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Sample records for giant cell myocarditis

  1. Giant Cell Myocarditis: Not Always a Presentation of Cardiogenic Shock

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    Rose Tompkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and often fatal disease. The most obvious presentation often described in the literature is one of rapid hemodynamic deterioration due to cardiogenic shock necessitating urgent consideration of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man whose initial presentation was consistent with myopericarditis but who went on to develop a rapid decline in left ventricular systolic function without overt hemodynamic compromise or dramatic symptomatology. Giant cell myocarditis was confirmed via endomyocardial biopsy. Combined immunosuppression with corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitor resulted in resolution of symptoms and sustained recovery of left ventricular function one year later. Our case highlights that giant cell myocarditis does not always present with cardiogenic shock and should be considered in the evaluation of new onset cardiomyopathy of uncertain etiology as a timely diagnosis has distinct clinical implications on management and prognosis.

  2. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  3. Unusual echocardiographic features seen in a case of giant cell myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochar, Minisha; López-Candales, Angel; Ramani, Gautam; Rajagopalan, Navin; Edelman, Kathy

    2008-11-01

    The case of an 18-year-old college football player with a recent history of streptococcal pharyngitis who was experiencing progressive disabling dyspnea on exertion with easy fatigability and lack of stamina, and was taken to the hospital after a syncopal episode is described. The patient was initially diagnosed with heart failure and treated accordingly. However, because of a fulminant clinical deterioration, an endomyocardial biopsy was recommended, which showed focal giant cell transformation consistent with giant cell myocarditis. Treatment with methylprednisolone and cyclosporine was promptly initiated. Several apical clots were noted during treatment, but the patient attained full recovery with treatment.

  4. Giant Asian honeybee stings induced acute myocarditis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    NP Dinamithra; S Sivansuthan

    2013-01-01

    Hymenopterid stings and subsequent allergic reactions including fatal anaphylaxis are a common indication for emergency department visits worldwide. Less commonly, multiple wasp stings can result in multi-system involvement ranging from intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, cardiac involvement, hepatic dysfunction and occasionally thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Here we report one case of multiple Giant Asian honey bee stings induced myocarditis.

  5. Giant Asian honeybee stings induced acute myocarditis: a case report

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    NP Dinamithra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hymenopterid stings and subsequent allergic reactions including fatal anaphylaxis are a common indication for emergency department visits worldwide. Less commonly, multiple wasp stings can result in multi-system involvement ranging from intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, cardiac involvement, hepatic dysfunction and occasionally thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Here we report one case of multiple Giant Asian honey bee stings induced myocarditis.

  6. Miocarditis de células gigantes con bloqueo AV completo persistente: respuesta al tratamiento con resincronizador cardiaco Giant cell myocarditis with complete persistent A-V block: treatment response with cardiac resynchronization

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    Julián Aristizábal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available La miocarditis de células gigantes es una enfermedad grave y poco frecuente, cuya etiología, posiblemente autoinmune, se caracteriza por la presencia de células gigantes multinucleadas con infiltrado inflamatorio y necrosis extensa en la biopsia endomiocárdica. Es común su asociación con taquicardias ventriculares y con alteraciones de la conducción aurículo-ventricular, lo cual se resuelve algunas veces con tratamiento inmunosupresor. Dada la complejidad del pronóstico de esta entidad, el papel de los dispositivos de resincronización después de la estabilización de la falla cardíaca, no está claro. Aquí se reporta un caso en el cual el implante de uno de estos dispositivos fue parte fundamental de la terapia y recuperación del paciente.Giant cell myocarditis is an infrequent and serious illness, possibly of autoimmune etiology, characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells with inflammatory infiltrate and extensive necrosis in the endomyocardial biopsy. Its association with ventricular tachycardia is common and alterations in atrioventricular conduction are frequently solved through immunosuppressive treatment. Given the generally complex prognosis of this entity, the role of the resynchronization devices after the heart failure stabilization, is unclear. We reported a case in which the implant of one of these devices was a fundamental part of the therapy and patient recovery.

  7. Mononuclear cell secretome protects from experimental autoimmune myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Zimmermann, Matthias; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schweiger, Thomas; Kollmann, Dagmar; Mildner, Michael; Hegedus, Balazs; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Hacker, Stefan; Birner, Peter; Gabriel, Christian; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-03-14

    Supernatants of serum-free cultured mononuclear cells (MNC) contain a mix of immunomodulating factors (secretome), which have been shown to attenuate detrimental inflammatory responses following myocardial ischaemia. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) is a common cause of heart failure in young patients. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4+ T cell-dependent model, which mirrors important pathogenic aspects of iDCM. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of MNC secretome on myocardial inflammation in the EAM model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with an alpha myosin heavy chain peptide together with Complete Freund adjuvant. Supernatants from mouse mononuclear cells were collected, dialysed, and injected i.p. at Day 0, Day 7, or Day 14, respectively. Myocarditis severity, T cell responses, and autoantibody formation were assessed at Day 21. The impact of MNC secretome on CD4+ T cell function and viability was evaluated using in vitro proliferation and cell viability assays. A single high-dose application of MNC secretome, injected at Day 14 after the first immunization, effectively attenuated myocardial inflammation. Mechanistically, MNC secretome induced caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in autoreactive CD4+ T cells. MNC secretome abrogated myocardial inflammation in a CD4+ T cell-dependent animal model of autoimmune myocarditis. This anti-inflammatory effect of MNC secretome suggests a novel and simple potential treatment concept for inflammatory heart diseases. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  9. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. Myocarditis - pediatric

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007307.htm Myocarditis - pediatric To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in ...

  11. Human cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells reduce murine acute Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

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    Kapka Miteva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs. They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-induced myocarditis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  12. Ventricular myocarditis coincides with atrial myocarditis in patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begieneman, Mark P. V.; Emmens, Reindert W.; Rijvers, Liza; Kubat, Bela; Paulus, Walter J.; Vonk, Alexander B. A.; Rozendaal, Lawrence; Biesbroek, P. Stefan; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; van Ham, Marieke; Heymans, Stephane; van Rossum, Albert C.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Krijnen, Paul A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication in myocarditis. Atrial inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of AF. However, little is known about the occurrence of atrial inflammation in myocarditis patients. Here, we analyzed inflammatory cell numbers

  13. Giant cell arteritis of fallopian tube.

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    Azzena, A; Altavilla, G; Salmaso, R; Vasoin, F; Pellizzari, P; Doria, A

    1994-01-01

    One case of giant cells arteritis involving tubaric arteries in a postmenopausal woman is described. The patient was 59 years old and presented with asthenia, anemia, fever, weight loss, an abdominal palpable mass and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large ovarian cyst of 14 cm in diameter. Extensive giant cell arteritis, Horton's type, of the small-sizes arteries was found unexpectedly in the fallopian tube of the patient who had had a prior ovariectomy. Giant cell arteritis of the female genital tract is a rare finding in elderly women and may occur as an isolated finding or as part of generalised arteritis.

  14. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

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    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  15. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

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    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  16. Atypical visual loss in giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thystrup, Jan Deichmann; Knudsen, G M; Mogensen, A M

    1994-01-01

    Three patients with atypical ocular involvement due to histologically verified giant cell arteritis are reported. Prior to diagnosis, the first patient had periods of amaurosis fugax. He presented with normal vision. In spite of high-dose systemic corticosteroid therapy, he became blind in the te......Three patients with atypical ocular involvement due to histologically verified giant cell arteritis are reported. Prior to diagnosis, the first patient had periods of amaurosis fugax. He presented with normal vision. In spite of high-dose systemic corticosteroid therapy, he became blind...

  17. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

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    Golka Dariusz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  18. Giant cell angiofibroma or localized periorbital lymphedema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael C; Chung, Catherine G; Specht, Charles S; Wilkinson, Michael; Clarke, Loren E

    2013-12-01

    Giant cell angiofibroma represents a rare soft tissue neoplasm with a predilection for the orbit. We recently encountered a mass removed from the lower eyelid of a 56-year-old female that histopathologically resembled giant cell angiofibroma. The process consisted of haphazardly arranged CD34-positive spindled and multinucleated cells within an edematous, densely vascular stroma. However, the patient had recently undergone laryngectomy and radiotherapy for a laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A similar mass had arisen on the contralateral eyelid, and both had developed several months post-therapy. Lymphedema of the orbit can present as tumor-like nodules and in some cases may share histopathologic features purported to be characteristic of giant cell angiofibroma. A relationship between giant cell angiofibroma and lymphedema has not been established, but our case suggests there may be one. The potential overlap of these two conditions should be recognized, as should other entities that may enter the differential diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Excess mortality in giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgård, C; Sloth, H; Keiding, Niels

    1991-01-01

    A 13-year departmental sample of 34 patients with definite (biopsy-verified) giant cell arteritis (GCA) was reviewed. The mortality of this material was compared to sex-, age- and time-specific death rates in the Danish population. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.8 (95% confidence...

  20. Total hip arthroplasty for giant cell tumour.

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    Kulkarni S

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 month follow up of an uncommon case of a Giant Cell Tumour affecting the proximal end of femur is presented. Following a wide excision, the hip was reconstructed using Charnley type of low friction total hip arthroplasty. At a 32 month review, there was no recurrence and the function was good.

  1. CYTOKINE DISBALANCE AT HERPESVIRUS MYOCARDITIS

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    Peremot S. D

    2016-12-01

    , IL-10, INF-γ, TNF-α in blood serum was conducted by the method of solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, population structure of lymphocytes with different antigenic determinants (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16/56, CD19+, СD95+ was determined by monoclonal antibodies by cytofluorimetric assay. Obtained data processing was conducted with the use of parametric and non-parametric methods of biostatistics by programs EXEL-2003® and Biostatistics 4.03. Results and discussion. The data obtained indicates the disbalance in their system, which above all is characterized by a considerable level increase of pro-inflammatory IL-6 up to 134,09 ± 22,72 pg/ml (control level 11,83 ± 1,64 pg/ml and in relation to moderate growth of levels of IL-2 та TNF-α at subacute myocarditis. Such increase in level of IL-6 can take place due to the change of pro-inflammatory effect to anti-inflammatory in a remote period. In a complex with IL-10 IL-6 limits the secretion of TNF-α. For this reason, its level remains high at chronic herpesvirus myocarditis and exceeds the level of the control group by over 8 times. In addition, there is an increase of levels of anti-inflammatory IL-4, IL-10 cytokines at the chronic form of herpesvirus myocarditis course by 2,9 and 3,1 times respectively. At the same time, the level of IL-10 increased not only in comparison with the level of the control group but also almost 2 times exceeded the proper index at subacute myocarditis. Instead of the predicted INF-γ level rise, its decline was discovered, in patients with subacute course the index value was the lowest. This phenomenon can be the result of mast cells activity and in its turn influences the synthesis of collogen and processes of myocardium remodeling. Analysis of sub-population composition of lymphocytes discovered the increase in number of CD3+CD95+ lymphocytes of peripheral blood at myocarditis, especially in the group of patients with subacute herpesvirus myocarditis with its level

  2. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

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    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  3. Giant cells reparative granuloma of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, Nancy; Jorge Andres Delgado; Walter Leon

    1998-01-01

    The giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG), was first described by Jaffe in 1953, which found it to be clinically and histopathologically different from the giant cell tumor. The GCRG accounts for 1.0 % of the osseous tumoral lesions, is more frequently found in females (68%) and in patients less than 30 years old (74%). It was believed that it only affected the jaw; it has been reported compromising other locations including the spine (7 cases). We report a case affecting the vertebral bodies of C2-C3 in a 10 years old, female patient, who was studied by plain film and MRI. The histological diagnosis was established at surgery, this report is the first one described in a cervical location and the second studied by MRI

  4. Vaccine Associated Myocarditis

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    Johnson Francis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cases of vaccine associated myocarditis have been following small pox vaccination. Reports have also been there after streptococcal pneumonia vaccine and influenza vaccine. In some cases, autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA used in the vaccine have been implicated. Exclusion of other causes is very important in the diagnostic process, especially that of acute coronary syndrome. Management is similar to that of other etiologies of myocarditis. These rare instances of myocarditis should not preclude one from taking necessary immunization for vaccine preventable diseases.

  5. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  6. Lyme carditis mimicking giant cell arteritis

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    Krati Chauhan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Presenting an interesting case of a patient who complained of myalgias, fatigue, headache, jaw claudication and scalp tenderness. Patient’s physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory findings showed elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, bilateral temporal artery biopsy results were negative and first degree atrioventricular block was seen on electrocardiogram. Serology for Borrelia burgdorferi was positive; patient was diagnosed with Lyme carditis and treated with doxycycline. Lyme is a tick-borne, multi-system disease and occasionally its presentation may mimic giant cell arteritis. On follow-up there was complete resolution of symptoms and electrocardiogram findings.

  7. Giant cells around bone biomaterials: Osteoclasts or multi-nucleated giant cells?

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    Miron, Richard J; Zohdi, Hamoon; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2016-12-01

    Recently accumulating evidence has put into question the role of large multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone biomaterials. While cells derived from the monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the first cell types in contact with implanted biomaterials, it was originally thought that specifically in bone tissues, all giant cells were bone-resorbing osteoclasts whereas foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) were found associated with a connective tissue foreign body reaction resulting in fibrous encapsulation and/or material rejection. Despite the great majority of bone grafting materials routinely found with large osteoclasts, a special subclass of bone biomaterials has more recently been found surrounded by large giant cells virtually incapable of resorbing bone grafts even years after their implantation. While original hypotheses believed that a 'foreign body reaction' may be taking place, histological data retrieved from human samples years after their implantation have put these original hypotheses into question by demonstrating better and more stable long-term bone volume around certain bone grafts. Exactly how or why this 'special' subclass of giant cells is capable of maintaining long-term bone volume, or methods to scientifically distinguish them from osteoclasts remains extremely poorly studied. The aim of this review article was to gather the current available literature on giant cell markers and differences in expression patterns between osteoclasts and MNGCs utilizing 19 specific markers including an array of CD-cell surface markers. Furthermore, the concept of now distinguishing between pro-inflammatory M1-MNGCs (previously referred to as FBGCs) as well as wound-healing M2-MNGCs is introduced and discussed. This review article presents 19 specific cell-surface markers to distinguish between osteoclasts and MNGCs including an array of CD-cell surface markers. Furthermore, the concept of now distinguishing between pro-inflammatory M1-MNGCs (often

  8. Coexistence of giant cell fibroblastoma and encephalocele.

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    Afroz, Nishat; Shamim, Nida; Jain, Anshu; Soni, Mayank

    2014-04-11

    Giant cell fibroblastoma (GCF) is a rare soft tissue tumour that occurs almost exclusively in children younger than 10 years of age and is mostly located in the superficial soft tissues of the back and thighs. We present a rare case of GCF with encephalocele in a 1.5-year-old boy who presented with a swelling in the occipital area of the scalp since birth. CT scan suggested encephalocele without any suspicion of a mass lesion. On histopathology, an ill-defined proliferation of fibroblasts in a heavily collagenised and focally myxoid stroma was seen containing numerous multinucleated cells having a floret-like appearance along with mature glial tissue bordering a cystic space. Immunohistochemically, the stromal cells were positive for both, vimentin (diffuse) and CD34 (focal) thereby confirming the histological diagnosis of GCF. This case highlights the unusual coexistence of GCF with congenital defects and its histogenetic resemblance to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

  9. Malignant Giant Cell Tumour of Bone with Axillary Metastasis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-06-06

    Jun 6, 2002 ... SUMMARY. Giant Cell Tumour of bone is a typically benign and solitary tumour. However, multiple lesions have been described and 5-10% of lesions may be malignant. We present a case of a malignant giant cell tumour of the distal radius with metastasis to the ipsilateral axilla (an uncommon location).

  10. MRI for myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutberlet, M.; Luecke, C.; Krieghoff, C.; Hildebrand, L.; Steiner, J.; Adam, J.; Grotthoff, M.; Lehmkuhl, L.; Lurz, P.; Eitel, I.; Thiele, H.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has become the primary tool for the non-invasive assessment in patients with suspected myocarditis, especially after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the differential diagnosis. Various MRI parameters are available which have different accuracies. Volumetric and functional ventricular assessment and the occurrence of pericardial effusion alone demonstrate only a poor sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the T2-ratio (edema assessment), the early or global relative myocardial enhancement (gRE) and the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), which represents irreversibly injured myocardium, are more specific parameters. All MRI parameters demonstrate the best accuracy in infarct-like acute myocarditis, whereas in chronic myocarditis sensitivity and specificity are less accurate. Therefore, a multisequential (at least two out of three parameters are positive) approach is recommended. The assessment of the value of newer, more quantitative MRI sequences, such as T1 and T2-mapping is still under investigation. (orig.) [de

  11. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  12. Giant Cell Angiofibroma in Unusual Localization: A Case Report

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    Emel Ebru Pala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA was initially described as a potentially recurrent tumor in the orbit of adults. However, it is now recognized that it can also present in other locations. The morphological hallmark is a richly vascularized patternless spindle cell proliferation containing pseudovascular spaces and floret like multinucleate giant cells. Our case was a 32-years-old female complaining of painless solitary nodule arising on the occipital region of the scalp, which was diagnosed as giant cell angiofibroma. We report the case because of its extremely rare localization.

  13. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

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    Gupta A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31, followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21, distal end of radius(n=14,upper end of fibula (n=9,proximal end of femur(n=5, upper end of the humerus(n=3, iliac bone(n=2,phalanx (n=2 and spine(n=1. The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4 and metatarsal(n=1. Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases . Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice . The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction.

  14. A case report of giant cell reparative granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Sik; Lee, Yoo Dong [College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-11-15

    The authors observed in the routine roentgenographic examination, a rare case of Giant cell Reparative Granuloma found in the mandible of woman 23 years of age who had visited Infirmary of Dental College, Seoul National University be cause of the traffic accident. In the serial roentgenograms, authors had obtained the results as follows; 1. Giant cell Reparative Granuloma occurred below the 20 years of age, and occurred in the mandible of female. 2. In roentgenograms, it figures the radiolucent lesion with multilocular appearance. 3. The growing process of Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma is not by the neoplastic reaction but by the local reparative reaction.

  15. Analyzing the spatial positioning of nuclei in polynuclear giant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stange, Maike; Hintsche, Marius; Sachse, Kirsten; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten; Valleriani, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    How cells establish and maintain a well-defined size is a fundamental question of cell biology. Here we investigated to what extent the microtubule cytoskeleton can set a predefined cell size, independent of an enclosing cell membrane. We used electropulse-induced cell fusion to form giant multinuclear cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum . Based on dual-color confocal imaging of cells that expressed fluorescent markers for the cell nucleus and the microtubules, we determined the subcellular distributions of nuclei and centrosomes in the giant cells. Our two- and three-dimensional imaging results showed that the positions of nuclei in giant cells do not fall onto a regular lattice. However, a comparison with model predictions for random positioning showed that the subcellular arrangement of nuclei maintains a low but still detectable degree of ordering. This can be explained by the steric requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as confirmed by the effect of a microtubule degrading drug. (paper)

  16. Analyzing the spatial positioning of nuclei in polynuclear giant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Maike; Hintsche, Marius; Sachse, Kirsten; Gerhardt, Matthias; Valleriani, Angelo; Beta, Carsten

    2017-11-01

    How cells establish and maintain a well-defined size is a fundamental question of cell biology. Here we investigated to what extent the microtubule cytoskeleton can set a predefined cell size, independent of an enclosing cell membrane. We used electropulse-induced cell fusion to form giant multinuclear cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Based on dual-color confocal imaging of cells that expressed fluorescent markers for the cell nucleus and the microtubules, we determined the subcellular distributions of nuclei and centrosomes in the giant cells. Our two- and three-dimensional imaging results showed that the positions of nuclei in giant cells do not fall onto a regular lattice. However, a comparison with model predictions for random positioning showed that the subcellular arrangement of nuclei maintains a low but still detectable degree of ordering. This can be explained by the steric requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as confirmed by the effect of a microtubule degrading drug.

  17. Unilateral giant cell lesion of the jaw in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyselbergs, M; Vanhoenacker, F; Hintjens, J; Dom, M; Devriendt, K; Van Dijck, H

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Noonan-Like/Multiple Giant Cell Lesion (NL/MGCL) syndrome is initially described as the occurrence of multiple gnathic giant cell lesions in patients with phenotypic features of NS. Nowadays, NS/MGCL syndrome is considered a variant of the NS spectrum rather than a distinct entity. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient carrying a SOS1 mutation with a unilateral giant cell lesion of the right mandible. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and MRI are not specific for the diagnosis of oral giant cell lesions. Nonetheless, intralesional scattered foci of low SI on T2-WI, corresponding to hemosiderin deposits due to hemorrhage, can help the radiologist in narrowing down the differential diagnosis of gnathic lesions in patients with NS.

  18. Giant cell phlebitis: a potentially lethal clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunieda, Takeshige; Murayama, Masanori; Ikeda, Tsuneko; Yamakita, Noriyoshi

    2012-08-01

    An 83-year-old woman presented to us with a 4-week history of general malaise, subjective fever and lower abdominal pain. Despite the intravenous infusion of antibiotics, her blood results and physical condition worsened, resulting in her sudden death. Autopsy study revealed that the medium-sized veins of the mesentery were infiltrated by eosinophil granulocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells; however, the arteries were not involved. Microscopically, venous giant cell infiltration was observed in the gastrointestinal tract, bladder, retroperitoneal tissues and myocardium. The final diagnosis was giant cell phlebitis, a rare disease of unknown aetiology. This case demonstrates for the first time that giant cell phlebitis involving extra-abdominal organs, including hearts, can cause serious morbidity.

  19. Multidisciplinary approach for the rehabilitation of central giant cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-16

    Sep 16, 2013 ... Key words: Dental implant, giant cell granuloma, hybrid prosthesis ... needed either in the same gene or in other genes involved in the same pathway.[13] Manor .... Surgical treatment was preferred as treatment option and the ...

  20. The role of extracorporeal life support in acute myocarditis: a bridge to recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D Bradford; Sowell, Steven R; Willis, Brigham; Lane, John; Pierce, Christopher; Pophal, Stephen; Arabia, Francisco A; Nigro, John J

    2012-12-01

    Acute myocardial failure associated with myocarditis is highly lethal. Left ventricular assist device support for these patients has been advocated to decompress the left ventricle and facilitate myocardial remodeling and recovery. Concerns exist regarding the ability of venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal life support (ECLS) to decompress the left ventricle and allow effective myocardial recovery. ECLS has several advantages, including availability, rapid deployment, and flexibility, as compared with contemporary ventricular assist devices. The objective of this study was to provide a brief review of acute myocarditis and present our series of patients. After Institutional Review Board approval, we conducted a retrospective data analysis of patients on ECLS experiencing rapidly progressive myocardial failure from a normal baseline. Patients with a history of intrinsic heart disease were excluded. All patients were thought to have myocarditis and had failed medical therapy requiring emergent ECLS support. Five patients demographics are detailed in Table 1. Patients experienced life-threatening intractable dysrhythmias or cardiac arrest and were refractory to medical therapy with severe acidosis and impending multisystem organ failure. All patients were stabilized with VA ECLS, and the left ventricle and atrium were decompressed in four of five patients. A left atrial vent was placed in one patient. Myocardial recovery with successful weaning from ECLS was obtained in four of five patients and to a normal ejection fraction in three of the five. One patient failed ECLS weaning and required biventricular VAD support secondary to severe myocardial necrosis from giant cell myocarditis and was transplanted, one died, all others are alive at follow-up. ECLS is safe and effective to treat acute myocardial failure and may be used to obtain myocardial recovery in certain subsets. We devised a decision algorithm for ECLS deployment in this patient cohort and routinely use ECLS.

  1. Regulatory T cells protect mice against coxsackievirus-induced myocarditis through the transforming growth factor beta-coxsackie-adenovirus receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Li, Guohua; Liu, Youan; Chen, Manyin; Konviser, Michael; Chen, Xin; Opavsky, Mary Anne; Liu, Peter P

    2010-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 infection is an excellent model of human myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac injury is caused either by a direct cytopathic effect of the virus or through immune-mediated mechanisms. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the negative modulation of host immune responses and set the threshold of autoimmune activation. This study was designed to test the protective effects of Tregs and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled Tregs or naïve CD4(+) T cells were injected intravenously once every 2 weeks 3 times into mice. The mice were then challenged with intraperitoneal coxsackievirus B3 immediately after the last cell transfer. Transfer of Tregs showed higher survival rates than transfer of CD4(+) T cells (P=0.0136) but not compared with the PBS injection group (P=0.0589). Interestingly, Tregs also significantly decreased virus titers and inflammatory scores in the heart. Transforming growth factor-beta and phosphorylated AKT were upregulated in Tregs-transferred mice and coxsackie-adenovirus receptor expression was decreased in the heart compared with control groups. Transforming growth factor-beta decreased coxsackie-adenovirus receptor expression and inhibited coxsackievirus B3 infection in HL-1 cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes. Splenocytes collected from Treg-, CD4(+) T-cell-, and PBS-treated mice proliferated equally when stimulated with heat-inactivated virus, whereas in the Treg group, the proliferation rate was reduced significantly when stimulated with noninfected heart tissue homogenate. Adoptive transfer of Tregs protected mice from coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis through the transforming growth factor beta-coxsackie-adenovirus receptor pathway and thus suppresses the immune response to cardiac tissue, maintaining the antiviral immune response.

  2. Localized tenosynovial giant cell tumor in both knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Kwon, Jong Won; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Chang, Moon Jong; Cho, Eun Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor, previously called pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), is a rare benign neoplastic process that may involve the synovium of the joint. The disorder is usually monoarticular and only a few cases have been reported on polyarticular involvement. Herein, we present a case of localized intra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumor in a 29-year-old man involving both knee joints with a description of the MR imaging and histological findings. (orig.)

  3. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Balke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (=6 or sacrum (=13 have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4% patients with sacral and 4 (66.7% with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors.

  4. Vertebral bony tumor of giant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo Carling, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    This is a report of a 37 years old, masculine patient, in whom a unique primary bone injury was demonstrated, located at T-11, diagnosed as a giant cells tumor (osteoclastoma). Location is described in the literature as unusual. The clinical presentation of the injury is described, as the initial radiological studies and magnetic resonance images 8 years after surgical treatment, with no neoplasic recurrences. The medical literature of these primary bone injuries and its treatment was also reviewed. Objectives: to present a patient with an unusual extramedullar tumor injury, of primary bone origin, benign, treated surgically and who has a post surgical follow-up of 8 years. Local tumor recurrence and not pulmonary metastasis was demonstrated. The medical literature of this bone pathology that affects the spine in an infrequent manner, was also reviewed, specially the related to medical, surgical and radio-therapeutic treatments. Methodology: the clinical history of the patient is described, who was successfully operated, because the expansive tumor was totally drawn out, without neurological injury; inter operating or post-operating vertebral instability was not observed or diagnosed. The patient was controlled in periodic form, with last medical checkup and of magnetic resonance 8 years after the surgery. The medical publications existing are reviewed

  5. Radiation induced formation of giant cells (Saccharomyces uvarum). Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumstark-Khan, C; Schnitzler, L; Rink, H

    1984-02-01

    X-irradiated yeast cells (Saccharomyces uvarum) grown in liquid media stop mitosis and form giant cells. Chitin ring formation, being a prerequisite for cell separation, was studied by fluorescence microscopy using Calcofluor White, a chitin specific dye. Experiments with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (hydroxyurea) and chitin synthesis (polyoxin D) demonstrate chitin ring formation to be dependent on DNA synthesis, whereas bud formation is independent of DNA synthesis and chitin ring formation respectively. Basing on these results the formation of X-ray induced giant cells implies one DNA replication which in turn induces the formation of only one chitin ring between mother cell and giant bud. Obviously no septum can be formed. Thus cell separation does not occur, but the bud already formed, produces another bud demonstrating that bud formation itself is independent of DNA synthesis.

  6. Radiation induced formation of giant cells (Saccharomyces uvarum). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.; Schnitzler, L.; Rink, H.

    1984-01-01

    X-irradiated yeast cells (Saccharomyces uvarum) grown in liquid media stop mitosis and form giant cells. Chitin ring formation, being a prerequisite for cell separation, was studied by fluorescence microscopy using Calcofluor White, a chitin specific dye. Experiments with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (hydroxyurea) and chitin synthesis (polyoxin D) demonstrate chitin ring formation to be dependent on DNA synthesis, whereas bud formation is independent of DNA synthesis and chitin ring formation respectively. Basing on these results the formation of X-ray induced giant cells implies one DNA replication which in turn induces the formation of only one chitin ring between mother cell and giant bud. Obviously no septum can be formed. Thus cell separation does not occur, but the bud already formed, produces another bud demonstrating that bud formation itself is independent of DNA synthesis. (orig.)

  7. Parvovirus B19 is a bystander in adult myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, Scott A; Anderson, Daniel R; Radio, Stanley J

    2012-01-01

    The genomic DNA of parvovirus B19, a small single-stranded DNA virus of the genus Erythrovirus, has been shown to persist in solid tissues of constitutionally healthy, immunocompetent individuals. Despite these data, many case reports and series have linked the presence of parvovirus B19 genomic DNA, detected through nucleic acid amplification testing, with myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Herein, we use multiple tools to better assess the relationship between parvovirus B19 and myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Nucleic acid amplification testing, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy were used to assess the location and activity of parvovirus B19 in cases of myocarditis and in cases with no significant cardiac disease. Nucleic acid amplification testing for parvovirus B19 genomic DNA was positive in 73% of patients with myocarditis/cardiomyopathy and in 26% of patients with no significant disease. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that, in cases with amplifiable parvovirus B19 DNA, parvovirus B19 genomic DNA and viral protein production were present in rare mononuclear cells. In a majority of cases of myocarditis and a significant number of otherwise normal hearts, nucleic acid amplification testing detected persistent parvovirus B19 genomic DNA that did not play a significant pathogenic role. The source of parvovirus B19 DNA appeared to be interstitial mononuclear inflammatory cells and not myocardial or endothelial cells. Therefore, nucleic acid amplification testing alone is not diagnostically helpful for determining the etiology of adult myocarditis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Giant cell temporal arteritis associated with overlying basal cell carcinoma: co-incidence or connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alowami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium sized arteries manifesting as temporal arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica. The histological assessment of temporal artery biopsies is frequently encountered in anatomical pathology and has important diagnostic consequences in patients clinically suspected of having giant cell arteritis. We present an intriguing case of giant cell arteritis associated with a Basal cell carcinoma and discuss the ongoing controversy pertaining to the association of giant cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica with malignancy.

  9. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: A review of 123 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral giant cell granuloma is one of the reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity, which originates from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical characteristics of peripheral gi-ant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population. Methods: A series of 123 consecutive confirmed cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma after biopsy were evaluated. Age, sex, anatomic location, consistency, etiologic factor, pain and bleeding history, color, surface texture, and pedicle situation were recorded and were analyzed by chi-square test and values were considered to be significant if P < 0.05. Results: Age ranged from 6 to 75 years (mean 33 years. Women affected more than men (M/F 1:1.1. Peripheral giant cell granuloma was seen in the mandible more than in the maxilla and in the anterior region more than in the posterior region. In most cases, lesions were pink, pedunculated and had non-ulcerated surface. In less than half of the cases, there was no history of bleeding and also pain was rarely reported. Calculus was the most common etiologic factor. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the clinical features of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population are almost similar to those reported by other investigators.

  10. Diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the subcutaneous thigh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghvi, D.A.; Purandare, N.C.; Jambhekar, N.A.; Agarwal, A.; Agarwal, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse-type giant cell tumor is an extra-articular form of pigmented villonodular synovitis. The localized form of this lesion (tenosynovial giant cell tumor) is frequent, representing the most common subset arising from the synovium of a joint, bursa or tendon sheath, with 85% of cases occurring in the fingers. The less frequent diffuse-type giant cell tumors are commonly located in the periarticular soft tissues, but on rare occasions these lesions can be purely intramuscular or subcutaneous We report the case of a 26-year-old female with diffuse-type giant cell tumor of the subcutaneous thigh, remote from a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. A review of the literature did not reveal any similar description of a diffuse-type giant cell tumor completely within the subcutaneous thigh, remote from a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. These lesions were initially regarded as inflammatory or reactive processes, but since the identification of clonal abnormalities in these patients, and in view of their capacity for autonomous growth, they are now widely considered to represent benign neoplasms. (orig.)

  11. Infection and Proliferation of Giant Viruses in Amoeba Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, the first discovered giant virus with genome size and particle size much larger than previously discovered viruses, possesses several genes for translation and CRISPER Cas system-like defense mechanism against virophages, which co-infect amoeba cells with the giant virus and which inhibit giant virus proliferation. Mimiviruses infect amoeba cells by phagocytosis and release their DNA into amoeba cytoplasm through their stargate structure. After infection, giant virion factories (VFs) form in amoeba cytoplasm, followed by DNA replication and particle formation at peripheral regions of VF. Marseilleviruses, the smallest giant viruses, infect amoeba cells by phagocytosis or endocytosis, form larger VF than Mimivirus's VF in amoeba cytoplasm, and replicate their particles. Pandoraviruses found in 2013 have the largest genome size and particle size among all viruses ever found. Pandoraviruses infect amoeba cells by phagocytosis and release their DNA into amoeba cytoplasm through their mouth-like apical pores. The proliferation of Pandoraviruses occurs along with nucleus disruption. New virions form at the periphery of the region formerly occupied by the amoeba cell nucleus.

  12. M cell-targeting strategy facilitates mucosal immune response and enhances protection against CVB3-induced viral myocarditis elicited by chitosan-DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Yue, Yan; Fan, Xiangmei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-07-31

    Efficient delivery of antigen to mucosal associated lymphoid tissue is a first and critical step for successful induction of mucosal immunity by vaccines. Considering its potential transcytotic capability, M cell has become a more and more attractive target for mucosal vaccines. In this research, we designed an M cell-targeting strategy by which mucosal delivery system chitosan (CS) was endowed with M cell-targeting ability via conjugating with a CPE30 peptide, C terminal 30 amino acids of clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and then evaluated its immune-enhancing ability in the context of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-specific mucosal vaccine consisting of CS and a plasmid encoding CVB3 predominant antigen VP1. It had shown that similar to CS-pVP1, M cell-targeting CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine appeared a uniform spherical shape with about 300 nm diameter and +22 mV zeta potential, and could efficiently protect DNA from DNase I digestion. Mice were orally immunized with 4 doses of CPE30-CS-pVP1 containing 50 μg pVP1 at 2-week intervals and challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with CS-pVP1 vaccine, CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine had no obvious impact on CVB3-specific serum IgG level and splenic T cell immune responses, but significantly increased specific fecal SIgA level and augmented mucosal T cell immune responses. Consequently, much milder myocarditis and lower viral load were witnessed in CPE30-CS-pVP1 immunized group. The enhanced immunogenicity and immunoprotection were associated with the M cell-targeting ability of CPE30-CS-pVP1 which improved its mucosal uptake and transcytosis. Our findings indicated that CPE30-CS-pVP1 may represent a novel prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis, and this M cell-targeting strategy indeed could be applied as a promising and universal platform for mucosal vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  14. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1

  15. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  16. Bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath arises from the synovium of tendon sheaths, joints, or bursae, mostly affects adults between 30 and 50 years of age, and is slightly more common in females. We report the case of a 32-years-old male presenting with pain in both ankles without any history of trauma. On clinical examination, tenderness on both tendoachilles and local thickening were observed. Ultrasonography showed thickening of local tendinous area with increase in anteroposterior diameter, and Doppler demonstrated increased flow in peritendinous area. MRI findings showed that most of the tumor had intermediate signal intensity and portions of the tumor had low signal intensity. Fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision biopsy was done with no recurrence on five month follow-up. Review of literature did not reveal any similar result; so, bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles is a rare presentation.

  17. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the occipital bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Briz, A.; Ricoy, J.R.; Martinez-Tello, F.J.; Lobato, R.D.; Ramos, A.; Millan, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a non-neoplastic fibrous lesion with unevenly distributed multinucleated giant cells, areas of osseous metaplasia and hemorrhage. The small bones of the hands and feet are the most common sites, followed by the vertebral bodies and craniofacial bones. In the craniofacial bones GCRG has been reported in the temporal bone, in the frontal bone and paranasal sinus. However, to the best of our knowledge no case has been reported in the occipital bone. We report on the imaging findings and pathological features of a GCRG of the occipital bone and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity in this particular location, especially with giant cell tumor because of the therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  18. Unilateral giant cell lesion of the jaw in Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Eyselbergs, M; Vanhoenacker, F; Hintjens, J; Dom, M; Devriendt, K; Dijck, H Van

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Noonan-Like/Multiple Giant Cell Lesion (NL/MGCL) syndrome is initially described as the occurrence of multiple gnathic giant cell lesions in patients with phenotypic features of NS. Nowadays, NS/MGCL syndrome is considered a variant of the NS spectrum rather than a distinct entity. We report the case of a 14-year-old female patient carrying a SOS1 mutation with a unilateral g...

  19. Breast carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Lauridsen, M C; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2001-01-01

    Primary carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a very rare tumour of the female breast. The clinical course, histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of 61 cases of invasive duct carcinoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (OMGCs) are reviewed and a new...... in the literature have shown that 86% of patients with these tumours are still alive after 5 years. Histologically, these tumours are invasive ductal carcinomas with OMGCs next to the neoplastic glands and within their lumen. Signs of recent and past haemorrhage are ubiquitously present in the highly vascularized...

  20. Iatrogenic giant cell tumor at bone graft harvesting site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zile S Kundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 30 year old female patient with giant cell tumor of the distal tibia initially treated at a peripheral nononcological center by curettage and autologous bone grafting from the ipsilateral iliac crest reported to us with local recurrence and an implantation giant cell tumor at the graft harvesting site which required extensive surgeries at both sites. The risk of iatrogenic direct implantation of tumor, often attributable to inadequate surgical planning or poor surgical techniques, and the steps to prevent such complication is reported here.

  1. Giant cell granuloma of the maxilla - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setubal, Roger; Menezes, Benedito; Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino de; Soares, Aldemir Humberto; Souza, Ricardo Pires de

    1997-01-01

    Giant cell granuloma is an uncommon lesion of the giant cell lesion's group, which includes brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, true giant cell tumor, cherubism and aneurysmal bone cyst. their histologic features are very similar and make certain types indistinguishable from each other, remaining a considerable controversy on its classification. The authors report a case of giant cell maxillary granuloma and makes a review of the literature. (author)

  2.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  3. Localized giant cell tumors in the spinal column radiologic presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Echeverria, M.A.; Parra Blanco, J.A.; Pagola Serrano, M.A.; Mellado Santos, J.M.; Bueno Lopez, J.; Gonzalez Tutor, A.

    1994-01-01

    Given the uncommonness of the location of giant cell tumors (GCT) in the spinal column and the limited number of studies published, we present a case of GCT located in the spinal column, which involved both vertebral bodies and partially destroyed the adjacent rib. (Author)

  4. CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF THE MANDIBLE: A RARE PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra SINGH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is an intra-osseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrosis tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, multinucleated giant cells and trabecules of woven bone. This lesion accounts for less than 7% of all benign jaw tumours. Jaffe considered it as a locally reparative reaction of bone, which can be possibly due to either an inflammatory response, hemorrhage or local trauma. Females are affected more frequently than males. It occurs over a wide age range.It has been reported that this lesion is diagnosed during the first two decades of life in approximately 48% of cases, and 60% of cases are evident before the age of 30. It is considerably more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. Most lesions occur in the molar and premolar area, some of these extending up to the ascending ramus. The presence of giant cell granuloma in the mandibular body area, the entire ramus, condyle and coronoid represents a therapeutic challenge for the oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The aim of this report is to describe an unusual presentation of central giant cell granuloma involving the mandibular body, ramus, condylar and coronoid processes, and to discuss the differentiated diagnosis, the radiographic presentation and the management of this lesion.

  5. Delayed Diagnosis: Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of Scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Didar Balcı,

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common form of skin cancer, the scalp lesions of BCC have been rarely reported. Giant BCC is defined as a tumor larger than 5 cm in diameter and only 0.5-1 % of all BCCs achieve this size. We report a case of giant BCC on the scalp that was treated with topical coticosteroids and antifungal shampoo for five years. BCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in erythematous plaque type lesions resistant to therapy with long duration localized on the scalp.

  6. Giant cell arteritis: a multicenter observational study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wagner Silva de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe demographic features, disease manifestations and therapy in patients with giant cell arteritis from referral centers in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed on 45 giant cell arteritis patients from three university hospitals in Brazil. Diagnoses were based on the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for giant cell arteritis or temporal artery biopsy findings. RESULTS: Most patients were Caucasian, and females were slightly more predominant. The frequencies of disease manifestations were as follows: temporal headache in 82.2%, neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations in 68.9%, jaw claudication in 48.9%, systemic symptoms in 44.4%, polymyalgia rheumatica in 35.6% and extra-cranial vessel involvement in 17.8% of cases. Aortic aneurysms were observed in 6.6% of patients. A comparison between patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis and those without temporal artery biopsies did not yield significant differences in disease manifestations. All patients were treated with oral prednisone, and intravenous methylprednisolone was administered to nearly half of the patients. Methotrexate was the most commonly used immunosuppressive agent, and low-dose aspirin was prescribed to the majority of patients. Relapses occurred in 28.9% of patients, and aspirin had a protective effect against relapses. Females had higher prevalences of polymyalgia rheumatica, systemic manifestations and jaw claudication, while permanent visual loss was more prevalent in men. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the clinical features of Brazilian giant cell arteritis patients were similar to those found in other studies, except for the high prevalence of neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and permanent blindness in the Brazilian patients. Aspirin had a protective effect on relapses.

  7. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Awomolo, Agboola O. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Szabo, Sara [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Pathology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  8. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Arthur B; Awomolo, Agboola O; Szabo, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions.

  9. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Arthur B.; Awomolo, Agboola O.; Szabo, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  10. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma of conjunctiva: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabi Konar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma is a condition characterized histologically by damaged elastic fibers associated with preponderance of giant cells along with absence of necrobiosis, lipid, mucin, and pallisading granuloma. It usually occurs on sun-damaged skin and hence the previous name actinic granuloma. A similar process occurs on the conjunctiva. Over the past three decades only four cases of conjunctival actinic granuloma have been documented. All the previous patients were females with lesions in nasal or temporal bulbar conjunctiva varying 2-3 mm in size. We report a male patient aged 70 years presenting with a 14 mm × 7 mm fleshy mass on right lower bulbar conjunctiva. Clinical differential diagnoses were lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma in situ and amyloidosis. Surgical excision followed by histopathology confirmed it to be a case of actinic granuloma. This is the first case of isolated conjunctival actinic granuloma of such a large size reported from India.

  11. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Myocarditis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ju Hsiao

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Pediatric myocarditis presents primarily with gastrointestinal symptoms in Taiwan. Careful check of heart rhythm may provide a useful objective marker of myocarditis. The predictors of a poor prognosis were gastrointestinal symptoms, hepatomegaly, and hypotension.

  12. COMPARISON OF CARDIAC BIOMARKERS AND ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY IN DIAGNOSING MYOCARDITIS

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    Nimi Bharathan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Conventional methods used to diagnose or rule out myocarditis is not useful in detecting cardiac myocyte injury in clinically suspected cases. Endomyocardial biopsy and histopathological examination is not feasible in most government hospitals in India. Sensitive parameters have yet to be found out. The study was conducted to find out whether diagnosis of myocarditis in clinically suspected cases can be done by measurement of serum levels of cardiac troponinI (cTnI and MB isoform of creatine kinase (CK-MB. MATERIALS AND METHODS 19 patients with clinically suspected myocarditis were screened for CK-MB activity and cTnI. Echocardiography, ECG and IgM for leptospirosis were also checked in these patients. RESULTS cTnI was elevated in 10 out of 19 patients with clinically suspected myocarditis. CK-MB was elevated in 7 patients. CONCLUSION Elevation of cTnI level in blood can be taken as an indicator of cardiac muscle cell injury in suspected cases of myocarditis.

  13. Giant Cell Tumour of the Distal Ulna: A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Jaya Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumour (GCT of bone, a primary yet locally aggressive benign tumour, commonly affects patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years, with the peak incidence occurring in the third decade. Women are affected slightly more than men. The distal end of the ulna is an extremely uncommon site for primary bone tumours in general and giant cell tumours in particular. Wide resection of the distal ulna is the recommended treatment for GCT in such locations. Radio-ulna convergence and dorsal displacement of the ulna stump are known complications following ulna resection proximal to the insertion of the pronator quadratus. This leads to reduction in grip power and forearm rotatory motion. Stabilization of the ulna stump with extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU tendon after wide resection of the tumour has been described in the literature. We report a case of GCT of distal end of ulna treated with wide resection and stabilization with ECU tendon.

  14. Giant Cell Tumour of Tendon Sheath Masquerading As Trigger Finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rahimawati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 59-year-old female who presented in the general orthopaedic clinic with triggering of her right middle finger. She did not respond to conventional treatment methods; subsequently she underwent surgical open release under local anaesthesia. Five months postoperatively, the patient presented with signs and symptoms of acute flexor tenosynovitis, and was thought to have a postoperative infection. Re-examination by a hand surgeon raised the possibility of a different aetiology. Based on clinical findings and response to initial treatment, giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath was suspected and later confirmed following surgical biopsy. A high index of suspicion and knowledge of the variegated presentations of giant cell tumour in the hand are beneficial in these types of cases.

  15. Central giant cell granuloma: A case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Buduru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is a benign intra-osseous lesion of unknown etiology, and occurs in jaws. Clinically and radiographically difference between its nature - aggressive and non-aggressive can be made. It is characterized histologically by cellular fibrous tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, aggregations of multinucleated giant cells, and occasionally, trabeculae of woven bone. Histologically, identical lesions occur in patients with known genetic defects such as cherubism, Noonan syndrome, or neurofibromatosis type I. It has an increased predilection for mandible and females in younger age group. Surgical curettage or resection is the most common therapy in aggressive lesions. The drawback is undesirable damage to the jaw or teeth, tooth germs, and frequent recurrences. Non-aggressive tumors respond well to such treatments. We are presenting a case of an aggressive type of CGCG of mandible in a young patient, who presented with massive swelling associated with loss of teeth in just 6 months duration.

  16. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  17. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Ajay; Agarwal Manish

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function. Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone ...

  18. Giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matushita, Joao Paulo, E-mail: jpauloejulieta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Matushita, Julieta S.; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem Dr. Matsushita, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Matushita, Cristina S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Simoes, Luiz Antonio Monteiro; Carvalho Neto, Lizando Franco de

    2013-06-15

    The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus in a 54-year-old male patient. This tumor location is rare, and this is the third case reported in the literature with radiographic documentation and histopathological confirmation. The patient underwent surgery, with curettage of frontal sinus and placement of a prosthesis. He died because a voluntary abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids. (author)

  19. Rare giant cell tumor involvement of the olecranon bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is a relatively common benign bone lesion and is usually located in long bones, but involvement of the olecranon is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of solitary GCT of bone in the olecranon that was confirmed by preoperative needle biopsy and postoperative histological examination. The treatment included intralesional curettage, allogeneic bone grafting, and plating. At 26 months follow-up, the patient had no local recurrence.

  20. Giant Cell Fibroma in a Two-Year-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolina Volpi Mello-Moura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The giant cell fibroma is a benign nonneoplastic fibrous tumor of the oral mucosa. It occurs in the first three decades of life in the mandibular gingiva, predominantly, showing predilection for females. This article reports a case of giant cell fibroma in a 2-year-old girl, which is an uncommon age for this lesion. The patient was brought for treatment at the Research and Clinical Center of Dental Trauma in Primary Teeth, where practice for the Discipline of Pediatric Dentistry (Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil takes place. During clinical examination, a tissue growth was detected on the lingual gingival mucosa of the lower right primary incisors teeth. The lesion was excised under local anesthesia and submitted to histological examination at the Oral Pathology Department of the Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. There was no recurrence after 20 months of monitoring. This instance reinforces the importance of oral care from the very first months of life in order to enable doctors to make precocious diagnosis and offer more appropriate treatments for oral diseases, as well as to promote more efficient oral health in the community.

  1. Focal giant cell cardiomyopathy with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, S; Kuehl, K S; Midgely, F M; Chandra, R S

    1985-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is mostly limited to mild cardiomegaly. Although these patients have visceromegaly, macroglossia, gigantism, and adrenal cytomegaly, no significant myocardial changes have been described. An infant with dysmorphic features of this syndrome had supraventricular tachycardia since birth. Nodular lesions were present in the right atrium. Morphologically these lesions were composed of hypertrophic myocardial fibers admixed with multinucleated giant cells of myogenic origin. The exact nature of these lesions remains undetermined. It is postulated that hypertrophic myocardial cells may represent cardiac cytomegaly as a manifestation of the accelerated growth potential of cells seen with this syndrome.

  2. Leiomyosarcoma of the skin with osteoclast-like giant cells: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Deba P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Osteoclast-like giant cells have been noted in various malignant tumors, such as, carcinomas of pancreas and liver and leiomyosarcomas of non-cutaneous locations, such as, uterus and rectum. We were unable to find any reported case of a leiomyosarcoma of the skin where osteoclast-like giant cells were present in the tumor. Case presentation We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with a cutaneous leiomyosarcoma associated with osteoclast-like giant cells arising from the subcutaneous artery of the leg. The nature of the giant cells is discussed in light of the findings from the immunostaining as well as survey of the literature. Conclusion A rare case of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is reported. The giant cells in the tumor appear to be reactive histiocytic cells.

  3. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  4. Giant Glial Cell: New Insight Through Mechanism-Based Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Brazhe, Nadezda

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a detailed mechanism-based model of a tripartite synapse consisting of P- and R-neurons together with a giant glial cell in the ganglia of the medical leech (Hirudo medicinalis), which is a useful object for experimental studies in situ. We describe the two main pathways...... of the glial cell activation: (1) via IP3 production and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and (2) via increase of the extracellular potassium concentration, glia depolarization, and opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. We suggest that the second pathway is the more significant...

  5. Wheatstone bridge giant-magnetoresistance based cell counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiun-Peng; Lai, Mei-Feng; Huang, Hao-Ting; Lin, Chi-Wen; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2014-07-15

    A Wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor was proposed here for the detection and counting of magnetic cells. The biosensor was made of a top-pinned spin-valve layer structure, and it was integrated with a microchannel possessing the function of hydrodynamic focusing that allowed the cells to flow in series one by one and ensured the accuracy of detection. Through measuring the magnetoresistance variation caused by the stray field of the magnetic cells that flowed through the microchannel above the GMR biosensor, we can not only detect and count the cells but we can also recognize cells with different magnetic moments. In addition, a magnetic field gradient was applied for the separation of different cells into different channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  7. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma Mimicking Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in Proximal Phalanx of Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan CM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma (GCRG of phalanx is uncommon. It is a benign osteolytic lesion but can be locally aggressive. GCRG has certain radiology and histological features that are similar to other giant cell lesions of the bone. We present a case report of a young patient with giant cell reparative granuloma of proximal phalanx of left third toe. The bone lesion was successfully treated surgically.

  8. What is the role of giant cells in AL-amyloidosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Sletten, K; Sandgren, O

    1999-01-01

    of some cases of systemic AL-amyloidosis. Based on these findings and electron microscopic studies, it is discussed whether the giant cells actively participate in amyloid fibril formation by uptake and modification of the precursor protein or the giant cells are part of a foreign body reaction. Included....... In this work it is shown that that there is a difference between localized and systemic amyloidosis in respect to accompanying giant cells which constantly are found associated with amyloid deposits in localized AL-amyloidosis. In addition, giant cells were found together with amyloid deposits in lymph nodes...

  9. Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor: Better molecular understanding revolutionizes treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Shash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCTs are rare tumors, which are primarily treated via surgery with a low likelihood of metastasis. Although wide excision is an excellent choice for local control, tumors located within or close to major joints, along with the benign nature of the disease, make such resection impractical. An increase in local recurrences and the need for multiple surgical procedures promoted the interest in targeted-therapies for this disease. TGCTs contain a mixture of giant cells, mononuclear cells and inflammatory cells, with clonal cytogenetic abnormalities through rearrangements involving 1p11–13. Colony stimulating factor (CSF1 gene encodes for the ligand of CSF1 receptor (CSF1R. The CSF1 gene is located at the chromosome 1p13 breakpoint and is found to be translocated in 63%–77% of patients with TGCTs. Selective CSF1R inhibitors yield high response rate and disease control, demonstrating the integration of a new drug development technology that could revolutionize treatment outcomes.

  10. Aptamer-based isolation and subsequent imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in ischemic myocard by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, R; Wiskirchen, J; Guo, K; Neumann, B; Kehlbach, R; Pintaske, J; Voth, V; Walker, T; Scheule, A M; Greiner, T O; Hermanutz-Klein, U; Claussen, C D; Northoff, H; Ziemer, G; Wendel, H P

    2007-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seem to be a promising cell source for cellular cardiomyoplasty. We recently developed a new aptamer-based specific selection of MSC to provide "ready to transplant" cells directly after isolation. We evaluated MRI tracking of newly isolated and freshly transplanted MSC in the heart using one short ex vivo selection step combining specific aptamer-based isolation and labeling of the cells. Bone marrow (BM) was collected from healthy pigs. The animals were euthanized and the heart was placed in a perfusion model. During cold ischemia, immunomagnetic isolation of MSC from the BM by MSC-specific aptamers labeled with Dynabeads was performed within 2 h. For histological identification the cells were additionally stained with PKH26. Approx. 3 x 10(6) of the freshly aptamer-isolated cells were injected into the ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA) and 5 x 10(5) cells were injected directly into myocardial tissue after damaging the respective area by freezing (cryo-scar). 3 x 10(6) of the aptamer-isolated cells were kept for further characterization (FACS and differentiation assays). 20 h after cell transplantation, MRI of the heart using a clinical 3.0 Tesla whole body scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Germany) was performed followed by histological examinations. The average yield of sorted cells from 120 ml BM was 7 x 10(6) cells. The cells were cultured and showed MSC-like properties. MRI showed reproducible artifacts within the RIVA-perfusion area and the cryo-scar with surprisingly excellent quality. The histological examination of the biopsies showed PKH26-positive cells within the areas which were positive in the MRI in contrast to the control biopsies. Immunomagnetic separation of MSC by specific aptamers linked to magnetic particles is feasible, effective and combines a specific separation and labeling technique to a "one stop shop" strategy.

  11. FDG PET in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Yeung, H.W.D.; Pui, J.; Macapinlac, H.; Liebovitz, E.; Rusch, V.; Goy, A.; Larson, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate the role of PET in the diagnosis of vasculitis. Methods: We report a case of giant cell arteritis diagnosed by FDG-PET in a 75-year-old woman with a fever of unknown origin. The patient presented with a 3 month history of fatigue, fevers, headaches, visual disturbance and jaw claudication. Diagnosis of temporal arteritis was initially excluded because of a normal ESR. CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass, suspicious for malignancy. An FDG-PET scan for pre-operative evaluation was acquired 45 minutes after intravenous injection of 10 mCi F18-FDG, on a dedicated PET scanner. Image reconstruction was performed using an iterative algorithm with segmented attenuation correction. The study identified striking localisation of FDG to the entire aorta, left main coronary artery, and subclavian, carotid and common iliac arteries bilaterally (SUV max range 4-4.5 g/ml), suggestive of large vessel arteritis. Subsequent excisional biopsy of the mediastinal mass confirmed giant cell vasculitis of a large muscular artery in thymic tissue. No malignancy was detected. A repeat ESR was 129 mm/hr. The patient was commenced on oral Prednisone, with prompt improvement of symptoms, ESR and anaemia and complete normalisation of the FDG-PET scan within two weeks. This case suggests a potential role of FDG-PET in the non-invasive diagnosis, classification and follow-up of giant cell arteritis, and possibly other vasculitides, so far notoriously difficult to diagnose, relying usually on a constellation of non-specific symptoms, laboratory investigations or invasive pathologic and angiographic means. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  12. GIANT CELL AORTITIS DIAGNOSED WITH PET/CT - PARANEOPLASTIC SYNDROME?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakula, Marija; Cerovec, Mislav; Mayer, Miroslav; Huić, Dražen; Anić, Branimir

    2016-05-01

    Vasculitides are heterogenic group of autoimmune connective tissue diseases which often present difficulties in early diagnosing. Giant cell arteritis is vasculitis of large and medium arteries. It predominantly presents with symptoms of affection of the external carotid artery branches. Furthermore, the only symptoms can be constitutional. In clinical practice, vasculitides are sometimes considered as paraneoplastic, but no definite association with malignancies has been established and the mechanisms are still debated. The gold standard for diagnosing giant cell arteritis is a positive temporal artery biopsy, but the results can often be false negative. Additionally, more than half of the patients have aorta and its main branches affected. Considering aforementioned, imaging studies are essential in confirming large-vessel vasculitis, amongst which is highly sensitive PET/CT. We present the case of a 70-year-old female patient with constitutional symptoms and elevated sedimentation rate. After extensive diagnostic tests, she was admitted to our Rheumatology unit. Aortitis of the abdominal aorta has been confirmed by PET/CT and after the introduction of glucocorticoids the disease soon went into clinical and laboratory remission. Shortly after aortitis has been diagnosed, lung carcinoma was revealed of which the patient died. At the time of the comprehensive diagnostics, there was no reasonable doubt for underlying malignoma. To the best of our knowledge, there are no recent publications concerning giant cell arteritis and neoplastic processes in the context of up-to-date non-invasive diagnostic methods (i.e. PET/CT). In the light of previous research results, we underline that the sensitivity of PET/CT is not satisfactory when estimating cancer dissemination in non-enlarged lymph nodes and that its value can at times be overestimated.

  13. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Nesher

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2–3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be “isolated” or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of “isolated” PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, “hidden” GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2–3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied.

  14. Giant cells tumor of radius distal end and bone reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La O Duran, Eldis; Monzon Fernandez, Abel Nicolas; Sanz Delgado, Licett

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a black women aged 40 presenting with a tumor of distal end of right radium with histological diagnosis of low-grade malignancy giant cells tumor and proposal of limb amputation. A conservative surgery was performed with a two-steps total exeresis of lesion sparing the oncologic margin. A fibular free-graft was used and wrist arthrodesis and internal fixation of graft using AO system. There was a good graft consolidation and an active incorporation of patient to social activities. The diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, rehabilitation and case prognosis are exposed

  15. Aptamer-based isolation and subsequent imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in ischemic myocard by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, R.; Hermanutz-Klein, U.; Northoff, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Transfusionsmedizin; Wiskirchen, J.; Kehlbach, R.; Pintaske, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Guo, K.; Neumann, B.; Voth, V.; Walker, T.; Scheule, A.M.; Greiner, T.O.; Ziemer, G.; Wendel, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Thorax-, Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seem to be a promising cell source for cellular cardiomyoplasty. We recently developed a new aptamer-based specific selection of MSC to provide ''ready to transplant'' cells directly after isolation. We evaluated MRI tracking of newly isolated and freshly transplanted MSC in the heart using one short ex vivo selection step combining specific aptamer-based isolation and labeling of the cells. Materials and Methods: Bone marrow (BM) was collected from healthy pigs. The animals were euthanized and the heart was placed in a perfusion model. During cold ischemia, immunomagnetic isolation of MSC from the BM by MSC-specific aptamers labeled with Dynabeads {sup registered} was performed within 2 h. For histological identification the cells were additionally stained with PKH26. Approx. 3 x 10{sup 6} of the freshly aptamer-isolated cells were injected into the ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA) and 5 x 10{sup 5} cells were injected directly into myocardial tissue after damaging the respective area by freezing (cryo-scar). 3 x 10{sup 6} of the aptamer-isolated cells were kept for further characterization (FACS and differentiation assays). 20 h after cell transplantation, MRI of the heart using a clinical 3.0 Tesla whole body scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Germany) was performed followed by histological examinations. Results: The average yield of sorted cells from 120 ml BM was 7 x 10{sup 6} cells. The cells were cultured and showed MSC-like properties. MRI showed reproducible artifacts within the RIVA-perfusion area and the cryo-scar with surprisingly excellent quality. The histological examination of the biopsies showed PKH26-positive cells within the areas which were positive in the MRI in contrast to the control biopsies. Conclusion: Immunomagnetic separation of MSC by specific aptamers linked to magnetic particles is feasible, effective and combines a specific separation and labeling technique to a &apos

  16. Dedifferentiated giant-cell tumor of bone with an undifferentiated round cell mesenchymal component

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    Eréndira G. Estrada-Villaseñor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The dedifferentiated giant-cell tumor of the bone is a very rare variant of the giant-cell tumor (GCT. We report the clinical, radiographic and histological findings of a dedifferentiated GCT in which the dedifferentiated component consisted of small round cells. We also comment on previously reported cases of dedifferentiated GCT, discuss the clinical implications of this dual histology, and analyze the information published about the coexistence of similar genetic abnormalities in GCT and small round cell tumors of the bone.

  17. Everolimus Alleviates Obstructive Hydrocephalus due to Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moavero, Romina; Carai, Andrea; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Marciano, Sara; Graziola, Federica; Vigevano, Federico; Curatolo, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) are low-grade tumors affecting up to 20% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Early neurosurgical resection has been the only standard treatment until few years ago when a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of TSC led to the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Surgical resection of SEGAs is still considered as the first line treatment in individuals with symptomatic hydrocephalus and intratumoral hemorrhage. We describe four patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic hydrocephalus who were successfully treated with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. We collected the clinical data of four consecutive patients presenting with symptomatic or asymptomatic hydrocephalus due to a growth of subependymal giant cell atrocytomas and who could not undergo surgery for different reasons. All patients experienced a clinically significant response to everolimus and an early shrinkage of the SEGA with improvement in ventricular dilatation. Everolimus was well tolerated by all individuals. Our clinical series demonstrate a possible expanding indication for mTOR inhibition in TSC, which can be considered in patients with asymptomatic hydrocephalus or even when the symptoms already appeared. It offers a significant therapeutic alternative to individuals that once would have undergone immediate surgery. Everolimus might also allow postponement of a neurosurgical resection, making it elective with an overall lower risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2005-01-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear β-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear β-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3β activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death

  19. Histological Regression of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Following RANK Ligand Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Dietrich MD, PhD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung metastases are a rare complication of giant cell tumors of bone. We herein describe an interesting case of histological regression and size reduction of lung metastases originating from a primary giant cell tumor of bone in response to the RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab.

  20. [Effects of Chinese herbal compound for supplementing qi and activating blood circulation on actin, Cx43 expressions and gap junctional intercellular communication functions of myocardial cells in patients with Coxsackie virus B 3 viral myocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-xue; He, Wei; Gu, Ping

    2010-08-01

    To observe the effect of Chinese herbal compound for supplementing qi and activating blood circulation (CHC) on the gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) function of myocardial cells in patients with Coxsackie virus B 3 (CVB3) viral myocarditis. Expressions of actin and connexin43 (Cx43) in myocardial cells of patients arranged in three groups (the normal control group, the viral infected group and the CHC treated group) were detected by immunohistochemical method; the fluorescence photobleaching recovery rate of cells was detected by laser scanning confocal microscope. As compared with the viral infected group, the expressions of actin and Cx43 were increased and the GJIC function was improved in the CHC treated group. CHC could antagonize viral injury on skeleton protein, and repair the structure of gap junction channel to improve the GJIC function of myocardial cells after being attacked by CVB3.

  1. Giant kidney worms in a patient with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Jemima; Lombardo, Lindsay; Janda, William M; Hollowell, Courtney M P

    2016-03-07

    Dioctophyma renale (D. renale), or giant kidney worms, are the largest nematodes that infect mammals. Approximately 20 cases of human infection have been reported. We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a recent history of unintentional weight loss and painless haematuria, passing elongated erythematous tissue via his urethra. CT revealed a left renal mass with pulmonary nodules and hepatic lesions. On microscopy, the erythematous tissue passed was identified as D. renale. On subsequent renal biopsy, pathology was consistent with renal cell carcinoma. This is the first reported case of concomitant D. renale infection and renal cell carcinoma, and the second reported case of D. renale infection of the left kidney alone. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE VERTEBRA SIMULATING VERTEBRA PLANA

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    B. Aalami-Harandi

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of g iant cell tumor of t he vertebra simulat ing vert ebra plana was reported . t he d i agnos i s o f t he vertebra plana should not be confirmed by t he history of the patient and radiologica l manifestation alone . it can onlybe confirmed by biopsy ."nBone l esions of the spine i s one of the most di fficul t problems t o diagnosis and t r eat . Spinal tumors a r e either primary or metastatic . Ilos t bone tumors of the spine i n t he first two decade of l i f e are primary and benign;where as a majority of the bone lesions in old people ar e me tast at1,c and rna I 1' 9n ant . 5- 11 The rnaI1' 9~ant Lee Ss 1i 0ns 0f t h e Sp1' - ne can wi t hout very great risk be excl uded f r om diagnostic considerati on in chi ldren and adoles cence (She r r a r d . 1969 12 . From 34 casps of bone l esions of the spine and the pelvis i n the f irst two decade of l i f e, reported by Thommes on and 1 3 , Paulsen (1967 ni ne were histiochtosis X, two anevr ysma l bone cyst,nine Ewi ng sar coma , two reticul um cell sar c ~ma. None were g i ant cel l tumor ."nGiant cell tumor of the spine is r a re; mo s t of t he report ed cases were in t he sacrum. J affe (1958 17repor t ed only two c ases of giant cell t umo r, one of which o c c ur r e d in the por t e d s a c r um.Of the 218 cases of the g i an t ce l l tumor re6 by Goldenbe rg and Carnpbell( 1970 there were 13 cases of g i ant c e l l tumor o f the ver t ebra , one in the cervical r e g i o n , o ne in the l umbar spi ne , and e l e ven in t he sacrum. Of '08 giant ce l l t umors studied by Coley( 19604 ,one was i n the lumba r ver t ebra and one in the s a c rum. al In a r e view of 413 tumors i nc l uding t he spine(Cohen et 3 1964 tr.ere were sixteen cases o f g i ant c e l l tumor ,one  n the c e r vica l spine , one in the l umbar r e gion and f ourte61 n the sacrum. I n thi s a r t i c l e we are going to report a case of giant cel l t umor of the s i xth thor a ci

  3. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish

    2007-04-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function.Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone graft or cement to pack the defect and the management of recurrent lesions are some of the issues that offer topics for eternal debate.Current literature suggests that intralesional curettage strikes the best balance between controlling disease and preserving optimum function in the majority of the cases though there may be occasions where the extent of the disease mandates resection to ensure adequate disease clearance.An accompanying treatment algorithm helps outline the management strategy in GCT.

  4. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Ajay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function. Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone graft or cement to pack the defect and the management of recurrent lesions are some of the issues that offer topics for eternal debate. Current literature suggests that intralesional curettage strikes the best balance between controlling disease and preserving optimum function in the majority of the cases though there may be occasions where the extent of the disease mandates resection to ensure adequate disease clearance. An accompanying treatment algorithm helps outline the management strategy in GCT.

  5. Unusual intraconal localization of orbital giant cell angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Meryem Altin; Ugurlu, Seyda Karadeniz; Cakalagaoglu, Fulya

    2018-01-01

    Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA) is a recently reported rare soft-tissue tumor that can develop in various sites including orbit. Orbital GCAs were mainly located in the eyelid or extraconal regions such as lacrimal gland and conjunctiva. We report an atypical case of a GCA arising in the intraconal area of the orbit in a 65-year-old male patient. The tumor was excised in total by lateral orbitotomy. Histological and immunohistochemical features were consistent with the diagnosis of GCA. No recurrence was observed during the follow-up of over 2 years. GCA is a rare tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraconal orbital tumors. Complete surgical removal is the current optimal treatment option.

  6. Unusual intraconal localization of orbital giant cell angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Altin Ekin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA is a recently reported rare soft-tissue tumor that can develop in various sites including orbit. Orbital GCAs were mainly located in the eyelid or extraconal regions such as lacrimal gland and conjunctiva. We report an atypical case of a GCA arising in the intraconal area of the orbit in a 65-year-old male patient. The tumor was excised in total by lateral orbitotomy. Histological and immunohistochemical features were consistent with the diagnosis of GCA. No recurrence was observed during the follow-up of over 2 years. GCA is a rare tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraconal orbital tumors. Complete surgical removal is the current optimal treatment option.

  7. Giant Cell Fibroma of the Tongue: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokh Farhadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell fibroma of the tongue is a rare benign fibrous tumor of connective tissues in the oral cavity, very few of which have been reported. This benign neoplasm has a predilection for the gingiva and .usually occurs in women under 30. Since this tumor is clinically, and especially histopathologically, placed in the differential diagnosis list of benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors, its proper diagnosis is of great significance because widespread and unnecessary surgeries are avoided as a result. The aim of the present report is to present a case of the tumor in the tongue of a 65-year-old man. The fibroma is a benign fibrous tumor of connective tissues which is microscopically classified in differential diagnosis with other soft tissue tumors since its proper diagnosis prevents from extensive and unnecessary surgeries on the patient.

  8. Nonepiphyseal Giant Cell Tumor of the Rib: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippocrates Moschouris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 32-year-old female patient with a giant cell tumor originating in the middle part of the left 10th rib is presented. On X-rays and CT, the tumor caused a well-defined osteolysis with nonsclerotic borders. On MRI, it exhibited intermediate signal intensity on T1 sequences and central high signal and peripheral intermediate signal on T2 sequences. On contrast-enhanced MR images both central and peripheral-periosteal enhancement was noted. Thanks to its small size ( cm, the lesion was easily resected en bloc with a part of the affected rib. The patient is free of recurrence for 3 years after the operation.

  9. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  10. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor of the posterior arch of C1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Koplin, Stephanie A.; Salamat, M.S.; Hafez, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor, also called pigmented villonodular synovitis, is a disease typically of the joints and which uncommonly involves the spine. We present a case of a mass of the posterior C1 arch which eroded bone and did not arise from the facet joint. The imaging findings of spinal tenosynovial giant cell tumor will be reviewed as well as the imaging findings in this case, where tenosynovial giant cell tumor arose presumably within a small bursa. One's understanding of the imaging characteristics can lead to the correct diagnosis and avoid an unnecessary work-up. (orig.)

  11. Immunopathological Features of Canine Myocarditis Associated with Leishmania infantum Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Costagliola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis associated with infectious diseases may occur in dogs, including those caused by the protozoa Neospora caninum, Trypanosoma cruzi, Babesia canis, and Hepatozoon canis. However, although cardiac disease due to Leishmania infection has also been documented, the immunopathological features of myocarditis have not been reported so far. The aim of this study was to examine the types of cellular infiltrates and expression of MHC classes I and II in myocardial samples obtained at necropsy from 15 dogs with an established intravitam diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Pathological features of myocardium were characterized by hyaline degeneration of cardiomyocytes, necrosis, and infiltration of mononuclear inflammatory cells consisting of lymphocytes and macrophages, sometimes with perivascular pattern; fibrosis was also present in various degrees. Immunophenotyping of inflammatory cells was performed by immunohistochemistry on cryostat sections obtained from the heart of the infected dogs. The predominant leukocyte population was CD8+ with a fewer number of CD4+ cells. Many cardiomyocytes expressed MHC classes I and II on the sarcolemma. Leishmania amastigote forms were not detected within macrophages or any other cell of the examined samples. Our study provided evidence that myocarditis in canine visceral leishmaniasis might be related to immunological alterations associated with Leishmania infection.

  12. Photoinduced Giant Dielectric Constant in Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Perez, Emilio J; Sanchez, Rafael S; Badia, Laura; Garcia-Belmonte, Germá; Kang, Yong Soo; Mora-Sero, Ivan; Bisquert, Juan

    2014-07-03

    Organic-inorganic lead trihalide perovskites have emerged as an outstanding photovoltaic material that demonstrated a high 17.9% conversion efficiency of sunlight to electricity in a short time. We have found a giant dielectric constant (GDC) phenomenon in these materials consisting on a low frequency dielectric constant in the dark of the order of ε0 = 1000. We also found an unprecedented behavior in which ε0 further increases under illumination or by charge injection at applied bias. We observe that ε0 increases nearly linearly with the illumination intensity up to an additional factor 1000 under 1 sun. Measurement of a variety of samples of different morphologies, compositions, and different types of contacts shows that the GDC is an intrinsic property of MAPbX3 (MA = CH3NH3(+)). We hypothesize that the large dielectric response is induced by structural fluctuations. Photoinduced carriers modify the local unit cell equilibrium and change the polarizability, assisted by the freedom of rotation of MA. The study opens a way for the understanding of a key aspect of the photovoltaic operation of high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  13. Giant cell lesion of the jaw as a presenting feature of Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Bridget P; Patel, Maya

    2018-05-30

    This is a case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with a left jaw mass which was resected and found to be a giant cell granuloma of the mandible. Her history and physical examination were suggestive for Noonan syndrome which was confirmed with genetic testing and the finding of a PTPN11 gene mutation which has rarely been associated with giant cell lesions of the jaw. Given her particular genetic mutation and the presence of a giant cell lesion, we present a case of Noonan-like/multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and peripheral giant cell granuloma in a patient with neurofibromatosis 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Dmitry José de Santana; Carvalho, Sérgio Henrique Gonçalves de; Araújo, José Cadmo Wanderley Peregrino de; Carvalho, Marianne de Vasconcelos; Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas da

    2017-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old mulatto female patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 who presented with facial asymmetry. The patient had two lesions: florid cemento-osseous dysplasia associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma. She was referred for surgical treatment of the peripheral giant cell granuloma and the florid cemento-osseous dysplasia was treated conservatively by a multidisciplinary team. So far, no changes have been observed in the patient's clinical status. We observed no recurrence of peripheral giant cell granuloma. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 associated with a giant cell lesion and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  15. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and peripheral giant cell granuloma in a patient with neurofibromatosis 1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Dmitry José de Santana; de Carvalho, Sérgio Henrique Gonçalves; de Araújo Filho, José Cadmo Wanderley Peregrino; Carvalho, Marianne de Vasconcelos; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas

    2017-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old mulatto female patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 who presented with facial asymmetry. The patient had two lesions: florid cemento-osseous dysplasia associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma. She was referred for surgical treatment of the peripheral giant cell granuloma and the florid cemento-osseous dysplasia was treated conservatively by a multidisciplinary team. So far, no changes have been observed in the patient's clinical status. We observed no recurrence of peripheral giant cell granuloma. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of a patient with neurofibromatosis Type 1 associated with a giant cell lesion and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia. PMID:28538890

  16. Giant cell tumour of the first cuneiform: Case study

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    J.A. Enríquez-Castro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumours (GCT are usually benign, locally aggressive tumours. They tend to occur in long bones and rarely in small bones, with an incidence rate is 1.2–2.4% in the bones of the foot. The objective is to present a unique case in the literature of a GCT that only affected the first cuneiform. We present the case of a 35-year-old male patient seen at Hospital General de México (HGM with seven months history of pain and increased volume in the medial region of the right foot, with X-ray and MRI images consistent with GCT in first cuneiform of the right foot. The excisional biopsy confirmed GCT. The definitive treatment consisted of curettage, cryotherapy with nitrogen and heterologous bone graft placement. Evolution was satisfactory, with no pain, no volume increase, normal gait and radiographic bone graft integration. Follow-up was at 24 months. Resumen: El tumor de células gigantes (TCG es un tumor generalmente benigno y localmente agresivo. Se presenta más en huesos largos y raramente en huesos pequeños, su incidencia es de 1.2 al 2.4% en los huesos del pie. El objetivo es la presentación de un caso único en la literatura, de un TCG que sólo lesiona la primera cuña. Masculino de 35 años de edad, visto en el Hospital General de México (HGM con un padecimiento de 7 meses de evolución, caracterizado por dolor y aumento de volumen en la región medial del pie derecho, con imágenes radiológicas y de RMN compatibles con TCG en cuña del pie derecho, se le realizó biopsia excisional, la cual reportó TCG. El tratamiento definitivo consistió en curetaje, crioterapia con nitrógeno y colocación de injerto óseo heterólogo. Presentó una evolución satisfactoria, sin dolor, sin aumento de volumen, con marcha normal, y radiográficamente con integración de injerto óseo. Seguimiento de 24 meses. Keywords: Giant cell tumour (GCT, First cuneiform, Cryotherapy, Palabras clave: Tumor de células gigantes (TCG, Primera cu

  17. TRAP-Positive Multinucleated Giant Cells Are Foreign Body Giant Cells Rather Than Osteoclasts: Results From a Split-Mouth Study in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Jonas; Kubesch, Alica; Korzinskas, Tadas; Barbeck, Mike; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert A; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-12-01

    This study compared the material-specific tissue response to the synthetic, hydroxyapatite-based bone substitute material NanoBone (NB) with that of the xenogeneic, bovine-based bone substitute material Bio-Oss (BO). The sinus cavities of 14 human patients were augmented with NB and BO in a split-mouth design. Six months after augmentation, bone biopsies were extracted for histological and histomorphometric investigation prior to dental implant insertion. The following were evaluated: the cellular inflammatory pattern, the induction of multinucleated giant cells, vascularization, the relative amounts of newly formed bone, connective tissue, and the remaining bone substitute material. NB granules were well integrated in the peri-implant tissue and were surrounded by newly formed bone tissue. Multinucleated giant cells were visible on the surfaces of the remaining granules. BO granules were integrated into the newly formed bone tissue, which originated from active osteoblasts on their surface. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significantly higher number of multinucleated giant cells and blood vessels in the NB group compared to the BO group. No statistical differences were observed in regard to connective tissue, remaining bone substitute, and newly formed bone. The results of this study highlight the different cellular reactions to synthetic and xenogeneic bone substitute materials. The significantly higher number of multinucleated giant cells within the NB implantation bed seems to have no effect on its biodegradation. Accordingly, the multinucleated giant cells observed within the NB implantation bed have characteristics more similar to those of foreign body giant cells than to those of osteoclasts.

  18. Case report: Noonan-like multiple central giant cell granuloma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Natalie; Alexander, Stanley; Ruggiero, Salvatore; Parameswaran, Ashish; Russo, Antonino; Ferguson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to: summarize the care of a child between the ages of 12 to 16 years old born with Noonan-like central giant cell syndrome and unrelated common variable immune deficiency; provide information on the dental management of patients with Noonan's syndrome; and present a brief discussion of the recent associated genetic findings. A review of the common features of Noonan syndrome and Noonan-like central giant cell syndrome is also provided.

  19. Skin metastasis from conventional giant cell tumor of bone: conceptual significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, W.; Barrett, T.; Frassica, F.; McCarthy, E.

    2002-01-01

    A conventional giant cell tumor of the proximal femur recurred twice locally and developed pulmonary nodules. The lung lesions were felt to be an example of ''benign'' metastases. Eight months after the initial presentation, the patient developed a single skin nodule on the contralateral leg. Histologic features of the skin nodule showed conventional giant cell tumor identical to the bone lesion. This nodule is a manifestation of arterial metastasis typical of any malignant tumor and seemingly contradicts the concept of ''benign '' metastasis. (orig.)

  20. Multinucleated Giant Cancer Cells Produced in Response to Ionizing Radiation Retain Viability and Replicate Their Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmik Mirzayans

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss of wild-type p53 function is widely accepted to be permissive for the development of multinucleated giant cells. However, whether therapy-induced multinucleation is associated with cancer cell death or survival remains controversial. Herein, we demonstrate that exposure of p53-deficient or p21WAF1 (p21-deficient solid tumor-derived cell lines to ionizing radiation (between 2 and 8 Gy results in the development of multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent to the culture dish for long times post-irradiation. Somewhat surprisingly, single-cell observations revealed that virtually all multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent for the duration of the experiments (up to three weeks post-irradiation retain viability and metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT, and the majority (>60% exhibit DNA synthesis. We further report that treatment of multinucleated giant cells with pharmacological activators of apoptosis (e.g., sodium salicylate triggers their demise. Our observations reinforce the notion that radiation-induced multinucleation may reflect a survival mechanism for p53/p21-deficient cancer cells. With respect to evaluating radiosensitivity, our observations underscore the importance of single-cell experimental approaches (e.g., single-cell MTT as the creation of viable multinucleated giant cells complicates the interpretation of the experimental data obtained by commonly-used multi-well plate colorimetric assays.

  1. Two cases of breast carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells: Are the osteoclastic giant cells pro-tumoural differentiation of macrophages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishido-Hara Yukiko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells (OGCs is characterized by multinucleated OGCs, and usually displays inflammatory hypervascular stroma. OGCs may derive from tumor-associated macrophages, but their nature remains controversial. We report two cases, in which OGCs appear in common microenvironment despite different tumoural histology. A 44-year-old woman (Case 1 had OGCs accompanying invasive ductal carcinoma, and an 83-year-old woman (Case 2 with carcinosarcoma. Immunohistochemically, in both cases, tumoural and non-tumoural cells strongly expressed VEGF and MMP12, which promote macrophage migration and angiogenesis. The Chalkley count on CD-31-stained sections revealed elevated angiogenesis in both cases. The OGCs expressed bone-osteoclast markers (MMP9, TRAP, cathepsin K and a histiocyte marker (CD68, but not an MHC class II antigen, HLA-DR. The results indicate a pathogenesis: regardless of tumoural histology, OGCs derive from macrophages, likely in response to hypervascular microenvironments with secretion of common cytokines. The OGCs have acquired bone-osteoclast-like characteristics, but lost antigen presentation abilities as an anti-cancer defense. Appearance of OGCs may not be anti-tumoural immunological reactions, but rather pro-tumoural differentiation of macrophage responding to hypervascular microenvironments induced by breast cancer.

  2. GIANT CELL-RICH LESIONS OF BONE AND JOINTS: A ONE YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Nithisa H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Giant cell-rich lesions constitute a group of biologically and morphologically diverse bone and joint tumours. The common feature is presence of numerous multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. However, they differ from each other by in terms of clinical and radiographic features and in many cases by their distinct morphological features. METHODS All the bone and joint specimens with giant cell-rich lesions received in the period of one year were studied along with clinical and radiological data available. Gross and microscopic findings were noted. RESULTS In a period of one year, 10 cases of giant cell-rich lesions of bone and joints have been studied, which were and correlated with clinical and radiological findings. Five were lesions from bone and two were from joints, which are chondroblastoma, chondromyxoid fibroma, osteoclastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, pigmented villonodular synovitis, giant cell lesion of tendon sheath, and tendinous xanthoma. CONCLUSION In the present study, variety of giant cell lesions of bone and joints are studied. Of which, the mean age in young patients being 20 years and in elderly patients being 50 years. The common site being lower end of femur.

  3. Giant cell arteritis complicated by acute pancreatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne Deepthi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe a case of giant cell arteritis in a woman who was treated with high-dose systemic corticosteroids and subsequently developed acute pancreatitis. Case presentation A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with four weeks of progressive headache and scalp tenderness. One day before ophthalmology assessment, she had experienced visual obscurations in both eyes. Her visual acuity was 6/9 in both eyes, with a right afferent pupillary defect and right swollen optic nerve. She was diagnosed as having temporal arteritis and was urgently treated with high-dose pulsed intravenous and oral corticosteroids. Her previous diet-controlled diabetes needed insulin and oral hyperglycaemic therapy to control erratic blood sugars. On day 8 of treatment with steroids, she became unwell with epigastric pain and vomiting. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and was treated conservatively. Conclusion Acute pancreatitis, a potentially life-threatening condition, is a rare but important side effect of systemic corticosteroids.

  4. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  5. Management of acute myocarditis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Q.; Haque, A.; Hasan, B.S.

    2013-01-01

    Myocarditis is defined as the inflammation of the myocardium. It continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the paediatric population and is the commonest cause of cardiac failure in a healthy child. Some studies estimate the incidence of myocarditis to be around 1 per 100000. PubMed search was performed using the term myocarditis. The search was limited to age 0-19 years. A total of 50 articles were identified between 1966 to date and reviewed. Myocarditis is a challenging diagnosis to make on clinical grounds and requires high index of suspicion. The cornerstone of treatment remains supportive though therapeutic modalities such as immunosuppressive and intravenous immunoglobulin therapies are being studied extensively. The overall prognosis of the disease is good with survival rates up to 80%. (author)

  6. Modern imaging of myocarditis. Possibilities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baessler, B.; Maintz, D.; Bunck, A.C. [University Hospital of Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Koeln Univ. (Germany). Radiology; Schmidt, M. [University Hospital of Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Luecke, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig, Herzzentrum Leipzig GmbH (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Blazek, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig, Herzzentrum Leipzig GmbH (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine/Cardiology; Ou, P. [Universite Paris Diderot (France). Dept. of Cardiovascular Imaging

    2016-10-15

    Myocarditis is known as the chameleon of cardiac diseases. The symptoms and the course of disease vary greatly so that it is often challenging to establish a diagnosis. Early and accurate diagnosis is of utmost importance, since myocarditis is one of the leading causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and represents an important precursor to dilated cardiomyopathy. Due to the constraints of the routinely used diagnostic approach, including clinical history and examination, laboratory testing, and electrocardiogram, different imaging modalities have emerged over the last decades as contributors to the noninvasive diagnosis of myocarditis. With this interdisciplinary review we would like to present the current state-of-the-art imaging of myocarditis across all available imaging modalities (i.e., echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, cardiac computed tomography, and nuclear medicine). Furthermore, we present novel imaging techniques that might become useful in the near future for easier and more accurate diagnosis of this highly relevant disease.

  7. Can p63 serve as a biomarker for giant cell tumor of bone? A Moroccan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammas Nawal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multinucleated giant cell-containing tumors and pseudotumors of bone represent a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant lesions. Differential diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in instances of limited sampling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the P63 in the positive and differential diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone. Methods This study includes 48 giant cell-containing tumors and pseudotumors of bone. P63 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Data analysis was performed using Epi-info software and SPSS software package (version 17. Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed a P63 nuclear expression in all giant cell tumors of bone, in 50% of osteoid osteomas, 40% of aneurysmal bone cysts, 37.5% of osteoblastomas, 33.3% of chondromyxoide fibromas, 25% of non ossifiant fibromas and 8.3% of osteosarcomas. Only one case of chondroblastoma was included in this series and expressed p63. No P63 immunoreactivity was detected in any of the cases of central giant cell granulomas or langerhans cells histiocytosis. The sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV of P63 immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone were 100%. The specificity and positive predictive value (PPV were 74.42% and 59.26% respectively. Conclusions This study found not only that GCTOB expresses the P63 but it also shows that this protein may serve as a biomarker for the differential diagnosis between two morphologically similar lesions particularly in instances of limited sampling. Indeed, P63 expression seems to differentiate between giant cell tumor of bone and central giant cell granuloma since the latter does not express P63. Other benign and malignant giant cell-containing lesions express P63, decreasing its specificity as a diagnostic marker, but a strong staining was seen, except a case of chondroblastoma, only in giant cell tumor of bone. Clinical and radiological

  8. Myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes a mild rash, usually in children (fifth disease); and herpes simplex virus. Gastrointestinal infections (echoviruses), mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus) and German measles (rubella) also can cause ...

  9. [Giant-cell arteritis: a descriptive study in southwestern Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Romero, J M; Magro Ledesma, D; Ramos Salado, J L; Bureo Dacal, J C; de Dios Arrebola García, J; Bureo Dacal, P; Pérez Miranda, M

    2000-02-01

    To study the clinical and laboratory features of a series of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) or temporal arteritis in south-western Spain (Extremadura). Retrospective study of 25 patients with GCA diagnosed by temporal artery biopsy between 1990 and 1998. Nine patients were males and 16 (64%) females. Sixteen cases (64%) presented polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Other clinical findings were: fever/febricula (64%), constitutional syndrome (64%), new headache (96%), visual symptoms (48%), jaw claudication (17%) and abnormal temporal arteries (17%). All patients had an ESR of more than 50 mm/hour and a raised C-reactive protein. Thirteen patients (52%) had anemia (hemoglobin level < 12 g/dl). Eleven cases (44%) presented a platelet count higher than 400,000/mm3. Four patients (16%) had an elevated AST and/or ALT levels and 8 patients (32%) had an elevated GGT and/or alkaline phosphatase levels. In patients with PMR, there was a higher frequency of constitutional syndrome (81 vs 33%, p = 0.02). In females, there was a higher frequency of anemia (75 vs 11%, p < 0.01), platelet count higher than 400,000/mm3 (75 vs 0%, p < 0.01) and elevated AST and/or ALT (25 vs 0%, p < 0.01) and elevated GGT and/or alkaline phosphatase (50 vs 0%, p < 0.01) levels. The clinical and laboratory features of GCA in our series of patients in south-western Spain are similar to that described in other spanish populations, with the exception of a slightly higher frequency of PMR and a lower frequency of jaw claudication and abnormal temporal arteries. In our study, the clinical picture of GCA was more severe in patients with PMR and in females.

  10. Peritumoral bone marrow edema accompanying benign giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Ji Yong; Gi, Won Hee; Sung, Mi Suk; Lee, Jae Mun; Shin, Kyung Sub

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of peritumoral bone marrow(BM) edema accompanying benign giant cell tumor(GCT) of the appendicular bone by magnetic resonance(MR) imaging and to correlate MRI findings with those of plain radiography and bone scintigraphy. Eighteen cases of pathologically proven benign GCT of the appendicular bone were retrospectively analyzed using MR images, plain radiographs and bone scintigrams. A plain radiography was available in 15 cases, and a scintigram in six. Marrow edema was defined as peritumoral signal changes which were of homogeneous intermediate or low signal intensity(SI) onT1WI and high SI on T2WI, relative to the SI of normal BM, and homogeneous enhancement on Gd-DTPA -enhanced T1WI. The transition zone, sclerotic margin and aggressiveness of the lesion were assessed on the basis of plain radiographs. BM edema seen on MR images was correlated with plain radiographic and scintigraphic findings. 1. Peritumoral BM edema was seen on MR images in 10 of 18 cases (55.5%). 2. In 8 of 15 cases for which plain radiographs were available, MR imaging revealed BM edema. In six of these eight, transition zone was wide, while in two it was narrow. Six of seven patients without marrow edema showed a wide transition zone, and in one this was narrow. There was significant correlation between BM edema shown by MR imaging and the transition zone seen on plain radiographs (x 2 , p<0.05). But the aggressiveness shown by plain radiographs correlated only marginally while the presence of sclerotic rim did not correlate. 3. All six cases for which a bone scintigram was available showed an extended uptake pattern. In five of the six, MR imaging revealed edema. Peritumoral BM edema was frequently seen (55.5%) in the GCTs of appendicular bone; it was more often shown in association with a wide transition zone by plain radiographs.=20

  11. Giant basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid: a case history | Fetohi | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid: a case history. ... Abstract. Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer and rare, aggressive forms of basal cell ... She died 09 months after the end of irradiation in Intensive care unit due to septic shock.

  12. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important

  13. Omental leiomyosarcoma with unusual giant cells in a Beagle dog - Short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Toyoshima, Megumi; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Goryo, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    A 10-year-old castrated male Beagle dog was presented with a 2-month history of intermittent vomiting and abdominal pain. The dog was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Iwate University for further evaluation, and a splenic tumour was suspected on the basis of ultrasonography and computed tomography. Surgery identified a large, solid, light-pink mass on the greater omentum with blood-coloured ascites in the abdominal cavity, and resection was performed. Microscopically, the mass comprised spindle-shaped tumour cells and scattered osteoclast-like giant cells. Most spindle-shaped cells were positive for vimentin, desmin, and smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), whereas osteoclast-like giant cells were positive only for vimentin. On the basis of histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of leiomyosarcoma associated with osteoclast-like giant cells developing from the greater omentum in a dog.

  14. Ultrastructural findings in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and focal lymphocytic thyroiditis with reference to giant cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, H; Hedinger, C E

    1982-09-01

    Ultrastructural findings in two cases of Hashimoto's disease and two cases of focal lymphocytic thyroiditis are reported. Stimulated thyrocytes, oncocytes and degenerating thyrocytes were observed in all cases. Multinucleated thyrocytes and epithelial pseudogiant cells were identified in Hashimoto's disease only. Infiltrating lymphocytes, plasma cells, monocytes and macrophages were present in all cases. The ultrastructure of germinal centres was similar to that seen in lymphatic organs. Giant cells of both intra- and extrafollicular localization were seen in Hashimoto's disease. Most of the giant cells were macrophage-derived. Two different ways of giant cell formation were identified: besides the familiar dissolution of plasma membranes of adjacent macrophages, another mechanism of fusion was observed. At sites of contact, peculiar membrane structures were developed and disintegration of plasma membranes occurred in parts adjacent to these structures. These are not identical to desmosomes and are different from Langerhans' granules. They probably represent special organelles for the initiation of cellular fusion.

  15. Biophysical characterisation of electrofused giant HEK293-cells as a novel electrophysiological expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, D.; Terpitz, U.; Zhou, A.; Reuss, R.; Mueller, K.; Sukhorukov, V.L.; Gessner, P.; Nagel, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Bamberg, E.

    2006-01-01

    Giant HEK293 cells of 30-65 μm in diameter were produced by three-dimensional multi-cell electrofusion in 75 mOsm sorbitol media. These strong hypotonic conditions facilitated fusion because of the spherical shape and smooth membrane surface of the swollen cells. A regulatory volume decrease (RVD), as observed at higher osmolalities, did not occur at 75 mOsm. In contrast to field-treated, but unfused cells, the increase in volume induced by hypotonic shock was only partly reversible in the case of fused giant cells after their transfer into isotonic medium. The large size of the electrofused cells allowed the study of their electrophysiological properties by application of both whole-cell and giant excised patch-clamp techniques. Recordings on giant cells yielded a value of 1.1 ± 0.1 μF/cm 2 for the area-specific membrane capacitance. This value was consistent with that of the parental cells. The area-specific conductivity of giant cells (diameter > 50 μm) was found to be between 12.8 and 16.1 μS/cm 2 , which is in the range of that of the parental cells. Measurements with patch-pipettes containing fluorescein showed uniform dye uptake in the whole-cell configuration, but not in the cell-attached configuration. The diffusion-controlled uniform uptake of the dye into the cell interior excludes internal compartmentalisation. The finding of a homogeneous fusion was also supported by expression of the yellow fluorescent protein YFP (as part of the fusion-protein ChR2-YFP) in giant cells since no plasma-membrane bound YFP-mediated fluorescence was detected in the interior of the electrofused cells. Functional expression and the electrophysiological characterisation of the light-activated cation channel Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) yielded similar results as for parental cells. Most importantly, the giant cells exhibited a comparable expression density of the channel protein in the plasma membrane as observed in parental cells. This demonstrates that electrofused cells

  16. Giant Cell Fibroma of Tongue: Understanding the Nature of an Unusual Histopathological Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjari Ghate Sonalika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell fibroma (GCF is a rare case with unique histopathology. It belongs to the broad category of fibrous hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity. It is often mistaken with fibroma and papilloma due to its clinical resemblance. Only its peculiar histopathological features help us to distinguish it from them. The origin of the giant cell is still controversial. Data available is very sparse to predict the exact behavior. Hence, we report a case of GCF of tongue in a 19-year-old male. Special emphasis is given to understand the basic process of development of the lesion, nature of giant cells, and also the need for formation of these peculiar cells. Briefly, the differential diagnosis for GCF is tabulated.

  17. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Currently, giant cell arteritis (GCA) is primarily treated with corticosteroids or immunomodulating agents, but there is interest in identifying other noncorticosteroid alternatives. Similarities exist in the injury pathways between GCA and atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II is a vasoactive......, internal elastic lamina degeneration, and band-shaped infiltrates of inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, histocytes, and multinucleated giant cells. AT(1) receptor staining was primarily observed in the medial layer of the temporal arteries and was higher in the patients with GCA than in the control...

  18. Making it big : how characean algae use cytoplasmic streaming to enhance transport in giant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meent, Jan Willem van de

    2010-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable variation in sizes, yet cell sizes are surprisingly similar across species, typically ranging from 10 μm to 100 μm. A striking exception are the giant cells of the algal weed Chara, which can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. A circulation known as cytoplasmic

  19. Giant cell tumor of the rib: Two cases of F-18 FDG PET/CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Lim; Yoo, Le Ryung; Lee, Yeong Joo; Jung, Chan Kwon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sonya Young Ju [Molecular Imaging Program, Dept. of Radiology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We report two cases of giant cell tumor arising from the rib and their F-18 FDG PET/CT findings. The two patients complained of chest wall pain, and large lobulated soft tissue masses with intense FDG uptake were seen on F-18 FDG PET/CT. A malignant tumor such as osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma was suspected due to the large size of the mass, bony destruction, and intense FDG uptake. En bloc resection was performed and final pathologic results revealed giant cell tumor of the rib. Giant cell tumor of the rib is very rare, and larger lesions with high FDG uptake can be misdiagnosed as an intrathoracic malignancy arising from the rib, pleura, or chest wall.

  20. Nonsyndromic Synchronous Multifocal Central Giant Cell Granulomas of the Maxillofacial Region: Report of a Case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Munde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is a benign proliferation of fibroblasts and multinucleated giant cells that almost exclusively occurs in the jaws. It commonly occurs in young adults showing a female predilection in the anterior mandible. Multifocal CGCGs in maxillofacial region are very rare and suggestive of systemic diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, an inherited syndrome such as Noonan-like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome or other disorders. Only 10 cases of multifocal CGCGs in the maxillofacial region without any concomitant systemic disease have been reported in the English literature. Here, we report an unusual case of 36 year-old female presented with non-syndromic synchronous, multifocal CGCGs in the left posterior mandible and left posterior maxilla without any concomitant systemic disease. Relevant literature is reviewed and the incidence, clinical features, radiological features, differential diagnosis and management of CGCGs are discussed.

  1. Giant kidney worms in a patient with renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehn, Jemima; Lombardo, Lindsay; Janda, William M; Hollowell, Courtney M P

    2016-01-01

    Dioctophyma renale (D. renale), or giant kidney worms, are the largest nematodes that infect mammals. Approximately 20 cases of human infection have been reported. We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a recent history of unintentional weight loss and painless haematuria, passing elongated erythematous tissue via his urethra. CT revealed a left renal mass with pulmonary nodules and hepatic lesions. On microscopy, the erythematous tissue passed was identified as D. renale. On subsequent ...

  2. Central giant cell lesion of the mandible in a 2-year old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Takaaki; Sue, Mikiko; Okada, Yasuo; Kanri, Yoriaki; Ono, Junya; Ogura, Ichiro [The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata, Niigata (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    Central giant cell lesions are rare, benign, osteolytic, pseudocystic, solitary, localized lesions that are common in the skeletal structure, but less so in the maxillofacial region. Furthermore, to perform panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography, it is necessary to prepare patients properly and to position their heads carefully. However, this can be difficult in pediatric patients, who may be anxious. In this report, we describe the case of a central giant cell lesion of the mandible in a 2-year-old girl that was evaluated with multidetector computed tomography.

  3. Giant cell tumor in long bones: the significance of marginal sclerosis for the differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun

    1993-01-01

    Plain radiographs of thirty nine patients with giant cell tumor of long bone and CT scans of twenty patients among the thirty patients were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the frequency and significance of sclerosis of the tumor margin. The sclerosis of the tumor margin was observed on plain radiographs in thirteen patients(33.3%) and they were located either on epiphyseal or on both epiphyseal or metaphyseal portion of the tumor. The authors concluded that the giant cell tumor should not be excluded from the differential entities even though the tumor has the marginal sclerosis

  4. Giant cell tumor of the metatarsal bone: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites Filho, Paulo R.; Escuissato, Dante L.; Gasparetto, Taisa P. Davaus; Sakamoto, Danielle; Ioshii, Sergio; Marchiori, Edson

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare neoplasm and account for 5% of all primary bone tumors. It is common in the knee and wrist, but rare in the small bones of the foot. The authors report a 32-year old male patient presented with a four-month history of right foot pain. Plain radiographs showed an expansive lytic lesion involving the first right metatarsal bone. Computed tomography scan demonstrated a radiolucent lesion with well-defined borders. Biopsy was performed and the histological diagnostic was giant cell tumor. The authors emphasize the correlation between the imaging and histological findings. (author)

  5. Multiple Synchronous Central Giant Cell Granulomas of the Maxillofacial Region: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Hak Jin

    2010-01-01

    Multifocal central giant cell granulomas (CGCG) in the maxillofacial region are suggestive of systemic disease such as hyperparathyroidism or an inherited syndrome such as Noonan-like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. Only 5 cases of multifocal CGCGs in the maxillofacial region without any concomitant systemic disease have currently been reported. We report here on an unusual case of 17-year-old man who presented with multifocal CGCGs of the bilateral posterior mandible and right maxilla and he was without any concomitant systemic disease

  6. Giant cell tumor of distal phalanx in an adolescent with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgers, A; Peters, S; Sciot, R; De Smet, L

    2014-01-01

    We report on a unique case of a young female patient with the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome who developed a giant cell tumor of bone in the distal phalanx of the thumb. This case is noteworthy because of the combination of some unusual features. Firstly, it is only the fifth case report on the association of giant cell tumor of bone and the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Also the localization of the lesion in the bones of the hand and the presentation at adolescent age is rarely seen.

  7. Multiple Synchronous Central Giant Cell Granulomas of the Maxillofacial Region: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Hak Jin [Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Multifocal central giant cell granulomas (CGCG) in the maxillofacial region are suggestive of systemic disease such as hyperparathyroidism or an inherited syndrome such as Noonan-like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome. Only 5 cases of multifocal CGCGs in the maxillofacial region without any concomitant systemic disease have currently been reported. We report here on an unusual case of 17-year-old man who presented with multifocal CGCGs of the bilateral posterior mandible and right maxilla and he was without any concomitant systemic disease

  8. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the base of the skull in a 4-month-old infant - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.; Granda-Ricart, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    An unusual case of giant cell reparative granuloma of the base of the skull of a 4-month-old infant is described. Computerized tomography was useful in defining extent of the lesion and soft tissue abnormalities. Differential diagnosis with other giant cell lesions is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Radiation induced formation of giant cells in Saccharomyces uvarum. Pt. 4. Macromolecular synthesis and protein patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rink, H; Baumstark-Khan, C; Partke, H J

    1986-08-01

    X-irradiated (1.0 kGy) yeast cells (Saccharomyces uvarum, ATCC 9080), grown in liquid medium stop their mitotic activities and form giant cells by development of several buds which do not separate from mother cells. Depending on the time in culture, wet and dry weights per cell, protein- RNA- and DNA- contents per cell as well as incorporation rates of /sup 14/C-leucine per cell and per hour and patterns (isoelectric focusing) of water soluble proteins were studied. Weights per cell, RNA and protein contents per cell and /sup 14/C-leucine incorporation rates increase markedly in giant cells, whereas DNA content per cell is only duplicated. Protein patterns in isoelectric focusing show one interesting difference. In samples from giant cells one protein band (IP=6.63) decreases after 8 h in culture and later on disappears completely. This finding is not due to primary damage in X-irradiated DNA but seems to be related to the control of cell cycle events.

  10. THE ROLE OF HERPESVIRUS IN THE PARADIGM OF INFECTIOUS MYOCARDITIS (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peremot S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the research of the last decade, there has been growth in the noncoronary disease infarction, increased their share among the causes temporary or persistent disability, disability and deaths. Among others myocarditis, which constitute 11% of all diseases of the cardiovascular system and is responsible for almost 20% of cases of sudden death in people physically safe. The disease is an inflammatory damage to cardiomyocytes, which is caused by direct action or indirectly through immune mechanisms of infectious agents of bacterial, viral, protozoan nature, as well as chemical and physical factors. The term "myocarditis" was first proposed I F Soberheim in 1837 and in 1900. A. Fiedler described the myocardial injury and justified the very concept of primary myocarditis. It is widely accepted that myocarditis - natural complications of infectious diseases in which etiological factor may be any infectious agent. However, at the present stage bacterial pathogens give way to viral. Those viruses according to numerous studies result in the development of myocarditis and consequently lead to the development of myocardial dysfunction. Until recently, most were considered cardiotropic ECHO viruses, Coxsackie group A, B, causing half of all cases of viral myocarditis. However recently reviewed the role of enteroviruses in favor of persistent virus and particularly the family Herpesviridae. The significance in the etiology of myocarditis herpes simplex virus, human herpes type 6, Epstein - Barr virus, cytomegalovirus. Published data indicate that the development of viral myocarditis patients after serous meningoencephalitis caused by the varicella-zoster virus. Widespread herpesvirus diseases their tropism for endothelial cells and myocardium, the capacity for long-term persistence in the body the opportunity to explain virus inducted inflammatory damage to cardiomyocytes. Increased attention to this issue recently linked with the present stage

  11. Significant reduction of peripheral blood interleukin-35 and CD4+EBI3+ T cells, which are negatively correlated with an increase in the plasma IL-17 and cTnI level, in viral myocarditis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ouyang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Viral myocarditis (VMC has become an increasingly common heart disease that endangers human health. In the present study, the plasma interleukin-35 (IL-35 level and the percentage of CD4 + EBI3 + T cells in VMC patients were detected to investigate the significance of changes in these parameters in the plasma of VMC patients and their association with the disease. Material and methods: ELISA was performed to detect the plasma IL-35 level and the percentage of peripheral blood CD4 + EBI3 + T cells in 40 VMC patients and in 20 healthy individuals. Moreover, the plasma IL-17 levels in the VMC patients and in the healthy individuals were detected using an ELISA, and the cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI levels were detected using a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay to compare the differences in the groups. Results : Plasma IL-35 level and the percentage of CD4 + EBI3 + T cells in acute phase VMC patients was lower than that in the healthy control group and the convalescent phase VMC patients. Additionally, the plasma IL-35 level in the VMC patients exhibited a negative correlation with the levels of cTnI and IL-17. The percentage of CD4 + EBI3 + T cells also showed a negative correlation with the levels of cTnI and IL-17. Conclusions : The plasma IL-35 level and the percentage of CD4 + EBI3 + T cells in VMC patients was reduced, and the amount of the decrease was associated with the severity of the disease. These results suggest that IL-35 and CD4 + EBI3 + T might play important roles in the progression of VMC and could be used as indictors of the disease.

  12. Heterogeneous vesicles in mucous epithelial cells of posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultrastructural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E. Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC; ii electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC; and iii mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC.

  13. Multiple giant cell lesions in a patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Henk; Schreuder, Willem Hans; Jongmans, Marjolijn; van Bommel-Slee, Danielle; Witsenburg, Bart; de Lange, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) and multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) in mandibles and maxillae is described. A mutation p.Thr468Met in the PTPN11-gene was found. This is the second reported NSML patient with MGCL. Our case adds to the assumption that, despite a

  14. Temporal artery biopsy is not required in all cases of suspected giant cell arteritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-07-01

    Temporal artery biopsy (TAB) is performed during the diagnostic workup for giant cell arteritis (GCA), a vasculitis with the potential to cause irreversible blindness or stroke. However, treatment is often started on clinical grounds, and TAB result frequently does not influence patient management. The aim of this study was to assess the need for TAB in cases of suspected GCA.

  15. [«Man-in-the-barrel» syndrome: atypical manifestation of giant cell arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Lopez, Y; Fernandez-Ramirez, A F; Franco-Dager, E; Gomez-Lopera, J G; Vanegas-Garcia, A L

    2018-06-01

    «Man-in-the-barrel» syndrome refers to diplegia of the upper extremities in which mobility of the head and lower limbs is preserved. Brachial plexitis that presents as «man-in-the-barrel» syndrome is an unusual manifestation of giant cell arteritis. We report a case of C5-C6 plexitis as part of the clinical features of a patient with giant cell arteritis. A 70-year-old male with a two-month history of weight loss, headache, facial pain and jaw claudication, associated with a persistent elevation of acute phase reactants and bilateral brachial plexopathy, with no evidence of neck or brain injuries or occult neoplasm and with negative autoimmunity tests. Results of the biopsy study of the temporal artery were compatible with giant cell arteritis, and the positron emission tomography scan revealed extensive vascular involvement of the aorta and its branches. Although the typical clinical manifestations of giant cell arteritis are headache, jaw claudication, loss of sight, constitutional symptoms and polymyalgia rheumatica, its presence must be suspected in patients over the age of 50 who manifest alterations affecting the peripheral nerve, including brachial diplegia with no other demonstrable cause.

  16. Infectious myocarditis (Clinic, diagnostics, principles of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Finogeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective myocarditis can be considered as a case of myocardial damage caused by different infectious agents. Traditionally discusses the questions of diagnostics and treatment infectious myocarditis. The paper has repeatedly stressed the difficulty of clinical diagnosis, and the laboriousness and economic costs of laboratory tests and additional researches. Endomyocardial biopsy findings remain the gold standard for unequivocally establishing the diagnosis. However, it is technically extremely invasive test and can be performed only in specialized cardiology centers. The paper analyzes in detail not only own materials, but also results of researches published in numerous domestic and foreign sources of literature. Publication of «Infectious myocarditis» is necessary due to the fact that patients with a diagnosis of «Myocarditis » account for 11% of all cardiovascular disease in the world. Article is timely and necessary for many professionals, senior students of medical universities.

  17. Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

    1985-01-01

    In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved

  18. Osteoclastic Giant Cell Rich Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Alemán-Meza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and represents the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Histologically 85 to 90% of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinoma. Osteoclastic giant cell rich squamous cell carcinoma is an unusual histological variant of which only 4 cases have been reported. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a 6-month history of irregular vaginal bleeding. Examination revealed a 2.7 cm polypoid mass in the anterior lip of the uterine cervix. The patient underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Microscopically the tumor was composed of infiltrative nests of poorly differentiated nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. Interspersed in between these tumor cells were numerous osteoclastic giant cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm devoid of nuclear atypia, hyperchromatism, or mitotic activity. Immunohistochemistry was performed; CK and P63 were strongly positive in the squamous component and negative in the osteoclastic giant cells, while CD68 and Vimentin were strongly positive in the giant cell population and negative in the squamous component. The patient received chemo- and radiotherapy for recurrent disease identified 3 months later on a follow-up CT scan; 7 months after the surgical procedure the patient is clinically and radiologically disease-free.

  19. Generation of erythroid cells from polyploid giant cancer cells: re-thinking about tumor blood supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhigang; Yao, Hong; Fei, Fei; Li, Yuwei; Qu, Jie; Li, Chunyuan; Zhang, Shiwu

    2018-04-01

    During development and tumor progression, cells need a sufficient blood supply to maintain development and rapid growth. It is reported that there are three patterns of blood supply for tumor growth: endothelium-dependent vessels, mosaic vessels, and vasculogenic mimicry (VM). VM was first reported in highly aggressive uveal melanomas, with tumor cells mimicking the presence and function of endothelial cells forming the walls of VM vessels. The walls of mosaic vessels are randomly lined with both endothelial cells and tumor cells. We previously proposed a three-stage process, beginning with VM, progressing to mosaic vessels, and eventually leading to endothelium-dependent vessels. However, many phenomena unique to VM channel formation remain to be elucidated, such as the origin of erythrocytes before VM vessels connect with endothelium-dependent vessels. In adults, erythroid cells are generally believed to be generated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. In contrast, embryonic tissue obtains oxygen through formation of blood islands, which are largely composed of embryonic hemoglobin with a higher affinity with oxygen, in the absence of mature erythrocytes. Recent data from our laboratory suggest that embryonic blood-forming mechanisms also exist in cancer tissue, particularly when these tissues are under environmental stress such as hypoxia. We review the evidence from induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro and in vivo to support this previously underappreciated cell functionality in normal and cancer cells, including the ability to generate erythroid cells. We will also summarize the current understanding of tumor angiogenesis, VM, and our recent work on polyploid giant cancer cells, with emphasis on their ability to generate erythroid cells and their association with tumor growth under hypoxia. An alternative embryonic pathway to obtain oxygen in cancer cells exists, particularly when they are under hypoxic conditions.

  20. Detection of association and fusion of giant vesicles using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Takeshi; Caschera, Filippo; Morita, Yuuki; Toyota, Taro; Nishimura, Kazuya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Hanczyc, Martin M; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2010-10-05

    We have developed a method to evaluate the fusion process of giant vesicles using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Three fluorescent markers and FACS technology were used to evaluate the extent of association and fusion of giant vesicles. Two fluorescent markers encapsulated in different vesicle populations were used as association markers; when these vesicles associate, the two independent markers should be observed simultaneously in a single detection event. The quenched fluorescent marker and the dequencher, which were encapsulated in separate vesicle populations, were used as the fusion marker. When the internal aqueous solutions mix, the quenched marker is liberated by the dequencher and emits the third fluorescent signal. Although populations of pure POPC vesicles showed no detectable association or fusion, the same populations, oppositely charged by the exogenous addition of charged amphiphiles, showed up to 50% association and 30% fusion upon population analysis of 100,000 giant vesicles. Although a substantial fraction of the vesicles associated in response to a small amount of the charged amphiphiles (5% mole fraction compared to POPC alone), a larger amount of the charged amphiphiles (25%) was needed to induce vesicle fusion. The present methodology also revealed that the association and fusion of giant vesicles was dependent on size, with larger giant vesicles associating and fusing more frequently.

  1. Giant cell tumor of soft tissues of low malignant potential: A rare diagnosis on fine needle aspiration cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maithili M Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary giant cell tumors of soft tissues (GCT-ST are extremely rare soft tissue tumors, located in both superficial and deep soft tissues. They resemble osseous giant cell tumors morphologically and immunohistochemically. The tumor exhibits strong positive immunoreactivity for cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68 within multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells and focal staining of mononuclear cells. Case reports describing the cytohistological features of this entity are very few. We report a case of GCT-ST of low malignant potential diagnosed on fine needle aspiration (FNA and confirmed on histological and immunohistochemical studies.

  2. Osteoclasts derive from hematopoietic stem cells according to marker, giant lysosomes of beige mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, P.; Loutit, J.F.; Townsend, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    To ascertain the origin of multinucleated osteoclasts from hematopoietic stem cells, giant lysosomes peculiar to cells of beige mice (bg bg) were used as marker cells of that provenance. Radiation chimeras were established reciprocally between bg bg mice and osteopetrotic mi mi mice with defective osteoclasts. As a result, all the derivative cells of the hematopoietic stem cell would depend on the donor's cell line, whereas osteogenesis would remain the province of the host. It was affirmed in the chimeras mi mi/bg bg that the osteopetrosis was cured within six weeks. Thereafter the definitive osteoclasts of the chimeras contained giant lysosomes attributable to the beige cell line. However, the cure was well advanced before donor osteoclasts were prominent, for which several reasons are offered. In the mouse chimeras, bg bg/mi mi, there was a delay of some six weeks before osteopetrosis became evident, histologically before radiologically, at the major metaphyseal growth centers. During the period one to two months after establishment, osteoclasts appeared to be a mixture of two cell lines according to quantitative assessments for giant lysosomes. Assessments consisted of measurements of the percentage area of osteoclasts occupied by lysosomes over 1 micrometer diameter. The means were 0.018% +/- 0.008% for nonbeige stock and 2.09% +/- 0.58% for beige stock

  3. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process. © 2013 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  4. Characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents at time of diagnosis in a series of 98 patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, Thierry; Puget, Marie

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents at time of diagnosis in patients with giant cell arteritis. Retrospective data were collected from 98 patients at a single hospital with giant cell arteritis (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) diagnosed between October 1999 and January 2012. Cerebrovascular accident was found at initial presentation in 6 patients (6.1 %, 95 % CIs 2.3-12.9). Most of them had other symptoms of giant cell arteritis when the disease began. Signs reflecting the involvement of vertebro-basilar territory were present in 3 cases. No other case of cerebrovascular accident was described during the follow-up of patient; particularly no case of cerebrovascular accident occurred once corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of giant cell arteritis had been initiated. No differences in the epidemiologic, clinical and laboratory features at the time of diagnosis between patients who had cerebrovascular accidents and the rest of the giant cell arteritis patients were observed. Prognosis was good in our survey. However, there was no case of bilateral vertebral artery occlusion, a condition associated with poor prognosis. The present study confirms that cerebrovascular accidents may be the initial manifestation of giant cell arteritis, an argument in favor of a direct effect of the vasculitis in the development of cerebrovascular accidents rather than a complication of the corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis of giant cell arteritis should always be considered in an elderly patient with stroke and an unexplained elevation of inflammatory biomarkers.

  5. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  6. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary M A Prescott

    Full Text Available Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca; red panda (Ailurus fulgens; and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica. m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of

  7. Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Posterior Mediastinal Tumor with Benign Pulmonary Metastases: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hun [Daegu Fatima Hospital College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Byung Hak; Bahn, Young Eun; Choi, Won Il [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a benign, but potentially aggressive lesion that can show local recurrence and metastases. We report here on a case of a 29-year-old man who presented with an incidentally found mediastinal mass. Chest radiography and computed tomography showed a huge mediastinal mass with bilateral pulmonary nodules and the diagnosis of giant cell tumor with benign pulmonary metastasis was confirmed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary thoracic spinal giant cell tumor manifesting as a huge mediastinal mass with pulmonary metastases

  8. Fine needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of metastatic malignant diffuse type tenosynovial giant cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Ramteke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCTs arise from the synovium of joint, bursa, and tendon sheath, and are classified into localized and diffuse types. Diffused type often affects the large joint, and has more recurrence, metastasis, and malignant transformation potential compared to the localized type. Malignant diffused TGCT (D-TGCT usually occurs as a large tumor (>5 cm, in older patients, and its histopathologic features include necrosis, cellular anaplasia, prominent nucleoli, high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, brisk mitosis, discohesion of tumor cells, paucity of giant cells, and a diffuse growth pattern. At least five of these criteria are required for the histopathologic diagnosis of malignant TGCT because the benign TGCT also shares many of these morphological features. We describe the cytomorphologic features of a malignant D-TGCT from an unusual case of pulmonary metastasis in an adult patient. Fine needle aspiration cytologic features of malignant D-TGCT have not been described earlier in the English literature.

  9. Pediatric Death Due to Myocarditis After Exposure to Cannabis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Nappe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Since marijuana legalization, pediatric exposures to cannabis have increased. 1 To date, pediatric deaths from cannabis exposure have not been reported. The authors report an 11-month-old male who, following cannabis exposure, presented with central nervous system depression after seizure, and progressed to cardiac arrest and died. Myocarditis was diagnosed post-mortem and cannabis exposure was confirmed. Given the temporal relationship of these two rare occurrences – cannabis exposure and sudden death secondary to myocarditis in an 11-month-old – as well as histological consistency with drug-induced myocarditis without confirmed alternate causes, and prior reported cases of cannabis-associated myocarditis, a possible relationship exists between cannabis exposure in this child and myocarditis leading to death. In areas where marijuana is commercially available or decriminalized, the authors urge clinicians to preventively counsel parents and to include cannabis exposure in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with myocarditis.

  10. An expanded dengue syndrome patient with manifestation myocarditis: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifijanto, M. V.; Luqmana, H. P.; Rusli, M.; Bramantono

    2018-03-01

    Dengue infection may manifest asymptomatic, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, dengue shock syndrome. However, atypical manifestations in other organs have been increasingly reported and called expanded dengue syndrome. One of the cardiac complications in dengue is myocarditis. An 18-year-old woman complains of high fever since 3 days, epistaxis, chest pain, dyspnea, and vomiting. Laboratory examination obtained thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, NS1, IgG-IgM dengue positive, CKMB and Troponin- I increase. Electrocardiogram result ischemic anterior-posterior. Echocardiography results hyperechogenic on myocardial suspicious a myocarditis. The patient was diagnosed with acute myocarditis and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Condition improved after five days of treatment. Cardiac complications in dengue are now increasingly observed with the most common case is myocarditis. The main mechanism of dengue myocarditis is still unknown though both direct viral infection and immune mediated damage have been suggested to be the cause of myocardial damage. The low incidence of dengue myocarditis is because it’s asymptomatic and diagnosis is easily missed. Almost all cases of dengue myocarditis are self-limiting and severe myocarditis leading to dilated cardiomyopathy is extremely rare. There have been reported a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever with manifestation myocarditis. Condition improve with supportive management.

  11. A Family History of Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cognet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis can lead to acute heart failure, cardiogenic shock, or sudden death and later, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM with chronic heart failure. We report the cases of two DCM induced by acute and past myocarditis in the same family and expressed by its two main complications within few weeks: an hemodynamic presentation as a fulminant myocarditis rapidly leading to cardiac tranplantation and a rythmologic presentation as an electrical storm leading to catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia. These cases ask the question of the family predisposition to viral myocarditis leading to DCM.

  12. Immunohistochemical features of giant cell ependymoma of the filum terminale with unusual clinical and radiological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candanedo-Gonzalez, Fernando; Ortiz-Arce, Cindy Sharon; Rosales-Perez, Samuel; Remirez-Castellanos, Ana Lilia; Cordova-Uscanga, Candelaria; Gamboa-Dominguez, Armando

    2017-01-14

    Giant cell ependymoma of the filum terminale is a rare variant, generally manifested as a well-circunscribed intradural mass with an indolent biological behavior. We describe the case of a 48-year-old Mexican female who non-relevant past medical history, that developed a GCE of the filum terminale. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed the presence of an intra-axial tumor extending from L3 to L5 with extra-medullary invasion. Therefore the tumor was considered unresectable and only incisional biopsy was obtained, establishing the tentative diagnosis of a poorly differentiated neoplasia. A second evaluation of the case revealed the presence of numerous non-cohesive pleomorphic giant cells with intranuclear inclusions and broad eosinophilic cytoplasm, alternating with intermediate size cells with round, hyperchromatic nuclei and forming a perivascular pseudo-rosettes pattern. The ependymal phenotype was supported by light microscopy and corroborated by immunohistochemistry analysis. The patient was subsequently treated with radiotherapy 54Gy. She is alive after a 27-month follow-up, with residual disease, difficulty ambulating and pain. GCE of filum terminale may have an atypical clinical and radiological presentation, albeit with invasive characteristics and anaplasia on histologic analysis. However, its biological behavior is indolent and associated to longer survival. Due to the presence of giant cells, the differential diagnosis of other primary neoplasias at that site were considered, including paraganglioma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors as well as metastatic malignant melanoma, adrenal carcinoma, thyroid gland carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma, that may all harbor giant cells.

  13. Giant basal cell carcinoma of the face: surgical management and challenges for reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaiti, A; Mijiti, A; Yarbag, A; Moming, A

    2016-02-01

    Giant basal cell carcinoma, in which the tumour measures 5 cm or greater in diameter, is a very rare skin malignancy that accounts for less than 1 per cent of all basal cell tumours. Very few studies have reported on the incidence, resection and reconstruction of this lesion worldwide. In total, 17 patients with giant basal cell carcinoma of the head and neck region underwent surgical excision and reconstruction at our hospital. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. The lesion was usually in the forehead, eyelid, lips or nasal-cheek region. The greatest diameter ranged from 5 to 11 cm, with 5-6 cm being the most common size at the time of presentation. All patients had their tumour resected and reconstructed in a single-stage procedure, mostly with a local advancement flap, and with no post-operative flap failure. Giant basal cell carcinoma of the head and neck can be successfully treated with a local flap in a single-stage approach.

  14. Hypersensitivity myocarditis associated with ephedra use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaacks, S M; Klein, L; Tan, C D; Rodriguez, E R; Leikin, J B

    1999-01-01

    Ephedrine has previously been described as a causative factor of vasculitis but myocarditis has not yet been associated with either ephedrine or its plant derivative ephedra. A 39-year-old African American male with hypertension presented to Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center with a 1-month history of progressive dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea, and dependent edema. He was taking Ma Huang (Herbalife) 1-3 tablets twice daily for 3 months along with other vitamin supplements, pravastatin, and furosemide. Physical examination revealed a male in mild respiratory distress. The lung fields had rales at both bases without audible wheezes. Internal jugular venous pulsations were 5 cm above the sternal notch. Medical therapy with intravenous furosemide and oral enalapril was initiated upon admission. Cardiac catheterization with coronary angiography revealed normal coronary arteries, a dilated left ventricle, moderate pulmonary hypertension, and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of 34 mm Hg. The patient had right ventricular biopsy performed demonstrating mild myocyte hypertrophy and an infiltrate consisting predominantly of lymphocytes with eosinophils present in significantly increased numbers. Treatment for myocarditis was initiated with azothioprine 200 mg daily and prednisone 60 mg per day with a tapering course over 6 months. Anticoagulation with warfarin and diuretics was initiated and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition was continued. Hydralazine was added later. One month into therapy, an echocardiogram demonstrated improved left ventricular function with only mild global hypokinesis. A repeat right ventricular biopsy 2 months after the first admission showed no evidence of myocarditis. At 6 months, left ventricular ejection fraction was normal (EFN 50%) and the patient asymptomatic. Ephedra (Ma Huang) is the suspected cause of hypersensitivity myocarditis in this patient due to the temporal course of disease and its propensity to induce vasculitis.

  15. Immunoperoxidase technique in experimental chronic chagasic myocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    M.d. Maria Celina Morales; M.D. José Milei

    1987-01-01

    Chagas'disease has been described as the commonest form of chronic myocarditis. An immunologic pathogenesis has been discribed for this form of the disease. So far, no immunoperoxidase technique has been used for the detection of immunological deposits in chronic experimental Chagas'myocardiopathy. Forty-one Swiss mice, three months old were inoculated intraperitoneally with doses between 10 and 10(5) Tulahuen trypomastigotes. Mice were reinoculated one month after with doses between 10² and ...

  16. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  17. Giant cell lesions with a Noonan-like phenotype: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino, Claudia Marcela H; Gaião, Léonilson; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Oliveira, Flavio Augusto Marsiaj

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of multiple giant cell lesions of the mandible that occurred in a 14-year-old girl with phenotypic characteristics associated with Noonan Syndrome (NS). NS is a dysmorphic disorder characterized by hypertelorism, short stature, congenital heart defects, short and webbed neck, skeletal anomalies, and bleeding diathesis. A 14-year-old girl with a previous diagnosis of NS (sporadic case) presented with multiple radiolucent lesions in the body and ramus of her mandible. In terms of clinical behavior and the described radiographic characteristics, giant cells lesions with Noonan-like phenotype can be considered a form of cherubism. Therefore, surgical intervention is not necessary, but radiographic follow-up and observation is very important during the control and gradual regression of the lesions.

  18. THE CASE OF THE GIANT-CELL ARTERITIS MANIFESTED AS DORSOLATERAL MEDULLARY INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Akimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a giant-cell arteritis is presented. First clinical signs of the disease were fewer and development of infarction in the basin of the left vertebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed its prolonged diminution. Laboratory results were remarkable for the high rate of erythrocyte sedimentation and the increase of C-reactive protein (CRP concentration. Physical examination revealed acrotism in temporal arteries. Diagnosis was proven by biopsy results which included giant multinucleate cells. Authors discuss problems of diagnosis of the disease, the role of radiological methods (angio-ultrasonography, magnetic resonance and computed tomography aided angiography, positron-emission tomography and the necessity to pay particular attention to the elderly patients with high rate of erythrocyte sedimentation and the increased CRP concentration.

  19. Differential rotation and giant cell circulation of the solar Ca+-network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, E.H.; Woehl, H.

    1976-01-01

    High precision computer controlled tracings of bright Ca + -mottles were performed during 1974 and 1975 at the Locarno Observatory of Gottingen to study solar differential rotation and to search for giant cell circulation pattern. The method consists of measuring the position of 5-15 bright Ca + - mottles with respect to the center of the solar disc every 10 to 15 min during 4h every day. From a linear least square fit of the observed positions the solar-latitude and longitude were computed for the beginning and the end of the daily 4h observation period. From this the components in latitude and longitude of the proper motions were derived which result from the differential rotation, possible giant cell circulation and the small scale random walk of these features. (Auth.)

  20. Radiographic features of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodner, L.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1996-01-01

    The radiographic features of ten pediatric cases of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws were studied, using plain film radiography (PFR), computed tomography (CT), and a dental CT software program (DS). The radiologic features varied from ill-defined destructive lesions to a well-defined, multilocular appearance. Teeth or root displacement was found as the most consistent feature. Root resorption was rare. The features seen on CT were clearer than those seen on PFR. DS, by its visualization of the jaw in three plans - axial, panoramic, and buccolingual - provided useful information for determining the topography of the lesion in its structure (uni- or multilocular) and proximity to adjacent anatomic structures, such as teeth, nerves, or maxillary sinus. CT and, ideally, CT with DS should be used for diagnosis and surgical management of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws in children. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Radiographic features of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws in children

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    Bodner, L. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Soroka Medical Center, P. O. Box 151, Beer-Sheva 84101 (Israel); Bar-Ziv, J. [Department of Radiology, Hebrew University and Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1996-02-01

    The radiographic features of ten pediatric cases of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws were studied, using plain film radiography (PFR), computed tomography (CT), and a dental CT software program (DS). The radiologic features varied from ill-defined destructive lesions to a well-defined, multilocular appearance. Teeth or root displacement was found as the most consistent feature. Root resorption was rare. The features seen on CT were clearer than those seen on PFR. DS, by its visualization of the jaw in three plans - axial, panoramic, and buccolingual - provided useful information for determining the topography of the lesion in its structure (uni- or multilocular) and proximity to adjacent anatomic structures, such as teeth, nerves, or maxillary sinus. CT and, ideally, CT with DS should be used for diagnosis and surgical management of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws in children. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced giant cell interstitial pneumonia: Case report and literature review

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    Boeun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP is a rare form of chronic interstitial pneumonia typically associated with hard metal exposure. Only two cases of GIP induced by nitrofurantoin have been reported in the medical literature. We are reporting a case of recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced GIP. Although extremely rare, GIP needs to be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with chronic nitrofurantoin use who present with respiratory illness.

  3. Giant oral tumor in a child with malnutrition and sickle cell trait: Anesthetic challenges

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    Preet Mohinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric oral tumors have always been challenging for the even most skilled anesthesiologists. The conventional method of awake intubation is not realistic in this age group. The management is to chart out a plan to intubate the child post induction. We describe successful management of a case of giant of ossifying fibroma in a child with sickle cell trait where non-conventional innovate approach helped us to secure the airway pre-operatively and avoid possible medical complications.

  4. Tocilizumab for giant cell arteritis with corticosteroid-resistant progressive anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

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    Vionnet, Julien; Buss, Guillaume; Mayer, Cédric; Sokolov, Arseny A; Borruat, François-Xavier; Spertini, François

    2017-10-01

    Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory disorder of the medium- and large-size arteries. Permanent visual loss related to arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is among the most serious complications of this disease and initial treatment usually consists of high dose corticosteroids. There is no consensus in the literature concerning the optimal therapeutic approach in giant cell arteritis patients with corticosteroid-resistant arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A 73-year-old Caucasian female with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis developed an acute visual loss of the right eye due to arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. Despite 5 daily methylprednisolone pulses, systemic symptoms persisted and rapid involvement of the controlateral eye was documented. Therefore, tocilizumab (humanised monoclonal antibody binding the human interleukin-6 receptor) was introduced as a potential salvage therapy with a swift consecutive resolution of the systemic symptoms and stabilization of the ophthalmic lesions. Although a late effect of steroids pulses cannot be formally ruled out in this dramatic situation, tocilizumab likely offered a decisive effect in preventing bilateral blindness and may have contributed to steroid tapering. Tocilizumab may represent a new early effective second-line treatment option in corticosteroid-resistant anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. More data are needed to confirm this observation and to evaluate the safety profile of this treatment. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A large giant cell tumor of the larynx: case report and review of the literature.

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    Arndt, Andrew; LeBlanc, Rachelle; Spafford, Peter

    2017-04-04

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are typically found in the metaphyseal-epiphyseal area of long bones but can also occur in the head and neck region. GCT of the larynx is a rare entity with only 42 reported cases in the international literature. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge this is the largest laryngeal GCT reported in the literature to date. GCT of the larynx can present with dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a neck mass. This case report describes a giant cell tumor of the left thyroid cartilage in a 30-year-old man who initially presented with dysphonia and dysphagia. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 5 × 5.7 cm mass centered on the left thyroid cartilage, which was further diagnosed by histopathology as giant cell tumour by open biopsy. The patient was counselled on treatment options and it was decided to proceed with a surgical approach. The patient consented to and successfully underwent a total laryngectomy (TL). Currently the patient has no evidence of disease at 13 months follow-up, has an optimal prosthetic voice, and is able to tolerate all textures of foods. GCTs of the larynx have a good prognosis and can be treated successfully through complete resection of the tumor, negating the need for adjunctive therapy such as radiation, chemo or denosumab therapy.

  6. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and synovial membrane: A review of 26 cases.

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    Kant, Kumar Shashi; Manav, Ajoy Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Abhinav; Sinha, Vishvendra Kumar; Sharma, Akshat

    2017-11-01

    Aim of our study is to highlight the incidence and benign nature of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath and need for complete removal, thus minimizing the chances of recurrence. A total of 26 cases of Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath operated in the department of Orthopaedics, Patna Medical College & Hospital, Patna from 2003 to 2010 were included in this study. The surgery was performed after clinical evaluation of the lesion and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC). The tumour underwent en bloc marginal excision. The patients were followed up for minimum two year. Our study population consisted of 18 females and 8 males. The mean age at the time of surgery was 38.3 years (range, 18-62 years). Twenty three cases were found in the 3rd and 4th decade. Twenty two cases involved upper extremity and only 4 cases in lower extremity. MRI was done in 2 cases where diagnosis was in doubt. Bony indentation on X-ray film was found in 7 cases and thorough curettage of cortical shell was done. All the cases were treated by marginal excision. Three cases developed post-operative stiffness but regained full range of movement with physiotherapy. Sensory impairment was seen in 3 cases. Recurrence occurred in 2 case and they were treated by repeat marginal excision. Meticulous en-masse marginal excision of the giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in blood less field using magnification is the treatment of choice.

  7. SURGICAL TREATMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION FOR CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF MANDIBLE - case report and literature review.

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    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is a benign aggressive destructive osteolytic lesion of osteoclastic origin. The central giant cell granuloma is often found in the mandible, anterior to the first molars. It most commonly occurs in patients under the age of 30, with a clear female prevalencePurpose: To present a case of CGCG of the lower jaw in Department of Oral and maxillofacial surgery, University Hospital "St. Anna". Although en bloc resection provides the lowest recurrence rate, only a few single case reports describe the use of this technique followed by reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts.Material and methods: The medical history of a 28 years patient with a large central giant cell granuloma in the mandible. Biopsy specimen taken from the lesion showed CGCG followed by curettage with peripheral ostectomy with preservation of the continuity of the mandible.Result: At the 1-year clinical and radiological follow up there was no sign of recurrence. Conclusion: After complete healing of the graft, prosthetic rehabilitation with implants will be perfomed. This allows the best functional and aesthetic results.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging aspects of giant-cell tumours of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Helcio Mendoncça; Marchiori, Edson; Severo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of giant-cell tumours of bone. We analysed the clinical and MRI features of patients diagnosed with giant-cell tumours of bone confirmed by histopathology at our institution between 2010 and 2012. The peak incidence was between the second and third decades of life. There was no gender predominance. The most frequent locations were the knee and wrist. Pain and swelling were the prevailing symptoms. Fifty-one per cent of the patients were found to have associated secondary aneurysmal bone cysts on histopathology. On MRI, lesions demonstrated signal intensity equal to that of skeletal muscle on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted images in 90% of cases. In gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images, 76.6% of cases demonstrated heterogeneous enhancement. We observed cystic components involving more than 50% of the lesion in 17 cases (56.6%). There was extra-osseous involvement in 13 cases (43.3%). MRI offers a valuable diagnostic tool for giant-cell tumours of bone. Contrast-enhanced MRI can distinguish between cystic and solid components of the tumour. MRI is also the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of soft-tissue involvement, offering a complete preoperative diagnosis.

  9. Giant cell glioblastoma in childhood - clinical case from our practice and literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, L.; Hristozova, I.; Minkin, K.; Mihaylova, I.; Katzarov, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare clinical case of brain tumor in childhood - giant cells glioblastoma- The disease was diagnosed in July 2014. Following an evidently total tumor excision, a course of chemotherapy with Vincristine, Vepesid and Cisplatine was applied followed by external beam radiotherapy of total dose 56 Gy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy (Vepesid, Cisplatine and Cyclophosphamide), on the regular MRI - performed in January 2015, local tumor recurrence was discovered requiring re-operation. A local progression of the disease was manifested after 6 courses chemotherapy (Temodal 100 mg 1 tablet daily for 5 days monthly) with increased intracranial pressure, followed by exitus letalis of the patient, 12 months after the diagnosis being made. A rarely met pathology subtype of giant cells glioblastoma in childhood was discussed, its typical MRI image, unfavorable prognosis and manifested radio- and chemo-resistance. Despite the complex treatment including total tumor excision, postoperative radiotherapy with radical irradiation dose and adjuvant chemotherapy the risk of local recurrences and tumor progression is high. With the help of this rarely diagnosed aggressive brain tumor in childhood, we present the need of optimization of the multidisciplinary treatment approach. (authors) Key words: Giant Cell Glioblastoma. Childhood. Surgery. Radiotherapy. Chemotherapy. Complex Treatment

  10. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Giant Condyloma Acuminatum (Buschke-Lowenstein Tumour

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    Michael W.T. Chao

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant condyloma acuminatum (GCA is a tumour that primarily affects the genital and perianal areas. Despite the histologically benign appearance, it behaves in a malignant fashion, destroying adjacent tissues, and is regarded as an entity intermediate between an ordinary condyloma acuminatum and squamous cell carcinoma. Primary anorectal lesions account for only a small number of GCA cases and, as with squamous cell carcinoma, the human papilloma virus is the causative agent. The hallmark of GCA is the high rate of local recurrence and transformation into squamous cell carcinoma. We describe a case of GCA complicated by malignant transformation, where locoregional control was achieved with combined chemoradiotherapy.

  11. Application of Nuclear Volume Measurements to Comprehend the Cell Cycle in Root-Knot Nematode-Induced Giant Cells

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    José Dijair Antonino de Souza Junior

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes induce galls that contain giant-feeding cells harboring multiple enlarged nuclei within the roots of host plants. It is recognized that the cell cycle plays an essential role in the set-up of a peculiar nuclear organization that seemingly steers nematode feeding site induction and development. Functional studies of a large set of cell cycle genes in transgenic lines of the model host Arabidopsis thaliana have contributed to better understand the role of the cell cycle components and their implication in the establishment of functional galls. Mitotic activity mainly occurs during the initial stages of gall development and is followed by an intense endoreduplication phase imperative to produce giant-feeding cells, essential to form vigorous galls. Transgenic lines overexpressing particular cell cycle genes can provoke severe nuclei phenotype changes mainly at later stages of feeding site development. This can result in chaotic nuclear phenotypes affecting their volume. These aberrant nuclear organizations are hampering gall development and nematode maturation. Herein we report on two nuclear volume assessment methods which provide information on the complex changes occurring in nuclei during giant cell development. Although we observed that the data obtained with AMIRA tend to be more detailed than Volumest (Image J, both approaches proved to be highly versatile, allowing to access 3D morphological changes in nuclei of complex tissues and organs. The protocol presented here is based on standard confocal optical sectioning and 3-D image analysis and can be applied to study any volume and shape of cellular organelles in various complex biological specimens. Our results suggest that an increase in giant cell nuclear volume is not solely linked to increasing ploidy levels, but might result from the accumulation of mitotic defects.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction analysis for viruses in paraffin-embedded myocardium from dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy or myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, T R; Meurs, K M; Lehmkuhl, L B; Magnon, A L; Weisbrode, S E; Atkins, C E

    2001-01-01

    To perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis on paraffin-embedded myocardium from dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and dogs with myocarditis to screen for canine parvovirus, adenovirus types 1 and 2, and herpesvirus. Myocardial specimens from 18 dogs with an antemortem diagnosis of DCM and 9 dogs with a histopathologic diagnosis of myocarditis were evaluated. Paraffin-embedded myocardial specimens were screened for viral genome by PCR analysis. Positive-control specimens were developed from cell cultures as well as paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from dogs with clinical and histopathologic diagnoses of viral infection with canine parvovirus, adenovirus types 1 and 2, and herpesvirus. The histologic characteristics of all myocardial specimens were classified regarding extent, location, and type of inflammation and fibrosis. Canine adenovirus type 1 was amplified from 1 specimen from a dog with DCM. Canine parvovirus, adenovirus type 2, and herpesvirus were not amplified from any myocardial specimens. Histologic analysis of specimens from dogs with DCM revealed variable amounts of fibrosis; myocardial inflammation was observed in 1 affected dog. Histopathologic analysis of specimens from dogs with myocarditis disclosed variable degrees of inflammation and fibrosis. Viral agents canine parvovirus, adenovirus types 1 and 2, and herpesvirus are not commonly associated with DCM or active myocarditis in dogs. Additional studies evaluating for nucleic acid from viruses that less commonly affect dogs or different types of infectious agents may be warranted to gain insight into the cause of DCM and myocarditis in dogs.

  13. A giant benign clear cell hidradenoma on the anterior trunk

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    Damlanur Sakiz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell hidroadenoma (CCA is a uncommon variant of bening cutaneous adnexial tumors. These tumors are clinically asymptomatic, solitary dermal nodules. they occur most frequently on the scalp, face, abdomen and the extremities. Growth is slow and malignant change is rare. 45- year-old woman presented us with a nodule with a central ulceration and a minimal hemoragic discharge on her anterior abdomen wall which had begun 4 years ago as a small nodular asymptomatic lesion. On dermatological examination there was a 6.5x4x5 cm non-tender, soft reddish purple nodule with lobular appearence and ulceration. In the laboratory investigations, all the hematologic and biochemical tests were normal. A CT scan demonstrated a cyctic tumor with lobulated countour with contrast enhancement. The lesion excised totally. In histopathological examination the tumor was composed of biphasic  smaller dark polygonal cells and larger clera cells and coarse nuclear chromatine. There were duct like structures. Immunohistochemical investigation was done for the suspicion of malignancy. Cytoplasm of clear cells and duct like structures showed PAS positive and d-Pas resistant staining. There was a positive reactivity to epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembrionic antigen. The mitotic index in Ki 67 examination was low. All these findings confirmed the diagnosis of bening CCA. 

  14. A giant benign clear cell hidradenoma on the anterior trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Atis, Guldehan; Altunay, Ilknur Kivanç; Sakiz, Damlanur

    2011-10-05

    Clear cell hidradenoma (CCH) is an uncommon variant of benign cutaneous adnexal tumors. These tumors are clinically asymptomatic, solitary dermal nodules. They occur most frequently on the scalp, face abdomen and extremities. Growth is slow and malignant change is rare. 45-year-old woman presented with a nodule which had begun 4 years ago as a small nodular asymptomatic lesion and had a central ulceration and a minimal hemorrhagic discharge on her anterior abdomen wall. On dermatologic examination there was a 6.5×5×4 cm non-tender, soft reddish purple nodule, with lobular appearance and ulceration. In the laboratory investigations, all hematologic and biochemical tests were normal. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a cystic tumor with lobulated contour with contrast enhancement. The lesion was excised totally. In histopathological examination, the tumor was composed of biphasic smaller dark polygonal cells and larger clear cells and coarse nuclear chromatine. There were duct like structures. Immunohistochemical investigation was done for the suspicion of malignancy. Cytoplasm of clear cells and of duct like structures showed PAS-positive and d-PAS resistant staining. There was a positive reaction to epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen. The mitotic index in Ki 67 examination was low. All these findings confirmed the diagnosis of benign CCH.

  15. Giant morphea-form basal cell carcinoma of the umbilicus: Successful debulking with vismodegib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduz Robledo, Mariana; Lebas, Eve; Reginster, Marie-Annick; Baghaie, Mahmoud; Groves, Sabine; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2018-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the umbilicus is very rare. The nodular subtype is the main representative. Giant basal cell carcinomas represent around 1% of all basal cell carcinomas. The hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib is indicated for advanced basal cell carcinoma and CD56-negative immunostaining seems indicative for successful treatment. A 54-year-old man presented a 10 cm × 14 cm large and 4.5 cm deep morphea-form basal cell carcinoma with faint immunohistochemical CD56 expression arising from the umbilicus. A sequential treatment was initiated with debulking using vismodegib 150 mg per day for 4 months, followed by reconstructive surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a giant basal cell carcinoma of the morphea-form type of the umbilicus. The sequential treatment plan reduces the duration of vismodegib inherent adverse effects and significantly reduces the tumor mass prior to surgery. Besides increasing adherence to vismodegib treatment, this approach facilitates the surgical technique and improves cosmetic outcome.

  16. A diagnostic dilemma in breast pathology – benign fibroadenoma with multinucleated stromal giant cells

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    Tobbia Igdam

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroadenomas are common benign breast tumours that display a characteristic pathological morphology, although several epithelial and stromal variations exist. A very rare histological finding is the presence of multinucleated giant cells throughout the stroma of a benign fibroadenoma. Cells of this type, which are more commonly found incidentally within the interlobular stroma of breast tissue, are benign and should not be mistaken for malignant cells on microscopic examination. Unfortunately a lack of awareness of this pathological entity can lead to diagnostic confusion amongst pathologists resulting in the multinucleate giant cells being mistaken for highly mitotic cells and consequently the fibroadenoma being mistaken for a malignant lesion. This may have serious implications for the subsequent management of the patient. The presence of this unusual cell type in the stroma does not alter the prognosis of otherwise benign lesion. We encountered two such cases at our institution in a six month period recently. We present their histories along with relevant radiological, microscopic and immunohistochemical features, followed by a discussion of this unusual pathological entity.

  17. Giant Lysosomes as a Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanism in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Federico; Trombetta, Elena; Cetrangolo, Paola; Maggioni, Marco; Razini, Paola; De Santis, Francesca; Torrente, Yvan; Prati, Daniele; Torresani, Erminio; Porretti, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous improvements in therapeutic protocols, cancer-related mortality is still one of the main problems facing public health. The main cause of treatment failure is multi-drug resistance (MDR: simultaneous insensitivity to different anti-cancer agents), the underlying molecular and biological mechanisms of which include the activity of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins and drug compartmentalisation in cell organelles. We investigated the expression of the main ABC proteins and the role of cytoplasmic vacuoles in the MDR of six hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, and confirmed the accumulation of the yellow anti-cancer drug sunitinib in giant (four lines) and small cytoplasmic vacuoles of lysosomal origin (two lines). ABC expression analyses showed that the main ABC protein harboured by all of the cell lines was PGP, whose expression was not limited to the cell membrane but was also found on lysosomes. MTT assays showed that the cell lines with giant lysosomes were more resistant to sorafenib treatment than those with small lysosomes (plysosomes in drug sequestration and MDR in HCC cell lines. The possibility of modulating this mechanism using PGP inhibitors could lead to the development of new targeted strategies to enhance HCC treatment.

  18. Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia with giant cell arteritis and pulmonary mucormycosis

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    Ryan A. Denu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL is characterized by a low CD4+ lymphocyte count in the absence of HIV or other underlying etiologies. We report a case of a 57-year old man with ICL and giant cell arteritis (GCA who developed pulmonary mucormycosis, which, to our knowledge, is the first report of these occurring in a patient with ICL. Abnormally low total lymphocyte or CD4+ cell counts occurring in patients with autoimmune disorders should alert clinicians to the possibility of ICL. Immunosuppressive treatment should be used with caution in this context.

  19. Fibroadenoma With Pleomorphic Stromal Giant Cells: It's Not as Bad as It Looks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawire, Jonathan; Singh, Kamaljeet; Steinhoff, Margaret M

    2017-08-01

    Clinically relevant histological categorization of fibroepithelial lesions can be a daunting task, especially in a core needle biopsy. Assessment of stromal nuclear atypia, including nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic activity, is a key morphological feature employed to classify fibroepithelial lesions. We describe a case of fibroadenoma with markedly atypical nuclear features in the stromal cells that led to misclassification as phyllodes tumor in the core needle biopsy. Excision showed a fibroadenoma containing pleomorphic stromal giant cells, with occasional mitotic figures, including atypical forms. Aforementioned nuclear findings in a fibroepithelial lesion raise a legitimate question of phyllodes tumor. Knowledge of this pitfall may help avoid overtreatment of an otherwise benign fibroepithelial lesion.

  20. Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis due to autoimmune hepatitis type II (LKM1+) presenting as subfulminant hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Z; Broida, E; Monselise, Y; Kazatsker, A; Baruch, J; Pappo, O; Skappa, E; Tur-Kaspa, R

    2000-03-01

    Giant cell hepatitis (GCH) in adults is a rare event. The diagnosis of GCH is based on findings of syncytial giant hepatocytes. It is commonly associated with either viral infection or autoimmune hepatitis type I. A patient with GCH due to autoimmune hepatitis type II (LKM1+) is described, a combination that has not been previously reported. Corticosteroid therapy was effective in decreasing serum liver enzymes; however, the patient deteriorated rapidly and developed subfulminant hepatic failure. Although an emergency orthotopic liver transplantation was performed, the patient died because of reperfusion injury. Interestingly, only a few giant hepatocytes were noted in the explanted liver. This case stresses the association of GCH with autoimmune disorders, the possible immune mechanism involved in the formation of giant cell hepatocytes, and illustrates the rapidly progressive course and unfavorable prognosis that these patients can develop.

  1. Inhalant-Abuse Myocarditis Diagnosed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsfriend, William; Rao, Krishnasree; Matulevicius, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Multiple reports of toxic myocarditis from inhalant abuse have been reported. We now report the case of a 23-year-old man found to have toxic myocarditis from inhalation of a hydrocarbon. The diagnosis was made by means of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with delayed enhancement. The use of cardiac magnetic resonance to diagnose myocarditis has become increasingly common in clinical medicine, although there is not a universally accepted criterion for diagnosis. We appear to be the first to document a case of toxic myocarditis diagnosed by cardiac magnetic resonance. In patients with a history of drug abuse who present with clinical findings that suggest myocarditis or pericarditis, cardiac magnetic resonance can be considered to support the diagnosis.

  2. Phosphoinositides: Tiny Lipids With Giant Impact on Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) make up only a small fraction of cellular phospholipids, yet they control almost all aspects of a cell's life and death. These lipids gained tremendous research interest as plasma membrane signaling molecules when discovered in the 1970s and 1980s. Research in the last 15 years has added a wide range of biological processes regulated by PIs, turning these lipids into one of the most universal signaling entities in eukaryotic cells. PIs control organelle biology by regulating vesicular trafficking, but they also modulate lipid distribution and metabolism via their close relationship with lipid transfer proteins. PIs regulate ion channels, pumps, and transporters and control both endocytic and exocytic processes. The nuclear phosphoinositides have grown from being an epiphenomenon to a research area of its own. As expected from such pleiotropic regulators, derangements of phosphoinositide metabolism are responsible for a number of human diseases ranging from rare genetic disorders to the most common ones such as cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that a number of infectious agents hijack the PI regulatory systems of host cells for their intracellular movements, replication, and assembly. As a result, PI converting enzymes began to be noticed by pharmaceutical companies as potential therapeutic targets. This review is an attempt to give an overview of this enormous research field focusing on major developments in diverse areas of basic science linked to cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23899561

  3. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

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    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  4. Diagnostic Efficacy of Radiology in the Diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumour of Bone

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    Afia Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumour (GCT is an aggressive and potentially malignant lesion. Microscopic feature reveals osteoclast like giant cells in a mononuclear stromal cells background. The mononuclear stromal cell is interpreted as neoplastic. Objective: As radiological diagnosis is non invasive and cost effective in comparison to histopathological diagnosis, considering the patients’ compliance, the aim of the study was to observe the diagnostic efficacy of radiology in diagnosis of GCT. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Delta Hopital Ltd., Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2011 to December 2012. A total of 30 study subjects were enrolled in the study irrespective of age and sex. Biopsy material and relevant data of clinically suspected cases of GCT along with radiology report were sent from National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Histopathological diagnosis was made by expert pathologists. Results: Mean (±SD age of the study subjects was 29.20 (±7.34 years with highest number of patients were observed in 3rd decade and female was predominant (60% with a male female ratio of 1:1.5. Common site of GCT was around knee (50%. Among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 25 (83.3% cases were radiologically diagnosed as GCT, 2 (6.7% diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia, 1 (3.3% as chondroblastoma, 1 (3.3% as simple bone cyst and 1 (3.3% as aneurysmal bone cyst. However among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 28 (93.3% patients were histopathologically diagnosed as Giant cell lesion and rest 2 (6.7% patients diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of radiological diagnosis of GCT were found to be 92.6%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 40.0% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiology can be effectively used as a screening tool in diagnosing GCT.

  5. Analysis of Giant-nucleated Cell Formation Following X-ray and Proton Irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahwasi, Ashraf Abdu

    Radiation-induced genetic instability has been observed in survivors of irradiated cancerous and normal cells in vitro and in vivo and has been determined in different forms, such as delayed cell death, chromosomal aberration or mutation. A well defined and characterized normal human-diploid AG1522 fibroblast cell line was used to study giant-nucleated cell (GCs) formation as the ultimate endpoint of this research. The average nuclear cross-sectional areas of the AG1522 cells were measured in mum2. The doubling time required by the AG1522 cells to divide was measured. The potential toxicity of the Hoechst dye at a working concentration on the live AG1522 cells was assessed. The yield of giant cells was determined at 7, 14 and 21 days after exposure to equivalent clinical doses of 0.2, 1 or 2 Gy of X-ray or proton irradiation. Significant differences were found to exist between X-ray or proton irradiation when compared with sham-irradiated control populations. The frequency of GCs induced by X-rays was also compared to those formed in proton irradiated cultures. The results confirm that 1 Gy X-rays are shown to induce higher rates of mitotically arrested GCs, increasing continually over time up to 21 days post-irradiation. The yield of GCs was significantly greater (10%) compared to those formed in proton populations (2%) 21 days postirradiation. The GCs can undergo a prolonged mitotic arrest that significantly increases the length of cell cycle. The arrest of GCs at the mitotic phase for longer periods of time might be indicative of a strategy for cell survival, as it increases the time available for DNA repair and enables an alternative route to division for the cells. However, the reduction in their formation 21 days after both types of radiation might favour GCs formation, ultimately contributing to carcinogenesis or cancer therapy resistance. The X-ray experiments revealed a dose-dependent increase in the GCs up to 14 days after irradiation. Although the proton

  6. MRI for myocarditis; MRT bei Myokarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutberlet, M.; Luecke, C.; Krieghoff, C.; Hildebrand, L.; Steiner, J.; Adam, J.; Grotthoff, M.; Lehmkuhl, L. [Herzzentrum, Universitaet Leipzig, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany); Lurz, P.; Eitel, I.; Thiele, H. [Herzzentrum, Universitaet Leipzig, Abteilung Kardiologie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has become the primary tool for the non-invasive assessment in patients with suspected myocarditis, especially after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the differential diagnosis. Various MRI parameters are available which have different accuracies. Volumetric and functional ventricular assessment and the occurrence of pericardial effusion alone demonstrate only a poor sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the T2-ratio (edema assessment), the early or global relative myocardial enhancement (gRE) and the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), which represents irreversibly injured myocardium, are more specific parameters. All MRI parameters demonstrate the best accuracy in infarct-like acute myocarditis, whereas in chronic myocarditis sensitivity and specificity are less accurate. Therefore, a multisequential (at least two out of three parameters are positive) approach is recommended. The assessment of the value of newer, more quantitative MRI sequences, such as T1 and T2-mapping is still under investigation. (orig.) [German] Die kardiale MRT stellt die primaere nichtinvasive bildgebende Modalitaet bei Verdacht auf Myokarditis dar, insbesondere auch nach Ausschluss eines akuten Koronarsyndroms (ACS) zur Differenzialdiagnose. Verschiedene MR-Parameter mit unterschiedlicher Wertigkeit stehen zur Verfuegung. Die Beurteilung der Volumetrie und Ventrikelfunktion weisen ebenso wie der Nachweis eines Perikardergusses alleine nur eine geringe Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet auf. Die spezifischeren MRT-Inflammationsparameter stellen die T2-Ratio (Oedemnachweis), die fruehe Kontrastmittelanreicherung bzw. das globale relative Enhancement (gRE) und die spaete Kontrastmittelanreicherung, das so genannte Late-Gadolinium-Enhancement (LGE) als Zeichen eines irreversiblen Myokardschadens dar. Alle MR-Parameter zeigen die beste diagnostische Genauigkeit bei einer ''infarktaehnlichen'' akuten

  7. Fluctuations of the transcription factor ATML1 generate the pattern of giant cells in the Arabidopsis sepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heather M; Teles, José; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Refahi, Yassin; San-Bento, Rita; Ingram, Gwyneth; Jönsson, Henrik; Locke, James C W; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular development produces patterns of specialized cell types. Yet, it is often unclear how individual cells within a field of identical cells initiate the patterning process. Using live imaging, quantitative image analyses and modeling, we show that during Arabidopsis thaliana sepal development, fluctuations in the concentration of the transcription factor ATML1 pattern a field of identical epidermal cells to differentiate into giant cells interspersed between smaller cells. We find that ATML1 is expressed in all epidermal cells. However, its level fluctuates in each of these cells. If ATML1 levels surpass a threshold during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, the cell will likely enter a state of endoreduplication and become giant. Otherwise, the cell divides. Our results demonstrate a fluctuation-driven patterning mechanism for how cell fate decisions can be initiated through a random yet tightly regulated process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19131.001 PMID:28145865

  8. INI Expressing Epithelioid Sarcoma with Osteoclastic Giant Cells in a Child: A Case Report with Summary of Prior Published Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Riju; Ghosh, Ranajoy; Saha, Koushik; Chatterjee, Uttara

    2017-08-01

    Epithelioid sarcoma is a heterogeneous tumor with 2 subtypes, classic and proximal. The proximal variant is more aggressive and occurs in proximal location in young adults. We present a proximal epithelioid sarcoma in the leg of an 8 year old girl with rhabdoid morphology and scattered osteoclastic giant cells. Nuclear INI-1 was retained. Despite wide local excision, local recurrence occurred at 8 months. Following re-excision, she developed a chest wall metastasis after 9 months. Epithelioid sarcoma, proximal type with osteoclastic giant cells in the pediatric age group has not been reported previously and should be considered in the differential diagnoses of tumors with epithelioid cell morphology and scattered osteoclastic giant cells. Retained INI expression helped to differentiate this tumor from malignant rhabdoid tumor.

  9. Eosinophilic Myocarditis due to Toxocariasis: Not a Rare Cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Shibazaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis is a clinically important disease because of the high mortality. From the perspective of treatment strategy, eosinophilic myocarditis should be distinguished from other types of myocarditis. Toxocariasis, caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, is known as a cause of eosinophilic myocarditis but is considered rare. As it is an unpopular disease, eosinophilic myocarditis due to toxocariasis may be underdiagnosed. We experienced two cases of eosinophilic myocarditis due to toxocariasis from different geographical areas in quick succession between 2013 and 2014. Case 1 is 32-year-old man. Case 2 is 66-year-old woman. In both cases, diagnosis was done by endomyocardial biopsy and IgG-ELISA against Toxocara excretory-secretory antigen. Only a corticosteroid was used in Case  1, whereas a corticosteroid and albendazole were used in Case  2 as induction therapy. Both patients recovered. Albendazole was also used in Case  1 to prevent recurrence after induction therapy. Eosinophilic myocarditis by toxocariasis may in actuality not be a rare disease, and corticosteroid is an effective drug as induction therapy even before use of albendazole.

  10. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sharma Tandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (GCT is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge.

  11. Plasma viscosity or erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Brittain, G. P.; McIlwaine, G. G.; Bell, J. A.; Gibson, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma viscosity (PV) has replaced the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as a routine laboratory test in many hospitals. The finding of a normal PV but raised ESR in a case of biopsy proved giant cell arteritis (GCA) cast doubt on this substitution in cases of suspected GCA. To assess the equivalence of PV and ESR in the diagnosis of this disease 40 suspected cases were prospectively investigated with both tests. The correlation between the two tests was good (r = 0.742, p less than 0.0001...

  12. A Patient-Matched Entire First Metacarpal Prosthesis in Treatment of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thipachart Punyaratabandhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of the bones occurring in the first metacarpals frequently requires entire metacarpal resection due to the aggressive nature and high rate of recurrence. Bone reconstruction can be performed with autogenous bone grafts. Here we describe a new technique of reconstruction using a patient-matched three-dimensional printed titanium first metacarpal prosthesis. This prosthesis has a special design for ligament reconstruction in the proximal and distal portions. Good hand function and aesthetic appearance were maintained at a 24-month follow-up visit. This reconstructive technique can avoid donor-site complications and spare the autogenous bone grafts for revision options.

  13. Simultaneous Presentation of Giant Cell Arteritis and Myelodysplastic Syndrome in an Elderly Japanese Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senjo, Hajime; Higuchi, Takakazu; Morimoto, Masaya; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Yanaoka, Chisun; Okada, Sadamu

    2018-05-18

    An 81-year-old Japanese man presented with constitutional symptoms and anemia and was diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) simultaneously. His symptoms and anemia improved promptly with steroids; however, the MDS rapidly progressed to overt leukemia. While MDS patients are at an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, an association with GCA has rarely been reported. This case illustrates the importance of considering GCA as a cause of anemia in elderly patients if MDS is already diagnosed, even in countries where the prevalence of GCA is very low. The simultaneous development of GCA and MDS suggests a common pathogenetic link between these two diseases.

  14. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz

    2008-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. the NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only gen...

  15. Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinoma of the intestine. An immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Teglbjaerg, P S

    1989-01-01

    reaction for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was found in three tumors and a positive reaction for chromogranin was found in one tumor. On electron microscopic study, intracytoplasmic whorls of intermediate filaments were seen in the perinuclear area. Dense core "neurosecretory" granules were rarely seen......Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinomas have been described in the lungs, thyroid, pancreas, and gallbladder. Two pleomorphic carcinomas of the small bowel and two of the large bowel are presented. On light microscopic study, the carcinomas were solid, without squamous or glandular differentiation...

  16. Giant-cell Arteritis of the Ovarian Arteries: A Rare Manifestation of a Common Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisca Theunissen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 58-year-old woman presenting with headache and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, who was diagnosed with and successfully treated for giant-cell arteritis (GCA. Seven months after the end of treatment, ovarian GCA was incidentally found after ovariectomy for a simple cyst. GCA of extracranial vessels like the ovarian arteries is rare. Nevertheless, we stress that extracranial GCA should be considered in patients older than 50 years with an elevated ESR, even if a temporal artery biopsy is negative or specific symptoms are absent. Moreover, we discuss the importance of imaging techniques when GCA of the extracranial large vessels is suspected.

  17. Giant Cell Arteritis in a 12-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is rare in children. The kidneys are generally spared. We present a case of GCA in a 12-year-old girl with severe headache and tender scalp especially over the right temporal area. The right superficial temporal artery was cord like and nodular and the pulsations were barely felt. Several small tender nodular swellings were felt in the occipital area. She had been previously diagnosed as a case of nephrotic syndrome due to underlying membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. This report is aimed at drawing attention to this rare form of vasculitis in children aiming at decreasing its morbidities.

  18. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated with a giant cell tumor: One case in the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzaa, M R; Bennis, A; Iken, M; Abouzzahir, A; Boussouga, M; Jaafar, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism can present itself as brown tumors (or osteolytic expansive lesions) that usually disappear after normalization of calcium and phosphate levels. It rarely occurs simultaneously with a giant cell tumor. The authors report one case of a localized form at the distal radius in a patient being followed for primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnostic challenges related to the clinical and radiological similarities of these two pathological entities are discussed, as they can lead to delays in therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The fate of radiation induced giant-nucleated cells of human skin fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahwasi, A. A.; Jeynes, J. C.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    Radiation-induced giant-nucleated cells (GCs) have been observed to occur within survivors of irradiated cancerous and within healthy cells, both in vivo and in vitro. The expression of such morphological alterations is associated with genomic instability. This study was designed to investigate the fate of GCs induced in a normal human fibroblast cell line (AG1522) after exposure to 0.2, 1 or 2 Gy of X-ray or proton irradiation. The total of 79 individual AG1522 GCs present at 7, 14 or 21 days after each dose point were analysed from fluorescence microscopy images captured over approximately 120 h. The GCs were identified at the beginning of the observation period for each time point post-irradiation and the area of the cell nucleus was measured (μm2) using a cell-recognition MATLAB code. The results demonstrate that the majority of GCs had undergone a prolonged mitotic arrest, which might be an indication of the survival strategy. The live cell microscopy confirms that a giant-nucleated cell formed 14 days after exposure to 0.2 Gy of proton irradiation was divided into two asymmetrical normal-sized cells. These results suggest that a small fraction of GCs can proliferate and form progeny. Some of GCs had disappeared from the microscopy fields. The rate of their loss was decreased as the dose increased but there remains the potential for them to have progeny that could continue to proliferate, ultimately contributing to development of cancer risk. This important method to access delayed effects in normal tissues could act as a potential radioprotective assay for a dose-limiting parameter when applying radiotherapy. These results might have important implications in evaluating risk estimates for patients during radiation therapy treatment.

  20. Asymmetric Hybrid Polymer-Lipid Giant Vesicles as Cell Membrane Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyret, Ariane; Ibarboure, Emmanuel; Le Meins, Jean-François; Lecommandoux, Sebastien

    2018-01-01

    Lipid membrane asymmetry plays an important role in cell function and activity, being for instance a relevant signal of its integrity. The development of artificial asymmetric membranes thus represents a key challenge. In this context, an emulsion-centrifugation method is developed to prepare giant vesicles with an asymmetric membrane composed of an inner monolayer of poly(butadiene)- b -poly(ethylene oxide) (PBut- b -PEO) and outer monolayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The formation of a complete membrane asymmetry is demonstrated and its stability with time is followed by measuring lipid transverse diffusion. From fluorescence spectroscopy measurements, the lipid half-life is estimated to be 7.5 h. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique, the diffusion coefficient of 1,2-dioleoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl) (DOPE-rhod, inserted into the POPC leaflet) is determined to be about D = 1.8 ± 0.50 μm 2 s -1 at 25 °C and D = 2.3 ± 0.7 μm 2 s -1 at 37 °C, between the characteristic values of pure POPC and pure polymer giant vesicles and in good agreement with the diffusion of lipids in a variety of biological membranes. These results demonstrate the ability to prepare a cell-like model system that displays an asymmetric membrane with transverse and translational diffusion properties similar to that of biological cells.

  1. Absence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reduces mortality of acute viral myocarditis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hisako; Hoshi, Masato; Mouri, Akihiro; Tashita, Chieko; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Saito, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    Infection of the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) in mice is an established model for viral myocarditis. Previously, we have demonstrated that indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an L-tryptophan - kynurenine pathway (KP) enzyme, affects acute viral myocarditis. However, the roles of KP metabolites in EMCV infection remain unclear. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is one of the key regulatory enzymes, which metabolizes kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine in the KP. Therefore, we examined the role of KMO in acute viral infection by comparing between KMO -/- mice and KMO +/+ mice. KMO deficiency resulted in suppressed mortality after EMCV infection. The number of infiltrating cells and F4/80 + cells in KMO -/- mice was suppressed compared with those in KMO +/+ mice. KMO -/- mice showed significantly increased levels of serum KP metabolites, and induction of KMO expression upon EMCV infection was involved in its effect on mortality through EMCV suppression. Furthermore, KMO -/- mice showed significantly suppression of CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4 on day 2 and CXCL1 on day 4 after infection. These results suggest that increased KP metabolites reduced chemokine production, resulting in suppressed mortality upon KMO knockdown in EMCV infection. KP metabolites may thus provide an effective strategy for treating acute viral myocarditis. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 99mTc-Hynic-annexin V imaging to evaluate inflammation and apoptosis in rats with autoimmune myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokita, Naoki; Izumi, Tohru; Hasegawa, Shinji; Maruyama, Kaoru; Blankenberg, Francis G.; Tait, Jonathan F.; Strauss, William H.; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2003-01-01

    Inflammation and cell death are two important components of myocarditis. We evaluated the distribution of inflammation and apoptotic cell death in rats with autoimmune myocarditis using two radiotracers - technetium-99m Hynic-annexin V ( 99m Tc-annexin) as a marker of apoptotic cell death and carbon-14 deoxyglucose ( 14 C-DG) as a marker of inflammation - in comparison with histologic findings. Three, 7 and 14 weeks after immunization with porcine cardiac myosin (acute, subacute, and chronic phases, respectively) 99m Tc-annexin and 14 C-DG were injected. The uptake in the total heart was determined as the percentage of injected dose per gram (% ID/g) by tissue counting. Dual-tracer autoradiography with 99m Tc-annexin and 14 C-DG was performed. The distribution of each of these agents was compared with the results of hematoxylin and eosin staining to identify areas of inflammation, and TUNEL staining to identify areas of apoptosis. Total cardiac uptake of 99m Tc-annexin in the acute phase of myocarditis was significantly higher than that in normal rats (1.28%±0.30% vs 0.46%±0.01%; P 14 C-DG in the acute phase of myocarditis was significantly higher than that in normal rats (2.78%±0.95% vs 1.02%±0.25%; P 14 C-DG uptake; some also corresponded to areas of high 99m Tc-annexin uptake in the acute phase of myocarditis. 99m Tc-annexin localization was strongly correlated with the number of TUNEL-positive cells (P 14 C-DG showed no relationship with it. There is a marked difference in the distribution of inflammation and apoptotic cell death in the myocardium of animals with immune myocarditis. These changes are mirrored by the localization of 14 C-DG and 99m Tc-annexin. Sites of inflammation and zones of apoptotic cell death change over the course of immune myocarditis. (orig.)

  3. Primary peritoneal anaplastic giant cell carcinoma: case report of an unusual and highly malignant müllerian neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Zhang, Cunxian; Liu, Fang; Sung, C James; Steinhoff, Margaret M; Lawrence, W Dwayne

    2008-01-01

    Virtually all primary peritoneal carcinomas (PPCs) are of serous papillary type. We report an unusual histologic type of PPC composed of anaplastic giant cells, which exhibited an aggressive clinical course. A 72-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography showed a diffuse omental thickening. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy with omentectomy, total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and appendectomy. Pathologic examination revealed extensive omental replacement by tumor but only superficial surface cortical involvement of both ovaries, a disease distribution consistent with a typical müllerian-derived PPC. However, this neoplasm was composed of diffuse anaplastic tumor giant cells, rather than serous carcinoma, which is the usual histologic type encountered in PPC. The patient died within 1 month after surgery. We report this unusual histologic variant of PPC to raise awareness that anaplastic giant cell carcinoma may arise in the pelvic peritoneum as a primary tumor.

  4. Endodontic misdiagnosis of periapical central giant cell granuloma: Report of case with 2 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma is considered as reactive lesion of jaws possibly to intramedullary hemorrhage or trauma. It may manifest as radiolucencies anywhere in the mandible or maxilla. In rare cases, it can appear as a localized periapical area and mimic an endodontic lesion. This report presents a case where central giant cell granuloma was misdiagnosed as a periapical cyst in 20-year-old male and was treated by conventional endodontic treatment. However the lesion was refractory to endodontic treatment and proved to be central giant cell granuloma after surgical intervention and histopathological examination. The purpose of this case report is to emphasize on periodic follow-up of periapical lesions after endodontic treatment and surgical intervention if required.

  5. Nucleoli in large (giant bi- and multinucleate cells after apoptosis-inducing photodynamic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Smetana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental study was undertaken to provide information on nucleolar changes accompanying the apoptotic process in large or giant binucleate and multinucleate cells (LBMNCs. Such cells were present in a small but constant percentage in cultures of HL-60 cells. The apoptotic process was induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT by means of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA as the precursor of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX and irradiation with broad spectrum blue light (BL. Nucleolar changes in LBMNCs were characterized by marked reduction or disappearance of silver stained particles representing AgNORs in nucleoli including the large ones. In addition, PDT also significantly reduced the number of nucleoli regardless of their size. These changes apparently reflected the decrease or cessation of nucleolar biosynthetic activities and resembled those which were previously observed in naturally maturing bone marrow megakaryocytes (Janoutová et al., 2001.

  6. Delayed cell death, giant cell formation and chromosome instability induced by X-irradiation in human embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, K.; Kodama, Seiji; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1999-01-01

    We studied X-ray-induced delayed cell death, delayed giant cell formation and delayed chromosome aberrations in normal human embryo cells to explore the relationship between initial radiation damage and delayed effect appeared at 14 to 55 population doubling numbers (PDNs) after X-irradiation. The delayed effect was induced in the progeny of X-ray survivors in a dose-dependent manner and recovered with increasing PDNs after X-irradiation. Delayed plating for 24 h post-irradiation reduced both acute and delayed lethal damage, suggesting that potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) can be effective for relieving the delayed cell death. The chromosome analysis revealed that most of the dicentrics (more than 90%) observed in the progeny of X-ray survivors were not accompanied with fragments, in contrast with those observed in the first mitosis after X-irradiation. The present results indicate that the potentiality of genetic instability is determined during the repair process of initial radiation damage and suggest that the mechanism for formation of delayed chromosome aberrations by radiation might be different from that of direct radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. (author)

  7. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  8. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W.; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro. PMID:26375397

  9. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Wang

    Full Text Available It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  10. Isolated (localized) idiopathic granulomatous (giant cell) vasculitis in an intramuscular lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando Val-Bernal, J; Val, Daniel; Calvo, Ignacio; Francisca Garijo, M

    2006-01-01

    Isolated (localized) idiopathic granulomatous vasculitis (IGV) is an uncommon, heterogeneous, and poorly defined group of disorders characterized by infiltration of the arterial wall caused by compactly grouped mononuclear phagocytes, with or without giant cells, in segmental distribution. We report on a 55-year-old woman with IGV limited to an intramuscular lipoma of the left thigh. The vasculitis was identified incidentally upon microscopic examination of the removed tumor. The IGV was centered on two medium-sized arteries, accompanied by narrowing of the lumens, and not associated with secondary changes such as infart or postinfart fibrosis. The inflammatory infiltrate was rich in T-lymphocytes and macrophages, with the presence of giant cells. The patient was asymptomatic and well in a follow-up period of 2 months, during which she was not treated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of lipoma involvement in localized IGV. It is important to distinguish cases of isolated intratumorous IGV from systemic disease, because the latter implies a poor prognosis and requires an aggressive treatment.

  11. What is the impact of giant cell arteritis on patients’ lives? A UK qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jennifer; Bartlam, Roisin; Mallen, Christian D; Mackie, Sarah L; Prior, James A; Helliwell, Toby; Richardson, Jane C

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Clinical management of giant cell arteritis (GCA) involves balancing the risks and burdens arising from the disease with those arising from treatment, but there is little research on the nature of those burdens. We aimed to explore the impact of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and its treatment on patients’ lives. Methods UK patients with GCA participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Inductive thematic analysis was employed. Results 24 participants were recruited (age: 65–92 years, time since diagnosis: 2 months to >6 years). The overarching themes from analysis were: ongoing symptoms of the disease and its treatment; and ‘life-changing’ impacts. The overall impact of GCA on patients’ lives arose from a changing combination of symptoms, side effects, adaptations to everyday life and impacts on sense of normality. Important factors contributing to loss of normality were glucocorticoid-related treatment burdens and fear about possible future loss of vision. Conclusions The impact of GCA in patients’ everyday lives can be substantial, multifaceted and ongoing despite apparent control of disease activity. The findings of this study will help doctors better understand patient priorities, legitimise patients’ experiences of GCA and work with patients to set realistic treatment goals and plan adaptations to their everyday lives. PMID:28838902

  12. Central Giant Cell Granuloma of Posterior Maxilla: First Expression of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of 19-year-old male patient reported with the chief complaint of slowly growing diffuse painless swelling over the right part of the face from last 6 months. Intraoral examination revealed a swelling on right side of palate in relation to molar region with buccal cortical plate expansion. Radiographic examination (orthopantograph and 3DCT showed large multilocular radiolucency in right maxilla with generalized loss of lamina dura. Incisional biopsy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which showed multinucleated giant cells containing 15–30 nuclei. Based on clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings provisional diagnosis of central giant cell granuloma was made. Blood tests after histopathology demonstrated elevated serum calcium level and alkaline phosphatase level. Immunoassay of parathyroid hormone (PTH level was found to be highly elevated. Radiographic examination of long bones like humerus and femur, mandible, and skull was also done which showed osteoclastic lesions. Considering the clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and blood investigation findings, final diagnosis of brown tumour of maxilla was made. The patient underwent partial parathyroidectomy under general anaesthesia to control primary hyperparathyroidism. Surgical removal of the bony lesion was done by curettage. The patient has been followed up for 1 year with no postoperative complications and the lesion healed uneventfully.

  13. Profile of tocilizumab and its potential in the treatment of giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollan SP

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Susan Patricia Mollan,1,2 John Horsburgh,1 Bhaskar Dasgupta3 1Birmingham Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, 2Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, 3Department of Rheumatology, Southend University Hospital, Southend-on-Sea, UK Abstract: Giant cell arteritis (GCA remains a medical emergency due to the threat of permanent sight loss. High-dose glucocorticoids (GCs are effective in inducing remission in the majority of patients, however, relapses are common which lengthen GC therapy. GC toxicity remains a major morbidity in this group of patients, and conventional steroid-sparing therapies have not yet shown enough of a clinical benefit to change the standard of care. As the understanding of the underlying immunopathophysiology of GCA has increased, positive clinical observations have been made with the use of IL-6 receptor inhibitor therapies, such as tocilizumab (TCZ. This has led to prospective randomized control trials that have highlighted the safety and efficacy of TCZ in both new-onset and relapsing GCA. Keywords: giant cell arteritis, temporal arteritis, Horton disease, interleukin-6, tocilizumab, treatment

  14. Diagnostic approach of myocarditis: strike the golden mean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazebroek, M R; Everaerts, K; Heymans, S

    2014-02-01

    Myocarditis is a challenging diagnosis due to the extreme diversity of clinical manifestations. The actual incidence of myocarditis is also difficult to determine as endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), the diagnostic gold standard, is used infrequently. Nevertheless, in up to 30 % of patients with biopsy-proven myocarditis, progression to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) can occur and is associated with a poor prognosis. Recent position statements of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the American Heart Association vary widely with regard to indications for performing an EMB in these patients. This makes decision-making, in particular for general practitioners (GPs) and regional hospitals, difficult and unclear. Therefore, we will present a short summary of the ESC Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases statement and our suggestions for GPs and regional hospitals for the diagnostic approach in patients with suspected myocarditis.

  15. The effect of experimental streptococcus infection in myocarditis on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    faecalis induction of myocarditis and its effect on some blood parameters, inflammatory markers and .... LSD. 41. 5. 0.9. Similar characters denote insignificance between groups. *** denote .... detectable in serum, brain and intestine of rat pups.

  16. Saffold virus infection associated with human myocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nielsen, Alex Yde; Banner, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Saffold virus was described in 2007 as one of the first human viruses within the genus cardioviruses. Cardioviruses may cause severe infections of the myocardium in animals, and several studies have associated saffold virus with human disease. As a result, saffold virus has been...... isolated from different anatomical compartments, including the myocardium, but, until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate the accompanying histopathological signs of inflammation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine if saffold virus is capable of causing invasive infection in the human...... myocardium. STUDY DESIGN: Using real-time PCR, we retrospectively examined formalin-fixed paraffin embedded cardiac tissue specimens from 150 deceased individuals diagnosed with myocarditis at autopsy. The results were compared with histological findings. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Saffold virus was detected...

  17. Pericardial disease and myocarditis: management guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Jorge E; Duque, Mauricio; Uribe, William; Medina, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Pericardium is a structure that can be primarily affected by a series of different agents and in a secondary way by systemic processes. Its response is not specific and in general it corresponds to an inflammatory process that can be acute, chronic or recurrent. The recognition of these pathologies is of vital significance in the making of a right therapeutic approach. Some basic orientations for the correct classification, diagnosis and therapy of main pericardial syndromes, based on clinical and etiological aspects and para clinical available aids are presented. Likewise, some recommendations for the specific treatment of each one of the main entities usually affecting the pericardium are given. Next, a brief mention of some pathophysiological aspects of acute myocarditis, its main etiologies, and the treatment of the cardiac failure secondary to the disease with its specific differences, is made, and the controversy on its handling with immuno suppressors and the experimental therapy measures are studied in depth

  18. A case report and literature review of Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting with myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lu; Gao, Dengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by asthma, prominent peripheral blood eosinophilia, and vasculitis signs. Here we report a case of CSS presenting with acute myocarditis and heart failure and review the literature on CSS with cardiac involvement. A 59-year-old man with general fatigue, numbness of limbs, and a 2-year history of asthma was admitted to the department of orthopedics. Eosinophilia, history of asthma, lung infiltrates, peripheral neurological damage, and myocarditis suggested the diagnosis of CSS. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a dilated hypokinetic left ventricle (left ventricular ejection fraction ∼40%) with mild segmental abnormalities in the septal and apical segments. By reviewing the present case reports, we concluded that (1) the younger age of CSS, the greater occurrence rate of complicating myocarditis and the poorer prognosis; (2) female CSS patients are older than male patients; (3) patients with cardiac involvement usually have a history of severe asthma; (4) markedly increased eosinophil count suggests a potential diagnosis of CSS (when the count increases to 20% of white blood cell counts or 8.1 × 109/L, eosinophils start to infiltrate into myocardium); and (5) negative ANCA status is associated with heart disease in CSS.

  19. Acute myocarditis mimicking myocardial infarction can misdirect the diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Yildirim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocarditis is a well-recognized but rare manifestation of mostly viral infections. It can present with various clinical manifestations and may mimic myocardial infarction (MI since patients usually present with chest pain, and the electrocardiographic changes similar to those observed in acute ST-elevation MI. We, herein, present such an extreme case of acute myocarditis characterized by dynamic ST segment elevation with reciprocal changes in the electrocardiogram.

  20. Pulmonary Edema and Myocarditis Developing Due to Scorpion Stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevdegul Karadas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although most of the scorpion stings are harmless, deadly species of scorpions may cause multiorgan failure, neurotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, and pulmonary edema. The cases should be observed in the emergency department against the possibility of development of systemic effects. Fatal complications, in particular such as pulmonary edema, and myocarditis should be considered. In this study, a case of myocarditis and pulmonary edema was detected on the patient who had applied to the emergency department due to a scorpion sting is presented.

  1. Lyme myocarditis diagnosed by indium-111-antimyosin antibody scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casans, I.; Villar, A.; Almenar, V.; Blanes, A.

    1989-06-01

    We report a new case of Lyme disease with cardiac manifestations, which has been possible to follow during the long period of 12 years. We have detected the usual ECG abnormalities, and concentric hypertrophic myocardiopathy, by echocardiography. The acute myocarditis was demonstrated by /sup 111/In-antimyosin scintigraphy, which showed global myocardial uptake of the tracer, constituting the first report, to our knowledge, of Lyme myocarditis diagnosed by this method.

  2. Lyme myocarditis diagnosed by indium-111-antimyosin antibody scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casans, I.; Villar, A.; Almenar, V.; Blanes, A.

    1989-01-01

    We report a new case of Lyme disease with cardiac manifestations, which has been possible to follow during the long period of 12 years. We have detected the usual ECG abnormalities, and concentric hypertrophic myocardiopathy, by echocardiography. The acute myocarditis was demonstrated by 111 In-antimyosin scintigraphy, which showed global myocardial uptake of the tracer, constituting the first report, to our knowledge, of Lyme myocarditis diagnosed by this method. (orig.)

  3. Mycobacteria exploit nitric oxide-induced transformation of macrophages into permissive giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharun, Kourosh; Senges, Julia; Seidl, Maximilian; Lösslein, Anne; Kolter, Julia; Lohrmann, Florens; Fliegauf, Manfred; Elgizouli, Magdeldin; Vavra, Martina; Schachtrup, Kristina; Illert, Anna L; Gilleron, Martine; Kirschning, Carsten J; Triantafyllopoulou, Antigoni; Henneke, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    Immunity to mycobacteria involves the formation of granulomas, characterized by a unique macrophage (MΦ) species, so-called multinucleated giant cells (MGC). It remains unresolved whether MGC are beneficial to the host, that is, by prevention of bacterial spread, or whether they promote mycobacterial persistence. Here, we show that the prototypical antimycobacterial molecule nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by MGC in excessive amounts, is a double-edged sword. Next to its antibacterial capacity, NO propagates the transformation of MΦ into MGC, which are relatively permissive for mycobacterial persistence. The mechanism underlying MGC formation involves NO-induced DNA damage and impairment of p53 function. Moreover, MGC have an unsurpassed potential to engulf mycobacteria-infected apoptotic cells, which adds a further burden to their antimycobacterial capacity. Accordingly, mycobacteria take paradoxical advantage of antimicrobial cellular efforts by driving effector MΦ into a permissive MGC state. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Fluorescence microscopical studies on chitin distribution in the cell wall of giant cells of Saccharomyces uvarum, grown following X-radiaiton treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoschka, L.

    1982-01-01

    Teast cells are synchronized and modiated with X-rays (1.0 kGy) in the Cr, phase. Their growth behaviour is observed in suspension cultures and the formation of giant cells noted. The chitin structures are selectively stained with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white. In the unradiated cells the chitin is deposited at the bud constriction site in the form of rings in the mother cell wall, whereas for irradiated cells only one chitin ring of normal appearance is formed between the mother cell and first bud equivalent. Between further bud equivalents an intensification of fluorescence is occasionally noted, however the organisation of the chitin into a regular ring arrangement is disturbed. In giant cells the facility for primary and secondary septa formation is missing and these are essential for successful cell division. By further experiments it was possible to identify the cause of disturbance in the cell cycle of irradiated cells. Giant cells only form one chitin ring because its DNA is replicated one time only. The major cause triggering the actual formation of giant cells must be considered the missing distribution of the once-rephicated DNA. All processes in the cell cycle dependent on this step are therefore stopped and only bud formation which occurs independently continues along its rhytmical path. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Protein Expression Profiling of Giant Cell Tumors of Bone Treated with Denosumab.

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    Kenta Mukaihara

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB are locally aggressive osteolytic bone tumors. Recently, some clinical trials have shown that denosumab is a novel and effective therapeutic option for aggressive and recurrent GCTB. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of denosumab. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed using GCTB samples which were taken before and after denosumab treatment. Each expression profile was analyzed using the software program to further understand the affected biological network. One of identified proteins was further evaluated by gelatin zymography and an immunohistochemical analysis. We identified 13 consistently upregulated proteins and 19 consistently downregulated proteins in the pre- and post-denosumab samples. Using these profiles, the software program identified molecular interactions between the differentially expressed proteins that were indirectly involved in the RANK/RANKL pathway and in several non-canonical subpathways including the Matrix metalloproteinase pathway. The data analysis also suggested that the identified proteins play a critical functional role in the osteolytic process of GCTB. Among the most downregulated proteins, the activity of MMP-9 was significantly decreased in the denosumab-treated samples, although the residual stromal cells were found to express MMP-9 by an immunohistochemical analysis. The expression level of MMP-9 in the primary GCTB samples was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors, including patient outcomes. Although the replacement of tumors by fibro-osseous tissue or the diminishment of osteoclast-like giant cells have been shown as therapeutic effects of denosumab, the residual tumor after denosumab treatment, which is composed of only stromal cells, might be capable of causing bone destruction; thus the therapeutic application of denosumab would be still necessary for these lesions. We believe that the

  6. EEVD motif of heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of abortion-inducing pathogens by trophoblast giant (TG cells is a key event in infectious abortion. However, little is known about phagocytic functions of TG cells against the pathogens. Here we show that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 contributes to bacterial uptake by TG cells and the EEVD motif of Hsc70 plays an important role in this. Methods Brucella abortus and Listeria monocytogenes were used as the bacterial antigen in this study. Recombinant proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains were constructed and confirmation of the binding capacity to Hsc70 was assessed by ELISA. The recombinant TPR proteins were used for investigation of the effect of TPR proteins on bacterial uptake by TG cells and on pregnancy in mice. Results The monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial uptake by TG cells reacted with the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Bacterial TPR proteins bound to the C-terminal of Hsc70 through its EEVD motif and this binding inhibited bacterial uptake by TG cells. Infectious abortion was also prevented by blocking the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that surface located Hsc70 on TG cells mediates the uptake of pathogenic bacteria and proteins containing the TPR domain inhibit the function of Hsc70 by binding to its EEVD motif. These molecules may be useful in the development of methods for preventing infectious abortion.

  7. Driving Solar Giant Cells through the Self-organization of Near-surface Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Miesch, Mark S.; Toomre, Juri

    2018-06-01

    Global 3D simulations of solar giant-cell convection have provided significant insight into the processes which yield the Sun’s observed differential rotation and cyclic dynamo action. However, as we move to higher-resolution simulations a variety of codes have encountered what has been termed the convection conundrum. As these simulations increase in resolution and hence the level of turbulence achieved, they tend to produce weak or even anti-solar differential rotation patterns associated with a weak rotational influence (high Rossby number) due to large convective velocities. One potential culprit for this convection conundrum is the upper boundary condition applied in most simulations, which is generally impenetrable. Here we present an alternative stochastic plume boundary condition which imposes small-scale convective plumes designed to mimic near-surface convective downflows, thus allowing convection to carry the majority of the outward solar energy flux up to and through our simulated upper boundary. The use of a plume boundary condition leads to significant changes in the convective driving realized in the simulated domain and thus to the convective energy transport, the dominant scale of the convective enthalpy flux, and the relative strength of the strongest downflows, the downflow network, and the convective upflows. These changes are present even far from the upper boundary layer. Additionally, we demonstrate that, in spite of significant changes, giant cell morphology in the convective patterns is still achieved with self-organization of the imposed boundary plumes into downflow lanes, cellular patterns, and even rotationally aligned banana cells in equatorial regions. This plume boundary presents an alternative pathway for 3D global convection simulations where driving is non-local and may provide a new approach toward addressing the convection conundrum.

  8. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Minami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained.

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of Rib Arising Anteriorly as a Large Inframammary Mass: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sharma

    2012-01-01

    posteriorly. The rarity of this tumor poses diagnostic and therapeutic problems for physicians, especially when it is located in the anterior arc of the rib in close proximity to the breasts in female patients. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 32-year-old Asian female with a giant cell tumor of her anterior rib, presenting as a large inframammary mass. Computed tomography showed a tumor arising from the 7th rib anteriorly with marginal sclerosis, cortical destruction, and a soft tissue mass. She was treated with surgical resection, and the defect was reconstructed primarily. The surgical specimen measured 28.0 × 24.0 cm. The microscopic examination showed a large number of multinucleate giant cells scattered over the parenchyma. Patient recovered uneventfully and continues to be recurrence-free six years after surgical resection. Conclusion. We report the largest known case of giant cell tumor arising from the anterior aspect of a rib. We recommend including giant cell tumor in the differential diagnosis of chest wall masses especially in female patients, regardless of the size on clinical examination.

  10. Introducing micrometer-sized artificial objects into live cells: a method for cell-giant unilamellar vesicle electrofusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira C Saito

    Full Text Available Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC field to induce a linear cell-GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation.

  11. Activation of professional antigen presenting cells by acharan sulfate isolated from giant African snail, Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Young-Ran; Im, Sun-A; Lee, Jae-Kwon; Kim, Yeong Shik; Sim, Joon-Soo; Choi, Hyung Seok; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2007-07-01

    Acharan sulfate isolated from the giant African snail, Achatina fulica, has been reported to have antitumor activity in vivo. In an effort to determine the mechanisms of its antitumor activity, we examined the effects of acharan sulfate on professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Acharan sulfate increased the phagocytic activity, the production of cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and the release of nitric oxide on a macrophage cell line, Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, acharan sulfate induced phenotypic and functional maturation of immature dendritic cells (DCs). Immature DCs cultured with acharan sulfate expressed higher levels of class II MHC molecules and major co-stimulatory molecules such as B7-1, B7-2, and CD40. Functional maturation of immature DCs cultured in the presence of acharan sulfate was confirmed by the increased allostimulatory capacity and IL-12 production. These results suggest that the antitumor activity of acharan sulfate is partly due to the activation of professional antigen presenting cells.

  12. Giant cell tumour in the foot of a skeletally immature girl: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2009-08-01

    We present a case of delayed diagnosis of a benign giant cell tumour (GCT) of the third metatarsal in a skeletally immature girl. The patient underwent en bloc excision of the tumour. The tumour had replaced the third metatarsal and had infiltrated the surrounding soft tissue and the second and fourth metatarsal bases. Deep, lateral and medial margins were all involved. A high index of suspicion is needed when evaluating any tumours of the foot, because the compact structure of the foot may delay diagnosis. Early detection is important for avoiding amputation, as the hindfoot and midfoot are classified as one compartment and radical resection is impossible to achieve. Tumours grow faster in the foot than in other bones. GCT in this location and age-group are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a destructive bony lesion in skeletally immature patients.

  13. Intramuscular diffuse-type giant cell tumor within the hamstring muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Akio; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao; Izumi, Teiyu; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse-type giant cell tumor (D-TGCT) is known as a synonym for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVS), a condition usually found in the large joints. We report an extremely rare case of D-TGCT which was located within the hamstring muscle. The lesion was an incidental finding in a 62-year-old man who underwent positron emission tomography (PET) as part of a staging evaluation for gastric cancer. The lesion was resected. There has been neither metastasis nor recurrence during the 6-month period since resection. This case demonstrates that PVS/D-TGCT may have a high SUV on PET imaging, and for this reason PET may be useful for detecting both the tumor and any recurrence. (orig.)

  14. Medical management of a case of central giant cell granuloma masquerading as a periapical pathosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Babu Bangi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of non-endodontic origin may mimic periapical pathosis. Errors in one or more of the clinical reasoning steps of diagnosis of such lesions may ultimately lead to misdiagnosis and ensuing complications. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is one such lesion of non-endodontic origin which can present as periapical pathosis. Here, we present a case of CGCG in a 33-year-old female patient who visited our department with a complaint of growth from the extraction sockets of upper front teeth, which were extracted 1 month back after a misdiagnosis as periapical pathosis. Suspecting a non-endodontic lesion, radiographic examination and incisional biopsy were performed and a final diagnosis of CGCG was made. Biweekly intra-lesional steroids were given for 6 weeks and patient was followed up for 6 months.

  15. GIANT CELL GRANULOMAS OF THE JAWS (ANALYSIS OF 1,083 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Yazdi

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell granulomas of the jaws are rather common in [rail, however, more reliable data need to be published In this retrospecti ve study 1,083 cases ojPGCO and CGCG (817 peripheral and 203 central were extracted from 6800 oral biopsy archives of the Oral Pathology Department and were analyzed: Age and sex ofthe patients and type and location distribution were obtained Our results show that most cases ofPGCG and CGCG occurred before"nthe fifth and during fourth decade, respectively. Slight predominance offemales was notedfor both types. Mandible wa~ often more affected (60.3%, especially in the premolarmolar region. The results obtained in this study were in agreement with other independent reports.

  16. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath of the hand - magnetic resonance image and orthopaedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Monovska, T.; Jablanski, V.; Alexieva, K.; Velev, M.

    2009-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS), also known as localized nodular tenosynovitis, is a benign neoplasm that occurs dominantly on the digits. These tumours most commonly occur in patients aged 30-50 years and are associated with degenerative joint disease. GCT-TS usually arises from the synovium of tendon sheets, affecting interfalangeal joints of the hand, feet, ankle and knees. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is able to depict characteristic signal intensities and can accurately assess the tumor size and degree of extent around the phalanx. We present a case of a 36 years-old male patient with GCT-TS in the flexor tendon of his left second finger, diagnosed with Magnetic Resonance imaging. The mass was excised widely with preservation of the flexor tendon without recurrence. (authors)

  17. A recurrent central giant cell granuloma in a young patient and orthodontic treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Devaki; Minhas, Gursharan; Johnson, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is an uncommon benign intraosseous lesion of the jaw, found predominantly in children and young adults below 30 years of age. The purpose of this article was to present a summary of the current literature and a case report of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with an aggressive CGCG involving the anterior maxilla that was removed in 2004 and subsequently recurred almost 3 years later in 2006. The presenting features of the patient and the effect of combined surgical and orthodontic treatment for this condition are discussed. This case shows how the dentition was successfully maintained with conservative surgery and orthodontic treatment in spite of the extensive destruction of the supporting bone, and the importance of long-term follow-up. The report also reminds orthodontic practitioners that rare pathological conditions can occur in their child patient groups.

  18. Laryngeal giant cell tumour presenting as a tongue base lesion causing severe dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Razi M. Saud, MBBS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available الملخص: أورام الخلايا العملاقة هي آفات حميدة وغير مألوفة تظهر في الحنجرة. قد يصاب المريض بصعوبة في البلع، وبحة في الصوت وتورم في الجهة الأمامية من الرقبة. أورام الخلايا العملاقة هي نادرة للغاية، وهناك حالات قليلة في الأدبيات المنشورة. نعرض لحالة إمرأة مسنة قدمت بصعوبة شديدة في البلع، وورم في قاعدة اللسان. أظهرت نتيجة الورم بأنه ورم الخلايا العملاقة في الحنجرة وتم علاجه بنجاح باستخدام المعالجة الكيميائية. Abstract: Giant cell tumours are benign lesions that are uncommonly found in the larynx. Patients with these tumours may present with dysphagia, hoarseness and anterior neck swelling. Giant cell tumours are extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. We present a case of an elderly woman who presented with severe dysphagia and a mass at the base of her tongue. The mass was found to be a laryngeal giant cell tumour and was successfully treated with chemotherapy. الكلمات المفتاحية: أورام الخلايا العملاقة, الحنجرة, صعوبة البلع, دينوسوماب, المعالجة الكيميائية, Keywords: Chemotherapy, Denosumab, Dysphagia, Giant cell tumour, Larynx

  19. Tumor-induced Osteomalacia in a 3-Year-Old With Unresectable Central Giant Cell Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossen, Stephanie S; Zambrano, Eduardo; Newman, Beverley; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Messner, Anna H; Bachrach, Laura K; Twist, Clare J

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare cause of hypophosphatemia involving overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23. TIO has been described largely in adults with small mesenchymal tumors. We report a case of TIO in a child who presented with knee pain and radiographic findings concerning for rickets, and was found to have maxillomandibular giant cell lesions. The patient was treated with oral phosphorus and calcitriol, surgical debulking, and intralesional corticosteroids, which resulted in tumor regression and normalization of serum fibroblast growth factor 23 and phosphorus. This case illustrates the occurrence of this rare paraneoplastic syndrome in children and adds to our knowledge about clinical manifestations and pathologic findings associated with pediatric TIO.

  20. Centrosome Clustering in the Development of Bovine Binucleate Trophoblast Giant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, Karl; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Boos, Alois

    2017-01-01

    Binucleate trophoblast giant cells (BNC) are the characteristic feature of the ruminant placenta. During their development, BNC pass through 2 acytokinetic mitoses and become binucleate with 2 tetraploid nuclei. In this study, we investigate the number and location of centrosomes in bovine BNC. Centrosomes typically consist of 2 centrioles surrounded by electron-dense pericentriolar material. Duplication of centrosomes is tightly linked to the cell cycle, which ensures that the number of centrosomes remains constant in proliferating diploid cells. Alterations of the cell cycle, which affect the number of chromosome sets, also affect the number of centrosomes. In this study, we use placentomal tissue from pregnant cows (gestational days 80-230) for immunohistochemical staining of γ-tubulin (n = 3) and transmission electron microscopy (n = 3). We show that mature BNC have 4 centrosomes with 8 centrioles, clustered in the angle between the 2 cell nuclei. During the second acytokinetic mitosis, the centrosomes must be clustered to form the poles of a bipolar spindle. In rare cases, centrosome clustering fails and tripolar mitosis leads to the formation of trinucleate "BNC". Generally, centrosome clustering occurs in polyploid tumor cells, which have an increased number of centrioles, but it is absent in proliferating diploid cells. Thus, inhibition of centrosome clustering in tumor cells is a novel promising strategy for cancer treatment. BNC are a cell population in which centrosome clustering occurs as part of the normal life history. Thus, they might be a good model for the study of the molecular mechanisms of centrosome clustering. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Central Giant Cell Granuloma of the Jaws: Correlation between Vascularity and Biologic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Giant cell lesions of the bone comprise a group of jaw bone pathologies. Different pathogeneses such as reactive, vascular or neoplastic have been proposed for these lesions. In addition, differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG of the jaws based on histopathologic features is still impossible and due to different treatment protocols for the two groups, correct diagnosis is necessary. The purpose of this study was to compare the expression of CD34 between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs of the jaws. Methods & Materials: This retrospective study was carried out on 16 paraffin blocks in each aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs group. The expression of CD34 was evaluated with immunohistochemical technique. Afterwards, t-test was used for quantitative evaluation and comparison of CD34 expression among the two groups. Eventually, statistical analysis was performed using Spss20 software. Significance was assigned at p < 0.05. Results: In the present study, the average age of patients in aggressive and nonaggressive groups was 20.93±8.08 and 26.18±16.97, respectively. In both groups, female predilection was observed. Mandible was the most common site of involvement in the aggressive group and the distribution of nonaggressive lesions was equal between both jaws. Although the expression of CD34 in the aggressive group was higher than the nonaggressive group, no statistically significant difference was seen (p=0.15. Conclusion: According to the results of the current study, it appears that CD34 protein cannot be used for identifying the clinical behavior of CGCGs.

  2. MRI in giant cell (temporal) arteritis; Magnetresonanztomografie der Arteriitis temporalis Horton

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    Bley, T.A.; Uhl, M.; Frydrychowicz, A.; Langer, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik; Markl, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik - Medizinische Physik

    2007-07-15

    Giant cell (temporal) arteritis is a diagnostic challenge. Blindness is a dreaded complication, especially if high-dose steroid treatment is delayed. With an optimized MR protocol, noninvasive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis is facilitated. Submillimeter in-plane resolution makes it possible to distinguish healthy segments from inflamed segments. The lumen and arterial wall can be depicted in high detail. Post-contrast high-resolution MRI visualizes the superficial cranial arteries bilaterally and simultaneously, allowing assessment of the cranial involvement pattern. In combination with MR angiography of the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the extracranial involvement pattern can be demonstrated in a single comprehensive MR examination assessing the cranial, cervical and thoracic vasculature. Good diagnostic image quality can be achieved at 1.5 Tesla and at 3 Tesla. However, due to higher signal-to-noise ratios, image quality seems to be superior at 3 Tesla. Over the course of successful long-term treatment, MR signs of mural inflammation decrease significantly and eventually vanish entirely. In contrast to color-coded Duplex sonography, which is a comparatively cost-efficient imaging modality, acquisition of high-resolution MRI is almost independent of the investigator's expertise. Compared to positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, which is a very sensitive whole-body screening tool for detecting extracranial involvement of large vessel vasculitis, MRI allows visualization and assessment of both the superficial cranial arteries in high detail and the extracranial large artery involvement in the same investigation. (orig.)

  3. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz; Sasiadek, Maria M; Musante, Luciana; Laurie, Rohan; Peters, Hartmut; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. The NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only genetic abnormalities reported so far in some patients with NL/MGCLS and in one individual with LEOPARD syndrome and MGCL. In a cohort of 75 NS patients previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS, we detected SOS1 mutations in 11 individuals, four of whom had MGCL. To explore further the relevance of aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling in syndromic MGCL, we analyzed the established genes causing CFCS in three subjects with MGCL associated with a phenotype fitting CFCS. Mutations in BRAF or MEK1 were identified in these patients. All mutations detected in these seven patients with syndromic MGCL had previously been described in NS or CFCS without apparent MGCL. This study demonstrates that MGCL may occur in NS and CFCS with various underlying genetic alterations and no obvious genotype–phenotype correlation. This suggests that dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway represents the common and basic molecular event predisposing to giant cell lesion formation in patients with NS and CFCS rather than specific mutation effects. PMID:18854871

  4. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery

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    Von Borstel, Donald; Strle, Nicholas A. [Oklahoma State University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tulsa, OK (United States); Taguibao, Roberto A. [University of California, Irvine, UCI Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Orange, CA (United States); Burns, Joseph E. [University of California, Irvine, UCI Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis. (orig.)

  5. Multiple giant cell lesions in patients with Noonan syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas E; Allanson, Judith; Kavamura, Ines; Kerr, Bronwyn; Neri, Giovanni; Noonan, Jacqueline; Cordeddu, Viviana; Gibson, Kate; Tzschach, Andreas; Krüger, Gabriele; Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Goecke, Timm O; Kehl, Hans Gerd; Albrecht, Beate; Luczak, Klaudiusz; Sasiadek, Maria M; Musante, Luciana; Laurie, Rohan; Peters, Hartmut; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2009-04-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS) are related developmental disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the RAS-MAPK signaling cascade. NS is associated with mutations in the genes PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, or KRAS, whereas CFCS can be caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2, or KRAS. The NS phenotype is rarely accompanied by multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) of the jaw (Noonan-like/MGCL syndrome (NL/MGCLS)). PTPN11 mutations are the only genetic abnormalities reported so far in some patients with NL/MGCLS and in one individual with LEOPARD syndrome and MGCL. In a cohort of 75 NS patients previously tested negative for mutations in PTPN11 and KRAS, we detected SOS1 mutations in 11 individuals, four of whom had MGCL. To explore further the relevance of aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling in syndromic MGCL, we analyzed the established genes causing CFCS in three subjects with MGCL associated with a phenotype fitting CFCS. Mutations in BRAF or MEK1 were identified in these patients. All mutations detected in these seven patients with syndromic MGCL had previously been described in NS or CFCS without apparent MGCL. This study demonstrates that MGCL may occur in NS and CFCS with various underlying genetic alterations and no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation. This suggests that dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway represents the common and basic molecular event predisposing to giant cell lesion formation in patients with NS and CFCS rather than specific mutation effects.

  6. Limited arthrodesis of the wrist for treatment of giant cell tumor of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Babinet, Antoine; Kahwaji, Antoine; Anract, Philippe; Biau, David-Jean

    2013-08-01

    To present the functional results of a technique of radiocarpal arthrodesis and reconstruction with a structural nonvascularized autologous bone graft after en bloc resection of giant cell tumors of the distal radius. A total of 13 patients with a mean age of 37 years with aggressive giant cell tumor (Campanacci grade III) of distal radius were managed with en bloc resection and reconstruction with a structural nonvascularized bone graft. The primary outcome measure was the disability evaluated by the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating score of limb salvage. Secondary outcomes included survival of the reconstruction measured from the date of the operation to revision procedure for any reason (mechanical, infectious, or oncologic). Other outcomes included active wrist motion and ability to resume work. Mean follow-up period was 6 years (range, 2-14 y). The median arc of motion at the midcarpal joint was 40°, median wrist flexion was 20°, and median extension was 10°. The median Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score based on the analysis of factors pertinent to the patient as a whole (pain, functional activities, and emotional acceptance) and specific to the upper limb (positioning of the hand, manual dexterity, and lifting ability) was 86%. Five patients underwent a second surgical procedure. The cumulative probability of reoperation for mechanical reason was 31% at similar follow-up times at 2, 5, and 10 years. This technique provided a stable wrist and partially restored wrist motion with limited pain. However, further surgical procedures may be necessary to reach this goal. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Differentiation of primary chordoma, giant cell tumor and schwannoma of the sacrum by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Ming-Jue, E-mail: smjsh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng-Sheng [Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Ding, Xiao-Yi, E-mail: dingxiaoyi1965@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yuan, Fei, E-mail: yuanfeirj@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Du, Lian-Jun; Lu, Yong [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Wei-Bin [Department of Orthopedics, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate criteria to differentiate sacral chordoma (SC), sacral giant cell tumor (SGCT) and giant sacral schwannoma (GSS) with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: CT and MR images of 22 SCs, 19 SGCTs and 8 GSSs were reviewed. The clinical and imaging features of each tumor were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of SC, SGCT and GSS were 55.1 ± 10.7, 34.3 ± 10.7 and 42.4 ± 15.7 years old. SCs (77.3%) were predominantly located in the midline of lower sacrum, while most SGCTs (73.7%) and GSSs (87.5%) were eccentrically located in upper sacrum. There were significant differences in age, location, eccentricity, morphology of bone residues, intratumoral bleeding and septations. Multiple small cysts were mainly observed in SGCTs (73.7%) with large central cysts in GSSs (87.5%). SGCTs expanded mainly inside sacrum while SCs and GSSs often extended into pelvic cavity (P = 0.0022). Involvement of sacroiliac joints and muscles were also different. Ascending extension within sacral canal was only displayed in SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs showed difference between large and small tumors (P = 0.0002), regardless of tumor type (P = 0.095). No significant difference was displayed in gender (P = 0.234) or tumor size (P = 0.0832) among three groups. Conclusion: Age, epicenter of the lesion (midline vs. eccentric and upper vs. lower sacral vertebra), bone residues, cysts, bleeding, septation, expanding pattern, muscles and sacroiliac joint involvement can be criteria for diagnosis. Fluid–fluid level is specific for SGCTs and ascending extension within the sacral canal for SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs is related to tumor size rather than tumor type.

  8. Ebi3 Prevents Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Myocarditis by Dampening IFN-γ-Driven Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Silva Medina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of anti-inflammatory mediators can reveal important targetable molecules capable of counterbalancing Trypanosoma cruzi-induced myocarditis. Composed of Ebi3 and IL-27p28 subunits, IL-27 is produced by myeloid cells and is able to suppress inflammation by inducing IL-10-producing Tr1 cells, thus emerging as a potential candidate to ameliorate cardiac inflammation induced by T. cruzi. Although IL-27 has been extensively characterized as a suppressive cytokine that prevents liver immunopathogenesis after T. cruzi infection, the mechanisms underlying its effects on T. cruzi-induced myocarditis remain largely unknown. Here, wild-type (WT and Ebi3-deficient animals were intraperitoneally infected with trypomastigotes of T. cruzi Y strain and used to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory properties of Ebi3 during T. cruzi infection. The survival rates of mice were daily recorded, the frequency of inflammatory cells was analyzed by flow cytometry and inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA, real-time PCR and PCR array. We reported that T. cruzi-induced myocarditis was prevented by Ebi3. Stressors mainly recognized by TLR2 and TLR4 receptors on myeloid cells were essential to trigger IL-27p28 production. In addition, Ebi3 regulated IFN-γ-mediated myocarditis by promoting an anti-inflammatory environment through IL-10, which was most likely produced by Tr1 cells rather than classical regulatory T cells (Tregs, in the heart tissue of T. cruzi-infected animals. Furthermore, in vivo IFN-γ blockade ameliorated the host survival without compromising the parasite control in the bloodstream. In humans, IL-27p28 was correlated with cardiac protection during Chagas disease. Patients with mild clinical forms of the disease produced high levels of IL-27p28, whereas lower levels were found in those with severe forms. In addition, polymorphic sites at Ebi3 gene were associated with severe cardiomyopathy in patients with Chagas disease

  9. Ebi3 Prevents Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Myocarditis by Dampening IFN-γ-Driven Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Tiago Silva; Oliveira, Gabriela Gonçalves; Silva, Maria Cláudia; David, Bruna Araújo; Silva, Grace Kelly; Fonseca, Denise Morais; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Frade, Amanda Farage; Baron, Monique Andrade; Ianni, Barbara; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Chevillard, Christophe; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Silva, João Santana

    2017-01-01

    The identification of anti-inflammatory mediators can reveal important targetable molecules capable of counterbalancing Trypanosoma cruzi-induced myocarditis. Composed of Ebi3 and IL-27p28 subunits, IL-27 is produced by myeloid cells and is able to suppress inflammation by inducing IL-10-producing Tr1 cells, thus emerging as a potential candidate to ameliorate cardiac inflammation induced by T. cruzi. Although IL-27 has been extensively characterized as a suppressive cytokine that prevents liver immunopathogenesis after T. cruzi infection, the mechanisms underlying its effects on T. cruzi-induced myocarditis remain largely unknown. Here, wild-type (WT) and Ebi3-deficient animals were intraperitoneally infected with trypomastigotes of T. cruzi Y strain and used to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory properties of Ebi3 during T. cruzi infection. The survival rates of mice were daily recorded, the frequency of inflammatory cells was analyzed by flow cytometry and inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA, real-time PCR and PCR array. We reported that T. cruzi-induced myocarditis was prevented by Ebi3. Stressors mainly recognized by TLR2 and TLR4 receptors on myeloid cells were essential to trigger IL-27p28 production. In addition, Ebi3 regulated IFN-γ-mediated myocarditis by promoting an anti-inflammatory environment through IL-10, which was most likely produced by Tr1 cells rather than classical regulatory T cells (Tregs), in the heart tissue of T. cruzi-infected animals. Furthermore, in vivo IFN-γ blockade ameliorated the host survival without compromising the parasite control in the bloodstream. In humans, IL-27p28 was correlated with cardiac protection during Chagas disease. Patients with mild clinical forms of the disease produced high levels of IL-27p28, whereas lower levels were found in those with severe forms. In addition, polymorphic sites at Ebi3 gene were associated with severe cardiomyopathy in patients with Chagas disease. Collectively, we

  10. Imaging of oxygen gradients in giant umbrella cells: an ex vivo PLIM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, A V; Golubeva, A V; Okkelman, I A; Cryan, J F; Papkovsky, D B

    2015-10-01

    O2 plays a pivotal role in aerobic metabolism and regulation of cell and tissue function. Local differences and fluctuations in tissue O2 levels are well documented; however, the physiological significance of O2 microgradients, particularly at the subcellular level, remains poorly understood. Using the cell-penetrating phosphorescent O2 probe Pt-Glc and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we visualized O2 distribution in individual giant (>100-μm) umbrella cells located superficially in the urinary bladder epithelium. We optimized conditions for in vivo phosphorescent staining of the inner surface of the mouse bladder and subsequent ex vivo analysis of excised live tissue. Imaging experiments revealed significant (≤85 μM) and heterogeneous deoxygenation within respiring umbrella cells, with radial O2 gradients of up to 40 μM across the cell, or ∼0.6 μM/μm. Deeply deoxygenated (5-15 μM O2) regions were seen to correspond to the areas enriched with polarized mitochondria. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial respiration decreased oxygenation and O2 gradients in umbrella cells, while inhibition with antimycin A dissipated the gradients and caused gradual reoxygenation of the tissue to ambient levels. Detailed three-dimensional maps of O2 distribution potentially can be used for the modeling of intracellular O2-dependent enzymatic reactions and downstream processes, such as hypoxia-inducible factor signaling. Further ex vivo and in vivo studies on intracellular and tissue O2 gradients using confocal imaging can shed light on the molecular mechanisms regulating O2-dependent (patho)physiological processes in the bladder and other tissues. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Myocarditis in auto-immune or auto-inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comarmond, Cloé; Cacoub, Patrice

    2017-08-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart disease in young patients and a common precursor of heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Some auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory diseases may be accompanied by myocarditis, such as sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, myositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, data concerning myocarditis in such auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory diseases are sparse. New therapeutic strategies should better target the modulation of the immune system, depending on the phase of the disease and the type of underlying auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathologic Markers Determining Prognosis in Patients with Treated or Healing Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Harris; Smith, Stacy V; Lee, Andrew G; Chévez-Barrios, Patricia

    2018-06-08

    To provide quantitative evidence linking the Cluster of Differentiation-68 (CD68)+ macrophage-marker found on temporal artery biopsies (TABs) with disease prognosis. Retrospective, cross-sectional study METHODS: We examined 42 consecutive patients who had undergone unilateral TABs at a single hospital in 2015. Clinical data, laboratory data, and histopathologic features of TABs were recorded. clinical diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA) with TAB performed at the same center. CD68 immunohistochemistry was used to label macrophages in the TABs. multiple logistic regression and bivariate comparisons to measure the association between CD68+ cells per histologic section with placement on immunomodulatory therapy (IMT). Twenty seven patients were females (64%), with a mean age of 72 (standard deviation [S.D.] ±7.7). Eleven patients (26%) were placed on IMT, 17 (40%) had disease recurrence during steroid taper, and 25 (60%) were referred to rheumatology. Of 42 biopsies, 35 underwent staining with CD68 to confirm active inflammation in suspicious, but not diagnostic, specimens. Patients eventually placed on IMT had increased CD68+ cells/slice compared to those not on IMT (median 5.00 [25-75 th quartile 2.00-7.15] vs 1.21 [0.38-2.57], p=0.031, respectively). A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve demonstrates that 2.17 CD68+ cells/slice predicts placement on IMT with an odds ratio of 1.54 (95% C.I. 1.02-2.33, p=0.038). Patients refractory to initial steroid tapers and those eventually placed on IMT had increased CD68 cells/section. CD68+ macrophages and their location on the internal elastic lamina may predict disease severity in patients with presumed GCA. Our results suggest that this marker may expedite patient triaging to alternate treatment to the usual steroid therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ten Harkel

    Full Text Available Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP. However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones--cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII, chloride channel 7 (CIC7, and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase, in contrast the matrix degrading

  14. Foreign Body Giant Cell-Related Encapsulation of a Synthetic Material Three Years After Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Jonas; Barbeck, Mike; Sader, Robert A; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Russe, Philippe; Choukroun, Joseph; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2016-06-01

    Bone substitute materials of different origin and chemical compositions are frequently used in augmentation procedures to enlarge the local bone amount. However, relatively little data exist on the long-term tissue reactions. The presented case reports for the first time histological and histomorphometrical analyses of a nanocrystaline hydroxyapatite-based bone substitute material implanted in the human sinus cavity after an integration period of 3 years. The extracted biopsy was analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically with focus on the tissue reactions, vascularization, new bone formation, and the induction of a foreign body reaction. A comparably high rate of connective tissue (48.25%) surrounding the remaining bone substitute granules (42.13%) was observed. Accordingly, the amount of bone tissue (9.62%) built the smallest fraction within the biopsy. Further, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive and -negative multinucleated giant cells (4.35 and 3.93 cells/mm(2), respectively) were detected on the material-tissue interfaces. The implantation bed showed a mild vascularization of 10.03 vessels/mm(2) and 0.78%. The present case report shows that after 3 years, a comparable small amount of bone tissue was observable. Thus, the foreign body response to the bone substitute seems to be folded without further degradation or regeneration.

  15. Acute Toxic Myocarditis and Pulmonary Oedema Developing from Scorpion Sting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Sahin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of scorpion stings are generally seen with a set of simple clinical findings, such as pain, oedema, numbness, and tenderness in the area of the sting. However, occasionally events, such as toxic myocarditis, acute heart failure, acute pulmonary oedema, and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS, which occur in scorpion sting cases are a significant problem which determine mortality and morbidity. The case presented here was a 38-year-old man who developed acute toxic myocarditis, acute heart failure, and acute pulmonary oedema following a scorpion sting on the 3rd finger of his right hand.

  16. Reconstruction of the Midfoot Using a Free Vascularized Fibular Graft After En Bloc Excision for Giant Cell Tumor of the Tarsal Bones: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hitomi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Onishi, Yasuo; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Akisue, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old Japanese female with a giant cell tumor of bone involving multiple midfoot bones. Giant cell tumors of bone account for approximately 5% of all primary bone tumors and most often arise at the ends of long bones. The small bones, such as those of the hands and feet, are rare sites for giant cell tumors. Giant cell tumors of the small bones tend to exhibit more aggressive clinical behavior than those of the long bones. The present patient underwent en bloc tumor excision involving multiple tarsals and metatarsals. We reconstructed the longitudinal arch of the foot with a free vascularized fibular graft. At the 2-year follow-up visit, bony union had been achieved, with no tumor recurrence. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 99 mTc-sulphur-colloid and heat-denatured 99mTc-labelled red cell scans demonstrating a giant intrapelvic spleen in a girl after splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, P.F.; Tzen, K.Y.; Tsai, M.F.; Lin, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    A 17 x 12 x 5-cm giant intrapelvic mass in a 14-year-old girl is reported. This mass developed 6 years after a splenectomy for splenic torsion. The heat-denatured 99 m Tc-labelled red cell scan and 99 m Tc- sulphur-colloid scan confirmed the specific red cell sequestration function and reticuloendothelial activity in the giant intrapelvic spleen. The size and development of the giant intrapelvic spleen are unusual. The usefulness of functional images to diagnosis the nature of the intrapelvic mass is well demonstrated. (orig.)

  18. A case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis with giant cells in a female dental technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Chung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Changhwan; Nam, Eun Suk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Joo, Youngsu

    2013-10-04

    Dental technicians are exposed to methyl methacrylate(MMA) and hard metal dusts while working, and several cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by the exposure have been reported. The authors experienced a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a female dental technician who had 10 years' work experience and report the case with clinical evidence. The patient's work, personal, social, and past and present medical histories were investigated based on patient questioning and medical records. Furthermore, the workplace conditions and tools and materials the patient worked with were also evaluated. Next, the pathophysiology and risk factors of pneumonitis were studied, and studies on the relationship between hypersensitivity pneumonitis and a dental technician's exposure to dust were reviewed. Any changes in the clinical course of her disease were noted for evaluation of the work-relatedness of the disease. The patient complained of cough and sputum for 1 year. In addition, while walking up the stairs, the patient was not able to ascend without resting due to dyspnea. She visited our emergency department due to epistaxis, and secondary hypertension was incidentally suspected. Laboratory tests including serologic, electrolyte, and endocrinologic tests and a simple chest radiograph showed no specific findings, but chest computed tomography revealed a centrilobular ground-glass pattern in both lung fields. A transbronchial biopsy was performed, and bronchoalveolar washing fluid was obtained. Among the findings of the laboratory tests, microcalcification, noncaseating granuloma containing foreign body-type giant cells, and metal particles within macrophages were identified histologically. Based on these results, hypersensitivity pneumonitis was diagnosed. The patient stopped working due to admission, and she completely quit her job within 2 months of restarting work due to reappearance of the symptoms. In this study, the patient did not have typical radiologic

  19. Advantages of Pressurized-Spray Cryosurgery in Giant Cell Tumors of the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant Cell Tumor is considered a benign, local and aggressive tumor. Although considered a benign bone tumor, it is still the subject of discussion and research because of the associated local bone destruction, as well as high rates of recurrence and distant metastases. Options are being developed for both surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies. Aims: The present study evaluated the administration of cryotherapy via a pressurized-spray technique in giant cell tumors of the bone. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study included 40 patients who were treated with extensive curettage and cryotherapy at various locations during the period from February 2006 to December 2013. Informed consent forms were obtained from the participants and ethics committee approval was taken from the local ethics committee of Ondokuz Mayıs University. The pressurized-spray technique was performed using liquid nitrogen. The patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, radiological appearance, treatment modality, duration of follow-up, skin problems and recurrence. Results: Twenty-one patients were female; 19 were male. The average age of the patients was 33 years (range: 16–72 years, and the average duration of follow-up was 43 months (range: 12–80 months. The average time from the onset of the complaints to the diagnosis was 6 months (range: 2–12 months. Based on the Campanacci classification: 9 patients were Grade I; 25 patients were Grade II; six patients were Grade III. The lesion was located in the femur in 14 patients, in the tibia in 11 patients, in the radius in 5 patients, in the pelvis in 4 patients, in the fibula in 3 patients, in the metatarsal in 2 patients and in the phalanges of the hand in one patient. One patient had postoperative early fracture. None of the patients had skin problems and infection. Three (7.5% of the patients had recurrence. Conclusion: It was found that cryotherapy was highly effective in

  20. Granuloma central de células gigantes Giant cells central granuloma

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    Ayelén María Portelles Massó

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available El granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes es una lesión proliferativa no neoplásica de etiología desconocida. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 40 años de edad, portador de prótesis parcial superior. Fue remitido al Servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital "V. I. Lenin" por presentar aumento de volumen en reborde alveolar superior, de color rojo grisáceo y que provocaba expansión de corticales óseas. Una vez analizados los exámenes clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos se diagnosticó un granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes Se realizó exéresis quirúrgica de la lesión y extracción de dientes adyacentes con una evolución satisfactoria sin señales de recidivas luego de tres años del tratamiento. El granuloma reparativo central de células gigantes se presentó como respuesta a un trauma. La correcta interpretación de los datos clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos nos permitió llegar al correcto diagnóstico y plan de tratamiento.Giant-cell central reparative granuloma is non neoplastic proliferative lesion of unknown etiology. We report a 40 years old male patient who was admitted at the Maxillofacial Service of the "V. I. Lenin" Hospital. The patient had partial upper prosthesis and was complaining of red-grey volume increase lesion in upper alveolar ridge which led to the expansion of cortical bone. Having analyzed clinical, radiographic and histopathological findings the case was concluded as a giant-cell central reparative granuloma. Surgical exeresis and adjunct tooth extraction were done. After three years of treatment, satisfactory follow up without recurrence is reported.

  1. Soft tissue recurrence of giant cell tumor of the bone: Prevalence and radiographic features

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    Leilei Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recurrence of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB in the soft tissue is rarely seen in the clinical practice. This study aims to determine the prevalence of soft tissue recurrence of GCTB, and to characterize its radiographic features. Methods: A total of 291 patients treated by intralesional curettage for histologically diagnosed GCTB were reviewed. 6 patients were identified to have the recurrence of GCTB in the soft tissue, all of whom had undergone marginal resection of the lesion. Based on the x-ray, CT and MRI imaging, the radiographic features of soft tissue recurrence were classified into 3 types. Type I was defined as soft tissue recurrence with peripheral ossification, type II was defined as soft tissue recurrence with central ossification, and type III was defined as pure soft tissue recurrence without ossification. Demographic data including period of recurrence and follow-up duration after the second surgery were recorded for these 6 patients. Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS scoring system was used to evaluate functional outcomes. Results: The overall recurrence rate was 2.1% (6/291. The mean interval between initial surgery and recurrence was 11.3 ± 4.1 months (range, 5–17. The recurrence lesions were located in the thigh of 2 patients, in the forearm of 2 patients and in the leg of the other 2 patients. According to the classification system mentioned above, 2 patients were classified with type I, 1 as type II and 3 as type III. After the marginal excision surgery, all patients were consistently followed up for a mean period of 13.4 ± 5.3 months (range, 6–19, with no recurrence observed at the final visit. All the patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. According to the MSTS scale, the mean postoperative functional score was 28.0 ± 1.2 (range, 26–29. Conclusions: The classification of soft tissue recurrence of GCTB may be helpful for the surgeon to select the appropriate imaging procedure to

  2. MRI and CT findings of the giant cell tumors of the skull; five cases and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Nobuo; Hirabuki, Norio; Andou, Kumiko; Yoshifumi, Narumi; Tanaka, Hisashi; Morino, Hideo; Taki, Takuyu; Ishikura, Reiichi; Hirota, Seiichi; Onishi, Hiromitu; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT and MR findings of giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the skull, an unusual site for such tumors. Materials and methods: CT and MR features of five histologically proven giant cell tumors of the skull were retrospectively reviewed. We also reviewed 22 cases in the literature that included MR or CT findings. Results: Three of the tumors originated from the temporal bone with predominantly medial extension, and the other two were centered in the body of the sphenoid bone and featured symmetrical soft tissue extension. CT images with bone window settings showed reactive bone changes for all three tumors of the temporal bone, suggesting slow growth for example, an expanded intradiploic space, expansive remodelling and development of foci of pressure erosion. GCTs of the sphenoid bone showed purely osteolytic changes without remodelling. Although the MR signals and enhancement patterns varied, all the tumors of the temporal bone had a markedly low intensity area on T2-weighted images, which was not seen in the tumors of the sphenoid bone. The findings for our cases generally corresponded to those reported in the literature. Conclusion: Giant cell tumors of the skull have two preferential sites and may have characteristic tendencies as to their extent. Bone changes and MR signals appear to show differences between the two sites

  3. Surgical Treatment, Oral Rehabilitation, and Orthognathic Surgery After Failure of Pharmacologic Treatment of Central Giant Cell Lesion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia Nogueira, Renato Luiz; Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Abreu, Ricardo Teixeira

    2016-12-01

    Although pharmacologic treatments for central giant cell lesions have gained much emphasis, these treatment modalities do not always have successful outcomes, and surgical treatment may be necessary. The purpose of the present study was to report a case of aggressive central giant cell lesion initially treated by nonsurgical methods without satisfactory results, necessitating segmental mandibular resection for definitive treatment and oral rehabilitation. A 20-year-old woman was diagnosed with an aggressive central giant cell lesion in the mandible. The patient was first treated with intralesional corticosteroid injections. Subsequently, the lesion increased in size. Therefore, a second pharmacologic treatment was proposed with salmon calcitonin nasal spray, but no signs of a treatment response were noted. Because of the lack of response, surgical excision was performed, and a mandibular reconstruction plate was installed. At 12 months after surgical resection, the patient underwent mandibular reconstruction with bone grafts. After 6 months, 7 dental implants were installed, and fixed prostheses were made. After installation of the prostheses, the patient experienced persistent mandibular laterognathism, and a mandibular orthognathic surgery was performed to correct the laterognathia. The follow-up examination 4 years after orthognathic surgery showed no signs of recurrence and good facial symmetry. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SOS1 and PTPN11 mutations in five cases of Noonan syndrome with multiple giant cell lesions.

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    Beneteau, Claire; Cavé, Hélène; Moncla, Anne; Dorison, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Verloes, Alain; Leheup, Bruno

    2009-10-01

    We report five cases of multiple giant cell lesions in patients with typical Noonan syndrome. Such association has frequently been referred to as Noonan-like/multiple giant cell (NL/MGCL) syndrome before the molecular definition of Noonan syndrome. Two patients show mutations in PTPN11 (p.Tyr62Asp and p.Asn308Asp) and three in SOS1 (p.Arg552Ser and p.Arg552Thr). The latter are the first SOS1 mutations reported outside PTPN11 in NL/MGCL syndrome. MGCL lesions were observed in jaws ('cherubism') and joints ('pigmented villonodular synovitis'). We show through those patients that both types of MGCL are not PTPN11-specific, but rather represent a low penetrant (or perhaps overlooked) complication of the dysregulated RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. We recommend discarding NL/MGCL syndrome from the nosology, as this presentation is neither gene-nor allele-specific of Noonan syndrome; these patients should be described as Noonan syndrome with MGCL (of the mandible, the long bone...). The term cherubism should be used only when multiple giant cell lesions occur without any other clinical and molecular evidence of Noonan syndrome, with or without mutations of the SH3BP2 gene.

  5. Age-Associated Changes in Estrogen Receptor Ratios Correlate with Increased Female Susceptibility to Coxsackievirus B3-Induced Myocarditis

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    Andreas Koenig

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sexual bias is a hallmark in various diseases. This review evaluates sexual dimorphism in clinical and experimental coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis, and how sex bias in the experimental disease changes with increased age. Coxsackieviruses are major causes of viral myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle, which is more frequent and severe in men than women. Young male mice infected with CVB3 develop heart-specific autoimmunity and severe myocarditis. Females infected during estrus (high estradiol develop T-regulatory cells and when infected during diestrus (low estradiol develop autoimmunity similar to males. During estrus, protection depends on estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, which promotes type I interferon, activation of natural killer/natural killer T cells and suppressor cell responses. Estrogen receptor beta has opposing effects to ERα and supports pro-inflammatory immunity. However, the sexual dimorphism of the disease is significantly ameliorated in aged animals when old females become as susceptible as males. This correlates to a selective loss of the ERα that is required for immunosuppression. Therefore, sex-associated hormones control susceptibility in the virus-mediated disease, but their impact can alter with the age and physiological stage of the individual.

  6. Primary Hyperparathyroidism Misdiagnosed as Giant Cell Bone Tumor of Maxillary Sinus: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaghazvini, Leila; Sharifian, Hashem; Rasuli, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is an endocrine disorder recognized by hyperfunction of parathyroid gland, which can result in persistent bone absorption and brown tumor. Facial involvement of brown tumor is rare and usually involves the mandible. Giant cell tumor (GCT) is an expansile osteolytic bone tumor which is very similar in clinical, radiological and histological features to brown tumor. Herein, we present a 35-year-old woman with an 11-month history of gradually swelling of the right maxilla and buccal spaces began during pregnancy two years ago. No other clinical or laboratory problems were detected. Postpartum CT scan demonstrated a lytic expansile multi-septated mass lesion containing enhancing areas, which initially described as GCT of the right maxillary sinus following surgery. Four months later, gradual progressive swelling of the bed of tumor was recurred and revised pathological slices were compatible with GCT. Regarding patient recent paresthesia, repeated laboratory tests were performed. Finally, according to laboratory results (elevation of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone), ultrasonographic findings and radioisotope scan (Sestamibi), probable parathyroid mass and brown tumor of maxilla was diagnosed. Pathology confirmed hyperplasia of right inferior parathyroid gland. Our case was thought-provoking due to its interesting clinical presentation and unusual presentation of brown tumor in parathyroid hyperplasia

  7. Isolated aortitis versus giant cell arteritis: are they really two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Rosaria; Boiardi, Luigi; Pipitone, Nicolo'; d'Ascanio, Anna; Stagnaro, Chiara; Ferrari, Claudia; Elefante, Elena; Salvarani, Carlo; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare epidemiological data, clinical findings and results of investigations in patients with isolated aortitis and those with giant cell arteritis (GCA) to establish whether patients with isolated aortitis differ from those with GCA. We reviewed the medical notes of all patients consecutively seen in two Rheumatology centres in the last two decades with a suspicion of GCA, searching for cases characterised by abnormal [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET uptake of the aorta. 'Isolated aortitis' was defined as increased FDG uptake in the aorta not explained by atherosclerosis in the absence of FDG uptake in other large vessels. Comparing the epidemiological and clinical data of patients with isolated arteritis with those with GCA, we observed many statistical significant differences. First of all, the male/female ratio was reversed, with a predominant male involvement in isolated arteritis. Moreover, the mean age of patients with isolated arteritis was significantly lower than that of GCA patients (62 vs. 78.4 yrs; psides of the same coin.

  8. Acute Paraparesis Caused by a Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine

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    Liang-Chun Chao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign but locally aggressive skeletal neoplasm of young adults. GCT located in the spine is relatively rare and may need a combination of surgical and adjunctive therapies. Here we present a patient who had intermittent thoracic back pain for two weeks and experienced an acute episode of decreased muscle power of both lower limbs. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging examinations of the thoracic spine revealed that the patient had severe spinal canal compression caused by pathological fracture due to a tumor within the seventh thoracic vertebra. She underwent an emergent surgical intervention for total removal of the tumor and spinal reconstruction with autologous rib grafts and instruments. Postoperatively, the patient made an uneventful recovery of muscle power of bilateral lower limbs. She subsequently received adjuvant radiotherapy. In a follow-up period of 36 months, the patient had no clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence. Even though spinal location for GCT is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with osteolytic lesions or pathological fractures of the vertebra, especially in young female patients sustaining no trauma who had a clinical history of persistent low back pain.

  9. Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

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    Pankaj Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

  10. IgG,kappa monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance with AL amyloidosis simulating giant cell arteritis

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    Pompilian Valer Mihai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathies complicated by AL amyloidosis can mimic giant cell arteritis (GCA. We hereby present the case of a 63 year old woman in whom symptoms consistent with GCA were the first manifestations of a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS associated with amyloidosis. A 63 year old woman was admitted for temporal headache, maseterine claudication, neck and shoulder stiffness. She was recently diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. On physical examination she had prominent temporal arteries, macroglosia and orthostatic hypotension. Muscular strength was normal. She had high ESR and CRP; in this clinical context, GCA was suspected. A gamma spike on serum protein electrophoresis raised the suspicion of monoclonal gammopathy (MG. Immunoelectrophoresis revealed monoclonal bands for IgG and kappa chains. Massive deposits of amyloid and no inflammation were found on temporal artery biopsy. Multiple myeloma and lymphoma were ruled out. A diagnosis of AL amyloidosis complicating MGUS was formulated. She did well on therapy with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. Cases published in medical literature reveal amyloidosis mimicking GCA in the setting of established MGUS. As far as we know, this is the first case of MGUS with IgG and kappa chains in which a GCA-like picture induced by amyloidosis was present from the very onset.

  11. A chondroblastoma versus a giant cell tumor: emphasis on the MR imaging features

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    Chai, Jee Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Na Ra; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    To assess the MR imaging features in differentiating a chondroblastoma (CB) from a giant cell tumor (GCT), with an emphasis on the accompanying peritumoral bone marrow edema. MR imaging findings in 20 patients with CB were compared with the imaging features of 22 patients with GCT. The location of the lesion, signal intensity, adjacent cortical change, degree of accompanying bone marrow edema, synovitis in the adjacent joint and cystic change were analyzed. The findings of CB and GCT were examined statistically with use of Fisher's exact test. The incidence ratios of MR imaging findings were as follows (CB:GCT). Metaphyseal dominant involvement (2:21), partial cortical disruption (2:14), extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor (14:0) and synovitis in the adjacent joint (11:2) were statistically different in incidence between CB and GCT ({rho} < 0.01). The inhomogeneous signal intensity (17:17) and cystic change (10:15) were not different in incidence between a CB and GCT. The presence of metaphyseal dominant involvement and cortical disruption favors a diagnosis of a GCT rather than a CB. In contrast, extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor and synovitis in the adjacent joint are highly indicative of a CB.

  12. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws: clinical and radiological evaluation of 22 cases

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    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yu; Zhao, Yi-Fang [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wuhan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zwahlen, Roger A. [University of Hong Kong, Discipline of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry (China); Zheng, Yun-Fei [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wang, Shi-Ping [Wuhan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan (China)

    2009-09-15

    The objective was to investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. A retrospective analysis of a 20-year database was performed regarding both clinical and radiological features of 22 patients affected with CGCGs of the jaws. Fourteen women and 8 men were included with the age range of 7-81 years (mean 31.7 years). Among the 22 lesions, 16 were located in the mandible and 6 in the maxilla. Painless swelling was the most common clinical feature in 18 of all cases. Limited mouth opening was noted in 2 patients where the lesions involved the condyle. Radiographically, 13 lesions were homogeneously osteolytic and 9 lesions were trabeculated. Fifteen lesions were unilocular and 14 lesions presented with well-defined but not sclerotic margins. CT images in 5 patients clearly showed the trabeculation within the lesions. The follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 11 years with a mean period of 5 years. Three out of 9 aggressive and 1 out of 13 nonaggressive lesions developed recurrence. Diagnosis of CGCGs of the jaws depends on both correct interpretation of clinical, radiographic and pathological data. Differentiation between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs should be considered to improve individual treatment planning. (orig.)

  13. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws: clinical and radiological evaluation of 22 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yu; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Zwahlen, Roger A.; Zheng, Yun-Fei; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. A retrospective analysis of a 20-year database was performed regarding both clinical and radiological features of 22 patients affected with CGCGs of the jaws. Fourteen women and 8 men were included with the age range of 7-81 years (mean 31.7 years). Among the 22 lesions, 16 were located in the mandible and 6 in the maxilla. Painless swelling was the most common clinical feature in 18 of all cases. Limited mouth opening was noted in 2 patients where the lesions involved the condyle. Radiographically, 13 lesions were homogeneously osteolytic and 9 lesions were trabeculated. Fifteen lesions were unilocular and 14 lesions presented with well-defined but not sclerotic margins. CT images in 5 patients clearly showed the trabeculation within the lesions. The follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 11 years with a mean period of 5 years. Three out of 9 aggressive and 1 out of 13 nonaggressive lesions developed recurrence. Diagnosis of CGCGs of the jaws depends on both correct interpretation of clinical, radiographic and pathological data. Differentiation between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs should be considered to improve individual treatment planning. (orig.)

  14. A chondroblastoma versus a giant cell tumor: emphasis on the MR imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jee Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Na Ra; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2007-01-01

    To assess the MR imaging features in differentiating a chondroblastoma (CB) from a giant cell tumor (GCT), with an emphasis on the accompanying peritumoral bone marrow edema. MR imaging findings in 20 patients with CB were compared with the imaging features of 22 patients with GCT. The location of the lesion, signal intensity, adjacent cortical change, degree of accompanying bone marrow edema, synovitis in the adjacent joint and cystic change were analyzed. The findings of CB and GCT were examined statistically with use of Fisher's exact test. The incidence ratios of MR imaging findings were as follows (CB:GCT). Metaphyseal dominant involvement (2:21), partial cortical disruption (2:14), extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor (14:0) and synovitis in the adjacent joint (11:2) were statistically different in incidence between CB and GCT (ρ < 0.01). The inhomogeneous signal intensity (17:17) and cystic change (10:15) were not different in incidence between a CB and GCT. The presence of metaphyseal dominant involvement and cortical disruption favors a diagnosis of a GCT rather than a CB. In contrast, extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor and synovitis in the adjacent joint are highly indicative of a CB

  15. Guz olbrzymiokomórkowy - opis przypadku = Giant cell tumor - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Białkowska-Głowacka

    2016-01-01

    Kierownik: dr hab. n. med., prof. nadzw. Anna Janas-Naze     Adres do korespondencji: dr n. med. Piotr Osica Zakład Chirurgii Stomatologicznej UM w Łodzi 92-213 Łódź, ul. Pomorska 251 mail: piotr.osica@umed.lodz.pl   Praca finansowana przez UM w Łodzi w ramach działalności statutowej nr 503/2-163-01/503-21-001.   Streszczenie   W pracy przedstawiono przypadek pacjentki u której obserwowano przez kilka miesięcy  zmianę na błonie śluzowej szczęki, bez weryfikacji diagnostycznej. Podkreślono jak ważną rolę pełni lekarz stomatolog w monitorowaniu zmian w jamie ustnej, przedstawiono niektóre metody diagnostyczne niezbędne do ustalenia rozpoznania.   Słowa kluczowe: guz olbrzymiokomórkowy, badanie histopatologiczne, diagnostyka.   Summary   The article describes a case of a patient, in which over a few months period, a lesion on the maxillary mucosa has been observed, without earlier histopathological verification. The important role of a dentist in monitoring the lesions in oral cavity has been underlined. The authors discuss also certain diagnostic methods, necessary for confirming the diagnosis.   Key words: giant cell tumor, histological examination, diagnosis.

  16. Ultrasonography of occipital arteries to diagnose giant cell arteritis: a case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnell, Jonathan; Tiivas, Carl; Perkins, Phillip; Blake, Tim; Saravana, Shanmugam; Dubey, Shirish

    2018-02-01

    We describe four cases of giant cell arteritis (GCA) that presented with occipital headache in the last 6 months. Typical ultrasound features of GCA were found in the occipital arteries which helped to confirm the diagnosis. One patient had already suffered significant visual loss by the time the diagnosis was made, reflecting the similarity in prognosis to the more typical GCA patients. These cases prompted a review of the literature to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of occipital artery ultrasonography in the investigation of GCA. We searched PubMed, Google Scholar and Web of Science and identified 17 papers but only four of these were relevant studies. The studies available show that typical features of GCA can be detected in the occipital arteries using ultrasonography. They also suggest that ultrasonography can detect changes in the occipital arteries when temporal arteries are not involved. However, occipital artery abnormalities were less common than temporal artery abnormalities in GCA. We advocate maintaining a high index of suspicion for GCA in patients presenting with atypical features, such as occipital headache. Ultrasonography has a vital role to play in the diagnosis of these patients. We recommend priority imaging of the affected area to facilitate prompt and accurate diagnosis of GCA, especially when atypical vessels are involved.

  17. Lack of association between STAT4 gene polymorphism and biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Tomas R; Morado, Inmaculada C; Castañeda, Santos; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Miranda-Filloy, Jose A; Lamas, Jose R; Martin, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the potential implication of the STAT4 gene polymorphism rs7574865 in the predisposition to or the clinical expression of giant cell arteritis (GCA). A total of 212 patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA were studied. DNA from patients and controls matched by age, sex, and ethnicity was obtained from peripheral blood. Samples were genotyped for STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism. No statistically significant differences in the allele frequencies for the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism were observed between patients and controls. Although we observed an increased frequency of the T/T genotype in GCA patients (6.0%) compared to healthy controls (3.9%), this difference did not achieve statistical significance (OR 1.57, 95% CI 0.72-3.41). No statistically significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies were observed when patients were stratified according to the presence of typical disease features such as polymyalgia rheumatica, severe ischemic manifestations, and visual ischemic complications in the setting of this vasculitis. Our results do not support a major role of the STAT4 rs7574865 gene polymorphism in susceptibility to or clinical manifestations of GCA.

  18. Myositis, Ganglioneuritis, and Myocarditis with Distinct Perifascicular Muscle Atrophy in a 2-Year-Old Male Boxer

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    Paul M. Rossman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old male, intact Boxer was referred for chronic diarrhea, hyporexia, labored breathing, weakness and elevated creatine kinase, and alanine aminotransferase activities. Initial examination and diagnostics revealed a peripheral nervous system neurolocalization, atrial premature complexes, and generalized megaesophagus. Progressive worsening of the dog’s condition was noted after 36 h; the dog developed aspiration pneumonia, was febrile and oxygen dependent. The owners elected humane euthanasia. Immediately postmortem biopsies of the left cranial tibial and triceps muscles and the left peroneal nerve were obtained. Postmortem histology revealed concurrent myositis, myocarditis, endocarditis, and ganglioneuritis. Mixed mononuclear cell infiltrations and a distinct perifascicular pattern of muscle fiber atrophy was present in both muscles. This is a novel case of diffuse inflammatory myopathy with a distinct perifascicular pattern of atrophy in addition to endocarditis, myocarditis, and epicarditis.

  19. Immunoperoxidase technique in experimental chronic chagasic myocarditis

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    M.d. Maria Celina Morales

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas'disease has been described as the commonest form of chronic myocarditis. An immunologic pathogenesis has been discribed for this form of the disease. So far, no immunoperoxidase technique has been used for the detection of immunological deposits in chronic experimental Chagas'myocardiopathy. Forty-one Swiss mice, three months old were inoculated intraperitoneally with doses between 10 and 10(5 Tulahuen trypomastigotes. Mice were reinoculated one month after with doses between 10² and 10(5 and sacrificed at 6 (n=21 and 9 months (n=9 after the first inoculation. ECGs were recorded before sacrifice. Immunoperoxidase technique (peroxidase-antiperoxidase method, immunofluorescence (direct and indirect as well as histological studies were performed in myocardiums and skeletal muscles of the surviving animals. The most sensitive methods for detecting chronic chagasic infection were the routine histologic studies (73% and the ECGs 83% and 89% on 6 and 9 mo. post-infected mice, respectively. Myocardial involvement varied from interstitial mild focal lymphocyte infiltrates up to replacement of myocytes by loose connective tissue. Atrial myocardiums (21/23, 91% were more affected than ventricles (9/23, 39%. Typical chagasic nests were rarely found. Skeletal muscle involvement (11/18 and 7/9 varied from mild to extensive lymphocyte and plasmacell infiltrates, and necrotic fibers. The involved antigen were shown in skeletal muscles by the immunoperoxidase technique as diffusely arranged granular intracytoplasmatic deposit for both IgC and total immunoglobulins. The coincidence between this technique and histologic muscle lesions was 11/18 (61(% in 6 mo. and 6/8 (75% at 9 mo. post-infection. In heart, delicate granular deposits of total immunoglobulins were seen diffusely arranged within the ventricular myocytes; coincidence between immunoperoxidase technique anl histologic involvement increased from 36 to 66% in animals sacrifeced 6 and 9 mo. post

  20. Myocarditis caused by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Five Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolim, V Machado; Casagrande, R Assis; Wouters, A Terezinha Barth; Driemeier, D; Pavarini, S Petinatti

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have been implicated as the cause of cardiomyopathy in several mammalian species. This study describes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and myocarditis associated with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in five cats aged between 1 and 4 years. Clinical manifestations included dyspnoea in four animals, one of which also exhibited restlessness. One animal showed only lethargy, anorexia and vomiting. Necropsy examination revealed marked cardiomegaly, marked left ventricular hypertrophy and pallor of the myocardium and epicardium in all animals. Microscopical and immunohistochemical examination showed multifocal infiltration of the myocardium with T lymphocytes and fewer macrophages, neutrophils and plasma cells. An intense immunoreaction for FIV antigen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of lymphocytes and the cytoplasm of some macrophages was observed via immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC did not reveal the presence of antigen from feline calicivirus, coronavirus, feline leukaemia virus, feline parvovirus, Chlamydia spp. or Toxoplasma gondii. The results demonstrate the occurrence of FIV infection in inflammatory cells in the myocardium of five cats with myocarditis and HCM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Erythrocytosis caused by giant chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: a case report indicating a 9-year misdiagnosis of polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Renbo; Liang, Yiran; Yan, Lei; Xu, Zhonghua; Ren, Juchao

    2017-09-06

    Erythrocytosis, a rare paraneoplastic syndrome, generally occurs in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma and has never been reported in patients with chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. We report a case of a young man suffering from a giant (22-cm) mass on his left kidney. Because of a history of polycythemia vera, the patient had been treated for the condition for 9 years. Radical nephrectomy was successfully performed, and the postoperative pathologic examination confirmed a diagnosis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. Unexpectedly, the symptom of erythrocytosis disappeared after the surgery. Further examination and analysis were performed, and we finally attributed his erythrocytosis to chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma could cause erythrocytosis, but the clear-cut mechanism needs further research. Secondary erythrocytosis such as those related with renal tumors should be taken into consideration during the diagnosis of polycythemia vera.

  2. Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.B.; Henkin, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.; Subramanian, R.; Scanlon, P.J.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Current standards for detection of myocarditis in a clinical setting rely on endomyocardial biopsy for accurate diagnosis. With this technique a subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy show unsuspected myocarditis histologically. Endomyocardial biopsy, despite its specificity, may lack sensitivity due to sampling error if the inflammation is patchy or focal. Therefore, inflammation-sensitive radioisotopic imaging may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of myocarditis. This study was designed to evaluate the applicability of gallium-67 (67Ga) myocardial imaging as an adjunct to endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. Sixty-eight consecutive patients referred for evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy underwent 71 parallel studies with 67Ga imaging and biopsies that served as the basis of comparison for this study. Histologic myocarditis was identified in 8% of biopsy specimens. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters could not be used to predict the presence of myocarditis. Five of six biopsy samples (87%) with myocarditis showed dense 67Ga uptake, whereas only nine of 65 negative biopsy samples (14%) were paired with equivocally positive 67Ga scans. The single patient with myocarditis and no myocardial 67Ga uptake had dense mediastinal lymph node uptake that may have obscured cardiac uptake. The incidence of myocarditis on biopsy with a positive 67Ga scan was 36% (5/14); however, the incidence of myocarditis with a negative 67Ga scan was only 1.8% (1/57). Follow-up scans for three patients showed close correlation of 67Ga uptake with myocarditis on biopsy. In conclusion 67Ga may be a useful screening test for identifying patients with a high yield of myocarditis on biopsy, and serial scans may eliminate the need for frequent biopsies in patients with proven myocarditis

  3. Multivariable prediction model for suspected giant cell arteritis: development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing EB

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Edsel B Ing,1 Gabriela Lahaie Luna,2 Andrew Toren,3 Royce Ing,4 John J Chen,5 Nitika Arora,6 Nurhan Torun,7 Otana A Jakpor,8 J Alexander Fraser,9 Felix J Tyndel,10 Arun NE Sundaram,10 Xinyang Liu,11 Cindy TY Lam,1 Vivek Patel,12 Ezekiel Weis,13 David Jordan,14 Steven Gilberg,14 Christian Pagnoux,15 Martin ten Hove21Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto Medical School, Toronto, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, 4Toronto Eyelid, Strabismus and Orbit Surgery Clinic, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Mayo Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology and Neurology, 6Mayo Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology, Rochester, MN, 7Department of Surgery, Division of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 8Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 9Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences and Ophthalmology, Western University, London, 10Department of Medicine, University of Toronto Medical School, Toronto, ON, Canada; 11Department of Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 12Roski Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 13Departments of Ophthalmology, Universities of Alberta and Calgary, Edmonton and Calgary, AB, 14Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 15Vasculitis Clinic, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, CanadaPurpose: To develop and validate a diagnostic prediction model for patients with suspected giant cell arteritis (GCA.Methods: A retrospective review of records of consecutive adult patients undergoing temporal artery biopsy (TABx for suspected GCA was conducted at seven university centers. The pathologic diagnosis was considered the final diagnosis. The predictor variables were age, gender, new onset headache, clinical temporal artery abnormality, jaw claudication, ischemic vision loss (VL, diplopia

  4. Flares in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restuccia, Giovanna; Boiardi, Luigi; Cavazza, Alberto; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Muratore, Francesco; Cimino, Luca; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Crescentini, Filippo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the frequency, timing, and characteristics of flares in a large cohort of Italian patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to identify factors at diagnosis able to predict the occurrence of flares. We evaluated 157 patients with biopsy-proven transmural GCA diagnosed and followed at the Rheumatology Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital (Italy) for whom sufficient information was available from the time of diagnosis until at least 4 years of follow-up. Fifty-seven patients (36.5%) experienced ≥1 flares. Fifty-one (46.4%) of the 110 total flares (88 relapses and 22 recurrences) were experienced during the first 2 years after diagnosis. The majority of relapses occurred with doses of prednisone ≤ 10 mg/day (82.9%), whereas only 3.4% of relapses occurred for doses ≥ 25 mg/day. Polymyalgia rheumatica (46.5%) and cranial symptoms (41.9%) were the most frequent manifestations at the time of the first relapse. Cumulative prednisone dose during the first year and total cumulative prednisone dose were significantly higher in flaring patients compared with those without flares (7.8 ± 2.4 vs 6.7 ± 2.4 g, P = 0.02; 15.5 ± 8.9 vs 10.0 ± 9.2 g, P = 0.0001, respectively). The total duration of prednisone treatment was longer in flaring patients (58 ± 44 vs 30 ± 30 months, P = 0.0001). Patients with disease flares had at diagnosis more frequently systemic manifestations (P = 0.02) and fever ≥ 38°C (P = 0.02), significantly lower hemoglobin levels (P = 0.05), more frequent presence at temporal artery biopsy (TAB) specimens of giant cells (P = 0.04) and intraluminal acute thrombosis (P = 0.007), and more moderate/severe arterial inflammation (P = 0.009) compared with those without flares. In the multivariate model fever ≥ 38 °C (hazard ratio 2.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.32, P = 0.03) and the severity of inflammatory infiltrate

  5. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath may present radiologically as intrinsic osseous lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepper, A.M. de; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands); Hogendoorn, P.C.W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to explain radiographic features of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), in particular, osseous extension, by correlating imaging findings with histology in order to increase the accuracy of radiological diagnosis. In a series of 200 consecutive osseous (pseudo) tumors of the hand, on radiography, six patients presented with an intrinsic osseous lesion caused by a histologically confirmed neighboring GCTTS. Available radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images were correlated with histology. Radiography showed osseous lesions consisting of well-defined cortical defects in four (one of whom also demonstrated cortical scalloping) and a slightly expansile, well-defined osteolytic lesion in two patients. MR obtained in four patients showed the extraosseous tumor invading/eroding bone and causing cortical scalloping (three and one patients, respectively). Extension depicted on MR was confirmed on the two available resection specimens. All lesions were polylobular (cauliflower or mushroom like) and neighbored tendon sheaths. Dense collagen and hemosiderin-loaded macrophages explained the high CT attenuation and the low MR signal intensity on T2-weighted images that was observed in all four MR and in all two CT scans. The high density of proliferative capillaries explained the marked enhancement observed in all four patients with gadolinium (Gd)-chelate-enhanced MR imaging. GCTTS is a soft tissue (pseudo) tumor that may invade bone and as a consequence mimick an intrinsic osseous lesion on radiographs. In such cases, specific MR and CT features that can be explained by histological findings can be used to suggest the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Surgical treatment for diffused-type giant cell tumor (pigmented villonodular synovitis) about the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingchen; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Xiangyang

    2017-11-14

    Diffused-type giant cell tumor(Dt-GCT) is a rare, aggressive disorder of the joint synovium, bursa and tendon sheaths. Osseous erosions and subchondral cysts may develop as the result of synovium infiltration in Dt-GCT. We present a retrospective study of a series of patients who are diagnosed with Dt-GCT about the ankle joint, there clinical outcome is evaluated in this study. Fifteen patients with radiologically and histologically confirmed Dt-GCT about the ankle joint were identified in our foot and ankle department. Patients were managed with open synovectomy for the tumor tissue and bone grafting for bony erosions. X-rays and MRI scans were used for evaluation of the tumor and bony erosions pre- and post-operatively. Pre- and post-operative ankle function was assessed using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society -Ankle and Hindfoot (AOFAS-AH) score and the Muscularskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. The mean follow-up duration was 37.4 months (range 25 to 50 months). There were 6 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 35 years old (range 18 to 65 years). All patients had talar erosion with the average size of 10.1*9.1*8.2 mm, distal tibia was affected in 5 patients with the average size of 6.2*5.6*5.8 mm. 7 patients had tendon involvement, 2 patients had recurrence and progression of ankle osteoarthritis. Both of them underwent ankle fusion. At the time of last follow-up, the mean AOFAS-AH score increased from 49 to 80 points (p ankle joint. Fusion is recommended for failed and severe cartilage destruction of the ankle joint.

  8. Complete heart block due to diphtheritic myocarditis in the present era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun J Varghese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria continues to be reported from many parts of the world. Complete heart block is rare but often fatal complication of diphtheric myocarditis. We report six children with diphtheric myocarditis who presented with complete heart block. Three patients survived, one with persistent complete heart block. Aggressive supportive management including transvenous pacing may result in complete recovery in a significant number of children with diphtheric myocarditis.

  9. Giant grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch-Devlin, M.A.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared observations of the Orion nebula have been interpreted by Rowan-Robinson (1975) to imply the existence of 'giant' grains, radius approximately 10 -2 cm, throughout a volume about a parsec in diameter. Although Rowan-Robinson's model of the nebula has been criticized and the presence of such grains in Orion is disputed, the proposition is accepted, that they exist, and in this paper situations in which giant grains could arise are examined. It is found that, while a giant-grain component to the interstellar grain density may exist, it is difficult to understand how giant grains arise to the extent apparently required by the Orion nebula model. (Auth.)

  10. Techniques in the management of juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumors around the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyadhara, S; Rao, S K

    2007-03-01

    Juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumors around the knee pose difficulties in management. This article reviews current problems and options in the management of these giant cell tumors. A systematic search was performed on juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumor. Additional information was retrieved from hand searching the literature and from relevant congress proceedings. We addressed the following issues: general consensus on early diagnosis and techniques in its management. In particular, we describe our results with resection arthrodesis performed combining the benefits of both interlocking intramedullary nail and Ilizarov fixator in the management of these tumors around the knee. Mean operative age of the 22 patients undergoing resection arthrodesis was 35.63 years. Seven lesions were in the tibia and fifteen in the femur. Mean length of the bone defect was 12.34 cm. The mean external fixator index was 7.44 days/cm and the distraction index was 7.88 days/cm. Mean period of follow-up for the patients was 64.5 months. The function of the affected limb was rated excellent in 10 and good and fair in six patients each as per Enneking criteria. No local recurrence of tumor was seen. Seven complications occurred in five patients. Two-ring construct, bifocal bone transport, and early definite plate osteosynthesis with additional bone grafting of the docking site at the end of distraction even before consolidation of the regenerate helps to reduce the problems of pin tract infections drastically. Thin-diameter long intramedullary nail in addition to preserving the endosteal blood supply also prevents mal-alignment of the regenerate. Thus resection arthrodesis using interlocking intramedullary nail and bone transport using Ilizarov fixator is cost effective and effective in achieving the desired goals of reconstruction with least complications in selected patients with specific indications.

  11. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane eBeilby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i very large cell size, (ii position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt-sensitive Chara australis succumbs to 50 - 100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells

  12. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever; A child with acute myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaz Aslam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever (DF is an acute febrile illness that follows a self-limiting course. However, some patients suffer from complications, including myocarditis, due to the involvement of other organs. A child presented at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, in June 2013 with a high-grade fever, malaise and epigastric pain radiating to the chest. Positive DF antigen and immunoglobulin M assays confirmed the diagnosis of DF. Persistent bradycardia with low blood pressure led to further cardiac investigations which showed a decreased ejection fraction and raised serum cardiac enzymes, indicating myocardial damage. With supportive care and use of inotropes, the spontaneous normalisation of cardiac enzyme levels and ejection fraction was observed. The child was discharged five days after admission. This case highlights the importance of identifying myocarditis in DF patients suffering from cardiac symptoms that are not explained by other potential aetiologies. Awareness, early suspicion and supportive care are essential to ensure favourable outcomes.

  13. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis-three challenges-consequences of the vasculitis process, osteoporosis, and malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Hess, Søren; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) are common inflammatory conditions. The diagnosis of PMR/GCA poses many challenges since there are no specific diagnostic tests. Recent literature emphasizes the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography...... of clinical picture of PMR/GCA with PET findings; the validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT scan for diagnosis of PMR/GCA compared with temporal artery biopsy; the prevalence of newly diagnosed malignancies in patients with PMR/GCA, or PMR-like syndrome, with the focus on diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT scan...

  14. Painless giant cell thyroiditis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration and associated with intense thyroidal uptake of gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, L.R.; Moreno, A.J.; Pittman, D.L.; Jones, J.D.; Spicer, M.J.; Tracy, K.P.

    1986-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with fever, goiter, and no evidence of pain or tenderness in the thyroid. A diagnosis of silent thyroiditis was made after obtaining evidence of biochemical thyrotoxicosis, intense gallium-67 citrate thyroidal localization, and cytologic thyroiditis. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid revealed numerous giant cells in all areas of the thyroid, typical of subacute thyroiditis. This is believed to be the first time painless thyroiditis is reported with the classic cytologic feature of painful subacute thyroiditis

  15. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; de Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado; Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi; Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; de Menezes, Marcos Roberto

    2016-02-01

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  16. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de; Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi; Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de

    2016-01-01

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones

  17. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil); Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi [Instituto Avanços em Medicina (Brazil); Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de, E-mail: marcos.menezes@hc.fm.usp.br [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  18. Four cases of acute chagasic myocarditis in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carme, B; Aune, I; Nguyen, G; Aznar, C; Beaudet, B

    2001-01-01

    The authors report four cases of acute chagasic myocarditis which had been diagnosed and treated in Cayenne, French Guiana, in the past 6 years. This French territory, which has the highest standard of living in South America, should be considered an area of risk for sporadic Chagas disease with epidemiologic features similar to those of the disease found in dense Amazon forest areas. Appropriate measures must be taken to screen and promptly manage Chagas disease in the French Guiana population.

  19. A CLINICAL CASE OF ACUTE ALLERGIC MYOCARDITIS SIMULATING MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe a clinical case of evolving acute eosinophilic myocarditis simulating coronary heart disease. Subjects and methods. Patient B. aged 62 years was admitted to Intensive Care Unit Fifteen, N.I. Pirogov First Moscow City Clinical Hospital, by being transferred from Thailand with a referral diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction made on November 1, 2012, with complaints of pressing and aching heart pains. At a Phuket hospital, his electrocardiogram recorded atrial fibrillation; indirect cardiac massage, electric pulse therapy, and mechanical ventilation were performed. After being admitted to the N.I. Pirogov First Moscow City Clinical Hospital, the patient underwent examination: estimation of laboratory indicators over time, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography, Holter ECG monitoring, and myocardial scintigraphy. Results. The patient had a history of an allergic reaction as urticaria to the ingestion of fish products. His examination showed practically all diagnostic criteria for allergic myocarditis: hypereosinophilia (the admission level of eosinophils was 9% with their further normalization; the characteristic clinical presentation of myocarditis (pressing retrosternal pain; elevated levels of cardiac specific enzymes (creatinine phosphokinase-MB, lactate dehydrogenase, troponin T; ECG changes – myocardial hypokinesis in the acute period, followed by its pattern normalization. of the pattern. Myocardial scintigraphy (by taking into account the fact that the patient had had a new allergic reaction episode, the investigators decided not to perform coronary angiography revealed decreased radiopharmaceutical accumulation in the lower left ventricular wall in the right coronary arterial bed; perfusion remained in the other myocardial walls. Conclusion. This clinical case reflects the specific features of the course of and difficulties in the diagnosis of acute allergic myocarditis that, in most cases, has no specific

  20. [Cardiac tamponade and myocarditis in Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baili, L; Aydi, Z; Soussi, G; Ben Dhaou B, B; Zidi, A; Berraies, A; Boussema, F; Kammoun, S; Hamzaoui, A; Kraiem, S; Ben Miled M'rad, K; Rokbani, L

    2014-09-01

    The successive occurrence of pericardial tamponade and myocarditis during a Churg-Strauss syndrome is exceptionally described. We report a patient in whom pericardial tamponade and myocarditis were the presenting manifestation of a Churg-Strauss syndrome. A 58-year-old woman was admitted because of alteration of the clinical status with eosinophilia. One month ago, she was hospitalized for a pericardial tamponade treated by pericardial drainage. Acute myocarditis was diagnosed on chest pain during the second hospitalization. The etiologic inquiry ended in the diagnosis of Churg-Strauss complicated with a double cardiac involvement. A good response of clinical and biological anomalies was obtained after corticosteroid and immunosuppressive treatment. Isolated or multiple involvements of cardiac tunics should lead to make diagnosis of systemic vasculitis. A complete initial assessment and a close observation of the patients followed for Churg-Strauss syndrome is imperative to detect a cardiac achievement and set up an early treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Reconstructive procedures for segmental resection of bone in giant cell tumors around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Aditya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Segmental resection of bone in Giant Cell Tumor (GCT around the knee, in indicated cases, leaves a gap which requires a complex reconstructive procedure. The present study analyzes various reconstructive procedures in terms of morbidity and various complications encountered. Materials and Methods: Thirteen cases (M-six and F-seven; lower end femur-six and upper end tibia -seven of GCT around the knee, radiologically either Campanacci Grade II, Grade II with pathological fracture or Grade III were included. Mean age was 25.6 years (range 19-30 years. Resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening over intramedullary nail ( n=5, resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail ( n=3 and resection arthrodesis with intercalary fibular autograft and simultaneous limb lengthening ( n=5 were the procedure performed. Results: Shortening was the major problem following resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening over intramedullary nail. Only two patients agreed for subsequent limb lengthening. The rest continued to walk with shortening. Infection was the major problem in all cases of resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail and required multiple drainage procedures. Fusion was achieved after two years in two patients. In the third patient the allograft sequestrated. The patient underwent sequestrectomy, telescoping of fragments and ilizarov fixator application with subsequent limb lengthening. The patient was finally given an ischial weight relieving orthosis, 54 months after the index procedure. After resection arthrodesis with intercalary autograft and simultaneous lengthening the resultant gap (~15cm was partially bridged by intercalary nonvascularized dual fibular strut graft (6-7cm and additional corticocancellous bone graft from ipsilateral patella. Simultaneous limb lengthening with a distal tibial corticotomy was performed on an

  2. A Rare Case of Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Abdominal Wall: Excision and Immediate Reconstruction with a Pedicled Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP) Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Sara; Zabbia, Giovanni; Corradino, Bartolo; Tripoli, Massimiliano; Pirrello, Roberto; Cordova, Adriana

    2017-12-04

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) greater than 5 cm in diameter is called giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC), or super giant basal cell carcinoma if it has a diameter larger than 20 cm. Giant BCC only accounts for 0.5% of BCCs and super giant BCC is exceedingly rare. On account of their rarity, there are no established guidelines for GBCC treatment. CASE REPORT We describe a peculiar case of an 82-year-old woman with a GBCC carcinoma of the lower abdominal wall. The tumor was surgically removed with ipsilateral inguinal lymph nodes and the abdominal wall was reconstructed immediately with a pedicled deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of giant basal cell carcinoma is often difficult, especially in elderly patients with poor general health and multiple pathologies. The pedicled DIEP flap is rotated to cover the loss of substance without tension, and it is easy to harvest and transfer. This flap allowed a good result without local or systemic complication. We present this report as a reminder of the occasional occurrence of extremely aggressive BCCs. We believe that, especially for rare tumors like these, it is very useful for the entire scientific community to publish these cases and the therapeutic strategies used to treat them.

  3. Molecular phenotypes of human parvovirus B19 in patients with myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, C-Thomas; Düchting, Anja; Utta, Friederike; Brunner, Eva; Sy, Bui Tien; Klingel, Karin; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Felix, Stephan B; Kandolf, Reinhard

    2014-04-26

    To investigate molecular phenotypes of myocardial B19V-infection to determine the role of B19V in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) from 498 B19V-positive patients with myocarditis and DCM were analyzed using molecular methods and functional experiments. EMBs were obtained from the University Hospitals of Greifswald and Tuebingen and additionally from 36 German cardiology centers. Control tissues were obtained at autopsy from 34 victims of accidents, crime or suicide. Identification of mononuclear cell infiltrates in EMBs was performed using immunohistological staining. Anti-B19V-IgM and anti-B19V-IgG were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). B19V viral loads were determined using in-house quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For B19V-genotyping a new B19V-genotype-specific restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-PCR was established. B19V-genotyping was verified by direct DNA-sequencing and sequences were aligned using BLAST and BioEdit software. B19V P6-promoter and HHV6-U94-transactivator constructs were generated for cell culture experiments. Transfection experiments were conducted using human endothelial cells 1. Luciferase reporter assays were performed to determine B19V-replication activity. Statistical analysis and graphical representation were calculated using SPSS and Prism5 software. The prevalence of B19V was significantly more likely to be associated with inflammatory cardiomyopathy (iCMP) compared to uninflamed DCM (59.6% vs 35.3%) (P reactivation of B19V-infection by HHV6-coinfection in B19V-associated iCMP. Our findings suggest that B19V-infection of the human heart can be a causative event for the development of an endothelial cell-mediated inflammatory disease and that this is related to both viral load and genotype.

  4. INTEGRAL EVALUATION OF THE CYTOKINE SYSTEM IN VIRAL MYOCARDITIS

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    Peremot S. D.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The need for an individual approach in the choice of means for the prevention of complications in inflammatory processes in cardiomyocytes, the course of which unfolds against a persistent viral infection, dictates the need to determine the general mechanisms for maintaining and progressing of the pathological process and an objective evaluation of immunological changes. The aim of the study was to determine changes in the system of inflammatory mediators in patients with subacute and chronic herpesviral infectious myocarditis on the basis of an integral assessment of the levels of opposing groups of cytokines. Materials & methods. To achieve this goal, we conducted a determination and analysis of changes in the cytokine profile in 87 patients with subacute (from 2 to 6 months and chronic (more than 6 months myocarditis due to an integral assessment of the mediator levels of inflammation of opposing groups in patients with herpesviral myocarditis on treatment in medical institutions of the Kharkov city. The average age of the patients was (27 ± 7.4 years. The control group was attracted to 40 people without clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and in whose anamnesis there were no data on the transferred inflammatory diseases of the myocardium. Both groups of subjects were comparable in age and gender. The main group of subjects was divided into two subgroups. The first was 44 patients with subacute flow, the second - 43 patients with chronic infectious myocarditis. The diagnosis was established in accordance with the recommendations of the Association of Cardiologists of Ukraine and experts of the European Society of Cardiology, according to the formation of definitions of diseases in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10 of the tenth revision. The removal of material from patients was carried out according to the rules for the collection of infectious material. The concentration of cytokines: IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL

  5. Case report 353: Giant cell tumor of distal end of the femur, containing a fluid level as demonstrated by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnik, C.S.; Steffe, J.W.; Wang, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    In summary, a 22-year-old man presented after sustaining a minor injury to his left knee while playing football. Radiological studies showed the characteristic stigmata of a giant cell tumor in the distal end of the femur involving the medial femoral condyle. On computed tomography with the proper window settings a fluid level was demonstrated in the osteolytic lesion. At surgery, yellowish sanguinous fluid was aspirated from the lesion which was completely curetted. Pathological studies showed the typical stigmata of a giant cell tumor. (orig./SHA)

  6. Imaging in a case of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in foot: A case report with re-view of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Patnaik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Large sized Giant cell tumors (GCT of the tendon sheaths of the foot are rare. We present a case with a large tumor over the dor-sum of foot which was diagnosed and studied by plain radiog-raphy, Ultrasound, CT and MRI scans. It was histologically con-firmed on biopsy. When the size of the tumor (like Giant cell tu-mor is too large and spread over multiple bones of the foot MRI is the imaging modality of choice to precisely define the anatomy to help in taking surgical decisions.

  7. An unusual case of aortic rupture after deployment of a bare stent in the treatment of aortic dissection in a patient with giant-cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynio, Pawel; Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz; Gutowski, Piotr; Cnotliwy, Miloslaw

    2017-06-01

    Giant-cell arteritis is associated with a higher risk of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection formation. We present a women with aortic dissection type B treated with a stent graft and bare-metal stent implantation. After the stent deployment we noticed aortic rupture, which was successfully treated with implantation of an additional stent graft. This report highlights the difficulty of endovascular therapy in patients with giant-cell arteritis. We have to bear in mind that chronic inflammation of the aorta leads to a more fragile aortic wall than normal. We recommend the use of a stent graft over a bare-metal stent and gentle use of a balloon catheter.

  8. Heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to Brucella invasion into trophoblast giant cells that cause infectious abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuoka Hidefumi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell tropism of Brucella abortus, a causative agent of brucellosis and facultative intracellular pathogen, in the placenta is thought to be a key event of infectious abortion, although the molecular mechanism for this is largely unknown. There is a higher degree of bacterial colonization in the placenta than in other organs and many bacteria are detected in trophoblast giant (TG cells in the placenta. In the present study, we investigated mechanism of B. abortus invasion into TG cells. Results We observed internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in cultured TG cells. A monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial internalization was isolated and this reacted with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70. Depletion and over expression of Hsc70 in TG cells inhibited and promoted bacterial internalization, respectively. IFN-γ receptor was expressed in TG cells and IFN-γ treatment enhanced the uptake of bacteria by TG cells. Administering the anti-Hsc70 antibody to pregnant mice served to prevent infectious abortion. Conclusion B. abortus infection of TG cells in placenta is mediated by Hsc70, and that such infection leads to infectious abortion.

  9. MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF SPERMATOGONIA AND TESTES DISSOCIATION : A Preliminary Study for the Germ Cell Transplantation in Giant Gouramy (Osphronemus gouramy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Andriani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent study were attempting to develop spermatogonial germ cell transplantation as a tool to preserve and propagate male germ-plasm from endangered fish species, as well as to produce surrogate broodstock of commercially valuable fish. Spermatogonia identification and testes dissociation were the first necessary steps to obtain highly amount and viable population of spermatogonia as donor cells for transplantation. Using giant gouramy testes as a model, spermatogonia was histological characterized and two methods of testes dissociations were compared (i.e. medium A contained 0.5% trypsin in PBS and medium B contained 0.5% trypsin and DNase 10 IU/μL in PBS complemented with CaCl2, Hepes and FCS. Optimal incubation times (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours in dissociation medium were also determined. Freshly isolated testes of immature giant gouramy were minced in dissociation medium and then incubated to get monodisperce cell suspension. Parameters observed were number and viability of spermatogonia (ø > 10 μm. The viability was analyzed using trypan blue exclusion dye. The results showed that the average number of spermatogonia observed in medium B was higher than in medium A (P0.05. The viability of spermatogonia decreased by the increasing duration time of dissociation. The viability of spermatogonia started to decrease significantly in 2 hours incubation time in medium A and 4 hours incubation time in medium B (P<0.05. In conclusion, application of dissociation medium B yielded higher number of viable spermatogonia than dissociation medium A.

  10. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David Carmona, F.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castaneda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jose; Prieto-Gonzalez, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Francisca Gonzalez-Escribano, M.; Ortiz-Fernandez, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narvaez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, Jose A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schoenau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Oyvind; Molberg, Oyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip

  11. A Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Risk Alleles in Plasminogen and P4HA2 Associated with Giant Cell Arteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, Francisco David; Vaglio, Augusto; Mackie, Sarah L.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Monach, Paul A.; Castañeda, Santos; Solans, Roser; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Pease, Colin T.; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Watts, Richard; Khalidi, Nader A.; Langford, Carol A.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Boiardi, Luigi; Beretta, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marcello; Emmi, Giacomo; Bonatti, Francesco; Cimmino, Marco A.; Witte, Torsten; Neumann, Thomas; Holle, Julia; Schönau, Verena; Sailler, Laurent; Papo, Thomas; Haroche, Julien; Mahr, Alfred; Mouthon, Luc; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Daikeler, Thomas; Berger, Christoph T.; Molloy, Eamonn S.; O'Neill, Lorraine; Blockmans, Daniel; Lie, Benedicte A.; McLaren, Paul J; Vyse, Timothy J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Allanore, Yannick; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Callejas-Rubio, José Luis; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; de Miguel, Eugenio; López, J. Bernardino Díaz; García-Villanueva, María Jesús; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Guijarro-Rojas, Mercedes; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Berriochoa, Agustín Martínez; Zapico, Aleida Martínez; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Monfort, Jordi; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Prieto-González, Sergio; Raya, Enrique; Fernández, Raquel Ríos; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Sopeña, Bernardo; Tío, Laura; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Gough, Andrew; Isaacs, John D.; Green, Michael; McHugh, Neil J.; Hordon, Lesley; Kamath, Sanjeet; Nisar, Mohammed; Patel, Yusuf; Yee, Cee Seng; Stevens, Robert; Nandi, Pradip; Nandagudi, Anupama; Jarrett, Stephen; Li, Charles; Levy, Sarah; Mollan, Susan; Salih, Abdel; Wordsworth, Oliver; Sanders, Emma; Roads, Esme; Gill, Anne; Carr, Lisa; Routledge, Christine; Culfear, Karen; Nugaliyadde, Asanka; James, Lynne; Spimpolo, Jenny; Kempa, Andy; Mackenzie, Felicity; Fong, Rosanna; Peters, Genessa; Rowbotham, Bridie; Masqood, Zahira; Hollywood, Jane; Gondo, Prisca; Wood, Rose; Martin, Steve; Rashid, Lubna Haroon; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Mike; Sorensen, Louise; Taylor, John C.; Carette, Simon; Chung, Sharon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen M.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry W.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Spiera, Robert F.; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Weisman, Michael H; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Cid, María C.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Morgan, Ann W.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in individuals older than 50 years in Western countries. To shed light onto the genetic background influencing susceptibility for GCA, we performed a genome-wide association screening in a well-powered study cohort. After imputation,

  12. Osteoclastome-like giant cell thyroid carcinoma controlled by intensive radiation and adriamycin, in a patient with meningioma and multiple myeloma treated by radiation and cytoxan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizel-Schwartz, M.

    1981-01-01

    The eighth cases of osteoclastome-like giant cell carcinoma of the thyroid, and the first one to be treated with adriamycin in addition to surgery and radiation, is reported. This rare variant of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma appeared in a patient operated on for meningioma and treated for multiple myeloma with cranial radiation and chronic administration of cytoxan

  13. Liquid nitrogen or phenolization for giant cell tumor of bone?: a comparative cohort study of various standard treatments at two tertiary referral centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, L. van der; Geest, I.C.M. van der; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Dijkstra, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rate of recurrence of giant cell tumor of bone is decreased by use of adjuvant treatments such as phenol, liquid nitrogen, or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) during curettage. We assessed recurrence and complication rates and functional outcome after curettage with use of phenol and

  14. Fluorescence microscopical studies on chitin distribution in the cell wall of giant cells of Saccharomyces uvarum, grown following X-radiaiton treatment. Fluoreszenzmikroskopische Untersuchungen zur Chitinverteilung in der Zellwand von Riesenzellen von Saccharomyces uvarum, gewachsen nach Roentgenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoschka, L

    1982-01-01

    Teast cells are synchronized and modiated with X-rays (1.0 kGy) in the Cr, phase. Their growth behaviour is observed in suspension cultures and the formation of giant cells noted. The chitin structures are selectively stained with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white. In the unradiated cells the chitin is deposited at the bud constriction site in the form of rings in the mother cell wall, whereas for irradiated cells only one chitin ring of normal appearance is formed between the mother cell and first bud equivalent. Between further bud equivalents an intensification of fluorescence is occasionally noted, however the organisation of the chitin into a regular ring arrangement is disturbed. In giant cells the facility for primary and secondary septa formation is missing and these are essential for successful cell division. By further experiments it was possible to identify the cause of disturbance in the cell cycle of irradiated cells. Giant cells only form one chitin ring because its DNA is replicated one time only. The major cause triggering the actual formation of giant cells must be considered the missing distribution of the once-rephicated DNA. All processes in the cell cycle dependent on this step are therefore stopped and only bud formation which occurs independently continues along its rhytmical path.

  15. Fluorescence microscopical studies on chitin distribution in the cell wall of giant cells of Saccharomyces uvarum, grown following X-radiation treatment. Fluoreszenzmikroskopische Untersuchungen zur Chitinverteilung in der Zellwand von Riesenzellen von Saccharomyces uvarum, gewachsen nach Roentgenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoschka, L

    1982-01-01

    Yeast cells are synchronized and modiated with X-rays (1.0 kGy) in the Cr, phase. Their growth behaviour is observed in suspension cultures and the formation of giant cells noted. The chitin structures are selectively stained with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white. In the unradiated cells the chitin is deposited at the bud constriction site in the form of rings in the mother cell wall, whereas for irradiated cells only one chitin ring of normal appearance is formed between the mother cell and first bud equivalent. Between further bud equivalents an intensification of fluorescence is occasionally noted, however the organisation of the chitin into a regular ring arrangement is disturbed. In giant cells the facility for primary and secondary septa formation is missing and these are essential for successful cell division. By further experiments it was possible to identify the cause of disturbance in the cell cycle of irradiated cells. Giant cells only form one chitin ring because its DNA is replicated one time only. The major cause triggering the actual formation of giant cells must be considered the missing distribution of the once-rephicated DNA. All processes in the cell cycle dependent on this step are therefore stopped and only bud formation which occurs independently continues along its rhythmical path.

  16. Lethal giant larvae 1 tumour suppressor activity is not conserved in models of mammalian T and B cell leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin D Hawkins

    Full Text Available In epithelial and stem cells, lethal giant larvae (Lgl is a potent tumour suppressor, a regulator of Notch signalling, and a mediator of cell fate via asymmetric cell division. Recent evidence suggests that the function of Lgl is conserved in mammalian haematopoietic stem cells and implies a contribution to haematological malignancies. To date, direct measurement of the effect of Lgl expression on malignancies of the haematopoietic lineage has not been tested. In Lgl1⁻/⁻ mice, we analysed the development of haematopoietic malignancies either alone, or in the presence of common oncogenic lesions. We show that in the absence of Lgl1, production of mature white blood cell lineages and long-term survival of mice are not affected. Additionally, loss of Lgl1 does not alter leukaemia driven by constitutive Notch, c-Myc or Jak2 signalling. These results suggest that the role of Lgl1 in the haematopoietic lineage might be restricted to specific co-operating mutations and a limited number of cellular contexts.

  17. Lethal Giant Larvae 1 Tumour Suppressor Activity Is Not Conserved in Models of Mammalian T and B Cell Leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Edwin D.; Oliaro, Jane; Ramsbottom, Kelly M.; Ting, Stephen B.; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Harvey, Michael; Kinwell, Tanja; Ghysdael, Jacques; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Russell, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial and stem cells, lethal giant larvae (Lgl) is a potent tumour suppressor, a regulator of Notch signalling, and a mediator of cell fate via asymmetric cell division. Recent evidence suggests that the function of Lgl is conserved in mammalian haematopoietic stem cells and implies a contribution to haematological malignancies. To date, direct measurement of the effect of Lgl expression on malignancies of the haematopoietic lineage has not been tested. In Lgl1−/− mice, we analysed the development of haematopoietic malignancies either alone, or in the presence of common oncogenic lesions. We show that in the absence of Lgl1, production of mature white blood cell lineages and long-term survival of mice are not affected. Additionally, loss of Lgl1 does not alter leukaemia driven by constitutive Notch, c-Myc or Jak2 signalling. These results suggest that the role of Lgl1 in the haematopoietic lineage might be restricted to specific co-operating mutations and a limited number of cellular contexts. PMID:24475281

  18. Tumor of giant cells: A revision of 56 cases, National Institute of Cancerology. January 1980. December of 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya Cardenas, Ruben Danilo

    1996-01-01

    56 patients with giant cell tumour of the bone, diagnosed during 11 years at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, are reviewed. The average presentation age was 35.02 years with a ratio male to female 1:1.4. The most frequent clinical signs included mass and pain. The radiographic aspect of the lesion on long bones is a rather characteristic destructive geographic pattern with inner trabecular, located on the apyphises. The most frequently compromised anatomic sites were the proximal tibia and the distal femur. Other sites included the spine and pelvis where, even though the radiographic pattern was not classics, the lesion was considered in the differential diagnosis. Two cases in this series were malignant

  19. Tumor-induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia Report of a cases associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma of gingiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Rae; Kim, Won Chul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Mee Kyung; Lee, Byung Do

    1987-01-01

    The authors observed a patient who referred to the Department of Oral Radiology, due to diffuse skeletal pain, muscular weakness and unknown tumor mass on the buccal gingiva of upper right molar region. The patient was found to have peripheral reparative giant cell granuloma and osteomalacia. After removal of the tumor, the clinical, radiologic, and laboratory findings of the patient was rapidly normalized with remarkable improvement of bone pain. The results were as follows: 1. After removal of the tumor, the patient improved the clinical findings such as bone pain, trismus, muscular weakness and he could walk. 2. In postoperative x-ray findings at 1 and 2 months intervals, the lamina dura of all dentition and bony trabeculae in upper and lower arches were regenerating and the bone density increased. 3. In periodic recall check, no occurrence of osteomalacia was existed and the laboratory findings of the patient showed gradual improvement.

  20. Tumor-induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia Report of a cases associated with peripheral giant cell granuloma of gingiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Rae; Kim, Won Chul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Mee Kyung; Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-11-15

    The authors observed a patient who referred to the Department of Oral Radiology, due to diffuse skeletal pain, muscular weakness and unknown tumor mass on the buccal gingiva of upper right molar region. The patient was found to have peripheral reparative giant cell granuloma and osteomalacia. After removal of the tumor, the clinical, radiologic, and laboratory findings of the patient was rapidly normalized with remarkable improvement of bone pain. The results were as follows: 1. After removal of the tumor, the patient improved the clinical findings such as bone pain, trismus, muscular weakness and he could walk. 2. In postoperative x-ray findings at 1 and 2 months intervals, the lamina dura of all dentition and bony trabeculae in upper and lower arches were regenerating and the bone density increased. 3. In periodic recall check, no occurrence of osteomalacia was existed and the laboratory findings of the patient showed gradual improvement.

  1. The Central Bright Spot Sign: A Potential New MR Imaging Sign for the Early Diagnosis of Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy due to Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remond, P; Attyé, A; Lecler, A; Lamalle, L; Boudiaf, N; Aptel, F; Krainik, A; Chiquet, C

    2017-07-01

    A rapid identification of the etiology of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is crucial because it determines therapeutic management. Our aim was to assess MR imaging to study the optic nerve head in patients referred with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, due to either giant cell arteritis or the nonarteritic form of the disease, compared with healthy subjects. Fifteen patients with giant cell arteritis-related anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and 15 patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy from 2 medical centers were prospectively included in our study between August 2015 and May 2016. Fifteen healthy subjects and patients had undergone contrast-enhanced, flow-compensated, 3D T1-weighted MR imaging. The bright spot sign was defined as optic nerve head enhancement with a 3-grade ranking system. Two radiologists and 1 ophthalmologist independently performed blinded evaluations of MR imaging sequences with this scale. Statistical analysis included interobserver agreement. MR imaging scores were significantly higher in patients with giant cell arteritis-related anterior ischemic optic neuropathy than in patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy ( P ≤ .05). All patients with giant cell arteritis-related anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (15/15) and 7/15 patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presented with the bright spot sign. No healthy subjects exhibited enhancement of the anterior part of the optic nerve. There was a significant relationship between the side of the bright spot and the side of the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy ( P ≤ .001). Interreader agreement was good for observers (κ = 0.815). Here, we provide evidence of a new MR imaging sign that identifies the acute stage of giant cell arteritis-related anterior ischemic optic neuropathy; patients without this central bright spot sign always had a nonarteritic pathophysiology and therefore did not require emergency corticosteroid

  2. Response evaluation of giant-cell tumor of bone treated by denosumab: Histogram and texture analysis of CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jisook; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Seung Hyun; Song, Ho-Taek; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare computed tomography (CT) features, including tumor size and textural and histogram measurements, of giant-cell tumors of bone (GCTBs) before and after denosumab treatment and determine their applicability in monitoring GCTB response to denosumab treatment. This retrospective study included eight patients (male, 3; female, 5; mean age, 33.4 years) diagnosed with GCTB, who had received treatment by denosumab and had undergone pre- and post-treatment non-contrast CT between January 2010 and December 2016. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Pre- and post-treatment size, histogram, and textural parameters of GCTBs were compared by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Pathological findings of five patients who underwent surgery after denosumab treatment were evaluated for assessment of treatment response. Relative to the baseline values, the tumor size had decreased, while the mean attenuation, standard deviation, entropy (all, P = 0.017), and skewness (P = 0.036) of the GCTBs had significantly increased post-treatment. Although the difference was statistically insignificant, the tumors also exhibited increased kurtosis, contrast, and inverse difference moment (P = 0.123, 0.327, and 0.575, respectively) post-treatment. Histologic findings revealed new bone formation and complete depletion or decrease in the number of osteoclast-like giant cells. The histogram and textural parameters of GCTBs changed significantly after denosumab treatment. Knowledge of the tendency towards increased mean attenuation and heterogeneity but increased local homogeneity in post-treatment CT histogram and textural features of GCTBs might aid in treatment planning and tumor response evaluation during denosumab treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Tibial stress reaction presenting as bilateral shin pain in a man taking denosumab for giant cell tumor of the bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sian Yik; Rastalsky, Naina; Choy, Edwin; Bolster, Marcy B

    2015-12-01

    Prolonged bisphosphonate use has been associated with increased risk of atypical femoral fractures. Very few cases of atypical femoral fractures have been reported with denosumab. We report a case of bilateral tibial stress reactions in a 60-year-old man with no history of osteoporosis who was on prolonged high-dose denosumab for the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone. He presented with a 3-month history of pain in his bilateral shins worsening with activity and improving with rest. Although initial radiographs were unremarkable, he was found to have changes consistent with a stress reaction on magnetic resonance imaging of the distal tibia. To our knowledge, bilateral tibial stress reactions have not been previously reported with anti-resorptive therapies (neither bisphosphonates nor denosumab). Our case is intriguing in terms of the development of stress reactions as a precursor to stress fractures which may also relate to atypical fractures. Our case suggests a possible association between denosumab use and stress reactions. Of note the indication for denosumab in our case was for the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone where the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved dose is substantially higher than the FDA approved dose for osteoporosis treatment. Although rare, clinicians should consider the possibility of stress fractures in patients on anti-resorptive medications such as denosumab, especially when a patient presents with new onset thigh pain, hip pain or pain over an area affecting the long bones. Evaluation by imaging of affected areas should be pursued to enable early detection and intervention, as well as prevention of morbidity and associated ongoing risk to the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Associated factors and impact of myocarditis in patients with SLE from LUMINA, a multiethnic US cohort (LV). [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, M; McGwin, G; Vilá, L M; Kaslow, R A; Alarcón, G S; Reveille, J D

    2008-03-01

    To examine the factors associated with myocarditis and its impact on disease outcomes in SLE patients. SLE patients aged > or = 16 yrs, disease duration NAture vs nurture), a multiethnic US cohort, were studied. Myocarditis was defined as per the category 3 of the pericarditis/myocarditis item of the SLAM-Revised (SLAM-R). Patients with concurrent pericardial involvement were excluded. Patients with myocarditis were compared with those without myocarditis or its sequelae in the preceding year. The association between myocarditis and baseline variables (T(0)) was first examined. The impact of myocarditis on disease activity over time (SLAM-R), damage accrual [SLICC Damage Index (SDI)] at last visit (T(L)) and mortality was evaluated. Fifty-three of the 496 patients studied had myocarditis. African American ethnicity [Odds ratio (OR) = 12.6; 95% CI 1.6, 97.8] and SLAM-R at diagnosis (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 1.0, 1.1) were significantly and independently associated with myocarditis. Myocarditis did not predict disease activity over time, but approached significance as a predictor of SDI at T(L) in multivariable analyses P = 0.051. Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that myocarditis was associated with shorter survival (log-rank = 4.87, P = 0.02), particularly in patients with > or = 5 yrs disease; however, myocarditis was not retained in the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Ethnicity and disease activity at diagnosis were associated with the occurrence of myocarditis in SLE. Myocarditis did not significantly impact on disease activity over time, but impacts some on damage accrual and survival, reflecting overall the more severe disease those patients experience.

  5. Therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, improves experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats via nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kana; Okabe, Taka-aki; Mikami, Yu; Hattori, Miki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Chiharu

    2010-09-01

    We systematically investigated serial efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy upon experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats treated with and without the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) with the analyses of tissue regeneration. G-CSF could mobilize multipotent progenitor cells of bone marrow into the peripheral blood and may improve ventricular function. A rat model of porcine myosin-induced EAM was used. After the immunization of myosin, G-CSF (10 microg/kg/day) or saline was injected intraperitoneally on days 0-21 in experiment 1 and on days 21-42 in experiment 2. Additional myosin-immunized rats were orally given 25 mg/kg/day of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in each experiment (each group; n=8-21). Serum cytokines and peripheral blood cell counts were measured in each group. In experiment 1, G-CSF treatment aggravated cardiac pathology associated with increased macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and enhanced superoxide production. In experiment 2, G-CSF treatment reduced the severity of myocarditis with increased capillary density and improved left ventricular ejection fraction. In the rats with EAM treated with G-CSF associated with oral L-NAME treatment in experiment 2, the severity of myocarditis was not reduced. Myocardial c-kit(+) cells were demonstrated only in G-CSF-treated group in experiment 2 but not in other groups. G-CSF has differential effects on EAM in rats associated with the modulation of cytokine network. The overwhelming superoxide production by G-CSF administration in the acute stage may worsen the disease. G-CSF therapy improved cardiac function via NO system in a rat model of myocarditis in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, possibly through the myocardial regeneration and acceleration of healing process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Swiss cheese ventricular septal defect with myocarditis - A rare coexistence in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Saboo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis is defined as acute inflammation of the myocardium, usually following a non-specific flu-like illness, and encompasses a wide range of clinical presentations ranging from mild or subclinical disease to heart failure. We report a 12-day-old healthy full-term neonate who presented with abrupt onset of congestive cardiac failure (CCF following a viral prodrome. Examination revealed persistent sinus tachycardia, lymphocytosis, gross cardiomegaly, nonspecific electrocardiogram changes with echocardiography showing Swiss cheese ventricular septal defect (VSD. VSD alone very rarely presents as early-onset cardiac failure in the absence of other precipitating factors like anemia, sepsis, hypoglycemia etc. Myocarditis, however, can mimic VSD and can present as fulminant cardiac failure in an otherwise healthy newborn. Myocarditis is usually diagnosed based on circumstantial evidence such as a recent viral infection and the sudden onset of cardiac dysfunction while ruling out other diagnostic possibilities. Elevated troponin T level is one of the most crucial noninvasive diagnostic modalities. Several trials have concluded that levels >0.055 ng/ml are statistically significant for diagnosing myocarditis in children. In our case an abrupt onset of cardiac failure following a viral prodrome and markedly elevated cardiac troponin T without sepsis and in the presence of normal coronary anatomy clinched the diagnosis of myocarditis. An early and aggressive treatment for CCF along with regular long-term follow-up plays a key role in the management of myocarditis. Role of high-dose Intravenous immunoglobulin in myocarditis has been studied by many trials with different outcomes. This is the first case report showing coexistence of VSD with myocarditis in a neonate presenting as early-onset acute cardiac failure. The report highlights the importance of screening for myocarditis in all previously normal babies presenting primarily with cardiogenic

  7. Total artificial heart implantation for biventricular failure due to eosinophilic myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabori, Masashi; Kurihara, Chitaru; Miller, Yair; Heck, Kent A; Bogaev, Roberta C; Civitello, Andrew B; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H; Morgan, Jeffrey A

    2017-09-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome is a condition of unknown etiology characterized by proliferation of eosinophils and their infiltration into tissues. Although cardiac involvement is rare, eosinophilic myocarditis can lead to life-threating fulminant congestive heart failure. Treatment of patients with eosinophilic myocarditis is challenging as heart failure can be caused by biventricular dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature describing a patient with acute severe biventricular heart failure caused by eosinophilic myocarditis with mural left ventricular apical thrombus who was successfully treated with implantation of a total artificial heart as a bridge to heart transplant.

  8. Giant Chancroid

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    Bhushan Kumar

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of giant chancroid following rupture of inguinal bubo and having systemic symptoms is described. Response with sulfa and streptomycin combination was excellent and the lesion healed completely in 3 weeks. Early diagnosis and treatment of chancroid will prevent this debilitating complication.

  9. Giant microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Sala, D.; Privato, C.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Fortunato, G.

    1999-01-01

    Giant microelectronics, on which the technology of flat liquid-crystal screens is based, is an example of fruitful interaction among independently-developed technologies, in this case thin film micro devices and laser applications. It typifies the interdisciplinary approach needed to produce innovations in microelectronics [it

  10. Unresolved issues in theories of autoimmune disease using myocarditis as a framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Fairweather, DeLisa

    2015-06-21

    Many theories of autoimmune disease have been proposed since the discovery that the immune system can attack the body. These theories include the hidden or cryptic antigen theory, modified antigen theory, T cell bypass, T cell-B cell mismatch, epitope spread or drift, the bystander effect, molecular mimicry, anti-idiotype theory, antigenic complementarity, and dual-affinity T cell receptors. We critically review these theories and relevant mathematical models as they apply to autoimmune myocarditis. All theories share the common assumption that autoimmune diseases are triggered by environmental factors such as infections or chemical exposure. Most, but not all, theories and mathematical models are unifactorial assuming single-agent causation of disease. Experimental and clinical evidence and mathematical models exist to support some aspects of most theories, but evidence/models that support one theory almost invariably supports other theories as well. More importantly, every theory (and every model) lacks the ability to account for some key autoimmune disease phenomena such as the fundamental roles of innate immunity, sex differences in disease susceptibility, the necessity for adjuvants in experimental animal models, and the often paradoxical effect of exposure timing and dose on disease induction. We argue that a more comprehensive and integrated theory of autoimmunity associated with new mathematical models is needed and suggest specific experimental and clinical tests for each major theory that might help to clarify how they relate to clinical disease and reveal how theories are related. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unresolved issues in theories of autoimmune disease using myocarditis as a framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Fairweather, DeLisa

    2014-01-01

    Many theories of autoimmune disease have been proposed since the discovery that the immune system can attack the body. These theories include the hidden or cryptic antigen theory, modified antigen theory, T cell bypass, T cell-B cell mismatch, epitope spread or drift, the bystander effect, molecular mimicry, anti-idiotype theory, antigenic complementarity, and dual-affinity T cell receptors. We critically review these theories and relevant mathematical models as they apply to autoimmune myocarditis. All theories share the common assumption that autoimmune diseases are triggered by environmental factors such as infections or chemical exposure. Most, but not all, theories and mathematical models are unifactorial assuming single-agent causation of disease. Experimental and clinical evidence and mathematical models exist to support some aspects of most theories, but evidence/models that support one theory almost invariably supports other theories as well. More importantly, every theory (and every model) lacks the ability to account for some key autoimmune disease phenomena such as the fundamental roles of innate immunity, sex differences in disease susceptibility, the necessity for adjuvants in experimental animal models, and the often paradoxical effect of exposure timing and dose on disease induction. We argue that a more comprehensive and integrated theory of autoimmunity associated with new mathematical models is needed and suggest specific experimental and clinical tests for each major theory that might help to clarify how they relate to clinical disease and reveal how theories are related. PMID:25484004

  12. Rupturing Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles to Form Micron-sized Supported Cell Plasma Membranes with Native Transmembrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Chieh; Tanady, Kevin; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2017-11-09

    Being able to directly obtain micron-sized cell blebs, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), with native membrane proteins and deposit them on a planar support to form supported plasma membranes could allow the membrane proteins to be studied by various surface analytical tools in native-like bilayer environments. However, GPMVs do not easily rupture on conventional supports because of their high protein and cholesterol contents. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of using compression generated by the air-water interface to efficiently rupture GPMVs to form micron-sized supported membranes with native plasma membrane proteins. We demonstrated that not only lipid but also a native transmembrane protein in HeLa cells, Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), is mobile in the supported membrane platform. This convenient method for generating micron-sized supported membrane patches with mobile native transmembrane proteins could not only facilitate the study of membrane proteins by surface analytical tools, but could also enable us to use native membrane proteins for bio-sensing applications.

  13. Effect of water-soluble P-chitosan and S-chitosan on human primary osteoblasts and giant cell tumor of bone stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, T; Zhang, G; PY Lau, Carol; Zheng, L Z; Xie, X H; Wang, X L; Patrick, Y; Qin, L; Kumta, Shekhar M [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang, X H; He, K, E-mail: kumta@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Bio-manufacturing Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2011-02-15

    Water-soluble phosphorylated chitosan (P-chitosan) and disodium (1 {yields} 4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfoamino-{beta}-D-glucopyranuronan (S-chitosan) are two chemically modified chitosans. In this study, we found that P-chitosan significantly promotes cell proliferation of both human primary osteoblasts (OBs) and the OB like stromal cell component of the giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) cells at the concentration from 125 to 1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1} at all time points of 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after treatment. Further investigation of the osteogenic effect of the P-chitosan suggested that it regulates the levels of osteoclastogenic factors, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin expression. An interesting finding is that S-chitosan at lower concentration (100 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) stimulates cell proliferation while a higher dose (1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) of S-chitosan inhibits it. The inhibitory effect of S-chitosan on human primary GCT stromal cells was greater than that of OBs (p < 0.05). Taken together, our findings elucidated the osteogenic effect of P-chitosan and the varying effects of S-chitosan on the proliferation of human primary OBs and GCT stromal cells and provided us the rationale for the construction of novel bone repair biomaterials with the dual properties of bone induction and bone tumor inhibition.

  14. Detection of the Epstein-Barr Virus and DNA-Topoisomerase II-α in Recurrent and Nonrecurrent Giant Cell Lesion of the Jawbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal M. Zyada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II- correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II- using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II- in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs. Student t-test showed that mean Topo II- labelling index (LI in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (. Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II- LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II- LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II- LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  15. Detection of experimental myocarditis by monoclonal antimyosin antibody, Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezkalla, S.; Kloner, R.A.; Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.; Fallon, J.T.; Smith, F.E.; Khatib, R.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether monoclonal antimyosin Fab (antigen binding fragment) was capable of labeling hearts with experimental coxsackievirus myocarditis, and to determine whether Fab could be used for detecting myocardial damage in either early or chronic phases of the disease. Sixty-five, 3-week-old cesarean-derived 1 (CD 1) mice were divided into two groups: group I (noninfected animals) and group II (infected with coxsackievirus B3). Mice from each group were killed on days 7, 17, 30, or 90 of infection. Forty-eight hours before killing, mice were injected with monoclonal I-125 antimyosin, Fab (25 microCi/injection) and radioactivity was counted in the heart. Selected heart sections were also examined by autoradiography. Heart radioactivity, count/m/mg (m +/- SEM) on days 7, 17, 30, and 90 of infection was 10.8 +/- 1.7, 21.3 +/- 1.1, 11.2 +/- 3.4, and 12.4 +/- 1.5 for group I, versus 36.7 +/- 8.0 (p less than 0.01), 50.0 +/- 4.5 (p less than 0.001), 33.4 +/- 16.1 (p = NS), and 40.6 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01) for group II, respectively. Autoradiography revealed focal uptake within areas of necrotic myocardium. We conclude that I125 Fab may be useful in detecting myocardial damage in the experimental model of murine myocarditis up to day 90 of infection.

  16. Detection of experimental myocarditis by monoclonal antimyosin antibody, Fab fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezkalla, S.; Kloner, R.A.; Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.; Fallon, J.T.; Smith, F.E.; Khatib, R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether monoclonal antimyosin Fab (antigen binding fragment) was capable of labeling hearts with experimental coxsackievirus myocarditis, and to determine whether Fab could be used for detecting myocardial damage in either early or chronic phases of the disease. Sixty-five, 3-week-old cesarean-derived 1 (CD 1) mice were divided into two groups: group I (noninfected animals) and group II (infected with coxsackievirus B3). Mice from each group were killed on days 7, 17, 30, or 90 of infection. Forty-eight hours before killing, mice were injected with monoclonal I-125 antimyosin, Fab (25 microCi/injection) and radioactivity was counted in the heart. Selected heart sections were also examined by autoradiography. Heart radioactivity, count/m/mg (m +/- SEM) on days 7, 17, 30, and 90 of infection was 10.8 +/- 1.7, 21.3 +/- 1.1, 11.2 +/- 3.4, and 12.4 +/- 1.5 for group I, versus 36.7 +/- 8.0 (p less than 0.01), 50.0 +/- 4.5 (p less than 0.001), 33.4 +/- 16.1 (p = NS), and 40.6 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01) for group II, respectively. Autoradiography revealed focal uptake within areas of necrotic myocardium. We conclude that I125 Fab may be useful in detecting myocardial damage in the experimental model of murine myocarditis up to day 90 of infection

  17. Predictors of acute myocarditis in complicated scrub typhus: an endemic province in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jung Yeon; Kang, Ki-Woon; Moon, Kyung Min; Kim, Jongwoo; Choi, Yu Jeong

    2018-03-01

    Scrub typhus is known as a self-limited infectious disease. Cardiac complication is uncommon and usually not life-threatening. Until now, few cases of fulminant myocarditis by scrub typhus have been reported. So, we investigated incidence and predictors of acute myocarditis in severe scrub typhus. We retrospectively reviewed 89 patients among 91 scrub typhus confirmed patients who examined an echocardiogram and cardiac biomarkers from 2005 to 2015 in the intensive care unit at our hospital. We excluded two patients who didn't have electrocardiography. Patients were divided into two groups and compared between scrub typhus with (n = 13) and without (n = 76) acute myocarditis. Age, sex, and underlying diseases were similar between the groups. The existence of eschar and duration of general ache and fever were similar between the groups. However, patients with acute myocarditis had more elevated total bilirubin, high incidence of ST elevations and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) than those without acute myocarditis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the PAF was a predictor of myocarditis with a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 84%. Predictive power of combination of ST-segment elevation and PAF was significantly associated with myocarditis in the multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 11.7; p = 0.041) and area under the curve was 0.947 (95% CI, 0.878 to 0.983; p scrub typhus may be more common than previously reported. Patients with high bilirubin and PAF are at increased risk of acute myocarditis with scrub typhus. These patients warrant closer follow-up and echocardiogram would be needed.

  18. A Risk Prediction Model for In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Suspected Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Zhao, Ruo-Chi; Gao, Wen-Hui; Cui, Han-Bin

    2017-04-05

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium that may lead to cardiac death in some patients. However, little is known about the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis by establishing a risk prediction model. A retrospective study was performed to analyze the clinical medical records of 403 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis who were admitted to Ningbo First Hospital between January 2003 and December 2013. A total of 238 males (59%) and 165 females (41%) were enrolled in this study. We divided the above patients into two subgroups (survival and nonsurvival), according to their clinical in-hospital outcomes. To maximize the effectiveness of the prediction model, we first identified the potential risk factors for in-hospital mortality among patients with suspected myocarditis, based on data pertaining to previously established risk factors and basic patient characteristics. We subsequently established a regression model for predicting in-hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Finally, we identified the independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality using our risk prediction model. The following prediction model for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis, including creatinine clearance rate (Ccr), age, ventricular tachycardia (VT), New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification, gender and cardiac troponin T (cTnT), was established in the study: P = ea/(1 + ea) (where e is the exponential function, P is the probability of in-hospital death, and a = -7.34 + 2.99 × [Ccr model demonstrated that a Ccr prediction model for in-hospital mortality in patients with suspected myocarditis. In addition, sufficient life support during the early stage of the disease might improve the prognoses of patients with

  19. Fulminant myocarditis mimicking acute coronary syndrome = Miocarditis fulminante, simuladora de síndrome coronario agudo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senior, Juan Manuel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fulminant myocarditis mimicking acute coronary syndrome We report the case of a 48 year-old man with chest pain and history of coronary and autoimmune diseases, who developed acute heart failure and hemodynamic collapse. We present his clinical evolution and the tests that allowed the diagnosis of fulminant myocarditis secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus. A review of the most important aspects of this disease is also included.

  20. Speckle tracking echocardiography in acute lupus myocarditis: comparison to conventional echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riëtte Du Toit

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Lupus myocarditis occurs in 5–10% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. No single feature is diagnostic of lupus myocarditis. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE can detect subclinical left ventricular dysfunction in SLE patients, with limited research on its utility in clinical lupus myocarditis. We report on STE in comparison to conventional echocardiography in patients with clinical lupus myocarditis. Methods and results: A retrospective study was done at a tertiary referral hospital in South Africa. SLE patients with lupus myocarditis were included and compared to healthy controls. Echocardiographic images were reanalyzed, including global longitudinal strain through STE. A poor echocardiographic outcome was defined as final left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <40%. 28 SLE patients fulfilled the criteria. Global longitudinal strain correlated with global (LVEF: r = −0.808; P = 0.001 and regional (wall motion score: r = 0.715; P < 0.001 function. In patients presenting with a LVEF ≥50%, global longitudinal strain (P = 0.023, wall motion score (P = 0.005 and diastolic function (P = 0.004 were significantly impaired vs controls. Following treatment, LVEF (35–47% (P = 0.023 and wall motion score (1.88–1.5 (P = 0.017 improved but not global longitudinal strain. Initial LVEF (34%; P = 0.046 and global longitudinal strain (−9.5%; P = 0.095 were lower in patients with a final LVEF <40%. Conclusions: This is the first known report on STE in a series of patients with clinical lupus myocarditis. Global longitudinal strain correlated with regional and global left ventricular function. Global longitudinal strain, wall motion score and diastolic parameters may be more sensitive markers of lupus myocarditis in patients presenting with a preserved LVEF ≥50%. A poor initial LVEF and global longitudinal strain were associated with a persistent LVEF <40%. Echocardiography is a non-invasive tool with diagnostic and

  1. {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-sulphur-colloid and heat-denatured {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-labelled red cell scans demonstrating a giant intrapelvic spleen in a girl after splenectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, P.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Tzen, K.Y.; Tsai, M.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan); Lin, J.N. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Chang Gung Childrens Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2001-04-01

    A 17 x 12 x 5-cm giant intrapelvic mass in a 14-year-old girl is reported. This mass developed 6 years after a splenectomy for splenic torsion. The heat-denatured {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-labelled red cell scan and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc- sulphur-colloid scan confirmed the specific red cell sequestration function and reticuloendothelial activity in the giant intrapelvic spleen. The size and development of the giant intrapelvic spleen are unusual. The usefulness of functional images to diagnosis the nature of the intrapelvic mass is well demonstrated. (orig.)

  2. Formation of multinucleated giant cells and microglial degeneration in rats expressing a mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit Wolfgang J

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial neuroinflammation is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The purpose of this study was to provide a histopathological evaluation of the microglial neuroinflammatory response in a rodent model of ALS, the SOD1G93A transgenic rat. Methods Multiple levels of the CNS from spinal cord to cerebral cortex were studied in SOD1G93A transgenic rats during three stages of natural disease progression, including presymptomatic, early symptomatic (onset, and late symptomatic (end stage, using immuno- and lectin histochemical markers for microglia, such as OX-42, OX-6, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4. Results Our studies revealed abnormal aggregates of microglia forming in the spinal cord as early as the presymptomatic stage. During the symptomatic stages there was prominent formation of multinucleated giant cells through fusion of microglial cells in the spinal cord, brainstem, and red nucleus of the midbrain. Other brain regions, including substantia nigra, cranial nerve nuclei, hippocampus and cortex showed normal appearing microglia. In animals during end stage disease at 4–5 months of age virtually all microglia in the spinal cord gray matter showed extensive fragmentation of their cytoplasm (cytorrhexis, indicative of widespread microglial degeneration. Few microglia exhibiting nuclear fragmentation (karyorrhexis indicative of apoptosis were identified at any stage. Conclusion The current findings demonstrate the occurrence of severe abnormalities in microglia, such as cell fusions and cytorrhexis, which may be the result of expression of mutant SOD1 in these cells. The microglial changes observed are different from those that accompany normal microglial activation, and they demonstrate that aberrant activation and degeneration of microglia is part of the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.

  3. Soft-tissue Necrosis Complicating Bone-cement Filling in a Patient with Proximal Tibia Giant cell Tumour and Co-morbid Depressive Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Narang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumors are common around the knee. Proximal tibia is a challenging location for limb-salvage due to paucity of soft-tissue cover. Bone cement has been used in treatment of giant-cell tumors after curettage. Tissue irritant properties of its monomer and exothermic reaction involved in polymerization may compromise surgical outcome to varying degrees. Preoperative planning and intra-operative positioning during cementing process are of importance to avoid complications. Co-occurrence of psychiatric illness in tumor patients should be managed by psychiatric counselling and drug therapy. This case has been presented to suggest measures for preventing soft-tissue complications during cement filling in proximal tibia, and for dealing with concomitant psychiatric problems for a holistic improvement in tumor patients.

  4. Myocarditis in Paediatric Patients: Unveiling the Progression to Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Teixeira Farinha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis is a challenging and potentially life-threatening disease associated with high morbidity in some paediatric patients, due to its ability to present as an acute and fulminant disease and to ultimately progress to dilated cardiomyopathy. It has been described as an inflammatory disease of the myocardium caused by diverse aetiologies. Viral infection is the most frequent cause of myocarditis in developed countries, but bacterial and protozoal infections or drug hypersensitivity may also be causative agents. The prompt diagnosis in paediatric patients is difficult, as the spectrum of clinical manifestation can range from no myocardial dysfunction to sudden cardiac death. Recent studies on myocarditis pathogenesis have revealed a triphasic nature of this disease, which influences the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to adopt in each patient. Endomyocardial biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosing myocarditis, and several non-invasive diagnostic tools can be used to support the diagnosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin has become part of routine practice in the treatment of myocarditis in paediatric patients at many centres, but its true effect on the cardiac function has been the target of many studies. The aim of this review is to approach the recently discovered facets of paediatric myocarditis regarding its progression to dilated cardiomyopathy.

  5. The use of the color Doppler ultrasonography in the diagnosis and monitoring of an atypical case of giant-cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, N; Polido-Pereira, J; Rodrigues, A M; Soares, F; Batista, P; Pereira da Silva, J A

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA) is a large vessels vasculitis that is typically characterised by headache, scalp tenderness, jaw claudication and visual disturbances. Temporal arteries color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) is a sensitive and non-invasive image technique used in the diagnosis of this disease. This work highlights the importance of CDUS in the diagnostic workup of GCA and also demonstrates it´s usefullness in the evaluation and documentation of the response to corticosteroids therapy in an atypical case of ACG.

  6. Giant Pendulous Carcinosarcoma – Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Type - of the Leg – A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe; Riedel, Ina; Abushika, Mohammad R.; Lotti, Torello; Tchernev, Georgi

    2018-01-01

    Cutaneous carcinosarcoma (CCS) is a rare non-melanoma skin cancer with a biphasic growth pattern. A tumour is composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cells that show clonality. In most cases, CCS develops in the head-and-neck region on the chronic sun-exposed skin of males. Here, we describe an 80-year-old female patient who developed a giant, pendulous CCS on the leg.  A tumour was surgically removed. We found no evidence of metastatic spread.

  7. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Sandra M.; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de La Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose. L.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; García-Romero, Noemí; Luis, Jose; Cuñado, F.; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications.

  8. The effect of everolimus on renal angiomyolipoma in pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis being treated for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissler, John J; Franz, David N; Frost, Michael D; Belousova, Elena; Bebin, E Martina; Sparagana, Steven; Berkowitz, Noah; Ridolfi, Antonia; Kingswood, J Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) often have multiple TSC-associated hamartomas, particularly in the brain and kidney. This was a post hoc analysis of pediatric patients being treated for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) during the phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled EXIST-1 trial. Patients were initially randomly assigned to receive everolimus 4.5 mg/m 2 /day (target blood trough 5-15 mg/dl) or placebo and could continue in an open-label extension phase. Angiomyolipoma response rates were analyzed in patients aged 20% increase in kidney volume from nadir, and angiomyolipoma-related bleeding ≥ grade 2. Tolerability was also assessed. Overall, this analysis included 33 patients. Renal angiomyolipoma response was achieved by 75.8% of patients (95% confidence interval, 57.7-88.9%), with sustained mean reductions in renal angiomyolipoma volume over nearly 4 years of treatment. In addition, most (≥80%) achieved clinically relevant reductions in angiomyolipoma volume (≥50%), beginning at week 24 and continuing for the remainder of the study. Everolimus was generally well tolerated in this subgroup, with most adverse events being grade 1 or 2 in severity. Although everolimus is currently not indicated for this use, this analysis from EXIST-1 demonstrates its long-term efficacy and safety for the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma in pediatric patients undergoing treatment for TSC-associated SEGA.

  9. Cerebral Giant Cells are Necessary for the Formation and Recall of Memory of Conditioned Taste Aversion in Lymnaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunada, Hiroshi; Lukowiak, Ken; Ito, Etsuro

    2017-02-01

    The pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis can acquire conditioned taste aversion (CTA) as a long-term memory. CTA is caused by the temporal pairing of a stimulus, such as sucrose (the conditioned stimulus; CS), with another stimulus, such as electric shock (the unconditioned stimulus; US). Previous studies have demonstrated changes in both cellular and molecular properties in a pair of neurons known as the cerebral giant cells (CGCs), suggesting that these neurons play a key role in CTA. Here we examined the necessity of the pair of CGC somata for the learning, memory formation and memory recall of CTA by using the soma ablation technique. There was no difference in the feeding response elicited by the CS before and after ablation of the CGC somata. Ablation of the CGC somata before taste-aversion training resulted in the learning acquisition, but the memory formation was not observed 24 h later. We next asked whether memory was present when the CGC somata were ablated 24 h after taste-aversion training. The memory was present before performing the somata ablation. However, when we tested snails five days after somata ablation, the memory recall was not present. Together the data show that: 1) the somata of the CGCs are not necessary for learning acquisition; 2) the somata are necessary for memory formation; and 3) the somata are necessary for memory recall. That is, these results demonstrate that the CGCs function in the long-term memory of CTA in Lymnaea.

  10. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis: a 5-year epidemiologic and clinical study in Reggio Emilia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P L; Tartoni, P L; Rossi, F; Baricchi, R; Castri, C; Chiaravalloti, F; Portioli, I

    1987-01-01

    Among the population of Reggio Emilia, Italy, 56 patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) were identified during the 5-year period 1981-85. The average annual incidence rates of PR and GCA were 12.8 and 8.8 respectively per 100,000 population aged 50 years or older. Forty-nine patients were followed up and the mean duration of follow-up was 32 months. All the patients received steroid therapy. We have evaluated the cumulative probability of requiring continued steroid therapy between patients with PR only, GCA only, and PR associated with GCA using life-table methods with permanent discontinuation of therapy as an end point. The different duration of steroid therapy between these 3 groups did not achieve statistical significance by the method of Lee and Desu. We identified a 5 variable discriminant function that correctly predicted whether the duration of therapy would be longer or shorter than 16 months (median duration of therapy) in 80% of our patients followed up for at least 24 months. The presence of synovitis in PR is also discussed.

  11. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells is neither exceptional in gynecomastia nor characteristic of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižem, Jože; Velikonja, Mojca; Matjašič, Alenka; Jerše, Maja; Glavač, Damjan

    2015-04-01

    Six cases of gynecomastia with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) and multinucleated stromal giant cells (MSGC) associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have been reported, and finding MSGC within PASH in gynecomastia has been suggested as being a characteristic of NF1. The frequency of PASH with MSGC in gynecomastia and its specificity for NF1 have not, however, been systematically studied. A total of 337 gynecomastia specimens from 215 patients, aged from 8 to 78 years (median, 22 years) were reevaluated for the presence of PASH with MSGC. Breast tissue samples of 25 patients were analyzed for the presence of an NF1 gene mutation using next generation sequencing. Rare MSGC, usually in the background of PASH, were noted at least unilaterally in 27 (13 %) patients; and prominent MSGC, always in the background of PASH, were noted in 8 (4 %) patients. The NF1 gene was mutated in only 1 (an 8-year-old boy with known NF1 and prominent MSGC) of the 25 tested patients, including 6 patients with prominent MSGC and 19 patients with rare MSGC. MSGC, usually in the background of PASH, are not characteristic of NF1.

  12. A Case Report of Preoperative Application of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis and Treatment of Central Giant Cell Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ebrahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central giant cell granuloma(CGCG is a relatively rare and non neoplastic tumor with unclear exact etiology that is reported in children. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT technique for precise diagnosis and treatment of the jaw lesions is recommended in the recent years. The object of this case-report study is to use CBCT in the diagnosis and treatment of CGCG.Case Report: A 6-year-old boy with a painless swallowing at the right side of the lower face had been arisen 3 months before referring to the pediatric department of Mashhad dental school .The lesion had bony hard consistency and smooth surface. For more accurate examination of the region CBCT radiographs were recommended. According to CBCT radiographic sections, expansion of cortical plates and precise extension of the lesion in buccal-lingual and mesial-distal aspects were distinctly observed.Conclusion: A 12 month follow up after the surgery showed reconstruction and growth of the bone and no sign of recurrence.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:69-74

  13. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  14. ETIOLOGIC FACTOR IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF MYOCARDITIS IN THE KHARKIV REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smelyanskaya MV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the research conducted in the last decade, there has been growth in the non-coronary disease infarction among all cardiovascular diseases. The prominent place among all non-coronary heart diseases is taken by myocarditis, which predominantly affects young people of working age (30-40 years old. According to the bibliography, the prevalence of myocarditis is 20% of the non-coronary heart lesions and by different authors 5 - 11% of the total amount of diseases of the cardiovascular system. To date, there are no clear criteria of infectious myocarditis. It is widely accepted that myocarditis is natural complication of infectious diseases in which any infectious agent may be the etiological factor. Until recently, Coxsackie virus of group A, B was considered the most cardiotropic. However, the role of enteroviruses has been recently reviewed in favor of persisting viruses and especially family Herpesviridae. Optimization of myocarditis diagnosis using noninvasive tests, will not only reveal the true extent of the disease but may also enable to examine viral myocarditis as a much more common pathology than it seems at present and will increase understanding of the significance of this pathology in the cardiovascular continuum. Material & methods. 87 people diagnosed with infectious myocarditis were examined. Blood and other biological fluids were subject to examination. Patients of the main group have also had their biopsy material, obtained in a result of endomyocardial biopsy, and pericardial fluid, derived as a result of diagnostic and therapeutic puncture under hydro pericarditis, examined. PCR was performed to determine the genomic sequence of enterovirus (HEV, adenovirus (HAdV, human cytomegalovirus (CMV, herpes simplex virus (HSV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, human herpes virus 6 (HHV6 and influenza A viruses and B. Results & discussion. Our research confirms the global trend of reducing the role of enteroviruses in

  15. Transcription Profiling of Bacillus subtilis Cells Infected with AR9, a Giant Phage Encoding Two Multisubunit RNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavysh, Daria; Sokolova, Maria; Slashcheva, Marina; Förstner, Konrad U; Severinov, Konstantin

    2017-02-14

    Bacteriophage AR9 is a recently sequenced jumbo phage that encodes two multisubunit RNA polymerases. Here we investigated the AR9 transcription strategy and the effect of AR9 infection on the transcription of its host, Bacillus subtilis Analysis of whole-genome transcription revealed early, late, and continuously expressed AR9 genes. Alignment of sequences upstream of the 5' ends of AR9 transcripts revealed consensus sequences that define early and late phage promoters. Continuously expressed AR9 genes have both early and late promoters in front of them. Early AR9 transcription is independent of protein synthesis and must be determined by virion RNA polymerase injected together with viral DNA. During infection, the overall amount of host mRNAs is significantly decreased. Analysis of relative amounts of host transcripts revealed notable differences in the levels of some mRNAs. The physiological significance of up- or downregulation of host genes for AR9 phage infection remains to be established. AR9 infection is significantly affected by rifampin, an inhibitor of host RNA polymerase transcription. The effect is likely caused by the antibiotic-induced killing of host cells, while phage genome transcription is solely performed by viral RNA polymerases. IMPORTANCE Phages regulate the timing of the expression of their own genes to coordinate processes in the infected cell and maximize the release of viral progeny. Phages also alter the levels of host transcripts. Here we present the results of a temporal analysis of the host and viral transcriptomes of Bacillus subtilis infected with a giant phage, AR9. We identify viral promoters recognized by two virus-encoded RNA polymerases that are a unique feature of the phiKZ-related group of phages to which AR9 belongs. Our results set the stage for future analyses of highly unusual RNA polymerases encoded by AR9 and other phiKZ-related phages. Copyright © 2017 Lavysh et al.

  16. Changes in perfusion and fatty acid metabolism of rat heart with autoimmune myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Kusuoka, Hideo; Fukuchi, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yutani, Kenji; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Biomedical Research Center; Hori, Masatsugu; Hirono, Satoru; Izumi, Tohru

    2000-10-01

    To elucidate the change in perfusion and aerobic metabolism in myocarditis, tissue counting and dual tracer ex vivo autoradiography with Tl-201 and free fatty acid analog, I-123- or I-125-labeled (p-iodophenyl)-methyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP), were performed in rats with myocarditis induced by immunization with cardiac myosin. Inflammatory damage was classified histologically. At the acute stage (2-4 weeks after the antigen-injection), total heart uptakes of Tl and BMIPP and the ratio (BMIPP/Tl) were significantly reduced in myocarditis rats (N=15) compared with the controls (N=12). Myocardial distribution of Tl and BMIPP was not homogeneous. Relative uptake of Tl and BMIPP (N=9, 128 regions) was gradually decreased with the extent of inflammation, and the regional BMIPP/Tl was smaller than the control. At the subacute stage (7 weeks after the antigen-injection), total Tl uptake in myocarditis rats (N=5) recovered to the control level (N=4), but that of BMIPP was still significantly lower than the control. BMIPP/Tl was still significantly lower in myocarditis. Myocardial distribution of Tl and BMIPP recovered to be more homogeneous. Relative uptake of Tl and BMIPP (N=6, 78 regions) still gradually but significantly decreased with the extent of inflammation. Regional BMIPP/Tl was still depressed in myocarditis. These results indicate that myocardial perfusion and aerobic metabolism were discrepant and heterogeneously suppressed with severe inflammation during the acute stages, but the difference decreases with time. Examination with Tl-201 and BMIPP may provide information about the severity of myocarditis. (author)

  17. A massive neglected giant basal cell carcinoma in a schizophrenic patient treated successfully with vismodegib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Lei, Ulrikke

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule vismodegib is a great treatment alternative to patients challenged, e.g. psychiatric disorders, suffering from severe basal cell carcinoma of the skin in which surgery or other treatment modalities is not possible because of patient's wish or condition. We present a case of a 73...

  18. Halofuginone alleviates acute viral myocarditis in suckling BALB/c mice by inhibiting TGF-β1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Hua [Department of Emergency, Xi’an Children’s Hospital, Xi' an, 710003, Shanxi (China); Fu, Jia [Department of Infection, Xi’an Children’s Hospital, Xi' an, 710003, Shanxi (China); Sun, Da-Qing, E-mail: daqingsuncd@163.com [Department of Respiration, Xi’an Children’s Hospital, NO. 69 Xijuyuan Lane, Xi' an 710003, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-29

    Viral myocarditis (VMC) is an inflammation of heart muscle in infants and young adolescents. This study explored the function of halofuginone (HF) in Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) -treated suckling mice. HF-treated animal exhibited higher survival rate, lower heart/body weight, and more decreased blood sugar concentration than CVB3 group. HF also reduced the expressions of interleukin(IL)-17 and IL-23 and the numbers of Th17 cells. Moreover, HF downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine levels. The expressions of transforming growth factor(TGF-β1) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) p65/ tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) proteins were decreased by HF as well. Finally, the overexpression of TGF-β1 counteracted the protection effect of HF in CVB3-treated suckling mice. In summary, our study suggests HF increases the survival of CVB3 suckling mice, reduces the Th17 cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, and may through downregulation of the TGF-β1-mediated expression of NF-κB p65/TNF-α pathway proteins. These results offer a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of VMC. - Highlights: • Halofuginone (HF) increases the survival of suckling BALB/c mice infected with acute CVB3. • HF reduces the expression of Th17 cell markers (IL-17 and IL-23) and the number of CD4{sup +} IL17{sup +} cells. • Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels associated with myocarditis were reduced by HF in CVB3-treated suckling mice. • HF alleviates VMC via inhibition of TGF-β1-mediated NF-κB p65/TNF-α pathway.

  19. Inoperable metastatic giant basal cell trunk carcinoma: radiotherapy can be useful; Carcinome basocellulaire geant du tronc metastatique inoperable: la radiotherapie peut etre utile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, A.; Durando, X.; Lapeyre, M. [Centre Jean-Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Barthelemy, I. [CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors evoke some characteristics of the basal cell carcinoma (slow evolution, local morbidity) and report and discuss the case of a giant basal cell trunk carcinoma, associated with several symptoms (pain, bleeding, anaemia), already metastatic at the moment of diagnosis, and locally treated by irradiation. Due to its size and expansion, this carcinoma was considered as inoperable. An external radiotherapy has been performed and resulted in a significant clinical tumour reduction. But the metastatic risk is high in such cases. Radiotherapy is then a therapeutic option for a local treatment with a durable efficiency. Short communication

  20. Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of the female breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balbi Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors describe a case of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the breast occurring in a 50-year-old woman who presented with a palpable mass in her right breast. She first noticed the mass one month previously. Core needle biopsy showed connective tissue including epithelioid and spindle cells. The patient underwent total mastectomy without axillary lymph node dissection. Based on examination of the excised tumor, the initial pathologic diagnosis was atypical spindle-shaped and ovoid cells with uncertain malignant potential. Histological findings with immunomarkers led to the final diagnosis of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. This case highlights a rare and interesting variant of primary breast sarcoma and the important role of immunohistochemistry in defining histological type and differential diagnosis. Hence, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma has been a diagnosis of exclusion performed through sampling and critical use of ancillary diagnostic techniques.

  1. Giant photocurrent enhancement by transition metal doping in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Pimachev, Artem K.; Yost, Andrew J.; Poudyal, Uma; Maloney, Scott; Wang, Wenyong; Chien, TeYu; Dahnovsky, Yuri; Tang, Jinke

    2016-09-01

    A huge enhancement in the incident photon-to-current efficiency of PbS quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells by manganese doping is observed. In the presence of Mn dopants with relatively small concentration (4 at. %), the photoelectric current increases by an average of 300% (up to 700%). This effect cannot be explained by the light absorption mechanism because both the experimental and theoretical absorption spectra demonstrate several times decreases in the absorption coefficient. To explain such dramatic increase in the photocurrent we propose the electron tunneling mechanism from the LUMO of the QD excited state to the Zn2SnO4 (ZTO) semiconductor photoanode. This change is due to the presence of the Mn instead of Pb atom at the QD/ZTO interface. The ab initio calculations confirm this mechanism. This work proposes an alternative route for a significant improvement of the efficiency for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  2. Giant photocurrent enhancement by transition metal doping in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Pimachev, Artem K.; Yost, Andrew J.; Poudyal, Uma; Maloney, Scott; Wang, Wenyong; Chien, TeYu; Dahnovsky, Yuri, E-mail: yurid@uwyo.edu, E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Tang, Jinke, E-mail: yurid@uwyo.edu, E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2016-09-05

    A huge enhancement in the incident photon-to-current efficiency of PbS quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells by manganese doping is observed. In the presence of Mn dopants with relatively small concentration (4 at. %), the photoelectric current increases by an average of 300% (up to 700%). This effect cannot be explained by the light absorption mechanism because both the experimental and theoretical absorption spectra demonstrate several times decreases in the absorption coefficient. To explain such dramatic increase in the photocurrent we propose the electron tunneling mechanism from the LUMO of the QD excited state to the Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} (ZTO) semiconductor photoanode. This change is due to the presence of the Mn instead of Pb atom at the QD/ZTO interface. The ab initio calculations confirm this mechanism. This work proposes an alternative route for a significant improvement of the efficiency for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  3. Left and right atrial feature tracking in acute myocarditis: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Anastasia; Schmidt, Björn; Michels, Guido; Bunck, Alexander C.; Maintz, David; Baeßler, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aims at evaluating the feasibility and reproducibility of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) feature tracking (FT) derived strain and strain rate (SR) parameters of the left and right atrium (LA, RA) in patients with acute myocarditis as well as their potential to detect diastolic dysfunction. In addition, the diagnostic value of LA and RA strain parameters in the setting of acute myocarditis is investigated. Methods: CMR cine data of 30 patients with CMR-positive acute myocarditis were retrospectively analyzed. 25 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals served as a control. Analysis of longitudinal strain and SR of both atria was performed in two long-axis views using a dedicated FT-software. LA and RA deformation was analyzed including reservoir function (total strain [ε s ], peak positive SR [SR s ]), conduit function (passive strain [ε e ], peak early negative SR [SR e ]) and booster pump function (active strain [ε a ], peak late negative SR [SR a ]). Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed for all strain and SR parameters using Bland-Altman analyses, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation (CV). Results: FT analyses of both atria were feasible in all patients and controls. Reproducibility was good for reservoir and conduit function parameters and moderate for booster pump function parameters. Myocarditis patients demonstrated an impaired LA reservoir and conduit function when compared to healthy controls (LA ε s : 32 ± 17 vs. 46 ± 13, p = 0.019; LA SR s : 1.5 ± 0.5 vs. 1.8 ± 0.5, p = 0.117; LA SR e : −1.3 ± 0.5 vs. −1.9 ± 0.5, p < 0.001), while LA booster pump function was preserved. In logistic regression and ROC-analyses, LA SR e proved to be the best independent predictor of acute myocarditis (AUC 0.80), and using LA SR e with a cut-off of −1.6 s −1 resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. Changes in RA phasic function parameters

  4. The Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score as a Measure of Disease Activity in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, TA; Cuthbertson, D; Carette, S; Hoffman, GS; Khalidi, NA; Koening, CL; Langford, CA; McKinnon-Maksimowicz, K; McAlear, CA; Monach, PA; Seo, P; Warrington, KJ; Ytterberg, SR; Merkel, PA; Matteson, EL

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS) in the assessment of disease activity in giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods Patients with GCA enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study with symptoms of active vasculitis during any visit were included. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to explore the association of the BVAS with other measures of disease activity. Results During a mean (SD) follow-up of 2.3 (1.6) years, symptoms of active GCA were present in 236 visits in 136 subjects (100 female, 74%). Median (range) BVAS1 (new/worse symptoms) was 1 (0–10) and median (range) BVAS2 (persistent symptoms) was 0 (0–5). Median (range) physician global assessment (PGA) was 4 (0–9) for disease activity in the past 28 days and 2 (0–9) for activity on the day of the visit. Important ischemic manifestations of active vasculitis not captured by the BVAS included tongue/jaw claudication (27%), upper extremity claudication (15%), lower extremity claudication (5%), carotidynia (7%), ischemic retinopathy (5%). During 25 visits (11%) with active disease, all symptoms of active vasculitis were captured in the “Other” category yet still resulted in a BVAS 1 and BVAS 2 of 0. BVAS1 moderately correlated with PGA for the past 28 days (Spearman’s correlation 0.50) and physician-rated disease activity for the past 28 days (Spearman’s correlation 0.46). Conclusions The BVAS has limited utility in GCA. Patients with active GCA can have a BVAS of 0. Many important ischemic symptoms attributable to active vasculitis are not captured in the composite score. PMID:27036388

  5. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw and Rebound Hypercalcemia in Young People Treated With Denosumab for Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uday, Suma; Gaston, Czar Louie; Rogers, Luke; Parry, Michael; Joffe, Johnathan; Pearson, John; Sutton, David; Grimer, Robert; Högler, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    Denosumab, an inhibitor of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand, is an approved treatment of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) in adults and "skeletally mature" adolescents. Safety concerns include oversuppression of bone remodelling, with risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) and atypical femur fractures during treatment in adults and rebound hypercalcemia after treatment cessation in children. To date, ONJ has never been reported in children or adolescents. To describe serious adverse effects during and following high-dose denosumab therapy in GCTB patients. Two adolescents (14 and 15 years) and a young adult (40 years) received fixed-dose denosumab for GCTB for 1.3 to 4 years (cumulative dose, 47 to 98 mg/kg), which was stopped because of development of ONJ in one adolescent and bilateral femoral cortical stress reactions in the young adult. All three patients developed rebound hypercalcemia with acute kidney injury 5.5 to 7 months after denosumab cessation. The ONJ necessitated surgical debridement. Rebound hypercalcemia (serum calcium, 3.1 to 4.3 mmol/L) was unresponsive to hyperhydration alone, requiring repeated doses of calcitonin or intravenous bisphosphonate treatment. Hypercalcemia recurred in two patients within 4 weeks, with normal serum calcium profiles thereafter. All patients were naive to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, bisphosphonates, and corticosteroids and were metastases free, confirming the causative role of denosumab in these complications. These suppression-release effects of high-dose denosumab on bone remodeling raise questions about safety of fixed dosing and treatment duration. In young people, weight-adjusted dosing and safety monitoring during and after antiresorptive therapy is required. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  6. The role of colour doppler ultrasonography of facial and occipital arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ješe, Rok; Rotar, Žiga; Tomšič, Matija; Hočevar, Alojzija

    2017-10-01

    Colour Doppler Sonography (CDS) in giant cell arteritis (GCA) allows the study of involvement of cranial arteries other than the temporal arteries, which are inconvenient to biopsy, such as the facial (FaA), and occipital (OcA) arteries. We aimed to estimate the frequency of the FaA, and OcA involvement in GCA; and to explore the clinical characteristics of these subgroups of patients. From 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2016 we prospectively performed a CDS of the FaA, and OcA in addition to the temporal (TA), and the extracranial supra-aortic arteries in all newly diagnosed patients suspected of having GCA. All the arteries were evaluated in two planes for the highly specific halo sign. During the 36-month observation period we performed a CDS of the cranial and extra-cranial arteries in 93 GCA patients. We observed the halo sign on the FaA, and OcA in 38 (40.9%), and 29 (31.2%) cases, respectively. The FaA, or OcA were affected in 4/22 (18.2%) patients with a negative TA CDS. FaA involvement significantly correlated with jaw claudication and with severe visual manifestations, including permanent visual loss. A fifth of patients with a negative CDS of the TAs had signs of vasculitis on the CDS of the FaA, or OcA. The addition of FaA and OcA CDS to the routine CDS of the TAs could identify 4.3% more patients and thus further improve the sensitivity of the CDS in the suspected GCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 111indium-antimyosin immunoscintigraphy in suspected myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.; Schuemichen, C.; Joseph, A.; Moser, E.; Zeiher, A.

    1991-01-01

    111 Indium-monoclonal antimyosin scans were carried out in 21 patients with suspected myocarditis, confirmed by reduced ejection volume, pericardial effusion and clinical follow up in 12 patients. Coronary heart disease was excluded angiographically in all cases. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial 111 In-antimyosin accumulation 48 hours after injection showed a pathological uptake in 10/12 patients with increased heart/lung ratios (Q 48 >1,58). Ratios were also elevated in 2 patients with cardiomyopathy, 2 suffering from vasculitis and 1 with dermatomyositis. Four patients without proven cardiac disease had normal ratios (Q 48 ≤1,58). Examination after 24 hours was of limited value, depending on the residual blood pool activity. Visual analysis of the scans showed a high interobserver variation despite a positive correlation with quantitative analysis (48 h p.i.: r=0,72; p 111 In-antimyosin scan as a screening method prior to myocardial biopsy. However, scintigraphy cannot definitely elucidate the cause of myocardial damage. Therefore, myocardial biopsy is still recommended after positive antimyosin scans. (orig.) [de

  8. Learning from myocarditis: mimicry, chaos and black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noel R

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune myocarditis and its sequel, dilated cardiomyopathy, are major causes of heart failure, especially in children and young adults. We have developed animal models to investigate their pathogenesis by infecting genetically susceptible mice with coxsackievirus B3 or by immunizing them with cardiac myosin or its immunodominant peptide. A number of valuable lessons have emerged from our study of this paradigm of an infection-induced autoimmune disease. We understand more clearly how natural autoimmunity, as an important component of normal physiology, must be recalibrated regularly due to changes caused by infection or other internal and external stimuli. A new normal homeostatic platform will be established based on its evolutionary fitness. A loss of homeostasis with out-of-control normal autoimmunity leads to autoimmune disease. It is signified early on by a spread of an adaptive autoimmune response to novel epitopes and neighboring antigens. The progression from infection to normal, well-balanced autoimmunity to autoimmune disease and on to irreversible damage is a complex, step-wise process. Yet, chaos theory provides hope that the pattern is potentially predictable. Infection-induced autoimmune disease represents a sequence of events heading for a train wreck at the end of the line. Our aim in autoimmune disease research must be to stop the train before this happens.

  9. Docetaxel-Loaded Nanoparticles Assembled from β-Cyclodextrin/Calixarene Giant Surfactants: Physicochemical Properties and Cytotoxic Effect in Prostate Cancer and Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gallego-Yerga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Giant amphiphiles encompassing a hydrophilic β-cyclodextrin (βCD component and a hydrophobic calix[4]arene (CA4 module undergo self-assembly in aqueous media to afford core-shell nanospheres or nanocapsules, depending on the nanoprecipitation protocol, with high docetaxel (DTX loading capacity. The blank and loaded nanoparticles have been fully characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS, ζ-potential measurements and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM. The data are compatible with the distribution of the drug between the nanoparticle core and the shell, where it is probably anchored by inclusion of the DTX aromatic moieties in βCD cavities. Indeed, the release kinetics profiles evidenced an initial fast release of the drug, which likely accounts for the fraction hosted on the surface, followed by a slow and sustained release rate, corresponding to diffusion of DTX in the core, which can be finely tuned by modification of the giant amphiphile chemical structure. The ability of the docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles to induce cellular death in different prostate (human LnCap and PC3 and glioblastoma (human U87 and rat C6 cells was also explored. Giant amphiphile-based DTX formulations surpassing or matching the antitumoral activity of the free DTX formulation were identified in all cases with no need to employ any organic co-solvent, thus overcoming the DTX water solubility problems. Moreover, the presence of the βCD shell at the surface of the assemblies is intended to impart stealth properties against serum proteins while permitting nanoparticle surface decoration by supramolecular approaches, paving the way for a new generation of molecularly well-defined antitumoral drug delivery systems with improved specificity and efficiency. Altogether, the results provide a proof of concept of the suitability of the approach based on βCD-CA4 giant amphiphiles to access DTX carriers with tunable properties.

  10. Clinical and pathologic findings of myocarditis in two families with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.B.; Fowles, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.; Subramanian, R.; Henkin, R.E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of endomyocardial biopsy and gallium-67 scans in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has demonstrated the presence of myocardial inflammation in a subset of patients. A family with DCM was studied with endomyocardial biopsy and gallium-67 scanning; both identified the presence of myocarditis in the proband. Evaluation of histologic sections from deceased family members revealed myocarditis as the principal pathologic finding. This patient identified during life demonstrated a defect in suppressor lymphocytic function and improved with immunosuppressive therapy. A second family with DCM was discovered when postmortem examination of the proband and his father's heart showed myocarditis. A living sibling was identified with asymptomatic myocardial dysfunction. Longitudinal follow-up of surviving members of both families are in progress. This study indicates that thorough diagnostic evaluation of all patients with familial DCM should be pursued to identify subgroups with potentially treatable inflammation

  11. Eosinophilic myocarditis due to Churg-Strauss syndrome with markedly elevated eosinophil cationic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Koji; Iwase, Takashi; Kadota, Muneyuki; Bando, Mika; Ogasawara, Kozue; Bando, Sachiko; Ise, Takayuki; Niki, Toshiyuki; Ueda, Yuka; Tomita, Noriko; Taketani, Yoshio; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Sata, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with asthma visited our hospital with increasing dyspnea and new-onset paresthesia and purpura in her legs. Physical examination showed a wheeze, pretibial edema, and surrounding purpura. Chest X-rays showed cardiac decompensation and an electrocardiogram revealed a new ST-T change. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, hypereosinophilia (10,450/μL), troponin T(+), elevated BNP, and markedly elevated eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) (> 150 ng/mL). Echocardiography revealed diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis (ejection fraction 30%) with increased wall thickness. Coronary angiography was normal. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging implied diffuse myocardial edema and subendocardial late gadolinium enhancement. Skin biopsy of purpura showed superfi cial perivascular dermatitis with remarkable eosinophilic infiltrations. No evidence of drug allergies, parasitic infection, or myeloproliferative disorder was detected. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of eosinophilic myocarditis due to Churg-Strauss syndrome was considered. She was administered prednisolone at a dose of 1 mg/kg, cyclophosphamide, and diuretics. Several markers of eosinophilic myocarditis and heart failure gradually improved, including ECP. She was discharged 30 days later with no cardiac event. Eosinophilic myocarditis is characterized by predominantly eosinophilic infi ltration. Eosinophilic granule proteins, such as ECP and major basic protein, play important roles in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic myocarditis. We experienced a rare case of eosinophilic myocarditis due to Churg-Strauss syndrome. Markedly elevated ECP played an important role in the early diagnosis and subsequent reduction in ECP served as a marker of monitoring. In an asthmatic patient with dyspnea, hypereosinophilia, and vasculitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome with eosinophilic myocarditis should be considered.

  12. The use of the color Doppler ultrasonography in the diagnosis and monitoring of an atypical case of giant-cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Martins

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA is a large vessels vasculitis that is typically characterised by headache, scalp tenderness, jaw claudication and visual disturbances. Temporal arteries color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS is a sensitive and non-invasive image technique used in the diagnosis of this disease. This work highlights the importance of CDUS in the diagnostic workup of GCA and also demonstrates it´s usefullness in the evaluation and documentation of the response to corticosteroids therapy in an atypical case of ACG.

  13. Giant Pendulous Carcinosarcoma – Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Type - of the Leg – A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous carcinosarcoma (CCS is a rare non-melanoma skin cancer with a biphasic growth pattern. A tumour is composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cells that show clonality. In most cases, CCS develops in the head-and-neck region on the chronic sun-exposed skin of males. Here, we describe an 80-year-old female patient who developed a giant, pendulous CCS on the leg.  A tumour was surgically removed. We found no evidence of metastatic spread.

  14. Lyme carditis with isolated left bundle branch block and myocarditis successfully treated with oral doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Elyasi, Maekal; Singh, Prince; Jimada, Ismail

    2018-01-01

    Lyme disease may present with a variety of cardiac manifestations ranging from first degree to third degree heart block. Cardiac involvement with Lyme disease may be asymptomatic, or symptomatic. Atrioventrical conduction abnormalities are the most common manifestation of Lyme carditis. Less common, are alternating right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left bundle branch block (LBBB). We present an interesting case of a young male whose main manifestation of Lyme carditis was isolated LBBB. He also had mild Lyme myocarditis. The patient was successfully treated with oral doxycycline, and his isolated LBBB and myocarditis rapidly resolved.

  15. De novo development of eosinophilic myocarditis with left ventricular assist device support as bridge to transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Naveen L; Park, Soon J; Daly, Richard C; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Edwards, William D

    2010-10-01

    The de novo development of myocarditis during left ventricular assist device support for dilated cardiomyopathy has not been previously described. We report a case of severe eosinophilic myocarditis associated with the use of leukotriene-receptor antagonist montelukast that developed during left ventricular assist device support accompanied by intra-device thrombus formation that was hemodynamically tolerated and subsequently discovered in the explanted heart. There may be no visible change in cardiac function as assessed by echocardiography, but the diagnosis should be entertained with the development of peripheral eosinophilia. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clozapine-Induced Myocarditis: Is Mandatory Monitoring Warranted for Its Early Recognition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Munshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic used for treatment resistant schizophrenia. Its potential to induce agranulocytosis is well known but it can also cause myocarditis. Clozapine is the only antipsychotic known to induce this side effect, typically early in the treatment, and literature is scarce on this condition. We are presenting a case report of a 21-year-old schizophrenic male who developed myocarditis within 3 weeks of starting on clozapine for his treatment resistant psychosis. We then aim to review some of the available literature and raise awareness among physicians as this condition can potentially be fatal if not detected early.

  17. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y.; Maruyama, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  18. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y. [Shimane Medical Univ., The Fourth Dept. of Internal Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan); Maruyama, R. [Shimane Medical Univ., Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  19. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  20. Diagnosis of Acute Global Myocarditis Using Cardiac MRI with Quantitative T1 and T2 Mapping: Case Report and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui-Young [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Greiser, Andreas [Healthcare Sector, Siemens AG, Erlangen D-91052 (Germany); Paek, Mun Young [Siemens Ltd., Seoul 120-837 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hoon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The diagnosis of myocarditis can be challenging given that symptoms, clinical exam findings, electrocardiogram results, biomarkers, and echocardiogram results are often non-specific. Endocardial biopsy is an established method for diagnosing myocarditis, but carries the risk of complications and false negative results. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the primary non-invasive imaging tool in patients with suspected myocarditis. Myocarditis can be diagnosed by using three tissue markers including edema, hyperemia/capillary leak, and necrosis/fibrosis. The interpretation of cardiac MR findings can be confusing, especially when the myocardium is diffusely involved. Using T1 and T2 maps, the diagnosis of myocarditis can be made even in cases of global myocarditis with the help of quantitative analysis. We herein describe a case of acute global myocarditis which was diagnosed by using quantitative T1 and T2 mapping.

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OII) Timed Up & Go (TUG) Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Young Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient ...

  2. Retrobulbar blood flow and visual organ function disturbance in the course of giant cell arteritis coexisting with optic disc drusen – a case repor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Modrzejewska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The review presented ophthalmologic syndrome connected with visual organ function disorder in giant cell arteritis patient concomitant with optic nerve disc drusen. Diagnostic difficulties were shown in relation to incidence of both similar ophthalmic symptoms as well as interpretation of specialists examinations results (pattern visual evoked potential test, scanning laser polarimetry, and perimetric tests – kinetic and static. Apart from ophthalmic investigations, significant role of radiological examinations was considered, especially color Doppler ultrasonography of retrobulbar circulation – optic artery, central retinal artery, long posterior ciliary arteries. Adequate interpretation of results seems to be crucial to establish scheme and timing of treatment in case of co-occurrence of the abovementioned disorders. In the presented case early implementation of steroid therapy resulted in improvement of blood flow parameters and the regression of ophthalmological complaints. Visual field deficiency in kinetic perimetry, reduced wave amplitude p100 in visual evoked potential test as well as decrease in number of optic nerve fibers in optic nerve disc region in scanning laser polarimetry exam can be diagnostic features in diagnosis of visual impairment in the course of giant cell arteritis and optic nerve disc drusen. Evaluation of blood flow velocity parameters in retrobulbar arteries in color Doppler ultrasonography is the most valuable screening in monitoring ophthalmic dysregulation in presented disorders.

  3. A Phenotyping Method of Giant Cells from Root-Knot Nematode Feeding Sites by Confocal Microscopy Highlights a Role for CHITINASE-LIKE 1 in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Javier; Olmo, Rocio; Ruiz-Ferrer, Virginia; Hermans, Christian; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Escobar, Carolina

    2018-01-01

    Most effective nematicides for the control of root-knot nematodes are banned, which demands a better understanding of the plant-nematode interaction. Understanding how gene expression in the nematode-feeding sites relates to morphological features may assist a better characterization of the interaction. However, nematode-induced galls resulting from cell-proliferation and hypertrophy hinders such observation, which would require tissue sectioning or clearing. We demonstrate that a method based on the green auto-fluorescence produced by glutaraldehyde and the tissue-clearing properties of benzyl-alcohol/benzyl-benzoate preserves the structure of the nematode-feeding sites and the plant-nematode interface with unprecedented resolution quality. This allowed us to obtain detailed measurements of the giant cells’ area in an Arabidopsis line overexpressing CHITINASE-LIKE-1 (CTL1) from optical sections by confocal microscopy, assigning a role for CTL1 and adding essential data to the scarce information of the role of gene repression in giant cells. Furthermore, subcellular structures and features of the nematodes body and tissues from thick organs formed after different biotic interactions, i.e., galls, syncytia, and nodules, were clearly distinguished without embedding or sectioning in different plant species (Arabidopsis, cucumber or Medicago). The combination of this method with molecular studies will be valuable for a better understanding of the plant-biotic interactions. PMID:29389847

  4. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of a large clival giant cell tumor complicated by an intraoperative internal carotid artery rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacoangeli M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Iacoangeli,1 Alessandro Di Rienzo,1 Massimo Re,2 Lorenzo Alvaro,1 Niccolò Nocchi,1 Maurizio Gladi,1 Maurizio De Nicola,3 Massimo Scerrati11Department of Neurosurgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 2Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Giant cell tumors (GCTs are primary bone neoplasms that rarely involve the skull base. These lesions are usually locally aggressive and require complete removal, including the surrounding apparently healthy bone, to provide the best chance of cure. GCTs, as well as other lesions located in the clivus, can nowadays be treated by a minimally invasive fully endoscopic extended endonasal approach. This approach ensures a more direct route to the craniovertebral junction than other possible approaches (transfacial, extended lateral, and posterolateral approaches. The case reported is a clival GCT operated on by an extended endonasal approach that provides another contribution on how to address one of the most feared complications attributed to this approach: a massive bleed due to an internal carotid artery injury.Keywords: clival giant cell tumor, endoscopic endonasal approach, internal carotid artery injury, minimally invasive surgery

  5. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  6. Myocarditis Complicated by Complete Atrioventricular Block: Nine Years' Experience in a Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Ju Chien

    2008-12-01

    Conclusion: The outcome of CAVB complicated with myocarditis is variable. Most of our patients resumed normal heart function. The incidence of persistent CAVB was 22%. VT is a common and serious complication, but it can be effectively treated medically. Persistent low cardiac output after pacemaker implantation and late onset VT should be considered as risk factors of mortality.

  7. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Moritz Becher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice.

  8. [Bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transversal aortic arch and myocarditis caused by Salmonella enteritidis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, L; Mesa, E; Rodríguez, J E; Sánchez, M P; Ugarte, J; Algora Weber, A; Dámaso, D; Daza, R M; Mendaza, P

    1989-02-01

    A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus had Salmonella enteritidis bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transverse aortic arc and myocarditis. Antibiotic therapy with ampicillin and chloramphenicol was ineffective despite the fact that the microorganism was sensitive in vitro to those antimicrobials, and the patient had a progressive clinical deterioration which culminated in death.

  9. A Case of Clozapine-Induced Myocarditis in a Young Patient with Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of drug-induced myocarditis manifesting as acute heart failure in a young patient with bipolar disorder being treated for depression. The case describes a 20-year-old man being treated in the psychiatry ward for worsening depression when he started complaining of chest pain and shortness of breath. His list of medications included clozapine, lithium, lorazepam, and haloperidol. The main findings on physical examination were tachycardia, low-grade fever, crackles in both lung bases on auscultation, and the absence of any notable edema. Abnormal labs included a troponin of 0.9, with a CK of 245 and CK-MB of 3.1. An ECG revealed sinus tachycardia and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB. An echocardiogram revealed global hypokinesis, severe left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction estimated at 20%. The patient had an admitting diagnosis of acute left ventricular systolic dysfunction likely secondary to drug-induced myocarditis (suspect clozapine versus acute coronary syndrome. He was managed conservatively and transferred to another facility for endomyocardial biopsy confirming myocarditis. This case is an example of one of the most typical presentations of suspected drug-induced acute myocarditis and will hopefully prompt the reader to think of this underdiagnosed entity in the right clinical setting.

  10. Acute myocarditis with normal wall motion detected with 2D speckle tracking echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sturmberger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 26-year-old male with acute tonsillitis who was referred for coronary angiography because of chest pain, elevated cardiac biomarkers, and biphasic T waves. The patient had no cardiovascular risk factors. Echocardiography showed no wall motion abnormalities and no pericardial effusion. 2D speckle tracking revealed distinct decreased regional peak longitudinal systolic strain in the lateral and posterior walls. Ischemic disease was extremely unlikely in view of his young age, negative family history regarding coronary artery disease, and lack of regional wall motion abnormalities on the conventional 2D echocardiogram. Coronary angiography was deferred as myocarditis was suspected. To confirm the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance tomography (MRT was performed, showing subepicardial delayed hyperenhancement in the lateral and posterior walls correlating closely with the strain pattern obtained by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. With a working diagnosis of acute myocarditis associated with acute tonsillitis, we prescribed antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The patient’s clinical signs resolved along with normalization of serum creatine kinase (CK levels, and the patient was discharged on the third day after admission. Learning points: • Acute myocarditis can mimic acute coronary syndromes. • Conventional 2D echocardiography lacks specific features for detection of subtle regional wall motion abnormalities. • 2D speckle tracking expands the scope of echocardiography in identifying myocardial dysfunction derived from edema in acute myocarditis.

  11. sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate and /sup 201/Tl myocardial scintigrams in a patient with myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, M.; Nishimura, T.; Shimoto, Y.; Fuzioka, S.; Kobayashi, K. (Shimada City Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    Myocardial necrosis in acute myocarditis was investigated by scintigraphy. sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate (PYP) and /sup 201/TI myocardial scintigrams were obtained on a patient with acute myocarditis due to mycoplasma infection. sup(99m)Tc-PYP myocardial scintigrams in the acute stage demonstrated grade 2+ findings, which remained until the chronic stage. /sup 201/TI myocardial scintigrams in the acute stage revealed impaired perfusion restricted to the posterolateral wall, and this decrease continued through the chronic stage. It was concluded that both of sup(99m)Tc-PYP and /sup 201/TI myocardial scintigrams can reveal abnormality of acute myocarditis.

  12. Toxicological effect of TiO2 nanoparticle-induced myocarditis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Fashui; Wang, Ling; Yu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingjun; Hong, Jie; Sheng, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Currently, impacts of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on the cardiovascular system are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TiO2 NPs induce myocarditis and its underlying molecular mechanism in the cardiac inflammation in mice. Mice were exposed to TiO2 NPs for 6 months; biochemical parameters of serum and expression of Th1-related and Th2-related cytokines in the heart were investigated. The results showed that TiO2 NP exposure resulted in cardiac lesions coupling with pulmonary inflammation; increases of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), C-reaction protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH), adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels; and a reduction of nitric oxide (NOx) level in the serum. These were associated with increases of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), creatine kinase, CRP, adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1, STAT3, or STAT6, GATA-binding domain-3, GATA-binding domain-4, endothelin-1 expression levels, and T-box expressed in T cells expression level that is the master regulator of pro-inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors in the heart. These findings imply that TiO2 NP exposure may increase the occurrence and development of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Parvovirus Infection Is Associated With Myocarditis and Myocardial Fibrosis in Young Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jordan; McEndaffer, Laura; Renshaw, Randall; Molesan, Alex; Kelly, Kathleen

    2017-11-01

    Perinatal parvoviral infection causes necrotizing myocarditis in puppies, which results in acute high mortality or progressive cardiac injury. While widespread vaccination has dramatically curtailed the epidemic of canine parvoviral myocarditis, we hypothesized that canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) myocardial infection is an underrecognized cause of myocarditis, cardiac damage, and/or repair by fibrosis in young dogs. In this retrospective study, DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 40 cases and 41 control dogs under 2 years of age from 2007 to 2015. Cases had a diagnosis of myocardial necrosis, inflammation, or fibrosis, while age-matched controls lacked myocardial lesions. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing targeting the VP1 to VP2 region detected CPV-2 in 12 of 40 cases (30%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18%-45%) and 2 of 41 controls (5%; 95% CI, 0.1%-16%). Detection of CPV-2 DNA in the myocardium was significantly associated with myocardial lesions ( P = .003). Reverse transcription quantitative PCR amplifying VP2 identified viral messenger RNA in 12 of 12 PCR-positive cases and 2 of 2 controls. PCR results were confirmed by in situ hybridization, which identified parvoviral DNA in cardiomyocytes and occasionally macrophages of juvenile and young adult dogs (median age 61 days). Myocardial CPV-2 was identified in juveniles with minimal myocarditis and CPV-2 enteritis, which may indicate a longer window of cardiac susceptibility to myocarditis than previously reported. CPV-2 was also detected in dogs with severe myocardial fibrosis with in situ hybridization signal localized to cardiomyocytes, suggesting prior myocardial damage by CPV-2. Despite the frequency of vaccination, these findings suggest that CPV-2 remains an important cause of myocardial damage in dogs.

  14. EXPERIENCE IN THE OBSERVATION OF ACUTE AND FULMINANT MYOCARDITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Bregel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of observation of 17 patients aged 2 monthsto 16 years with acute and fulminant myocarditis(FM were analyzed. Patients were observed in the period 2013-2016. Diagnostics used clinical data, laboratory and instrumental studies. Of 17 patients, acute myocarditis was diagnosed in 14 children, fulminant in 3. Therapy included, first of all, measures for the treatment of heart failure – diuretics (furosemide, verospiron, triampur, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors (captopril, beta-blockers, digoxin inotropic agents. Intravenous human immunoglobulin was administered at a dose of 1-2 g/kg/course in 5 of 17 (29.4% patients. When the pathogen was verified, specific antiviral therapy (acyclovir, ganciclovir, cymevene was administered in a standard mode. Immunosuppressive therapy (prednisolone, delagil was prescribed for two of them. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, diclofenac was obtained in children with acute myocarditis duration of over 2 weeks (13 children prior to 2016. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were not administered to hemodynamically unstable patients, regardless of the time period of observation. Overall, 16 out of 17 (94.4% patients recovered with apparent regression of signs of myocarditis on the background of treatment – the symptoms of acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock were treated, and then manifestations of chronic congestive heart failure gradually decreased. 1 (5,6% child with fulminant myocarditis died. After 6 months to 3 years, 14 children were observed. Follow-up within 6 months to 3 years showed that the diameter of the left ventricle normalized in 10 out of 14 (71.4%. Two out of 14 children (14.3% formed postmyocardial dilated cardiomyopathy.

  15. Left and right atrial feature tracking in acute myocarditis: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Anastasia, E-mail: anastasia-dick@web.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Schmidt, Björn, E-mail: bjoernschmidt1989@gmx.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Michels, Guido, E-mail: guido.michels@uk-koeln.de [Department III of Internal Medicine, Heart Centre, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Bunck, Alexander C., E-mail: alexander.bunck@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Maintz, David, E-mail: david.maintz@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Baeßler, Bettina, E-mail: bettina.baessler@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: The present study aims at evaluating the feasibility and reproducibility of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) feature tracking (FT) derived strain and strain rate (SR) parameters of the left and right atrium (LA, RA) in patients with acute myocarditis as well as their potential to detect diastolic dysfunction. In addition, the diagnostic value of LA and RA strain parameters in the setting of acute myocarditis is investigated. Methods: CMR cine data of 30 patients with CMR-positive acute myocarditis were retrospectively analyzed. 25 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals served as a control. Analysis of longitudinal strain and SR of both atria was performed in two long-axis views using a dedicated FT-software. LA and RA deformation was analyzed including reservoir function (total strain [ε{sub s}], peak positive SR [SR{sub s}]), conduit function (passive strain [ε{sub e}], peak early negative SR [SR{sub e}]) and booster pump function (active strain [ε{sub a}], peak late negative SR [SR{sub a}]). Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed for all strain and SR parameters using Bland-Altman analyses, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation (CV). Results: FT analyses of both atria were feasible in all patients and controls. Reproducibility was good for reservoir and conduit function parameters and moderate for booster pump function parameters. Myocarditis patients demonstrated an impaired LA reservoir and conduit function when compared to healthy controls (LA ε{sub s}: 32 ± 17 vs. 46 ± 13, p = 0.019; LA SR{sub s}: 1.5 ± 0.5 vs. 1.8 ± 0.5, p = 0.117; LA SR{sub e}: −1.3 ± 0.5 vs. −1.9 ± 0.5, p < 0.001), while LA booster pump function was preserved. In logistic regression and ROC-analyses, LA SR{sub e} proved to be the best independent predictor of acute myocarditis (AUC 0.80), and using LA SR{sub e} with a cut-off of −1.6 s{sup −1} resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of

  16. Gamma graphic findings in giant hepatic hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Mendoza, P.; Ramirez, E.; Aguilar, C.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to describe gamma graphic findings in patients with giant hepatic hemangiomas, when evaluated with 99m Tc red blood cell (RBC) imaging. Three patients with clinical suspicion of giant hepatic hemangiomas, who had had, ultrasound and computed tomography were studied with RBC using in vivo labelling with pyrophosphate. All cases had dynamic and static views. All cases showed hypoperfusion in dynamics views and over perfusion in delayed studies. Surgery confirmed diagnosis in two cases. 99m Tc RBC is a good method for diagnosis of giant hepatic hemangioma, which generally needs surgical treatment. (Authors). 24 refs., 2 figs

  17. [Comparison analysis of muscle enzymes in children with myocarditis and Duchene/Becker muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Wang, Hong; Yu, Xuexin; Xing, Yanlin; Wang, Ce; He, Rong

    2016-09-28

    To compare the changes in muscle enzyme between children with myocarditis and Duchene/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), and to seek the explanations for variation.
 The retrospective analysis for 83 myocarditis children (myocarditis group) and 69 DMD/BMD children (DMD/BMD group), who were collected from Department of Pediatric of Shengjing Hospital affiliated to China Medical University since January 2008 to May 2015, was carried out. At the same time, 24 healthy children from the Department of Pediatric Development served as a control group. The examination indexes included creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase-isoenzyme MB (CK-MB), creatine kinase isoenzyme MB mass (CK-MB mass), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and high-sensitive-cTnT (hs-cTnT).
 1) In the myocarditis group, the CK increased from 100 to 1 000 U/L, reached a peak after 5 days, which lasted for a week and then dropped to the normal; the CK-MB reached a peak after 5 to 7 days and dropped to the normal a month later; the CK-MB mass reached a peak on the first day and dropped to the normal after 3 weeks; the cTn reached to a peak after 5 days and dropped to the normal after about 17 days; hs-cTnT reached to a peak on the first day and dropped to the normal after about 19 days. 2) In the DMD/BMD group, the CK increased significantly and 27 cases had a CK value of more than 10 000 U/L. After the treatment for 1 to 2 weeks, their enzyme rose again after a slight drop. In terms of cTnI, 6 cases showed a moderate increase, 5 of them couldn't drop to the normal level until more than 3 weeks later; the hs-cTnT increased in the 45 cases, which lasted for more than 3 weeks in the 31 cases of them and showed a tendency of persisting increase.
 The cTnI and hs-cTnT rise significantly and possess wider observation window than CK and CK-MB mass in myocarditis children, with more sensitive and specific changes. The myocardial damage can occur before myasthenia and keep this trend for a long time in the DMD

  18. Aspectos radiológicos e epidemiológicos do granuloma central de células gigantes Radiological and epidemiological aspects of central giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilson Noleto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar os principais aspectos radiográficos e epidemiológicos das lesões de células gigantes (granulomas centrais de células gigantes e tumores marrons do hiperparatireoidismo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: A amostra consistiu de 26 lesões de células gigantes diagnosticadas em 22 pacientes divididos em dois grupos, um deles composto por 17 pacientes que não tinham hiperparatireoidismo (grupo A e o outro formado por cinco pacientes portadores de tal distúrbio (grupo B. RESULTADOS: O sexo feminino (72,7% foi o mais acometido. As lesões ocorreram mais freqüentemente na segunda década de vida, com média de idade de 27 anos. A mandíbula (61,5% foi o arco mais envolvido. Radiograficamente, 57,7% das lesões eram multiloculares e 42,3% eram uniloculares com limites definidos. Todas as 26 lesões provocaram expansão óssea, 15,4% produziram reabsorção radicular, 50% causaram deslocamento dentário e 11,5% produziram dor. Na mandíbula, 18,7% das lesões cruzavam a linha média. O grupo A apresentou 66,7% das lesões na mandíbula e o grupo B mostrou igualdade na distribuição das lesões entre os arcos. O grupo A apresentou 66,7% das lesões multiloculares e 33,3%, uniloculares. O grupo B apresentou 62,5% das lesões uniloculares e 37,5%, multiloculares. CONCLUSÃO: As lesões de células gigantes podem manifestar-se, radiograficamente, com um amplo espectro, desde pequenas lesões uniloculares de crescimento lento até extensas lesões multiloculares. Elas apresentam características de benignidade, embora algumas lesões possam demonstrar um comportamento localmente agressivo.OBJECTIVE: The present study was aimed at evaluating main radiological and epidemiological aspects of giant cell lesions (central giant cell granuloma and brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 26 giant cell lesions diagnosed in 22 patients divided into two groups, one of them

  19. Does Wrist Arthrodesis With Structural Iliac Crest Bone Graft After Wide Resection of Distal Radius Giant Cell Tumor Result in Satisfactory Function and Local Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Chan, Chung Ming; Yu, Feng; Li, Yuan; Niu, Xiaohui

    2017-03-01

    Many techniques have been described for reconstruction after distal radius resection for giant cell tumor with none being clearly superior. The favored technique at our institution is total wrist fusion with autogenous nonvascularized structural iliac crest bone graft because it is structurally robust, avoids the complications associated with obtaining autologous fibula graft, and is useful in areas where bone banks are not available. However, the success of arthrodesis and the functional outcomes with this approach, to our knowledge, have only been limitedly reported. (1) What is the success of union of these grafts and how long does it take? (2) How effective is the technique in achieving tumor control? (3) What complications occur with this type of arthrodesis? (4) What are the functional results of wrist arthrodesis by this technique for treating giant cell tumor of the distal radius? Between 2005 and 2013, 48 patients were treated for biopsy-confirmed Campanacci Grade III giant cell tumor of the distal radius. Of those, 39 (81% [39 of 48]) were treated with wrist arthrodesis using autogenous nonvascularized iliac crest bone graft. Of those, 27 (69% [27 of 39]) were available for followup at a minimum of 24 months (mean, 45 months; range, 24-103 months). During that period, the general indications for this approach were Campanacci Grade III and estimated resection length of 8 cm or less. Followup included clinical and radiographic assessment and functional assessment using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, grip strength, and range of motion at every followup by the treating surgeon and his team. All functional results were from the latest followup of each patient. Union of the distal junction occurred at a mean of 4 months (± 2 months) and union of the proximal junction occurred at a mean of 9 months (± 5 months). Accounting for competing events, at 12 months, the rate of proximal

  20. The Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, and P mass fractions in benign and malignant giant cell tumors of bone investigated by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir Zaichick; German Davydov; Tatyana Epatova; Sofia Zaichick

    2015-01-01

    The Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, and P content and Ca/P, Ca/Mg, Ca/Na, Cl/Ca, and Cl/Na ratios in samples of intact bone, benign and malignant giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone were investigated by neutron activation analysis with high resolution spectrometry of short-lived radionuclides. It was found that in GCT tissue the mass fractions of Cl and Na are higher and the mass fraction of Ca and P are lower than in normal bone tissues. Moreover, it was shown that higher Cl/Na mass fraction ratios as well as lower Ca/Cl, Ca/Mg, and Ca/Na mass fraction ratios are typical of the GCT tissue compared to intact bone. Finally, we propose to use the estimation of such parameters as the Cl mass fraction and the Ca/Cl mass fraction ratio as an additional test for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant GCT. (author)

  1. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N

    2002-01-01

    conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8......OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that infective agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis (GCA), in particular Chlamydia pneumoniae and parvovirus B19. We investigated temporal arteries from patients with GCA for these infections as well as human herpes viruses....... RESULTS: In all 30 biopsies, PCR was negative for DNAs of parvovirus B19, each of the eight human herpes viruses and C. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of DNA from parvovirus B19, human herpes virus or C. pneumoniae in any of the temporal arteries. These agents do not seem to play a unique...

  2. Adhesions, inflammatory response and foreign body giant cells infiltration of the topical hemostats TachoSil®, Hemopatch™ and Veriset™

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtt Nissen, Line; Hunter, Jacob; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2017-01-01

    Background: When liver bleeding cannot be controlled by conventional methods, a topical hemostatic patch can be applied during surgery. In recent years new hemostats have become available. The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of adhesion and inflammation for three topical hemostatic...... patches, TachoSil®, Hemopatch™ and Veriset™. Methods: In 60 adult male Sprague Dawley rats liver two lesions were induced with a scalpel. Each rat was treated with two of the three patches tested. After 1, 2 and 3 months the animals were euthanized and macroscopic evaluation of adhesions and histological...... assessment of inflammation and macrophage infiltration were performed. Results: A significant higher (pforeign body giant cells (FBGCs) was found in Hemopatch™ and Veriset™, whereas both had a lower degree of infl ammatory and macrophage infiltration compared to TachoSil®. No differences...

  3. Co-occurrence of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst, Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Central Odontogenic Fibroma: Report of a Very Rare Entity and Its Surgical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Vaezi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC, Central odontogenic fibroma (COF and aggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG are rare pathologic diseases affecting the jaws. While the Co-existence of two of them is reported in the literature, existence of all three conditions in one patient is an extremely rare entity. In the present report, initial biopsy revealed fibrosarcoma, therefore mandibular resection was performed for the subject. Sectional Histopathologic evaluation revealed the co-existence of three conditions through histopathologic evaluation. This report emphasizes the importance of precise microscopical evaluation of jaw lesions and thorough sectional examination of the lesions to reach the precise diagnosis. Treatment modalities and follow-up radiographs are also provided to help clinicians manage these entities.

  4. Giant cell angiofibroma misdiagnosed as a vascular malformation and treated with absolute alcohol for one year: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yue; Zhang, Chenping; Liu, Guanglong; Tian, Zhuowei; Wang, Lizhen; Kalfarentzos, Evagelos

    2014-04-24

    To present the clinical, imaging, pathological and immunohistochemical features of giant cell angiofibroma (GCA). In this paper we report an atypical case of a GCA extending from the parotid to the parapharyngeal space. The lesion was being treated as a vascular malformation for one year prior to surgical removal. We summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging, pathological and molecular features of this rare disease.After complete surgical removal of the tumor, immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong positivity for the mesenchymal markers vimentin, CD34, CD31 and CD99 in neoplastic cells. Tumor proliferation antigen marker Ki67 was partly positive (<5% of cells). Tumor cells were negative for muscle-specific actin, epithelial membrane antigen, smooth muscle actin, cytokeratin pan, S100, desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, myogenin, MyoD1 and F8. The morphological and immunohistochemical profile was consistent with the diagnosis of GCA. GCA is a rare soft tissue tumor that can easily be misdiagnosed in the clinical preoperative setting. In view of the clinical, pathological and molecular features of the tumor, complete surgical removal is the current optimal treatment option, providing accurate diagnosis and low to minimal recurrence rate.

  5. Giant Pumpkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, David; Alexeev, Alex

    2009-11-01

    In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we investigate the growth of pumpkins from 1 to 1000 pounds in weight. Time-lapse photography is used to document the growth of pumpkins. Data is presented on the relation between the pumpkins' weights and aspect ratios (height divided by width). We observe pumpkins tend to become squashed (up to 50%) as they increase in size. The lattice-spring method is used to numerically estimate the elasto-plastic forces resisting deformation of the pumpkin. Using levels of plasticity consistent with that of plant cell growth, we find pumpkins shapes consistent with those observed.

  6. Severe human parechovirus type 3 myocarditis and encephalitis in an adolescent with hypogammaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey K. Mardekian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human parechovirus (HPeV belongs to the Picornaviridae family of RNA viruses. HPeV infections can be asymptomatic, lead to mild respiratory and/or gastrointestinal symptoms, or less frequently cause severe diseases such as sepsis, meningitis, encephalitis, and myocarditis. Severe neurological HPeV infections occur most commonly in infants and neonates. There are currently 16 recognized types of HPeV. HPeV type 3 (HPeV3 has been the predominant type associated with severe central nervous system disease in neonates and newborns since its discovery in 1999. Although HPeV-related infections have been reported in adults, symptomatic HPeV3 infections in adolescents and adults are uncommon. A case of severe HPeV3 myocarditis and encephalitis in an adolescent is described.

  7. Role of Electrophysiological Study and Catheter Ablation for Recurrent Ventricular Tachycardia Complicating Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Cecchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of a 31-year-old man admitted to our hospital with echocardiografic and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance signs of myocarditis complicated by ventricular tachycardia, initially resolved with direct current shock. After the recurrence of ventricular tachycardia the patient was submitted to electrophysiological study revealing a re-entrant circuit at the level of the medium segment of interventricular septum, successfully treated with transcatheter ablation. This case highlights how the presence of recurrent ventricular arrhythmias at the onset of acute myocarditis, suspected or proven, could be associated with a pre-existing arrhythmogenic substrate, therefore these patients should be submitted to electrophysiological study in order to rule out the presence of arrhythmogenic focuses that can be treated with transcatheter ablation.

  8. Churg-Strauss syndrome presenting with eosinophilic myocarditis: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ana Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Araújo, Vítor; Almeida e Silva, João; Pereira, José Manuel; Rodrigues Pereira, Pedro; Pizarro, Manuel; Silva, João Carlos; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2013-09-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is an unusual disease that presents as systemic vasculitis and peripheral eosinophilia in patients with an atopic constitution. Cardiac involvement is unusual and often not prominent on initial presentation, but is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CSS. We report the case of a young woman with severe acute myocarditis. Coronary arteriography demonstrated extensive focal vasculopathy, consistent with coronary vasculitis, and myocardial biopsy showed eosinophilic myocarditis. This presentation led to an initial diagnosis of CSS in this patient and appropriate therapy resulted in a spectacular remission of disease activity. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Feature-tracking myocardial strain analysis in acute myocarditis. Diagnostic value and association with myocardial oedema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetkens, Julian A.; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Kuetting, Daniel L.; Dabir, Darius; Homsi, Rami; Schmeel, Frederic C.; Sprinkart, Alois M.; Naehle, Claas P.; Schild, Hans H.; Thomas, Daniel; Doerner, Jonas; Fimmers, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) feature-tracking (FT) myocardial strain analysis in patients with suspected acute myocarditis and its association with myocardial oedema. Forty-eight patients with suspected acute myocarditis and 35 control subjects underwent CMR. FT CMR analysis of systolic longitudinal (LS), circumferential (CS) and radial strain (RS) was performed. Additionally, the protocol allowed for the assessment of T1 and T2 relaxation times. When compared with healthy controls, myocarditis patients demonstrated reduced LS, CS and RS values (LS: -19.5 ± 4.4% vs. -23.6 ± 3.1%, CS: -23.0 ± 5.8% vs. -27.4 ± 3.4%, RS: 28.9 ± 8.5% vs. 32.4 ± 7.4%; P < 0.05, respectively). LS (T1: r = 0.462, P < 0.001; T2: r = 0.436, P < 0.001) and CS (T1: r = 0.429, P < 0.001; T2: r = 0.467, P < 0.001) showed the strongest correlations with T1 and T2 relaxations times. Area under the curve of LS (0.79) was higher compared with those of CS (0.75; P = 0.478) and RS (0.62; P = 0.008). FT CMR myocardial strain analysis might serve as a new tool for assessment of myocardial dysfunction in the diagnostic work-up of patients suspected of having acute myocarditis. Especially, LS and CS show a sufficient diagnostic performance and were most closely correlated with CMR parameters of myocardial oedema. (orig.)

  10. Value of Cine-MRI sequences before and after injection in the diagnosis of acute myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidi, Asma; Zairi, Ihsen; Mzoughi, Khadija; Zakhama, Lilia; Kamoun, Ikram; Ben Halima, Afef; Ridene, Imen

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the examination of choice in case of suspicion of acute myocarditis. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging is very important to establish this diagnosis. Cine MRI sequences are useful for the study of the myocardial contractility.   The purpose is to estimate the value of cine MRI sequences before and after injection for the diagnosis of acute myocarditis compared with late gadolinium enhanced sequences. We prospectively included 40 patients having a high suspicion of acute myocarditis and examined using a 1.5 Tesla CMR. Cine MRI sequences before and after injection were performed. The protocol also include  T2-weighted  short- tau-inversion-recovery (STIR T2) fast spin echo MRI and LGE imaging eight minutes after injection with visual adjustment of inversion time. Delayed enhancement was found among 23 patients. Fifteen patients (65 %) presented a spontaneous hyper signal detected visually on Cine MRI sequences before injection and 11 patients (48 %) on STIR T2. The hyper signal on Cine MRI sequences after injection of gadolinium was the same topography that the late raising at 23 patients. In addition, we highlighted a significant difference between this hyper signal before injection and the left ventricle ejection fraction (p=0.022) as well as with the telesystolic volume of the left ventricle (LV) indexed by the body mass (p=0.039). Our study suggests that Cine MRI sequences after injection are of equal performance in the diagnosis of acute myocarditis as the LGE sequences and its contibution is important when we want to shorten the examination or when inversion time isn't optimal.

  11. Feature-tracking myocardial strain analysis in acute myocarditis. Diagnostic value and association with myocardial oedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetkens, Julian A.; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Kuetting, Daniel L.; Dabir, Darius; Homsi, Rami; Schmeel, Frederic C.; Sprinkart, Alois M.; Naehle, Claas P.; Schild, Hans H.; Thomas, Daniel [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Doerner, Jonas [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics, and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the diagnostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) feature-tracking (FT) myocardial strain analysis in patients with suspected acute myocarditis and its association with myocardial oedema. Forty-eight patients with suspected acute myocarditis and 35 control subjects underwent CMR. FT CMR analysis of systolic longitudinal (LS), circumferential (CS) and radial strain (RS) was performed. Additionally, the protocol allowed for the assessment of T1 and T2 relaxation times. When compared with healthy controls, myocarditis patients demonstrated reduced LS, CS and RS values (LS: -19.5 ± 4.4% vs. -23.6 ± 3.1%, CS: -23.0 ± 5.8% vs. -27.4 ± 3.4%, RS: 28.9 ± 8.5% vs. 32.4 ± 7.4%; P < 0.05, respectively). LS (T1: r = 0.462, P < 0.001; T2: r = 0.436, P < 0.001) and CS (T1: r = 0.429, P < 0.001; T2: r = 0.467, P < 0.001) showed the strongest correlations with T1 and T2 relaxations times. Area under the curve of LS (0.79) was higher compared with those of CS (0.75; P = 0.478) and RS (0.62; P = 0.008). FT CMR myocardial strain analysis might serve as a new tool for assessment of myocardial dysfunction in the diagnostic work-up of patients suspected of having acute myocarditis. Especially, LS and CS show a sufficient diagnostic performance and were most closely correlated with CMR parameters of myocardial oedema. (orig.)

  12. Substance P Receptor Antagonism: A Potential Novel Treatment Option for Viral-Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prema Robinson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral-myocarditis is an important cause of heart failure for which no specific treatment is available. We previously showed the neuropeptide substance P (SP is associated with the pathogenesis of murine myocarditis caused by encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The current studies determined if pharmacological inhibition of SP-signaling via its high affinity receptor, NK1R and downstream G-protein, Ras homolog gene family, member-A (RhoA, will be beneficial in viral-myocarditis. Aprepitant (1.2 mg/kg, a SP-receptor antagonist, or fasudil (10 mg/kg, a RhoA inhibitor, or saline control was administered daily to mice orally for 3 days, prior to, or 5 days following, intraperitoneal infection with and without 50 PFU of EMCV, following which disease assessment studies, including echocardiogram and cardiac Doppler were performed in day 14 after infection. Pretreatment and posttreatment with aprepitant significantly reduced mortality, heart and cardiomyocyte size, and cardiac viral RNA levels (P<0.05 all, ANOVA. Only aprepitant pretreatment improved heart functions; it significantly decreased end systolic diameter, improved fractional shortening, and increased peak aortic flow velocity (P<0.05 all, ANOVA. Pre- or posttreatment with fasudil did not significantly impact disease manifestations. These findings indicate that SP contributes to cardiac-remodeling and dysfunction following ECMV infection via its high affinity receptor, but not through the Rho-A pathway. These studies suggest that SP-receptor antagonism may be a novel therapeutic-option for patients with viral-myocarditis.

  13. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and myocardial infarction: Etude Cas-Témoins de l'Infarctus du Myocarde (ECTIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumeron, Frédéric; Betoulle, Dina; Nicaud, Viviane; Evans, Alun; Kee, Frank; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Arveiler, Dominique; Luc, Gérald; Cambien, François

    2002-06-25

    Depression is a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduce this risk. The site of action is the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), which is expressed in brain and blood cells. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the SLC6A4 gene has been described. This polymorphism may be associated with the risk of MI. The SLC6A4 polymorphism has been investigated by polymerase chain reaction in 671 male patients with MI and in 688 controls from the Etude Cas-Témoins de l'Infarctus du Myocarde (ECTIM) multicentric study. Percentages for LL, LS, and SS genotypes were 35.5%, 45.4%, and 19.1%, respectively, for cases versus 28.1%, 49.1%, and 22.8%, respectively, for controls. S allele frequency was 41.8% and 47.4% for cases and controls, respectively. After adjustment for age and center by using multivariable logistic regression, the odds ratio for MI associated with the LL genotype was 1.40 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.76, P=0.0047). The LL genotype of the SLC6A4 polymorphism is associated with a higher risk of MI. This could be attributable to the effect of the polymorphism on serotonin-mediated platelet activation or smooth muscle cell proliferation or on other risk factors, such as depression or response to stress.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody in murine experimental viral myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Matsumori, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Kawai, C.

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab were investigated with use of murine experimental viral myocarditis as a model. The biodistribution of indium-111-labeled antimyosin antibody Fab on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after encephalomyocarditis virus inoculation demonstrated that myocardial uptake increased significantly on days 5, 7 and 14 (maximum on day 7) in infected versus uninfected mice (p less than 0.001). In vivo kinetics in infected mice on day 7 demonstrated that the heart to blood ratio reached a maximum 48 h after the intravenous administration of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab, which was considered to be the optimal time for scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images obtained with indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab demonstrated positive uptake in the cardiac lesion in infected mice. The pathologic study demonstrated that myocardial uptake correlated well with pathologic grades of myocardial necrosis. High performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of an antigen-antibody complex in the circulation of infected mice after the injection of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab. This antigen bound to indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab in the circulation might be whole myosin and this complex may decrease myocardial uptake and increase liver uptake. It is concluded that indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab accumulates selectively in damaged heart tissue in mice with acute myocarditis and that indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab scintigraphy may be a useful method for the visualization of acute myocarditis

  15. Murine model of acute myocarditis and cerebral cortical neuron edema induced by coxsackievirus B4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Peng Dong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, coxsackievirus B4 (CV-B4 has been continuously isolated and evidence suggests an association with the development of pancreatitis and type I diabetes. In addition, CV-B4 is also associated with myocarditis and severe central nervous system (CNS complications, which remain poorly studied and understood. In the present study, we established an ICR mouse model of CV-B4 infection and examined whether CV-B4 infection resulted in a predisposition to myocarditis and CNS infection. We found high survival in both the treatment and control group, with no significant differences in clinical outcomes observed. However, pathological lesions were evident in both brain and heart tissue of the CV-B4-infected mice. In addition, high viral loads were found in the neural and cardiac tissues as early as 2 d postinfection. Expressions of IFN-γ and IL-6 in sera were significantly higher in CV-B4-infected mice compared to uninfected negative controls, suggesting the involvement of these cytokines in the development of histopathological lesions. Our murine model successfully reproduced the acute myocarditis and cerebral cortical neuron edema induced by CV-B4, and may be useful for the evaluation of vaccine candidates and potential antivirals against CV-B4 infection.

  16. Lyme disease presenting with facial palsy and myocarditis mimicking myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Julieta; Khalighi, Koroush; Elmi, Farhad; Krishnamurthy, Mahesh; Talebian, Amirsina; Toor, Rubinder S

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented with a sudden episode of typical chest pain, radiating to her neck. The patient denied premature coronary artery disease in the family. Initial EKG showed normal sinus rhythm with a 1 mm ST-elevation involving lead II and lead aVF and a 1 mm ST-depression in lead V1 with associated T-wave inversion. Initial Troponin I (normal disease. Two days later the patient developed right-sided facial palsy. Diagnosis of Lyme disease was confirmed by ELISA with positive IgM and IgG antibodies. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone and oral steroids was started. Eventually resolution of symptoms and, normalization of cardiac markers and EKG changes, were achieved. This is a rare case of Lyme myocarditis associated with markedly elevated Troponin I, normal left ventricle function, and an absence of conduction abnormalities. To the best of our knowledge, Lyme myocarditis mimicking acute coronary syndrome with such high levels of Troponin I and neurologic compromise has not been previously described. Lyme myocarditis may be a challenging diagnosis in endemic areas especially in patients with coronary artery disease risk factors, presenting with typical chest pain, EKG changes and positive cardiac biomarkers. Therefore, it should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome. Abbreviations AV: Atrioventricular; CK-MB: Creatinine Kinase-MB; EKG: Electrocardiogram; ELISA: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; IgG: Immunoglobulin G; IgM: Immunoglobulin M.

  17. Structure and oxidation states of giant unit cell compound Dy{sub 117+x}Fe{sub 57-y}Sn{sub 112-z}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Alexander T.; Barron, Keaton G.; Salazar, Bryan G.; Kirby, Parker; McCandless, Gregory T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Walker, Amy V.; Chan, Julia Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas, Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States)

    2017-12-13

    Motivated by the complex structure and properties of giant unit cell intermetallic compounds, a new isostructural Fe analogue of the Dy{sub 117}Co{sub 57}Sn{sub 112} structure type was synthesized. Single crystals of Dy{sub 122}Fe{sub 55}Sn{sub 101} were grown at 1260 C via a Dy-Fe eutectoid flux. The Fe analogue also adopts the space group Fm anti 3m with lattice parameters a = 29.914(9) Aa, V = 26769(23) Aa{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Dy{sub 122}Fe{sub 55}Sn{sub 101} has a large cell volume, structural complexity, and consists of seven Dy, eight Fe, and ten Sn unique crystallographic sites. There are fifteen fully occupied atomic positions, three unique pairs of alternating atomic positions with positional disorder, and seven partially occupied atomic sites. Within this complex unit cell, only approximately half the unique atomic positions are fully occupied with the remainder of the atoms either positionally or occupationally disordered. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the compound contains Dy{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 0}, Fe{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 0}, and Sn{sup 4+}. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. In vivo T2* weighted MRI visualizes cardiac lesions in murine models of acute and chronic viral myocarditis.

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    Xavier Helluy

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic forms of myocarditis are mainly induced by virus infections. As a consequence of myocardial damage and inflammation dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure may develop. The gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis is endomyocardial biopsies which are required to determine the etiopathogenesis of cardiac inflammatory processes. However, new non-invasive MRI techniques hold great potential in visualizing cardiac non-ischemic inflammatory lesions at high spatial resolution, which could improve the investigation of the pathophysiology of viral myocarditis.Here we present the discovery of a novel endogenous T2* MRI contrast of myocardial lesions in murine models of acute and chronic CVB3 myocarditis. The evaluation of infected hearts ex vivo and in vivo by 3D T2w and T2*w MRI allowed direct localization of virus-induced myocardial lesions without any MRI tracer or contrast agent. T2*w weighted MRI is able to detect both small cardiac lesions of acute myocarditis and larger necrotic areas at later stages of chronic myocarditis, which was confirmed by spatial correlation of MRI hypointensity in myocardium with myocardial lesions histologically. Additional in vivo and ex vivo MRI analysis proved that the contrast mechanism was due to a strong paramagnetic tissue alteration in the vicinity of myocardial lesions, effectively pointing towards iron deposits as the primary contributor of contrast. The evaluation of the biological origin of the MR contrast by specific histological staining and transmission electron microscopy revealed that impaired iron metabolism primarily in mitochondria caused iron deposits within necrotic myocytes, which induces strong magnetic susceptibility in myocardial lesions and results in strong T2* contrast.This T2*w MRI technique provides a fast and sensitive diagnostic tool to determine the patterns and the severity of acute and chronic enteroviral myocarditis and the precise localization of

  19. In vivo T2* weighted MRI visualizes cardiac lesions in murine models of acute and chronic viral myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helluy, Xavier; Sauter, Martina; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Lykowsky, Gunthard; Kreutner, Jakob; Yilmaz, Ali; Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valerie; Kandolf, Reinhard; Jakob, Peter M.; Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Klingel, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute and chronic forms of myocarditis are mainly induced by virus infections. As a consequence of myocardial damage and inflammation dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure may develop. The gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis is endomyocardial biopsies which are required to determine the etiopathogenesis of cardiac inflammatory processes. However, new non-invasive MRI techniques hold great potential in visualizing cardiac non-ischemic inflammatory lesions at high spatial resolution, which could improve the investigation of the pathophysiology of viral myocarditis. Results Here we present the discovery of a novel endogenous T2* MRI contrast of myocardial lesions in murine models of acute and chronic CVB3 myocarditis. The evaluation of infected hearts ex vivo and in vivo by 3D T2w and T2*w MRI allowed direct localization of virus-induced myocardial lesions without any MRI tracer or contrast agent. T2*w weighted MRI is able to detect both small cardiac lesions of acute myocarditis and larger necrotic areas at later stages of chronic myocarditis, which was confirmed by spatial correlation of MRI hypointensity in myocardium with myocardial lesions histologically. Additional in vivo and ex vivo MRI analysis proved that the contrast mechanism was due to a strong paramagnetic tissue alteration in the vicinity of myocardial lesions, effectively pointing towards iron deposits as the primary contributor of contrast. The evaluation of the biological origin of the MR contrast by specific histological staining and transmission electron microscopy revealed that impaired iron metabolism primarily in mitochondria caused iron deposits within necrotic myocytes, which induces strong magnetic susceptibility in myocardial lesions and results in strong T2* contrast. Conclusion This T2*w MRI technique provides a fast and sensitive diagnostic tool to determine the patterns and the severity of acute and chronic enteroviral myocarditis and the precise

  20. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal ...

  1. Factors Affecting the Recurrence of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone After Surgery: A Clinicopathological Study of 80 Cases from a Single Center

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    Dong-dong Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This aim of the present study was to identify specific markers determining the recurrence of the giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB. Methods: This study involved the clinicopathological analysis of 80 cases. All of the clinical features, pathological fracture, Campanacci grade, histological features and surgical methods were reviewed. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Ki-67, CD147, mutant p53 and p63 in GCTB. Comparisons between different groups were performed using the Chi-square test. The risk factors affecting recurrence were analyzed using a binary logistic model. Kaplan-Meier analysis was employed for the survival analysis between the groups. Cell proliferation assays, migration and invasion assays were used to detect the function of CD147 on GCTB in vitro. Results: The univariate analysis showed that Ki-67 and CD147 expression, pathological fracture, Campanacci grade and surgical method were associated with recurrence. The multivariate analysis revealed that CD147 expression, Campanacci grade and surgical method were the factors affecting GCTB recurrence. In addition, the Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that these factors affected tumor-free survival time. In vitro study revealed that the CD147 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA technique dramatically reduced the proliferation, migration and invasion of GCTB. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CD147 may serve as an adequate marker for GCTB recurrence. Campanacci grade is a risk factor for GCTB recurrence, which is also affected by the surgical method used.

  2. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic Properties of Giant Unit Cell Intermetallics R117Co52+δSn112+γ (R = Y, La, Pr, Nd, Ho

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    Ping Chai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary intermetallics R117Co52+δSn112+γ (R = Y, La, Pr, Nd, and Ho have been prepared by arc-melting followed by annealing at 800 °C. All the compounds belong to the Tb117Fe52Ge112 structure type (space group Fm 3 ¯ m characterized by a complex giant cubic unit cell with a ~ 30 Å. The single-crystal structure determination of Y- and La-containing compounds reveals a significant structural disorder. A comparison of these and earlier reported crystal structures of R117Co52+δSn112+γ suggests that more extensive disorder occurs for structures that contain larger lanthanide atoms. This observation can be explained by the need to maintain optimal bonding interactions as the size of the unit cell increases. Y117Co56Sn115 exhibits weak paramagnetism due to the Co sublattice and does not show magnetic ordering in the 1.8–300 K range. Ho117Co55Sn108 shows ferromagnetic ordering at 10.6 K. Both Pr117Co54Sn112 and Nd117Co54Sn111 exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering at 17 K and 24.7 K, respectively, followed by a spin reorientation transition at lower temperature.

  3. Clinical Profile and Outcome of Myocarditis in Children at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from 2008 to 2012

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    Erza Nurtriandari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis of myocarditis in children is still challenging due to its inconsistent and wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. There is no specific laboratory test available. This may obscure the true incidence of myocarditis. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical profile and outcome of myocarditis in children. Methods: A descriptive study was performed using 80 medical records of hospitalized pediatrics patients with myocarditis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from January 2008 to December 2012. The obtained data were age, gender, nutritional status, etiology, chief complaint, physical examination, laboratory findings, other examinations and outcome of the disease. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of frequency distribution. Results: The mean age of the patients was 91.46 (45.93 months old, predominantly male. The most etiology was dengue infections (61%. High fever was found as the most common chief complaint (38% and the most common found in physical examinations were tachypnea (65% and hepatomegaly (55%. Electrocardiography (ECG showed the first degree atrioventricular block (AV block (35%, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and creatine kinase myocardial band (CKMB was increased in more than 80% of patients. The majority of patient was improved. Shock was the common complication. Conclusions: Dengue is the most etiology of myocarditis etiology. Tachypnea, hepatomegaly, the first degree AV block in ECG, elevated AST and CKMB were the most common presentations. Most of the patients were improved during treatment.

  4. Liquid nitrogen or phenolization for giant cell tumor of bone?: a comparative cohort study of various standard treatments at two tertiary referral centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Lizz; van der Geest, Ingrid C M; Schreuder, H W Bart; van de Sande, Michiel A J; Dijkstra, P D Sander

    2014-03-05

    The rate of recurrence of giant cell tumor of bone is decreased by use of adjuvant treatments such as phenol, liquid nitrogen, or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) during curettage. We assessed recurrence and complication rates and functional outcome after curettage with use of phenol and PMMA, liquid nitrogen and PMMA, and liquid nitrogen and bone grafts. We retrospectively compared the relative effectiveness of treatment of giant cell tumors of bone at two tertiary centers with a regional function from 1990 to 2010. The 132 (of 201) patients who met the inclusion criteria had a mean age of thirty-three years (range, eleven to sixty-nine years). Treatment assignment depended purely on the center, with primary treatment consisting of curettage with use of phenol and PMMA (n = 82) at one center and with use of either liquid nitrogen and PMMA (n = 26) or liquid nitrogen and bone grafts (n = 24) at the other center. Recurrence and complication rates were determined, and functional outcome was assessed on the basis of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. The mean duration of follow-up was eight years (range, two to twenty-two years). Recurrence rates were comparable among the groups (28% for phenol and PMMA, 31% for liquid nitrogen and PMMA, and 38% for liquid nitrogen and bone grafts; p = 0.52). Soft-tissue extension increased the recurrence risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1 to 4.0, p = 0.024). The complication rate was 33% after use of liquid nitrogen and bone grafts, 27% after liquid nitrogen and PMMA, and 11% after phenol and PMMA (p = 0.019); complications included osteoarthritis, infection, postoperative fracture, nonunion, transient nerve palsy, and PMMA leakage. The complication risk was increased by the presence of a pathologic fracture (HR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.7 to 9.5, p = 0.001) and use of liquid nitrogen (HR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.5 to 10, p = 0.006 for liquid nitrogen and bone grafts; HR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.1 to 8.6, p = 0

  5. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

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    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  6. A Case Report of Salmonella muenchen Enteritis Causing Rhabdomyolysis and Myocarditis in a Previously Healthy 26-Year-Old Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Will; Martell, Jon; Wilson, Joy S; Matsuura, Don T

    2017-04-01

    This case report examines an unusual presentation of a non-typhoidal Salmonella serovar with limited prevalence in the literature. This is the first case report to associate specifically the Salmonella muenchen serovar with rhabdomyolysis and myocarditis. This case report reviews the diagnostic criteria for myocarditis and explores the diagnostic dilemma of troponin elevation in the setting of rhabdomyolysis. It demonstrates that Salmonella muenchen has the ability to present in a broad range of individuals with complications extending beyond classical gastrointestinal symptoms. This report also concludes that diagnosis of the many possible complications from non-typhoidal Salmonella infections can be difficult due to patient comorbidities, variability in the severity of the illnesses, laboratory test limitations, and imaging limitations. When a patient presents with elevated troponins in the setting of rhabdomyolysis a careful workup should be done to evaluate for ischemic causes, myocarditis, or false elevation secondary to rhabdomyolysis.

  7. Denosumab treatment for progressive skull base giant cell tumor of bone in a 14 year old female - a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakhchyan, Samvel; Kager, Leo; Danielyan, Samvel; Avagyan, Armen; Karamyan, Nerses; Vardevanyan, Hovhannes; Mkhitaryan, Sergey; Papyan, Ruzanna; Zohrabyan, Davit; Safaryan, Liana; Sargsyan, Lilit; Harutyunyan, Lilit; Hakobyan, Lusine; Iskanyan, Samvel; Tamamyan, Gevorg

    2017-03-29

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a rare primary bone tumor, which can metastasize and undergo malignant transformation. The standard treatment of GCT is surgery. In patients with unresectable or metastatic disease, additional therapeutic options are available. These include blocking of the receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) signaling pathway, which plays a role in the pathogenesis of GCT of bone, via the anti-RANKL monoclonal antibody denosumab. Herein we report on a female teenager who presented in a very poor clinical condition (cachexia, diplopia, strabismus, dysphonia with palsy of cranial nerves V, VI, VIII, IX, X, XI and XII) due to progressive disease, after incomplete resection and adjuvant radiotherapy, of a GCT which affected the cervical spine (C1 and C2) as well as the skull base; and who had an impressive clinical response to denosumab therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest patient ever reported with a skull base tumor treated with denosumab. In situations when surgery can be postponed and local aggressiveness of the tumor does not urge for acute surgical intervention, upfront use of denosumab in order to reduce the tumor size might be considered. Principally, the goal of denosumab therapy is to reduce tumor size as much as possible, with the ultimate goal to make local surgery (or as in our case re-surgery) amenable. However, improvement in quality of life, as demonstrated in our patient, is also an important aspect of such targeted therapies.

  8. Giant cell tumor of cervicothoracic region treated by triple corpectomy from posterior only approach: A case report with review of literature

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    Rajat Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign aggressive tumor, which affects axial as well as a peripheral skeleton. It affects epiphysis of long bones and can result in pathological fractures. GCT affects cervical spine rarely and has been known to affect almost all vertebra in the human body. It has a predilection for fixed spine, that is, sacrum though it can affect mobile spine as well. GCT of cervicothoracic region poses a challenge for the surgeon because of the difficulty in approaching this region anteriorly. This situation is further compounded when GCT involves multiple contiguous vertebral bodies in this region and has already spread beyond the confines of its capsule. We report a case of GCT involving three vertebral bodies C7, D1, and D2 at cervicothoracic region who presented to us and was treated with triple corpectomy from the posterior only approach. This is the first ever case report of triple corpectomy and anterior reconstruction by a posterior only approach for GCT at the cervicothoracic junction to the best of author′s knowledge.

  9. Geographical and genetic factors do not account for significant differences in the clinical spectrum of giant cell arteritis in southern europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Boiardi, Luigi; Garcia-Porrua, Carlos; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Amor-Dorado, Juan C; Salvarani, Carlo

    2004-03-01

    To investigate whether genetic and geographical differences may influence the clinical spectrum of giant cell arteritis (GCA), we compared the demographic and clinical features of patients with biopsy-proven GCA from Reggio Emilia (Northern Italy) and Lugo (Northwest Spain) during a 15-year period. We performed a retrospective review of the case records of all patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA at Hospital Xeral-Calde (Lugo, Spain) and Hospital Santa Maria Nuova (Reggio Emilia, Italy) between 1 January 1986 and 31 December 2001. Both hospitals are the only referral centers for populations living in central Galicia and central Emilia Romagna, respectively. During the period of study, 194 Lugo residents and 126 Reggio Emilia residents were diagnosed with biopsy proven GCA. Reggio Emilia patients were more likely to be female (74% vs 54%; p = 0.0001). Although Lugo patients complained of headache (86%) more commonly than did those from Reggio Emilia (77%), the difference was only marginally significant (p = 0.05). The proportion of patients with visual manifestations or visual loss was remarkably similar (22% for visual manifestations and 17% for visual loss in Lugo and 29% and 21% for Reggio Emilia residents). The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate prior to the onset of therapy was also similar. Apart from differences in sex, the clinical spectrum of GCA in these 2 Southern European regions was similar.

  10. Giant cell tumor with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst shows heterogeneous metabolic pattern on {sup 18}F-FDG PET.CT: A case reort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Yoon, Yeon Hong [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Huasun (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. 18F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT.

  11. Tumor de células gigantes de bainha de tendão no LCA Tendon sheath giant cells tumor in ACL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um relato de caso de tumor de células gigantes de bainha do ligamento cruzado anterior, uma localização extremamente rara para esse tipo de lesão. O paciente do sexo feminino apresentava dor no joelho, sem relato de trauma anterior. Foi submetido ao exame clínico, ao estudo radiográfico e de ressonância magnética da região. Feita a hipótese diagnóstica de TGC de Bainha, o paciente foi então tratado com ressecção artroscópica do tumor. O diagnóstico foi confirmado com exame anátomo-patológico. O paciente evoluiu bem, com melhora dos sintomas referidos no pré-operatório.The author presents a case report of Tumor Giant Cells (TGC localized on the anterior cruciate ligament sheath, an extremely rare site for this kind of lesion. A 37 y-o female patient presented with knee pain, with no history of previous trauma. She underwent clinical examination, X-ray study and magnetic resonance of the region. The diagnostic hypothesis of Sheath TGC was provided, and the patient was treated with tumor arthroscopy resection. Diagnosis was confirmed by anatomicopathological examination. By the end point assessment, none of the pre-operative symptoms were reported.

  12. Uncemented three-dimensional-printed prosthetic replacement for giant cell tumor of distal radius: a new design of prosthesis and surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minxun; Min, Li; Xiao, Cong; Li, Yongjiang; Luo, Yi; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Wenli; Tu, Chongqi

    2018-01-01

    Currently, it is challenging to treat giant cell tumor (GCT) of distal radius. For Campanacci grade III or recurrent GCTs, en bloc resection has been accepted as a better treatment option. Although numerous methods are available for reconstruction, all of them have some limitations in joint function and complications. In this study, our aims were to treat the GCT of distal radius with uncemented three-dimensional (3D)-printed prosthesis and to present and evaluate the surgical techniques and short-term outcomes. Between September 2015 and March 2017, 11 patients with distal radius GCTs were treated with personalized uncemented 3D-printed prosthesis. The preoperative/postoperative pain, range of motion, and grip strengths of all patients were evaluated. Oncological results, complications, and degenerative changes in the wrist joint were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed according to the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire and Mayo wrist scoring systems. The average follow-up was 14.45 months (range, 8-18 months). There was a significant decrease in the mean postoperative visual analog scale score (2.33) compared with the preoperative score (5.22; p 3D-printed prosthesis can be alternative options to treat Campanacci grade III or recurrent GCTs of distal radius and can result in short-term oncologic salvage, good postoperative function, and low complication rate. However, a long-term follow-up is required to determine the outcome.

  13. Giant Cell Arteritis of the Female Genital Tract With Occult Temporal Arteritis and Marginal Zone Lymphoma Harboring Novel 20q Deletion: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Dinesh; Amin, Rajnikant M; Jones, Miroslawa W; Surti, Urvashi; Parwani, Anil V

    2016-02-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an immunologically mediated vasculitis of large and medium-sized vessels, typically affecting the cranial arteries and usually occurring in the elderly. GCA of the female genital tract is extremely rare with only 31 cases reported in the English literature. An 83-year-old white female with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding revealed an endometrial polyp on pelvic ultrasonography following which polypectomy and subsequently hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was done. Microscopy revealed a well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Interestingly, classic GCA involving numerous small to medium-sized arteries of the cervix, myometrium, bilateral fallopian tubes, and ovaries was also identified. Hematologic evaluation revealed marginal zone lymphoma with an exceptionally rare 20q deletion. Bilateral temporal artery biopsy was done subsequently, which exhibited GCA on microscopy. Corticosteroid was started that improved her polymyalgia rheumatica symptoms. The patient is on follow-up for 3 years and is doing well. To our knowledge, this is the first case of GCA of the female genital tract associated with a lymphoma and the second case of marginal zone lymphoma with the novel 20q deletion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Third cranial nerve palsy (ptosis, diplopia accompanied by orbital swelling: case report of unusual clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis associated with polymyalgia rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prassede Bravi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionGiant cell arteritis (GCA is the most common systemic vasculitis in older individuals, characterized by granulomatosus inflammation of the wall of large and medium-sized arteries. The wide spectrum of arterial sites involved leads to ischemia of different organs resulting in a wide range of clinical signs and symptoms. Temporal artery is commonly involved (temporal arteritis. Unusual patterns of presentation, such as extraocular motility disorders and orbital swelling, may be early and transient manifestations of GCA and precede the permanent visual loss due to ischemic optic neuropathy.Case reportWe describe a patient with uncommon manifestations of GCA consisting of transient recurrent diplopia, ptosis, orbital swelling together with more typical clinical features of the disease such as musculoskeletal manifestations (polymyalgia rheumatica and facial pain: all signs and symptoms promptly resolved under corticosteroid therapy without relapse.Conclusions A high level of suspicion of GCA in individuals over the age of 50 years is needed to prevent the development of severe complications. Clinicians should be aware of uncommon manifestations of the disease such as head–neck swelling and ophthalmoplegia: management guidelines have stated that prompt administration of adequate dose of corticosteroids as soon as ocular manifestations of GCA are noted may almost totally prevent blindness.

  15. Giant cell tumor with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst shows heterogeneous metabolic pattern on "1"8F-FDG PET.CT: A case reort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. 18F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on "1"8F-FDG PET/CT

  16. Local experience with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in children with acute fulminant myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Ning

    Full Text Available To analyze the clinical effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO in children with acute fulminant myocarditis, we retrospectively analyzed the data of five children with acute fulminant myocarditis in the intensive care unit (ICU at the Affiliated Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University from February 2009 to November 2012. The study group included two boys and three girls ranging in age from 9 to 13 years (median 10 years. Body weight ranged from 25 to 33 kg (mean 29.6 kg. They underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO through a venous-arterial ECMO model with an average ECMO supporting time of 89.8 h (40-142 h. Extracorporeal circulation was established in all five children. After treatment with ECMO, the heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were greatly improved in the four children who survived. These four children were successfully weaned from ECMO and discharged from hospital machine-free, for a survival rate of 80% (4/5. One child died still dependent on the machine. Cause of death was irrecoverable cardiac function and multiple organ failure. Complications during ECMO included three cases of suture bleeding, one case of acute hemolytic renal failure and suture bleeding, and one case of hyperglycemia. During the follow-up period of 4-50 months, the four surviving children recovered with normal cardiac function and no abnormal functions of other organs. The application of ECMO in acute fulminant myocarditis, even in local centers that experience low incidence of this disease, remains an effective approach. Larger studies to determine optimal timing of placement on ECMO to guide local centers are warranted.

  17. Cell wall composition profiling of parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its hosts: a priori differences and induced changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hanne R; Striberny, Bernd; Olsen, Stian; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-08-01

    Host plant penetration is the gateway to survival for holoparasitic Cuscuta and requires host cell wall degradation. Compositional differences of cell walls may explain why some hosts are amenable to such degradation while others can resist infection. Antibody-based techniques for comprehensive profiling of cell wall epitopes and cell wall-modifying enzymes were applied to several susceptible hosts and a resistant host of Cuscuta reflexa and to the parasite itself. Infected tissue of Pelargonium zonale contained high concentrations of de-esterified homogalacturonans in the cell walls, particularly adjacent to the parasite's haustoria. High pectinolytic activity in haustorial extracts and high expression levels of pectate lyase genes suggest that the parasite contributes directly to wall remodeling. Mannan and xylan concentrations were low in P. zonale and in five susceptible tomato introgression lines, but high in the resistant Solanum lycopersicum cv M82, and in C. reflexa itself. Knowledge of the composition of resistant host cell walls and the parasite's own cell walls is useful in developing strategies to prevent infection by parasitic plants. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Cell wall glycoproteins at interaction sites between parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its host Pelargonium zonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striberny, Bernd; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The process of host plant penetration by parasitic dodder (genus Cuscuta) is accompanied by molecular and structural changes at the host/parasite interface. Recently, changes in pectin methyl esterification levels in the host cell walls abutting parasitic cells in established infection sites were reported. In addition to that, we show here that the composition of cell wall glycoproteins in Cuscuta-infected Pelargonium zonale undergoes substantial changes. While several arabinogalactan protein epitopes exhibit decreased abundances in the vicinity of the Cuscuta reflexa haustorium, extensins tend to increase in the infected areas.

  19. Advances in the Traditional Chinese Medicine-Based Management of Viral Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Xu, Xia; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-09-01

    Viral myocarditis (VMC) is a common clinical condition; however, no specific treatment has been available from the perspective of modern western medicine, and typically only symptomatic treatment is provided in clinical settings. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has shown certain advantages in treating VMC. Last few years have witnessed certain advances in the TCM-based research on the etiology and pathogenesis of VMC and its clinical management. This article reviews the clinical advances made in the TCM-based management of VMC in the last 5 years.

  20. Ga-67 citrate myocardial uptake in a patient with AIDS, toxoplasmosis, and myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memel, D.S.; DeRogatis, A.J.; William, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    A 38-year-old man with AIDS presented with fever of unknown origin, splenomegaly, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Admission laboratory data revealed a positive toxoplasmosis titer in the blood. The initial chest x-ray showed small bilateral pleural effusions, a normal cardiac silhouette, no infiltrates, and no interstitial edema. Ga-67 imaging revealed markedly abnormal uptake in the myocardium. A diagnosis of toxoplasmosis myocarditis was made based on laboratory and imaging data. The patient was treated for toxoplasmosis. No myocardial uptake of tracer was demonstrated on a follow-up Ga-67 scan, performed after completion of treatment for toxoplasmosis

  1. Lipase polystyrene giant amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velonia, Kelly; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2002-04-24

    A new type of giant amphiphilic molecule has been synthesized by covalently connecting a lipase enzyme headgroup to a maleimide-functionalized polystyrene tail (40 repeat units). The resulting biohybrid forms catalytic micellar rods in water.

  2. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Myocarditis with ST elevation and elevated cardiac enzymes misdiagnosed as an ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Seth H; Crandall, Mark A; Jaffe, Allan S

    2012-12-01

    Acute myocarditis can mimic ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Quickly determining the correct diagnosis is critical given the "time is muscle" implication with a STEMI and the potential adverse effects associated with use of fibrinolytic therapy. A 46-year-old man presented to a rural emergency department with chest pain, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) read as showing 0.1 mV of ST-segment elevation in leads III and aVF. His initial cardiac troponin T was 0.44 ng/mL. He received fibrinolytic therapy for presumed STEMI. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was later performed and showed epicardial delayed enhancement consistent with myocarditis. Upon further questioning, he acknowledged 3 days of stuttering chest discomfort and a recent upper respiratory infection, as well as similar chest pain in his wife. A systematic evaluation is essential for acute chest pain, including a focused history, identification of cardiac risk factors, and ECG interpretation. A history of recent viral illness, absence of cardiac risk factors, or ECG findings inconsistent with a single anatomic lesion would suggest a potential alternate diagnosis to STEMI. This case emphasizes the importance of a focused history in the initial evaluation of chest pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Serum expression of HA and LN in lewis rat models of autoimmune myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Li'na; Li Tieling; Zhang Yajing; Yang Tingshu; Ding Yu; Guo Shuli; Zhao Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of dynamic changes of serum expressions of hyaluronic acid (HA) and laminin (LN) in Lewis rat models of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). Methods: Fifty Lewis rat models of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) were established with injection of recombinant cardiac C protein with complete freund adjuvant into two foot-pads plus intraperitoneal injection of pertussis toxin. At 1w, 2w, 4w, 6w and 8w, 10 models were sacrificed each time;cardiac tissues were examined with HE stain for myocardial inflammatory score and examined with picrosirius red stain for myocardial fibrosis score, also, serum HA and LN expressions were determined with RIA. These examinations were performed in 10 undisturbed animals as controls. Results: The myocardial inflammatory scores of the models at 1w were about the same as those in the controls, but the scores rapidly increased from 2w on to 4w then fell gradually. The myocardial fibrosis scores of the models at 1wk were also not much different from those in controls. The fibrosis scores increased rapidly at 4w and maintained at high level up to 8w. The changes of serum expressions of HA and LN roughly paralleled those of myocardial fibrosis scores i. e. rapidly increased at 4w up to 8w. Conclusion: Serum expressions of HA and LN could faithfully reflect the degree of myocardial fibrosis in rat models of EAM. HA and LN were useful markers of myocardial fibrois and were of prognostic importance. (authors)

  5. Coxsackievirus B3 vaccines: use as an expression vector for prevention of myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Andreas; Jarasch, Nadine; Wutzler, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is considered to be one of the most important infectious agents to cause virus-induced myocarditis. Despite improvements in studying virus pathology, structure and molecular biology, as well as the diagnosis of this disease, there is still no virus-specific drug or vaccine in clinical use. During the last 20 years many investigations have been performed to develop classic and modern immunization techniques against CVB3-induced heart disease. One promising approach among others includes the insertion of coding sequences of cytokines into the viral genome. The application of an IFN-gamma-expressing recombinant coxsackievirus vector is especially efficient against CVB3-induced myocarditis. Beside direct IFN-gamma-mediated antiviral effects, the local and simultaneous expression of IFN-gamma by the virus itself activates the immune system in a strong and long-lasting manner, which protects animals completely against subsequent lethal infections independently of the age of the immunized individual and the route of vaccine administration.

  6. Myocarditis exacerbation in a child undergoing inguinal hernioplasty after viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Dušica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Immunosuppressive effects of general anesthesia and surgery could have unexpected consequences in a child with recent infection. The incidence of myocarditis in childhood is unknown. Case outline During general anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair, a seven-year-old boy suddenly developed heart failure. Clinical presentation included hypotension, pulmonary edema, drop in hemoglobin oxygen saturation, ST segment elevation and premature ventricular contractions. Homodynamic stability and adequate oxygenation were achieved with dopamine and furosemide. Preoperative history, physical examination and complete blood count were unremarkable. Moderate cardiomegaly and pulmonary edema were present on chest radiography. Diminished left ventricular contractility found on echocardiography increased troponin I and CK-MB levels suggested myocardial injury. Increased C-reactive protein with lymphocytosis suggested inflammation as its cause. Parents failed to report rubella 10 days before the operation. A clinical diagnosis of myocarditis as a complication of rubella was based on increased titer of IgM to rubella. With intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and symptomatic treatment for heart failure, his condition improved and ejection fraction reached 68 % one month after operation. Conclusion In future, we need protocols with instructions for pediatric patients undergoing elective surgery and anesthesia after viral infections.

  7. Molecular screening by polymerase chain reaction detects panleukopenia virus DNA in formalin-fixed hearts from cats with idiopathic cardiomyopathy and myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, K M; Fox, P R; Magnon, A L; Liu, S; Towbin, J A

    2000-01-01

    Viral myocarditis has been suggested as an etiology for cardiomyopathy in several mammalian species. Myocarditis and idiopathic cardiomyopathy have been reported in the domestic cat, although a viral etiology has not been demonstrated. Because of the continuing interest in the potential relationship between viral myocarditis and cardiomyopathy, we evaluated hearts from cats with spontaneous, idiopathic cardiomyopathy for viral genomic material within myocytes by polymerase chain reaction, and for the presence of myocarditis by light microscopy. Thirty-one (31) formalin-fixed hearts from domestic cats who died of idiopathic cardiomyopathy were randomly selected from pathology archives. Seventeen (17) formalin-fixed hearts from healthy cats were similarly selected as normal controls. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate myocardial tissue for the presence of viral genome from feline panleukopenia virus, herpes virus, calici virus, and corona virus. Hearts were examined using light microscopy for histologic evidence of myocarditis according to the Dallas criteria. Panleukopenia virus was identified by PCR in 10 of 31 cats with cardiomyopathy but in none of the controls. Neither cardiomyopathic or control cats tested positive by PCR for herpes virus, calici virus, and corona virus. Myocarditis was detected by histologic examination in 18 of 31 cardiomyopathic cats and in none of 17 control cats. Myocarditis and or feline panleukopenia virus genome was detected in felines with idiopathic hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive cardiomyopathy, suggesting a possible role of viral infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in this species.

  8. Giant omental lipoblastoma and CD56 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Miyano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of giant omental lipoblastoma in a 13-month-old boy, which was treated successfully by total excision. Tumor cells were positive for S100, CD34 and CD56. This is the first report of lipoblastoma expressing CD56, a fact that could be used to differentiate lipoblastoma from liposarcoma.

  9. Th2 Regulation of Viral Myocarditis in Mice: Different Roles for TLR3 versus TRIF in Progression to Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Abston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are able to induce autoimmune inflammation in the heart. Here, we investigated the role of virus-activated Toll-like receptor (TLR3 and its adaptor TRIF on the development of autoimmune coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis in mice. Although TLR3- or TRIF-deficient mice developed similarly worse acute CVB3 myocarditis and viral replication compared to control mice, disease was significantly worse in TRIF compared to TLR3-deficient mice. Interestingly, TLR3-deficient mice developed an interleukin (IL-4-dominant T helper (Th2 response during acute CVB3 myocarditis with elevated markers of alternative activation, while TRIF-deficient mice elevated the Th2-associated cytokine IL-33. Treatment of TLR3-deficient mice with recombinant IL-33 improved heart function indicating that elevated IL-33 in the context of a classic Th2-driven response protects against autoimmune heart disease. We show for the first time that TLR3 versus TRIF deficiency results in different Th2 responses that uniquely influence the progression to chronic myocarditis.

  10. Towards an optimal semiquantitative approach in giant cell arteritis: an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, Florent L.; Bouvard, Gerard [CHU Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Boysson, Hubert de; Bienvenu, Boris [CHU Caen, Department of Internal Medicine, Caen (France); Parienti, Jean-Jacques [CHU Caen, Department of Biostatistics, Caen (France); Agostini, Denis [CHU Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); University of Caen Lower-Normandy, EA 4650, Caen (France)

    2014-01-15

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common form of vasculitis in western countries. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been shown to be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of extracranial GCA, but results of studies are inconsistent due to a lack of standardized {sup 18}F-FDG PET criteria. In this study, we compared different semiquantitative approaches using a controlled design to define the most efficient method. All patients with biopsy-proven GCA who had undergone an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan in our PET unit were reviewed and matched with a control group based on age and sex. Different semiquantitative arterial (ascending and descending thoracic aorta and aortic arch) to background (liver, lung and venous blood pool) SUV ratios were blindly compared between GCA patients and matched controls. We included 11 patients with biopsy-proven GCA cases and 11 matched controls. There were no differences between the groups with regard to body weight, injected radioactivity, blood glucose level or CRP. The arterial to venous blood pool ratios discriminated the two groups better than other methods when applied to the aortic arch and the descending thoracic aorta (p < 0.015). In particular, the highest aortic to highest blood pool SUV{sub max} ratio, when applied to the aortic arch, provided optimal diagnostic performance (sensitivity 81.8 %, specificity 91 %, AUC 0.87; p < 0.0001) using a cut-off value of 1.53. Among all tested {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT methods, the aortic to blood pool SUV{sub max} ratio outperformed the liver and lung ratios. We suggest the use of this ratio for the assessment of aortic inflammation in GCA patients. (orig.)

  11. Ewing's sarcoma, fibrogenic tumors, giant cell tumor, hemangioma of bone. Radiology and pathology; Ewing-Sarkom, fibrogene Tumoren, Riesenzelltumor, Haemangiom des Skeletts. Radiologie und Pathologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyschmidt, J. [Beratungsstelle und Referenzzentrum fuer Osteoradiologie, Bremen (Germany); Ostertag, H. [Klinikum Region Hannover GmbH, Pathologisches Institut, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Radiological imaging only reflects the anatomy and its pathological abnormalities. Therefore, the radiologist should be able to recognize the basic features of the pathological anatomy of bone tumors. This can only be learned working closely with a pathologist who is experienced in this field. On the other hand, the pathologist needs from the radiologist their diagnostic assessment with information on size, location, aggressiveness and the existence of a bone tumor's matrix, of the whole lesion, because he usually only receives a small part for examination in the form of a biopsy. In this article, the features and fundamentals (standards) of radiological-pathological cooperation as the mainstay for a precise diagnosis in bone tumors are outlined. The radiological appearance and the histopathological features behind it are presented for Ewing's sarcoma, fibrogenic tumors, giant cell tumor, and hemangioma of the bone. (orig.) [German] Radiologische Bilder spiegeln nichts anderes als die Anatomie und ihre pathologischen Abweichungen wider. Deshalb sollte der Radiologe die Grundzuege der pathologischen Anatomie auch von Knochentumoren kennen. Das kann er nur durch eine enge Zusammenarbeit mit einem auf diesem Gebiet erfahrenen Pathologen erlernen. Andererseits braucht der Pathologe vom Radiologen dessen diagnostische Einschaetzung mit Informationen ueber die Groesse, Lage, Aggressivitaet und das Vorhandensein einer Matrix eines Knochentumors und zwar von der gesamten Laesion, denn er bekommt inform einer Biopsie i. d. R. nur einen mehr oder weniger kleinen Teil zur Untersuchung. In diesem Beitrag werden die Grundzuege und Standards der radiologisch-pathologischen Zusammenarbeit aufgezeigt, auf denen eine praezise Diagnosestellung beruht. Radiologisches Erscheinungsbild und die dahintersteckenden - und erklaerenden - histopathologischen Merkmale werden fuer das Ewing-Sarkom, fuer fibrogene Tumoren, den Riesenzelltumor und das Haemangiom des Knochens

  12. Customized Knee Prosthesis in Treatment of Giant Cell Tumors of the Proximal Tibia: Application of 3-Dimensional Printing Technology in Surgical Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenbin; Huang, Lanfeng; Liu, He; Qu, Wenrui; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Chenyu; Li, Chen; Yu, Tao; Han, Qing; Wang, Jincheng; Qin, Yanguo

    2017-04-07

    BACKGROUND We explored the application of 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology in treating giant cell tumors (GCT) of the proximal tibia. A tibia block was designed and produced through 3D printing technology. We expected that this 3D-printed block would fill the bone defect after en-bloc resection. Importantly, the block, combined with a standard knee joint prosthesis, provided attachments for collateral ligaments of the knee, which can maintain knee stability. MATERIAL AND METHODS A computed tomography (CT) scan was taken of both knee joints in 4 patients with GCT of the proximal tibia. We developed a novel technique - the real-size 3D-printed proximal tibia model - to design preoperative treatment plans. Hence, with the application of 3D printing technology, a customized proximal tibia block could be designed for each patient individually, which fixed the bone defect, combined with standard knee prosthesis. RESULTS In all 4 cases, the 3D-printed block fitted the bone defect precisely. The motion range of the affected knee was 90 degrees on average, and the soft tissue balance and stability of the knee were good. After an average 7-month follow-up, the MSTS score was 19 on average. No sign of prosthesis fracture, loosening, or other relevant complications were detected. CONCLUSIONS This technique can be used to treat GCT of the proximal tibia when it is hard to achieve soft tissue balance after tumor resection. 3D printing technology simplified the design and manufacturing progress of custom-made orthopedic medical instruments. This new surgical technique could be much more widely applied because of 3D printing technology.

  13. Giant-cell arteritis. Concordance study between aortic CT angiography and FDG-PET/CT in detection of large-vessel involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boysson, Hubert de; Dumont, Anael; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigne, Gwenola; Martin Silva, Nicolas; Sultan, Audrey; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille; Liozon, Eric; Ly, Kim Heang; Lambert, Marc; Aide, Nicolas; Manrique, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the concordance of aortic CT angiography (CTA) and FDG-PET/CT in the detection of large-vessel involvement at diagnosis in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We created a multicenter cohort of patients with GCA diagnosed between 2010 and 2015, and who underwent both FDG-PET/CT and aortic CTA before or in the first ten days following treatment introduction. Eight vascular segments were studied on each procedure. We calculated concordance between both imaging techniques in a per-patient and a per-segment analysis, using Cohen's kappa concordance index. We included 28 patients (21/7 women/men, median age 67 [56-82]). Nineteen patients had large-vessel involvement on PET/CT and 18 of these patients also presented positive findings on CTA. In a per-segment analysis, a median of 5 [1-7] and 3 [1-6] vascular territories were involved on positive PET/CT and CTA, respectively (p = 0.03). In qualitative analysis, i.e., positivity of the procedure suggesting a large-vessel involvement, the concordance rate between both procedures was 0.85 [0.64-1]. In quantitative analysis, i.e., per-segment analysis in both procedures, the global concordance rate was 0.64 [0.54-0.75]. Using FDG-PET/CT as a reference, CTA showed excellent sensitivity (95%) and specificity (100%) in a per-patient analysis. In a per-segment analysis, sensitivity and specificity were 61% and 97.9%, respectively. CTA and FDG-PET/CT were both able to detect large-vessel involvement in GCA with comparable results in a per-patient analysis. However, PET/CT showed higher performance in a per-segment analysis, especially in the detection of inflammation of the aorta's branches. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.franke@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Institut für Diagnostische Radiologie, Gartenstr. 28, 79098 Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael, E-mail: mmarkl@northwestern.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Chicago, 737 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Heinzelmann, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.heinzelmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Freiburg, Killianstr. 5, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Vaith, Peter, E-mail: peter.vaith@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Bürk, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.buerk@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Langer, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.langer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Geiger, J., E-mail: julia.geiger@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Children‘s Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstr. 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3 T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3 T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries’ inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries’ inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ = 0.89 for 12-channel and κ = 0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ = 0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ = 0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (p < 0.01) were obtained with the 32-channel coil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  15. Giant-cell arteritis. Concordance study between aortic CT angiography and FDG-PET/CT in detection of large-vessel involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boysson, Hubert de; Dumont, Anael; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigne, Gwenola; Martin Silva, Nicolas; Sultan, Audrey; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille [Caen University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Caen (France); Liozon, Eric; Ly, Kim Heang [Limoges University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Limoges (France); Lambert, Marc [Lille University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Lille (France); Aide, Nicolas [Caen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); INSERM U1086 ' ' ANTICIPE' ' , Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain [Caen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Normandy University, Caen (France)

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of our study was to assess the concordance of aortic CT angiography (CTA) and FDG-PET/CT in the detection of large-vessel involvement at diagnosis in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We created a multicenter cohort of patients with GCA diagnosed between 2010 and 2015, and who underwent both FDG-PET/CT and aortic CTA before or in the first ten days following treatment introduction. Eight vascular segments were studied on each procedure. We calculated concordance between both imaging techniques in a per-patient and a per-segment analysis, using Cohen's kappa concordance index. We included 28 patients (21/7 women/men, median age 67 [56-82]). Nineteen patients had large-vessel involvement on PET/CT and 18 of these patients also presented positive findings on CTA. In a per-segment analysis, a median of 5 [1-7] and 3 [1-6] vascular territories were involved on positive PET/CT and CTA, respectively (p = 0.03). In qualitative analysis, i.e., positivity of the procedure suggesting a large-vessel involvement, the concordance rate between both procedures was 0.85 [0.64-1]. In quantitative analysis, i.e., per-segment analysis in both procedures, the global concordance rate was 0.64 [0.54-0.75]. Using FDG-PET/CT as a reference, CTA showed excellent sensitivity (95%) and specificity (100%) in a per-patient analysis. In a per-segment analysis, sensitivity and specificity were 61% and 97.9%, respectively. CTA and FDG-PET/CT were both able to detect large-vessel involvement in GCA with comparable results in a per-patient analysis. However, PET/CT showed higher performance in a per-segment analysis, especially in the detection of inflammation of the aorta's branches. (orig.)

  16. Comparisons of radiosensitivity and damage repair potential between mutants from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast and laboratory-bred wild yeasts with particular attention being given to giant cell formation after X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast cells were exposed to X-rays at dose levels up to 10 kGy to induce damage to the DNA and investigate its effects on cellular growth patterns. For this purpose, comparisons were carried out between one diploid strain and six haploid strains of the Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, which permitted the individual recovery and damage repair pathways to be described in more detail. The laboratory-bred wild strains ATCC 9080, 211 and 706 were judged to have unimpaired repair mechanisms as compared to the auxotrophs, which fact was evident from the higher radiosensitivity of the latter. A further parameter in this evaluation of growth behaviours was giant cell formation. The results here provided evidence in confirmation of deviations between wild strains and mutants. Even though the ceiling values for the formation of giant cells were similarly high in all strains, impairments of cell division and initial development were observed for the mutants already at considerably lower dose levels. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  18. A large-scale genetic analysis reveals a strong contribution of the HLA class II region to giant cell arteritis susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F David; Mackie, Sarah L; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J; Hoffman, Gary S; Khalidi, Nader A; Koening, Curry L; Langford, Carol A; McAlear, Carol A; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G; Warrington, Kenneth J; Ytterberg, Steven R; Gregersen, Peter K; Pease, Colin T; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Bakker, Paul I W; Barrett, Jennifer H; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A; González-Gay, Miguel A; Morgan, Ann W; Martín, Javier

    2015-04-02

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10(-40), OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1(∗)04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10(-43)) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10(-46)), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10(-45)) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10(-6), OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10(-6), OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10(-5), OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pleomorphic lipoma: A gentle giant of pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Uma Sakhadeo; Rajesh Mundhe; Maria A DeSouza; Roshan F Chinoy

    2015-01-01

    Pleomorphic lipoma is a relatively rare adipocytic neoplasm, occurring predominantly in elderly males in the subcutaneous tissues of the neck or shoulder. To the best of our knowledge, only five cases have been reported in which the lesion was intramuscular. We hereby report a case of a 60-year-old female patient, presenting with an intramuscular, posterior shoulder mass. The aspirate showed a giant cell-rich lesion, admixed with short, plump-looking, spindly cells. There was no overt evidenc...

  20. Meningeal hyperaemia and myocarditis in a caged rabbit with encephalitozoonosis: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davinson Chuka Anyogu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, encephalitozoonosis in rabbits has raised serious concern owing to the subclinical nature of the infection in most rabbits and the danger of zoonosis in immunocompromised persons. The disease has been diagnosed by clinical signs, histopathological examination and detection of the antibody in serum. The lesions have been described mainly in the brain, kidney and liver of infected rabbits. The present report documented additional lesions seen in a male rabbit presented to the Necropsy Unit of the Department of Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka for euthanasia. Following euthanasia, tissue samples from the rabbit were processed and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The microscopic lesions were comprised of meningeal hyperaemia, myocarditis, chronic nonsuppurative granulomatous hepatitis, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi spores in the brain parenchyma. The study showed the importance of reporting new findings in order to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms for the disease and to renew attention to its zoonotic potential.

  1. Severe necrotizing myocarditis caused by serratia marcescens infection in an axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Pozo, J; Girling, S; Pizzi, R; Mancinelli, E; Else, R W

    2011-05-01

    This report provides the first account of the pathological changes associated with infection by Serratia marcescens in an adult male axolotl. The infection resulted in septicaemia with severe multifocal necrotizing myocarditis. The latter lesion evolved to cardiac rupture, haemopericardium and death resulting from cardiac tamponade. This animal was exposed to higher than usual temperatures (24-25 °C) 2 weeks before the onset of disease and this may have resulted in immunocompromise and opportunistic bacterial infection. S. marcescens was isolated from the coelomic and pericardial cavity. Both isolates were identical and were resistant to β-lactam antibiotics, but not to aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones. The production of red prodigiosin pigment by the bacterium suggested an environmental origin. Overall, the clinical and histopathological presentation suggests that S. marcescens should be included in the list of aetiological agents of the 'red-leg'/bacterial dermatosepticaemia syndrome of amphibians. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeted Therapy for Acute Autoimmune Myocarditis with Nano-Sized Liposomal FK506 in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Okuda

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive agents are used for the treatment of immune-mediated myocarditis; however, the need to develop a more effective therapeutic approach remains. Nano-sized liposomes may accumulate in and selectively deliver drugs to an inflammatory lesion with enhanced vascular permeability. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of liposomal FK506, an immunosuppressive drug encapsulated within liposomes, and the drug's effects on cardiac function in a rat experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM model. We prepared polyethylene glycol-modified liposomal FK506 (mean diameter: 109.5 ± 4.4 nm. We induced EAM by immunization with porcine myosin and assessed the tissue distribution of the nano-sized beads and liposomal FK506 in this model. After liposomal or free FK506 was administered on days 14 and 17 after immunization, the cytokine expression in the rat hearts along with the histological findings and hemodynamic parameters were determined on day 21. Ex vivo fluorescent imaging revealed that intravenously administered fluorescent-labeled nano-sized beads had accumulated in myocarditic but not normal hearts on day 14 after immunization and thereafter. Compared to the administration of free FK506, FK506 levels were increased in both the plasma and hearts of EAM rats when liposomal FK506 was administered. The administration of liposomal FK506 markedly suppressed the expression of cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, and reduced inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium on day 21 compared to free FK506. The administration of liposomal FK506 also markedly ameliorated cardiac dysfunction on day 21 compared to free FK506. Nano-sized liposomes may be a promising drug delivery system for targeting myocarditic hearts with cardioprotective agents.

  3. Targeted Therapy for Acute Autoimmune Myocarditis with Nano-Sized Liposomal FK506 in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Keiji; Fu, Hai Ying; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Araki, Ryo; Tsuchida, Shota; Thanikachalam, Punniyakoti V; Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yamato, Masaki; Sanada, Shoji; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asano, Yoshihiro; Asakura, Masanori; Hanawa, Haruo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Oku, Naoto; Takashima, Seiji; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Sakata, Yasushi; Minamino, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for the treatment of immune-mediated myocarditis; however, the need to develop a more effective therapeutic approach remains. Nano-sized liposomes may accumulate in and selectively deliver drugs to an inflammatory lesion with enhanced vascular permeability. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of liposomal FK506, an immunosuppressive drug encapsulated within liposomes, and the drug's effects on cardiac function in a rat experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model. We prepared polyethylene glycol-modified liposomal FK506 (mean diameter: 109.5 ± 4.4 nm). We induced EAM by immunization with porcine myosin and assessed the tissue distribution of the nano-sized beads and liposomal FK506 in this model. After liposomal or free FK506 was administered on days 14 and 17 after immunization, the cytokine expression in the rat hearts along with the histological findings and hemodynamic parameters were determined on day 21. Ex vivo fluorescent imaging revealed that intravenously administered fluorescent-labeled nano-sized beads had accumulated in myocarditic but not normal hearts on day 14 after immunization and thereafter. Compared to the administration of free FK506, FK506 levels were increased in both the plasma and hearts of EAM rats when liposomal FK506 was administered. The administration of liposomal FK506 markedly suppressed the expression of cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, and reduced inflammation and fibrosis in the myocardium on day 21 compared to free FK506. The administration of liposomal FK506 also markedly ameliorated cardiac dysfunction on day 21 compared to free FK506. Nano-sized liposomes may be a promising drug delivery system for targeting myocarditic hearts with cardioprotective agents.

  4. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  5. Waking the Sleeping Giant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollenburger, Mary H.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crane, Todd A.; Sanogo, Ousmane M.; Giller, Ken E.

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank argued that West Africa's Guinea Savannah zone forms part of “Africa's Sleeping Giant,” where increases in agricultural production could be an engine of economic growth, through expansion of cultivated land in sparsely populated areas. The district of Bougouni, in southern Mali,

  6. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  7. from the Giant Panda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... 1College of Life Science, China West Normal University, 44# Yuying Road, 637002, Nanchong, China. 2Zhan Jiang educational ... in Escherichia coli and the RPS28 protein fusioned with the N-terminally GST -tagged protein gave rise ... long Conservation Center of the Giant Panda, Sichuan, China. The.

  8. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  9. Giant vesical calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesical calculus. A case report. H. H. LAUBSCHER. Summary. An exceptional case of bladder stone is presented. The case is unusual as regards the size of the stone and the fact that the patient did··not seek medical assistance much earlier, as this was readily avail- able. Furthermore, recovery after removal of the.

  10. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  11. Giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, V.; Florencio, I.; Boluda, F.

    1996-01-01

    We present a case of giant abdominal cystic lymphangioma in a 10-year-old boy. Despite numerous consultations with physicians to identify the underlying problem, it had originally been attributed to ascites of unknown cause. We review the characteristics of this lesion and the diagnostic features that aid in differentiating it from ascites

  12. Giant peritoneal loose bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-27

    Mar 27, 2015 ... not be familiar with the entity, can potentially be confused with malignant or parasitic lesions. Familiarity with their characteristic computed tomographic ... preventing unnecessary surgical intervention in an asymptomatic patient.3,4 It is important to differentiate giant peritoneal loose bodies from lesions such ...

  13. Uncemented three-dimensional-printed prosthetic replacement for giant cell tumor of distal radius: a new design of prosthesis and surgical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu MX

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Minxun Lu,* Li Min,* Cong Xiao, Yongjiang Li, Yi Luo, Yong Zhou, Wenli Zhang, Chongqi Tu Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Currently, it is challenging to treat giant cell tumor (GCT of distal radius. For Campanacci grade III or recurrent GCTs, en bloc resection has been accepted as a better treatment option. Although numerous methods are available for reconstruction, all of them have some limitations in joint function and complications. In this study, our aims were to treat the GCT of distal radius with uncemented three-dimensional (3D-printed prosthesis and to present and evaluate the surgical techniques and short-term outcomes. Methods: Between September 2015 and March 2017, 11 patients with distal radius GCTs were treated with personalized uncemented 3D-printed prosthesis. The preoperative/postoperative pain, range of motion, and grip strengths of all patients were evaluated. Oncological results, complications, and degenerative changes in the wrist joint were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed according to the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH questionnaire and Mayo wrist scoring systems. Results: The average follow-up was 14.45 months (range, 8–18 months. There was a significant decrease in the mean postoperative visual analog scale score (2.33 compared with the preoperative score (5.22; p<0.001. The mean DASH score and Mayo wrist score of the wrist joint function were 18.7 and 72, respectively. There was no local recurrence or lung metastasis. No complication associated with prosthesis was observed, including aseptic loosening, subluxation, and breakage. Joint space narrowing, or disuse osteoporosis, was also not found in all cases. Conclusion: En bloc resection and reconstruction with a personalized uncemented 3D-printed prosthesis can be alternative options to

  14. [Giant paraovarian cyst in childhood - Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Janina P; Íñiguez, Rodrigo D

    2015-01-01

    Paraovarian cysts are very uncommon in children To present a case of giant paraovarian cyst case in a child and its management using a modified laparoscopic-assisted technique A 13-year-old patient with a 15 day-history of intermittent abdominal pain, located in the left hemiabdomen and associated with progressive increase in abdominal volume. Diagnostic imaging was inconclusive, describing a giant cystic formation that filled up the abdomen, but without specifying its origin. Laboratory tests and tumor markers were within normal range. Video-assisted transumbilical cystectomy, a modified laparoscopic procedure with diagnostic and therapeutic intent, was performed with a successful outcome. The histological study reported giant paraovarian cyst. Cytology results were negative for tumor cells. The patient remained asymptomatic during the postoperative follow-up. The video-assisted transumbilical cystectomy is a safe procedure and an excellent diagnostic and therapeutic alternative for the treatment of giant paraovarian cysts. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Juvenile Churg-Strauss Syndrome as an Etiology of Myocarditis and Ischemic Stroke in Adolescents; a Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Rezaei, Amir; Ziaee, Vahid

    2011-01-01

    Background Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), a systemic vasculitis accompanied by asthma and eosinophilia, almost invariably affects the lung and is frequently associated with cutaneous involvement. It rarely has cardiac involvement. We report an unusual case of CSS with myocardial involvement and stroke. Case Presentation A 16-year old female suffered of allergic asthma for 4 years. She was under treatment with oral prednisolone and seretide inhalation. After CSS diagnosis, she developed paroxysmal atrial tachycardia. Serum levels of Troponin I and Troponin T were increased indicating massive myocardial damage probably due to myocarditis. After 5 months she developed acute hemiparesis without any evidence of ischemic or hemorrhagic event. She was treated with IVIg, intravenous pulses of methylprednisone and cyclophosphamide for each complication. Conclusion Myocarditis and stroke may also complicate CSS which should be taken in consideration for better management. PMID:23056844

  16. The Role of Symbiotic Zooxanthellae on Giant Clam Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Ambariyanto

    1997-01-01

    Zooxanthellae, Symbiodinium sp, are single cell dinoflagellate algae known to live in association with many marine invertebrates such as hermatypic corals, sea anemones, jellyfish and giant clams (family Tridacnidae). In giant clams, these photosynthetic algae are located in a tubular system (known as Z tube system) which occurs within the clams. Apart from filter feeding, the nutrition of the clams is provided by zooxanthellae. These algae are capable of translocating part of their photosynt...

  17. Rapid reversal of heart failure in a patient with pheochromocytoma and catecholamine-induced myocarditis/cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Sankaran, R.; Al-Addad, A.

    2002-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is rare and usually presents as paroxysal or sustained hypertension, nonetheless, it can also cause severe acute pulmonary edema in normotensive individuals. We present a case with pheochromocytoma and severe left ventricular failure caused by catecholamine induced myocarditis/cardiomyopathy. Severe left ventricular failure resolved rapidly and left ventricular systolic function became normal within two weeks of medical treatment. Later, patient underwent elective and uneventful surgical removal of pheochromocytoma. (author)

  18. Giant cystic craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, S.C.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Nowell, M.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    Three cases of giant cystic craniopharyngiomas with large areas of extension beyond the suprasellar area are presented. The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance in one case is described. These giant tumors had large, multilobulated cysts that comprised the bulk of the tumors. In one case, there was an unusual extension of the large tumor cyst into the lateral ventricle. In two cases, the tumors extended to the level of the foramen magnum. On CT, the cyst contents of these two tumors were hyperdense and became hypodense postoperatively. All three tumors harbored calcifications in the form of clumps in the suprasellar region and rim calcifications around the cysts. None of the tumors exhibited contrast enhancement. A literature review of the radiographic features of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Giant duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Benjamin Newton; Mark R Versland; Thomas E Sepe

    2008-01-01

    Giant duodenal ulcers (GDUs) are a subset of duodenal ulcers that have historically resulted in greater morbidity than usual duodenal ulcers. Until recently,few cases had been successfully treated with medical therapy. However, the widespread use of endoscopy,the introduction of H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, and the improvement in surgical techniques all have revolutionized the diagnosis,treatment and outcome of this condition. Nevertheless,GDUs are still associated with high rates of morbidity,mortality and complications. Thus, surgical evaluation of a patient with a GDU should remain an integral part of patient care. These giant variants, while usually benign, can frequently harbor malignancy. A careful review of the literature highlights the important differences when comparing GDUs to classical peptic ulcers and why they must be thought of differently than their more common counterpart.

  20. Multispin giant magnons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobev, N. P.; Rashkov, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate giant magnons from classical rotating strings in two different backgrounds. First we generalize the solution of Hofman and Maldacena and investigate new magnon excitations of a spin chain which are dual to a string on RxS 5 with two nonvanishing angular momenta. Allowing string dynamics along the third angle in the five sphere, we find a dispersion relation that reproduces the Hofman and Maldacena one and the one found by Dorey for the two spin case. In the second part of the paper we generalize the two 'spin' giant magnon to the case of β-deformed AdS 5 xS 5 background. We find agreement between the dispersion relation of the rotating string and the proposed dispersion relation of the magnon bound state on the spin chain