctional device design.

  13. Magnetoresistance of magnetically doped ZnO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behan, A J; Mokhtari, A; Blythe, H J; Fox, A M; Gehring, G A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Ziese, M, E-mail: G.A.Gehring@sheffield.ac.u [Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, University of Leipzig, D-04103, Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-08-26

    Magnetoresistance measurements have been made at 5 K on doped ZnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. ZnCoO, ZnCoAlO and ZnMnAlO samples have been investigated and compared to similar films containing no transition metal dopants. It is found that the Co-doped samples with a high carrier concentration have a small negative magnetoresistance, irrespective of their magnetic moment. On decreasing the carrier concentration, a positive contribution to the magnetoresistance appears and a further negative contribution. This second, negative contribution, which occurs at very low carrier densities, correlates with the onset of ferromagnetism due to bound magnetic polarons suggesting that the negative magnetoresistance results from the destruction of polarons by a magnetic field. An investigation of the anisotropic magnetoresistance showed that the orientation of the applied magnetic field, relative to the sample, had a large effect. The results for the ZnMnAlO samples showed less consistent trends.

  14. Fusion neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Eight copper wires were repeatedly irradiated at 4.2 to 4.4 K with 14.8 MV neutrons and isochronally annealed at temperatures up to 34 0 C for a total of five cycles. Their electrical resistances were monitored during irradiation under zero applied magnetic field. After each irradiation the magnetoresistances were measured in applied transverse magnetic fields of up to 12 T. Then the samples were isochronally annealed to observe the recovery of the resistivity and magnetoresistivity. After each anneal at the highest temperature (34 0 C), some of the damage remained and contributed to the damage state observed following the subsequent irradiation. In this way, we were able to observe how the changes in magnetoresistance would accumulate during the repeated irradiations and anneals expected to be characteristic of fusion reactor magnets. For each succeeding irradiation the fluence was chosen to produce approximately the same final magnetoresistance at 12 T, taking account of the accumulating residual radiation damage. The increment of magnetoresistivity added by the irradiation varied from 35 to 65% at 12 T and from 50 to 90% at 8 T for the various samples

  15. Anisotropy of magnetoresistance on trapping magnetic fields in granular HTSC

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhanov, A A

    2003-01-01

    The features of magnetoresistance in Bi (Pb)-HTSC ceramics with the magnetic fields trapped are investigated. It is found that on trapping magnetic flux the magnetoresistance in granular HTSC becomes anisotropic. Moreover, for magnetic fields H parallel and currents perpendicular to field H sub i which induces the trapping the magnetoresistance field dependence DELTA R(H) is nonmonotonic and the magnetoresistance is negative for small fields H < Hinv. The effect of trapped field and transport current and their orientations on the dependence DELTA R(H) is investigated. In particular, it is found that the field of magnetoresistance sign inversion Hinv almost linearly grows with increase of the effective trapped magnetic fields. Hinv decreases down to zero as the angle between fields H and H sub i increases up to pi/2 and slightly decreases with increasing transport current. The results are treated in terms of the model of magnetic flux trapping in superconducting grains or 'loops' embedded in a matrix of wea...

  16. Multiple crossovers between positive and negative magnetoresistance versus field due to fragile spin structure in metallic GdPd3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Abhishek; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.; Johnston, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the phenomenon of magnetoresistance (MR) have produced intriguing and application-oriented outcomes for decades–colossal MR, giant MR and recently discovered extremely large MR of millions of percents in semimetals can be taken as examples. We report here the discovery of novel multiple sign changes versus applied magnetic field of the MR in the cubic intermetallic compound GdPd3. Our study shows that a very strong correlation between magnetic, electrical and magnetotransport properties is present in this compound. The magnetic structure in GdPd3 is highly fragile since applied magnetic fields of moderate strength significantly alter the spin arrangement within the system–a behavior that manifests itself in the oscillating MR. Intriguing magnetotransport characteristics of GdPd3 are appealing for field-sensitive device applications, especially if the MR oscillation could materialize at higher temperature by manipulating the magnetic interaction through perturbations caused by chemical substitutions. PMID:28211520

  17. Ballistic Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Single-Atom Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneberg, J; Otte, F; Néel, N; Weismann, A; Mokrousov, Y; Kröger, J; Berndt, R; Heinze, S

    2016-02-10

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance, that is, the sensitivity of the electrical resistance of magnetic materials on the magnetization direction, is expected to be strongly enhanced in ballistic transport through nanoscale junctions. However, unambiguous experimental evidence of this effect is difficult to achieve. We utilize single-atom junctions to measure this ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Single Co and Ir atoms are deposited on domains and domain walls of ferromagnetic Fe layers on W(110) to control their magnetization directions. They are contacted with nonmagnetic tips in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to measure the junction conductances. Large changes of the magnetoresistance occur from the tunneling to the ballistic regime due to the competition of localized and delocalized d-orbitals, which are differently affected by spin-orbit coupling. This work shows that engineering the AMR at the single atom level is feasible.

  18. Studies of colossal magnetoresistive oxides with radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and Neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; Amaral, V S; Araújo, J P; Butz, T; Correia, J G; Dubourdieu, C; Habermeier, H U; Lourenço, A A; Marques, J G; Da Silva, M F A; Senateur, J P; Soares, J C; Sousa, J B; Suryan, R; Tokura, Y; Tavares, P B; Tomioka, Y; Tröger, W; Vantomme, A; Vieira, J M; Wahl, U; Weiss, F P; INTC

    2000-01-01

    We propose to study Colossal Magnetoresistive (CMR) oxides with several nuclear techniques, which use radioactive elements at ISOLDE. Our aim is to provide local and element selective information on some of the doping mechanisms that rule electronic interactions and magnetoresistance, in a complementary way to the use of conventional characterisation techniques. Three main topics are proposed: \\\\ \\\\ a) Studies of local [charge and] structural modifications in antiferromagnetic LaMnO$_{3+ \\delta}$ and La$_{1-x}$R$_{x}$MnO$_{3}$ with R=Ca and Cd, doped ferromagnetic systems with competing interactions: - research on the lattice site and electronic characterisation of the doping element. \\\\ \\\\ b) Studies of self doped La$_{x}$R$_{1-x}$MnO$_{3+\\delta}$ systems, with oxygen and cation non-stoichiometry: -learning the role of defects in the optimisation of magnetoresistive properties. \\\\ \\\\ c) Probing the disorder and quenched random field effects in the vicinity of the charge or orbital Ordered/Ferromagnetic phase...

  19. Linear negative magnetoresistance in two-dimensional Lorentz gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluck, J.; Hund, M.; Heckenthaler, T.; Heinzel, T.; Siboni, N. H.; Horbach, J.; Pierz, K.; Schumacher, H. W.; Kazazis, D.; Gennser, U.; Mailly, D.

    2018-03-01

    Two-dimensional Lorentz gases formed by obstacles in the shape of circles, squares, and retroreflectors are reported to show a pronounced linear negative magnetoresistance at small magnetic fields. For circular obstacles at low number densities, our results agree with the predictions of a model based on classical retroreflection. In extension to the existing theoretical models, we find that the normalized magnetoresistance slope depends on the obstacle shape and increases as the number density of the obstacles is increased. The peaks are furthermore suppressed by in-plane magnetic fields as well as by elevated temperatures. These results suggest that classical retroreflection can form a significant contribution to the magnetoresistivity of two-dimensional Lorentz gases, while contributions from weak localization cannot be excluded, in particular for large obstacle densities.

  20. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-06-07

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  1. Determining the spin dependent mean free path in Co90Fe10 using giant magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespear, K. F.; Perdue, K. L.; Moyerman, S. M.; Checkelsky, J. G.; Harberger, S. S.; Tamboli, A. C.; Carey, M. J.; Sparks, P. D.; Eckert, J. C.

    2005-05-01

    The spin dependent mean free path in Co90Fe10 is determined as a function of temperature down to 5K using two different spin valve structures. At 5K the spin dependent mean free path for one structure was measured to be 9.4±1.4nm, decreasing by a factor of 3 by 350K. For the other structure, it is 7.5±0.5nm at 5K and decreased by a factor of 1.5 by 350K. In both cases, the spin dependent mean free path approaches the typical thickness of ferromagnetic layers in spin valves at room temperature and, thus, has an impact on the choice of design parameters for the development of new spintronic devices.

  2. Giant magnetoresistance of hysteresis-free Cu/Co-based multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huetten, A.; Hempel, T.; Schepper, W.; Kleineberg, U.; Reiss, G.

    2001-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that hysteresis-free multilayers based on {Cu/Co} and {Cu/Ni 57 Co 43 } can be experimentally realized obtaining room temperature GMR effect amplitudes from 6.5% up to 20%. A critical window for the layer thickness for hysteresis-free GMR curves can be achieved for both systems, ranging from 0.38 to 0.45 nm and 0.59 to 0.7 nm, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities range from 0.075 up to 0.114%/Oe, but are still below that of normal {Cu/Co} multilayers. Hysteresis-free multilayers based on these systems are stable up to 180 deg. C upon isochronal annealing. It is shown that hysteresis-free {Cu/Co or Ni 57 Co 43 }-multilayers are neither a solution to achieve good temperature stability nor a higher sensitivity compared with normal ones and hence are not candidates for application

  3. Magnetostriction measurement of a giant magnetoresistance film on a practical substrate covered by a shield layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kazuhiko; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Miura, Hideo

    2012-04-01

    Magnetostriction constant of a magnetic thin film is conventionally measured by detecting the deformation of a coupon sample that consists of the magnetic film deposited on a thin glass substrate (e.g., cover glass of size 10 mm × 25 mm) under an applied field using a laser beam [A. C. Tam and H. Schroeder, J. Appl. Phys. 64, 5422 (1988)]. This method, however, cannot be applied to films deposited on actual large-size substrates (wafers) with diameter from 3 to 6 in. or more. In a previous paper [Okita et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 200, 112008 (2010)], the authors presented a method for measuring magnetostriction of a magnetic thin film deposited on an actual substrate by detecting the change of magnetic anisotropy field, Hk, under mechanical bending of the substrate. It was validated that the method is very effective for measuring the magnetostriction constant of a free layer on the actual substrate. However, since a Ni-Fe shield layer usually covers a magnetic head used for a hard disk drive, this shield layer disturbs the effective measurement of R-H curve under minor loop. Therefore, a high magnetic field that can saturate the magnetic material in the shield layer should be applied to the head in order to measure the magnetostriction constant of a pinned layer under the shield layer. In this paper, this method was applied to the measurement of the magnetostriction constant of a pinned layer under the shield layer by using a high magnetic field up to 320 kA/m (4 kOe).

  4. Spatial mobility fluctuation induced giant linear magnetoresistance in multilayered graphene foam

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Qiang; He, Xin; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Zhang, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    (SdH) oscillations occurred at low temperatures and decayed with increasing temperature. The average classical mobility ranged from 300 (2 K) to 150 (300 K) cm2V−1s−1, which is much smaller than that required by the observed SdH oscillations

  5. Lipase polystyrene giant amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velonia, Kelly; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2002-04-24

    A new type of giant amphiphilic molecule has been synthesized by covalently connecting a lipase enzyme headgroup to a maleimide-functionalized polystyrene tail (40 repeat units). The resulting biohybrid forms catalytic micellar rods in water.

  6. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  8. Magnetoresistance of films and strips with the diffuse surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, A.G.

    1993-08-01

    Magnetoresistance of films in a parallel magnetic field and strips in a perpendicular field is considered. The temperature and magnetic field dependencies of magnetoconductance depend on the time evolution of the correlator of phases. This correlator has different behavior as the function of time: the ergodic behavior at small magnetic fields is changed on the nonergodic one at large magnetic fields in spite of the diffusion electron motion due to a diffuse scattering on boundaries. This leads to unusual temperature and magnetic field dependencies of magnetoresistance. The ergodic hypothesis is not applicable to mesoscopical fluctuations at such a large quasiclassical field. (author). 6 refs, 5 figs

  9. Magnetoresistance of Mn-decorated topological line defects in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2015-01-13

    We study the spin polarized transport through Mn-decorated 8-5-5-8 topological line defects in graphene using the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function formalism. Strong preferential bonding overcomes the high mobility of transition metal atoms on graphene and results in stable structures. Despite a large distance between the magnetic centers, we find a high magnetoresistance and attribute this unexpected property to very strong induced π magnetism, in particular for full coverage of all octagonal hollow sites by Mn atoms. In contrast to the magnetoresistance of graphene nanoribbon edges, the proposed system is well controlled and therefore suitable for applications.

  10. Anomalous rf magnetoresistance in copper at 4/degree/K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halama, H.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Rogers, J.T.

    1988-03-01

    We have measured the effect of a magnetic field on the surface resistance of polycrystalline Cu at f = 1.2 GHz and at 4.4/degree/K; under these conditions the surface resistance is well into the anomalous skin effect regime but has not reached its limiting value. We find that the transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance are an order of magnitude smaller than the DC magnetoresistance and depend quadratically on the field. At low fields we observe a decrease in surface resistance with increasing field which can be interpreted as a size effect of the TF surface current. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Spin Hall magnetoresistance in antiferromagnet/normal metal bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in a magnetic bilayer composed of a normal metal adjacent to an antiferromagnet. Based on a recently derived drift diffusion equation, we show that the resistance of the bilayer depends on the relative angle between the direction transverse to the current flow and the Néel order parameter. While this effect presents striking similarities with the spin Hall magnetoresistance recently reported in ferromagnetic bilayers, its physical origin is attributed to the anisotropic spin relaxation of itinerant spins in the antiferromagnet.

  12. Strain effects on anisotropic magnetoresistance in a nanowire spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md I.; Maksud, M.; Subramanian, A.; Atulasimha, J.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-11-01

    The longitudinal magnetoresistance of a copper nanowire contacted by two cobalt contacts shows broad spin-valve peaks at room temperature. However, when the contacts are slightly heated, the peaks change into troughs which are signature of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Under heating, the differential thermal expansion of the contacts and the substrate generates a small strain in the cobalt contacts which enhances the AMR effect sufficiently to change the peak into a trough. This shows the extreme sensitivity of AMR to strain. The change in the AMR resistivity coefficient due to strain is estimated to be a few m Ω -m/microstrain.

  13. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and thermodynamic fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, G.

    1999-05-01

    Measurements of the in-plane and out-of-plane resistivity and the transverse and longitudinal in-plane and out-of-plane magnetoresistance above T, are reported in the high-temperature superconductors Bi2Sr2CaCu208+' and YBa2CU307 b . The carrier concentration of the Bi2Sr2CaCu208+' single crystals covers a broad range of the phase diagram from the slightly under doped to the moderately over doped region. The doping concentration of the thin films ranges from strongly under doped to optimally doped. The in-plane resistivities obey a metallic-like temperature dependence with a positive magnetoresistance in the transverse and the longitudinal orientation of the magnetic field. The out-of-plane resistivities show an activated behavior above T, with a metallic region at higher temperatures and negative magnetoresistance. The data were analyzed in the framework of a model for superconducting order parameter fluctuations. The positive in-plane magnetoresistance of the highly anisotropic Bi2Sr2CaCu208+x single crystals is interpreted as the suppression of the fluctuation-conductivity enhancement including orbital and spin contributions, whereas the negative magnetoresistance arises from the reduction of the fluctuation-induced pseudogap in the single-electron density-of-states by the magnetic field. For higher temperatures a transition to the normal-state magnetoresistance occurs for the in-plane transport. In the less anisotropic YBa2CU307 b thin films the positive out-of-plane magnetoresistance near T, changes sign to a negative magnetoresistance at higher temperatures. This behavior is also consistent with predictions from the theory of thermodynamic order-parameter fluctuations. The agreement of the fluctuation theory with the experimental findings is excellent for samples from the over doped side of the phase diagram, but deteriorate with decreasing carrier concentration. This behavior is interpreted by the dominating d-wave symmetry of the superconducting order

  14. Magnetoresistance of Mn-decorated topological line defects in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua; Kahaly, M. Upadhyay; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    We study the spin polarized transport through Mn-decorated 8-5-5-8 topological line defects in graphene using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Strong preferential bonding overcomes the high mobility of transition metal atoms on graphene and results in stable structures. Despite a large distance between the magnetic centers, we find a high magnetoresistance and attribute this unexpected property to very strong induced π magnetism, in particular for full coverage of all octagonal hollow sites by Mn atoms. In contrast to the magnetoresistance of graphene nanoribbon edges, the proposed system is well controlled and therefore suitable for applications.

  15. Room temperature electrically tunable rectification magnetoresistance in Ge-based Schottky devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi-Kun; Yan, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yu-Feng

    2016-11-23

    Electrical control of magnetotransport properties is crucial for device applications in the field of spintronics. In this work, as an extension of our previous observation of rectification magnetoresistance, an innovative technique for electrical control of rectification magnetoresistance has been developed by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the Ge-based Schottky devices, where the rectification magnetoresistance could be remarkably tuned in a wide range. Moreover, the interface and bulk contribution to the magnetotransport properties has been effectively separated based on the rectification magnetoresistance effect. The state-of-the-art electrical manipulation technique could be adapt to other similar heterojunctions, where fascinating rectification magnetoresistance is worthy of expectation.

  16. Experimental investigation of the nature of the magnetoresistance effects in Pd-YIG hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Tang, Chi; Alyahayaei, Hamad M; Shi, Jing

    2014-07-18

    In bilayers consisting of Pd and yttrium iron garnet (Y(3)Fe(5)O(12) or YIG), we observe vanishingly small room-temperature conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance but large new magnetoresistance that is similar to the spin Hall magnetoresistance previously reported in Pt-YIG bilayers. We report a temperature dependence study of the two magnetoresistance effects in Pt-YIG bilayers. As the temperature is decreased, the new magnetoresistance shows a peak, whereas the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect starts to appear and increases monotonically. We find that the magnetoresistance peak shifts to lower temperatures in thicker Pd samples, a feature characteristic of the spin current effect. The distinct temperature dependence reveals fundamentally different mechanisms responsible for the two effects in such hybrid structures.

  17. An Automated Sensing System for Steel Bridge Inspection Using GMR Sensor Array and Magnetic Wheels of Climbing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is one of the main causes of deterioration of steel bridges. It may cause metal loss and fatigue cracks in the steel components, which would lead to the collapse of steel bridges. This paper presents an automated sensing system to detect corrosion, crack, and other kinds of defects using a GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance sensor array. Defects will change the relative permeability and electrical conductivity of the material. As a result, magnetic field density generated by ferromagnetic material and the magnetic wheels will be changed. The defects are able to be detected by using GMR sensor array to measure the changes of magnetic flux density. In this study, magnetic wheels are used not only as the adhesion device of the robot, but also as an excitation source to provide the exciting magnetic field for the sensing system. Furthermore, compared to the eddy current method and the MFL (magnetic flux leakage method, this sensing system suppresses the noise from lift-off value fluctuation by measuring the vertical component of induced magnetic field that is perpendicular to the surface of the specimen in the corrosion inspection. Simulations and experimental results validated the feasibility of the system for the automated defect inspection.

  18. Tuning spin transport properties and molecular magnetoresistance through contact geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Delin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Molecular spintronics seeks to unite the advantages of using organic molecules as nanoelectronic components, with the benefits of using spin as an additional degree of freedom. For technological applications, an important quantity is the molecular magnetoresistance. In this work, we show that this parameter is very sensitive to the contact geometry. To demonstrate this, we perform ab initio calculations, combining the non-equilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory, on a dithienylethene molecule placed between spin-polarized nickel leads of varying geometries. We find that, in general, the magnetoresistance is significantly higher when the contact is made to sharp tips than to flat surfaces. Interestingly, this holds true for both resonant and tunneling conduction regimes, i.e., when the molecule is in its "closed" and "open" conformations, respectively. We find that changing the lead geometry can increase the magnetoresistance by up to a factor of ˜5. We also introduce a simple model that, despite requiring minimal computational time, can recapture our ab initio results for the behavior of magnetoresistance as a function of bias voltage. This model requires as its input only the density of states on the anchoring atoms, at zero bias voltage. We also find that the non-resonant conductance in the open conformation of the molecule is significantly impacted by the lead geometry. As a result, the ratio of the current in the closed and open conformations can also be tuned by varying the geometry of the leads, and increased by ˜400%.

  19. Tuning spin transport properties and molecular magnetoresistance through contact geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Delin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Molecular spintronics seeks to unite the advantages of using organic molecules as nanoelectronic components, with the benefits of using spin as an additional degree of freedom. For technological applications, an important quantity is the molecular magnetoresistance. In this work, we show that this parameter is very sensitive to the contact geometry. To demonstrate this, we perform ab initio calculations, combining the non-equilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory, on a dithienylethene molecule placed between spin-polarized nickel leads of varying geometries. We find that, in general, the magnetoresistance is significantly higher when the contact is made to sharp tips than to flat surfaces. Interestingly, this holds true for both resonant and tunneling conduction regimes, i.e., when the molecule is in its “closed” and “open” conformations, respectively. We find that changing the lead geometry can increase the magnetoresistance by up to a factor of ∼5. We also introduce a simple model that, despite requiring minimal computational time, can recapture our ab initio results for the behavior of magnetoresistance as a function of bias voltage. This model requires as its input only the density of states on the anchoring atoms, at zero bias voltage. We also find that the non-resonant conductance in the open conformation of the molecule is significantly impacted by the lead geometry. As a result, the ratio of the current in the closed and open conformations can also be tuned by varying the geometry of the leads, and increased by ∼400%

  20. Spin polarization at the interface and tunnel magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Inoue, J.

    2001-01-01

    We propose that interfacial states of imperfectly oxidized Al ions may exist in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions with Al-O barrier and govern both the spin polarization and tunnel conductance. It is shown that the spin polarization is positive independent of materials and correlates well with the tunnel magnetoresistance

  1. Separating positive and negative magnetoresistance in organic semiconductor devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, F.L.; Wagemans, W.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2007-01-01

    We study the transition between positive and negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in tris-(8 hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), in order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing this phenomenon. We show how the sign of OMAR changes as function of the applied voltage and temperature. The

  2. Magnetoresistance in spin glass alloys: Theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, A.; Chowdhury, D.

    1984-11-01

    The magnetoresistance of spin glass alloys is examined within the percolation model of Mookerjee and Chowdhury (1983), the mode freezing model of Hertz (1983) and the constrained relaxation model of Palmer et al. (1984). All three models yield qualitatively similar results in excellent agreement with the experiments of Majumdar (1983, 1984) on AgMn. (author)

  3. Study of magnetoresistance and conductance of bicrystal grain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Presence of grain boundary exhibits substantial magnetoresistance ratio (MRR) in the low field and low temperature region. Bicrystal grain boundary contribution in MRR disappears at temperature > 175 K. At low temperature, - characteristic of the microbridge across bicrystal grain boundary is nonlinear. Analysis of ...

  4. Mixed-phase description of colossal magnetoresistive manganites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiáe, A.; Loos, Jan; Fehske, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 2 (2003), s. 024402-1 - 021102-6 ISSN 0163-1829 Grant - others:DFG(DE) 436 TSE 113/33/0-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : polarons * metal-insulator transitions * colossal magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.962, year: 2003

  5. High field magnetoresistance in Co-Al-O nanogranular films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chayka, Oleksandr; Kraus, Luděk; Lobotka, P.; Sechovsky, V.; Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 300, - (2006), s. 293-299 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : granular system * superparamagnetism * tunneling magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.212, year: 2006

  6. Tuning spin transport properties and molecular magnetoresistance through contact geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Delin, Anna

    2014-01-28

    Molecular spintronics seeks to unite the advantages of using organic molecules as nanoelectronic components, with the benefits of using spin as an additional degree of freedom. For technological applications, an important quantity is the molecular magnetoresistance. In this work, we show that this parameter is very sensitive to the contact geometry. To demonstrate this, we perform ab initio calculations, combining the non-equilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory, on a dithienylethene molecule placed between spin-polarized nickel leads of varying geometries. We find that, in general, the magnetoresistance is significantly higher when the contact is made to sharp tips than to flat surfaces. Interestingly, this holds true for both resonant and tunneling conduction regimes, i.e., when the molecule is in its "closed" and "open" conformations, respectively. We find that changing the lead geometry can increase the magnetoresistance by up to a factor of ∼5. We also introduce a simple model that, despite requiring minimal computational time, can recapture our ab initio results for the behavior of magnetoresistance as a function of bias voltage. This model requires as its input only the density of states on the anchoring atoms, at zero bias voltage. We also find that the non-resonant conductance in the open conformation of the molecule is significantly impacted by the lead geometry. As a result, the ratio of the current in the closed and open conformations can also be tuned by varying the geometry of the leads, and increased by ∼400%.

  7. Magnetoresistance at artificial interfaces in epitaxial ferromagnetic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontcuberta, J.; Bibes, M.; Martinez, B.; Trtik, V.; Ferrater, C.; Sanchez, F.; Varela, M.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial La 2/3 Sr 1/3 MnO 3 and SrRuO 3 thin films have been grown by laser ablation on single-crystalline SrTiO 3 substrates. Prior to manganite or ruthenate deposition tracks have been patterned on the SrTiO 3 substrate by using an appropriately focused laser beam. In the experiments here reported linear tracks have been formed. The magnetotransport properties of the films, particularly the magnetoresistance, along paths parallel and perpendicular to the track have been extensively investigated and compared to similar data recorded on films grown on bicrystalline STO substrates. Whereas in LSMO a significant low-field tunnel magnetoresistance develops across the artificial interface, in SRO this tunnel contribution is absent. However, a significant high-field magnetoresistance is observed for both metallic and ferromagnetic systems. The results are analysed and discussed within the framework of the current understanding of double exchange and itinerant ferromagnets. Magnetoresistance data for various configurations of the track array are presented

  8. The magnetoresistivity of some rare-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, G.D.

    1978-10-01

    The thesis describes measurements of the low temperature transverse magnetoresistivities of single crystals of rare-earth metals in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. A general introduction to the rare-earths, their magnetic properties and a review of the basic theory and mechanism of magnetoresistivity is given. Details of the crystal structure, growth of single crystals and sample mounting method follow. The experimental equipment and measuring techniques are then described. The low temperature transverse magnetoresistivity of polycrystalline lanthanum and single crystal praseodymium for the temperature range 4.2 - 30K is measured. The separation of the spin-disorder and Fermi-surface orbital effect contributions are described and the theoretical and experimental spin-disorder values compared. Magnetoresistivity measurements for neodymium single crystals (4.2 - 30K) are compared with the magnetic properties determined from neutron diffraction studies. Results for gadolinium single crystals (4.2 - 200K) are compared for two different impurity levels and with previous work. (UK)

  9. The MAGIC of CINEMA: first in-flight science results from a miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Archer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the first in-flight results from a novel miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive space magnetometer, MAGIC (MAGnetometer from Imperial College, aboard the first CINEMA (CubeSat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons and MAgnetic fields spacecraft in low Earth orbit. An attitude-independent calibration technique is detailed using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF, which is temperature dependent in the case of the outboard sensor. We show that the sensors accurately measure the expected absolute field to within 2% in attitude mode and 1% in science mode. Using a simple method we are able to estimate the spacecraft's attitude using the magnetometer only, thus characterising CINEMA's spin, precession and nutation. Finally, we show that the outboard sensor is capable of detecting transient physical signals with amplitudes of ~ 20–60 nT. These include field-aligned currents at the auroral oval, qualitatively similar to previous observations, which agree in location with measurements from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program and POES (Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites spacecraft. Thus, we demonstrate and discuss the potential science capabilities of the MAGIC instrument onboard a CubeSat platform.

  10. The MAGIC of CINEMA: first in-flight science results from a miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, M. O.; Horbury, T. S.; Brown, P.; Eastwood, J. P.; Oddy, T. M.; Whiteside, B. J.; Sample, J. G.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first in-flight results from a novel miniaturised anisotropic magnetoresistive space magnetometer, MAGIC (MAGnetometer from Imperial College), aboard the first CINEMA (CubeSat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons and MAgnetic fields) spacecraft in low Earth orbit. An attitude-independent calibration technique is detailed using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), which is temperature dependent in the case of the outboard sensor. We show that the sensors accurately measure the expected absolute field to within 2% in attitude mode and 1% in science mode. Using a simple method we are able to estimate the spacecraft's attitude using the magnetometer only, thus characterising CINEMA's spin, precession and nutation. Finally, we show that the outboard sensor is capable of detecting transient physical signals with amplitudes of ~ 20-60 nT. These include field-aligned currents at the auroral oval, qualitatively similar to previous observations, which agree in location with measurements from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) and POES (Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites) spacecraft. Thus, we demonstrate and discuss the potential science capabilities of the MAGIC instrument onboard a CubeSat platform.

  11. Determination of the aging offset voltage of AMR sensors based on accelerated degradation test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano Constantini, A.C.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    Usually Anisotropic Magnetoresistance angle sensors are configured with two Wheatstone bridges, but an undesirable offset voltage included in the sensor output affects its accuracy. The total offset voltage combines a voltage due to resistance mismatches during manufacturing and a voltage from

  12. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D Z; Wang, T; Sui, W B; Si, M S; Guo, D W; Shi, Z; Wang, F C; Xue, D S

    2015-09-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature.

  13. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  14. Giant magneto-spin-Seebeck effect and magnon transfer torques in insulating spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yihong; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Shufeng

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically study magnon transport in an insulating spin valve (ISV) made of an antiferromagnetic insulator sandwiched between two ferromagnetic insulator (FI) layers. In the conventional metal-based spin valve, the electron spins propagate between two metallic ferromagnetic layers, giving rise to giant magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque. Here, the incoherent magnons in the ISV serve as angular momentum carriers and are responsible for the angular momentum transport between two FI layers across the antiferromagnetic spacer. We predict two transport phenomena in the presence of the temperature gradient: a giant magneto-spin-Seebeck effect in which the output voltage signal is controlled by the relative orientation of the two FI layers and magnon transfer torque that can be used for switching the magnetization of the FI layers with a temperature gradient of the order of 0.1 Kelvin per nanometer.

  15. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  16. Waking the Sleeping Giant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollenburger, Mary H.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crane, Todd A.; Sanogo, Ousmane M.; Giller, Ken E.

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank argued that West Africa's Guinea Savannah zone forms part of “Africa's Sleeping Giant,” where increases in agricultural production could be an engine of economic growth, through expansion of cultivated land in sparsely populated areas. The district of Bougouni, in southern Mali,

  17. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  18. from the Giant Panda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... 1College of Life Science, China West Normal University, 44# Yuying Road, 637002, Nanchong, China. 2Zhan Jiang educational ... in Escherichia coli and the RPS28 protein fusioned with the N-terminally GST -tagged protein gave rise ... long Conservation Center of the Giant Panda, Sichuan, China. The.

  19. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  20. Giant vesical calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesical calculus. A case report. H. H. LAUBSCHER. Summary. An exceptional case of bladder stone is presented. The case is unusual as regards the size of the stone and the fact that the patient did··not seek medical assistance much earlier, as this was readily avail- able. Furthermore, recovery after removal of the.

  1. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  2. Giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, V.; Florencio, I.; Boluda, F.

    1996-01-01

    We present a case of giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma in a 10-year-old boy. Despite numerous consultations with physicians to identify the underlying problem, it had originally been attributed to ascites of unknown cause. We review the characteristics of this lesion and the diagnostic features that aid in differentiating it from ascites

  3. Giant peritoneal loose bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-27

    Mar 27, 2015 ... not be familiar with the entity, can potentially be confused with malignant or parasitic lesions. Familiarity with their characteristic computed tomographic ... preventing unnecessary surgical intervention in an asymptomatic patient.3,4 It is important to differentiate giant peritoneal loose bodies from lesions such ...

  4. Tunneling Negative Magnetoresistance via δ Doping in a Graphene-Based Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jian-Hui; Chen Ni; Mo Hua; Zhang Yan; Zhang Zhi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance via δ doping in a graphene-based magnetic tunnel junction in detail. It is found that the transmission probability and the conductance oscillates with the position and the aptitude of the δ doping. Also, both the transmission probability and the conductance at the parallel configuration are suppressed by the magnetic field more obviously than that at the antiparallel configuration, which implies a large negative magnetoresistance for this device. The results show that the negative magnetoresistance of over 300% at B = 1.0 T is observed by choosing suitable doped parameters, and the temperature plays an important role in the magnetoresistance. Thus it is possible to open a way to effectively manipulate the magnetoresistance devices, and to make a type of magnetoresistance device by controlling the structural parameter of the δ doping. (paper)

  5. Effect of crystallinity on the magnetoresistance in perovskite manganese oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shreekala, R.; Rajeswari, M.; Ghosh, K.; Goyal, A.; Gu, J.Y.; Kwon, C.; Trajanovic, Z.; Boettcher, T.; Greene, R.L.; Ramesh, R.; Venkatesan, T.

    1997-01-01

    We report our study of the effect of crystallinity on the magnetoresistance in epitaxial and polycrystalline La 2/3 Ba 1/3 MnO 3 and La 2/3 Ca 1/3 MnO 3 thin films. Magnetoresistance in epitaxial films exhibits field dependence and temperature dependence similar to bulk single crystals and sintered bulk ceramics. The polycrystalline films exhibit a markedly different behavior. The magnetoresistance in this case shows either a monotonic increase or saturation with decreasing temperature in contrast to that of epitaxial films in which the magnetoresistance peaks close to the ferromagnetic transition temperature. The field dependence in the polycrystalline films is also remarkably different. At low fields, we observe a sharp drop in resistance followed by a more gradual decrease at higher fields. Our data suggest that in addition to the intrinsic magnetoresistance, grain-boundary transport contributes significantly to the magnetoresistance in polycrystalline films. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. The effect of spin-orbit coupling on magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun-Qing; Ding Meng; Zhang Tian-You; Zhang Ning-Yu; Pang Yan-Tao; Ji Yan-Ju; Chen Ying; Wang Feng-Xiang; Fu Gang

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of spin-orbit coupling on magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic organic semiconductors. A Lorentz-type magnetoresistance is obtained from spin-orbit coupling-dependent spin precession under the condition of a space-charge-limited current. The magnetoresistance depends on the initial spin orientation of the electron with respect to the hole in electron—hole pairs, and the increasing spin-orbit coupling slows down the change in magnetoresistance with magnetic field. The field dependence, the sign and the saturation value of the magnetoresistance are composite effects of recombination and dissociation rate constants of singlet and triplet electron—hole pairs. The simulated magnetoresistance shows good consistency with the experimental results. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  7. Anomalous magnetoresistance effect in sputtered TbFeCo relating to dispersed magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, S.; Toki, K.; Okada, O.; Gokan, H.

    1988-01-01

    The electric resistance is sputtered TbFeCo has been measured at room temperature as a function of magnetic field perpendicular to the film plane. Two kinds of anomalous magnetoresistance have been observed. One is a magnetoresistance peak in the magnetization reversal region. The other is reversible change proportional to the applied magnetic field, appearing in the other region. The magnetoresistance peak agrees well with a curve calculated from experimental Hall loop, using a phenomenological relation between anomalous magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall voltage. The magnetoresistance peak is found to originate from magnetic domain walls. The linear magnetoresistance change for TM dominant samples appears in a direction opposite to that for RE dominant samples. The linear change can't be derived from Hall loop

  8. Quasilinear quantum magnetoresistance in pressure-induced nonsymmorphic superconductor chromium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Q; Yu, W C; Yip, K Y; Lim, Z L; Kotegawa, H; Matsuoka, E; Sugawara, H; Tou, H; Yanase, Y; Goh, Swee K

    2017-06-05

    In conventional metals, modification of electron trajectories under magnetic field gives rise to a magnetoresistance that varies quadratically at low field, followed by a saturation at high field for closed orbits on the Fermi surface. Deviations from the conventional behaviour, for example, the observation of a linear magnetoresistance, or a non-saturating magnetoresistance, have been attributed to exotic electron scattering mechanisms. Recently, linear magnetoresistance has been observed in many Dirac materials, in which the electron-electron correlation is relatively weak. The strongly correlated helimagnet CrAs undergoes a quantum phase transition to a nonmagnetic superconductor under pressure. Here we observe, near the magnetic instability, a large and non-saturating quasilinear magnetoresistance from the upper critical field to 14 T at low temperatures. We show that the quasilinear magnetoresistance may arise from an intricate interplay between a nontrivial band crossing protected by nonsymmorphic crystal symmetry and strong magnetic fluctuations.

  9. Magnetoresistance anisotropy of ultrathin epitaxial La0.83Sr0.17MnO3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevičius, Saulius; Tornau, Evaldas E.; ŽurauskienÄ--, Nerija; Stankevič, Voitech; Šimkevičius, Česlovas; TolvaišienÄ--, Sonata; PlaušinaitienÄ--, Valentina; Abrutis, Adulfas

    2017-12-01

    We present the study of temperature dependence of resistivity (ρ), magnetoresistance (MR), and magnetoresistance anisotropy (AMR) of thin epitaxial La0.83Sr0.17MnO3 films. The films with thickness from 4 nm to 140 nm were grown on an NdGaO3 (001) substrate by a pulsed injection metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. We demonstrate that the resistivity of these films significantly increases and the temperature Tm of the resistivity maximum in ρ(T) dependence decreases with the decrease of film thickness. The anisotropy of ρ(T) dependence with respect to the electrical current direction along the [100] or [010] crystallographic axis of the film is found for ultrathin films (4-8 nm) at temperatures close to Tm. Both MR and AMR, measured in magnetic fields up to 0.7 T applied in the film plane parallel and perpendicular to the current direction, have shown strong dependence on the film thickness. It was also found that the anisotropy of magnetoresistance could change its sign from positive (thicker films) to negative (ultrathin films) and obtain very small values at a certain intermediate thickness (20 nm) when the current is flowing perpendicular to the easy magnetization axis [010]. While the positive AMR effect was assigned to the conventional magnetic ordering of manganites, the AMR of ultrathin films was influenced by the pinning of magnetization to the easy axis. The temperature dependence and change of the AMR sign with film thickness is shown to be well described by the two-region model (more strained closer to the film substrate and more relaxed further from it) assuming that the relative concentration of both regions changes with the film thickness. The possibility to use the effect of the AMR compensation for the development of scalar in-plane magnetic field sensors is discussed.

  10. Magnetoresistance of individual ferromagnetic GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Butschkow, Christian H.; Reiger, Elisabeth; Geißler, Stefan; Rudolph, Andreas; Soda, Marcello; Schuh, Dieter; Woltersdorf, Georg; Wegscheider, Werner; Weiss, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    We investigate, angle dependent, the magnetoresistance (MR) of individual self-assembled ferromagnetic GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires at cryogenic temperatures. The shape of the MR traces and the observed strong anisotropies in transport can be ascribed to the interplay of the negative magnetoresistance effect and a strong uniaxial anisotropy with the magnetic easy direction pointing along the wire axis. The magnetoresistance can be well described by a quantitative analysis based on the ...

  11. Large linear magnetoresistance from neutral defects in Bi$_2$Se$_3$

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Devendra; Lakhani, Archana

    2016-01-01

    The chalcogenide Bi$_2$Se$_3$ can attain the three dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal state under the influence of strain and microstrain. Here we report the presnece of large linear magnetoresistance in such a Bi$_2$Se$_3$ crystal. The magnetoresistance has quadratic form at low fields which crossovers to linear above 4 T. The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance scales with carrier mobility and the crossover field scales with inverse of mobility. Our analysis suggest that the linear ma...

  12. Magnetoresistance of amorphous CuZr: weak localization in a three dimensional system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, J.B.; Fert, A.; Creuzet, G.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of anomalous magnetoresistance in amorphous CuZr at low temperature are reported. The magnetoresistance can be precisely accounted for in theoretical models of localization for 3-dimensional metallic systems in the presence of strong spin-orbit interactions (with a significant additional contribution from the quenching of superconducting fluctuations at the lowest temperatures). Magnetoresistance measurements on various other systems show that such 3-dimensional localization effects are very generally observed in amorphous alloys. (author)

  13. Magnetoresistance of microstructured permalloy ellipses having multi-domain configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, C.Y.; Chung, W.S.; Wu, J.C.; Horng, Lance; Wei, Z.-H.; Lai, M.-F.; Chang, C.-R.

    2007-01-01

    Mirostructured permalloy ellipses having purposely designed multi-domain configurations were investigated. The samples were fabricated using e-beam lithography through a lift-off process. The magnetoresistance measurements were carried out with a constant dc sensing current under the external magnetic field applied along the short axis. The magnetoresistance curves manifest characteristic features in accordance with the specific domain configurations. Step-like/kink features were observed on the ellipses with cross-tie wall/two-vortex configuration and step-like plus kink magnetorsistance curve was found on the ellipse with cross-tie wall combining with two-vortex structure. A magnetic force microscopy and a micromagnetic simulation were employed to support these results

  14. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  15. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in copper single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2018-03-01

    Transverse magnetoresistance of copper single crystals has been measured in the orientation of open-orbit from 2 K to 20 K for fields up to 9 T. The experimental Kohler's plots display deviation between individual curves below 16 K and overlap in the range of 16 K-20 K. The violation of the Kohler's rule below 16 K indicates that the magnetotransport can not be described by the classical theory of electron transport on spherical Fermi surface with a single relaxation time. A theoretical model incorporating two energy bands, spherical and cylindrical, with different relaxation times has been developed to describe the magnetoresistance data. The calculations show that the electron-phonon scattering rates at belly and neck regions of the Fermi surface have different temperature dependencies, and in general, they do not follow T3 law. The ratio of the relaxation times in belly and neck regions decreases parabolically with temperature as A - CT2 , with A and C being constants.

  16. Challenges and trends in the development of a magnetoresistive biochip portable platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Veronica C.; Germano, Jose; Cardoso, Filipe A.; Loureiro, Joana; Cardoso, Susana; Sousa, Leonel; Piedade, Moises; Fonseca, Luis P.; Freitas, P.P.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetoresistive (MR) biochip concept has emerged a decade ago and since then considerable achievements were made in the field. At the moment there is a strong effort in building up a fully integrated, portable and accessible spintronic device for bioanalytical assays. Some of the major challenges and working solutions are addressed here. In a MR-biochip platform five main components can be identified as key points for its success: the MR sensing elements, the magnetic labels, the surface chemistry, the microfluidic system and the read-out electronic set-up. Linear spin valve sensors were fabricated with good sensitivity and proper field range. Magnetic particles were carefully characterized and selected seeking for the best biomolecular labels. The surface chemistry was extensively optimized in order to get it more efficient, specific and reproducible. A microfluidic structure was designed and fabricated in polydimethilsiloxane (PDMS) to work as sample transportation and simultaneously control the wash out steps. Finally, a portable and autonomous electronic microsystem provides the electronic circuitry to control, address and read-out up to 256 sensors. From the assembling of all these components emerges a versatile portable platform. The first results from the platform in a real-time detection of 20mer single stranded DNA sequences labeled with 130 nm magnetic labels are presented.

  17. Challenges and trends in the development of a magnetoresistive biochip portable platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Veronica C., E-mail: veronicamartins@ist.utl.p [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Center for Biological and Chemical Engineering (CEBQ), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Germano, Jose [INESC-ID Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Investigacao e Desenvolvimento, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Cardoso, Filipe A.; Loureiro, Joana [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Physics Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cardoso, Susana [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Sousa, Leonel; Piedade, Moises [INESC-ID Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Investigacao e Desenvolvimento, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Fonseca, Luis P. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Center for Biological and Chemical Engineering (CEBQ), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Freitas, P.P. [INESC-MN-Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol 9, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Physics Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-05-15

    The magnetoresistive (MR) biochip concept has emerged a decade ago and since then considerable achievements were made in the field. At the moment there is a strong effort in building up a fully integrated, portable and accessible spintronic device for bioanalytical assays. Some of the major challenges and working solutions are addressed here. In a MR-biochip platform five main components can be identified as key points for its success: the MR sensing elements, the magnetic labels, the surface chemistry, the microfluidic system and the read-out electronic set-up. Linear spin valve sensors were fabricated with good sensitivity and proper field range. Magnetic particles were carefully characterized and selected seeking for the best biomolecular labels. The surface chemistry was extensively optimized in order to get it more efficient, specific and reproducible. A microfluidic structure was designed and fabricated in polydimethilsiloxane (PDMS) to work as sample transportation and simultaneously control the wash out steps. Finally, a portable and autonomous electronic microsystem provides the electronic circuitry to control, address and read-out up to 256 sensors. From the assembling of all these components emerges a versatile portable platform. The first results from the platform in a real-time detection of 20mer single stranded DNA sequences labeled with 130 nm magnetic labels are presented.

  18. Si, Ge and SiGe wires for sensor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, A.A.; Khoverko, Yu.M.; Ostrovskii, I.P.; Nichkalo, S.I.; Nikolaeva, A.A.; Konopko, L.A.; Stich, I.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance and magnetoresistance of Si, Ge and Si-Ge micro- and nanowires were studied in temperature range 4,2-300 K at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The wires diameters range from 200 nm to 20 μm. Ga-In gates were created to wires and ohmic I-U characteristics were observed in all temperature range. It was found high elastic strain for Ge nanowires (of about 0,7%) as well as high magnitude of magnetoresistance (of about 250% at 14 T), which was used to design multifunctional sensor of simultaneous measurements of strain and magnetic field intensity. (authors)

  19. Development of a passive and remote magnetic microsensor with thin-film giant magnetoimpedance element and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Al Rowais, Hommood; Li, Bodong; Liang, Cai; Green, Scott Ryan; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wireless magnetic field sensor consisting of a three-layer thin-film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave device on one substrate. The goal of this integration is a passive and remotely interrogated sensor that can be easily mass fabricated using standard microfabrication tools. The design parameters, fabrication process, and a model of the integrated sensor are presented together with experimental results of the sensor. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Extreme magnetoresistance in magnetic rare-earth monopnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linda; Suzuki, Takehito; Wicker, Christina R.; Checkelsky, Joseph G.

    2018-02-01

    The acute sensitivity of the electrical resistance of certain systems to magnetic fields known as extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been explored in a new materials context with topological semimetals. Exemplified by WTe2 and rare-earth monopnictide La(Sb,Bi), these systems tend to be nonmagnetic, nearly compensated semimetals and represent a platform for large magnetoresistance driven by intrinsic electronic structure. Here we explore electronic transport in magnetic members of the latter family of semimetals and find that XMR is strongly modulated by magnetic order. In particular, CeSb exhibits XMR in excess of 1.6 ×106% at fields of 9 T whereas the magnetoresistance itself is nonmonotonic across the various magnetic phases and shows a transition from negative magnetoresistance to XMR with fields above magnetic ordering temperature TN. The magnitude of the XMR is larger than in other rare-earth monopnictides including the nonmagnetic members and follows a nonsaturating power law to fields above 30 T. We show that the overall response can be understood as the modulation of conductivity by the Ce orbital state and for intermediate temperatures can be characterized by an effective medium model. Comparison to the orbitally quenched compound GdBi supports the correlation of XMR with the onset of magnetic ordering and compensation and highlights the unique combination of orbital inversion and type-I magnetic ordering in CeSb in determining its large response. These findings suggest a paradigm for magneto-orbital control of XMR and are relevant to the understanding of rare-earth-based correlated topological materials.

  1. Resistivity and magnetoresistivity of amorphous rare-earth alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchi, E.; Poli, M.; De Gennaro, S.

    1982-05-01

    The resistivity and magnetoresistivity of amorphous rare-earth alloys are studied starting from the general approach of Van Peski-Tinbergen and Dekker. The random axial crystal-field and the magnetic correlations between the rare-earth ions are consistently taken into account. The characteristic features of the available experimental data are explained both of the case of random ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order.

  2. Tunneling magnetoresistance in granular cermet films with particle size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vovk, A.Ya.; Golub, V.O.; Malkinski, L.; Kravets, A.F.; Pogorily, A.M.; Shypil', O.V.

    2004-01-01

    The correlation between tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and field sensitivity (dMR/dH) for granular films (Co 50 Fe 50 ) x -(Al 2 O 3 ) 1-x was studied. The position of TMR maximum is shifted towards the lower x in the higher applied magnetic fields. Such a behavior was observed for metal granular nanocomposites but is first reported for granular cermets. However the highest dMR/dH was found for the compositions just below the percolation threshold

  3. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernandez, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; Lopez-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.W.; Park, B.G.; Balcells, J.; Martí, Xavier; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Oct (2016), 1-6, č. článku 35471. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnets * spintronics * magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  4. Anisotropic magnetoresistance of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašek, Petr; Svoboda, Pavel; Novák, Vít; Cukr, Miroslav; Výborný, Karel; Jurka, Vlastimil; Stuchlík, Jiří; Orlita, Milan; Maude, D. K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 6 (2010), 1161-1163 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk MEB020928 Grant - others:EU EuroMagNET II(XE) Egide 19535NF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : GaMnAs * anisotropic magnetoresistance * hydrogenation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.014, year: 2010

  5. Magnetoresistance of Si(001) MOSFETs with high concentration of electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smrčka, Ludvík; Makarovsky, O. N.; Schemenchinskii, S. G.; Vašek, Petr; Jurka, Vlastimil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2004), s. 320-323 ISSN 1386-9477. [International Conference on Electronic Properties of Two-Dimensional Systems /15./. Nara, 14.07.2003-18.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0754; GA ČR GA202/96/0036 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : Si MOSFET * magnetoresistance * Hall effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.898, year: 2004

  6. Enhanced magnetoresistance in the binary semimetal NbAs2 due to improved crystal quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, K.; Murakawa, H.; Komada, M.; Kida, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Sakai, H.; Hanasaki, N.

    2018-02-01

    We have observed an extremely large magnetoresistance exceeding 1.9 million at 1.7 K at 40 T for a single crystal of the binary semimetal NbAs2. The magnetoresistive behavior for this compound is quantitatively reproduced by a semiclassical two-carrier model in which the significant enhancement of magnetoresistance is attributed to the almost full compensation of the hole and electron densities (0.994 6 ×105cm2 /V .s ). Our results indicate that binary semimetals with higher carrier densities have a great potential for exhibiting a further divergent increase in magnetoresistance merely through an improvement in crystal quality.

  7. Domain wall magnetoresistance in BiFeO3 thin films measured by scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, N; Farokhipoor, S; Santiso, J; Noheda, B; Catalan, G

    2017-08-23

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of individual 71° domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO 3 by means of conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in the presence of magnetic fields up to one Tesla. The results suggest anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature, with the sign of the magnetoresistance depending on the relative orientation between the magnetic field and the domain wall plane. A consequence of this finding is that macroscopically averaged magnetoresistance measurements for domain wall bunches are likely to underestimate the magnetoresistance of each individual domain wall.

  8. Spin–orbit coupling induced magnetoresistance oscillation in a dc biased two-dimensional electron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C M; Lei, X L

    2014-01-01

    We study dc-current effects on the magnetoresistance oscillation in a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, using the balance-equation approach to nonlinear magnetotransport. In the weak current limit the magnetoresistance exhibits periodical Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation with changing Rashba coupling strength for a fixed magnetic field. At finite dc bias, the period of the oscillation halves when the interbranch contribution to resistivity dominates. With further increasing current density, the oscillatory resistivity exhibits phase inversion, i.e., magnetoresistivity minima (maxima) invert to maxima (minima) at certain values of the dc bias, which is due to the current-induced magnetoresistance oscillation. (paper)

  9. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Antiferromagnetic Sr_{2}IrO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report point-contact measurements of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR in a single crystal of antiferromagnetic Mott insulator Sr_{2}IrO_{4}. The point-contact technique is used here as a local probe of magnetotransport properties on the nanoscale. The measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature reveal negative magnetoresistances (up to 28% for modest magnetic fields (250 mT applied within the IrO_{2} a-b plane and electric currents flowing perpendicular to the plane. The angular dependence of magnetoresistance shows a crossover from fourfold to twofold symmetry in response to an increasing magnetic field with angular variations in resistance from 1% to 14%. We tentatively attribute the fourfold symmetry to the crystalline component of AMR and the field-induced transition to the effects of applied field on the canting of antiferromagnetic-coupled moments in Sr_{2}IrO_{4}. The observed AMR is very large compared to the crystalline AMRs in 3d transition metal alloys or oxides (0.1%–0.5% and can be associated with the large spin-orbit interactions in this 5d oxide while the transition provides evidence of correlations between electronic transport, magnetic order, and orbital states. The finding of this work opens an entirely new avenue to not only gain a new insight into physics associated with spin-orbit coupling but also to better harness the power of spintronics in a more technically favorable fashion.

  10. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galceran, R; Fina, I; Cisneros-Fernández, J; Bozzo, B; Frontera, C; López-Mir, L; Deniz, H; Park, K-W; Park, B-G; Balcells, Ll; Martí, X; Jungwirth, T; Martínez, B

    2016-10-20

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature.

  11. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-08

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 10(17) cm(-3) at 300 K to 2.2 × 10(16) cm(-3) below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed.

  12. Magnetoresistance and magnetic breakdown phenomenon in amorphous magnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hui-yu; Gong Xiao-yu

    1988-01-01

    Transverse magnetoresistance in amorphous magnetic alloys (Fe/sub 1-//sub x/CO/sub x/) 82 Cu/sub 0.4/Si/sub 4.4/B/sub 13.2/ were measured at room temperature and in the magnetic field range 0--15 kOe. For large magnetic field, three different functional dependences of magnetoresistance on magnetic field strength have been found as follows: (1) Δrho/rho approaches saturation. (2) Δrho/rho increases proportionally to H 2 . (3) For x = 0.15, a sharp Δrho/rho peak appears at a certain magnetic field strength in spatial angular orientation of both magnetic field and electric currents. Case (3) is a magnetic breakdown phenomenon. Magnetic breakdown occurs at the gap between the spin-up and spin-down sheets of the Fermi surface. This gap is the spin-orbit gap and its magnitude is a sensitive function of magnetization. Hence the magnitude and width of the magnetoresistance peak and the magnetic field strength at the peak point are functions of angular orientation of both magnetic field and electric current

  13. Thickness Dependent Interlayer Magnetoresistance in Multilayer Graphene Stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Bodepudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition grown multilayer graphene (MLG exhibits large out-of-plane magnetoresistance due to interlayer magnetoresistance (ILMR effect. It is essential to identify the factors that influence this effect in order to explore its potential in magnetic sensing and data storage applications. It has been demonstrated before that the ILMR effect is sensitive to the interlayer coupling and the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the out-of-plane (c-axis direction. In this work, we investigate the role of MLG thickness on ILMR effect. Our results show that the magnitude of ILMR effect increases with the number of graphene layers in the MLG stack. Surprisingly, thicker devices exhibit field induced resistance switching by a factor of at least ~107. This effect persists even at room temperature and to our knowledge such large magnetoresistance values have not been reported before in the literature at comparable fields and temperatures. In addition, an oscillatory MR effect is observed at higher field values. A physical explanation of this effect is presented, which is consistent with our experimental scenario.

  14. Giant cystic craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, S.C.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Nowell, M.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    Three cases of giant cystic craniopharyngiomas with large areas of extension beyond the suprasellar area are presented. The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance in one case is described. These giant tumors had large, multilobulated cysts that comprised the bulk of the tumors. In one case, there was an unusual extension of the large tumor cyst into the lateral ventricle. In two cases, the tumors extended to the level of the foramen magnum. On CT, the cyst contents of these two tumors were hyperdense and became hypodense postoperatively. All three tumors harbored calcifications in the form of clumps in the suprasellar region and rim calcifications around the cysts. None of the tumors exhibited contrast enhancement. A literature review of the radiographic features of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Giant duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Benjamin Newton; Mark R Versland; Thomas E Sepe

    2008-01-01

    Giant duodenal ulcers (GDUs) are a subset of duodenal ulcers that have historically resulted in greater morbidity than usual duodenal ulcers. Until recently,few cases had been successfully treated with medical therapy. However, the widespread use of endoscopy,the introduction of H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, and the improvement in surgical techniques all have revolutionized the diagnosis,treatment and outcome of this condition. Nevertheless,GDUs are still associated with high rates of morbidity,mortality and complications. Thus, surgical evaluation of a patient with a GDU should remain an integral part of patient care. These giant variants, while usually benign, can frequently harbor malignancy. A careful review of the literature highlights the important differences when comparing GDUs to classical peptic ulcers and why they must be thought of differently than their more common counterpart.

  16. Multispin giant magnons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobev, N. P.; Rashkov, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate giant magnons from classical rotating strings in two different backgrounds. First we generalize the solution of Hofman and Maldacena and investigate new magnon excitations of a spin chain which are dual to a string on RxS 5 with two nonvanishing angular momenta. Allowing string dynamics along the third angle in the five sphere, we find a dispersion relation that reproduces the Hofman and Maldacena one and the one found by Dorey for the two spin case. In the second part of the paper we generalize the two 'spin' giant magnon to the case of β-deformed AdS 5 xS 5 background. We find agreement between the dispersion relation of the rotating string and the proposed dispersion relation of the magnon bound state on the spin chain

  17. Detection of BCG bacteria using a magnetoresistive biosensor: A step towards a fully electronic platform for tuberculosis point-of-care detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Teresa G; Martins, Rui C; Fernandes, Elisabete; Cardoso, Susana; Rivas, José; Freitas, Paulo P

    2018-02-15

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health concerns. This highly contagious disease affects more than 10.4 million people, being a leading cause of morbidity by infection. Tuberculosis is diagnosed at the point-of-care by the Ziehl-Neelsen sputum smear microscopy test. Ziehl-Neelsen is laborious, prone to human error and infection risk, with a limit of detection of 10 4 cells/mL. In resource-poor nations, a more practical test, with lower detection limit, is paramount. This work uses a magnetoresistive biosensor to detect BCG bacteria for tuberculosis diagnosis. Herein we report: i) nanoparticle assembly method and specificity for tuberculosis detection; ii) demonstration of proportionality between BCG cell concentration and magnetoresistive voltage signal; iii) application of multiplicative signal correction for systematic effects removal; iv) investigation of calibration effectiveness using chemometrics methods; and v) comparison with state-of-the-art point-of-care tuberculosis biosensors. Results present a clear correspondence between voltage signal and cell concentration. Multiplicative signal correction removes baseline shifts within and between biochip sensors, allowing accurate and precise voltage signal between different biochips. The corrected signal was used for multivariate regression models, which significantly decreased the calibration standard error from 0.50 to 0.03log 10 (cells/mL). Results show that Ziehl-Neelsen detection limits and below are achievable with the magnetoresistive biochip, when pre-processing and chemometrics are used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Red giants seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, B.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.

    2013-11-01

    The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are indiscreet. With their asteroseismic programs, they tell us what is hidden deep inside the stars. Waves excited just below the stellar surface travel throughout the stellar interior and unveil many secrets: how old is the star, how big, how massive, how fast (or slow) its core is dancing. This paper intends to paparazze the red giants according to the seismic pictures we have from their interiors.

  19. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  20. Intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum is reported in a 50- year- old Indian. He did not respond to topical application of podophyllin 20% but responded partially to electric cauterisation. Surgical excision was done to get rid of the warty growh completely. Since there were no skin or genital lesions and no history of marital or extramarital sexual contact the lesion was probably acquired from environmental sources. Nonsexual transmission should be considered especially when the lesions are extragenital.

  1. Giant prolactinomas in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgrange, Etienne; Raverot, Gerald; Bex, Marie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg/l and id......OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg....../l and identified 19 similar cases from the literature; a gender-based comparison of the frequency and age distribution was obtained from a literature review. RESULTS: The initial PubMed search using the term 'giant prolactinomas' identified 125 patients (13 women) responding to the inclusion criteria. The female......:male ratio was 1:9. Another six female patients were found by extending the literature search, while our own series added 15 patients. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years in women compared with 35 years in men (Pwomen (n=34), we...

  2. Characteristic features of the magnetoresistance in the ferrimagnetic (Sr2FeMoO6-δ) - dielectric (SrMoO4) nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanov, S.; Kalanda, N.; Yarmolich, M.; Petrov, A.; Lee, S.-H.; Yu, S.-C.; Oh, S. K.; Kim, D.-H.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic metal-oxide compounds with high values of magnetoresistance (MR) have attracted huge interest for spintronic applications, among which Sr2FeMoO6-δ (SFMO) has been relatively less known compared to the cobaltites and manganites, despite 100% electrons spin-polarization degree and a high Curie temperature. Here, stable fabrication and systematic analysis of nanocomposites based on SFMO with SrMoO4 dielectric sheaths are presented. SFMO-SrMoO4 nanocomposites were fabricated as follows: synthesis of the SFMO single-phase nanopowders by the modified citrate-gel technique; compaction under high pressure; thermal treatment for sheaths formation around grains. The nanocomposite is observed to exhibit a transitional behavior of conductivity from metallic, which is characteristic for the SFMO to semiconductor one in the temperature range 4 - 300K under magnetic fields up to 10T. A negative MR is observed due to the spin-polarized charge carriers tunneling through dielectric sheaths. MR value reaches 43% under 8T at 10κ. The dielectric sheaths thickness was determined to be about 10 nm by electric breakdown voltage value at current-voltage characteristics curves. The breakdown is found to be a reversible process determined by collisional ionization of dielectric atoms in strong electric field depending on knocked-out electrons from the SrMoO4. It was found that MR changes sign in electric breakdown region, revealing the giant magnetoresistive properties.

  3. Large linear magnetoresistance in topological crystalline insulator Pb_0_._6Sn_0_._4Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Ghara, Somnath; Guin, Satya N.; Sundaresan, A.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2016-01-01

    Classical magnetoresistance generally follows the quadratic dependence of the magnetic field at lower field and finally saturates when field is larger. Here, we report the large positive non-saturating linear magnetoresistance in topological crystalline insulator, Pb_0_._6Sn_0_._4Te, at different temperatures between 3 K and 300 K in magnetic field up to 9 T. Magnetoresistance value as high as ∼200% was achieved at 3 K at magnetic field of 9 T. Linear magnetoresistance observed in Pb_0_._6Sn_0_._4Te is mainly governed by the spatial fluctuation carrier mobility due to distortions in the current paths in inhomogeneous conductor. - Graphical abstract: Large non-saturating linear magnetoresistance has been evidenced in topological crystalline insulator, Pb_0_._6Sn_0_._4Te, at different temperatures between 3 K and 300 K in magnetic field up to 9 T. - Highlights: • Large non-saturating linear magnetoresistance was achieved in the topological crystalline insulator, Pb_0_._6Sn_0_._4Te. • Highest magnetoresistance value as high as ~200% was achieved at 3 K at magnetic field of 9 T. • Linear magnetoresistance in Pb_0_._6Sn_0_._4Te is mainly governed by the spatial fluctuation of the carrier mobility.

  4. Flat magnetic exchange springs as mechanism for additional magnetoresistance in magnetic nanoisland arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltaev, A.P.; Pudonin, F.A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Sherstnev, I.A., E-mail: sherstnev@lebedev.ru [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Egorov, D.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kozmin, A.M. [National Research University of Electronic Technology, Shokin Square, 1, Zelenograd, 124482 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Process of magnetization and magnetoresistance have been studied in nanoisland bilayer systems of FeNi-Co. Hysteresis loops show characteristic features (steps) most clearly observed in certain orientations of the sample in a magnetic field. To explain these features the concept of flat magnetic exchange spring has been introduced for nanoisland bilayers. It has been proposed that additional magnetoresistance can be the result of spin-dependent scattering of electrons in the area of flat magnetic exchange spring. Magnetoresistance studies of bilayer systems has shown that additional magnetoresistance occurs at the same magnetic fields as steps on hysteresis loops. - Highlights: • Metallic FeNi-Co bilayers are studied. • FeNi and Co layers magnetize independently. • Concept of flat spin spring is proposed. • Additional magnetoresistance occurs in intermediate magnetic fields.

  5. Flat magnetic exchange springs as mechanism for additional magnetoresistance in magnetic nanoisland arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boltaev, A.P.; Pudonin, F.A.; Sherstnev, I.A.; Egorov, D.A.; Kozmin, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Process of magnetization and magnetoresistance have been studied in nanoisland bilayer systems of FeNi-Co. Hysteresis loops show characteristic features (steps) most clearly observed in certain orientations of the sample in a magnetic field. To explain these features the concept of flat magnetic exchange spring has been introduced for nanoisland bilayers. It has been proposed that additional magnetoresistance can be the result of spin-dependent scattering of electrons in the area of flat magnetic exchange spring. Magnetoresistance studies of bilayer systems has shown that additional magnetoresistance occurs at the same magnetic fields as steps on hysteresis loops. - Highlights: • Metallic FeNi-Co bilayers are studied. • FeNi and Co layers magnetize independently. • Concept of flat spin spring is proposed. • Additional magnetoresistance occurs in intermediate magnetic fields.

  6. 3000% high-field magnetoresistance in super-lattices of CoFe nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Reasmey P.; Carrey, Julian; Respaud, Marc; Desvaux, Celine; Renaud, Philippe; Chaudret, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements on millimeter-large super-lattices of CoFe nanoparticles surrounded by an organic layer. Electrical properties are typical of Coulomb blockade in three-dimensional arrays of nanoparticles. A large high-field magnetoresistance, reaching up to 3000%, is measured between 1.8 and 10 K. This exceeds by two orders of magnitude magnetoresistance values generally measured in arrays of 3d transition metal ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The magnetoresistance amplitude scales with the magnetic field/temperature ratio and displays an unusual exponential dependency with the applied voltage. The magnetoresistance abruptly disappears below 1.8 K. We propose that the magnetoresistance is due to some individual paramagnetic moments localized between the metallic cores of the nanoparticles, the origin of which is discussed

  7. Isoscalar giant resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, D. H. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Cyclotron Inst.; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the knowledges of giant quadrupole resonance (GQR), low energy octupole resonance (LEOR), and giant monopole resonance (GMR), is described. In the lowest order of multipole resonance, both isoscalar and isovector modes can occur. The characteristics of the GQR in light nuclei are apparent in the experimental result for Mg-24. All of the isoscalar E2 strength are known in Mg-24. The Goldhaber-Teller model is preferred over the Steinwedel-Jensen model for the giant dipole resonance (GDR) transition density. A few interesting and puzzling features have been seen in Pb-208. There is some conflict between inelastic alpha and electron scatterings. About LEOR, the RPA calculation of Liu and Brown was compared to the data for 3/sup -/ strength in Ca-40, Zr-90 and Pb-208. The calculation was employed the residual interaction of the Skyrme type. The agreement in Zr-90 was excellent. The effect of quadrupole deformation on the LEOR in Sm isotopes was large. The inelastic alpha scattering data on Al-27, Ca-40, Ti-48, Ni-58, Zn-64 and 66, Zr-90, Sn-116, 118, 120 and 124, Sm-144, 148 and 154, and Pb-208 were utilized in order to identify the GMR, and the GMR parameters were obtained. The GMR exhausting a large fraction of the sum rule was apparent in the nuclei with mass larger than 90. The splitting of the GDR and the broadening of the GQR in permanently deformed nuclei were established. The splitting of GMR was seen in Sm-154. The studies with heavy ions are also described.

  8. Topological Phase Transition-Induced Triaxial Vector Magnetoresistance in (Bi1-xInx)2Se3 Nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhao; Wang, Huaiqiang; Mu, Kejun; Wang, Pengdong; Niu, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Xiao, Guiling; Chen, Yequan; Tong, Tong; Fu, Dongzhi; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Haijun; Song, Fengqi; Miao, Feng; Sun, Zhe; Xia, Zhengcai; Wang, Xinran; Xu, Yongbing; Wang, Baigeng; Xing, Dingyu; Zhang, Rong

    2018-02-27

    We report the study of a triaxial vector magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic (Bi 1-x In x ) 2 Se 3 nanodevices at the composition of x = 0.08. We show a dumbbell-shaped in-plane negative MR up to room temperature as well as a large out-of-plane positive MR. MR at three directions is about in a -3%:-1%:225% ratio at 2 K. Through both the thickness and composition-dependent magnetotransport measurements, we show that the in-plane negative MR is due to the topological phase transition enhanced intersurface coupling near the topological critical point. Our devices suggest the great potential for room-temperature spintronic applications in, for example, vector magnetic sensors.

  9. Magnetoresistive ceramics. Recent progress: from basic understanding to applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontcuberta, J.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoresistive ceramics, based on half-metallic ferromagnetic oxides have received renewed attention in the last few years because of their possible applications. Here, we review some recent progress on the development of magnetoresistive ceramic materials such as La2/3Sr1/ 3MnO3 and Sr2FeMoO6 ceramic materials. We shall revisit their basic properties, the strategies that have been employed to understand and to improve their intrinsic properties, pushing the limits of their operation at temperatures well above room-temperature, and the development of some applications. This effort has required the contribution of a number of actors. Starting from research laboratories, it has progressively involved industries that nowadays are able to supply high quality raw-materials or to manufacture magnetoresistive components at large scale.

    Las cerámicas magnetorresistivas, basadas en óxidos semi-metálicos ferromagnéticos han recibido una renovada atención en los últimos años debido a sus posibles aplicaciones. Se revisan aquí algunos de los recientes progresos en el desarrollo de materiales cerámicos magnetorresistivos como La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 y Sr2FeMoO6. Se revisitan sus propiedades básicas, las estrategias empleadas para entender y mejorar sus propiedades intrínsecas, llevando sus límites de operación a temperaturas muy por encima de temperatura ambiente, y el desarrollo de algunas aplicaciones. Este esfuerzo ha requerido al contribución de un gran número de actores. Comenzando por laboratorios de investigación, se ha implicado progresivamente a industrias que hoy en día están capacitadas para suministrar materias primas de alta calidad o para fabricar componentes magnetorresistivos a gran escala.

  10. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  11. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  12. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  13. Giant paraganglioma in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma is a rare neuroendocrine catecholamine producing tumour in childhood which arises outside the adrenal medulla. We present a 12 year old girl with giant paraganglioma with severe hypertension and end organ damage. Diagnosis was confirmed with 24 h urinary Vanillymandelic Acid (VMA and CT scan. Preoperative blood pressure was controlled with intravenous nitroprusside, and oral prazosin, amlodepine, labetalol and metoprolol. General anaesthesia with epidural analgesia was given. Intra operative blood pressure rise was managed with infusion of nitriglycerine (NTG, esmolol, nitroprusside and propofol.

  14. GIANT INTRACANALICULAR FIBROADENOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyn; Parsons, Robert J.; Bogart, William M.

    1951-01-01

    Five cases of giant intracanalicular fibroadenoma (“cystosarcoma phylloides”) were observed at one hospital in a period of three years. In a search of the literature, additional reports of breast tumors of this kind, not included in previous reviews, were noted. As there is record of 229 cases, it would appear that this rapidly growing benign tumor should be kept in mind in the diagnosis of masses in the breast. If removal is incomplete, there may be recurrence. Simple mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Radical mastectomy should be avoided. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2.Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:14848732

  15. Tailoring magnetoresistance at the atomic level: An ab initio study

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Kun

    2012-01-05

    The possibility of manipulating the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of antiferromagnetic nanostructures is predicted in the framework of ab initio calculations. By the example of a junction composed of an antiferromagnetic dimer and a spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy tip we show that the TMR can be tuned and even reversed in sign by lateral and vertical movements of the tip. Moreover, our finite-bias calculations demonstrate that the magnitude and the sign of the TMR can also be tuned by an external voltage. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  16. Tailoring magnetoresistance at the atomic level: An ab initio study

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Kun; Stepanyuk, V. S.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of manipulating the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of antiferromagnetic nanostructures is predicted in the framework of ab initio calculations. By the example of a junction composed of an antiferromagnetic dimer and a spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy tip we show that the TMR can be tuned and even reversed in sign by lateral and vertical movements of the tip. Moreover, our finite-bias calculations demonstrate that the magnitude and the sign of the TMR can also be tuned by an external voltage. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  17. The electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of metallic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraga, Luis, E-mail: luismoragajaramillo@gmail.com [Universidad Central de Chile, Toesca 1783, Santiago 8370178 (Chile); Henriquez, Ricardo, E-mail: rahc.78@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Bravo, Sergio, E-mail: bravo.castillo.sergio@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Solis, Basilio, E-mail: bsolis1984@gmail.com [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hügel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    Proceeding from exact solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, we present formulas for the electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of single-crystalline cylindrical nanotubes. The effects of surface scattering are taken into account by introducing different specularity parameters at the inner and outer surfaces. For small values of the inner diameter, these formulas reduce to the respective expressions for cylindrical nanowires. It is found that the existing measurements of the resistivity of nanotubes (Venkata Kamalakar and Raychaudhuri, New J. Phys. 14, 043032 (2012)) can be accurately described by this formalism.

  18. Fusion-neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this work is to quantify the changes which occur in the magnetoresistivity of coppers (having various purities and pretreatments, and at magnetic fields up to 12 T during the course of sequential fusion neutron irradiations at about 4 0 K and anneals to room temperature. In conjunction with work in progress by Coltman and Klabunde of ORNL, the results should lead to engineering design data for the stabilizers of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. These magnets are expected to be irradiated during reactor operation and warmed to room temperature periodically during maintenance

  19. Fusion-neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-02-24

    The objective of this work is to quantify the changes which occur in the magnetoresistivity of coppers (having various purities and pretreatments, and at magnetic fields up to 12 T during the course of sequential fusion neutron irradiations at about 4/sup 0/K and anneals to room temperature. In conjunction with work in progress by Coltman and Klabunde of ORNL, the results should lead to engineering design data for the stabilizers of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. These magnets are expected to be irradiated during reactor operation and warmed to room temperature periodically during maintenance.

  20. Magnetoresistance of UPdSn and pressure effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honda, F.; Alsmadi, A.; Nakotte, H.; Kamarád, Jiří; Sechovský, V.; Lacerda, A. H.; Mihálik, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2003), s. 1197-1200 ISSN 0587-4254. [International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 02). Cracow, 10.07.2002-13.07.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/01/D045; GA ČR GA106/02/0943 Grant - others:NSF(US) DMR-0094241; NSF(US) INT-9722777 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetoresistance * UPdSn * pressure effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2003

  1. Superconducting spin-triplet-MRAM with infinite magnetoresistance ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenk, Daniel; Ullrich, Aladin; Obermeier, Guenter; Mueller, Claus; Krug von Nidda, Hans-Albrecht; Horn, Siegfried; Tidecks, Reinhard [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Morari, Roman [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); D. Ghitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies ASM, Academiei Str. 3/3, MD2028 Kishinev (Moldova, Republic of); Solid State Physics Department, Kazan Federal University, 420008 Kazan (Russian Federation); Zdravkov, Vladimir I. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); D. Ghitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies ASM, Academiei Str. 3/3, MD2028 Kishinev (Moldova, Republic of); Institute of Applied Physics and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9A, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Sidorenko, Anatoli S. [D. Ghitsu Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies ASM, Academiei Str. 3/3, MD2028 Kishinev (Moldova, Republic of); Tagirov, Lenar R. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Solid State Physics Department, Kazan Federal University, 420008 Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    We fabricated a nanolayered hybrid superconductor-ferromagnet spin-valve structure, i.e. the superconducting transition temperature of this structure depends on its magnetic history. The observed spin-valve effect is based on the generation of the long range odd in frequency triplet component, arising from a non-collinear relative orientation of the constituent ferromagnetic layers. We investigated the effect both as a function of the sweep amplitude of the magnetic field, determining the magnetic history, and the applied transport current. Moreover, we demonstrate the possibility of switching the system from the normal o the superconducting state by applying field pulses, yielding an infinite magnetoresistance ratio.

  2. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance via molecular π orbitals of Pb dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Ferriani, Paolo; Heinze, Stefan; Weismann, Alexander; Berndt, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Pb dimers on a ferromagnetic surface are shown to exhibit large tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to molecular π orbitals. Dimers oriented differently with respect to the magnetization directions of a ferromagnetic Fe double layer on W(110) were made with a scanning tunneling microscope. Depending on the dimer orientations, TAMR is absent or as large as 20% at the Fermi level. General arguments and first-principles calculations show that mixing of molecular orbitals due to spin-orbit coupling, which leads to TAMR, is maximal when the magnetization is oriented parallel to the dimer axis.

  3. Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic molecules with spin-vibron coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kenawy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molecular vibrations on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR of a magnetic tunnel junction with a single spin-anisotropic molecule interconnecting its electrodes is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that if these vibrations couple at the same time to the charge of tunneling electrons and to the spin of the molecule, the spin anisotropy of such a molecule becomes enhanced. This has, in turn, a profound impact on the TMR of such a device showing that molecular vibrations lead to a significant change of spin-polarized transport, differing for the parallel and antiparallel magnetic configuration of the junction.

  4. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in single-molecule magnet junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiqing; Wang, Qiang; Jiao, Hujun; Liang, J.-Q.

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum transport through single-molecule magnet (SMM) junctions with ferromagnetic and normal-metal leads in the sequential regime. The current obtained by means of the rate-equation gives rise to the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR), which varies with the angle between the magnetization direction of ferromagnetic lead and the easy axis of SMM. The angular dependence of TAMR can serve as a probe to determine experimentally the easy axis of SMM. Moreover, it is demonstrated that both the magnitude and the sign of TAMR are tunable by the bias voltage, suggesting a new spin-valve device with only one magnetic electrode in molecular spintronics.

  5. Investigation of transport properties of colossal magnetoresistive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurav, Netram

    2006-01-01

    The transport properties, i.e. resistivity, heat capacity, thermal conductivity and optical conductivity have been theoretically analysed for colossal magnetoresistive materials within the framework of double exchange mechanism. Following an effective interaction potential, we deduce acoustic (optical) phonon modes, coupling strength for electron-phonon and phonon-impurities, the phonon (magnon) scattering rate and constants characterise the scattering of charge and heat carriers with various disorders in the crystal. The theoretical models have been developed to account the anomalies observed in the transport phenomenon. It is noticed that electron-electron, electron-phonon and electron-magnon interactions are essential in discussing the transport behaviour of doped magnetites. (author)

  6. Positive magnetoresistance in Fe3Se4 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Jiang, J. J.; Liu, W.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2011-04-01

    We report the magnetotransport properties of Fe3Se4 nanowire arrays in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane. The temperature dependence of resistance of Fe3Se4 nanowires at a zero field shows thermal activated behavior below 295 K. The exponential relationship in resistance is consistent with the model of strong localization with variable-range hopping (VRH) for a finite one-dimensional wire. Resistance versus magnetic field curves below 100 K show small positive magnetoresistance (MR). The field dependencies of log[R(H)/R(0)] explain the positive MR as the effect of magnetic field on the VRH conduction.

  7. Magnon Spin Hall Magnetoresistance of a Gapped Quantum Paramagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Camilo; Duine, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by recent experimental work, we consider spin transport between a normal metal and a gapped quantum paramagnet. We model the latter as the magnonic Mott-insulating phase of an easy-plane ferromagnetic insulator. We evaluate the spin current mediated by the interface exchange coupling between the ferromagnet and the adjacent normal metal. For the strongly interacting magnons that we consider, this spin current gives rise to a spin Hall magnetoresistance that strongly depends on the magnitude of the magnetic field, rather than its direction. This Letter may motivate electrical detection of the phases of quantum magnets and the incorporation of such materials into spintronic devices.

  8. Magneto-resistive and spin valve heads fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mallinson, John C

    2002-01-01

    This book is aims to be a comprehensive source on the physics and engineering of magneto-resistive heads. Most of the material is presented in a nonmathematical manner to make it more digestible for researchers, students, developers, and engineers.In addition to revising and updating material available in the first edition, Mallinson has added nine new chapters dealing with various aspects concerning spin valves, the electron spin tunneling effect, the electrostatic discharge effects, read amplifiers, and signal-to-noise ratios, making this a completely up-to-date reference.Th

  9. Magnetoresistance peculiarities of bismuth wires in high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condrea, E.; Gilewski, A.; Nicorici, A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetoresistance measurements of Bi wires performed in the magnetic field oriented along the bisector axis revealed unexpected anomalous peaks in a high magnetic field far above the quantum limit of the electrons. By combining a magnetic field and an uniaxial strain, we obtained a modification of the electronic structure; as a result, the quantum limit for light and heavy electrons is changed in a different way. For the case where heavy electrons are in the quantum limit, a correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of light electrons and the Lifshitz transition was found.

  10. Anisotropic magnetoresistance components in (Ga,Mn)As

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rushforth, A.W.; Výborný, Karel; King, C.S.; Edmonds, K. W.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.; Irvine, A.C.; Vašek, Petr; Novák, Vít; Olejník, Kamil; Sinova, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Gallagher, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 14 (2007), 147207/1-147207/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/1519; GA ČR GEFON/06/E002; GA MŠk LC510 Grant - others:UK(GB) GR/S81407/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * anisotropic magnetoresistence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 6.944, year: 2007

  11. Huge tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance in (Ga,Mn)As nanoconstrictions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giddings, A.D.; Makarovsky, O. N.; Khalid, M.N.; Yasin, S.; Edmonds, K. W.; Campion, R. P.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Williams, D.A.; Gallagher, B. L.; Foxon, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2008), 085004/1-085004/9 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GEFON/06/E002; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/1519 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 015728 - NANOSPIN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductor * nanoconstriction * tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance , Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2008

  12. Towards a magnetoresistive platform for neural signal recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P. P.; Gervasoni, G.; Albisetti, E.; D'Ercoli, F.; Monticelli, M.; Moretti, D.; Forte, N.; Rocchi, A.; Ferrari, G.; Baldelli, P.; Sampietro, M.; Benfenati, F.; Bertacco, R.; Petti, D.

    2017-05-01

    A promising strategy to get deeper insight on brain functionalities relies on the investigation of neural activities at the cellular and sub-cellular level. In this framework, methods for recording neuron electrical activity have gained interest over the years. Main technological challenges are associated to finding highly sensitive detection schemes, providing considerable spatial and temporal resolution. Moreover, the possibility to perform non-invasive assays would constitute a noteworthy benefit. In this work, we present a magnetoresistive platform for the detection of the action potential propagation in neural cells. Such platform allows, in perspective, the in vitro recording of neural signals arising from single neurons, neural networks and brain slices.

  13. The magnetoresistive effect induced by stress in spin-valve structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Jie, Qian; Xiao-Yong, Xu; Jing-Guo, Hu

    2009-01-01

    Using a method of free energy minimization, this paper investigates the magnetization properties of a ferromagnetic (FM) monolayer and an FM/antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer under a stress field, respectively. It then investigates the magnetoresistance (MR) of the spin-valve structure, which is built by an FM monolayer and an FM/AFM bilayer, and its dependence upon the applied stress field. The results show that under the stress field, the magnetization properties of the FM monolayer is obviously different from that of the FM/AFM bilayer, since the coupled AFM layer can obviously block the magnetization of the FM layer. This phenomenon makes the MR of the spin-valve structure become obvious. In detail, there are two behaviors for the MR of the spin-valve structure dependence upon the stress field distinguished by the coupling (FM coupling or AFM coupling) between the FM layer and the FM/AFM bilayer. Either behavior of the MR of the spin-valve structure depends on the stress field including its value and orientation. Based on these investigations, a perfect mechanical sensor at the nano-scale is suggested to be devised experimentally

  14. Large magnetoresistance and Fermi surface study of Sb2Se2Te single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K.; Marinova, V.; Graf, D.; Lorenz, B.; Chu, C. W.

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the magnetotransport properties of a Sb2Se2Te single crystal. Magnetoresistance (MR) is maximum when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the sample surface and reaches a value of 1100% at B = 31 T with no sign of saturation. MR shows Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations above B = 15 T. The frequency spectrum of SdH oscillations consists of three distinct peaks at α = 32 T, β = 80 T, and γ = 117 T indicating the presence of three Fermi surface pockets. Among these frequencies, β is the prominent peak in the frequency spectrum of SdH oscillations measured at different tilt angles of the sample with respect to the magnetic field. From the angle dependence β and Berry phase calculations, we have confirmed the trivial topology of the β-pocket. The cyclotron masses of charge carriers, obtained by using the Lifshitz-Kosevich formula, are found to be mβ*=0.16mo and m γ*=0.63 mo for the β and γ bands, respectively. The Large MR of Sb2Se2Te is suitable for utilization in electronic instruments such as computer hard discs, high field magnetic sensors, and memory devices.

  15. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke; Oufiero, Christopher E; Martin, Christopher H; McGee, Matthew D; Gamarra, Ashlee R; Lee, Johanna J; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-02-18

    The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone.

  16. Angle Dependence of the Orbital Magnetoresistance in Bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Collaudin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an extensive study of angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance in bismuth, with a magnetic field perpendicular to the applied electric current and rotating in three distinct crystallographic planes. The observed angular oscillations are confronted with the expectations of semiclassic transport theory for a multivalley system with anisotropic mobility and the agreement allows us to quantify the components of the mobility tensor for both electrons and holes. A quadratic temperature dependence is resolved. As Hartman argued long ago, this indicates that inelastic resistivity in bismuth is dominated by carrier-carrier scattering. At low temperature and high magnetic field, the threefold symmetry of the lattice is suddenly lost. Specifically, a 2π/3 rotation of magnetic field around the trigonal axis modifies the amplitude of the magnetoresistance below a field-dependent temperature. By following the evolution of this anomaly as a function of temperature and magnetic field, we map the boundary in the (field, temperature plane separating two electronic states. In the less symmetric state, confined to low temperature and high magnetic field, the three Dirac valleys cease to be rotationally invariant. We discuss the possible origins of this spontaneous valley polarization, including a valley-nematic scenario.

  17. Tunnel magnetoresistance in asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useinov, N.Kh.; Petukhov, D.A.; Tagirov, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    The spin-polarized tunnel conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) through a planar asymmetric double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction (DBMTJ) have been calculated using quasi-classical model. In DBMTJ nanostructure the magnetization of middle ferromagnetic metal layer can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the top and bottom ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients of an electron to pass through the barriers have been calculated in terms of quantum mechanics. The dependencies of tunnel conductance and TMR on the applied voltage have been calculated in case of non-resonant transmission. Estimated in the framework of our model, the difference between the spin-channels conductances at low voltages was found relatively large. This gives rise to very high magnitude of TMR. - Highlights: • The spin-polarized conductance through the junction is calculated. • Dependencies of the tunnel conductance vs applied bias are shown. • Bias voltage dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance for the structure is shown

  18. Large tunneling magnetoresistance in octahedral Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Mitra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have observed large tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR in amine functionalized octahedral nanoparticle assemblies. Amine monolayer on the surface of nanoparticles acts as an insulating barrier between the semimetal Fe3O4 nanoparticles and provides multiple tunnel junctions where inter-granular tunneling is plausible. The tunneling magnetoresistance recorded at room temperature is 38% which increases to 69% at 180 K. When the temperature drops below 150 K, coulomb staircase is observed in the current versus voltage characteristics as the charging energy exceeds the thermal energy. A similar study is also carried out with spherical nanoparticles. A 24% TMR is recorded at room temperature which increases to 41% at 180 K for spherical particles. Mössbauer spectra reveal better stoichiometry for octahedral particles which is attainable due to lesser surface disorder and strong amine coupling at the facets of octahedral Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Less stoichiometric defect in octahedral nanoparticles leads to a higher value of spin polarization and therefore larger TMR in octahedral nanoparticles.

  19. Observation of large low-field magnetoresistance in spinel cobaltite: A new half-metal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2015-12-10

    Low-field magnetoresistance is an effective and energy-saving way to use half-metallic materials in magnetic reading heads and magnetic random access memory. Common spin-polarized materials with low field magnetoresistance effect are perovskite-type manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum oxides. In this study, we report a new type of spinel cobaltite materials, self-assembled nanocrystalline NiCo2O4, which shows large low field magnetoresistance as large as –19.1% at 0.5 T and –50% at 9 T (2 K). The large low field magnetoresistance is attributed to the fast magnetization rotation of the core nanocrystals. The surface spin-glass is responsible for the observed weak saturation of magnetoresistance under high fields. Our calculation demonstrates that the half-metallicity of NiCo2O4 comes from the hopping eg electrons within the tetrahedral Co-atoms and the octahedral Ni-atoms. The discovery of large low-field magnetoresistance in simple spinel oxide NiCo2O4, a non-perovskite oxide, leads to an extended family of low-field magnetoresistance materials. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Observation of large low-field magnetoresistance in spinel cobaltite: A new half-metal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng; Xia, Chuan; Zheng, Dongxing; Wang, Ping; Jin, Chao; Bai, Haili

    2015-01-01

    Low-field magnetoresistance is an effective and energy-saving way to use half-metallic materials in magnetic reading heads and magnetic random access memory. Common spin-polarized materials with low field magnetoresistance effect are perovskite-type manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum oxides. In this study, we report a new type of spinel cobaltite materials, self-assembled nanocrystalline NiCo2O4, which shows large low field magnetoresistance as large as –19.1% at 0.5 T and –50% at 9 T (2 K). The large low field magnetoresistance is attributed to the fast magnetization rotation of the core nanocrystals. The surface spin-glass is responsible for the observed weak saturation of magnetoresistance under high fields. Our calculation demonstrates that the half-metallicity of NiCo2O4 comes from the hopping eg electrons within the tetrahedral Co-atoms and the octahedral Ni-atoms. The discovery of large low-field magnetoresistance in simple spinel oxide NiCo2O4, a non-perovskite oxide, leads to an extended family of low-field magnetoresistance materials. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-09-21

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of ∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen-Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications.

  2. Comment on "Planar Hall resistance ring sensor based on NiFe/Cu/IrMn trilayer structure" [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 063903 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Sinha et al. compared sensitivities of planar Hall effect sensors with different geometries that are all based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance of permalloy. They write that the sensitivity of a planar Hall effect sensor with a ring geometry is a factor of √2 larger than...

  3. Recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. King

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast masses in children, though rare, present a difficult clinical challenge as they can represent a wide variety of entities from benign fibroadenomas to phyllodes tumors. Rapidly growing or recurrent masses can be particularly concerning to patients, families and physicians alike. Clinical examination and conventional imaging modalities are not efficacious in distinguishing between different tumor types and surgical excision is often recommended for both final diagnosis and for treatment of large or rapidly growing masses. While surgical excision can result in significant long-term deformity of the breast there are some surgical techniques that can be used to limit deformity and/or aid in future reconstruction. Here we present a case of recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma with a review of the clinical presentation, diagnostic tools and treatment options.

  4. Hadron excitation of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, H.-P.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given on giant resonance studies in heavy nuclei using scattering of different hadronic probes. Concerning isoscalar giant resonances compression modes are discussed with the possibility to obtain more detailed structure information. From detailed studies of α scattering the distribution of isoscalar strengths of multipolarity up to L=6 was obtained. Some recent aspects of heavy ion excitation of collective modes are mentioned. The possibility to study isovector giant resonances in hadron charge exchange reactions is discussed. Finally, a comparison is made between α and 200 MeV proton scattering from which isoscalar and spin-isospin continuum response are extracted. (orig.)

  5. Maxillomandibular giant osteosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino LEDESMA-MONTES

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Giant Osteosclerotic Lesions (GOLs are a group of rarely reported intraosseous lesions. Their precise diagnosis is important since they can be confused with malignant neoplasms. Objective This retrospective study aimed to record and analyze the clinical and radiographic Giant Osteosclerotic Lesions (GOLs detected in the maxillomandibular area of patients attending to our institution. Materials and Methods: Informed consent from the patients was obtained and those cases of 2.5 cm or larger lesions with radiopaque or mixed (radiolucid-radiopaque appearance located in the maxillofacial bones were selected. Assessed parameters were: age, gender, radiographic aspect, shape, borders, size, location and relations to roots. Lesions were classified as radicular, apical, interradicular, interradicular-apical, radicular-apical or located in a previous teeth extraction area. Additionally, several osseous and dental developmental alterations (DDAs were assessed. Results Seventeen radiopacities in 14 patients were found and were located almost exclusively in mandible and were two types: idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis. GOLs were more frequent in females, and in the anterior and premolar zones. 94.2% of GOLs were qualified as idiopathic osteosclerosis and one case was condensing osteitis. All studied cases showed different osseous and dental developmental alterations (DDAs. The most common were: Microdontia, hypodontia, pulp stones, macrodontia and variations in the mental foramina. Conclusions GOLs must be differentiated from other radiopaque benign and malignant tumors. Condensing osteitis, was considered an anomalous osseous response induced by a chronic low-grade inflammatory stimulus. For development of idiopathic osteosclerosis, two possible mechanisms could be related. The first is modification of the normal turnover with excessive osseous deposition. The second mechanism will prevent the normal bone resorption, arresting the

  6. Negative magnetoresistance in perpendicular of the superlattices axis weak magnetic field at scattering of impurity ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askerov, B. M.; Figarova, R.; Guseynov, G.I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text : The transverse magnetoresistance in superlattices with the cosine dispersion law of conduction electrons in a case, when a weak magnetic field in plane of layer at scattering of the charge carriers of impurity ions has been studied. It has been shown that in a quasi-two-dimensional case the magnetoresistance was positive, while in a quasi-three-dimensional case can become negative depending of a degree of mini-band filling. Such behavior of magnetoresistance, apparently, has been related to presence in a mini-band of region with the negative effective mass

  7. Resistance and magnetoresistance of annealed amorphous carbon films containing Fe3C nanograins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Yuhua; Han Taichun; Wur, C.-S.

    2004-01-01

    The temperature-dependent resistance and the field-dependent magnetoresistance were measured for films annealed at temperatures from 250 deg. C to 550 deg. C for a period of 60 min. Results of temperature-dependent resistance show electrical tunneling conductance in the films annealed at T a =250 deg. C and 350 deg. C only. The largest magnetoresistance ratio (MR) of 23% at temperature T=2 K was observed for T a =350 deg. C. The variations of both the temperature dependence of resistance and the magnetoresistance with the annealing temperature are discussed

  8. Magnetoresistance in two-dimensional array of Ge/Si quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepina, N. P.; Koptev, E. S.; Pogosov, A. G.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Zhdanov, E. Yu

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoresistance in two-dimensional array of Ge/Si was studied for a wide range of the conductance, where the transport regime changes from hopping to diffusive one. The behavior of magnetoresistance is similar for all samples; it is negative in weak fields and becomes positive with increasing of magnetic field. Negative magnetoresistance can be described in the frame of weak localization approach with suggestion that quantum interference contribution to the conductance is restricted not only by the phase breaking length but also by the localization length.

  9. Magnetoresistance in two-dimensional array of Ge/Si quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepina, N P; Koptev, E S; Pogosov, A G; Dvurechenskii, A V; Nikiforov, A I; Zhdanov, E Yu

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoresistance in two-dimensional array of Ge/Si was studied for a wide range of the conductance, where the transport regime changes from hopping to diffusive one. The behavior of magnetoresistance is similar for all samples; it is negative in weak fields and becomes positive with increasing of magnetic field. Negative magnetoresistance can be described in the frame of weak localization approach with suggestion that quantum interference contribution to the conductance is restricted not only by the phase breaking length but also by the localization length.

  10. Miniature Inertial and Augmentation Sensors for Integrated Inertial/GPS Based Navigation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Magnetometer (Ref [23]) Until miniature atomic magnetometers transition from laboratory demonstration units to a mass produced product, fluxgate ...and/or magnetoresistive designs are a better suited magnetometer technology for a miniature navigation system. Figure 8 below shows the basic fluxgate ...is required to resolve magnetic field orientation. Fig 8. Fluxgate Magnetometer Schematic The PNI Sensor Corporation (Santa Rosa, CA

  11. Sensor and method for measuring the areal density of magnetic nanoparticles on a micro-array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for magnetic detection of binding of biological molecules on a biochip. A magnetoresistive sensor device for measuring an areal density of magnetic nanoparticles on a micro-array, the magnetic nanoparticles (15) being directly or indirectly

  12. Collective motion and giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, Z.; Kicinska-Habior, M.

    1984-01-01

    The report contains 15 papers devoted to problems of giant collective excitations of nuclei, heavy-ion induced reactions and their bearing on various aspects of nuclear structure. In some of them the numerical data are given. (A.S.)

  13. Negative tunnel magnetoresistance and spin transport in ferromagnetic graphene junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianfei; Jin Guojun; Ma Yuqiang

    2009-01-01

    We study the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin transport in ferromagnetic graphene junctions composed of ferromagnetic graphene (FG) and normal graphene (NG) layers. It is found that the TMR in the FG/NG/FG junction oscillates from positive to negative values with respect to the chemical potential adjusted by the gate voltage in the barrier region when the Fermi level is low enough. Particularly, the conventionally defined TMR in the FG/FG/FG junction oscillates periodically from a positive to negative value with increasing the barrier height at any Fermi level. The spin polarization of the current through the FG/FG/FG junction also has an oscillating behavior with increasing barrier height, whose oscillating amplitude can be modulated by the exchange splitting in the ferromagnetic graphene.

  14. Negative tunnel magnetoresistance and spin transport in ferromagnetic graphene junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianfei; Jin, Guojun; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2009-03-25

    We study the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin transport in ferromagnetic graphene junctions composed of ferromagnetic graphene (FG) and normal graphene (NG) layers. It is found that the TMR in the FG/NG/FG junction oscillates from positive to negative values with respect to the chemical potential adjusted by the gate voltage in the barrier region when the Fermi level is low enough. Particularly, the conventionally defined TMR in the FG/FG/FG junction oscillates periodically from a positive to negative value with increasing the barrier height at any Fermi level. The spin polarization of the current through the FG/FG/FG junction also has an oscillating behavior with increasing barrier height, whose oscillating amplitude can be modulated by the exchange splitting in the ferromagnetic graphene.

  15. Angular Magnetoresistance of Nanowires with Alternating Cobalt and Nickel Segments

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2017-06-22

    Magnetization reversal in segmented Co/Ni nanowires with varying number of segments was studied using angular Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on isolated nanowires. The MR measurements offer an insight into the pinning of domain walls within the nanowires. Angular MR measurements were performed on nanowires with two and multiple segments by varying the angle between the applied magnetic field and nanowire (−90° ≤θ≤90°). The angular MR measurements reveal that at lower values of θ the switching fields are nearly identical for the multisegmented and two-segmented nanowires, whereas at higher values of θ, a decrease in the switching field is observed in the case of two segmented nanowires. The two segmented nanowires generally exhibit a single domain wall pinning event, whereas an increased number of pinning events are characteristic of the multisegmented nanowires at higher values of θ. In-situ magnetic force microscopy substantiates reversal by domain wall nucleation and propagation in multisegmented nanowires.

  16. Single atom anisotropic magnetoresistance on a topological insulator surface

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2015-03-12

    © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. We demonstrate single atom anisotropic magnetoresistance on the surface of a topological insulator, arising from the interplay between the helical spin-momentum-locked surface electronic structure and the hybridization of the magnetic adatom states. Our first-principles quantum transport calculations based on density functional theory for Mn on Bi2Se3 elucidate the underlying mechanism. We complement our findings with a two dimensional model valid for both single adatoms and magnetic clusters, which leads to a proposed device setup for experimental realization. Our results provide an explanation for the conflicting scattering experiments on magnetic adatoms on topological insulator surfaces, and reveal the real space spin texture around the magnetic impurity.

  17. Resonant tunnel magnetoresistance in a double magnetic tunnel junction

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2011-08-09

    We present quasi-classical approach to calculate a spin-dependent current and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in double magnetic tunnel junctions (DMTJ) FML/I/FMW/I/FMR, where the magnetization of the middle ferromagnetic metal layer FMW can be aligned parallel or antiparallel with respect to the fixed magnetizations of the left FML and right FMR ferromagnetic electrodes. The transmission coefficients for components of the spin-dependent current, and TMR are calculated as a function of the applied voltage. As a result, we found a high resonant TMR. Thus, DMTJ can serve as highly effective magnetic nanosensor for biological applications, or as magnetic memory cells by switching the magnetization of the inner ferromagnetic layer FMW.© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.

  18. Magnetoresistance effect in permalloy nanowires with various types of notches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Suppressing the stochastic domain wall (DW motion in magnetic nanowires is of great importance for designing DW-related spintronic devices. In this work, we have investigated the pinning/depinning processes of DWs in permalloy nanowires with three different types of notches by using longitudinal magnetoresistance (MR measurement. The averaged MR curves demonstrate that the stochastic DW depinning is suppressed partly or even completely by a transversely asymmetric notch. The single-shot MR curves show that how the resistance changes with the applied field also depends strongly on the notch type while the DW is pinned around the notch. In the case of two depinning fields, larger (smaller change of resistance always corresponds to larger (smaller depinning field, regardless of the notch type. These phenomena can be understood by that the spin structure around the notch changes differently with the notch type when the DW is traveling through the notch.

  19. Tunneling magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic planar hetero-nanojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Useinov, Arthur

    2010-05-03

    We present a theoretical study of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) in nanojunctions between non-identical ferromagnetic metals in the framework of the quasiclassical approach. The lateral size of a dielectric oxide layer, which is considered as a tunneling barrier between the metallic electrodes, is comparable with the mean-free path of electrons. The dependence of the TMR on the bias voltage, physical parameters of the dielectric barrier, and spin polarization of the electrodes is studied. It is demonstrated that a simple enough theory can give high TMR magnitudes of several hundred percent at bias voltages below 0.5 V. A qualitative comparison with the available experimental data is given. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Studies of Colossal Magnetoresistive Oxides with Radioactive Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study Colossal Magnetoresistive (CMR) oxides with several nuclear techniques, which use radioactive elements at ISOLDE. Our aim is to provide local and element selective information on some of the doping mechanisms that rule electronic interactions and magneto- resistance, in a complementary way to the use of conventional characterisation techniques. Three main topics are proposed: \\\\ \\\\ a) Studies of local [charge and] structural modifications in antiferromagnetic LaMnO$_{3+\\delta}$ and La$_{1-x}$R$_{x}$MnO$_{3}$ with R=Ca and Cd, doped ferromagnetic systems with competing interactions: - research on the lattice site and electronic characterisation of the doping element. \\\\ \\\\ b) Studies of self doped La$_{x}$R$_{1-x}$MnO$_{3+\\delta}$ systems, with oxygen and cation non- stoichiometry: - learning the role of defects in the optimisation of magnetoresestive properties. \\\\ \\\\ c) Probing the disorder and quenched random field effects in the vicinity of the charge or orbital Ordered/Ferromagnetic p...

  1. Angular Magnetoresistance of Nanowires with Alternating Cobalt and Nickel Segments

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan; Corte-Leon, H.; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Moreno, J. A.; Kazakova, O.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2017-01-01

    Magnetization reversal in segmented Co/Ni nanowires with varying number of segments was studied using angular Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on isolated nanowires. The MR measurements offer an insight into the pinning of domain walls within the nanowires. Angular MR measurements were performed on nanowires with two and multiple segments by varying the angle between the applied magnetic field and nanowire (−90° ≤θ≤90°). The angular MR measurements reveal that at lower values of θ the switching fields are nearly identical for the multisegmented and two-segmented nanowires, whereas at higher values of θ, a decrease in the switching field is observed in the case of two segmented nanowires. The two segmented nanowires generally exhibit a single domain wall pinning event, whereas an increased number of pinning events are characteristic of the multisegmented nanowires at higher values of θ. In-situ magnetic force microscopy substantiates reversal by domain wall nucleation and propagation in multisegmented nanowires.

  2. Magnetoresistance peculiarities of bismuth wires in high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condrea, E., E-mail: condrea@nano.asm.md [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academy of Science of Moldova, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Gajowicka 95, 51-421 Wroclaw (Poland); Gilewski, A. [International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Gajowicka 95, 51-421 Wroclaw (Poland); MagNet, 50-421 Wroclaw (Poland); Nicorici, A. [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies, Academy of Science of Moldova, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2016-03-11

    Magnetoresistance measurements of Bi wires performed in the magnetic field oriented along the bisector axis revealed unexpected anomalous peaks in a high magnetic field far above the quantum limit of the electrons. By combining a magnetic field and an uniaxial strain, we obtained a modification of the electronic structure; as a result, the quantum limit for light and heavy electrons is changed in a different way. For the case where heavy electrons are in the quantum limit, a correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of light electrons and the Lifshitz transition was found. - Highlights: • Glass-coated single-crystalline Bi wires attain high limit of elastic strain of up to 3.0%. • Selective modification of the electronic structure of Bi wires is obtained by combining a high magnetic field and uniaxial strain. • The correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of electrons and Lifshitz transition was found.

  3. Magnetoresistance peculiarities of bismuth wires in high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrea, E.; Gilewski, A.; Nicorici, A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoresistance measurements of Bi wires performed in the magnetic field oriented along the bisector axis revealed unexpected anomalous peaks in a high magnetic field far above the quantum limit of the electrons. By combining a magnetic field and an uniaxial strain, we obtained a modification of the electronic structure; as a result, the quantum limit for light and heavy electrons is changed in a different way. For the case where heavy electrons are in the quantum limit, a correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of light electrons and the Lifshitz transition was found. - Highlights: • Glass-coated single-crystalline Bi wires attain high limit of elastic strain of up to 3.0%. • Selective modification of the electronic structure of Bi wires is obtained by combining a high magnetic field and uniaxial strain. • The correlation between the exit of the lowest Landau level of electrons and Lifshitz transition was found.

  4. Anisotropic magnetoresistance components in (Ga,Mn)As.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, A W; Výborný, K; King, C S; Edmonds, K W; Campion, R P; Foxon, C T; Wunderlich, J; Irvine, A C; Vasek, P; Novák, V; Olejník, K; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, T; Gallagher, B L

    2007-10-05

    We explore the basic physical origins of the noncrystalline and crystalline components of the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in (Ga,Mn)As. The sign of the noncrystalline AMR is found to be determined by the form of spin-orbit coupling in the host band and by the relative strengths of the nonmagnetic and magnetic contributions to the Mn impurity potential. We develop experimental methods yielding directly the noncrystalline and crystalline AMR components which are then analyzed independently. We report the observation of an AMR dominated by a large uniaxial crystalline component and show that AMR can be modified by local strain relaxation. Generic implications of our findings for other dilute moment systems are discussed.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystal colossal magnetoresistive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, J.N.; Bozovic, I.; Rzchowski, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Hinaus, B.; Onellion, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have grown films of (LaSr)MnO 3 (LSMO) and (LaCa)MnO 3 (LCMO) using atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). Depending on growth conditions, substrate lattice constant and the exact cation stoichiometry, the films are either pseudomorphic or strain relaxed. The pseudomorphic films show atomically flat surfaces, with a unit cell terrace structure that is a replica of that observed on the slightly vicinal substrates, while the strain relaxed films show bumpy surfaces correlated with a dislocation network. All films show tetragonal structure and exhibit anisotropic magnetoresistance, with a low field response, (1/R)(dR/dH) as large as 5 T -1

  6. Magnetoresistance effect in permalloy nanowires with various types of notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; You, B.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.; Wei, L. J.; Tu, H. Q.; Zhang, W.; Du, J.

    2018-05-01

    Suppressing the stochastic domain wall (DW) motion in magnetic nanowires is of great importance for designing DW-related spintronic devices. In this work, we have investigated the pinning/depinning processes of DWs in permalloy nanowires with three different types of notches by using longitudinal magnetoresistance (MR) measurement. The averaged MR curves demonstrate that the stochastic DW depinning is suppressed partly or even completely by a transversely asymmetric notch. The single-shot MR curves show that how the resistance changes with the applied field also depends strongly on the notch type while the DW is pinned around the notch. In the case of two depinning fields, larger (smaller) change of resistance always corresponds to larger (smaller) depinning field, regardless of the notch type. These phenomena can be understood by that the spin structure around the notch changes differently with the notch type when the DW is traveling through the notch.

  7. Extremely large magnetoresistance and electronic structure of TmSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Hongyun; Lu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Lin; Xu, Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Liu, Kai; Zhou, Shuyun; Xia, Tian-Long

    2018-02-01

    We report the magnetotransport properties and the electronic structure of TmSb. TmSb exhibits extremely large transverse magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Interestingly, the split of Fermi surfaces induced by the nonsymmetric spin-orbit interaction has been observed from SdH oscillation. The analysis of the angle-dependent SdH oscillation illustrates the contribution of each Fermi surface to the conductivity. The electronic structure revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations demonstrates a gap at the X point and the absence of band inversion. Combined with the trivial Berry phase extracted from SdH oscillation and the nearly equal concentrations of electron and hole from Hall measurements, it is suggested that TmSb is a topologically trivial semimetal and the observed XMR originates from the electron-hole compensation and high mobility.

  8. Tunable Positive to Negative Magnetoresistance in Atomically Thin WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enze; Chen, Rui; Huang, Ce; Yu, Jihai; Zhang, Kaitai; Wang, Weiyi; Liu, Shanshan; Ling, Jiwei; Wan, Xiangang; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Xiu, Faxian

    2017-02-08

    Transitional metal ditelluride WTe 2 has been extensively studied owing to its intriguing physical properties like nonsaturating positive magnetoresistance and being possibly a type-II Weyl semimetal. While surging research activities were devoted to the understanding of its bulk properties, it remains a substantial challenge to explore the pristine physics in atomically thin WTe 2 . Here, we report a successful synthesis of mono- to few-layer WTe 2 via chemical vapor deposition. Using atomically thin WTe 2 nanosheets, we discover a previously inaccessible ambipolar behavior that enables the tunability of magnetoconductance of few-layer WTe 2 from weak antilocalization to weak localization, revealing a strong electrical field modulation of the spin-orbit interaction under perpendicular magnetic field. These appealing physical properties unveiled in this study clearly identify WTe 2 as a promising platform for exotic electronic and spintronic device applications.

  9. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X. Z.; Matsui, Y.; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E. Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-01-01

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La0.69Ca0.31MnO3, leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a “colossal” AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings. PMID:19706504

  10. Magnetoresistance Probe of Ultrathin Mn5Ge3 Films with Anderson Weak Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Jun, Chen; De-Yong, Wang; Qing-Feng, Zhan; Wei, He; Qing-An, Li

    2008-01-01

    We present the magnetoresistance measurements of ultrathin Mn 5 Ge 3 films with different thicknesses at low temperatures. Owing to the lattice mismatch between Mn 5 Ge 3 and Ge (111), the thickness of Mn 5 Ge 3 films has a significant effect on the magnetoresistance. When the thickness of Mn is more than 72 monolayers (MLs), the magnetoresistance of the Mn 5 Ge 3 films appears a peak at about 6kOe, which shows that the magnetoresistance results from the Anderson weak localization effect and the variable range hopping in the presence of a magnetic field. The magnetic and semiconducting properties indicate that the Mn 5 Ge 3 film is a potential material for spin injection. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. High electron mobility and large magnetoresistance in the half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng; Wang, Wenhong; Xu, Guizhou; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wei, Zhiyang; Shen, Shipeng; Liu, Enke; Yao, Yuan; Chai, Yisheng; Sun, Young; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang

    2015-01-01

    Materials with high carrier mobility showing large magnetoresistance (MR) have recently received much attention because of potential applications in future high-performance magnetoelectric devices. Here, we report on an electron-hole

  12. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  13. Study of magnetoresistance in the supercooled state of Dy-Y alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Rudra Prasad; Lakhani, Archana

    2018-02-01

    We report the magnetoresistance studies on Dy1-xYx (x ≤ 0.05) alloys across the first order helimagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition. These alloys exhibit multiple magnetic phases on varying the temperature and magnetic field. The magnetoresistance studies in the hysteresis region shows irreversibility in forward and reverse field cycles. The resistivity values at zero field for these alloys after zero field cooling to the measurement temperatures, are different in both forward and reverse field cycles. The path dependence of magnetoresistance suggests the presence of helimagnetic phase as the supercooled metastable state which transforms to the stable ferromagnetic state on increasing the field. At high magnetic fields negative magnetoresistance following a linear dependence with field is observed which is attributed to the magnon scattering.

  14. Magnetoresistance effect in (La, Sr)MnO3 bicrystalline films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro, G; Steren, L B; Pastoriza, H; Vega, D; Granada, M; Sánchez, J C Rojas; Sirena, M; Alascio, B

    2010-09-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance effect has been measured on bicrystalline La(0.75)Sr(0.25)MnO(3) films. The measurements have been performed on an electronically lithographed Wheatstone bridge. The study of the angular dependence of both the magnetoresistance and the resistance of single-crystalline and grain-boundary regions of the samples allowed us to isolate two contributions of low-field magnetoresistance in manganites. One of them is associated with the spin-orbit effect, i.e. the anisotropic magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic compounds, and the other one is related to spin-disorder regions at the grain boundary. Complementary x-ray diffraction, ferromagnetic resonance and low temperature magnetization experiments contribute to the characterization of the magnetic anisotropy of the samples and the general comprehension of the problem.

  15. Magnetoresistance effect in (La, Sr)MnO{sub 3} bicrystalline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alejandro, G; Pastoriza, H; Granada, M; Rojas Sanchez, J C; Sirena, M; Alascio, B [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Pcia. de Rio Negro (Argentina); Steren, L B; Vega, D, E-mail: galejand@cab.cnea.gov.a [Centro Atomico Constituyentes (CNEA), 1650 San MartIn, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-09-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance effect has been measured on bicrystalline La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}MnO{sub 3} films. The measurements have been performed on an electronically lithographed Wheatstone bridge. The study of the angular dependence of both the magnetoresistance and the resistance of single-crystalline and grain-boundary regions of the samples allowed us to isolate two contributions of low-field magnetoresistance in manganites. One of them is associated with the spin-orbit effect, i.e. the anisotropic magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic compounds, and the other one is related to spin-disorder regions at the grain boundary. Complementary x-ray diffraction, ferromagnetic resonance and low temperature magnetization experiments contribute to the characterization of the magnetic anisotropy of the samples and the general comprehension of the problem.

  16. Magnetoresistance effect in (La, Sr)MnO3 bicrystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alejandro, G; Pastoriza, H; Granada, M; Rojas Sanchez, J C; Sirena, M; Alascio, B; Steren, L B; Vega, D

    2010-01-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance effect has been measured on bicrystalline La 0.75 Sr 0.25 MnO 3 films. The measurements have been performed on an electronically lithographed Wheatstone bridge. The study of the angular dependence of both the magnetoresistance and the resistance of single-crystalline and grain-boundary regions of the samples allowed us to isolate two contributions of low-field magnetoresistance in manganites. One of them is associated with the spin-orbit effect, i.e. the anisotropic magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic compounds, and the other one is related to spin-disorder regions at the grain boundary. Complementary x-ray diffraction, ferromagnetic resonance and low temperature magnetization experiments contribute to the characterization of the magnetic anisotropy of the samples and the general comprehension of the problem.

  17. The study of the sample size on the transverse magnetoresistance of bismuth nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, M.; Layeghnejad, R.; Sadeghi, E.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of sample size on the galvanomagnetice properties of semimetal nanowires are theoretically investigated. Transverse magnetoresistance (TMR) ratios have been calculated within a Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) approach by specular reflection approximation. Temperature and radius dependence of the transverse magnetoresistance of cylindrical Bismuth nanowires are given. The obtained values are in good agreement with the experimental results, reported by Heremans et al. - Highlights: ► In this study effects of sample size on the galvanomagnetic properties of Bi. ► Nanowires were explained by Parrott theorem by solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation. ► Transverse magnetoresistance (TMR) ratios have been measured by specular reflection approximation. ► Temperature and radius dependence of the transverse magnetoresistance of cylindrical Bismuth nanowires are given. ► The obtained values are in good agreement with the experimental results, reported by Heremans et al.

  18. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/AIOx/Al tunnel junctions with fcc Co (111) electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kai; Tran, T. Lan Ahn; Brinks, Peter; Brinks, P.; Sanderink, Johannes G.M.; Bolhuis, Thijs; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; de Jong, Machiel Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) has been characterized in junctions comprised of face-centered cubic (fcc) Co (111) ferromagnetic electrodes grown epitaxially on sapphire substrates, amorphous AlOx tunnel barriers, and nonmagnetic Al counterelectrodes. Large TAMR ratios have been

  19. Magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer at the multichannel surface scattering of conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutsishin, P.P.; Nakhodkin, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer with the (110) surface was studied at the adsorption of tungsten dioxide. The method of low-energy electron diffraction was used to study the symmetry of ordered surface structures. Using the method of the magnetoresistance measurement the character of the scattering of conduction electrons was investigated. THe dependence of magnetoresistance on the surface concentration of tungsten dioxide correlated w1th the structure of the surface layer of atoms, what was explained with allowance for diffraction of conduction electrons at the metal boundary. The magnetoresistance maximum for the (2x2) structure, which characterised decrease in surface conduction under the conditions of static skin effect, was explained by multichannel mirror reflection with the recombinations of electron and ho.le sections of Fermi Surface

  20. Magnetoresistance in amorphous NdFeB/FeB compositionally modulated multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peral, G.; Briones, F.; Vicent, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Resistance measurements have been done in amorphous Nd 12 Fe 80 B 8 sputtered films and in amorphous sputtered Nd 26 Fe 68 B 6 /Fe 92 B 8 multilayers between 6 and 150 K with applied magnetic field parallel (LMR) and perpendicular (TMR) up to 7 T. The samples were grown by dc triode sputtering, with nominal unequal (2:1) layer thicknesses. The layered character of the samples have been tested by x-ray diffraction. Longitudinal magnetoresistance (LMR) is positive and transverse magnetoresistance (TMR) is negative. The magnetoresistance values are higher than in amorphous ferromagnets, and multilayering of these alloys produces much larger magnetoresistance values than either alloy alone and there is a strong dependence on the multilayer wavelength. The MR shows a weak temperature dependence in the temperature interval that was investigated