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Sample records for ghz continuum emission

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AT 340 GHz FROM THE LOW-MASS T TAURI STAR FN TAURI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Munetake; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Motohide; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2010-01-01

    FN Tau is a rare example of a very low-mass T Tauri star that exhibits a spatially resolved nebulosity in near-infrared scattering light. To directly derive the parameters of a circumstellar disk around FN Tau, observations of dust continuum emission at 340 GHz are carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A point-like dust continuum emission was detected with a synthesized beam of ∼0.''7 in FWHM. From the analysis of the visibility plot, the radius of the emission is estimated to be ≤0.''29, corresponding to 41 AU. This is much smaller than the radius of the nebulosity, 1.''85 for its brighter part at 1.6 μm. The 340 GHz continuum emission observed with the SMA and the photometric data at λ ≤ 70 μm are explained by a power-law disk model whose outer radius and mass are 41 AU and (0.24-5.9) x 10 -3 M sun , respectively, if the exponent of dust mass opacity (β) is assumed to be 0-2. The disk model cannot fully reproduce the flux density at 230 GHz obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, suggesting that there is another extended 'halo' component that is missed in the SMA observations. By requiring the halo not to be detected with the SMA, the lower limit to the size of the halo is evaluated to be between 174 AU and 574 AU, depending on the assumed β value. This size is comparable to the near-infrared nebulosity, implying that the halo unseen with the SMA corresponds to the origin of the near-infrared nebulosity. The halo can contain mass comparable to or at most 8 times greater than that of the inner power-law disk, but its surface density should be lower than that at the outer edge of the power-law disk by more than 1 order of magnitude. The physical nature of the halo is unclear, but it may be the periphery of a flared circumstellar disk that is not described well in terms of a power-law disk model, or a remnant of a protostellar envelope having flattened structure.

  2. ALMA BAND 8 CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM ORION SOURCE I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Naoko [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsushita, Yuko [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Motogi, Kazuhito; Honma, Mareki [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hoshigaoka2-12, Mizusawa-ku, Oshu-shi, Iwate 023-0861 (Japan); Kim, Mi Kyoung [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Hwaam-dong 61-1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Burns, Ross A., E-mail: tomoya.hirota@nao.ac.jp [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2016-12-20

    We have measured continuum flux densities of a high-mass protostar candidate, a radio source I in the Orion KL region (Orion Source I) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at band 8 with an angular resolution of 0.″1. The continuum emission at 430, 460, and 490 GHz associated with Source I shows an elongated structure along the northwest–southeast direction perpendicular to the so-called low-velocity bipolar outflow. The deconvolved size of the continuum source, 90 au × 20 au, is consistent with those reported previously at other millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths. The flux density can be well fitted to the optically thick blackbody spectral energy distribution, and the brightness temperature is evaluated to be 700–800 K. It is much lower than that in the case of proton–electron or H{sup −} free–free radiations. Our data are consistent with the latest ALMA results by Plambeck and Wright, in which the continuum emission was proposed to arise from the edge-on circumstellar disk via thermal dust emission, unless the continuum source consists of an unresolved structure with a smaller beam filling factor.

  3. The 2.3 GHz continuum survey of the GEM project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, C.; Villela, T.; Torres, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Smoot, G. F.; Ferreira, I. S.; Cingoz, A.; Lamb, J.; Barbosa, D.; Perez-Becker, D.; Ricciardi, S.; Currivan, J. A.; Platania, P.; Maino, D.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Determining the spectral and spatial characteristics of the radio continuum of our Galaxy is an experimentally challenging endeavour for improving our understanding of the astrophysics of the interstellar medium. This knowledge has also become of paramount significance for cosmology, since Galactic emission is the main source of astrophysical contamination in measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on large angular scales. Aims: We present a partial-sky survey of the radio continuum at 2.3GHz within the scope of the Galactic Emission Mapping (GEM) project, an observational program conceived and developed to reveal the large-scale properties of Galactic synchrotron radiation through a set of self-consistent surveys of the radio continuum between 408MHz and 10GHz. Methods: The GEM experiment uses a portable and double-shielded 5.5-m radiotelescope in altazimuthal configuration to map 60-degree-wide declination bands from different observational sites by circularly scanning the sky at zenithal angles of 30° from a constantly rotating platform. The observations were accomplished with a total power receiver, whose front-end high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier was matched directly to a cylindrical horn at the prime focus of the parabolic reflector. The Moon was used to calibrate the antenna temperature scale and the preparation of the map required direct subtraction and destriping algorithms to remove ground contamination as the most significant source of systematic error. Results: We used 484 h of total intensity observations from two locations in Colombia and Brazil to yield 66% sky coverage from to . The observations in Colombia were obtained with a horizontal HPBW of and a vertical HPBW of . The pointing accuracy was and the RMS sensitivity was 11.42 mK. The observations in Brazil were obtained with a horizontal HPBW of and a vertical HPBW of . The pointing accuracy was and the RMS sensitivity was 8.24 mK. The zero

  4. THE UBIQUITOUS RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Michael J. I.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Floyd, David J. E.; Mould, Jeremy R.

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the radio continuum emission of 396 early-type galaxies brighter than K = 9, using 1.4 GHz imagery from the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey, Green Bank 300 ft Telescope, and 64 m Parkes Radio Telescope. For M K K < -25.5 early-type galaxies are greater than zero in all cases. It is thus highly likely that the most massive galaxies always host an active galactic nucleus or have recently undergone star formation.

  5. Radio-continuum emission from quasar host galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condon, J. J.; Gower, A. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Victoria Univ., Canada; Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria)

    1987-01-01

    Seven low-redshift quasars that are likely to be in spiral galaxies have been observed in a search for radio-continuum emission from the host galaxies of quasars. The properties of the individual quasars are listed, and 1.49 GHz contour maps of the seven quasar fields are presented. Map parameters and radio source parameters are given along with optical images of three of the objects. The results indicate that these quasars probably do reside in spiral galaxies. The radio luminosities, sizes, orientations, and u values all indicate that relativistic beaming alone cannot be used to explain the differences between the present sources and the far stronger radio sources seen in blazars or larger optically selected quasar samples. However, an apparent correlation between the radio luminosity and the ratio of the optical nuclear to host-galaxy luminosity is consistent with some beaming of nuclear radiation. 26 references

  6. The EUMETSAT OSI SAF near 50 GHz sea ice emissivity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasums T. Tonboe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A sea ice thermal microwave emission model for 50 GHz was developed under EUMETSAT's Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF programme. The model is based on correlations between the surface brightness temperature at 18, 36 and 50 GHz. The model coefficients are estimated using simulated data from a combined thermodynamic and emission model. The intention with the model is to provide a first guess sea ice surface emissivity estimate for atmospheric temperature sounding applications in the troposphere in numerical weather prediction (NWP models assimilating Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU and Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS data. The spectral gradient ratio is defined as the difference over the sum of the SSMIS brightness temperatures at 18 and 36 GHz vertical linear polarisation (GR1836. The GR1836 is related to the emissivity at the atmospheric temperature sounding channels at around 50 GHz. Furthermore, the brightness temperatures and the polarisation ratio (PR at the neighbouring 18, 36 and 50 GHz channels are highly correlated. Both the gradient ratio at 18 and 36 GHz and the PR at 36 GHz measured by SSMIS are input into the model predicting the 50 GHz emissivity for horizontal and vertical linear polarisations and incidence angles between 0° and 60° The simulated emissivity is compared to the emissivity derived with alternative methods. The fit to real AMSU observations is investigated using the different emissivity estimates for simulating the observations with atmospheric data from a regional weather prediction model.

  7. Continuum emission from classical nova winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    The emergent continuum of a slow classical nova during outburst is considered in the quasi-steady optically thick, transonic wind model. Models are presented for various steady mass loss rates and are related to the evolution of slow novae during decline and early post-maximum. The continuum emission is found to depart radically from a blackbody spectrum and to exhibit features common to highly extended stellar atmospheres. (author)

  8. Continuum emission of excited sodium dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Poyato, J.M.L.; Alonso, J.I.; Rico, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the behaviour of excited molecular sodium using high-power Ar + laser radiation. A continuum emission was observed in the red wavelength region. This emission was thought to be caused by the formation of excited triatomic molecules. Energy transfer was observed from excited molecules to atoms. (orig.)

  9. Continuum emission in the 1980 July 1 solar flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirin, H.; Neidig, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of continuum measurements of the 1980 July 1 flare at Big Bear Solar Observatory and Sacramento Peak Observatory show strong blue emission kernels with the ratio of Balmer continuum (Bac):lambda3862 continuum:continuum above 4275 A to be about 10:5:1. The blue continuum at 3862 A is too strong to be explained by unresolved lines. The Bac intensity was 2.5 times the photosphere and the strongest lambda3862 continuum was 2 times the photosphere. The brightest continuum kernel occurred late in the flare, after the hard X-ray peak and related in time to an isolated peak in the 2.2 MeV line, suggesting that the continuum was excited by protons above 20 MeV

  10. A radio continuum and infrared study of Galactic HII regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Hernandez, NL; van der Hulst, JM; Tielens, AGGM

    We present observations of the 4.8 and 8.6 GHz continuum emission towards 11 southern H II regions made with the Australian Telescope Compact Array. The observed objects were selected from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) spectral catalogue of compact H II regions (Peeters et al. 2002b). The

  11. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  12. First mm-VLBI Observations between the TRAO 14-m and the NRO 45-m Telescopes: Observations of 86 GHz SiO Masers in VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Katsunori M.; Chung, Hyung-Soo; Kameno, Seiji; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Kim, Kwang-Dong; Asada, Keiichi; Han, Seog-Tae; Mochizuki, Nanako; Cho, Se-Hyung; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Bushimata, Takeshi; Minh, Young Chol; Miyaji, Takeshi; Kuno, Nario; Mikoshiba, Hiroshi; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Makoto; Kobayashi, Hideyuki

    2004-06-01

    We have made VLBI observations at 86GHz using a 1000-km baseline between Korea and Japan with successful detections of SiO v = 1, J = 2 - 1 maser emissions from VY CMa and Orion KL in 2001 June. This was the first VLBI result for this baseline and the first astronomical VLBI observation for the Korean telescope. Since then, we observed SiO v = 1, J = 2 - 1 maser emission in VY CMa in 2002 January and 2003 February and derived the distributions of the maser emissions. Our results show that the maser emissions extend over 2-4 stellar radii, and were within the inner radius of the dust shell. We observed other SiO maser sources and continuum sources, and 86-GHz continuum emissions were detected from three continuum sources. It was verified that this baseline has a performance comparable to the most sensitive baseline in the VLBA and the CMVA, and is capable of investigating the proper motions of maser features in circumstellar envelopes using monitoring observations.

  13. Argon plasma jet continuum emission investigation by using different spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dgheim, J

    2007-01-01

    Radiation and temperature fields of the continuum field are determined by using different spectroscopic methods based on the spectral emission of an argon plasma jet. An interferential filter of bandwidth 2.714 nm centred at a wavelength of 633 nm is used to observe only the continuum emission and to eliminate the self-absorption phenomenon. An optical multichannel analyser (OMA) of an MOS detector is used to measure argon plasma jet volumetric emissivity under atmospheric pressure and high temperatures. An emission spectroscopic method is used to measure the Stark broadening of the hydrogen line H β and to determine the electron density. The local thermodynamic equilibrium is established and its limit is stated. The local electron temperature is determined by two methods (the continuum emission relation and the LTE relations), and the total Biberman factor is measured. The results given by the OMA are compared with those given by the imagery method. At a given wavelength, the Biberman factor, which depends on the electron temperature and the electron density, may serve as an indicator to show where the LTE prevails along the argon plasma jet core length

  14. On the integrated continuum radio spectrum of supernova remnant W44 (G34.7-0.4: New insights from Planck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onić D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the integrated continuum radio spectrum of supernova remnant (SNR W44 was analyzed up to 70 GHz, testing the different emission models that can be responsible for its particular shape. The observations by the Planck space telescope made it possible to analyze the high frequency part of radio emission from SNRs. Although the quality of radio continuum spectrum (a high scatter of data points at same frequencies prevents us to make definite conclusions, the possibility of spinning dust emission detection towards this remnant is emphasized. In addition, a concave-down feature, due to synchrotron losses, can not be definitely dismissed by the present knowledge of the integrated radio continuum spectrum of this SNR. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176005: Emission Nebulae: Structure and Evolution

  15. Nebular Continuum and Line Emission in Stellar Population Synthesis Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byler, Nell; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Conroy, Charlie; Johnson, Benjamin D., E-mail: ebyler@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Accounting for nebular emission when modeling galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is important, as both line and continuum emissions can contribute significantly to the total observed flux. In this work, we present a new nebular emission model integrated within the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis code that computes the line and continuum emission for complex stellar populations using the photoionization code Cloudy. The self-consistent coupling of the nebular emission to the matched ionizing spectrum produces emission line intensities that correctly scale with the stellar population as a function of age and metallicity. This more complete model of galaxy SEDs will improve estimates of global gas properties derived with diagnostic diagrams, star formation rates based on H α , and physical properties derived from broadband photometry. Our models agree well with results from other photoionization models and are able to reproduce observed emission from H ii regions and star-forming galaxies. Our models show improved agreement with the observed H ii regions in the Ne iii/O ii plane and show satisfactory agreement with He ii emission from z = 2 galaxies, when including rotating stellar models. Models including post-asymptotic giant branch stars are able to reproduce line ratios consistent with low-ionization emission regions. The models are integrated into current versions of FSPS and include self-consistent nebular emission predictions for MIST and Padova+Geneva evolutionary tracks.

  16. Radio continuum emission from young stellar objects in L1641

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.A.; Snell, R.L.; Strom, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a 6 and 20 cm radio continuum survey of young stellar objects in the L1641 region located south of the Orion Nebula are presented. Four are identified as low-luminosity young stellar objects in L1641 and three more as Herbig-Haro or Herbig-Haro-like objects. These objects have bolometric luminosities between 80 and 300 solar, and their 6-20 cm spectral index suggests optically thick, free-free emission. They are characterized by a rising spectrum between 2.2 and 25 microns, have no optical counterparts, and are associated with stellar wind activity. Thus, detectable radio continuum emission may be produced only by the youngest and most luminous objects in L1641. 34 refs

  17. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimojo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Loukitcheva, M., E-mail: tbastian@nrao.edu [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T{sub B} and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T {sub rad} is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T{sub B} (1.25 mm) and mean T {sub rad} (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T {sub rad} and the ALMA T {sub B} region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  18. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D.; Shimojo, M.; Leenaarts, J.; Loukitcheva, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T_B and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T _r_a_d is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T_B (1.25 mm) and mean T _r_a_d (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T _r_a_d and the ALMA T _B region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  19. On the Origin of the Flare Emission in IRIS ’ SJI 2832 Filter:Balmer Continuum or Spectral Lines?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, Lucia; Krucker, Säm [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Heinzel, Petr [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Fričova 298, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-03-10

    Continuum (“white-light,” WL) emission dominates the energetics of flares. Filter-based observations, such as the IRIS SJI 2832 filter, show WL-like brightenings during flares, but it is unclear whether the emission arises from real continuum emission or enhanced spectral lines, possibly turning into emission. The difficulty in filter-based observations, contrary to spectral observations, is to determine which processes contribute to the observed brightening during flares. Here we determine the contribution of the Balmer continuum and the spectral line emission to IRIS ’ SJI 2832 emission by analyzing the appropriate passband in simultaneous IRIS NUV spectra. We find that spectral line emission can contribute up to 100% to the observed slitjaw images (SJI) emission, that the relative contributions usually temporally vary, and that the highest SJI enhancements that are observed are most likely because of the Balmer continuum. We conclude that care should be taken when calling SJI 2832 a continuum filter during flares, because the influence of the lines on the emission can be significant.

  20. On the Origin of the Flare Emission in IRIS ’ SJI 2832 Filter:Balmer Continuum or Spectral Lines?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleint, Lucia; Krucker, Säm; Heinzel, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Continuum (“white-light,” WL) emission dominates the energetics of flares. Filter-based observations, such as the IRIS SJI 2832 filter, show WL-like brightenings during flares, but it is unclear whether the emission arises from real continuum emission or enhanced spectral lines, possibly turning into emission. The difficulty in filter-based observations, contrary to spectral observations, is to determine which processes contribute to the observed brightening during flares. Here we determine the contribution of the Balmer continuum and the spectral line emission to IRIS ’ SJI 2832 emission by analyzing the appropriate passband in simultaneous IRIS NUV spectra. We find that spectral line emission can contribute up to 100% to the observed slitjaw images (SJI) emission, that the relative contributions usually temporally vary, and that the highest SJI enhancements that are observed are most likely because of the Balmer continuum. We conclude that care should be taken when calling SJI 2832 a continuum filter during flares, because the influence of the lines on the emission can be significant.

  1. Polarisation observations of VY Canis Majoris H2O 532-441 620.701 GHz maser emission with HIFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwit, M.; Houde, M.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Cernicharo, J.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Henkel, C.; Higgins, R. D.; Jellema, W.; Kraus, A.; McCoey, C.; Melnick, G. J.; Menten, K. M.; Risacher, C.; Teyssier, D.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; Alcolea, J.; Bujarrabal, V.; Dominik, C.; Justtanont, K.; de Koter, A.; Marston, A. P.; Olofsson, H.; Planesas, P.; Schmidt, M.; Schöier, F. L.; Szczerba, R.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Water vapour maser emission from evolved oxygen-rich stars remains poorly understood. Additional observations, including polarisation studies and simultaneous observation of different maser transitions may ultimately lead to greater insight. Aims: We have aimed to elucidate the nature and structure of the VY CMa water vapour masers in part by observationally testing a theoretical prediction of the relative strengths of the 620.701 GHz and the 22.235 GHz maser components of ortho H2O. Methods: In its high-resolution mode (HRS) the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) offers a frequency resolution of 0.125 MHz, corresponding to a line-of-sight velocity of 0.06 km s-1, which we employed to obtain the strength and linear polarisation of maser spikes in the spectrum of VY CMa at 620.701 GHz. Simultaneous ground based observations of the 22.235 GHz maser with the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie 100-m telescope at Effelsberg, provided a ratio of 620.701 GHz to 22.235 GHz emission. Results: We report the first astronomical detection to date of H2O maser emission at 620.701 GHz. In VY CMa both the 620.701 and the 22.235 GHz polarisation are weak. At 620.701 GHz the maser peaks are superposed on what appears to be a broad emission component, jointly ejected from the star. We observed the 620.701 GHz emission at two epochs 21 days apart, both to measure the potential direction of linearly polarised maser components and to obtain a measure of the longevity of these components. Although we do not detect significant polarisation levels in the core of the line, they rise up to approximately 6% in its wings. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendix (page 5) is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. THE IMPORTANCE OF NEBULAR CONTINUUM AND LINE EMISSION IN OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG MASSIVE STAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Nidever, David L.; Whelan, David G.; Johnson, Kelsey E.

    2010-01-01

    In this spectroscopic study of infant massive star clusters, we find that continuum emission from ionized gas rivals the stellar luminosity at optical wavelengths. In addition, we find that nebular line emission is significant in many commonly used broadband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) filters including the F814W I-band, the F555W V-band, and the F435W B-band. Two young massive clusters (YMCs) in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449 were targeted for follow-up spectroscopic observations after Reines et al. discovered an F814W I-band excess in their photometric study of radio-detected clusters in the galaxy. The spectra were obtained with the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) on the 3.5 m Apache Point Observatory (APO) telescope and have a spectral range of ∼3800-9800 A. We supplement these data with HST and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry of the clusters. By comparing our data to the Starburst99 and GALEV evolutionary synthesis models, we find that nebular continuum emission competes with the stellar light in our observations and that the relative contribution from the nebular continuum is largest in the U- and I-bands, where the Balmer (3646 A) and Paschen jumps (8207 A) are located. The spectra also exhibit strong line emission including the [S III] λλ9069, 9532 lines in the HST F814W I-band. We find that the combination of nebular continuum and line emission can account for the F814W I-band excess previously found by Reines et al. In an effort to provide a benchmark for estimating the impact of ionized gas emission on photometric observations of young massive stellar populations, we compute the relative contributions of the stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines to the total observed flux of a 3 Myr old cluster through various HST filter/instrument combinations, including filters in the Wide Field Camera 3. We urge caution when comparing observations of YMCs to evolutionary synthesis models since nebular continuum and line emission can

  3. Measurements of the low-energy gamma-ray continuum emission from the Galactic Center direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, M.V.A.; Martin, I.M.; Jardim, J.O.D.

    1982-07-01

    The measurement of the gamma-ray continuum emission from the Galactic Center (GC) can provide us information about the physical processes taking place there at the site of emission. Using the data obtained with a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope to measure gamma-rays in the energy interval between 0,3 and 3 MeV, which was launched on March 28, 1980 from Cachoeira Paulista (SP), we calculeted two points for the continuum spectrum in the range between 0,34 and 0,67 MeV. The points are related to the GC emission radiated in the longitude interval - 31 0 0 . The measurements are compatible with the observations in 1969 and 1972 by Haymes et alii and Johnson, respectively. The power law spectrum suggests that the main component for the gamma-ray continuum emission below 10 MeV is dominated by the bremsstrahlung due to relativistic electrons. (Author) [pt

  4. MULTI-WAVELENGTH RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION STUDIES OF DUST-FREE RED GIANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Drake, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (α Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for α Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of α Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For α Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of α Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for α Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements

  5. Multi-wavelength Radio Continuum Emission Studies of Dust-free Red Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Dranke, Stephen; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (alpha Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (alpha Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for alpha Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of alpha Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For alpha Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of alpha Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for alpha Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  6. MULTI-WAVELENGTH RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION STUDIES OF DUST-FREE RED GIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Gorman, Eamon; Harper, Graham M. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Drake, Stephen [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Richards, Anita M. S. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Multi-wavelength centimeter continuum observations of non-dusty, non-pulsating K spectral-type red giants directly sample their chromospheres and wind acceleration zones. Such stars are feeble emitters at these wavelengths, however, and previous observations have provided only a small number of modest signal-to-noise measurements slowly accumulated over three decades. We present multi-wavelength Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array thermal continuum observations of the wind acceleration zones of two dust-free red giants, Arcturus (α Boo: K2 III) and Aldebaran (α Tau: K5 III). Importantly, most of our observations of each star were carried out over just a few days, so that we obtained a snapshot of the different stellar atmospheric layers sampled at different wavelengths, independent of any long-term variability. We report the first detections at several wavelengths for each star including a detection at 10 cm (3.0 GHz: S band) for both stars and a 20 cm (1.5 GHz: L band) detection for α Boo. This is the first time single (non-binary) luminosity class III red giants have been detected at these continuum wavelengths. Our long-wavelength data sample the outer layers of α Boo's atmosphere where its wind velocity is approaching (or possibly has reached) its terminal value and the ionization balance is becoming frozen-in. For α Tau, however, our long-wavelength data are still sampling its inner atmosphere, where the wind is still accelerating probably due to its lower mass-loss rate. We compare our data with published semi-empirical models based on ultraviolet data, and the marked deviations highlight the need for new atmospheric models to be developed. Spectral indices are used to discuss the possible properties of the stellar atmospheres, and we find evidence for a rapidly cooling wind in the case of α Boo. Finally, we develop a simple analytical wind model for α Boo based on our new long-wavelength flux measurements.

  7. Rotational emission-line spectrum of Orion A between 247 and 263 GHZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, G.A.; Sutton, E.C.; Masson, C.R.; Phillips, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from a molecular line survey of the core of the Orion molecular cloud between 247 and 263 GHz. The spectrum contains a total of 243 resolvable lines from 23 different chemical species. When combined with the earlier survey of Orion from 215 to 247 GHz by Sutton et al (1985), the complete data set includes over 780 emission features from 29 distinct molecules. Of the 23 molecules detected in this survey, only NO, CCH, and HCO + were identified not in the lower frequency data

  8. Integrated radio continuum spectra of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Rd, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Eilek, Jean, E-mail: josh.marvil@csiro.au [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of –0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, –0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and –0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = –0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later

  9. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of Emission Line-selected z ∼ 2.5 Galaxies Is Less Than 15%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Hayes, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Centre, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Scarlata, Claudia; Mehta, Vihang [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Henry, Alaina; Hathi, Nimish; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cohen, Seth; Windhorst, Rogier [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Haardt, Francesco [DiSAT, Università dellInsubria, via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Siana, Brian [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Recent work suggests that strong emission line, star-forming galaxies (SFGs) may be significant Lyman continuum leakers. We combine archival Hubble Space Telescope broadband ultraviolet and optical imaging (F275W and F606W, respectively) with emission line catalogs derived from WFC3 IR G141 grism spectroscopy to search for escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) emission from homogeneously selected z ∼ 2.5 SFGs. We detect no escaping Lyman continuum from SFGs selected on [O ii] nebular emission ( N = 208) and, within a narrow redshift range, on [O iii]/[O ii]. We measure 1 σ upper limits to the LyC escape fraction relative to the non-ionizing UV continuum from [O ii] emitters, f {sub esc} ≲ 5.6%, and strong [O iii]/[O ii] > 5 ELGs, f {sub esc} ≲ 14.0%. Our observations are not deep enough to detect f {sub esc} ∼ 10% typical of low-redshift Lyman continuum emitters. However, we find that this population represents a small fraction of the star-forming galaxy population at z ∼ 2. Thus, unless the number of extreme emission line galaxies grows substantially to z ≳ 6, such galaxies may be insufficient for reionization. Deeper survey data in the rest-frame ionizing UV will be necessary to determine whether strong line ratios could be useful for pre-selecting LyC leakers at high redshift.

  10. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of Emission Line-selected z ∼ 2.5 Galaxies Is Less Than 15%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Hayes, Matthew; Scarlata, Claudia; Mehta, Vihang; Henry, Alaina; Hathi, Nimish; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Cohen, Seth; Windhorst, Rogier; Teplitz, Harry I.; Haardt, Francesco; Siana, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Recent work suggests that strong emission line, star-forming galaxies (SFGs) may be significant Lyman continuum leakers. We combine archival Hubble Space Telescope broadband ultraviolet and optical imaging (F275W and F606W, respectively) with emission line catalogs derived from WFC3 IR G141 grism spectroscopy to search for escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) emission from homogeneously selected z ∼ 2.5 SFGs. We detect no escaping Lyman continuum from SFGs selected on [O ii] nebular emission ( N = 208) and, within a narrow redshift range, on [O iii]/[O ii]. We measure 1 σ upper limits to the LyC escape fraction relative to the non-ionizing UV continuum from [O ii] emitters, f _e_s_c ≲ 5.6%, and strong [O iii]/[O ii] > 5 ELGs, f _e_s_c ≲ 14.0%. Our observations are not deep enough to detect f _e_s_c ∼ 10% typical of low-redshift Lyman continuum emitters. However, we find that this population represents a small fraction of the star-forming galaxy population at z ∼ 2. Thus, unless the number of extreme emission line galaxies grows substantially to z ≳ 6, such galaxies may be insufficient for reionization. Deeper survey data in the rest-frame ionizing UV will be necessary to determine whether strong line ratios could be useful for pre-selecting LyC leakers at high redshift.

  11. THE SPATIAL EXTENT OF (U)LIRGs IN THE MID-INFRARED. I. THE CONTINUUM EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIaz-Santos, T.; Charmandaris, V.; Armus, L.; Petric, A. O.; Howell, J. H.; Murphy, E. J.; Inami, H.; Haan, S.; Marshall, J. A.; Stierwalt, S.; Surace, J. A.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Veilleux, S.; Bothun, G.; Appleton, P. N.; Evans, A. S.; Sanders, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the extended mid-infrared (MIR) emission of the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey sample based on 5-15 μm low-resolution spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer. We calculate the fraction of extended emission (FEE) as a function of wavelength for the galaxies in the sample, FEE λ , defined as the fraction of the emission which originates outside of the unresolved component of a source at a given distance. We find that the FEE λ varies from one galaxy to another, but we can identify three general types of FEE λ : one where FEE λ is constant, one where features due to emission lines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons appear more extended than the continuum, and a third which is characteristic of sources with deep silicate absorption at 9.7 μm. More than 30% of the galaxies have a median FEE λ larger than 0.5, implying that at least half of their MIR emission is extended. Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) display a wide range of FEE in their warm dust continuum (0 ∼ 13.2 μ m ∼ 13.2 μ m that we find in many LIRGs suggest that the extended component of their MIR continuum emission originates in scales up to 10 kpc and may contribute as much as the nuclear region to their total MIR luminosity. The mean size of the LIRG cores at 13.2 μm is 2.6 kpc. However, once the IR luminosity of the systems reaches the threshold of L IR ∼ 10 11.8 L sun , slightly below the regime of Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), all sources become clearly more compact, with FEE 13.2 μ m ∼ IR ∼> 10 11.25 L sun strongly increases in those classified as mergers in their final stage of interaction. The FEE 13.2 μ m is also related to the contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the MIR emission. Galaxies which are more AGN dominated are less extended, independently of their L IR . We finally find that the extent of the MIR continuum emission is correlated with the far-IR IRAS log(f 60 μ m /f 100 μ m

  12. The Star Formation in Radio Survey: Jansky Very Large Array 33 GHz Observations of Nearby Galaxy Nuclei and Extranuclear Star-forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E. J.; Dong, D.; Momjian, E.; Linden, S.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Meier, D. S.; Schinnerer, E.; Turner, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    We present 33 GHz imaging for 112 pointings toward galaxy nuclei and extranuclear star-forming regions at ≈2″ resolution using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. A comparison with 33 GHz Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope single-dish observations indicates that the interferometric VLA observations recover 78% ± 4% of the total flux density over 25″ regions (≈kpc scales) among all fields. On these scales, the emission being resolved out is most likely diffuse non-thermal synchrotron emission. Consequently, on the ≈30–300 pc scales sampled by our VLA observations, the bulk of the 33 GHz emission is recovered and primarily powered by free–free emission from discrete H II regions, making it an excellent tracer of massive star formation. Of the 225 discrete regions used for aperture photometry, 162 are extranuclear (i.e., having galactocentric radii r G ≥ 250 pc) and detected at >3σ significance at 33 GHz and in Hα. Assuming a typical 33 GHz thermal fraction of 90%, the ratio of optically-thin 33 GHz to uncorrected Hα star formation rates indicates a median extinction value on ≈30–300 pc scales of A Hα ≈ 1.26 ± 0.09 mag, with an associated median absolute deviation of 0.87 mag. We find that 10% of these sources are “highly embedded” (i.e., A Hα ≳ 3.3 mag), suggesting that on average, H II regions remain embedded for ≲1 Myr. Finally, we find the median 33 GHz continuum-to-Hα line flux ratio to be statistically larger within r G < 250 pc relative to the outer disk regions by a factor of 1.82 ± 0.39, while the ratio of 33 GHz to 24 μm flux densities is lower by a factor of 0.45 ± 0.08, which may suggest increased extinction in the central regions.

  13. Diffuse galactic continuum emission measured by COMPTEL and the cosmic-ray electron spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. W.; Diehl, R.; Schoenfelder, V.; Varendorff, M.; Youssefi, G.; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; De Vries, C.; Morris, D.; Stacy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    Diffuse galactic continuum gamma-ray emission in the 0.75-30 MeV range from the inner Galaxy has been studied using data from COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Observations of the inner Galaxy from the Sky Survey have been used. The imaging properties of COMPTEL enable spatial analysis of the gamma-ray distribution using model fitting. A model based on atomic and molecular gas distributions in the Galaxy has been used to derive the emissivity spectrum of the gamma-ray emission and this spectrum is compared with theoretical estimates of bremsstrahlung emission from cosmic-ray electrons.

  14. The evolution of young HII regions. I. Continuum emission and internal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, P. D.; Johnston, K. G.; Urquhart, J. S.; Mottram, J. C.; Peters, T.; Kuiper, R.; Beuther, H.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Goddi, C.

    2018-04-01

    Context. High-mass stars form in much richer environments than those associated with isolated low-mass stars, and once they reach a certain mass, produce ionised (HII) regions. The formation of these pockets of ionised gas are unique to the formation of high-mass stars (M > 8 M⊙), and present an excellent opportunity to study the final stages of accretion, which could include accretion through the HII region itself. Aim. This study of the dynamics of the gas on both sides of these ionisation boundaries in very young HII regions aims to quantify the relationship between the HII regions and their immediate environments. Methods: We present high-resolution ( 0.5″) ALMA observations of nine HII regions selected from the red MSX source survey with compact radio emission and bolometric luminosities greater than 104 L⊙. We focus on the initial presentation of the data, including initial results from the radio recombination line H29α, some complementary molecules, and the 256 GHz continuum emission. Results: Of the six (out of nine) regions with H29α detections, two appear to have cometary morphologies with velocity gradients across them, and two appear more spherical with velocity gradients suggestive of infalling ionised gas. The remaining two were either observed at low resolution or had signals that were too weak to draw robust conclusions. We also present a description of the interactions between the ionised and molecular gas (as traced by CS (J = 5 - 4)), often (but not always) finding the HII region had cleared its immediate vicinity of molecules. Conclusions: Of our sample of nine, the observations of the two clusters expected to have the youngest HII regions (from previous radio observations) are suggestive of having infalling motions in the H29α emission, which could be indicative of late stage accretion onto the stars despite the presence of an HII region. Table A.2 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130

  15. Direct Evidence for Maser Emission from the 36.2 GHz Class I Transition of Methanol in NGC253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; McCarthy, Tiege P.; Zhong, Wei-Ye; Deng, Hui

    2018-04-01

    Observations made with the Jansky Very large Array (JVLA) at an angular resolution of ∼0.″1 have detected class I methanol maser emission from the 36.2 GHz transition toward the starburst galaxy NGC 253. The methanol emission is detected toward four sites which lie within the regions of extended methanol emission detected in previous lower angular resolution (a few arcseconds) observations. The peak flux densities of the detected compact components are in the range 3–9 mJy beam‑1. Combining the JVLA data with single-dish observations from the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT) and previous interferometric observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), we show that the 36.2 GHz class I methanol emission consists of both extended and compact structures, with typical scales of ∼6″ (0.1 kpc) and ∼0.″05 (1 pc), respectively. The strongest components have a brightness temperature of >103 K, much higher than the maximum kinetic temperature (∼100 K) of the thermal methanol emission from NGC 253. Therefore, these observations conclusively demonstrate for the first time the presence of maser emission from a class I methanol transition in an external galaxy.

  16. Interpretation of the galactic radio-continuum and gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, K.P.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is performed of the nonthermal radio-continuum and gamma-ray emission of the galactic disc, using a spiral-arm model of the Galaxy. The results for the 408 MHz brightness temperature and the >100 MeV gamma-ray line intensity as a function of galactic longitude at bsup(II)=0 deg are presented. The observational implications, as well as the uncertainties in the calculations, are briefly discussed. An estimate of the possible range of the inverse Compton contribution to the observed gamma-ray flux is made

  17. Radio continuum observations of NML Cygni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, P.C.; Seaquist, E.R.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt to detect thermal radio emission from a compact circumstellar cloud about the infrared star NML Cyg has been carried out at three frequencies, 2.7, 8.1, and 10.5 GHz. Although positive results were obtained with single-dish observations at 10.5 GHz, the radio emission is not from a circumstellar cloud about NML Cyg. Instead it is postulated that the emission is from an H ii region with an angular extent of approx.2'. The red print of the Sky Survey shows a faint nebulosity of comparable angular size overlapping the star's position, lending support to this interpretation. The interferometer observations at 2.7 and 8.1 GHz provide an upper limit on the radio emission from any compact circumstellar cloud about NML Cyg of 2.8 mJy, which is well below the flux density expected for the absorbing cloud postulated by Davies et al. (1972)

  18. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CONTINUUM AND WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE IRAS 19217+1651 REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo Postal 144, Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico CP 36000 (Mexico); Migenes, V., E-mail: tatiana@iga.cu, E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx, E-mail: vmigenes@byu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, ESC-N145, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 19217+1651. We observed the radio continuum (1.3 cm and 3.6 cm) and water maser emission using the Very Large Array (VLA-EVLA) in transition mode (configuration A). Two radio continuum sources were detected at both wavelengths, I19217-A and I19217-B. In addition, 17 maser spots were observed distributed mainly in two groups, M1 and M2, and one isolated maser. This latter could be indicating the relative position of another continuum source which we did not detect. The results indicate that I19217-A appears to be consistent with an ultracompact H II region associated with a zero-age main-sequence B0-type star. Furthermore, the 1.3 cm continuum emission of this source suggests a cometary morphology. In addition, I19217-B appears to be an H II region consisting of at least two stars, which may be contributing to its complex structure. It was also found that the H{sub 2}O masers of the group M1 are apparently associated with the continuum source I19217-A. These are tracing motions which are not gravitationally bound according to their spatial distribution and kinematics. They also seem to be describing outflows in the direction of the elongated cometary region. On the other hand, the second maser group, M2, could be tracing the base of a jet. Finally, infrared data from Spitzer, Midcourse Space Experiment, and IRIS show that IRAS 19217+1651 is embedded inside a large open bubble, like a broken ring, which possibly has affected the morphology of the cometary H II region observed at 1.3 cm.

  19. The integrated radio continuum spectrum of M33 - Evidence for free-free absorption by cool ionized gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, F. P.; Mahoney, M. J.; Howarth, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the integrated radio continuum flux density of M33 at frequencies between 22 and 610 MHz and discuss the radio continuum spectrum of M33 between 22 MHz and 10 GHz. This spectrum has a turnover between 500 and 900 MHz, depending on the steepness of the high frequency radio spectrum of M33. Below 500 MHz the spectrum is relatively flat. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain this spectral shape and consider efficient free-free absorption of nonthermal emission by a cool (not greater than 1000 K) ionized gas to be a very likely possibility. The surface filling factor of both the nonthermal and the thermal material appears to be small (of order 0.001), which could be explained by magnetic field/density fluctuations in the M 33 interstellar medium. We briefly speculate on the possible presence of a nuclear radio source with a steep spectrum.

  20. An Interferometric 270--355 GHz Spectral Line Survey of the Red Supergiant VY CMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Young, K. H.; Patel, N. A.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Thaddeus, P.; McCarthy, M. C.; Gurwell, M. A.; Belloche, A.; Kaminski, T.; Verheyen, L.; Decin, L.; Brunken, S.; Holger, S. P. M.

    2011-05-01

    We have used the Submillimeter Array to image the molecular line emission in the circumstellar envelope of the peculiar red supergiant star VY Canis Majoris over the whole 870 μm atmospheric window. Employing adaptive calibration using the object's continuum emission we achieve high quality one arcsecond resolution imaging of the whole 280--355 GHz range within which we find 211 distinct spectral lines from 33 molecules (including isotopologues) plus 40 unidentified lines. From the distribution of molecules we are obtaining their abundances and isotopologic abundance ratios. Using data for multiple transitions in a number of molecules we are deriving the physical conditions in the circumstellar envelope to reach a picture of the star's chemistry that can be compared with models. Our legacy survey is accompanied by a strong laboratory effort that helps with the identification of possibly newly found molecules traced by unidentified lines. We shall create a publicly accessible database of spectral-line channel-maps of the emission from all the lines detected in the survey.

  1. Water vapor absorption in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Godon, M.; Carlier, J.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute absorption rates of pure water vapor and mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen have been measured in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz. The dependence on pressure as well as temperature has been obtained. The experimental data are compared with several theoretical or empirical models, and satisfactory agreement is obtained with the models involving a continuum; in the case of pure water vapor, the continuum contribution based upon recent theoretical developments gives good results. The temperature dependence is stronger than that proposed in a commonly used atmospheric transmission model.

  2. Fluxon induced surface resistance and field emission in niobium films at 1.5 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2001-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, a precursor of electron emission, is observed for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operating at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect. (23 refs).

  3. Solar radio continuum storms and a breathing magnetic field model. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Radio noise continuum emissions observed in metric and decametric wave frequencies are, in general, associated with actively varying sunspot groups accompanied by the S-component of microwave radio emissions. These continuum emission sources, often called type I storm sources, are often associated with type III burst storm activity from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. This storm activity is, therefore, closely connected with the development of these continuum emission sources. It is shown that the S-component emission in microwave frequencies generally precedes, by several days, the emission of these noise continuum storms of lower frequencies. In order for these storms to develop, the growth of sunspot groups into complex types is very important in addition to the increase of the average magnetic field intensity and area of these groups. After giving a review on the theory of these noise continuum storm emissions, a model is briefly considered to explain the relation of the emissions to the storms

  4. 95 GHz methanol masers near DR 21 and DR 21(OH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plambeck, R.L.; Menten, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    The BIMA array is used to map the 95-GHz 8(0) to 7 1A(+) transition of methanol and the 98-GHz J = 2-1 transition of CS toward the DR 21(OH) and DR 21 star-forming regions. Several strong methanol masers were found. The positions of the two brightest masers were measured with an accuracy of about + or - 0.3 arcsec. Toward DR 21(OH), the positions, velocities, and line shapes of the 95 GHz masers are in excellent agreement with those of the 84-GHz 5(-1) to 4 () methanol masers previously mapped by Batrla and Menten (1988), demonstrating that maser emission in both transitions originates from the same clumps of gas. The methanol masers are offset from CS emission peaks and from other known infrared and maser sources; they may possibly be clustered along the interface between outflows, traced by shock-excited H2 emission, and dense ambient gas, traced by CS emission. 25 refs

  5. RELATIVISTIC PLASMA AS THE DOMINANT SOURCE OF THE OPTICAL CONTINUUM EMISSION IN THE BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXY 3C 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon-Tavares, J.; Lobanov, A. P.; Arshakian, T. G.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Doroshenko, V. T.; Sergeev, S. G.; Efimov, Y. S.; Nazarov, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    We report a relation between radio emission in the inner jet of the Seyfert galaxy 3C 120 and optical continuum emission in this galaxy. Combining the optical variability data with multi-epoch high-resolution very long baseline interferometry observations reveals that an optical flare rises when a superluminal component emerges into the jet, and its maxima is related to the passage of such component through the location of a stationary feature at a distance of ∼1.3 pc from the jet origin. This indicates that a significant fraction of the optical continuum produced in 3C 120 is non-thermal, and it can ionize material in a sub-relativistic wind or outflow. We discuss implications of this finding for the ionization and structure of the broad emission line region, as well as for the use of broad emission lines for determining black hole masses in radio-loud active galactic nucleus.

  6. Airborne spectrophotometry of SN 1987A from 1.7 to 12.6 microns - Time history of the dust continuum and line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Rank, David M.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Witteborn, Fred C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Cohen, Martin; Pinto, Philip A.; Axelrod, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of SN 1987A from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory are presented for five epochs at 60, 260, 415, 615, and 775 days after the explosion. The low-resolution (lambda/Delta lambda = 50-100) spectra of SN 1987A are combined with data from other wavelengths to model the continuum, subtract the continuum from the spectra to determine line strengths and reveal molecular bands, separate the atomic continuum radiation from the dust continuum, and derive constraints on the grain temperatures and optical depths. A scenario for the evolution of SN 1987A and that of the ejecta from which it arises is obtained on the basis of the analysis of the continuum emission.

  7. The Association of Molecular Gas and Natal Super Star Clusters in Henize 2–10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Testi, Leonardo; Wilner, David J.; Reines, Amy E.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Vanzi, Leonardo

    2018-02-01

    We present ALMA observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 in combination with previous SMA CO observations to probe the molecular environments of natal super star clusters (SSCs). These observations include the HCO+(1-0), HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and CCH(1-0) molecular lines, as well as 88 GHz continuum with a spatial resolution of 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 7× 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 6. After correcting for the contribution from free–free emission to the 88 GHz continuum flux density (∼60% of the 88 GHz emission), we derive a total gas mass for He 2–10 of {M}{gas}=4{--}6× {10}8 M ⊙, roughly 5%–20% of the dynamical mass. Based on a principle component analysis, HCO+ is found to be the best “general” tracer of molecular emission. The line widths and luminosities of the CO emission suggests that the molecular clouds could either be as small as ∼8 pc, or alternately have enhanced line widths. The CO emission and 88 GHz continuum are anti-correlated, suggesting that either the dust and molecular gas are not cospatial, which could reflect that the 88 GHz continuum is dominated by free–free emission. The CO and CCH emission are also relatively anti-correlated, which is consistent with the CCH being photo-enhanced, and/or the CO being dissociated in the regions near the natal SSCs. The molecular line ratios of regions containing the natal star clusters are different from the line ratios observed for regions elsewhere in the galaxy. In particular, the regions with thermal radio emission all have {CO}(2{--}1)/{{HCO}}+(1-0)correlated with the evolutionary stage of the clusters.

  8. Ultraviolet continuum and H2 fluorescent emission in Herbig-Haro objects 43 and 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) short-wavelength spectra of the low-excitation Herbig-Haro objects HH 43 and HH 47 are reported. In HH 43 a number of emission lines in the Lyman band of H 2 from the excited state 1 μ + /sub u/, #betta#' = 1, J' = 4 are observed. The lines are produced by fluorescence from the H Lyα line which pumps the lower state 1 μ + /sub g/, #betta#'' = 2.J'' = 5 which in turn is excited by a low-velocity shock wave. No evidence of emission from highly ionized gas is present in the UV spectra. Both objects exhibit a UV continuum which peaks in the vicinity of 1500 A and which is probably caused by hydrogen two-photon emission enhanced by collisional excitation in a low-velocity shock

  9. VUV emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a 14 GHz ECR negative hydrogen ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, R., E-mail: duo0364@mail4.doshisha.ac.jp; Ichikawa, T.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Nishiura, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences The University of Tokyo, Kashiwara, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Shimozuma, T. [National lnstitute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    Vacuum Ultra Violet(VUV) emission from a 4 cm diameter 2 cm long compact ion source excited by 14 GHz microwave has been investigated. Intensity ratio of band spectrum emission near Ly-α to Ly-α line spectrum is determined from the measured spectrum. which shows preferential excitation of molecules near the entrance of microwave input power. The ratio does not depend strongly upon pressure nor the input microwave power when the intensity is integrated over the volume of the plasma. The spatial distribution of the spectrum intensity ratio exhibits concentrations near microwave inlet and the opposite side where the microwave matching structure is located. The ratio at these peripheral regions is about two times as high as that of the central region. The ratio increased in proportion to the ion source pressure up to about 3.0 Pa, indicating efficient production of high energy electrons by ECR up to this pressure.

  10. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  11. 154 GHz collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Saito, T.; Moseev, D.; Abramovic, I.

    2018-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) was developed by using a 154 GHz gyrotron, and the first data has been obtained. Already, 77 GHz CTS has worked successfully. However, in order to access higher density region, 154 GHz option enhances the usability that reduces the refraction effect, which deteriorates in the local measurements. The system in the down converted frequency was almost identical to the system for 77 GHz. Probing beam, a notch filter, a mixer, and a local oscillator in the receiver system for 77 GHz option were replaced to those for the 154 GHz option. 154 GHz gyrotron was originally prepared for the second harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECRH) at 2.75 T. However, scattering signal was masked by the second harmonic electron cyclotron emission (ECE) at 2.75 T. Therefore, 154 GHz CTS was operated at 1.375 T with fourth harmonic ECE, and an acceptable signal to noise ratio was obtained. There is a signature of fast ion components with neutral beam (NB) injection. In addition, the CTS spectrum became broader in hydrogen discharge than in deuterium discharge, as the theoretical CTS spectrum expects. This observation indicates a possibility to identify ion species ratio by the 154 GHz CTS diagnostic.

  12. STATCONT: A statistical continuum level determination method for line-rich sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Schilke, P.; Ginsburg, A.; Cesaroni, R.; Schmiedeke, A.

    2018-01-01

    STATCONT is a python-based tool designed to determine the continuum emission level in spectral data, in particular for sources with a line-rich spectrum. The tool inspects the intensity distribution of a given spectrum and automatically determines the continuum level by using different statistical approaches. The different methods included in STATCONT are tested against synthetic data. We conclude that the sigma-clipping algorithm provides the most accurate continuum level determination, together with information on the uncertainty in its determination. This uncertainty can be used to correct the final continuum emission level, resulting in the here called `corrected sigma-clipping method' or c-SCM. The c-SCM has been tested against more than 750 different synthetic spectra reproducing typical conditions found towards astronomical sources. The continuum level is determined with a discrepancy of less than 1% in 50% of the cases, and less than 5% in 90% of the cases, provided at least 10% of the channels are line free. The main products of STATCONT are the continuum emission level, together with a conservative value of its uncertainty, and datacubes containing only spectral line emission, i.e., continuum-subtracted datacubes. STATCONT also includes the option to estimate the spectral index, when different files covering different frequency ranges are provided.

  13. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Wentz, F.; Messiner, T.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.1 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest.

  14. The near-infrared broad emission line region of active galactic nuclei - II. The 1-μm continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landt, Hermine; Elvis, Martin; Ward, Martin J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Korista, Kirk T.; Karovska, Margarita

    2011-06-01

    We use quasi-simultaneous near-infrared (near-IR) and optical spectroscopy from four observing runs to study the continuum around 1 μm in 23 well-known broad emission line active galactic nuclei (AGN). We show that, after correcting the optical spectra for host galaxy light, the AGN continuum around this wavelength can be approximated by the sum of mainly two emission components, a hot dust blackbody and an accretion disc. The accretion disc spectrum appears to dominate the flux at ˜ 1 μm, which allows us to derive a relation for estimating AGN black hole masses based on the near-IR virial product. This result also means that a near-IR reverberation programme can determine the AGN state independent of simultaneous optical spectroscopy. On average we derive hot dust blackbody temperatures of ˜1400 K, a value close to the sublimation temperature of silicate dust grains, and relatively low hot dust covering factors of ˜7 per cent. Our preliminary variability studies indicate that in most sources, the hot dust emission responds to changes in the accretion disc flux with the expected time lag; however, a few sources show a behaviour that can be attributed to dust destruction.

  15. A 1.1-1.9 GHz SETI SURVEY OF THE KEPLER FIELD. I. A SEARCH FOR NARROW-BAND EMISSION FROM SELECT TARGETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Korpela, Eric; Werthimer, Dan; Cobb, Jeff; Lebofsky, Matt; Marcy, Geoffrey W. [University of California, Berkeley, 110 Sproul Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Demorest, Paul; Maddalena, Ron J.; Langston, Glen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North A' ohoku Place, 209 Hilo, HI 96720-2700 (United States); Tarter, Jill [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave 100 Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present a targeted search for narrow-band (<5 Hz) drifting sinusoidal radio emission from 86 stars in the Kepler field hosting confirmed or candidate exoplanets. Radio emission less than 5 Hz in spectral extent is currently known to only arise from artificial sources. The stars searched were chosen based on the properties of their putative exoplanets, including stars hosting candidates with 380 K > T{sub eq} > 230 K, stars with five or more detected candidates or stars with a super-Earth (R{sub p} < 3 R{sub Circled-Plus }) in a >50 day orbit. Baseband voltage data across the entire band between 1.1 and 1.9 GHz were recorded at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 2011 February and April and subsequently searched offline. No signals of extraterrestrial origin were found. We estimate that fewer than {approx}1% of transiting exoplanet systems host technological civilizations that are radio loud in narrow-band emission between 1 and 2 GHz at an equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) of {approx}1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} erg s{sup -1}, approximately eight times the peak EIRP of the Arecibo Planetary Radar, and we limit the number of 1-2 GHz narrow-band-radio-loud Kardashev type II civilizations in the Milky Way to be <10{sup -6} M{sub Sun }{sup -1}. Here we describe our observations, data reduction procedures and results.

  16. 77 FR 48097 - Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... modify the emission limits for vehicular radar systems operating within the 76-77 GHz band. Specifically.... 15.253 of the rules for vehicular radar systems operating in the 76-77 GHz band. Vehicular radars can... sensors operating in the 76-77 GHz band, the spectrum shall be investigated up to 231 GHz. (f) Fundamental...

  17. Toward 100 GHz direct modulation rate of antenna coupled nanoLED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortuna, Seth A.; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-01-01

    We show that > 100 GHz direct modulation rate while maintaining a quantum efficiency higher than 25% is possible by using an optical antenna to enhance the spontaneous emission rate of an electrically injected III-V nanoLED.......We show that > 100 GHz direct modulation rate while maintaining a quantum efficiency higher than 25% is possible by using an optical antenna to enhance the spontaneous emission rate of an electrically injected III-V nanoLED....

  18. The 1.4 GHZ light curve of GRB 970508

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, TJ; Wijers, RAMJ; Groot, PJ; Strom, RG; De Bruyn, AG; Kouveliotou, C; Robinson, CR; van Paradus, J

    1998-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 1.4 GHz radio observations of the radio counterpart to gamma-ray burst GRB 970508, between 0.80 and 138 days after this event. The 1.4 GHz light curve shows a transition from optically thick to thin emission between 39 and 54 days after the event. We derive the slope p of the

  19. ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN H ii REGIONS: IS IT REALLY ANOMALOUS? THE CASE OF RCW 49

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paladini, Roberta [Infrared Processing Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Umana, Grazia; Trigilio, Corrado [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania Italy (Italy); Tibbs, Christopher T. [Scientific Support Office, Directorate of Science and Robotic Exploration,European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Noriega-Crespo, Alberto [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Clive [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free–free emission has been reported for several Galactic H ii regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (∼3σ) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7′. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5, 19, and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109α radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: (1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.′4 to 0.″4, although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; (2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free–free emission, however, ∼30% of these are positive and much greater than −0.1, consistent with a stellar wind scenario; and (3) no major evidence for inverted free–free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of AME in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources that are very well known and studied, such as H ii regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emission might be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  20. Multi-year X-Ray Variations of Iron-K and Continuum Emissions in the Young Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Toshiki; Masai, Kuniaki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu [Department of High Energy Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, 229-8510 (Japan); Bamba, Aya [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Katsuda, Satoru [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Chuo University, 1-13-27 Kasuga, Bunkyo, Tokyo 112-8551 (Japan); Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo; Sawada, Makoto [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hironori [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Terada, Yukikatsu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Ohkubo, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Hughes, John P., E-mail: toshiki@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    We found a simultaneous decrease of the Fe–K line and 4.2–6 keV continuum of Cassiopeia A with the monitoring data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 2000–2013. The flux change rates in the whole remnant are −0.65 ± 0.02% yr{sup −1} in the 4.2–6.0 keV continuum and −0.6 ± 0.1% yr{sup −1} in the Fe–K line. In the eastern region where the thermal emission is considered to dominate, the variations show the largest values: −1.03 ± 0.05% yr{sup −1} (4.2–6 keV band) and −0.6 ± 0.1% yr{sup −1} (Fe–K line). In this region, the time evolution of the emission measure and the temperature have a decreasing trend. This could be interpreted as adiabatic cooling with the expansion of m = 0.66. On the other hand, in the non-thermal emission dominated regions, variations of the 4.2–6 keV continuum show smaller rates: −0.60 ± 0.04% yr{sup −1} in the southwestern region, −0.46 ± 0.05% yr{sup −1} in the inner region, and +0.00 ± 0.07% yr{sup −1} in the forward shock region. In particular, flux does not show significant change in the forward shock region. These results imply that strong braking in shock velocity has not been occurring in Cassiopeia A (<5 km s{sup −1} yr{sup −1}). All of our results support the idea that X-ray flux decay in the remnant is mainly caused by thermal components.

  1. Flare continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the metre-wave continuum radiation which is related to similar solar emissions observed in the decimetre and centimetre spectral regions. This type of emission, known as Flare Contiuum, is related to the radio bursts of types II and IV. After summarising the history of the phenomenon and reviewing the observational work, the author discusses the various possible radiation mechanisms and their relation to the solar corona, the interplanetary medium and related regions. The theoretical topics covered include the role of high-energy particles, the trapping of such particles, gyro-synchrotron radiation, polarization and plasma interactions. (U.K.)

  2. A New 95 GHz Methanol Maser Catalog. I. Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wenjin; Xu, Ye; Lu, Dengrong; Ju, Binggang; Li, Yingjie [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, Nanjing 210008 (China); Chen, Xi [Center for Astrophysics, GuangZhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P., E-mail: wjyang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: xuye@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia)

    2017-08-01

    The Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope has been used to search for 95 GHz (8{sub 0}–7{sub 1}A{sup +}) class I methanol masers toward 1020 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources, leading to 213 detections. We have compared the line width of the methanol and HCO{sup +} thermal emission in all of the methanol detections, and on that basis, we find that 205 of the 213 detections are very likely to be masers. This corresponds to an overall detection rate of 95 GHz methanol masers toward our BGPS sample of 20%. Of the 205 detected masers, 144 (70%) are new discoveries. Combining our results with those of previous 95 GHz methanol maser searches, a total of 481 95 GHz methanol masers are now known. We have compiled a catalog listing the locations and properties of all known 95 GHz methanol masers.

  3. Haro 11: Where is the Lyman Continuum Source?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, Ryan P.; Oey, M. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Jaskot, Anne E. [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); James, Bethan L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    Identifying the mechanism by which high-energy Lyman continuum (LyC) photons escaped from early galaxies is one of the most pressing questions in cosmic evolution. Haro 11 is the best known local LyC-leaking galaxy, providing an important opportunity to test our understanding of LyC escape. The observed LyC emission in this galaxy presumably originates from one of the three bright, photoionizing knots known as A, B, and C. It is known that Knot C has strong Ly α emission, and Knot B hosts an unusually bright ultraluminous X-ray source, which may be a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus. To clarify the LyC source, we carry out ionization-parameter mapping (IPM) by obtaining narrow-band imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 and ACS cameras to construct spatially resolved ratio maps of [O iii]/[O ii] emission from the galaxy. IPM traces the ionization structure of the interstellar medium and allows us to identify optically thin regions. To optimize the continuum subtraction, we introduce a new method for determining the best continuum scale factor derived from the mode of the continuum-subtracted, image flux distribution. We find no conclusive evidence of LyC escape from Knots B or C, but instead we identify a high-ionization region extending over at least 1 kpc from Knot A. This knot shows evidence of an extremely young age (≲1 Myr), perhaps containing very massive stars (>100 M {sub ⊙}). It is weak in Ly α , so if it is confirmed as the LyC source, our results imply that LyC emission may be independent of Ly α emission.

  4. Radio continuum emission from winds, chromospheres, and coronae of cool giants and supergiants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, S.A.; Linsky, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a sensitive VLA radio continuum survey at 6 cm of 39 of the nearest, single cool giants and supergiants with spectral types in the range G0--M5. We discuss our findings in the context of the various mechanisms that might be producing radio emission in these cool stars. We have definitely detected four K and M giants (α 1 Her, α Boo, rho Per, and μ Gem) and probably detected a fifth ( β UMi) at flux levels of 0.1--1.0 mJy. We believe that in all five of these cases the radio emission is thermal emission from cool stellar winds. We have made additional 2 cm observations of several stars, including the four stars definitely detected at 6 cm. We have derived spectral indices for α Boo, α 1 Her, and rho Per of 0.80, 0.84, and 0.95, respectively, that are close to the 0.6 value predicted by standard stellar wind models in the optically thick regime. An additional cool giant (α Tau) was detected only at 2 cm, implying a spectral index of > or =0.87. None of the coronal or hybrid-chromosphere giants observed were detected in this study, with the exception of α Aur, a 0.2 mJy radio source at 6 cm, which is in fact a widely separated, long-period (P/sub orb/approx.104/sup d/) RS CVn system containing two cool giant stars. In this case, we believe that the 6 cm radio emission is optically thin, thermal emission from the corona(e) of one or both of the components, since the radio-emission measure is consistent with that of the observed x-ray emission

  5. SUBMILLIMETER H{sub 2}O MEGAMASERS IN NGC 4945 AND THE CIRCINUS GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesce, D. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Braatz, J. A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V., E-mail: dpesce@virginia.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    We present 321 GHz observations of five active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from ALMA Cycle 0 archival data: NGC 5793, NGC 1068, NGC 1386, NGC 4945, and the Circinus galaxy. Submillimeter maser emission is detected for the first time toward NGC 4945, and we present a new analysis of the submillimeter maser system in Circinus. None of the other three galaxies show maser emission, although we have detected and imaged the continuum from every galaxy. Both NGC 4945 and Circinus are known to host strong (≳10 Jy) 22 GHz megamaser emission, and VLBI observations have shown that the masers reside in the innermost ∼1 pc of the galaxies. The peak flux densities of the 321 GHz masers in both systems are substantially weaker (by a factor of ∼100) than what is observed at 22 GHz, although the corresponding isotropic luminosities are more closely matched (within a factor of ∼10) between the two transitions. We compare the submillimeter spectra presented here to the known 22 GHz spectra in both galaxies, and we argue that while both transitions originate from the gaseous environment near the AGNs, not all sites are in common. In Circinus, the spectral structure of the 321 GHz masers indicates that they may trace the accretion disk at radii interior to the 22 GHz masers. The continuum emission in NGC 4945 and NGC 5793 shows a spatial distribution indicative of an origin in the galactic disks (likely thermal dust emission), while for the other three galaxies the emission is centrally concentrated and likely originates from the nucleus.

  6. One millimeter continuum observations of high redshift quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, D.J.; Soifer, B.T.

    1981-01-01

    Upper limits to the one-millimeter continuum flux densities of the high redshift quasars B2 1225 + 31, Ton 490, and PHL 957 are presented. The upper limit to the power observed from these quasars at 1 mm is, on the average, one half of the observed power in the continuum at L-alpha. These observations are used to constrain the temperature of a hypothetical dust shell which reddens the quasar line and continuum emission by an extinction optical depth sufficient to account for the anomalously low L-alpha/H-alpha emission line ratio observed in each of these quasars. For the quasars studied, dust shell temperatures between 25 K and 50 to 95 K are prohibited by the present data. A dust shell at a temperature within this span reradiating all the power absorbed from the quasar ultraviolet continuum would produce a one-millimeter flux density greater than the measured upper limit. The average radius of the model dust shell cannot be between 70 kpc and 1 Mpc

  7. Effect of electron emission on the charge and shielding of a dust grain in a plasma: A continuum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'yachkov, L. G.; Khrapak, A. G.; Khrapak, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    The continuum approximation is used to analyze the effect of electron emission from the surface of a spherical dust grain immersed in a plasma on the grain charge by assuming negligible ionization and recombination in the disturbed plasma region around the grain. A parameter is introduced that quantifies the emission intensity regardless of the emission mechanism (secondary, photoelectric, or thermionic emission). An analytical expression for the grain charge Z d is derived, and a criterion for change in the charge sign is obtained. The case of thermionic emission is examined in some detail. It is shown that the long-distance asymptotic behavior of the grain potential follows the Coulomb law with a negative effective charge Z eff , regardless of the sign of Z d . Thus, the potential changes sign and has a minimum if Z d > 0, which implies that attraction is possible between positively charged dust grains

  8. X-ray continuum and iron K emission line from the radio galaxy 3C 390.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M.; Makishima, K.; Kohmura, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Ohashi, T.; Barr, P.; Hayashida, K.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Trinchieri, G.; Elvis, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray properties of the radio galaxy 3C 390.3 were investigated using the European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) and Ginga satellites. Long-term, large-amplitude X-ray intensity changes were detected over a period extending from 1984 through 1991, and high-quality X-ray spectra were obtained especially with Ginga. The X-ray continuum spectra were described with power-law model with photon slope in the range 1.5-1.8, and the slope flattened as the 2-20 keV luminosity decreased by 40%. There was a first detection of the iron emission line from this source at the 90% confidence level. An upper limit was derived on the thermal X-ray component. X-ray emission mechanisms and possible origins of the long-term variation are discussed.

  9. Molecular astronomy using heterodyne detection at 691 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, H.R.; Buhl, D.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the CO J 6 - 5 transition at 691 GHz in new interstellar and planetary sources have been made. The heterodyne receiver uses an optically pumped laser local oscillator and a quasi-optical Schottky diode mixer, with measured noise temperatures consistently under 4000 K (double sideband). Continued improvements in system performance and antenna coupling have made possible the mapping of 691 GHz emission from W3, and the detection of CO J 5 - 6 absorption in the atmosphere of Venus. A detailed description of the instrumentation and recent observational data are provided. 14 references

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIO CONTINUUM MEASUREMENTS OF THE NUCLEAR DISKS OF Arp 220

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Evans, A. S.; Privon, G. C.; Stierwalt, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Leroy, A. K.; Condon, J.; Reichardt, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mazzarella, J. M.; Murphy, E. J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Meier, D. S. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Momjian, E.; Ott, J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Sakamoto, K. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Sanders, D. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96816 (United States); Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Surace, J. A. [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Thompson, T. A., E-mail: ldb7et@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum images of the nuclei of Arp 220, the nearest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. These new images have both the angular resolution to study the detailed morphologies of the two nuclei that power the galaxy merger and sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales. At 33 GHz, we achieve a resolution of 0.''081 × 0.''063 (29.9 × 23.3 pc) and resolve the radio emission surrounding both nuclei. We conclude from the decomposition of the radio spectral energy distribution that a majority of the 33 GHz emission is synchrotron radiation. The spatial distributions of radio emission in both nuclei are well described by exponential profiles. These have deconvolved half-light radii (R {sub 50d}) of 51 and 35 pc for the eastern and western nuclei, respectively, and they match the number density profile of radio supernovae observed with very long baseline interferometry. This similarity might be due to the fast cooling of cosmic rays electrons caused by the presence of a strong (∼mG) magnetic field in this system. We estimate extremely high molecular gas surface densities of 2.2{sub −1.0}{sup +2.1}×10{sup 5} (east) and 4.5{sub −1.9}{sup +4.5}×10{sup 5} (west) M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, corresponding to total hydrogen column densities of N {sub H} = 2.7{sub −1.2}{sup +2.7}×10{sup 25} (east) and 5.6{sub −2.4}{sup +5.5}×10{sup 25} cm{sup –2} (west). The implied gas volume densities are similarly high, n{sub H{sub {sub 2}}}∼3.8{sub −1.6}{sup +3.8}×10{sup 4} (east) and ∼11{sub −4.5}{sup +12}×10{sup 4} cm{sup –3} (west). We also estimate very high luminosity surface densities of Σ{sub IR}∼4.2{sub −0.7}{sup +1.6}×10{sup 13} (east) and Σ{sub IR}∼9.7{sub −2.4}{sup +3.7}×10{sup 13} (west) L{sub ⊙} kpc{sup −2}, and star formation rate surface densities of Σ{sub SFR} ∼ 10{sup 3.7} {sup ±} {sup 0.1} (east) and Σ{sub SFR} ∼ 10{sup 4.1} {sup ±} {sup 0.1}(west) M

  11. A Size-Luminosity Relationship for Protoplanetary Disks in Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Marie; Andrews, Sean

    2018-01-01

    The sizes of the 340 GHz continuum emission from 56 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star-forming region were measured by modeling their ALMA visibility profiles. We describe the mechanism for these measurements and some preliminary results regarding the correlation between the continuum luminosities and sizes.

  12. Investigation of the continuum radiation from a high pressure argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, J.; Chapelle, J.

    1975-01-01

    At the high electronic densities existing in high temperature strongly correlated plasmas (with number of electrons in the Debye sphere Nd<<1) it is sometimes difficult to find lines for which Stark broadening allows determination of electronic density. Since the broadening effect is rather strong, the lines overlap or could not be easily extracted from the intense continuous background. The continuum emission in the UV, visible and near infra-red regions, principally due to the radiative recombination, could thus be widely used for the diagnostics of such plasmas. So far a limited number of data on the continuum emission of Argon plasma is available. At the same time certain discrepancies between theoretical predictions and experiments have also been found. The aim of this work is to obtain more elaborated data on the Argon continuum emission at high pressure, where the differences were found to be the largest. (Auth.)

  13. FIRST INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGES OF THE 36 GHz METHANOL MASERS IN THE DR21 COMPLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Muehlbrad, Talitha C.; Pratap, Preethi; Sjouwerman, Lorant O.; Strelnitski, Vladimir; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.; Bourke, Tyler L.

    2011-01-01

    Class I methanol masers are believed to be produced in the shock-excited environment around star-forming regions. Many authors have argued that the appearance of various subsets of class I masers may be indicative of specific evolutionary stages of star formation or excitation conditions. Until recently, however, no major interferometer was capable of imaging the important 36 GHz transition. We report on Expanded Very Large Array observations of the 36 GHz methanol masers and Submillimeter Array observations of the 229 GHz methanol masers in DR21(OH), DR21N, and DR21W. The distribution of 36 GHz masers in the outflow of DR21(OH) is similar to that of the other class I methanol transitions, with numerous multitransition spatial overlaps. At the site of the main continuum source in DR21(OH), class I masers at 36 and 229 GHz are found in virtual overlap with class II 6.7 GHz masers. To the south of the outflow, the 36 GHz masers are scattered over a large region but usually do not appear coincident with 44 GHz masers. In DR21W, we detect an 'S-curve' signature in Stokes V that implies a large value of the magnetic field strength if interpreted as due to Zeeman splitting, suggesting either that class I masers may exist at higher densities than previously believed or that the direct Zeeman interpretation of S-curve Stokes V profiles in class I masers may be incorrect. We find a diverse variety of different maser phenomena in these sources, suggestive of differing physical conditions among them.

  14. A derivation of the free-free emission on the Galactic plane between ℓ= 20° and 44°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marta I. R.; Davies, Rodney D.; Dickinson, Clive; Calabretta, Mark; Davis, Richard; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2012-05-01

    We present the derivation of the free-free emission on the Galactic plane between ℓ= 20° and 44° and |b|≤ 4°, using radio recombination line (RRL) data from the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS). Following an upgrade of the RRL data reduction technique, which improves significantly the quality of the final RRL spectra, we have extended the analysis to three times the area covered in Alves et al. The final RRL map has an angular resolution of 14.8 arcmin and a velocity resolution of 20 km s-1. The electron temperature (Te) distribution of the ionized gas in the area under study at 1.4 GHz is derived using the line and continuum data from the present survey. The mean Te on the Galactic plane is 6000 K. The first direct measure of the free-free emission is obtained based on the derived Te distribution. Subtraction of this thermal component from the total continuum leads to the first direct measurement of the synchrotron emission at 1.4 GHz. A narrow component of width 2° is identified in the latitude distribution of the synchrotron emission. We present a list of H II regions and supernova remnants (SNRs) extracted from the present free-free and synchrotron maps, where we confirm the synchrotron nature of the SNRs G42.0-0.1 and G41.5+0.4 proposed by Kaplan et al. and the SNR G35.6-0.4 recently re-identified by Green. The latitude distribution for the RRL-derived free-free emission shows that the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) maximum entropy method is too high by ˜50 per cent, in agreement with other recent results. The extension of this study to the inner Galaxy region ℓ=-50° to 50° will allow a better overall comparison of the RRL result with WMAP.

  15. Continuum radiation emitted from transition metals under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Boujlaidi, A.; Kaddouri, A.; Ait El Fqih, M.; Hammoum, K.; Aouchiche, H.

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission of transition metals has been studied during 5 keV Kr + ions bombardment within and without oxygen atmosphere in the colliding chamber. The observed spectra consist of a series of discrete lines superimposed on a broad continuum. Generally, the emission intensity was influenced by the presence of oxygen giving rise to transient effects as well as to an increase in the line intensity. The behaviours of spectral lines were successfully explained in term of electron-transfer process between the excited sputtered atom and the solid surface. In this work, we have focused our study on the continuous radiation emitted during ion bombardment. The experimental results suggest that the continuum emission depends on the nature of metal and very probably related to its electronic structure. The collective deactivation of 3d-shell electrons appears to play a role in the emission of this radiation. The observed enhancement in the presence of oxygen is probably due to a significant contribution of the oxide molecules. (authors)

  16. Shell model with several particles in the continuum: application to the two-proton decay; Modele en couches avec plusieurs particules dans le continuum: description de la radioactivite deux protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotureau, J

    2005-02-15

    The recent experimental results concerning nuclei at the limit of stability close to the drip-lines and in particular the two-proton emitters require a development of new methodologies to reliably calculate and understand properties of those exotic physical systems. In this work we have extended the Shell Model Embedded in the Continuum (SMEC) in order to describe the coupling with two particles in the scattering continuum. We have obtained a microscopic description of the two-proton emission that takes into account the antisymmetrization of the total wavefunction, the configuration mixing and the three-body asymptotics. We have studied the decay of the 1{sub 2}{sup -} state in {sup 18}Ne in two limiting cases: (i) a sequential emission of two protons through the correlated continuum of {sup 17}F and (ii) emission of {sup 2}He cluster that disintegrates because of the final state interaction (diproton emission). Independently of the choice of the effective interaction we have observed that the two-proton emission of the 1{sub 2}{sup -} in {sup 18}Ne is mainly a sequential process; the ratio between the widths of the diproton emission and the sequential decay does not exceed 8% in any case. (author)

  17. Reverberation Mapping of the Continuum Source in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausnaugh, Michael Martin

    I present results from a monitoring campaign of 11 active galactic nuclei (AGN) conducted in Spring of 2014. I use the reverberation mapping method to probe the interior structures of the AGN, specifically the broad line regions (BLRs) and accretion disks. One of these AGN, NGC 5548, was also subject to multi-wavelength (X-ray, UV, optical, and near-IR) monitoring using 25 ground-based telescopes and four space-based facilities. For NGC 5548, I detect lags between the continuum emission at different wavelengths that follow a trend consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with temperature profile T ∝ R -3/4. However, the lags imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk models. The lags at wavelengths longer than the Vband are also equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as HeII lambda1640 and lambda4686), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region. Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, I estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters, and I find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination (˜20%) can be important for the shortest continuum lags. This likely has a significant impact on the u and U bands owing to Balmer continuum emission. I then develop a new procedure for the internal (night-to-night) calibration of time series spectra that can reach precisions of ˜1 millimagnitude and improves traditional techniques by up to a factor of 5. At this level, other systematic issues (e.g., the nightly sensitivity functions and Fe II contamination) limit the final precision of the observed light curves. Using the new calibration method, I next present the data and first results from the optical spectroscopic monitoring component of the reverberation mapping campaign. Five AGN were sufficiently

  18. The Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Smith, Howard A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Fisher, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    We report on the analysis of the first complete far-infrared spectrum (43-197 microns) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as observed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). In addition to the 7 expected ionic fine structure emission lines, the OH rotational lines at 79, 119 and 163 microns were all detected in emission, which is unique among galaxies with full LWS spectra, where the 119 micron line, where detected, is always in absorption. The observed line intensities were modelled together with IS0 Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) and optical and ultraviolet line intensities from the literature, considering two independent emission components: the AGN component and the starburst component in the circumnuclear ring of approximately 3kpc in size. Using the UV to mid-IR emission line spectrum to constrain the nuclear ionizing continuum, we have confirmed previous results: a canonical power-law ionizing spectrum is a poorer fit than one with a deep absorption trough, while the presence of a big blue bump is ruled out. Based on the instantaneous starburst age of 5 Myr constrained by the Br gamma equivalent width in the starburst ring, and starburst synthesis models of the mid- and far-infrared fine-structure line emission, a low ionization parameter (U=10(exp -3.5)) and low densities (n=100 cm (exp -3)) are derived. Combining the AGN and starburst components, we succeed in modeling the overall UV to far-IR atomic spectrum of SGC 1068, reproducing the line fluxes to within a factor 2.0 on average with a standard deviation of 1.4. The OH 119 micron emission indicates that the line is collisionally excited, and arises in a warm and dense region. The OH emission has been modeled using spherically symmetric, non-local, non-LTE radiative transfer models. The models indicate that the bulk of the emission arises from the nuclear region, although some extended contribution from the starburst is not ruled out. The OH abundance

  19. 1300 micron continuum observations of the Sagittarius B2 molecular cloud core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, P.F.; Snell, R.L.; Lis, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Observations with 23-arcsec angular resolution are obtained of the continuum emission at 1300 microns wavelength from the central region of the Sgr B2 molecular cloud, which contains the north and middle high-mass star-forming regions and associated radio continuum and maser sources. The spatial resolution of the present data shows that the 1300-micron continuum emission peak is located at Sgr B2(N), in contrast to the midinfrared emission, which is centered on Sgr B2(M). Comparison with 53 micron data having comparable angular resolution suggests that there is optically thick foreground dust which prevents detection of Sgr B2(N) at wavelengths not greater than 100 microns. Within the about 1.5 x 3.5 pc region mapped, the total mass is 500,000 solar masses and the mean H2 density is 300,000/cu cm, somewhat larger than found in previous investigations. 27 references

  20. Radio emission in the Virgo cluster and in SO galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotanyi, C.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of the radio continuum emission from the galaxies in the Virgo Cluster is presented. The sample of 274 galaxies in total contains a subsample of 188 galaxies complete down to magntiude msub(p) = 14. The observations consisted mostly of short (10 minutes) observations providing one-dimensional (East-West) strip distributions of the radio brightness at 1.4 GHz, with an East-West resolution of 23'' allowing separation of central sources from extended emission, and an r.m.s. noise level of 2 mJy. The radio emission of SO galaxies is examined. A sample of 145 SO galaxies is obtained by combining the Virgo cluster SO's with the nearby non-cluster SO's. The radio data, mainly from short observations, are used to derive the RLF. The radio emission in SO galaxies is at least three times weaker than that in ellipticals and spirals. Flat-spectrum compact nuclear sources are found in SO galaxies but they are at least 10 times weaker than in elliptical galaxies, which is attributed to the small mass of the bulges in SO's as compared to the mass of elliptical galaxies. The absence of steep-spectrum, extended central sources and of disk radio emission in SO's is attributed to their low neutral hydrogen content. (Auth.)

  1. ARCADE 2 MEASUREMENT OF THE ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS AT 3-90 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E.; Levin, S.; Seiffert, M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The ARCADE 2 instrument has measured the absolute temperature of the sky at frequencies 3, 8, 10, 30, and 90 GHz, using an open-aperture cryogenic instrument observing at balloon altitudes with no emissive windows between the beam-forming optics and the sky. An external blackbody calibrator provides an in situ reference. Systematic errors were greatly reduced by using differential radiometers and cooling all critical components to physical temperatures approximating the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature. A linear model is used to compare the output of each radiometer to a set of thermometers on the instrument. Small corrections are made for the residual emission from the flight train, balloon, atmosphere, and foreground Galactic emission. The ARCADE 2 data alone show an excess radio rise of 54 ± 6 mK at 3.3 GHz in addition to a CMB temperature of 2.731 ± 0.004 K. Combining the ARCADE 2 data with data from the literature shows an excess power-law spectrum of T = 24.1 ± 2.1 (K) (ν/ν 0 ) -2.599±0.036 from 22 MHz to 10 GHz (ν 0 = 310 MHz) in addition to a CMB temperature of 2.725 ± 0.001 K.

  2. 557 GHz Observations of Water Vapor Outflow from VY Canis Majoris and W Hydrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwit, Martin; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2002-02-01

    We report the first detection of thermal water vapor emission in the 557 GHz, 110-101 ground-state transition of ortho-H2O toward VY Canis Majoris. In observations obtained with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite, we measured a flux of ~450 Jy, in a spectrally resolved line centered on a velocity vLSR=25 km s-1 with an FWHM of ~35 km s-1, somewhat dependent on the assumed line shape. We analyze the line shape in the context of three different radial outflow models for which we provide analytical expressions. We also detected a weaker 557 GHz emission line from W Hydrae. We find that these and other H2O emission-line strengths scale as suggested by Zubko and Elitzur.

  3. Investigation of the sensitivity of visible continuum Zeff(0) to edge radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telesca, G.; Oost, G. Van; Ongena, J.; Leys, C.; Schoon, N.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of Z eff from visible continuum radiation is based on the assumption that the line-integrated continuum signal is mostly composed of bremsstrahlung radiation. In practice a wavelength window relatively free of spectral lines is selected, and the line-integrated continuum signal along different chords from the edge up to the central plasma is measured. The local emissivity ε(r) is then calculated using an Abel inversion procedure, and the Z eff profile can be obtained. Although theory and techniques are well established, in any experimental device there remains an uncertainty in the calculated value of Z eff due to the non-bremsstrahlung radiation from the cooler edge plasma (e.g. emission from recombination and molecular bands). As a consequence, the local bremsstrahlung emissivity in the outer region of the plasma cannot be determined and the signal measured along every chord through the plasma contains a spurious contribution. In this paper the error in the value of the central plasma emissivity (and Z eff ) due to edge radiation has been investigated. Qualitative analytical considerations have been complemented by a qualitative analysis, consisting of the comparison of test emissivity profiles with Abel-inverted profiles obtained from the integrals along central chords only. (author) 5 refs., 5 figs

  4. Shell model with several particles in the continuum: application to the two-proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotureau, J.

    2005-02-01

    The recent experimental results concerning nuclei at the limit of stability close to the drip-lines and in particular the two-proton emitters require a development of new methodologies to reliably calculate and understand properties of those exotic physical systems. In this work we have extended the Shell Model Embedded in the Continuum (SMEC) in order to describe the coupling with two particles in the scattering continuum. We have obtained a microscopic description of the two-proton emission that takes into account the antisymmetrization of the total wavefunction, the configuration mixing and the three-body asymptotics. We have studied the decay of the 1 2 - state in 18 Ne in two limiting cases: (i) a sequential emission of two protons through the correlated continuum of 17 F and (ii) emission of 2 He cluster that disintegrates because of the final state interaction (diproton emission). Independently of the choice of the effective interaction we have observed that the two-proton emission of the 1 2 - in 18 Ne is mainly a sequential process; the ratio between the widths of the diproton emission and the sequential decay does not exceed 8% in any case. (author)

  5. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ran; Wu, Xue-Bing; Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Königsstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wang, Feige [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μ Jy beam{sup −1} and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μ Jy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be T {sub B} = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 10{sup 7} K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  6. Performance Analysis of OFDM 60GHz System and SC-FDE 60GHz System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xueyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of 60GHz wireless communication system with SC and OFDM is studied, the models of OFDM 60GHz system and SC 60GHz frequency domain equalization (SC-FDE system are established, and the bit error rate (BER performance of OFDM 60GHz system and SC-FDE 60GHz system in 802.15.3c channels is compared. The simulation results show that SC-FDE 60GHz system has a slight advantage over OFDM system in line-of-sight (LOS channels, while OFDM 60GHz system has a slight advantage over SC-FDE system in non-line-of-sight (NLOS channels. For 60GHz system, OFDM 60GHz system has a slight advantage over SC-FDE system in overcoming multipath fading, but the performance of both is close whether in the LOS or NLOS case.

  7. GMRT Low Radio Frequency Study of the Wolf Rayet Galaxy NGC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we present the first low frequency (< 1.4 GHz) radio continuum study of a Wolf Rayet galaxy NGC 4214 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We detect diffuse extended emission from the galaxy disk at 325 MHz and find that the radio emission closely follows the ultraviolet emission mapped by ...

  8. Planck 2013 results. XIV. Zodiacal emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2013-01-01

    , three asteroidal dust bands, a circumsolar ring, and an Earth-trailing feature. The emissivity of the diuse cloud decreases with increasing wavelength, as expected from earlier analyses. The emissivities of the dust bands, however, decrease less rapidly, indicating that the properties of the grains......The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30 GHz to 857 GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere...

  9. Entanglement swapping of a GHZ state via a GHZ-like state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chia-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih, E-mail: hwangtl@ismail.csie.ncku.edu.t [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, No. 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-15

    This study uses the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-like state |G>= 1/2 (|001>+|010>+|100>+|111>) to establish an entanglement swapping protocol on a pure GHZ state. A quantum circuit is proposed to assist in teleporting the entanglement of the pure GHZ state. Furthermore, on the basis of the generation of the GHZ-like state, an improved protocol to reduce the number of transmitted photons required in the process of entanglement swapping is proposed.

  10. M DWARF FLARE CONTINUUM VARIATIONS ON ONE-SECOND TIMESCALES: CALIBRATING AND MODELING OF ULTRACAM FLARE COLOR INDICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mathioudakis, Mihalis [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Wisniewski, John P. [HL Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Dhillon, Vik S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Marsh, Tom R. [Department of Physics, Gibbet Hill Road, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Brown, Benjamin P., E-mail: adam.f.kowalski@nasa.gov [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color–color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 10{sup 4} K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100.

  11. M DWARF FLARE CONTINUUM VARIATIONS ON ONE-SECOND TIMESCALES: CALIBRATING AND MODELING OF ULTRACAM FLARE COLOR INDICES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color–color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 10 4 K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100

  12. A survey of infrared continuum versus line radiation from metal halide lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M; Herd, M T; Lawler, J E

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared radiation (near-IR) losses from the arcs of six commercial metal halide high intensity discharge (MH-HID) lamps with various power levels and with both Na/Sc and rare earth doses were surveyed in this paper. A radiometrically calibrated Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was used. Lamps with rare earth doses have appreciably better color rendering indices (CRIs) than lamps with Na/Sc doses. The ratios of near-IR continuum emission over near-IR line emission from these six lamps were compared. The near-IR continuum dominates near-IR losses from lamps with rare earth doses and the continuum is significant, but not dominant, from lamps with Na/Sc doses. There was no strong dependence of this ratio on input power or color temperature (T c ). Total near-IR losses were estimated using absolutely calibrated, horizontal irradiance measurements. Estimated total near-IR losses were correlated with CRI. The lamps with rare earth doses yield the best CRIs, but have appreciably higher near-IR losses due primarily to continuum processes. One of these rare earth MH-HID lamps was used in a more detailed study of the microscopic physics of the continuum mechanism (Herd M T and Lawler E 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 3386)

  13. Planck 2013 results. XIV. Zodiacal emission

    OpenAIRE

    Ade, PAR; Aghanim, N; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, AJ; Barreiro, RB; Bartlett, JG; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 ESO. The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30GHz to 857GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diffuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere multiple times, through different columns of IPD. We use the Planck data to investigate the behaviour of zodiacal emission over the whole sky at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelength...

  14. Radio continuum, far infrared and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielebinski, R.; Wunderlich, E.; Klein, U.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    A very tight correlation was found between the radio emission and the far infrared emission from galaxies. This has been found for various samples of galaxies and is explained in terms of recent star formation. The tight correlation would imply that the total radio emission is a good tracer of star formation. The correlation between the radio power at 5 GHz and the far infrared luminosity is shown. The galaxies are of various morphological types and were selected from the various IRAS circulars, hence the sample is an infrared selected sample. The far infrared luminosities were corrected for the dust temperature. This is significant because it decreases the dispersion in the correlation

  15. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  16. Radio continuum interferometry of dark clouds: A search for newly formed HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, W.S.

    1978-01-01

    A search for compact HII regions embedded in dark clouds has been carried out in an effort to study local massive star formation. Approximately 20% of the total area of opaque dark cloud material in the sky with Av greater than or equal to 6 mag was surveyed with the NRAO three-element interferometer at 2695 MHz, and at least 5% more was surveyed with the NRAO 300-foot telescope at 4750 MHz. The regions surveyed include the dark cloud complexes in Perseus, Taurus, Orion, and Ophiuchus, as well as several smaller cloud complexes and individual clouds. No hidden compact HII regions embedded inside dark clouds were detected with certainty in the radio continuum. However, eleven HII regions with associated visible emission and eighteen other possible HII regions were detected. Five infrared sources thought to have the luminosities of early B stars were not detected in the radio continuum. These five sources showed high correlation with the presence of CO self-absorption, CO emission over a wide range of velocities, and type I OH masers, but an absence of coincident visible nebulosity and detectable radio continuum emission. Therefore, it is suggested that they represent an earlier evolutionary stage than those HII region detected in the radio continuum. This first evolutionary state marks the presence of ''pre-emergent'' (with respect to the molecular cloud) cocoon stars. HII regions in the second evolutionary state are marked by the presence of detectable radio continuum emission, i.e., they are stronger than 10 mJy at 2695 MHz. They have associated visible nebulosity, are relatively large, and appear to be located at the edges of molecular clouds. These are designated as ''emergent edge'' HII regions. The fact that many young HII regions are edge HII regions implies that massive stars are born near the edges of clouds, a phenomenon previously suggested by several other investigators

  17. Experimental measurements on a 100 GHz frequency tunable quasioptical gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, S.; Tran, M.Q.; Hogge, J.P.; Tran, T.M.; Bondeson, A.; Muggli, P.; Perrenoud, A.; Joedicke, B.; Mathews, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments on a 100 GHz quasioptical (QO) gyrotron operating at the fundamental (ω=Ω ce ) are described. Powers larger than 90 kW at an efficiency of about 12% were achieved. Depending on the electron beam parameters, the frequency spectrum of the output can be either single moded or multimoded. One of the main advantages of the QO gyrotron over the conventional gyrotron is its continuous frequency tunability. Various techniques to tune the output frequency have been tested, such as changing the mirror separation, the beam voltage, or the main magnetic field. Within the limitations of the present setup, 5% tunability was achieved. The QO gyrotron designed for operation at the fundamental frequency exhibits simultaneous emission at 100 GHz (fundamental) and 200 GHz (second harmonic). For a beam current of 4 A, 20% of the total rf power is emitted at the second harmonic

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 ± 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is α = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  19. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Extragalactic Sources at 148 GHz in the 2008 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriage, T. A.; Juin, J. B.; Lin, Y. T.; Marsden, D.; Nolta, M. R.; Partridge, B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, P.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report on extragalactic sources detected in a 455 square-degree map of the southern sky made with data at a frequency of 148 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope 2008 observing season. We provide a catalog of 157 sources with flux densities spanning two orders of magnitude: from 15 mJy to 1500 mJy. Comparison to other catalogs shows that 98% of the ACT detections correspond to sources detected at lower radio frequencies. Three of the sources appear to be associated with the brightest cluster galaxies of low redshift X-ray selected galaxy clusters. Estimates of the radio to mm-wave spectral indices and differential counts of the sources further bolster the hypothesis that they are nearly all radio sources, and that their emission is not dominated by re-emission from warm dust. In a bright (> 50 mJy) 148 GHz-selected sample with complete cross-identifications from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey, we observe an average steepening of the spectra between .5, 20, and 148 GHz with median spectral indices of alp[ha (sub 5-20) = -0.07 +/- 0.06, alpha (sub 20-148) -0.39 +/- 0.04, and alpha (sub 5-148) = -0.20 +/- 0.03. When the measured spectral indices are taken into account, the 148 GHz differential source counts are consistent with previous measurements at 30 GHz in the context of a source count model dominated by radio sources. Extrapolating with an appropriately rescaled model for the radio source counts, the Poisson contribution to the spatial power spectrum from synchrotron-dominated sources with flux density less than 20 mJy is C(sup Sync) = (2.8 +/- 0.3) x 1O (exp-6) micro K(exp 2).

  20. Recent operating experience with Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Ives, L.; Jory, H.; Lopez, N.; Shively, J.; Spang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The design features and initial test results of Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz CW gyrotrons are presented. The first experimental 140 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 102 kW at 24% efficiency under pulsed conditions in the desired TE 031 0 cavity mode. Further tests aimed at achieving the design goal of 100 kW CW are currently underway. The 70 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 200 kW under pulsed conditions and possesses a wide dynamic range for output power variations. 6 refs., 8 figs

  1. Lyman continuum observations of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. E.; Noyes, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of Lyman continuum observations of solar flares, using data obtained by the EUV spectroheliometer on the Apollo Telescope Mount. It is found that there are two main types of flare regions: an overall 'mean' flare coincident with the H-alpha flare region, and transient Lyman continuum kernels which can be identified with the H-alpha and X-ray kernels observed by other authors. It is found that the ground level hydrogen population in flares is closer to LTE than in the quiet sun and active regions, and that the level of Lyman continuum formation is lowered in the atmosphere from a mass column density .000005 g/sq cm in the quiet sun to .0003 g/sq cm in the mean flare, and to .001 g/sq cm in kernels. From these results the amount of chromospheric material 'evaporated' into the high temperature region is derived, which is found to be approximately 10 to the 15th g, in agreement with observations of X-ray emission measures.

  2. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY Pi GHz SKY SURVEY. I. SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND STATIC CATALOG RESULTS FOR THE BOOeTES FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Croft, Steve; Keating, Garrett; Whysong, David; Backer, Don; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, Douglas; Cheng, Calvin; Dexter, Matt; Engargiola, Greg; Ackermann, Rob; Atkinson, Shannon; Backus, Peter; Bradford, Tucker; Davis, Mike; Dreher, John; Barott, Billy; Cork, Chris; DeBoer, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Pi GHz Sky Survey (PiGSS) is a key project of the Allen Telescope Array. PiGSS is a 3.1 GHz survey of radio continuum emission in the extragalactic sky with an emphasis on synoptic observations that measure the static and time-variable properties of the sky. During the 2.5 year campaign, PiGSS will twice observe ∼250,000 radio sources in the 10,000 deg 2 region of the sky with b>30 0 to an rms sensitivity of ∼1 mJy. Additionally, sub-regions of the sky will be observed multiple times to characterize variability on timescales of days to years. We present here observations of a 10 deg 2 region in the Booetes constellation overlapping the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey field. The PiGSS image was constructed from 75 daily observations distributed over a 4 month period and has an rms flux density between 200 and 250 μJy. This represents a deeper image by a factor of 4-8 than we will achieve over the entire 10,000 deg 2 . We provide flux densities, source sizes, and spectral indices for the 425 sources detected in the image. We identify ∼100 new flat-spectrum radio sources; we project that when completed PiGSS will identify 10 4 flat-spectrum sources. We identify one source that is a possible transient radio source. This survey provides new limits on faint radio transients and variables with characteristic durations of months.

  3. Signatures of human skin in the millimetre wave band (80-100) GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owda, Amani Y.; Rezgui, Nacer-Ddine; Salmon, Neil A.

    2017-10-01

    With the performance of millimeter wave security screening imagers improving (reduced speckle, greater sensitivity, and better spatial resolution) attention is turning to identification of anomalies which appear on the human body. Key to this identification is the understanding of how the emissive and reflective properties vary over the human body and between different categories of people, defined by age and gender for example. As the interaction of millimetre waves with the human body is only a fraction of a millimetre into the skin, precise measurement of the emission and reflection of this radiation will allow comparisons with the norm for that region of the body and person category. On an automated basis at security screening portals, this will increase detection probabilities and reduce false alarm rates, ensuring high throughputs at entrances to future airport departure lounges and transport networks. A technique to measure the human skin emissivity in vivo over the frequency band 80 GHz to 100 GHz is described. The emissivities of the skin of a sample of 60 healthy participants (36 males and 24 females) measured using a 90 GHz calibrated radiometer was found to range from 0.17+/-0.002 to 0.68+/-0.002. The radiometric measurements were made at four locations on the arm, namely: palm of hand, back of hand, dorsal surface of the forearm, and volar side of the forearm, where the water content and the skin thickness are known to be different. These measurements show significant variation in emissivity from person to person and, more importantly, significant variation at different locations on the arms of individuals. Males were found to have an emissivity 0.03 higher than those of females. The emissivity of the back of the hand, where the skin is thinner and the blood vessels are closer to the skin surface, was found to be lower by 0.0681 than the emissivity of the palm of the hand, where the skin is thicker. The measurements also show that the emissivity of the

  4. GMRT Low Radio Frequency Study of the Wolf Rayet Galaxy NGC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we present the first low frequency (< 1.4 GHz) radio continuum study of a Wolf Rayet galaxy NGC 4214 using the. Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We detect diffuse extended emission from the galaxy disk at 325 MHz and find that the radio emis- sion closely follows the ultraviolet emission ...

  5. Continuum emission from irradiated solid deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forrest, J.A.; Brooks, R.L.; Hunt, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new emission feature from the spectrum of irradiated solid deuterium has been observed in the very near-infrared spectral region. Experiments from three laboratories, using different excitation conditions, have confirmed the observation. Comparison of the timing and temperature dependence...... of the spectral feature to the information previously available from electron spin resonance studies of solid deuterium, points to atomic association as the underlying cause. We shall show the connection of this emission to the occurrence of thermal spikes and optical flashes, previously observed in solid...

  6. ALMA 0.1–0.2 arcsec resolution imaging of the NGC 1068 Nucleus: compact dense molecular gas emission at the putative AGN location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Izumi, Takuma, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 2 high angular resolution (0.″1–0.″2) observations of the nuclear region of the nearby well-studied type-2 active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 1068, at HCN J = 3–2 and HCO{sup +} J = 3–2 emission lines. For the first time, due to a higher angular resolution than previous studies, we clearly detected dense molecular gas emission at the putative AGN location, identified as a ∼1.1 mm (∼266 GHz) continuum emission peak, by separating this emission from brighter emission located at 0.″5–2.″0 on the eastern and western sides of the AGN. The estimated intrinsic molecular emission size and dense molecular mass, which are thought to be associated with the putative dusty molecular torus around an AGN, were ∼10 pc and ∼several × 10{sup 5} M {sub ⊙}, respectively. HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 3–2 flux ratios substantially higher than unity were found throughout the nuclear region of NGC 1068. The continuum emission displayed an elongated morphology along the direction of the radio jet located at the northern side of the AGN, as well as a weak spatially-resolved component at ∼2.″0 on the southwestern side of the AGN. The latter component most likely originated from star formation, with the estimated luminosity more than one order of magnitude lower than the luminosity of the central AGN. No vibrationally excited ( v {sub 2} = 1f) J = 3–2 emission lines were detected for HCN and HCO{sup +} across the field of view.

  7. On the Nature of Off-limb Flare Continuum Sources Detected by SDO /HMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, P.; Kašparová, J. [Astronomical Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Kleint, L.; Krucker, S., E-mail: pheinzel@asu.cas.cz [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland)

    2017-09-20

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory has provided unique observations of off-limb flare emission. White-light continuum enhancements were detected in the “continuum” channel of the Fe 6173 Å line during the impulsive phase of the observed flares. In this paper we aim to determine which radiation mechanism is responsible for such enhancement being seen above the limb, at chromospheric heights around or below 1000 km. Using a simple analytical approach, we compare two candidate mechanisms, the hydrogen recombination continuum (Paschen) and the Thomson continuum due to scattering of disk radiation on flare electrons. Both mechanisms depend on the electron density, which is typically enhanced during the impulsive phase of a flare as the result of collisional ionization (both thermal and also non-thermal due to electron beams). We conclude that for electron densities higher than 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, the Paschen recombination continuum significantly dominates the Thomson scattering continuum and there is some contribution from the hydrogen free–free emission. This is further supported by detailed radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations of the flare chromosphere heated by the electron beams. We use the RHD code FLARIX to compute the temporal evolution of the flare-heating in a semi-circular loop. The synthesized continuum structure above the limb resembles the off-limb flare structures detected by HMI, namely their height above the limb, as well as the radiation intensity. These results are consistent with recent findings related to hydrogen Balmer continuum enhancements, which were clearly detected in disk flares by the IRIS near-ultraviolet spectrometer.

  8. Band-9 ALMA Observations of the [N II] 122 μm Line and FIR Continuum in Two High-z galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl; Brisbin, Drew; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.; Sheth, Kartik; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Falgarone, Edith

    2015-06-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of two high-redshift systems (SMMJ02399-0136 at z 1 ˜ 2.8 and the Cloverleaf QSO at z 1 ˜ 2.5) in their rest-frame 122 μm continuum (ν sky ˜ 650 GHz, λ sky ˜ 450 μm) and [N ii] 122 μm line emission. The continuum observations with a synthesized beam of ˜0.″ 25 resolve both sources and recover the expected flux. The Cloverleaf is resolved into a partial Einstein ring, while SMMJ02399-0136 is unambiguously separated into two components: a point source associated with an active galactic nucleus and an extended region at the location of a previously identified dusty starburst. We detect the [N ii] line in both systems, though significantly weaker than our previous detections made with the first generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer. We show that this discrepancy is mostly explained if the line flux is resolved out due to significantly more extended emission and longer ALMA baselines than expected. Based on the ALMA observations we determine that ≥75% of the total [N ii] line flux in each source is produced via star formation. We use the [N ii] line flux that is recovered by ALMA to constrain the N/H abundance, ionized gas mass, hydrogen- ionizing photon rate, and star formation rate. In SMMJ02399-0136 we discover it contains a significant amount (˜1000 M ⊙ yr-1) of unobscured star formation in addition to its dusty starburst and argue that SMMJ02399-0136 may be similar to the Antennae Galaxies (Arp 244) locally. In total these observations provide a new look at two well-studied systems while demonstrating the power and challenges of Band-9 ALMA observations of high-z systems.

  9. BAND-9 ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE [N II] 122 μm LINE AND FIR CONTINUUM IN TWO HIGH-z GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brisbin, Drew; Stacey, Gordon J. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Nikola, Thomas [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve [California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 301-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, Edith, E-mail: ferkinhoff@mpia.de [LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris and ENS (France)

    2015-06-20

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of two high-redshift systems (SMMJ02399-0136 at z{sub 1} ∼ 2.8 and the Cloverleaf QSO at z{sub 1} ∼ 2.5) in their rest-frame 122 μm continuum (ν{sub sky} ∼ 650 GHz, λ{sub sky} ∼ 450 μm) and [N ii] 122 μm line emission. The continuum observations with a synthesized beam of ∼0.″ 25 resolve both sources and recover the expected flux. The Cloverleaf is resolved into a partial Einstein ring, while SMMJ02399-0136 is unambiguously separated into two components: a point source associated with an active galactic nucleus and an extended region at the location of a previously identified dusty starburst. We detect the [N ii] line in both systems, though significantly weaker than our previous detections made with the first generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer. We show that this discrepancy is mostly explained if the line flux is resolved out due to significantly more extended emission and longer ALMA baselines than expected. Based on the ALMA observations we determine that ≥75% of the total [N ii] line flux in each source is produced via star formation. We use the [N ii] line flux that is recovered by ALMA to constrain the N/H abundance, ionized gas mass, hydrogen- ionizing photon rate, and star formation rate. In SMMJ02399-0136 we discover it contains a significant amount (∼1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) of unobscured star formation in addition to its dusty starburst and argue that SMMJ02399-0136 may be similar to the Antennae Galaxies (Arp 244) locally. In total these observations provide a new look at two well-studied systems while demonstrating the power and challenges of Band-9 ALMA observations of high-z systems.

  10. Global spiral structure of M81 - radio continuum maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bash, F.N.; Kaufman, M.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus)

    1986-01-01

    VLA observations of the radio continuum emission from M81 at 6 and 20 cm are presented and used to check the predictions of density-wave theories. Both thermal and nonthermal radiation from the spiral arms are detected. Most of the bright knots along the radio arms are giant radio H II regions. The nonthermal emission defines spiral arms that are patchy and well-resolved, with a width of 1-2 kpc. The observed nonthermal arms are too broad to agree with the continuum gasdynamical calculations of Roberts (1969), Shu et al. (1972), and Visser (1978, 1980) for a classical density wave model. The observed arm widths appear consistent with the predictions of density-wave models that emphasize the clumpy nature of the ISM. The 20 cm arms appear to spiral outward from a faint inner H I ring, suggesting that the ring is produced by the inner Lindblad resonance. 36 references

  11. Sub-arcsecond imaging of the water emission in Arp 220⋆ ⋆⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, S.; Martín, S.; Muller, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Zschaechner, L. K.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Mroczkowski, T.; Krips, M.; Galametz, M.; Aalto, S.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Ott, J.; Meier, D. S.; Fuente, A.; García-Burillo, S.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Extragalactic observations of water emission can provide valuable insights into the excitation of the interstellar medium. In particular they allow us to investigate the excitation mechanisms in obscured nuclei, i.e. whether an active galactic nucleus or a starburst dominate. Methods We use sub-arcsecond resolution observations to tackle the nature of the water emission in Arp 220. ALMA Band 5 science verification observations of the 183 GHz H2O 313−220 line, in conjunction with new ALMA Band 7 H2O 515−422 data at 325 GHz, and supplementary 22 GHz H2O 616 − 523 VLA observations, are used to better constrain the parameter space in the excitation modelling of the water lines. Results We detect 183 GHz H2O and 325 GHz water emission towards the two compact nuclei at the center of Arp 220, being brighter in Arp 220 West. The emission at these two frequencies is compared to previous single-dish data and does not show evidence of variability. The 183 and 325 GHz lines show similar spectra and kinematics, but the 22 GHz profile is significantly different in both nuclei due to a blend with an NH3 absorption line. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the most likely scenario to cause the observed water emission in Arp 220 is a large number of independent masers originating from numerous star-forming regions. PMID:29151605

  12. Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This book offers a broad overview of the potential of continuum mechanics to describe a wide range of macroscopic phenomena in real-world problems. Building on the fundamentals presented in the authors' previous book, Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica(R), this new work explores interesting models of continuum mechanics, with an emphasis on exploring the flexibility of their applications in a wide variety of fields.Specific topics, which have been chosen to show the power of continuum mechanics to characterize the experimental behavior of real phenomena, include: * various aspects of nonlin

  13. INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PROCESSING IN THE INNER 20 pc IN GALACTIC CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Sun, Ai-Lei; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Minh, Young Chol

    2013-01-01

    We present the Submillimeter Array 157 pointing mosaic in 0.86 mm dust continuum emission with 5.''1 × 4.''2 angular resolution, and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank 100 m Telescope (GBT) observations of the CS/C 34 S/ 13 CS 1-0 and SiO 1-0 emission with ≤20'' × 18'' angular resolution. The dust continuum image marginally resolves at least several tens of 10-10 2 M ☉ dense clumps in the 5' field including the circumnuclear disk (CND) and the exterior gas streamers. There is very good agreement between the high resolution dust continuum map of the CND and all previous molecular line observations. As the dust emission is the most reliable optically thin tracer of the mass, free from most chemical and excitation effects, we demonstrate the reality of the abundant localized structures within the CND, and their connection to external gas structures. From the spectral line data, the velocity dispersions of the dense clumps and their parent molecular clouds are ∼10-20 times higher than their virial velocity dispersions. This supports the idea that the CND and its immediate environment may not be stationary or stable structures. Some of the dense gas clumps are associated with 22 GHz water masers and 36.2 GHz and 44.1 GHz CH 3 OH masers. However, we do not find clumps that are bound by the gravity of the enclosed molecular gas. Hence, the CH 3 OH or H 2 O maser emission may be due to strong (proto)stellar feedback, which may be dispersing some of the gas clumps.

  14. THE 5 GHz ARECIBO SEARCH FOR RADIO FLARES FROM ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Route, Matthew; Wolszczan, Alexander, E-mail: mroute@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: alex@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    We present the results of a 4.75 GHz survey of 33 brown dwarfs and one young exoplanetary system for flaring radio emission, conducted with the 305 m Arecibo radio telescope. The goal of this program was to detect and characterize the magnetic fields of objects cooler than spectral type L3.5, the coolest brown dwarf detected prior to our survey. We have also attempted to detect flaring radio emission from the HR 8799 planetary system, guided by theoretical work indicating that hot, massive exoplanets may have strong magnetic fields capable of generating radio emission at GHz frequencies. We have detected and confirmed radio flares from the T6.5 dwarf 2MASS J10475385+2124234. This detection dramatically extends the temperature range over which brown dwarfs appear to be at least sporadic radio-emitters, from 1900 K (L3.5) down to 900 K (T6.5). It also demonstrates that the utility of radio detection as a unique tool to study the magnetic fields of substellar objects extends to the coolest dwarfs, and, plausibly to hot, massive exoplanets. We have also identified a single, 3.6{sigma} flare from the L1 dwarf, 2MASS J1439284+192915. This detection is tentative and requires confirmation by additional monitoring observations.

  15. WEAK AND COMPACT RADIO EMISSION IN EARLY HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS. I. VLA OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy Pl., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Claussen, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Rd., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Loinard, L. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia 58090, México (Mexico); Cesaroni, R. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Araya, E. D. [Physics Department, Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States); Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F. [Max-Planck-Institute für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ellingsen, S. P. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)

    2016-12-01

    We present a high-sensitivity radio continuum survey at 6 and 1.3 cm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array toward a sample of 58 high-mass star-forming regions. Our sample was chosen from dust clumps within infrared dark clouds with and without IR sources (CMC–IRs and CMCs, respectively), and hot molecular cores (HMCs), with no previous, or relatively weak radio continuum detection at the 1 mJy level. Due to the improvement in the continuum sensitivity of the Very Large Array, this survey achieved map rms levels of ∼3–10  μ Jy beam{sup −1} at sub-arcsecond angular resolution. We extracted 70 continuum sources associated with 1.2 mm dust clumps. Most sources are weak, compact, and prime candidates for high-mass protostars. Detection rates of radio sources associated with the millimeter dust clumps for CMCs, CMC–IRs, and HMCs are 6%, 53%, and 100%, respectively. This result is consistent with increasing high-mass star formation activity from CMCs to HMCs. The radio sources located within HMCs and CMC–IRs occur close to the dust clump centers, with a median offset from it of 12,000 au and 4000 au, respectively. We calculated 5–25 GHz spectral indices using power-law fits and obtained a median value of 0.5 (i.e., flux increasing with frequency), suggestive of thermal emission from ionized jets. In this paper we describe the sample, observations, and detections. The analysis and discussion will be presented in Paper II.

  16. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  17. Planck 2013 results. XIV. Zodiacal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colley, J.-M.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polegre, A. M.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Smoot, G. F.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30 GHz to 857 GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diffuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere multiple times, through different columns of IPD. We use the Planck data to investigate the behaviour of zodiacal emission over the whole sky at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths. We fit the Planck data to find the emissivities of the various components of the COBE zodiacal model -- a diffuse cloud, three asteroidal dust bands, a circumsolar ring, and an Earth-trailing feature. The emissivity of the diffuse cloud decreases with increasing wavelength, as expected from earlier analyses. The emissivities of the dust bands, however, decrease less rapidly, indicating that the properties of the grains in the bands are different from those in the diffuse cloud. We fit the small amount of Galactic emission seen t...

  18. Static third-harmonic lines in widely variable fiber continuum generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing phenomenon of third-harmonic generation under fiber continuum generation is the emission of an anharmonic signal. One popular interpretation of this effect has developed into a general theory of fiber third-harmonic generation. Here we produce "static" third-harmonic lines dictated fully by fiber properties independent of pump parameters, in contrast to the signals of all known phase-matched nonlinear optical processes that vary dynamically with these parameters. We argue that the anharmonic signal is an illusion of the continuum generation, that it is in fact harmonic, and that this theory should be reevaluated.

  19. M Dwarf Flare Continuum Variations on One-second Timescales: Calibrating and Modeling of ULTRACAM Flare Color Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Hilton, Eric J.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color-color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 104 K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium, based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, and observations, and based on observations made with the ESO Telescopes

  20. A Characterization of the Diffuse Galactic Emissions at Large Angular Scales Using the Tenerife Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Macías-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    diffuse emission in the range from 20 to 60 GHz. To discriminate between different models of AME, low frequency microwave data from 10 to 20 GHz are needed. We present here a reanalysis of published and unpublished Tenerife data from 10 to 33 GHz at large angular scales (from 5 to 15 degrees. We cross-correlate the Tenerife data to templates of the main galactic diffuse emissions: synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We find evidence of dust-correlated emission in the Tenerife data that could be explained as spinning dust grain emission.

  1. Antenne Design for 24 GHz and 60 GHz Emerging Microwave Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, F.; Dolmans, W.M.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this project integrated antennas on a LAMP3 substrate for automotive radar systems at 24 GHz and wireless networks at 60 GHz have been designed. The most severe requirements on the antennas were the large bandwidth, which can not be met with conventional patch antennas. A tapered slot antenna and

  2. Laboratory Heterodyne Spectrometers Operating at 100 and 300 GHZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maßen, Jakob; Wehres, Nadine; Hermanns, Marius; Lewen, Frank; Heyne, Bettina; Endres, Christian; Graf, Urs; Honingh, Netty; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Two new laboratory heterodyne emission spectrometers are presented that are currently used for high-resolution rotational spectroscopy of complex organic molecules. The room temperature heterodyne receiver operating between 80-110 GHz, as well as the SIS heterodyne receiver operating between 270-370 GHz allow access to two very important frequency regimes, coinciding with Bands 3 and 7 of the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) telescope. Taking advantage of recent progresses in the field of mm/submm technology, we build these two spectrometers using an XFFFTS (eXtended Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer) for spectral acquisition. The instantaneous bandwidth is 2.5 GHz in a single sideband, spread over 32768 channels. Thus, the spectral resolution is about 76 kHz per channel and thus comparable to high resolution spectra from telescopes. Both receivers are operated in double sideband mode resulting in a total instantaneous bandwidth of 5 GHz. The system performances, in particular the noise temperatures and stabilities are presented. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by showing spectra of methyl cyanide obtained with both spectrometers. While the transition frequencies for this molecule are very well known, intensities of those transitions can also be determined with high accuracy using our new instruments. This additional information shall be exploited in future measurements to improve spectral predictions for astronomical observations. Other future prospects concern the study of more complex organic species, such as ethyl cyanide. These aspects of the new instruments as well as limitations of the two distinct receivers will be discussed.

  3. Superconducting ECR ion source: From 24-28 GHz SECRAL to 45 GHz fourth generation ECR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Zhang, W. H.; Lu, W.; Wu, W.; Wu, B. M.; Sabbi, G.; Juchno, M.; Hafalia, A.; Ravaioli, E.; Xie, D. Z.

    2018-05-01

    The development of superconducting ECR source with higher magnetic fields and higher microwave frequency is the most straight forward path to achieve higher beam intensity and higher charge state performance. SECRAL, a superconducting third generation ECR ion source, is designed for 24-28 GHz microwave frequency operation with an innovative magnet configuration of sextupole coils located outside the three solenoids. SECRAL at 24 GHz has already produced a number of record beam intensities, such as 40Ar12+ 1.4 emA, 129Xe26+ 1.1 emA, 129Xe30+ 0.36 emA, and 209Bi31+ 0.68 emA. SECRAL-II, an upgraded version of SECRAL, was built successfully in less than 3 years and has recently been commissioned at full power of a 28 GHz gyrotron and three-frequency heating (28 + 45 + 18 GHz). New record beam intensities for highly charged ion production have been achieved, such as 620 eμA 40Ar16+, 15 eμA 40Ar18+, 146 eμA 86Kr28+, 0.5 eμA 86Kr33+, 53 eμA 129Xe38+, and 17 eμA 129Xe42+. Recent beam test results at SECRAL and SECRAL II have demonstrated that the production of more intense highly charged heavy ion beams needs higher microwave power and higher frequency, as the scaling law predicted. A 45 GHz superconducting ECR ion source FECR (a first fourth generation ECR ion source) is being built at IMP. FECR will be the world's first Nb3Sn superconducting-magnet-based ECR ion source with 6.5 T axial mirror field, 3.5 T sextupole field on the plasma chamber inner wall, and 20 kW at a 45 GHz microwave coupling system. This paper will focus on SECRAL performance studies at 24-28 GHz and technical design of 45 GHz FECR, which demonstrates a technical path for highly charged ion beam production from 24 to 28 GHz SECRAL to 45 GHz FECR.

  4. Contactless Investigations of Yeast Cell Cultivation in the 7 GHz and 240 GHz Ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, J; Schmalz, K; Meliani, C; Gastrock, G; Cahill, B P

    2013-01-01

    Using a microfluidic system based on PTFE tubes, experimental results of contactless and label-free characterization techniques of yeast cell cultivation are presented. The PTFE tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm resulting in a sample volume of 2 μ1 for 1 cm sample length. Two approaches (at frequencies around 7 GHz and 240 GHz) are presented and compared in terms of sensitivity and applicability. These frequency bands are particularly interesting to gain information on the permittivity of yeast cells in Glucose solution. Measurements from 240 GHz to 300 GHz were conducted with a continuous wave spectrometer from Toptica. At 7 GHz band, measurements have been performed using a rat-race based characterizing system realized on a printed circuit board. The conducted experiments demonstrate that by selecting the phase as characterization parameter, the presented contactless and label-free techniques are suitable for cell cultivation monitoring in a PTFE pipe based microfluidic system.

  5. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Green, Paul J.; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Protopapas, Pavlos [Institute for Applied Computational Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Scott, Caroline [Astrophysics, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band ( g , r , i , z ) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN , we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g − r to g − i and then to g − z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  6. Low conversion loss 94 GHz and 188 GHz doublers in InP DHBT technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Squartecchia, Michele

    2017-01-01

    An Indium Phosphide (InP) Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (DHBT) process has been utilized to design two doublers to cover the 94 GHz and 188 GHz bands. The 94 GHz doubler employs 4-finger DHBTs and provides conversion loss of 2 dB. A maximum output power of nearly 3 dBm is measured whil...... operate over a broad bandwidth. The total circuit area of each chip is 1.41 mm2....

  7. EMPIRICAL PREDICTIONS FOR (SUB-)MILLIMETER LINE AND CONTINUUM DEEP FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Cunha, Elisabete; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bertoldi, Frank [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Carilli, Chris [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Pete V. Domenici Array Science Center, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Sargent, Mark [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ivison, Rob [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Maiolino, Roberto [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Riechers, Dominik [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smail, Ian [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Weiss, Axel, E-mail: cunha@mpia.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Modern (sub-)millimeter/radio interferometers such as ALMA, JVLA, and the PdBI successor NOEMA will enable us to measure the dust and molecular gas emission from galaxies that have luminosities lower than the Milky Way, out to high redshifts and with unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. This will provide new constraints on the star formation properties and gas reservoir in galaxies throughout cosmic times through dedicated deep field campaigns targeting the CO/[C II] lines and dust continuum emission in the (sub-)millimeter regime. In this paper, we present empirical predictions for such line and continuum deep fields. We base these predictions on the deepest available optical/near-infrared Advanced Camera for Surveys and NICMOS data on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (over an area of about 12 arcmin{sup 2}). Using a physically motivated spectral energy distribution model, we fit the observed optical/near-infrared emission of 13,099 galaxies with redshifts up to z = 5, and obtain median-likelihood estimates of their stellar mass, star formation rate, dust attenuation, and dust luminosity. We combine the attenuated stellar spectra with a library of infrared emission models spanning a wide range of dust temperatures to derive statistical constraints on the dust emission in the infrared and (sub-)millimeter which are consistent with the observed optical/near-infrared emission in terms of energy balance. This allows us to estimate, for each galaxy, the (sub-)millimeter continuum flux densities in several ALMA, PdBI/NOEMA, and JVLA bands. As a consistency check, we verify that the 850 {mu}m number counts and extragalactic background light derived using our predictions are consistent with previous observations. Using empirical relations between the observed CO/[C II] line luminosities and the infrared luminosity of star-forming galaxies, we infer the luminosity of the CO(1-0) and [C II] lines from the estimated infrared luminosity of each galaxy in our sample

  8. The relationship between Class I and Class II methanol masers at high angular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. P.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Cimò, G.

    2018-06-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to make the first high-resolution observations of a large sample of class I methanol masers in the 95-GHz (80-71A+) transition. The target sources consist of a statistically complete sample of 6.7-GHz class II methanol masers with an associated 95-GHz class I methanol maser, enabling a detailed study of the relationship between the two methanol maser classes at arcsecond angular resolution. These sources have been previously observed at high resolution in the 36- and 44-GHz transitions, allowing comparison between all three class I maser transitions. In total, 172 95-GHz maser components were detected across the 32 target sources. We find that at high resolution, when considering matched maser components, a 3:1 flux density ratio is observed between the 95- and 44-GHz components, consistent with a number of previous lower angular resolution studies. The 95-GHz maser components appear to be preferentially located closer to the driving sources and this may indicate that this transition is more strongly inverted nearby to background continuum sources. We do not observe an elevated association rate between 95-GHz maser emission and more evolved sources, as indicated by the presence of 12.2-GHz class II masers. We find that in the majority of cases where both class I and class II methanol emission is observed, some component of the class I emission is associated with a likely outflow candidate.

  9. Blue optical continuum associated with a radio knot in 3C346

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Arjun; van Breugel, Wil J. M.

    1994-06-01

    We report the discovery of extremely luminous near-UV continuum emission associated with a bright radio knot in the radio galaxy 3C346 (zeta = 0.162). Photometric measurements from U and r' band images and longslit spectra show a spectral energy distribution that steepens at higher frequencies, with radio and optical spectral indices alphar = -0.37 +/- 0.02 and alphao = -1.8 +/- 0.2, respectively. Based on a comparison of the optical properties of this knot with other known cases of optical emission associated with radio structures, we conclude that the continuum emission is optical synchrotron radiation. Our observations are consistent with the suggestion that 3C346 is a foreshortened FR-II radio galaxy with its radio axis oriented close to the line of sight. The optical and radio emission from the knot appear to be associated with a hotspot (at the end of a jet) on the near side. Finally, our U and r' images of 3C346 provide a striking illustration that the optical morphologies of nearby radio galaxies also depend upon wavelength and that studies of these objects are relevant to the interpretation of the alignment effect seen in the high redshift radio galaxies.

  10. HERSCHEL/PACS SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN TAURUS/AURIGA—OBSERVATIONS OF [O I] AND [C II], AND FAR-INFRARED CONTINUUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Vacca, William D.; Duchêne, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Ménard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Thi, Wing-Fai; Barrado, David; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Grady, Carol; Roberge, Aki; Kamp, Inga; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe ∼120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 μm, [O I] 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, OH, H 2 O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 μm. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 μm line and the 63 μm continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 μm is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 μm emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 μm to [O I] 145 μm are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 μm and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk

  11. Lower thermospheric nitric oxide concentrations derived from WINDII observations of the green nightglow continuum at 553.1 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. A. von Savigny

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of nitric oxide in the altitude range 90 to 105 km are derived from 553 nm nightglow continuum measurements made with the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. The profiles are derived under the assumption that the continuum emission is due entirely to the NO+O air afterglow reaction. Vertical profiles of the atomic oxygen density, which are required to determine the nitric oxide concentrations, are derived from coordinated WINDII measurements of the atomic oxygen OI 557.7 nm nightglow emission. Data coverage for local solar times ranging from 20 h to 04 h, and latitudes ranging from 42°S to 42°N, is achieved by zonally averaging and binning data obtained on 18 nights during a two-month period extending from mid-November 1992 until mid-January 1993. The derived nitric oxide concentrations are significantly smaller than those obtained from rocket measurements of the airglow continuum but they do compare well with model expectations and nitric oxide densities measured using the resonance fluorescence technique on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite. The near-global coverage of the WINDII observations and the similarities to the nitric oxide global morphology established from other satellite measurements strongly suggests that the NO+O reaction is the major source of the continuum near 553 nm and that there is no compelling reason to invoke additional sources of continuum emission in this immediate spectral region.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; thermosphere – composition and chemistry; instruments and techniques

  12. SiO maser emission as a density tracer of circumstellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Michael; Pihlstrom, Ylva; Sjouwerman, Lorant

    2018-06-01

    The circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of evolved stars offer a method to construct a sample of point-masses along the full Galactic plane, which can be used to test models of the gravitational potential. In the CSEs of red giants, SiO maser emission is frequently observed at 43 and 86 GHz, providing line-of-sight velocities. The Bulge Asymmetries and Dynamical Evolution (BAaDE) project aims to explore the complex structure of the inner Galaxy and Galactic Bulge, by observing 43 GHz SiO at the Very Large Array and 86 GHz SiO at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, with an expected final sample of about 20,000 line-of-sight velocities and positions. We observed the 43 GHz and 86 GHz transitions near-simultaneously in a subsample of the sources using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and found that on average the 43 GHz v=1 line is 1.3 times stronger than the 86 GHz v=1 line. The presence of a detectable 43 GHz v=3 line alters the statistics, consistent with the SiO masers displaying 43 GHz v=3 emission arising in a denser regime in the circumstellar shell compared to those without. Comparing our results with radiative models implies that the 43 GHz v=3 line is a tracer of density variations caused by stellar pulsations. We will discuss these results in the context of the BAaDE project.

  13. ALMA 690 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF IRAS 16293–2422B: INFALL IN A HIGHLY OPTICALLY THICK DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Hernández-Hernández, Vicente; Takahashi, Satoko; Trejo, Alfonso; Parise, Bérengère

    2013-01-01

    We present sensitive, high angular resolution (∼0.''2) submillimeter continuum and line observations of IRAS 16293–2422B made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The 0.45 mm continuum observations reveal a single and very compact source associated with IRAS 16293–2422B. This submillimeter source has a deconvolved angular size of about 400 mas (50 AU) and does not show any inner structure inside of this diameter. The H 13 CN, HC 15 N, and CH 3 OH line emission regions are about twice as large as the continuum emission and reveal a pronounced inner depression or ''hole'' with a size comparable to that estimated for the submillimeter continuum. We suggest that the presence of this inner depression and the fact that we do not see an inner structure (or a flat structure) in the continuum are produced by very optically thick dust located in the innermost parts of IRAS 16293–2422B. All three lines also show pronounced inverse P-Cygni profiles with infall and dispersion velocities larger than those recently reported from observations at lower frequencies, suggesting that we are detecting faster and more turbulent gas located closer to the central object. Finally, we report a small east-west velocity gradient in IRAS 16293–2422B that suggests that its disk plane is likely located very close to the plane of the sky.

  14. Black Hole Mass Estimation in Type 1 AGN: Hβ vs. Mg II Lines and the Role of Balmer Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovačević-Dojčinović, Jelena [Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade (Serbia); Marčeta-Mandić, Sladjana; Popović, Luka Č., E-mail: sladjana@aob.rs [Astronomical Observatory, Belgrade (Serbia); Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-07-24

    Here we investigate the Hβ and Mg II spectral line parameters used for the black hole mass (M{sub BH}) estimation for a sample of Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. We have analyzed and compared the virialization of the Hβ and Mg II emission lines, and found that the Hβ line is more confident virial estimator than Mg II. We have investigated the influence of the Balmer continuum emission to the M{sub BH} estimation from the UV parameters, and found that the Balmer continuum emission can contribute to the overestimation of the M{sub BH} on average for ~5% (up to 10%).

  15. Microlensing of quasar ultraviolet iron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna 38200, Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Lab, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Falco, E. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Motta, V.; Rojas, K. [Departamento de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Avda. Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2013-12-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in four cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications, we infer a typical size of r{sub s}∼4√(M/M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the Fe line-emitting regions, which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (∼3-7 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.

  16. CONTEMPORANEOUS VLBA 5 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTED BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Romani, R. W. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Helmboldt, J. F. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Richards, J. L. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 247-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    The radio properties of blazars detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In total, 232 sources were observed with the VLBA. Ninety sources that were previously observed as part of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) have been included in the sample, as well as 142 sources not found in VIPS. This very large, 5 GHz flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provides insights into the mechanism that produces strong {gamma}-ray emission. In particular, we see that {gamma}-ray emission is related to strong, uniform magnetic fields in the cores of the host AGN. Included in this sample are non-blazar AGNs such as 3C84, M82, and NGC 6251. For the blazars, the total VLBA radio flux density at 5 GHz correlates strongly with {gamma}-ray flux. The LAT BL Lac objects tend to be similar to the non-LAT BL Lac objects, but the LAT flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are significantly different from the non-LAT FSRQs. Strong core polarization is significantly more common among the LAT sources, and core fractional polarization appears to increase during LAT detection.

  17. CONTEMPORANEOUS VLBA 5 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTED BLAZARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Romani, R. W.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Richards, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    The radio properties of blazars detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In total, 232 sources were observed with the VLBA. Ninety sources that were previously observed as part of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) have been included in the sample, as well as 142 sources not found in VIPS. This very large, 5 GHz flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provides insights into the mechanism that produces strong γ-ray emission. In particular, we see that γ-ray emission is related to strong, uniform magnetic fields in the cores of the host AGN. Included in this sample are non-blazar AGNs such as 3C84, M82, and NGC 6251. For the blazars, the total VLBA radio flux density at 5 GHz correlates strongly with γ-ray flux. The LAT BL Lac objects tend to be similar to the non-LAT BL Lac objects, but the LAT flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are significantly different from the non-LAT FSRQs. Strong core polarization is significantly more common among the LAT sources, and core fractional polarization appears to increase during LAT detection.

  18. Contemporaneous VLBA 5 GHz Observations of Large Area Telescope Detected Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Romani, R. W.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Richards, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    The radio properties of blazars detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In total, 232 sources were observed with the VLBA. Ninety sources that were previously observed as part of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) have been included in the sample, as well as 142 sources not found in VIPS. This very large, 5 GHz flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provides insights into the mechanism that produces strong γ-ray emission. In particular, we see that γ-ray emission is related to strong, uniform magnetic fields in the cores of the host AGN. Included in this sample are non-blazar AGNs such as 3C84, M82, and NGC 6251. For the blazars, the total VLBA radio flux density at 5 GHz correlates strongly with γ-ray flux. The LAT BL Lac objects tend to be similar to the non-LAT BL Lac objects, but the LAT flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are significantly different from the non-LAT FSRQs. Strong core polarization is significantly more common among the LAT sources, and core fractional polarization appears to increase during LAT detection.

  19. DEEP RADIO CONTINUUM IMAGING OF THE DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC 10: TRACING STAR FORMATION AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesen, V.; Brinks, E.; Rau, U.; Rupen, M. P.; Hunter, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We exploit the vastly increased sensitivity of the Expanded Very Large Array to study the radio continuum and polarization properties of the post-starburst, dwarf irregular galaxy IC 10 at 6 cm, at a linear resolution of ∼50 pc. We find close agreement between radio continuum and Hα emission, from the brightest H II regions to the weaker emission in the disk. A quantitative analysis shows a strictly linear correlation, where the thermal component contributes 50% to the total radio emission, the remainder being due to a non-thermal component with a surprisingly steep radio spectral index of between -0.7 and -1.0 suggesting substantial radiation losses of the cosmic-ray electrons. We confirm and clearly resolve polarized emission at the 10%-20% level associated with a non-thermal superbubble, where the ordered magnetic field is possibly enhanced due to the compression of the expanding bubble. A fraction of the cosmic-ray electrons has likely escaped because the measured radio emission is a factor of three lower than what is suggested by the Hα-inferred star formation rate.

  20. Integrated 60GHz RF beamforming in CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yikun; van Roermund, Arthur H M

    2011-01-01

    ""Integrated 60GHz RF Beamforming in CMOS"" describes new concepts and design techniques that can be used for 60GHz phased array systems. First, general trends and challenges in low-cost high data-rate 60GHz wireless system are studied, and the phased array technique is introduced to improve the system performance. Second, the system requirements of phase shifters are analyzed, and different phased array architectures are compared. Third, the design and implementation of 60GHz passive and active phase shifters in a CMOS technology are presented. Fourth, the integration of 60GHz phase shifters

  1. MODELING THERMAL DUST EMISSION WITH TWO COMPONENTS: APPLICATION TO THE PLANCK HIGH FREQUENCY INSTRUMENT MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales

  2. The search for faint radio supernova remnants in the outer Galaxy: five new discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie; Foster, Tyler J.; Kothes, Roland; Geisbüsch, Jörn; Tung, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Context. High resolution and sensitivity large-scale radio surveys of the Milky Way are critical in the discovery of very low surface brightness supernova remnants (SNRs), which may constitute a significant portion of the Galactic SNRs still unaccounted for (ostensibly the "missing SNR problem"). Aims: The overall purpose here is to present the results of a systematic, deep data-mining of the Canadian Galactic plane Survey (CGPS) for faint, extended non-thermal and polarized emission structures that are likely the shells of uncatalogued SNRs. Methods: We examine 5 × 5 degree mosaics from the entire 1420 MHz continuum and polarization dataset of the CGPS after removing unresolved "point" sources and subsequently smoothing them. Newly revealed extended emission objects are compared to similarly prepared CGPS 408 MHz continuum mosaics, as well as to source-removed mosaics from various existing radio surveys at 4.8 GHz, 2.7 GHz, and 327 MHz, to identify candidates with non-thermal emission characteristics. We integrate flux densities at each frequency to characterise the radio spectra behaviour of these candidates. We further look for mid- and high-frequency (1420 MHz, 4.8 GHz) ordered polarized emission from the limb brightened "shell"-like continuum features that the candidates sport. Finally, we use IR and optical maps to provide additional backing evidence. Results: Here we present evidence that five new objects, identified as filling all or some of the criteria above, are strong candidates for new SNRs. These five are designated by their Galactic coordinate names G108.5+11.0, G128.5+2.6, G149.5+3.2, G150.8+3.8, and G160.1-1.1. The radio spectrum of each is presented, highlighting their steepness, which is characteristic of synchrotron radiation. CGPS 1420 MHz polarization data and 4.8 GHz polarization data also provide evidence that these objects are newly discovered SNRs. These discoveries represent a significant increase in the number of SNRs known in the outer

  3. Optical stealth transmission based on super-continuum generation in highly nonlinear fiber over WDM network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huatao; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Xiang, Peng; Zheng, Jilin; Chen, Dalei

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, the optical stealth transmission carried by super-continuum spectrum optical pulses generated in highly nonlinear fiber is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed transmission scheme, super-continuum signals are reshaped in the spectral domain through a wavelength-selective switch and are temporally spread by a chromatic dispersion device to achieve the same noise-like characteristic as the noise in optical networks, so that in both the time domain and the spectral domain, the stealth signals are hidden in public channel. Our experimental results show that compared with existing schemes where stealth channels are carried by amplified spontaneous emission noise, super-continuum signal can increase the transmission performance and robustness.

  4. Discovery of a Kiloparsec Extended Hard X-Ray Continuum and Fe-Kα from the Compton Thick AGN ESO 428-G014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, G.; Elvis, M.; Paggi, A.; Karovska, M.; Maksym, W. P.; Raymond, J.; Risaliti, G.; Wang, Junfeng

    2017-06-01

    We report the discovery of kiloparsec-scale diffuse emission in both the hard continuum (3-6 keV) and in the Fe-Kα line in the Compton thick (CT) Seyfert galaxy ESO 428-G014. This extended hard component contains at least ˜24% of the observed 3-8 keV emission, and follows the direction of the extended optical line emission (ionization cone) and radio jet. The extended hard component has ˜0.5% of the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity within the bi-cones. A uniform scattering medium of density 1 {{cm}}-3 would produce this luminosity in a 1 kpc path length in the bi-cones. Alternatively, higher column density molecular clouds in the disk of ESO 428-G014 may be responsible for these components. The continuum may also be enhanced by the acceleration of charged particles in the radio jet. The steeper spectrum (Γ ˜ 1.7 ± 0.4) of the hard continuum outside of the central 1.″5 radius nuclear region suggests a contribution of scattered/fluorescent intrinsic Seyfert emission. Ultrafast nuclear outflows cannot explain the extended Fe-Kα emission. This discovery suggests that we may need to revise the picture at the base of our interpretation of CT AGN spectra.

  5. Line and continuum spectroscopy as diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, E.P.

    1990-12-01

    We review the theoretical framework of both line and continuum spectra formation in gamma ray bursts. These include the cyclotron features at 10's of keV, redshifted annihilation features at ∼400 keV, as well as other potentially detectable nuclear transition lines, atomic x-ray lines, proton cyclotron lines and plasma oscillation lines. By combining the parameters derived from line and continuum modeling we can try to reconstruct the location, geometry and physical conditions of the burst emission region, thereby constraining and discriminating the astrophysical models. Hence spectroscopy with current and future generations of detectors should provide powerful diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursters. 48 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; De Amici, G.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. F.; Witebsky, C.

    1993-01-01

    We have used a radio-frequency-gain total-power radiometer to measure the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California in 1988 September and from the South Pole in 1989 December. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, T(CMB), is 2.27 +/- 0.25 K (68 percent confidence limit) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 +/- 0.20 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.26 +/- 0.19 K. The correction for Galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source of error. The atmospheric signal is extrapolated from our zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. These results are consistent with our previous measurement at 1.41 GHz and about 2.5 sigma from the 2.74 +/- 0.01 K global average CMB temperature.

  7. Correction of UBV Photometry for Emission Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skopal A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect on U,B,V magnitudes of the removal of emission lines from the spectra of some symbiotic stars and novae during their nebular phases. We approach this problem by the precise reconstruction of the composite UV/optical continuum and the line spectrum. The corrections ΔU, ΔB and ΔV are determined from the ratio of fluxes with and without emission lines. We demonstrate the effect for symbiotic nova V1016 Cyg during its nebular phase. We find that about 68%, 78% and 66% of the observed flux in the U, B and V filters is radiated in the emission lines. The effect should be taken into account before using the observed color indices of emission-line objects for diagnosis of their radiation in the continuum.

  8. Continuum and Line Emission Simulation of Star-Forming Galaxies and Development of a New Sub-mm Inte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagache, Guilaine

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, most of the constraints on the dusty star formation at high z comes from deep continuum surveys. We developed a new simulation of the dusty extragalactic sky with a realistic clustering. The comparison between single-dish and interferometric data showed that the clustering inside the beam of a single-dish instrument can seriously bias their measurements. Fortunately, these simulations also show that the beam of a >30-meter dish in the mm should not be affected by serious multiplicity effects. We will give predictions for important characteristics of future AtLAST surveys (as confusion limit, number of detections, properties of detected galaxies). These simulations can also include line emission to prepare a future sub-mm low-resolution spectroscopic survey at high z with AtLAST. Such a survey could be built on the legacy of the CONCERTO survey, that will map the fluctuations of the CII line intensity in the reionisation and post-reionisation epoch. A "super-CONCERTO" instrument on AtLAST would be a perfect first-light instrument to unveil the gigantic potential of this telescope.

  9. Plasma parameter diagnosis using hydrogen emission spectra of a quartz-chamber 2.45 GHz ECRIS at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, WenBin; Ren, HaiTao; Peng, ShiXiang; Xu, Yuan; Wen, JiaMei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, JingFeng; Zhang, AiLin; Sun, Jiang; Guo, ZhiYu; Chen, JiaEr

    2018-04-01

    A quartz-chamber 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was designed for diagnostic purposes at Peking University [Patent Number: ZL 201110026605.4]. This ion source can produce a maximum 84 mA hydrogen ion beam at 50 kV with a duty factor of 10%. The root-mean-square (RMS) emittance of this beam is less than 0.12π mm mrad. In our initial work, the electron temperature and electron density inside the plasma chamber had been measured with the line intensity ratio of noble gases. Based on these results, the atomic and molecular emission spectra of hydrogen were applied to determine the dissociation degree of hydrogen and the vibrational temperature of hydrogen molecules in the ground state, respectively. Measurements were performed at gas pressures from 4×10-4 to 1×10-3 Pa and at input peak RF power ranging from 1000 to 1800 W. The dissociation degree of hydrogen in the range of 0.5%-10% and the vibrational temperature of hydrogen molecules in the ground state in the range of 3500-8500 K were obtained. The plasma processes inside this ECRIS chamber were discussed based on these results.

  10. Measurement Results of the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 230 GHz and 460 GHz Balanced Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, J. W.; Monje, R. R.; Force, B. L.; Rice, F.; Miller, D.; Phillips, T. G.

    2010-03-01

    The Caltech Submillimeter observatory (CSO) is located on top of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, at an altitude of 4.2km. The existing suite of heterodyne receivers covering the submillimeter band is rapidly aging, and in need of replacement. To this extend we have developed a family of balanced receivers covering the astrophysical important 180-720 GHz atmospheric windows. For the CSO, wide IF bandwidth receivers are implemented in a balanced receiver configuration with dual frequency observation capability. This arrangement was opted to be an optimal compromise between scientific merit and finite funding. In principle, the balanced receiver configuration has the advantage that common mode amplitude noise in the LO system is canceled, while at the same time utilizing all available LO power. Both of these features facilitate the use of commercially available synthesized LO system. In combination with a 4 GHz IF bandwidth, the described receiver layout allows for rapid high resolution spectral line surveys. Dual frequency observation is another important mode of operation offered by the new facility instrumentation. Two band observations are accomplished by separating the H and V polarizations of the incoming signal and routing them via folded optics to the appropriate polarization sensitive balanced mixer. Scientifically this observation mode facilitates pointing for the higher receiver band under mediocre weather conditions and a doubling of scientific throughput (2 x 4 GHz) under good weather conditions. Not only do these changes greatly enhance the spectroscopic capabilities of the CSO, they also enable the observatory to be integrated into the Harvard-Smithsonian Submillimeter Array (eSMA) as an additional baseline. The upgrade of the 345 GHz/650 GHz dual band balanced receivers is not far behind. All the needed hardware has been procured, and commissioning is expected the summer of 2010. The SIS junctions are capable of a 2-12 GHz bandwidth.

  11. Te(R,t) Measurements using Electron Bernstein Wave Thermal Emission on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.J.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Carter, M.; Caughman, J.; Wilgen, J.B.; Harvey, R.W.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.

    2006-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) routinely studies overdense plasmas with n e of (1-5) x 10 19 m -3 and total magnetic field of e measurement. A significant upgrade to the previous NSTX EBW emission diagnostic to measure thermal EBW emission via the oblique B-X-O mode conversion process has been completed. The new EBW diagnostic consists of two remotely steerable, quad-ridged horn antennas, each of which is coupled to a dual channel radiometer. Fundamental (8-18 GHz) and second and third harmonic (18-40 GHz) thermal EBW emission and polarization measurements can be obtained simultaneously.

  12. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, Marc John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 ± 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 ± 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 ± 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is ~2.5 σ (~l% probability) from the 2.74 ± 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  13. UV time-dependent emission in SY Muscae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalitsianos, A.G.; Kafatos, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra acquired with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) of SY Mus = HD 10036 on 20 September 1980 and 11 June 1981 indicate a substantial enhancement of UV emission over a nine month period. The general UV flux level appears to have increased by approximately one order of magnitude between the first and second observing epochs. The strong ultraviolet continuum evident throughout the entire IUE spectral range lambdalambda1200-3200 A on 11 June 1981 is closely approximated by a star with Tsub(eff) = 40,000 K, where previously on 20 September 1980 the continuum distribution presented a more complex structure that is possibly explained by a combination of thermal emission from an early type main sequence star, and nebular recombination emission (Michalitsianos et al. 1981). (Auth.)

  14. Perpendicular electron cyclotron emission from hot electrons in TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.A.; Ellis, R.F.; Lasnier, C.J.; Casper, T.A.; Celata, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    Perpendicular electron cyclotron emission (PECE) from the electron cyclotron resonant heating of hot electrons in TMX-U is measured at 30 to 40 and 50 to 75 GHz. This emission is optically thin and is measured at the midplane, f/sub ce/ approx. = 14 GHz, in either end cell. In the west end cell, the emission can be measured at different axial positions thus yielding the temporal history of the hot electron axial profile. These profiles are in excellent agreement with the axial diamagnetic signals. In addition, the PECE signal level correlates well with the diamagnetic signal over a wide range of hot electron densities. Preliminary results from theoretical modeling and comparisons with other diagnostics are also presented

  15. 110GHz ECH on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, W.P.; Allen, J.C.; Callis, R.W.; Doane, J.L.; Harris, T.E.; Moetler, C.P.; Neren, A.; Prater, P.; Rensen, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a new high power electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system which has been introduced on DIII-D. This system is designed to operate at 110 GHz with a total output power of 2 MW. The system consists of four Varian VGT-8011 gyrotrons (output power of 500 kW), and their associated support equipment. All components have been designed for up to a 10 second pulse duration. The 110 GHz system is intended to further progress in rf current drive experiments on DIII-D when used in conjunction with the existing 60 GHz ECH (1. 6 MW) , and the 30-60 MHz ICH (2MW) systems. H-mode physics, plasma stabilization experiments and transport studies are also to be conducted at 110 GHz

  16. A 60 GHz Frequency Generator Based on a 20 GHz Oscillator and an Implicit Multiplier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zong, Z.; Babaie, M.; Staszewski, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a mm-wave frequency generation technique that improves its phase noise (PN) performance and power efficiency. The main idea is that a fundamental 20 GHz signal and its sufficiently strong third harmonic at 60 GHz are generated simultaneously in a single oscillator. The desired 60

  17. Inferring giant planets from ALMA millimeter continuum and line observations in (transition) disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, S.; Pinilla, P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; de Juan Ovelar, M.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Radial gaps or cavities in the continuum emission in the IR-mm wavelength range are potential signatures of protoplanets embedded in their natal protoplanetary disk are. Hitherto, models have relied on the combination of mm continuum observations and near-infrared scattered light images to put constraints on the properties of embedded planets. Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations are now probing spatially resolved rotational line emission of CO and other chemical species. These observations can provide complementary information on the mechanism carving the gaps in dust and additional constraints on the purported planet mass. Aims: We investigate whether the combination of ALMA continuum and CO line observations can constrain the presence and mass of planets embedded in protoplanetary disks. Methods: We post-processed azimuthally averaged 2D hydrodynamical simulations of planet-disk models, in which the dust densities and grain size distributions are computed with a dust evolution code that considers radial drift, fragmentation, and growth. The simulations explored various planet masses (1 MJ ≤ Mp ≤ 15 MJ) and turbulent parameters (10-4 ≤ α ≤ 10-3). The outputs were then post-processed with the thermochemical code DALI, accounting for the radially and vertically varying dust properties. We obtained the gas and dust temperature structures, chemical abundances, and synthetic emission maps of both thermal continuum and CO rotational lines. This is the first study combining hydrodynamical simulations, dust evolution, full radiative transfer, and chemistry to predict gas emission of disks hosting massive planets. Results: All radial intensity profiles of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O show a gap at the planet location. The ratio between the location of the gap as seen in CO and the peak in the mm continuum at the pressure maximum outside the orbit of the planet shows a clear dependence on planet mass and is independent of disk

  18. Angular correlation in the two-electron continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2006-01-01

    Following absorption of a single photon, angles of simultaneous emission of two electrons from a He(n 1 S) atom become more correlated with increasing n. We find that the strength of this correlation is due to the two-electron continuum of the electron-impact ionization of the He + (ns) ion. The strength is determined by the width of the momentum profile of the ionic ns state but not the strength of the electron correlation in the He initial state. This can explain the increasing (over He) angular correlation strength found in double photoionization of targets such as Be, Ne, and H 2

  19. Passing waves from atomistic to continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Diaz, Adrian; Xiong, Liming; McDowell, David L.; Chen, Youping

    2018-02-01

    Progress in the development of coupled atomistic-continuum methods for simulations of critical dynamic material behavior has been hampered by a spurious wave reflection problem at the atomistic-continuum interface. This problem is mainly caused by the difference in material descriptions between the atomistic and continuum models, which results in a mismatch in phonon dispersion relations. In this work, we introduce a new method based on atomistic dynamics of lattice coupled with a concurrent atomistic-continuum method to enable a full phonon representation in the continuum description. This permits the passage of short-wavelength, high-frequency phonon waves from the atomistic to continuum regions. The benchmark examples presented in this work demonstrate that the new scheme enables the passage of all allowable phonons through the atomistic-continuum interface; it also preserves the wave coherency and energy conservation after phonons transport across multiple atomistic-continuum interfaces. This work is the first step towards developing a concurrent atomistic-continuum simulation tool for non-equilibrium phonon-mediated thermal transport in materials with microstructural complexity.

  20. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA - II. Non-thermal diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; de Blok, W. J. G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2015-04-01

    Our closest neighbours, the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, are extremely quiescent and dim objects, where thermal and non-thermal diffuse emissions lack, so far, of detection. In order to possibly study the dSph interstellar medium, deep observations are required. They could reveal non-thermal emissions associated with the very low level of star formation, or to particle dark matter annihilating or decaying in the dSph halo. In this work, we employ radio observations of six dSphs, conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in the frequency band 1.1-3.1 GHz, to test the presence of a diffuse component over typical scales of few arcmin and at an rms sensitivity below 0.05 mJy beam-1. We observed the dSph fields with both a compact array and long baselines. Short spacings led to a synthesized beam of about 1 arcmin and were used for the extended emission search. The high-resolution data mapped background sources, which in turn were subtracted in the short-baseline maps, to reduce their confusion limit. We found no significant detection of a diffuse radio continuum component. After a detailed discussion on the modelling of the cosmic ray (CR) electron distribution and on the dSph magnetic properties, we present bounds on several physical quantities related to the dSphs, such that the total radio flux, the angular shape of the radio emissivity, the equipartition magnetic field, and the injection and equilibrium distributions of CR electrons. Finally, we discuss the connection to far-infrared and X-ray observations.

  1. Continuum mechanics of anisotropic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials(CMAM) presents an entirely new and unique development of material anisotropy in the context of an appropriate selection and organization of continuum mechanics topics. These features will distinguish this continuum mechanics book from other books on this subject. Textbooks on continuum mechanics are widely employed in engineering education, however, none of them deal specifically with anisotropy in materials. For the audience of Biomedical, Chemical and Civil Engineering students, these materials will be dealt with more frequently and greater accuracy in their analysis will be desired. Continuum Mechanics of Anisotropic Materials' author has been a leader in the field of developing new approaches for the understanding of anisotropic materials.

  2. Constraint on the polarization of electric dipole emission from spinning dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P. G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Lazarian, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    Planck results have revealed that the electric dipole emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the most reliable explanation for the anomalous microwave emission that interferes with cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation experiments. The emerging question is to what extent this emission component contaminates the polarized CMB radiation. We present constraints on polarized dust emission for the model of grain-size distribution and grain alignment that best fits the observed extinction and polarization curves. Two stars with a prominent polarization feature at λ = 2175 Å—HD 197770 and HD 147933-4—are chosen for our study. For HD 197770, we find that the model with aligned silicate grains plus weakly aligned PAHs can successfully reproduce the 2175 Å polarization feature; in contrast, for HD 147933-4, we find that the alignment of only silicate grains can account for that feature. The alignment function of PAHs for the best-fit model to the HD 197770 data is used to constrain polarized spinning dust emission. We find that the degree of polarization of spinning dust emission is about 1.6% at frequency ν ≈ 3 GHz and declines to below 0.9% for ν > 20 GHz. We also predict the degree of polarization of thermal dust emission at 353 GHz to be P {sub em} ≈ 11% and 14% for the lines of sight to the HD 197770 and HD 147933-4 stars, respectively.

  3. IUE observations of circumstellar emission from the late-type variable R AQR (M6 + pec)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, R. W.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1981-01-01

    The IUE observations of R Aqr (M7 + pec) obtained in low dispersion are discussed with particular reference to circumstellar emission. Strong permitted, semiforbidden, and forbidden emission lines are seen, superimposed on a bright ultraviolet continuum. It is deduced that the strong emission line spectrum that involves C III, C IV, Si III, (0 II) and (0 III) probably arises from a dense compact nebula the size of which is comparable to the orbital radius of the binary system of which R Aqr is the primary star. The low excitation emission lines of Fe II, Mg II, 0 I, and Si II probably a white dwarf, comparable to or somewhat brighter than the Sun, since such a star can produce enough ionizing photons to excite the continuum and emission line spectrum and yet be sufficiently faint as to escape detection by direct observation. The UV continuum is attributed to Balmer recombination from the dense nebula and not to blackbody emission from the hot companion.

  4. Study of the microwave emissivity characteristics over Gobi Desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yubao, Qiu; Lijuan, Shi; Wenbo, Wu

    2014-01-01

    The microwave emissivity represents the capacity of the thermal radiation of the surface, and it is the significant parameter for understanding the geophysical processes such as surface energy budget and surface radiation. Different land covers have different emissivity properties, and the Gobi Desert in Central Asia seriously impact the sandstorms occur and develop in China, because of its special geographical environment and surface soil characteristics. In this study half-month averaged microwave emissivity from March 2003 to February 2004 over the Gobi Desert has been estimated. Emissivities in this area at different frequencies, polarization and their seasonal variations are discussed respectively. The results showed that emissivity polarization difference decrease as the frequency increases, and the polarization difference is large (0.03–0.127). The H polarization emissivity increases with increasing frequency, but the V-polarized microwave emissivity is reduced with increasing frequency because of the body scattering. In winter, emissivity decreases sharply in snow covered area, especially for higher frequencies (such as 89GHz). In addition, we compared emissivity with MODIS NDVI data at the same time in the Gobi Desert, and the results indicate that NDVI derived the good negative correlation with microwave emissivity polarization difference at 37GHz

  5. Shock-related radio emission during coronal mass ejection lift-off?

    OpenAIRE

    Pohjolainen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We identify the source of fast-drifting decimetric-metric radio emission that is sometimes observed prior to the so-called flare continuum emission. Fast-drift structures and continuum bursts are also observed in association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), not only flares. Methods: We analyse radio spectral features and images acquired at radio, H-alpha, EUV, and soft X-ray wavelengths, during an event close to the solar limb on 2 June 2003. Results: The fast-drifting decimetric-met...

  6. Continuum robots and underactuated grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Giri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the capabilities of continuum (continuous backbone robot structures in the performance of under-actuated grasping. Continuum robots offer the potential of robust grasps over a wide variety of object classes, due to their ability to adapt their shape to interact with the environment via non-local continuum contact conditions. Furthermore, this capability can be achieved with simple, low degree of freedom hardware. However, there are practical issues which currently limit the application of continuum robots to grasping. We discuss these issues and illustrate via an experimental continuum grasping case study.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  7. Rectenna Technology Program: Ultra light 2.45 GHz rectenna 20 GHz rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William C.

    1987-01-01

    The program had two general objectives. The first objective was to develop the two plane rectenna format for space application at 2.45 GHz. The resultant foreplane was a thin-film, etched-circuit format fabricated from a laminate composed of 2 mil Kapton F sandwiched between sheets of 1 oz copper. The thin-film foreplane contains half wave dipoles, filter circuits, rectifying Schottky diode, and dc bussing lead. It weighs 160 grams per square meter. Efficiency and dc power output density were measured at 85% and 1 kw/sq m, respectively. Special testing techniques to measure temperature of circuit and diode without perturbing microwave operation using the fluoroptic thermometer were developed. A second objective was to investigate rectenna technology for use at 20 GHz and higher frequencies. Several fabrication formats including the thin-film scaled from 2.45 GHz, ceramic substrate and silk-screening, and monolithic were investigated, with the conclusion that the monolithic approach was the best. A preliminary design of the monolithic rectenna structure and the integrated Schottky diode were made.

  8. Modeling the Observed Microwave Emission from Shallow Multi-Layer Tundra Snow Using DMRT-ML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Saberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The observed brightness temperatures (Tb at 37 GHz from typical moderate density dry snow in mid-latitudes decreases with increasing snow water equivalent (SWE due to volume scattering of the ground emissions by the overlying snow. At a certain point, however, as SWE increases, the emission from the snowpack offsets the scattering of the sub-nivean emission. In tundra snow, the Tb slope reversal occurs at shallower snow thicknesses. While it has been postulated that the inflection point in the seasonal time series of observed Tb V 37 GHz of tundra snow is controlled by the formation of a thick wind slab layer, the simulation of this effect has yet to be confirmed. Therefore, the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory for Multi Layered (DMRT-ML snowpack is used to predict the passive microwave response from airborne observations over shallow, dense, slab-layered tundra snow. Airborne radiometer observations coordinated with ground-based in situ snow measurements were acquired in the Canadian high Arctic near Eureka, NT, in April 2011. The DMRT-ML was parameterized with the in situ snow measurements using a two-layer snowpack and run in two configurations: a depth hoar and a wind slab dominated pack. With these two configurations, the calibrated DMRT-ML successfully predicted the Tb V 37 GHz response (R correlation of 0.83 when compared with the observed airborne Tb footprints containing snow pits measurements. Using this calibrated model, the DMRT-ML was applied to the whole study region. At the satellite observation scale, observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E over the study area reflected seasonal differences between Tb V 37 GHz and Tb V 19 GHz that supports the hypothesis of the development of an early season volume scattering depth hoar layer, followed by the growth of the late season emission-dominated wind slab layer. This research highlights the necessity to consider the two

  9. Plasma ignition and tuning in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity: Proof of principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Moss, Andrew; Goudket, Philippe; Pattalwar, Shrikant; Herbert, Joe; Valizadeh, Reza; McIntosh, Peter

    2018-06-01

    Field emission is one of the critical issues in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and can degrade their accelerating gradient during operation. The contamination present at top surface of the SRF cavity is one of the foremost reasons for field emission. Plasma based surface processing can be a viable option to eliminate such surface contaminants and enhance performance of the SRF cavity especially for in-situ applications. These days, 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity has become baseline standard for many particle accelerators, it is of interest to develop plasma cleaning technique for such SRF cavities. In the development of the plasma processing technique for SRF cavities, the most challenging task is to ignite and tune the plasma in different cells of the SRF cavity. At Daresbury laboratory, UK, we have successfully achieved plasma ignition in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity. The plasma ignition in different cells of the cavity was accomplished at room temperature towards room temperature plasma cleaning of the SRF cavity surface. Here, we report the successful demonstration of the plasma ignition in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity.

  10. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar flares; X-ray detectors; X-ray line emission and continuum; break energy; microflares. Abstract. Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in ...

  11. A 60-GHz interferometer with a local oscillator integrated antenna array for divertor simulation experiments on GAMMA 10/PDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohagura, J., E-mail: kohagura@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, M.; Shima, Y.; Nojiri, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Wang, X. [Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ito, N. [National Institute of Technology, Ube College, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [National Institute of Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mase, A. [Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    In conventional multichannel/imaging microwave diagnostics of interferometry, reflectometry, and electron cyclotron emission measurements, a local oscillator (LO) signal is commonly supplied to a receiver array via irradiation using LO optics. In this work, we present a 60-GHz interferometer with a new eight-channel receiver array, called a local oscillator integrated antenna array (LIA). An outstanding feature of LIA is that it incorporates a frequency quadrupler integrated circuit for LO supply to each channel. This enables simple and uniform LO supply to the receiver array using only a 15-GHz LO source and a coaxial cable transmission line instead of using an expensive 60-GHz source, LO optics, and a waveguide transmission line. The new interferometer system is first applied to measure electron line-averaged density inside the divertor simulation experimental module (D-module) on GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror device.

  12. 45-GHz and 60-GHz 90 nm CMOS power amplifiers with a fully symmetrical 8-way transformer power combiner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengdong JIANG; Kaizhe GUO; Peng HUANG; Yiming FAN; Chenxi ZHAO; Yongling BAN; Jun LIU; Kai KANG

    2017-01-01

    In this paper,45 GHz and 60 GHz power amplifiers (PAs) with high output power have been successfully designed by using 90 nm CMOS process.The 45 GHz (60 GHz) PA consists of two (four) differential stages.The sizes of transistors have been designed in an appropriate way so as to trade-off gain,efficiency and stability.Due to limited supply voltage and low breakdown voltage of CMOS MOSFET compared with the traditional Ⅲ-Ⅴ technologies,the technique of power combining has been applied to achieve a high output power.In particular,a novel 8-way distributed active transformer power combiner has been proposed for realizing such mm-wave PA.The proposed transformer combiner with a fully symmetrical layout can improve its input impedance balance at mm-wave frequency regime significantly.Taking its advantages of this novel transformer based power combiner,our realized 45 GHz (60 GHz) mm-wave PA has achieved the gain of 20.3 dB (16.8 dB),the maximum PAE of 14.5% (13.4%) and the saturated output power of 21 dBm (21 dBm) with the 1.2 V supply voltage.

  13. High power tests of dressed supconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocker, A.; Harms, E.R.; Lunin, A.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A single-cavity test cryostat is used to conduct pulsed high power RF tests of superconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities at 2 K. The cavities under test are welded inside individual helium vessels and are outfitted ('dressed') with a fundamental power coupler, higher-order mode couplers, magnetic shielding, a blade tuner, and piezoelectric tuners. The cavity performance is evaluated in terms of accelerating gradient, unloaded quality factor, and field emission, and the functionality of the auxiliary components is verified. Test results from the first set of dressed cavities are presented here.

  14. 60-GHz Millimeter-Wave Radio: Principle, Technology, and New Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide opening of a massive amount of unlicensed spectra around 60 GHz has triggered great interest in developing affordable 60-GHz radios. This interest has been catalyzed by recent advance of 60-GHz front-end technologies. This paper briefly reports recent work in the 60-GHz radio. Aspects addressed in this paper include global regulatory and standardization, justification of using the 60-GHz bands, 60-GHz consumer electronics applications, radio system concept, 60-GHz propagation and antennas, and key issues in system design. Some new simulation results are also given. Potentials and problems are explained in detail.

  15. Continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, A J M

    2004-01-01

    The mechanics of fluids and the mechanics of solids represent the two major areas of physics and applied mathematics that meet in continuum mechanics, a field that forms the foundation of civil and mechanical engineering. This unified approach to the teaching of fluid and solid mechanics focuses on the general mechanical principles that apply to all materials. Students who have familiarized themselves with the basic principles can go on to specialize in any of the different branches of continuum mechanics. This text opens with introductory chapters on matrix algebra, vectors and Cartesian ten

  16. 8-12 GHz Radio Observations of Flare Activity On M dwarf CN Leo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Alia; Villadsen, Jackie; Quintana, Elisa; Barclay, Thomas; Thackeray, Beverly

    2018-01-01

    Red dwarfs are cool stars that make up 70% of all stars. Red dwarfs can be utilized to detect potentially habitable planets but they have particularly strong magnetic activity that can be detrimental to orbiting planets’ atmospheres and habitability. A coronal mass ejection (CME) is an eruption of magnetized plasma from the star that is ejected into the interplanetary medium which can erode a planet’s atmosphere daily. Based on the sun CMEs are expected to produce very bright radio bursts along with optical flares. We are using M dwarf CN Leo, a well studied flare star that was in the K2 campaign field in summer 2017, as a template to understand the relationship between radio and optical flares and the space weather conditions impacting M dwarf planets. Using radio frequencies ranging from 0.22 GHz-12 GHz we search for simultaneous radio bursts and optical flares to infer if CMEs, flares or aurorae are occurring on the star. I will present the 8-12 GHz radio data from eight 1.5-hour observations with simultaneous optical data. CN Leo produced a bright non-thermal radio flare that lasted approximately for a day during two consecutive observations, with a gyrosynchrotron emission mechanism.

  17. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  18. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 353, 545, and 857 GHz, and IRAS 100 mu m data. Using a modified blackbody fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a good repr...

  19. Continuum limbed robots for locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Alper

    This thesis focuses on continuum robots based on pneumatic muscle technology. We introduce a novel approach to use these muscles as limbs of lightweight legged robots. The flexibility of the continuum legs of these robots offers the potential to perform some duties that are not possible with classical rigid-link robots. Potential applications are as space robots in low gravity, and as cave explorer robots. The thesis covers the fabrication process of continuum pneumatic muscles and limbs. It also provides some new experimental data on this technology. Afterwards, the designs of two different novel continuum robots - one tripod, one quadruped - are introduced. Experimental data from tests using the robots is provided. The experimental results are the first published example of locomotion with tripod and quadruped continuum legged robots. Finally, discussion of the results and how far this technology can go forward is presented.

  20. The influence of continuum radiation fields on hydrogen radio recombination lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozesky, Andri; Smits, Derck P.

    2018-05-01

    Calculations of hydrogen departure coefficients using a model with the angular momentum quantum levels resolved that includes the effects of external radiation fields are presented. The stimulating processes are important at radio frequencies and can influence level populations. New numerical techniques with a solid mathematical basis have been incorporated into the model to ensure convergence of the solution. Our results differ from previous results by up to 20 per cent. A direct solver with a similar accuracy but more efficient than the iterative method is used to evaluate the influence of continuum radiation on the hydrogen population structure. The effects on departure coefficients of continuum radiation from dust, the cosmic microwave background, the stellar ionising radiation, and free-free radiation are quantified. Tables of emission and absorption coefficients for interpreting observed radio recombination lines are provided.

  1. Magnetically regulated collapse in the B335 protostar? I. ALMA observations of the polarized dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, A. J.; Girart, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Hennebelle, P.; Keto, E.; Rao, R.; Lai, S.-P.; Ohashi, N.; Galametz, M.

    2018-06-01

    The role of the magnetic field during protostellar collapse is poorly constrained from an observational point of view, although it could be significant if we believe state-of-the-art models of protostellar formation. We present polarimetric observations of the 233 GHz thermal dust continuum emission obtained with ALMA in the B335 Class 0 protostar. Linearly polarized dust emission arising from the circumstellar material in the envelope of B335 is detected at all scales probed by our observations (50 to 1000 au). The magnetic field structure producing the dust polarization has a very ordered topology in the inner envelope, with a transition from a large-scale poloidal magnetic field, in the outflow direction, to strongly pinched in the equatorial direction. This is probably due to magnetic field lines being dragged along the dominating infall direction since B335 does not exhibit prominent rotation. Our data and their qualitative comparison to a family of magnetized protostellar collapse models show that, during the magnetized collapse in B335, the magnetic field is maintaining a high level of organization from scales 1000 au to 50 au: this suggests the field is dynamically relevant and capable of influencing the typical outcome of protostellar collapse, such as regulating the disc size in B335.

  2. Magnetically regulated collapse in the B335 protostar? I. ALMA observations of the polarized dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, A. J.; Girart, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Hennebelle, P.; Keto, E.; Rao, R.; Lai, S.-P.; Ohashi, N.; Galametz, M.

    2018-03-01

    The role of the magnetic field during protostellar collapse is poorly constrained from an observational point of view, although it could be significant if we believe state-of-the-art models of protostellar formation. We present polarimetric observations of the 233 GHz thermal dust continuum emission obtained with ALMA in the B335 Class 0 protostar. Linearly polarized dust emission arising from the circumstellar material in the envelope of B335 is detected at all scales probed by our observations, from radii of 50 to 1000 au. The magnetic field structure producing the dust polarization has a very ordered topology in the inner envelope, with a transition from a large-scale poloidal magnetic field, in the outflow direction, to strongly pinched in the equatorial direction. This is probably due to magnetic field lines being dragged along the dominating infall direction since B335 does not exhibit prominent rotation. Our data and their qualitative comparison to a family of magnetized protostellar collapse models show that, during the magnetized collapse in B335, the magnetic field is maintaining a high level of organization from scales 1000 au to 50 au: this suggests the field is dynamically relevant and capable of influencing the typical outcome of protostellar collapse, such as regulating the disk size in B335.

  3. On the Nature of Orion Source I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Rubio, A.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Zhang, Q.; Curiel, S.

    2018-01-01

    The Kleinmann–Low nebula in Orion, the closest region of massive star formation, harbors Source I, whose nature is under debate. Knowledge of this source may have profound implications for our understanding of the energetics of the hot core in Orion KL since it might be the main heating source in the region. The spectral energy distribution of this source in the radio is characterized by a positive spectral index close to 2, which is consistent with (i) thermal bremsstrahlung emission of ionized hydrogen gas produced by a central massive protostar, or (ii) photospheric bremsstrahlung emission produced by electrons when deflected by the interaction with neutral and molecular hydrogen like Mira-like variable stars. If ionized hydrogen gas were responsible for the observed continuum emission, its modeling would predict detectable emission from hydrogen radio recombination lines (RRLs). However, our SMA observations were obtained with a high enough sensitivity to rule out that the radio continuum emission arises from a dense hypercompact H II region because the H26α line would have been detected, in contrast with our observations. To explain the observational constraints, we investigate further the nature of the radio continuum emission from source I. We have compared available radio continuum data with the predictions from our upgraded non-LTE 3D radiative transfer model, MOdel for REcombination LInes, to show that radio continuum fluxes and sizes can only be reproduced by assuming both dust and bremsstrahlung emission from neutral gas. The dust emission contribution is significant at ν ≥ 43 GHz. In addition, our RRL peak intensity predictions for the ionized metals case are consistent with the nondetection of Na and K RRLs at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  4. X-ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostorero, L.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Diaferio, A.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M.C.; Wagner, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the γ-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N H ) and radio (N HI ) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  5. Transient behavior of interface state continuum at InP insulator-semiconductor interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Masuda, H.; He, L.; Luo, J.K.; Sawada, T.; Ohno, H.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the drain current drift mechanism in InP MISFETs, an isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS) study of the interface state continuum is made on the anodic Al 2 O 3 /native oxide/ InP MIS system. Capture behavior is temperature-independent, non-exponential and extremely slow, whereas emission behavior is temperature- and bias- dependent, and is much faster. The observed behavior is explained quantitatively by the disorder induced gap state (DIGS) model, where states are distributed both in energy and in space. By comparing the transient behavior of interface states with the observed drift behavior of MISFETs, it is concluded that the electron capture by the DIGS continuum is responsible for the drain current drift of MISFETs. This led to a complete computer simulation of the observed current drift behavior

  6. The Virtuality Continuum Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Traum, D.; Zhai, Sh.; Kellogg, W.

    2005-01-01

    We survey the themes and the aims of a workshop devoted to the state-of-the-art virtuality continuum. In this continuum, ranging from fully virtual to real physical environments, allowing for mixed, augmented and desktop virtual reality, several perspectives can be taken. Originally, the emphasis

  7. Molecular Line Survey of CRL618 and Complete Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Phillips, T. G.

    We present a complete survey and model of the emission from the C-rich protoplanetary nebula CRL 618 at the frequencies accessible with the IRAM-30m telescope (80.25-115.75 GHz, 131.25-179.25 GHz, and 204.25-275.25 GHz) and some results of still on-going observations at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (280-360 GHz). Although the number of lines detected is large (several hundreds), the number of chemical species from which they arise is rather small. In fact, lines from cyanopolyynes HC3N and HC5N dominate by far the long-wave spectrum of CRL618, with detection of numerous vibrationally excited states and isotopic substituted species. Most of detected species exhibit P-Cygni profiles at the lowest frequencies (3 mm window), and they evolve to pure emission as frequency increases. This fact can only be explained by the behavior of the continuum emission arising from the inner ultracompact HII region and surrounding dust. The data set itself has been used to characterize the continuum emission by averaging all the continuum measurements during the time span of the survey (~8 years). The physical parameters of the different gas regions have been established by studying the large number of detected cyanopolyynes lines. Using these constraints, the abundances of many other species relative to HC3N could also be determined and a general model, that reproduce the whole data set at a very detailed level of agreement, could be built. 1. Introduction The motivation to perform the complete millimeter line survey presented here with the IRAM-30m telescope has been to gather the most complete information on the molecular content in one particular stage (protoplanetary nebula, PPNe) of stellar evolution from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to Planetary Nebulae (PN), of which CRL618 is the best example. Its chemical richness and its complex morphology are now very well known. Detailed chemical models for this object have been developed (Cernicharo 2004) indicating the

  8. HYDRO2GEN: Non-thermal hydrogen Balmer and Paschen emission in solar flares generated by electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, M. K.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. Sharp rises of hard X-ray (HXR) emission accompanied by Hα line profiles with strong red-shifts up to 4 Å from the central wavelength, often observed at the onset of flares with the Specola Solare Ticinese Telescope (STT) and the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), are not fully explained by existing radiative models. Moreover, observations of white light (WL) and Balmer continuum emission with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRISH) reveal strong co-temporal enhancements and are often nearly co-spatial with HXR emission. These effects indicate a fast effective source of excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms in flaring atmospheres associated with HXR emission. In this paper, we investigate electron beams as the agents accounting for the observed hydrogen line and continuum emission. Methods: Flaring atmospheres are considered to be produced by a 1D hydrodynamic response to the injection of an electron beam defining their kinetic temperatures, densities, and macro velocities. We simulated a radiative response in these atmospheres using a fully non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach for a 5-level plus continuum hydrogen atom model, considering its excitation and ionisation by spontaneous, external, and internal diffusive radiation and by inelastic collisions with thermal and beam electrons. Simultaneous steady-state and integral radiative transfer equations in all optically thick transitions (Lyman and Balmer series) were solved iteratively for all the transitions to define their source functions with the relative accuracy of 10-5. The solutions of the radiative transfer equations were found using the L2 approximation. Resulting intensities of hydrogen line and continuum emission were also calculated for Balmer and Paschen series. Results: We find that inelastic collisions with beam electrons strongly increase excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms from the chromosphere to photosphere. This leads to an increase in Lyman continuum

  9. Rapid Multiwaveband Polarization Variability in the Quasar PKS 0420-014: Optical Emission from the Compact Radio Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Francesca D.; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Smith, Paul S.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Kopatskaya, Eugenia N.; Williams, G. Grant; Gear, Walter K.

    2007-04-01

    An 11 day monitoring campaign in late 2005 reveals clear correlation in polarization between the optical emission and the region of the intensity peak (the ``pseudocore'') at the upstream end of the jet in 43 GHz VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) images in the highly variable quasar PKS 0420-014. The electric-vector position angle (EVPA) of the pseudocore rotated by about 80° in four VLBA observations over a period of 9 days, matching the trend of the optical EVPA. In addition, the 43 GHz EVPAs agree well with the optical values when we correct the former for Faraday rotation. Fluctuations in the polarization at both wave bands are consistent with the variable emission arising from a standing conical shock wave that compresses magnetically turbulent plasma in the ambient jet. The volume of the variable component is the same at both wave bands, although only ~20% of the total 43 GHz emission arises from this site. The remainder of the 43 GHz flux density must originate in a separate region with very low polarization. If 0420-014 is a typical case, the nonthermal optical emission from blazars originates primarily in and near the pseudocore rather than closer to the central engine where the flow collimates and accelerates.

  10. THE Lyα LINE PROFILES OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: FAST WINDS AND LYMAN CONTINUUM LEAKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Crystal L.; Wong, Joseph [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106 (United States); Dijkstra, Mark [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, Postboks 1029, 0858 Oslo (Norway); Henry, Alaina [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Soto, Kurt T. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Danforth, Charles W., E-mail: cmartin@physics.ucsb.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-ultraviolet (far-UV) spectroscopy and Keck Echellete optical spectroscopy of 11 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), a rare population of local galaxies experiencing massive gas inflows, extreme starbursts, and prominent outflows. We detect Lyα emission from eight ULIRGs and the companion to IRAS09583+4714. In contrast to the P Cygni profiles often seen in galaxy spectra, the Lyα profiles exhibit prominent, blueshifted emission out to Doppler shifts exceeding −1000 km s{sup −1} in three H ii-dominated and two AGN-dominated ULIRGs. To better understand the role of resonance scattering in shaping the Lyα line profiles, we directly compare them to non-resonant emission lines in optical spectra. We find that the line wings are already present in the intrinsic nebular spectra, and scattering merely enhances the wings relative to the line core. The Lyα attenuation (as measured in the COS aperture) ranges from that of the far-UV continuum to over 100 times more. A simple radiative transfer model suggests the Lyα photons escape through cavities which have low column densities of neutral hydrogen and become optically thin to the Lyman continuum in the most advanced mergers. We show that the properties of the highly blueshifted line wings on the Lyα and optical emission-line profiles are consistent with emission from clumps of gas condensing out of a fast, hot wind. The luminosity of the Lyα emission increases nonlinearly with the ULIRG bolometric luminosity and represents about 0.1–1% of the radiative cooling from the hot winds in the H ii-dominated ULIRGs.

  11. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Güdel, Manuel [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Rupen, Michael, E-mail: jrv@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  12. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  13. ALMA Observations of the Archetypal “Hot Core” That Is Not: Orion-KL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco-Aguilera, M. T.; Zapata, Luis A.; Hirota, Tomoya; Qin, Sheng-Li; Masqué, Josep M

    2017-01-01

    We present sensitive high angular resolution (∼0.″1–0.″3) continuum Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the archetypal hot core located in the Orion Kleinmann-Low (KL) region. The observations were made in five different spectral bands (bands 3, 6, 7, 8, and 9) covering a very broad range of frequencies (149–658 GHz). Apart from the well-known millimeter emitting objects located in this region (Orion Source I and BN), we report the first submillimeter detection of three compact continuum sources (ALMA1–3) in the vicinities of the Orion-KL hot molecular core. These three continuum objects have spectral indices between 1.47 and 1.56, and brightness temperatures between 100 and 200 K at 658 GHz, suggesting that we are seeing moderate, optically thick dust emission with possible grain growth. However, as these objects are not associated with warm molecular gas, and some of them are farther out from the molecular core, we thus conclude that they cannot heat the molecular core. This result favors the hypothesis that the hot molecular core in Orion-KL core is heated externally.

  14. ALMA Observations of the Archetypal “Hot Core” That Is Not: Orion-KL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco-Aguilera, M. T. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, México (Mexico); Zapata, Luis A. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Hirota, Tomoya [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Qin, Sheng-Li [Department of Astronomy, Yunnan University, and Key Laboratory of Astroparticle Physics of Yunnan Province, Kunming 650091 (China); Masqué, Josep M, E-mail: lzapata@crya.unam.mx [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal 144, 36000 Guanajuato, México (Mexico)

    2017-09-20

    We present sensitive high angular resolution (∼0.″1–0.″3) continuum Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the archetypal hot core located in the Orion Kleinmann-Low (KL) region. The observations were made in five different spectral bands (bands 3, 6, 7, 8, and 9) covering a very broad range of frequencies (149–658 GHz). Apart from the well-known millimeter emitting objects located in this region (Orion Source I and BN), we report the first submillimeter detection of three compact continuum sources (ALMA1–3) in the vicinities of the Orion-KL hot molecular core. These three continuum objects have spectral indices between 1.47 and 1.56, and brightness temperatures between 100 and 200 K at 658 GHz, suggesting that we are seeing moderate, optically thick dust emission with possible grain growth. However, as these objects are not associated with warm molecular gas, and some of them are farther out from the molecular core, we thus conclude that they cannot heat the molecular core. This result favors the hypothesis that the hot molecular core in Orion-KL core is heated externally.

  15. LOOKING INTO THE HEARTS OF BOK GLOBULES: MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM IMAGES OF ISOLATED STAR-FORMING CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.; Khanzadyan, T.; Schmalzl, M.; Wolf, S.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bourke, T. L.; Zylka, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive infrared, submillimeter, and millimeter continuum emission study of isolated low-mass star-forming cores in 32 Bok globules, with the aim to investigate the process of star formation in these regions. The submillimeter and millimeter dust continuum emission maps together with the spectral energy distributions are used to model and derive the physical properties of the star-forming cores, such as luminosities, sizes, masses, densities, etc. Comparisons with ground-based near-infrared and space-based mid- and far-infrared images from Spitzer are used to reveal the stellar content of the Bok globules, association of embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) with the submillimeter dust cores, and the evolutionary stages of the individual sources. Submillimeter dust continuum emission was detected in 26 out of the 32 globule cores observed. For 18 globules with detected (sub)millimeter cores, we derive evolutionary stages and physical parameters of the embedded sources. We identify nine starless cores, most of which are presumably prestellar, nine Class 0 protostars, and twelve Class I YSOs. Specific source properties like bolometric temperature, core size, and central densities are discussed as a function of evolutionary stage. We find that at least two thirds (16 out of 24) of the star-forming globules studied here show evidence of forming multiple stars on scales between 1000 and 50,000 AU. However, we also find that most of these small prototstar and star groups are comprised of sources with different evolutionary stages, suggesting a picture of slow and sequential star formation in isolated globules.

  16. Spectrally-Precoded OFDM for 5G Wideband Operation in Fragmented sub-6GHz Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Pitaval, Renaud-Alexandre; Popović, Branislav M.; Mohamad, Medhat; Nilsson, Rickard; van de Beek, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    We consider spectrally-precoded OFDM waveforms for 5G wideband transmission in sub-6GHz band. In this densely packed spectrum, a low out-of-band (OOB) waveform is a critical 5G component to achieve the promised high spectral efficiency. By precoding data symbols before OFDM modulation, it is possible to achieve extremely low out-of-band emission with very sharp spectrum transition enabling an efficient and flexible usage of frequency resources. Spectrally-precoded OFDM shows promising results...

  17. Design of 2.5 GHz broad bandwidth microwave bandpass filter at operating frequency of 10 GHz using HFSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, S. E.; Jusoh, M. A.; Mahmud, S. N. S.; Zamani, A. H.

    2018-04-01

    Development of low losses, small size and broad bandwidth microwave bandpass filter operating at higher frequencies is an active area of research. This paper presents a new route used to design and simulate microwave bandpass filter using finite element modelling and realized broad bandwidth, low losses, small dimension microwave bandpass filter operating at 10 GHz frequency using return loss method. The filter circuit has been carried out using Computer Aid Design (CAD), Ansoft HFSS software and designed with four parallel couple line model and small dimension (10 × 10 mm2) using LaAlO3 substrate. The response of the microwave filter circuit showed high return loss -50 dB at operating frequency at 10.4 GHz and broad bandwidth of 2.5 GHz from 9.5 to 12 GHz. The results indicate the filter design and simulation using HFSS is reliable and have the opportunity to transfer from lab potential experiments to the industry.

  18. 105 GHz Notch Filter Design for Collective Thomson Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furtula, Vedran; Michelsen, Poul; Leipold, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A millimeter-wave notch filter with 105-GHz center frequency, >20-GHz passband coverage, and 1-GHz rejection bandwidth has been constructed. The design is based on a fundamental rectangular waveguide with cylindrical cavities coupled by narrow iris gaps, i.e., small elongated holes of negligible...

  19. Frequent VLBI Monitoring on Parsec-Scales of 450+ Extragalactic FERMI Sources at 8 and 32 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Majid, W. A.; Romero-Wolf, A.; García-Mirí, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.

    2012-10-01

    Executive Summary: An existing Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) catalog of 450+ sources is being monitored every 6-10 weeks on Giga-lambda baselines. These observations are sensitive to parsec scale activity in the AGN cores providing unique tests of gamma ray emission models. Abstract: The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has now released the 2nd catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources (2FGL) derived from the first 24 months of mission science data with 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. 1017 of 1873 sources at high Galactic latitude (abs(b) > 10 degrees) are associated statistically with active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Parsec-scale VLBI measurements play an important role in characterizing the nature of the candidate AGNs by providing crucial extra information to improve the probability of correct identification - VLBI filters out objects which do not host strong compact jets at parsec scale. We are carrying out regular VLBI monitoring of 450+ compact extragalactic sources using Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-meter antennas over intercontinental baselines simultaneously at 8 and 32 GHz. In addition to precision astrometric measurements of AGN compact cores used to maintain the JPL extragalactic reference frame, this program has the potential to provide regular simultaneous flux density measurements at 8 and 32 GHz with precision level of ~20%. By providing measurements on both East-West and North-South baselines with large antennas and Gbit/s recording capability, our program can probe sources down to a flux limit of 30 mJy (10-sigma), potentially increasing the sample to a fainter population of sources. In these regards, our program complements well existing northern and southern hemisphere VLBI monitoring programs, by providing flux measurements at 32 GHz, covering a fainter population sample, and by filling the gap for sources in the -20 to -45 degree declination range. Further, our program also provides additional flexibility for

  20. A statistical model for field emission in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Green, K.; Jost, W.; Wright, B.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical model is used to account for several features of performance of an ensemble of superconducting cavities. The input parameters are: the number of emitters/area, a distribution function for emitter β values, a distribution function for emissive areas, and a processing threshold. The power deposited by emitters is calculated from the field emission current and electron impact energy. The model can successfully account for the fraction of tests that reach the maximum field Epk in an ensemble of cavities, for eg, 1-cells at sign 3 GHz or 5-cells at sign 1.5 GHz. The model is used to predict the level of power needed to successfully process cavities of various surface areas with high pulsed power processing (HPP)

  1. An Empirical Ultraviolet Template for Iron Emission in Quasars as Derived from I Zw 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Wilkes, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    contaminant in optical--UV spectra of AGNs. Its presence complicates and limits the accuracy of measurements of both strong and weak emission lines and the continuum emission, affecting studies of line and continuum interrelations, the ionization structure, and elemental abundances in AGNs. Despite the wealth...... iron spectrum make the template particularly suitable for use with most AGN spectra. The iron emission spectrum and the line identifications and measurements are presented and compared with the work of Laor et al. We illustrate the application of the derived FeII and FeIII templates by fitting...

  2. Notes on continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves, Eduardo W V

    2013-01-01

    This publication is aimed at students, teachers, and researchers of Continuum Mechanics and focused extensively on stating and developing Initial Boundary Value equations used to solve physical problems. With respect to notation, the tensorial, indicial and Voigt notations have been used indiscriminately.   The book is divided into twelve chapters with the following topics: Tensors, Continuum Kinematics, Stress, The Objectivity of Tensors, The Fundamental Equations of Continuum Mechanics, An Introduction to Constitutive Equations, Linear Elasticity, Hyperelasticity, Plasticity (small and large deformations), Thermoelasticity (small and large deformations), Damage Mechanics (small and large deformations), and An Introduction to Fluids. Moreover, the text is supplemented with over 280 figures, over 100 solved problems, and 130 references.

  3. Changing public stigma with continuum beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Schmidt, Annie; Bink, Andrea B; Nieweglowski, Katherine; Al-Khouja, Maya A; Qin, Sang; Discont, Steve

    2017-10-01

    Given the egregious effect of public stigma on the lives of people with mental illness, researchers have sought to unpack and identify effective components of anti-stigma programs. We expect to show that continuum messages have more positive effect on stigma and affirming attitudes (beliefs that people with mental illness recover and should be personally empowered) than categorical perspectives. The effect of continuum beliefs will interact with contact strategies. A total of 598 research participants were randomly assigned to online presentations representing one of the six conditions: three messages (continuum, categorical, or neutral control) by two processes (education or contact). Participants completed measures of continuum beliefs (as a manipulation check), stigma and affirming attitudes after viewing the condition. Continuum messages had significantly better effect on views that people with mental illness are "different," a finding that interacted with contact. Continuum messages also had better effects on recovery beliefs, once again an effect that interacted significantly with contact. Implications of these findings for improving anti-stigma programs are discussed.

  4. 60 Gbit/s 400 GHz Wireless Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Asif, Rameez; Piels, Molly

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a 400 GHz carrier wireless transmission system with real-time capable detection and demonstrate transmission of a 60 Gbit/s signal derived from optical Nyquist channels in a 12.5 GHz ultra-dense wavelength division multiplexing (UD-WDM) grid and carrying QPSK...

  5. High sensitivity broadband 360GHz passive receiver for TeraSCREEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Oldfield, Matthew; Maestrojuán, Itziar; Platt, Duncan; Brewster, Nick; Viegas, Colin; Alderman, Byron; Ellison, Brian N.

    2016-05-01

    TeraSCREEN is an EU FP7 Security project aimed at developing a combined active, with frequency channel centered at 360 GHz, and passive, with frequency channels centered at 94, 220 and 360 GHz, imaging system for border controls in airport and commercial ferry ports. The system will include automatic threat detection and classification and has been designed with a strong focus on the ethical, legal and practical aspects of operating in these environments and with the potential threats in mind. Furthermore, both the passive and active systems are based on array receivers with the active system consisting of a 16 element MIMO FMCW radar centered at 360 GHz with a bandwidth of 30 GHz utilizing a custom made direct digital synthesizer. The 16 element passive receiver system at 360 GHz uses commercial Gunn diode oscillators at 90 GHz followed by custom made 90 to 180 GHz frequency doublers supplying the local oscillator for 360 GHz sub-harmonic mixers. This paper describes the development of the passive antenna module, local oscillator chain, frequency mixers and detectors used in the passive receiver array of this system. The complete passive receiver chain is characterized in this paper.

  6. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF Lyα EMISSION AT z ∼ 4.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finkelstein, Keely D.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Ryan, Russell E.; Hathi, Nimish P.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Anderson, Jay; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mutchler, Max; Bond, Howard E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    We present the highest redshift detections of resolved Lyα emission, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys F658N narrowband-imaging data taken in parallel with the Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science program in the GOODS Chandra Deep Field-South. We detect Lyα emission from three spectroscopically confirmed z = 4.4 Lyα emitting galaxies (LAEs), more than doubling the sample of LAEs with resolved Lyα emission. Comparing the light distribution between the rest-frame ultraviolet continuum and narrowband images, we investigate the escape of Lyα photons at high redshift. While our data do not support a positional offset between the Lyα and rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) continuum emission, the half-light radius in one out of the three galaxies is significantly (>1σ) larger in Lyα than in the rest-frame UV continuum. Stacking the three LAEs in both the narrowband and UV continuum images, we find that the Lyα light appears larger than the rest-frame UV at 4.2σ significance. This Lyα flux detected with HST is a factor of 4-10 less than observed in similar filters from the ground. These results together imply that the Lyα emission is not strictly confined to its indigenous star-forming regions. Rather, for at least one object the Lyα emission is more extended, with the missing HST flux possibly existing in a diffuse outer halo. This suggests that the radiative transfer of Lyα photons in high-redshift LAEs is complicated, with the interstellar-medium geometry and/or outflows playing a significant role in galaxies at these redshifts.

  7. Extension versus Bending for Continuum Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Grimes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the capabilities of a novel class of continuous-backbone ("continuum" robots. These robots are inspired by biological "trunks, and tentacles". However, the capabilities of established continuum robot designs, which feature controlled bending but not extension, fall short of those of their biological counterparts. In this paper, we argue that the addition of controlled extension provides dual and complementary functionality, and correspondingly enhanced performance, in continuum robots. We present an interval-based analysis to show how the inclusion of controllable extension significantly enhances the workspace and capabilities of continuum robots.

  8. An Extraordinary Outburst in the Massive Protostellar System NGC 6334I-MM1: Quadrupling of the Millimeter Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Indebetouw, R. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); MacLeod, G. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 443, Krugersdorp 1740 (South Africa); Cyganowski, C. J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Chandler, C. J. [NRAO, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Chibueze, J. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Carver Building, 1 University Road, Nsukka (Nigeria); Friesen, R. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Thesner, C. [Centre for Space Research, Physics Department, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Young, K. H., E-mail: thunter@nrao.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Based on sub-arcsecond Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm continuum images of the massive protocluster NGC 6334I obtained in 2015 and 2008, we find that the dust emission from MM1 has increased by a factor of 4.0 ± 0.3 during the intervening years, and undergone a significant change in morphology. The continuum emission from the other cluster members (MM2, MM4, and the UCH ii region MM3 = NGC 6334F) has remained constant. Long-term single-dish maser monitoring at HartRAO finds that multiple maser species toward NGC 6334I flared beginning in early 2015, a few months before our ALMA observation, and some persist in that state. New ALMA images obtained in 2016 July–August at 1.1 and 0.87 mm confirm the changes with respect to SMA 0.87 mm images from 2008, and indicate that the (sub)millimeter flaring has continued for at least a year. The excess continuum emission, centered on the hypercompact H ii region MM1B, is extended and elongated (1.″6 × 1.″0 ≈ 2100 × 1300 au) with multiple peaks, suggestive of general heating of the surrounding subcomponents of MM1, some of which may trace clumps in a fragmented disk rather than separate protostars. In either case, these remarkable increases in maser and dust emission provide direct observational evidence of a sudden accretion event in the growth of a massive protostar yielding a sustained luminosity surge by a factor of 70 ± 20, analogous to the largest events in simulations by Meyer et al. This target provides an excellent opportunity to assess the impact of such a rare event on a protocluster over many years.

  9. 41 GHz and 10.6 GHz low threshold and low noise InAs/InP quantum dash two-section mode-locked lasers in L band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dontabactouny, M.; Piron, R.; Klaime, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports recent results on InAs/InP quantum dash-based, two-section, passively mode-locked lasers pulsing at 41 GHz and 10.6 GHz and emitting at 1.59 mu m at 20 degrees C. The 41-GHz device (1 mm long) starts lasing at 25 mA under uniform injection and the 10.6 GHz (4 mm long) at 71 m...

  10. Studies of soft x-ray emission during solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandaram, M.N.

    1973-01-01

    Solar flare soft x-ray emission from 0.5 A to 8.5 A was observed during 1967-68 by Bragg crystal (LiF and EDDT) spectrometers aboard the OSO-4 satellite and also by NRL broad-band ionization detectors aboard the OGO-4 satellite. In this work, instrumental parameters for the LiF crystal spectrometer based on experimental values have been determined and used in the data analysis. The total continuum emission in the 0.5 to 3 A and the 1 to 8 A broad band segments has been determined from OGO-4 data for 21 flares. In doing this, a simple and approximate method of converting the total emission based on the gray body approximation (in which the OGO-4 data are reported) to one based on the thermal continuum spectrum has been developed. (author)

  11. Arbitrary waveform modulated pulse EPR at 200 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2017-06-01

    We report here on the implementation of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities at ∼200 GHz into an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) instrument platform operating at 7 T. This is achieved with the integration of a 1 GHz, 2 channel, digital to analog converter (DAC) board that enables the generation of coherent arbitrary waveforms at Ku-band frequencies with 1 ns resolution into an existing architecture of a solid state amplifier multiplier chain (AMC). This allows for the generation of arbitrary phase- and amplitude-modulated waveforms at 200 GHz with >150 mW power. We find that the non-linearity of the AMC poses significant difficulties in generating amplitude-modulated pulses at 200 GHz. We demonstrate that in the power-limited regime of ω1 10 MHz) spin manipulation in incoherent (inversion), as well as coherent (echo formation) experiments. Highlights include the improvement by one order of magnitude in inversion bandwidth compared to that of conventional rectangular pulses, as well as a factor of two in improvement in the refocused echo intensity at 200 GHz.

  12. DETECTION OF ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN THE PLEIADES REFLECTION NEBULA WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE AND THE COSMOSOMAS EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genova-Santos, R.; Rebolo, R.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Lopez-Caraballo, C. H.; Hildebrandt, S. R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-12-10

    We present evidence for anomalous microwave emission (AME) in the Pleiades reflection nebula, using data from the seven-year release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and from the COSMOSOMAS (Cosmological Structures on Medium Angular Scales) experiment. The flux integrated in a 1 Degree-Sign radius around R.A. = 56.{sup 0}24, decl. = 23.{sup 0}78 (J2000) is 2.15 {+-} 0.12 Jy at 22.8 GHz, where AME is dominant. COSMOSOMAS data show no significant emission, but allow one to set upper limits of 0.94 and 1.58 Jy (99.7% confidence level), respectively, at 10.9 and 14.7 GHz, which are crucial to pin down the AME spectrum at these frequencies, and to discard any other emission mechanisms which could have an important contribution to the signal detected at 22.8 GHz. We estimate the expected level of free-free emission from an extinction-corrected H{alpha} template, while the thermal dust emission is characterized from infrared DIRBE data and extrapolated to microwave frequencies. When we deduct the contribution from these two components at 22.8 GHz, the residual flux, associated with AME, is 2.12 {+-} 0.12 Jy (17.7{sigma}). The spectral energy distribution from 10 to 60 GHz can be accurately fitted with a model of electric dipole emission from small spinning dust grains distributed in two separated phases of molecular and atomic gas, respectively. The dust emissivity, calculated by correlating the 22.8 GHz data with 100 {mu}m data, is found to be 4.36 {+-} 0.17 {mu}K (MJy sr{sup -1}){sup -1}, a value considerably lower than in typical AME clouds, which present emissivities of {approx}20 {mu}K (MJy sr{sup -1}){sup -1}, although higher than the 0.2 {mu}K (MJy sr{sup -1}){sup -1} of the translucent cloud LDN 1780, where AME has recently been claimed. The physical properties of the Pleiades nebula, in particular its low extinction A{sub V} {approx} 0.4, indicate that this is indeed a much less opaque object than those where AME has usually been studied. This fact

  13. DETECTION OF ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN THE PLEIADES REFLECTION NEBULA WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE AND THE COSMOSOMAS EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rebolo, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Hildebrandt, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence for anomalous microwave emission (AME) in the Pleiades reflection nebula, using data from the seven-year release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and from the COSMOSOMAS (Cosmological Structures on Medium Angular Scales) experiment. The flux integrated in a 1° radius around R.A. = 56. 0 24, decl. = 23. 0 78 (J2000) is 2.15 ± 0.12 Jy at 22.8 GHz, where AME is dominant. COSMOSOMAS data show no significant emission, but allow one to set upper limits of 0.94 and 1.58 Jy (99.7% confidence level), respectively, at 10.9 and 14.7 GHz, which are crucial to pin down the AME spectrum at these frequencies, and to discard any other emission mechanisms which could have an important contribution to the signal detected at 22.8 GHz. We estimate the expected level of free-free emission from an extinction-corrected Hα template, while the thermal dust emission is characterized from infrared DIRBE data and extrapolated to microwave frequencies. When we deduct the contribution from these two components at 22.8 GHz, the residual flux, associated with AME, is 2.12 ± 0.12 Jy (17.7σ). The spectral energy distribution from 10 to 60 GHz can be accurately fitted with a model of electric dipole emission from small spinning dust grains distributed in two separated phases of molecular and atomic gas, respectively. The dust emissivity, calculated by correlating the 22.8 GHz data with 100 μm data, is found to be 4.36 ± 0.17 μK (MJy sr –1 ) –1 , a value considerably lower than in typical AME clouds, which present emissivities of ∼20 μK (MJy sr –1 ) –1 , although higher than the 0.2 μK (MJy sr –1 ) –1 of the translucent cloud LDN 1780, where AME has recently been claimed. The physical properties of the Pleiades nebula, in particular its low extinction A V ∼ 0.4, indicate that this is indeed a much less opaque object than those where AME has usually been studied. This fact, together with the broad knowledge of the stellar content of this region

  14. An Intrinsic Baldwin Effect in the H Beta Broad Emission Line in the Spectrum of NGC 5548

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Peterson, Bradley M.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of an intrinsic Baldwin effect (i.e., nonlinear emission-line response to continuum variations) in the broad HP emission line of the active galaxy NGC 5548 using crosscorrelation techniques to remove light-travel time effects from the data. We find a nonlinear relationship between the HP emission line and continuum fluxes that is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We suggest that similar analysis of multiple lines might provide a useful diagnostic of physical conditions in the broad-line region.

  15. Pre-equilibrium gamma emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sudip

    1993-01-01

    Together with the direct reaction and the compound nuclear emissions the pre-equilibrium (PEQ) or pre-compound processes give a fairly complete picture of nuclear reactions induced by light ions at energies of some tens of MeV. PEQ particle emissions covering the higher energy continuum spectra have been investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, very little work has been done on PEQ γ- emissions. The reason is that in spite of extensive work done on PEQ particle emissions, the mechanism is not yet fully understood. Also, the PEQ γ-emission cross-sections (∼ micro barns) are very small compared to the PEQ particle emission cross-sections (∼ milli barns). Yet apart from the academic interest the understanding of PEQ γ-emissions is important for applied fusion research etc. In this paper the PEQ γ-emissions is discussed and the work done in this field is reviewed. (author). 14 refs

  16. GHz-rate optical parametric amplifier in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ke-Yao; Foster, Amy C

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate optical parametric amplification operating at GHz-rates at telecommunications wavelengths using a hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguide through the nonlinear optical process of four-wave mixing. We investigate how the parametric amplification scales with repetition rate. The ability to achieve amplification at GHz-repetition rates shows hydrogenated amorphous silicon’s potential for telecommunication applications and a GHz-rate optical parametric oscillator. (paper)

  17. A SEARCH FOR 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Cong-Gui; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China); Xu, Ye; Ju, Bing-Gang, E-mail: cggan@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2013-01-20

    We have observed a sample of 288 molecular outflow sources including 123 high-mass and 165 low-mass sources in order to search for class I methanol masers at the 95 GHz transition and to investigate the relationship between outflow characteristics and class I methanol maser emission with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Our survey detected 62 sources with 95 GHz methanol masers above a 3{sigma} detection limit, which includes 47 high-mass sources and 15 low-mass sources. Therefore, the detection rate is 38% for high-mass outflow sources and 9% for low-mass outflow sources, suggesting that class I methanol masers are relatively easily excited in high-mass sources. There are 37 newly detected 95 GHz methanol masers (including 27 high-mass and 10 low-mass sources), 19 of which are newly identified (i.e., first identification) class I methanol masers (including 13 high-mass and 6 low-mass sources). A statistical analysis of the distributions of maser detections with the outflow parameters reveals that the maser detection efficiency increases with the outflow properties (e.g., mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity of outflows, etc.). Systematic investigations of the relationships between the intrinsic luminosity of methanol masers and the outflow properties (including mass, momentum, kinetic energy, bolometric luminosity, and mass-loss rate of the central stellar sources) indicate a positive correlation. This further supports the theory that class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and associated with shocks when outflows interact with the surrounding ambient medium.

  18. A 31 GHz Survey of Low-Frequency Selected Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B. S.; Weintraub, L.; Sievers, J.; Bond, J. R.; Myers, S. T.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Shepherd, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the 40 m Owens Valley Radio Observatory telescope have been used to conduct a 31 GHz survey of 3165 known extragalactic radio sources over 143 deg2 of the sky. Target sources were selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey in fields observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI); most are extragalactic active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with 1.4 GHz flux densities of 3-10 mJy. The resulting 31 GHz catalogs are presented in full online. Using a maximum-likelihood analysis to obtain an unbiased estimate of the distribution of the 1.4-31 GHz spectral indices of these sources, we find a mean 31-1.4 GHz flux ratio of 0.110 ± 0.003 corresponding to a spectral index of α = -0.71 ± 0.01 (S ν vprop να) 9.0% ± 0.8% of sources have α > - 0.5 and 1.2% ± 0.2% have α > 0. By combining this spectral-index distribution with 1.4 GHz source counts, we predict 31 GHz source counts in the range 1 mJy S 31) = (16.7 ± 1.7) deg-2(S 31/1 mJy)-0.80±0.07. We also assess the contribution of mJy-level (S 1.4 GHz < 3.4 mJy) radio sources to the 31 GHz cosmic microwave background power spectrum, finding a mean power of ell(ell + 1)C src ell/(2π) = 44 ± 14 μK2 and a 95% upper limit of 80 μK2 at ell = 2500. Including an estimated contribution of 12 μK2 from the population of sources responsible for the turn-up in counts below S 1.4 GHz = 1 mJy, this amounts to 21% ± 7% of what is needed to explain the CBI high-ell excess signal, 275 ± 63 μK2. These results are consistent with other measurements of the 31 GHz point-source foreground.

  19. 77 FR 45558 - 4.9 GHz Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ..., our rules currently require 4.9 GHz licensees to ``cooperate in the selection and use of channels in... directional and thus can be represented as narrow paths on a coordination map; in contrast, they note, the low-power, less- directional, geographically-dispersed links in a 4.9 GHz network must be represented as a...

  20. Low-noise heterodyne receiver for electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, B., E-mail: bjtobias@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Luo, C.; Mamidanna, M.; Phan, T.; Pham, A.-V.; Wang, Y. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The critical component enabling electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) to resolve 2D and 3D electron temperature and density perturbations is the heterodyne imaging array that collects and downconverts radiated emission and/or reflected signals (50–150 GHz) to an intermediate frequency (IF) band (e.g. 0.1–18 GHz) that can be transmitted by a shielded coaxial cable for further filtering and detection. New circuitry has been developed for this task, integrating gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) mounted on a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The improved topology significantly increases electromagnetic shielding from out-of-band interference, leads to 10× improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio, and dramatic cost savings through integration. The current design, optimized for reflectometry and edge radiometry on mid-sized tokamaks, has demonstrated >20 dB conversion gain in upper V-band (60-75 GHz). Implementation of the circuit in a multi-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) array will improve the diagnosis of edge-localized modes and fluctuations of the high-confinement, or H-mode, pedestal.

  1. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  2. Multifrequency radio observations of SNR J0536-6735 (N 59B with associated pulsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozzetto L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of new Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA observations of supernova remnant, SNR J0536-6735. This remnant appears to follow a shell morphology with a diameter of D=36x29 pc (with 1 pc uncertainty in each direction. There is an embedded HII region on the northern limb of the remnant which made various analysis and measurements (such as flux density, spectral index and polarisation difficult. The radio-continuum emission followed the same structure as the optical emission, allowing for extent and flux density estimates at 20 cm. We estimate the surface brightness at 1 GHz of 2.55x10−21 Wm−2 Hz−1 sr−1 for the SNR. Also, we detect a distinctive radio-continuum point source which confirms the previous suggestion of this remnant being associated with pulsar wind nebula (PWN. The tail of this remnant is not seen in the radio-continuum images and is only seen in the optical and X-ray images.

  3. A 1.8 GHz Voltage-Controlled Oscillator using CMOS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisurah, M. H. Siti; Emran, F. Nazif; Norman Fadhil, Idham M.; Rahim, A. I. Abdul; Razman, Y. Mohamed

    2011-05-01

    A Voltage-Controlled Oscillator (VCO) for 1.8 GHz application has been designed using a combination of both 0.13 μm and 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The VCO has a large tuning range, which is from 1.39 GHz to 1.91 GHz, using a control voltage from 0 to 3V. The VCO exhibits a low phase-noise at 1.8 GHz which is around -119.8dBc/Hz at a frequency offset of 1 MHz.

  4. A low noise 665 GHz SIS quasi-particle waveguide receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, J. W.; Walker, C. K.; Leduc, H. G.; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Phillips, T. G.

    1993-01-01

    Recent results on a 565-690 GHz SIS heterodyne receiver employing a 0.36 micron(sup 2) Nb/AlOx/Nb SIS tunnel junction with high quality circular non-contacting back short and E-plane tuners in a full height wave guide mount are reported. No resonant tuning structures were incorporated in the junction design at this time, even though such structures are expected to help the performance of the receiver. The receiver operates to at least the gap frequency of Niobium, approximately 680 GHz. Typical receiver noise temperatures from 565-690 GHz range from 160K to 230K with a best value of 185K DSB at 648 GHz. With the mixer cooled from 4.3K to 2K the measured receiver noise temperatures decreased by approximately 15 percent, giving roughly 180K DSB from 660 to 680 GHz. The receiver has a full 1 GHz IF pass band and was successfully installed at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory in Hawaii.

  5. Magnetic films for GHz applications (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenivski, V.; van Dover, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    Tremendous growth of the communications industry and the increasingly high demand for low-cost light-weight/small-size products drive technology to designs with a high degree of integration. In particular, planar inductors used in integrated circuits with significantly improved inductance per unit area characteristics are needed for further miniaturization of cellular phones operating at 0.95 and 1.9 GHz. Little has been done, however, to use magnetic films to improve the performance and/or reduce size of planar magnetic flux devices. The successful thin-film material would have a high ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency (well above the operating frequency of the device), large permaeability, and low magnetic loss, and very importantly be technologically attractive, i.e., be process compatible with IC technology and have as few preparation steps as possible. Here, we report on fabrication of metallic ferromagnetic films of CoNbZr, CoNbZr/AlN mulitilayered laminates, and exchange-biased structures suitable for GHz applications. Lamination of CoNbZr with thin insulating layers of AlN is shown to significantly improve the microstructure and dc magnetic properties of the films having thicknesses >0.2 μm, as well as to be effective in suppressing eddy current losses at frequencies up to 1 endash 2 GHz. We use exchange biasing to increase the FMR frequency of soft CoNbZr. In-plane unidirectional anisotropy fields of ∼50 Oe are achieved, which result in FMR frequencies >2 GHz. Permeability values of ∼200 with quality factors of ∼10 at 1 GHz are demonstrated. The films are deposited at room temperature and require no postdeposition processing. Application of these films in planar inductors is discussed.copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. The continuum of behavior guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Behavior guidance is a continuum of techniques, basic and advanced, fundamental to the provision of quality dental care for pediatric patients. This practice must be individualized, pairing the correct method of behavior guidance with each child. To select the appropriate technique, the clinician must have a thorough understanding of each aspect of the continuum and anticipate parental expectations, child temperament, and the technical procedures necessary to complete care. By effectively using techniques within the continuum of behavior guidance, a healing relationship with the family is maintained while addressing dental disease and empowering the child to receive dental treatment throughout their lifetime. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The 1600 Å Emission Bump in Protoplanetary Disks: A Spectral Signature of H2O Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Hervé

    2017-08-01

    The FUV continuum spectrum of many accreting pre-main sequence stars, Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), does not continue smoothly from the well-studied Balmer continuum emission in the NUV, suggesting that additional processes contribute to the short-wavelength emission in these objects. The most notable spectral feature in the FUV continuum of some CTTSs is a broad emission approximately centered at 1600 Å, which has been referred to as the “1600 Å Bump.” The origin of this feature remains unclear. In an effort to better understand the molecular properties of planet-forming disks and the UV spectral properties of accreting protostars, we have assembled archival FUV spectra of 37 disk-hosting systems observed by the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Clear 1600 Å Bump emission is observed above the smooth, underlying 1100-1800 Å continuum spectrum in 19/37 Classical T Tauri disks in the HST-COS sample, with the detection rate in transition disks (8/8) being much higher than that in primordial or non-transition sources (11/29). We describe a spectral deconvolution analysis to separate the Bump (spanning 1490-1690 Å) from the underlying FUV continuum, finding an average Bump luminosity L(Bump) ≈ 7 × 1029 erg s-1. Parameterizing the Bump with a combination of Gaussian and polynomial components, we find that the 1600 Å Bump is characterized by a peak wavelength λ o = 1598.6 ± 3.3 Å, with FWHM = 35.8 ± 19.1 Å. Contrary to previous studies, we find that this feature is inconsistent with models of H2 excited by electron -impact. We show that this Bump makes up between 5%-50% of the total FUV continuum emission in the 1490-1690 Å band and emits roughly 10%-80% of the total fluorescent H2 luminosity for stars with well-defined Bump features. Energetically, this suggests that the carrier of the 1600 Å Bump emission is powered by Lyα photons. We argue that the most likely mechanism is Lyα-driven dissociation of H2O in the inner disk, r

  8. Performance-based shape optimization of continuum structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Qingquan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a performance-based optimization (PBO) method for optimal shape design of continuum structures with stiffness constraints. Performance-based design concepts are incorporated in the shape optimization theory to achieve optimal designs. In the PBO method, the traditional shape optimization problem of minimizing the weight of a continuum structure with displacement or mean compliance constraints is transformed to the problem of maximizing the performance of the structure. The optimal shape of a continuum structure is obtained by gradually eliminating inefficient finite elements from the structure until its performance is maximized. Performance indices are employed to monitor the performance of optimized shapes in an optimization process. Performance-based optimality criteria are incorporated in the PBO method to identify the optimum from the optimization process. The PBO method is used to produce optimal shapes of plane stress continuum structures and plates in bending. Benchmark numerical results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PBO method for generating the maximum stiffness shape design of continuum structures. It is shown that the PBO method developed overcomes the limitations of traditional shape optimization methods in optimal design of continuum structures. Performance-based optimality criteria presented can be incorporated in any shape and topology optimization methods to obtain optimal designs of continuum structures.

  9. Observations of the Polarisation of the Anomalous Microwave Emission: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Rubiño-Martín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The observational status of the polarisation of the anomalous microwave emission (AME is reviewed, both for individual compact Galactic regions as well as for the large-scale Galactic emission. There are six Galactic regions with existing polarisation constraints in the relevant range of 10–40 GHz: four dust clouds (Perseus, ρ Ophiuchi, LDN1622, and Pleiades and two HII regions (LPH96 and the Helix nebula. These constraints are discussed in detail and are complemented by deriving upper limits on the polarisation of the AME for those objects without published WMAP constraints. For the case of large-scale emission, two recent works, based on WMAP data, are reviewed. Currently, the best constraints on the fractional polarisation of the AME, at frequencies near the peak of the emission (i.e., 20–30 GHz, are at the level of ~1% (95.4% confidence level. Finally, we compare these constraints with the predictions of some theoretical AME models and discuss the possible impact of polarised AME on future primordial B-mode experiments.

  10. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lavonen, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz......, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase...... of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data...

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE YOUNGEST HERSCHEL-DETECTED PROTOSTARS. I. ENVELOPE STRUCTURE REVEALED BY CARMA DUST CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ragan, Sarah E.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Manoj, P.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    2015-01-01

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy 2.9 mm dust continuum emission observations of a sample of 14 Herschel-detected Class 0 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds, drawn from the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS) sample. These objects are characterized by very red 24-70 μm colors and prominent submillimeter emission, suggesting that they are very young Class 0 protostars embedded in dense envelopes. We detect all of the PBRS in 2.9 mm continuum emission and emission from four protostars and one starless core in the fields toward the PBRS; we also report one new PBRS source. The ratio of 2.9 mm luminosity to bolometric luminosity is higher by a factor of ∼5 on average, compared to other well-studied protostars in the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds. The 2.9 mm visibility amplitudes for 6 of the 14 PBRS are very flat as a function of uv distance, with more than 50% of the source emission arising from radii <1500 AU. These flat visibility amplitudes are most consistent with spherically symmetric envelope density profiles with ρ ∝ R –2.5 . Alternatively, there could be a massive unresolved structure like a disk or a high-density inner envelope departing from a smooth power law. The large amount of mass on scales <1500 AU (implying high average central densities) leads us to suggest that that the PBRS with flat visibility amplitude profiles are the youngest PBRS and may be undergoing a brief phase of high mass infall/accretion and are possibly among the youngest Class 0 protostars. The PBRS with more rapidly declining visibility amplitudes still have large envelope masses, but could be slightly more evolved

  12. Observations of Anomalous Microwave Emission from HII Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Dickinson

    2013-01-01

    free-free emission from UCHII regions may be also be significant in some cases. The AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of the AME brightness to the 100 μm brightness, is comparable to the value observed in high-latitude diffuse cirrus in some regions, but is significantly lower in others. However, this value is dependent on the dust temperature. More data, both at high frequencies (>~5 GHz and high resolution (~1′ or better is required to disentangle the emission processes in such complex regions.

  13. Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy of powerful 2Jy and 3CRR radio galaxies. II. AGN power indicators and unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicken, D. [CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tadhunter, C. [University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Morganti, R. [ASTRON, P.O. Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Axon, D.; Robinson, A.; Magagnoli, M. [Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Kharb, P. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Ramos Almeida, C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/V ia Lactea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Mingo, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Hardcastle, M. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Singh, V. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Kouwenhoven, M. B. N. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, Beijing 100871 (China); Rose, M.; Spoon, H. [224 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Inskip, K. J. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Holt, J., E-mail: daniel.dicken@cea.fr [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-06-20

    It remains uncertain which continuum and emission line diagnostics best indicate the bolometric powers of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially given the attenuation caused by the circumnuclear material and the possible contamination by components related to star formation. Here we use mid-IR spectra along with multiwavelength data to investigate the merit of various diagnostics of AGN radiative power, including the mid-IR [Ne III] λ25.89 μm and [O IV] λ25.89 μm fine-structure lines, the optical [O III] λ5007 forbidden line, and mid-IR 24 μm, 5 GHz radio, and X-ray continuum emission, for complete samples of 46 2Jy radio galaxies (0.05 < z < 0.7) and 17 3CRR FRII radio galaxies (z < 0.1). We find that the mid-IR [O IV] line is the most reliable indicator of AGN power for powerful radio-loud AGNs. By assuming that the [O IV] is emitted isotropically, and comparing the [O III] and 24 μm luminosities of the broad- and narrow-line AGNs in our samples at fixed [O IV] luminosity, we show that the [O III] and 24 μm emission are both mildly attenuated in the narrow-line compared to the broad-line objects by a factor of ≈2. However, despite this attenuation, the [O III] and 24 μm luminosities are better AGN power indicators for our sample than either the 5 GHz radio or the X-ray continuum luminosities. We also detect the mid-IR 9.7 μm silicate feature in the spectra of many objects but not ubiquitously: at least 40% of the sample shows no clear evidence for these features. We conclude that, for the majority of powerful radio galaxies, the mid-IR lines are powered by AGN photoionization.

  14. Area Regge calculus and continuum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsymovsky, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    Encountered in the literature generalisations of general relativity to independent area variables are considered, the discrete (generalised Regge calculus) and continuum ones. The generalised Regge calculus can be either with purely area variables or, as we suggest, with area tensor-connection variables. Just for the latter, in particular, we prove that in analogy with corresponding statement in ordinary Regge calculus (by Feinberg, Friedberg, Lee and Ren), passing to the (appropriately defined) continuum limit yields the generalised continuum area tensor-connection general relativity

  15. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  16. A study of 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzic, G.; Connolly, D. J.; Haugland, E. J.; Kosmahl, H. G.; Chitwood, J. S.

    Applications of intersatellite links operating at 60 GHz are reviewed. Likely scenarios, ranging from transmission of moderate and high data rates over long distances to low data rates over short distances are examined. A limited parametric tradeoff is performed with system variables such as radiofrequency power, receiver noise temperature, link distance, data rate, and antenna size. Present status is discussed and projections are given for both electron tube and solid state transmitter technologies. Monolithic transmit and receive module technology, already under development at 20 to 30 GHz, is reviewed and its extension to 60 GHz, and possible applicability is discussed.

  17. A study of 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzic, G.; Connolly, D. J.; Haugland, E. J.; Kosmahl, H. G.; Chitwood, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of intersatellite links operating at 60 GHz are reviewed. Likely scenarios, ranging from transmission of moderate and high data rates over long distances to low data rates over short distances are examined. A limited parametric tradeoff is performed with system variables such as radiofrequency power, receiver noise temperature, link distance, data rate, and antenna size. Present status is discussed and projections are given for both electron tube and solid state transmitter technologies. Monolithic transmit and receive module technology, already under development at 20 to 30 GHz, is reviewed and its extension to 60 GHz, and possible applicability is discussed.

  18. The 30/20 GHz communications system functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siperko, C. M.; Frankfort, M.; Markham, R.; Wall, M.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of 30/20 GHz usage in satellite systems to be used in support of projected communication requirements of the 1990's are defined. A requirements analysis which develops projected market demand for satellite services by general and specialized carriers and an analysis of the impact of propagation and system constraints on 30/20 GHz operation are included. A set of technical performance characteristics for the 30/20 GHz systems which can serve the resulting market demand and the experimental program necessary to verify technical and operational aspects of the proposed systems is also discussed.

  19. Planck intermediate results XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz to me...

  20. Observations of interstellar H2O emission at 183 Gigahertz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, J.W.; Gustincic, J.J.; Kakar, R.K.; Kuiper, T.B.H.; Roscoe, H.K.; Swanson, P.N.; Rodriguez Kuiper, E.N.; Kerr, A.R.; Thaddeus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Line emission at 183 GHz by the 3 13 --2 20 rotational transition of water vapor has been detected from the Orion Nebula with the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory 91 cm telescope. The peak antenna temperature of the line is 15 K, its LSR velocity is 8 km s -1 , and its width is 15 km s -1 . The velocity profile has characteristics similar to those for CO:a narrow (approx.4 km s -1 ) ''spike'' centered at 9.5 km s -1 and a broad ''plateau'' with flaring wings centered at approx.8 km s -1 . Our 7'.5 antenna beam did not resolve the source. The 183 GHz H 2 O plateau emission appears enhanced above that expected for thermal excitation if it originates from the no greater than 1' region characteristic of plateau emission from all other observed molecules. The spike emission is consistent with an optically thick source of the approximated size of the well-known molecular ridge in Orion having the H 2 O in thermal equilibrium at Tapprox. =50 K. If this is the case, then the H 2 O column density giving rise to the spike is N/sub H/2/sub O/> or =3 x 10 17 cm -2 . An excitation calculation implies N/sub H/2/sub O/approx. =10 18 cm -2 for a source the size of the molecular ridge. These results imply that H 2 O is one of the more abundant species in the Orion Molecualr Cloud.H 2 O emission at 183 GHz was not detected in Sgr A, Sgr B2, W3, W43, W49, W51, DR 21, NGC 1333, NGC 7027, GL 2591, or the rho Oph cloud; it may have been detected in M17

  1. Continuum emission from the nucleus of NGC 1275

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmore, A.J.; Sharples, R.M.; Robson, E.I.; Ade, P.A.R.; Radostitz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Sub-millimeter and multi-aperture near-infrared observations of NGC 1275 are presented. The luminosity of the extended stellar component within the near-infrared apertures has been determined, and consequently also the 1.25-3.5 μm energy distribution of the unresolved nucleus. The 1 μm-30 cm energy distribution is reviewed. It is argued that the most likely origin for the 100 μm-30 cm radiation is synchrotron emission, with this non-thermal component also contributing significant flux at 10 μm. (author)

  2. Widespread HCN maser emission in carbon-rich evolved stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Keller, D.; Kamiński, T.

    2018-05-01

    Context. HCN is a major constituent of the circumstellar envelopes of carbon-rich evolved stars, and rotational lines from within its vibrationally excited states probe parts of these regions closest to the stellar surface. A number of such lines are known to show maser action. Historically, in one of them, the 177 GHz J = 2 → 1 line in the l-doubled bending mode has been found to show relatively strong maser action, with results only published for a single object, the archetypical high-mass loss asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRC+10216. Aims: To examine how common 177 GHz HCN maser emission is, we conducted an exploratory survey for this line toward a select sample of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars that are observable from the southern hemisphere. Methods: We used the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment 12 meter submillimeter Telescope (APEX) equipped with a new receiver to simultaneously observe three J = 2 → 1 HCN rotational transitions, the (0, 11c, 0) and (0, 11d, 0) l-doublet components, and the line from the (0,0,0) ground state. Results: The (0, 11c, 0) maser line is detected toward 11 of 13 observed sources, which all show emission in the (0,0,0) transition. In most of the sources, the peak intensity of the (0, 11c, 0) line rivals that of the (0,0,0) line; in two sources, it is even stronger. Except for the object with the highest mass-loss rate, IRC+10216, the (0, 11c, 0) line covers a smaller velocity range than the (0,0,0) line. The (0, 11d, 0) line, which is detected in four of the sources, is much weaker than the other two lines and covers a velocity range that is smaller yet, again except for IRC+10216. Compared to its first detection in 1989, the profile of the (0, 11c, 0) line observed toward IRC+10216 looks very different, and we also appear to see variability in the (0,0,0) line profile (at a much lower degree). Our limited information on temporal variabilitydisfavors a strong correlation of maser and stellar continuum flux

  3. Continuum mechanics of single-substance bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Eringen, A Cemal

    1975-01-01

    Continuum Physics, Volume II: Continuum Mechanics of Single-Substance Bodies discusses the continuum mechanics of bodies constituted by a single substance, providing a thorough and precise presentation of exact theories that have evolved during the past years. This book consists of three parts-basic principles, constitutive equations for simple materials, and methods of solution. Part I of this publication is devoted to a discussion of basic principles irrespective of material geometry and constitution that are valid for all kinds of substances, including composites. The geometrical notions, k

  4. Planck intermediate results: XVII. Emission of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium from the far-infrared to microwave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Delabrouille, J.

    2014-01-01

    H-atom. The dust temperature is observed to be anti-correlated with the dust emissivity and opacity. We interpret this result as evidence of dust evolution within the diffuse ISM. The mean dust opacity is measured to be (7.1 ± 0.6) × 10-27 cm2 H-1 × (v/353 GHz) 1.53 ± 0.03for 100 ≤ v ≤ 353 GHz......The dust-Hi correlation is used to characterize the emission properties of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) from far infrared wavelengths to microwave frequencies. The field of this investigation encompasses the part of the southern sky best suited to study the cosmic infrared...... and microwave backgrounds. We cross-correlate sky maps from Planck, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), and the diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE), at 17 frequencies from 23 to 3000 GHz, with the Parkes survey of the 21 cm line emission of neutral atomic hydrogen, over a contiguous area...

  5. The 1600 Å Emission Bump in Protoplanetary Disks: A Spectral Signature of H{sub 2}O Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Hervé, E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, F-92190, Meudon (France)

    2017-08-01

    The FUV continuum spectrum of many accreting pre-main sequence stars, Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), does not continue smoothly from the well-studied Balmer continuum emission in the NUV, suggesting that additional processes contribute to the short-wavelength emission in these objects. The most notable spectral feature in the FUV continuum of some CTTSs is a broad emission approximately centered at 1600 Å, which has been referred to as the “1600 Å Bump.” The origin of this feature remains unclear. In an effort to better understand the molecular properties of planet-forming disks and the UV spectral properties of accreting protostars, we have assembled archival FUV spectra of 37 disk-hosting systems observed by the Hubble Space Telescope -Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Clear 1600 Å Bump emission is observed above the smooth, underlying 1100–1800 Å continuum spectrum in 19/37 Classical T Tauri disks in the HST -COS sample, with the detection rate in transition disks (8/8) being much higher than that in primordial or non-transition sources (11/29). We describe a spectral deconvolution analysis to separate the Bump (spanning 1490–1690 Å) from the underlying FUV continuum, finding an average Bump luminosity L (Bump) ≈ 7 × 10{sup 29} erg s{sup −1}. Parameterizing the Bump with a combination of Gaussian and polynomial components, we find that the 1600 Å Bump is characterized by a peak wavelength λ {sub o} = 1598.6 ± 3.3 Å, with FWHM = 35.8 ± 19.1 Å. Contrary to previous studies, we find that this feature is inconsistent with models of H{sub 2} excited by electron -impact. We show that this Bump makes up between 5%–50% of the total FUV continuum emission in the 1490–1690 Å band and emits roughly 10%–80% of the total fluorescent H{sub 2} luminosity for stars with well-defined Bump features. Energetically, this suggests that the carrier of the 1600 Å Bump emission is powered by Ly α photons. We argue that the most likely mechanism

  6. A calibrated, broadband antenna for plasma RF emission measurements below 1 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, P.D.; Rosenberg, D.; Roth, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A constant impedance, constant aperture antenna can make possible broadband plasma RF emission measurements which yield relative and absolute power levels. However, good technique must be followed for the immersion of such an RF probe into plasma radiation. The authors have used a complementary conical spiral antenna to observe plasma RF emission over the frequency range 100 ≤ν≤ 1200 MHz. The RF emission was emitted by a modified Penning discharge. The RF emission from the discharge typically exhibits harmonic structure over a broad frequency range, necessitating a broadband antenna with a flat frequency response curve to allow detailed spectral analysis. The antenna consists of two metal strips of approximately uniform width wound helically on a cone made of Lexan plastic. Since the antenna is a balanced network, a balun is employed to make the transition to a 50-ohm coaxial line. The antenna feed method is critical in maintaining a uniform impedance network. Neglecting stray transmission line effects, the probe circuit for the frequency range 100 ≤ν≤ 500 MHz is 50 ohms due to the spectrum analyzer, paralleled by 291 ohms due to balun magnetization; the combination is fed by a 144 ohm probe aperture

  7. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  8. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz mobile-satellite...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz mobile-satellite service. 25.143 Section 25.143 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses...

  9. Continuum of eLearning: 2012 Project Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    multimedia, and Continuum of eLearning | Purpose and Vision 19 << UNCLASSIFIED>> (limited) situated learning. Future versions of the CoL self-paced...Continuum of eLearning : 2012 Project Summary Report Continuum of eLearning The Next Evolution of Joint Training on JKO October 2012 Joint...Technical Report November 2011 – August 2012 Continuum of eLearning : 2012 Project Summary Report N00140-06-D-0060 David T. Fautua, Sae Schatz, Andrea

  10. α particle induced scintillation in dense gaseous argon: emission spectra and temporal behavior of its ionic component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.J.; Klein, G.

    1980-01-01

    The scintillation induced by α particles in dense gaseous argon (above 1 atm) has been studied. The electric field dependence of the scintillation, shows that the second continuum (centred around 1270A) stems from the neutral as well as from the ionic species, initially created by the impinging particle. Intensity decay curves and emission spectra of these neutral excitation and ionic components were determined. Time constants suggest that the recombination mechanism is responsible for a delayed formation of the second continuum states, 1 Σ + sub(u) and 3 Σ + sub(u). The third continuum of the emission spectra, which spreads at longer wavelengths, from 1600A to 2800A, is field independent

  11. ALMA Images of the Orion Hot Core at 349 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M. C. H.; Plambeck, R. L., E-mail: wright@astro.berkeley.edu [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    We present ALMA images of the dust and molecular line emission in the Orion Hot Core at 349 GHz. At 0.″2 angular resolution the images reveal multiple clumps in an arc ∼1″ east of Orion Source I, the protostar at the center of the Kleinmann–Low Nebula, and another chain of peaks from IRc7 toward the southwest. The molecular line images show narrow filamentary structures at velocities >10 km s{sup −1} away from the heavily resolved ambient cloud velocity ∼5 km s{sup −1}. Many of these filaments trace the SiO outflow from Source I, and lie along the edges of the dust emission. Molecular line emission at excitation temperatures 300–2000 K, and velocities >10 km s{sup −1} from the ambient cloud, suggest that the Hot Core may be heated in shocks by the outflow from Source I or from the Becklin–Neugebauer (BN)/SrcI explosion. The spectral line observations also reveal a remarkable molecular ring, ∼2″ south of SrcI, with a diameter ∼600 au. The ring is seen in high-excitation transitions of HC{sub 3}N, HCN v 2 = 1, and SO{sub 2}. An impact of ejecta from the BN/SrcI explosion with a dense dust clump could result in the observed ring of shocked material.

  12. Continuum spectra in light-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, T.; Udagawa, T. [Texas Univ., Austin (USA). Dept. of Physics; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M [eds.

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of multi-step direct reaction method, to fit continuum cross sections of light-ion reactions, are reviewed. There has been a long-standing difficulty in reproducing sufficiently large (p, p') continuum cross section, but it has now been all but removed. It will be discussed in some detail, how this was achieved. Analyses of very recent data on analyzing powers in the continuum of (p, p') and (p, ..cap alpha..) reactions will also be discussed. Finally, analysis of the breakup of h into d and p will be presented.

  13. Improved Constraints on Cosmology and Foregrounds from BICEP2 and Keck Array Cosmic Microwave Background Data with Inclusion of 95 GHz Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, P A R; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bowens-Rubin, R; Brevik, J A; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Crill, B P; Duband, L; Dvorkin, C; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Grayson, J; Halpern, M; Harrison, S; Hilton, G C; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pryke, C; Richter, S; Schwarz, R; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Sudiwala, R V; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-22

    We present results from an analysis of all data taken by the BICEP2 and Keck Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments up to and including the 2014 observing season. This includes the first Keck Array observations at 95 GHz. The maps reach a depth of 50 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in the 150 GHz band and 127 nK deg in the 95 GHz band. We take auto- and cross-spectra between these maps and publicly available maps from WMAP and Planck at frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz. An excess over lensed ΛCDM is detected at modest significance in the 95×150 BB spectrum, and is consistent with the dust contribution expected from our previous work. No significant evidence for synchrotron emission is found in spectra such as 23×95, or for correlation between the dust and synchrotron sky patterns in spectra such as 23×353. We take the likelihood of all the spectra for a multicomponent model including lensed ΛCDM, dust, synchrotron, and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r) using priors on the frequency spectral behaviors of dust and synchrotron emission from previous analyses of WMAP and Planck data in other regions of the sky. This analysis yields an upper limit r_{0.05}<0.09 at 95% confidence, which is robust to variations explored in analysis and priors. Combining these B-mode results with the (more model-dependent) constraints from Planck analysis of CMB temperature plus baryon acoustic oscillations and other data yields a combined limit r_{0.05}<0.07 at 95% confidence. These are the strongest constraints to date on inflationary gravitational waves.

  14. Planck intermediate results. XIV. Dust emission at millimetre wavelengths in the Galactic plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, Marie-Helene

    2014-01-01

    We use Planck HFI data combined with ancillary radio data to study the emissivity index of the interstellar dust emission in the frequency range 100-353 GHz, or 3-0.8 mm, in the Galactic plane. We analyse the region l = 20 degrees-44 degrees and vertical bar b vertical bar...

  15. Pressure dependence of emission intensity of rare-gas excimer light produced by silent discharge; Teikiatsu ryoiki ni okeru musei hoden reiki ki gas excimer hikari shutsuryoku no atsuryoku izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yukimura, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-09-20

    To establish the pressure dependence of silent discharge excited rare gas excimer light emission, a vacua ultraviolet light was subjected to spectroscopic analysis at a pressure lower than 20kPa. Researches are under way to apply the discharge excited rare gas excimer lamp as a vacuum ultraviolet light source for the development of new materials and for the conservation of environments. When the pressure is as low as 1.8kPa or 4.4kPa, the emission has peaks at wavelengths centering on 147nm and 149nm, both of which are the resonance lines of the xenon atom. Excimer generation becomes prominent as the pressure increases, with the second continuum of light growing dominant at 35kPa to weaken relatively the resonance lines and the first continuum of light. In the first continuum, emission increases only at a suppressed rate, as compared with emission in the second continuum, due for instance to a collision caused relaxation process in which excimers are lost. In the case of xenon in the vicinity of 10-11kPa, the first continuum of light and the second continuum of light are approximately equal in emission intensity, producing a vacuum ultraviolet light source with a bandwidth relatively large for a single gas spectrum. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  16. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  17. Giant resonances in the deformed continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsukasa, T.; Yabana, K.

    2004-01-01

    Giant resonances in the continuum for deformed nuclei are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory in real time and real space. The continuum effect is effectively taken into account by introducing a complex Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC). (orig.)

  18. A Study of the Radio Continuum Far Infrared Correlation at Small Scales in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Monica I.; Allen, R. J.; Wiklind, T.; Loinard, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a study of the behavior of the Radio Continuum (RC) Far Infrared (FIR) correlation on scales corresponding to the size of small molecular clouds. This was done by comparing the spatial distribution of RC emission and FIR emission from a sample of several regions, distributed within the range 79∘ ≤ l ≤ 174∘ in the Galaxy. We have examined the 408 and 1420 MHz mosaic images of the sample, from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS), which later were compared with images at 60 and 100 μm. Preliminary results suggest that the RC -FIR correlation still holds at small scales, since a good qualitative correlation between RC and FIR emission is found. The physical process involved that may cause such correlation will be discussed as well as the nature of the RC emission. This research makes use of data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey.

  19. A STUDY OF BROADBAND FARADAY ROTATION AND POLARIZATION BEHAVIOR OVER 1.3–10 GHz IN 36 DISCRETE RADIO SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a broadband polarization analysis of 36 discrete polarized radio sources over a very broad, densely sampled frequency band. Our sample was selected on the basis of polarization behavior apparent in narrowband archival data at 1.4 GHz: half the sample shows complicated frequency-dependent polarization behavior (i.e., Faraday complexity) at these frequencies, while half shows comparatively simple behavior (i.e., they appear Faraday simple ). We re-observed the sample using the Australia Telescope Compact Array in full polarization, with 6 GHz of densely sampled frequency coverage spanning 1.3–10 GHz. We have devised a general polarization modeling technique that allows us to identify multiple polarized emission components in a source, and to characterize their properties. We detect Faraday complex behavior in almost every source in our sample. Several sources exhibit particularly remarkable polarization behavior. By comparing our new and archival data, we have identified temporal variability in the broadband integrated polarization spectra of some sources. In a number of cases, the characteristics of the polarized emission components, including the range of Faraday depths over which they emit, their temporal variability, spectral index, and the linear extent of the source, allow us to argue that the spectropolarimetric data encode information about the magneto-ionic environment of active galactic nuclei themselves. Furthermore, the data place direct constraints on the geometry and magneto-ionic structure of this material. We discuss the consequences of restricted frequency bands on the detection and interpretation of polarization structures, and the implications for upcoming spectropolarimetric surveys.

  20. Fundamentals of continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnicki, John W

    2014-01-01

    A concise introductory course text on continuum mechanics Fundamentals of Continuum Mechanics focuses on the fundamentals of the subject and provides the background for formulation of numerical methods for large deformations and a wide range of material behaviours. It aims to provide the foundations for further study, not just of these subjects, but also the formulations for much more complex material behaviour and their implementation computationally.  This book is divided into 5 parts, covering mathematical preliminaries, stress, motion and deformation, balance of mass, momentum and energ

  1. Introduction to continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, W Michael; Rubin, David

    1996-01-01

    Introduction to Continuum Mechanics is a recently updated and revised text which is perfect for either introductory courses in an undergraduate engineering curriculum or for a beginning graduate course.Continuum Mechanics studies the response of materials to different loading conditions. The concept of tensors is introduced through the idea of linear transformation in a self-contained chapter, and the interrelation of direct notation, indicial notation, and matrix operations is clearly presented. A wide range of idealized materials are considered through simple static and dynamic problems, a

  2. The shadow continuum : testing the records continuum model through the Djogdja Documenten and the migrated archives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karabinos, Michael Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation tests the universal suitability of the records continuum model by using two cases from the decolonization of Southeast Asia. The continuum model is a new model of records visualization invented in the 1990s that sees records as free to move throughout four ‘dimensions’ rather than

  3. Elementary Continuum Mechanics for Everyone - and Some More

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Esben

    Quite trivially, Continuum mechanics per se deals with the description of deformations of three-dimensional continua i.e. models whose properties are independent of scale in that the continuum does not possess a structure. Thus, continuum mechanics does not try to model the atomic structure...

  4. Elementary Continuum Mechanics for Everyone - And Some More

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Esben

    Quite trivially, Continuum mechanics per se deals with the description of deformations of three-dimensional continua i.e. models whose properties are independent of scale in that the continuum does not possess a structure. Thus, continuum mechanics does not try to model the atomic structure...

  5. Constraining Lyman continuum escape using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Sambit K.; Zackrisson, Erik; Binggeli, Christian; Pelckmans, Kristiaan; Cubo, Rubén; Mellema, Garrelt

    2018-05-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will observe the rest-frame ultraviolet/optical spectra of galaxies from the epoch of reionization (EoR) in unprecedented detail. While escaping into the intergalactic medium, hydrogen-ionizing (Lyman continuum; LyC) photons from the galaxies will contribute to the bluer end of the UV slope and make nebular emission lines less prominent. We present a method to constrain leakage of the LyC photons using the spectra of high redshift (z >~ 6) galaxies. We simulate JWST/NIRSpec observations of galaxies at z =6-9 by matching the fluxes of galaxies observed in the Frontier Fields observations of galaxy cluster MACS-J0416. Our method predicts the escape fraction fesc with a mean absolute error Δfesc ~ 0.14. The method also predicts the redshifts of the galaxies with an error .

  6. Continuum capture in the three-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    The three-body problem, especially the problem of electron capture to the continuum in heavy particle collisions is reviewed. Major topics covered include: second born-induced asymmetry in electron capture to the continuum; historical context, links to other tests of atomic scattering theory; experiments characterizing the velocity distribution of ECC electrons; other atomic physics tests of high velocity Born expansions; atom capture; capture by positrons; and pion capture to the continuum

  7. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    )% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization efficiency among components of interstellar dust (e.g., carbon versus silicate grains). Our observational results provide inputs to quantify and optimize......Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them...... of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably...

  8. Submillimeter (Lambda < 1 mm) Continuum Imaging at CSO: A Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, C. Darren

    2009-01-01

    This contribution is submitted on behalf of all students, postdocs, and staff inspired and supported by Tom Phillips to build an instrument and then wait for low precipitable water vapor. Over the 20 plus years of its existence, the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) has seen a succession of ever more powerful detectors to measure continuum emission in the shortest submillimeter bands available from Mauna Kea. These instruments have been trained on the nearest solar systems, the most distant galaxies, and objects in between. I show several images collected over the 5 plus year history of the SHARC II camera and anecdotal comparison with past work.

  9. Packaging of microwave integrated circuits operating beyond 100 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, L.; Daniel, E.; Sokolov, V.; Sommerfeldt, S.; Bublitz, J.; Olson, K.; Gilbert, B.; Chow, D.

    2002-01-01

    Several methods of packaging high speed (75-330 GHz) InP HEMT MMIC devices are discussed. Coplanar wirebonding is presented with measured insertion loss of less than 0.5dB and return loss better than -17 dB from DC to 110 GHz. A motherboard/daughterboard packaging scheme is presented which supports minimum loss chains of MMICs using this coplanar wirebonding method. Split waveguide block packaging approaches are presented in G-band (140-220 GHz) with two types of MMIC-waveguide transitions: E-plane probe andantipodal finline.

  10. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Abergel, A; Aghanim, N; Alina, D; Alves, M I R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clemens, M; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Grenier, I A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Joncas, G; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 857, 545 and 353 GHz, and IRAS 100 micron data. Using a modified black-body fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a tight representation of the data at 5 arcmin. It shows variations of the order of 30 % compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel. The Planck data allow us to estimate the dust temperature uniformly over the whole sky, providing an improved estimate of the dust optical depth compared to previous all-sky dust model, especially in high-contrast molecular regions. An increase of the dust opacity at 353 GHz, tau_353/N_H, from the diffuse to the denser interstellar medium (ISM) is reported. It is associated with a decrease in the observed dust temperature, T_obs, that could be due at least in part to the increased dust opacity. We also report an excess of dust emission at HI column densities lower than...

  11. Computational Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shabana, Ahmed A

    2011-01-01

    This text presents the theory of continuum mechanics using computational methods. Ideal for students and researchers, the second edition features a new chapter on computational geometry and finite element analysis.

  12. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. 25.139 Section 25.139 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses...

  13. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than ∼5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  14. Points-Based Safe Path Planning of Continuum Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuram Shahzad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuum robots exhibit great potential in a number of challenging applications where traditional rigid link robots pose certain limitations, e.g., working in unstructured environments. In order to enable the usage of continuum robots in safety-critical applications, such as surgery and nuclear decontamination, it is extremely important to ensure a safe path for the robot's movement. Existing algorithms for continuum robot path planning have certain limitations that need to be addressed. These include the fact that none of the algorithms provide safety assurance parameters and control for path planning. They are computationally expensive, applicable to a specific type of continuum robots, and mostly they do not incorporate design and kinematics constraints. In this paper, we propose a points-based path planning (PoPP algorithm for continuum robots that computes the path by imposing safety constraints and improves upon the limitations of existing approaches. In the algorithm, we exploit the constant curvature-bending property of continuum robots in their path planning process. The algorithm is computationally efficient and provides a good tradeoff between accuracy and efficiency that can be implemented to enable the safety-critical application of continuum robots. This algorithm also provides information regarding path volume and flexibility in movement. Simulation results confirm that the algorithm possesses promising potential for all types of continuum robots (following the constant curvature-bending property. We believe that this effectively balances the desired safety and efficiency requirements.

  15. Status and outlook for high power processing of 1.3 GHz TESLA multicell cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.; Barnes, P.; Graber, J.; Metzger, D.; Mofat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.; Tigner, M.; Matheisen, A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the usable accelerating gradient in Superconducting TESLA cavities, the field emission threshold barrier must be raised. As has been previously demonstrated on S-band cavities, a way to accomplish this is with the use of high peak power RF processing. A transmitter with a peak power of 2 Mwatt and 300 μsec pulse length has been assembled and has been used to process TESLA cavities. Several five cell TESLA cavities at 1.3 GHz have been manufactured for this purpose. This transmitter and the cavities will be described and the results of the tests will be presented

  16. Millimeter- and submillimeter-wave surveys of Orion A emission lines in the ranges 200.7-202.3, 203.7-205.3, and 330-360 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jewell, P.R.; Hollis, J.M.; Lovas, F.J.; Snyder, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous spectral line survey of the Orion A position from 330.5 to 360.1 GHz was carried out. This survey covers nearly the entire 870 micron atmospheric window accessible from ground-based observations. Approximately 160 distinct spectral features composed of about 180 lines were detected, 29 of which could not be readily identified. In addition, Orion A from 200.7 to 202.3 GHz and from 203.7 to 205.3 GHz and 42 distinct new spectral lines were detected, including four that are unidentified at present. These data sets are the first thorough survey results in these spectral regions. The new interstellar lines in the survey bands are tabulated and displayed graphically. Moreover, the data are being made available to the Astronomical Data Center at the Goddard Space Flight Center for distribution by request to the astronomical community. 14 refs

  17. Variational principles of continuum mechanics I fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Berdichevskii, V L

    2009-01-01

    This is a concise and understandable book about variational principles of continuum mechanics. The book is accessible to applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers who have an interest in continuum mechanics.

  18. The oxidized porous silicon field emission array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, T.S.; Kasprowicz, T.B.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Trost, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of developing a highly efficient microwave power source has led the authors to investigate new methods of electron field emission. One method presently under consideration involves the use of oxidized porous silicon thin films. The authors have used this technology to fabricate the first working field emission arrays from this substance. This approach reduces the diameter of an individual emitter to the nanometer scale. Tests of the first samples are encouraging, with extracted electron currents to nearly 1 mA resulting from less than 20 V of pulsed DC gate voltage. Modulated emission at 5 MHz was also observed. Developments of a full-scale emission array capable of delivering an electron beam at 18 GHz of minimum density 100 A/cm 2 is in progress

  19. ALMA IMAGING OF THE CO (6-5) LINE EMISSION IN NGC 7130

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yinghe [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Lu, Nanyao [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xu, C. Kevin; Appleton, Philip; Murphy, Eric [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gao, Yu [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Barcos-Munõz, Loreto [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Díaz-Santos, Tanio [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Charmandaris, Vassilis [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van der Werf, Paul [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Evans, Aaron [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Cao, Chen [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Inami, Hanae, E-mail: zhaoyinghe@gmail.com [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report our high-resolution (0.″20 × 0.″14 or ∼70 × 49 pc) observations of the CO(6-5) line emission, which probes warm and dense molecular gas, and the 434 μm dust continuum in the nuclear region of NGC 7130, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The CO line and dust continuum fluxes detected in our ALMA observations are 1230 ± 74 Jy km s{sup −1} and 814 ± 52 mJy, respectively, which account for 100% and 51% of their total fluxes. We find that the CO(6-5) and dust emissions are generally spatially correlated, but their brightest peaks show an offset of ∼70 pc, suggesting that the gas and dust emissions may start decoupling at this physical scale. The brightest peak of the CO(6-5) emission does not spatially correspond to the radio continuum peak, which is likely dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). This, together with our additional quantitative analysis, suggests that the heating contribution of the AGN to the CO(6-5) emission in NGC 7130 is negligible. The CO(6-5) and the extinction-corrected Pa-α maps display striking differences, suggestive of either a breakdown of the correlation between warm dense gas and star formation at linear scales of <100 pc or a large uncertainty in our extinction correction to the observed Pa-α image. Over a larger scale of ∼2.1 kpc, the double-lobed structure found in the CO(6-5) emission agrees well with the dust lanes in the optical/near-infrared images.

  20. ALMA IMAGING OF THE CO (6-5) LINE EMISSION IN NGC 7130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yinghe; Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin; Appleton, Philip; Murphy, Eric; Gao, Yu; Barcos-Munõz, Loreto; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Armus, Lee; Van der Werf, Paul; Evans, Aaron; Cao, Chen; Inami, Hanae

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report our high-resolution (0.″20 × 0.″14 or ∼70 × 49 pc) observations of the CO(6-5) line emission, which probes warm and dense molecular gas, and the 434 μm dust continuum in the nuclear region of NGC 7130, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The CO line and dust continuum fluxes detected in our ALMA observations are 1230 ± 74 Jy km s −1 and 814 ± 52 mJy, respectively, which account for 100% and 51% of their total fluxes. We find that the CO(6-5) and dust emissions are generally spatially correlated, but their brightest peaks show an offset of ∼70 pc, suggesting that the gas and dust emissions may start decoupling at this physical scale. The brightest peak of the CO(6-5) emission does not spatially correspond to the radio continuum peak, which is likely dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). This, together with our additional quantitative analysis, suggests that the heating contribution of the AGN to the CO(6-5) emission in NGC 7130 is negligible. The CO(6-5) and the extinction-corrected Pa-α maps display striking differences, suggestive of either a breakdown of the correlation between warm dense gas and star formation at linear scales of <100 pc or a large uncertainty in our extinction correction to the observed Pa-α image. Over a larger scale of ∼2.1 kpc, the double-lobed structure found in the CO(6-5) emission agrees well with the dust lanes in the optical/near-infrared images

  1. A comparison of radiative transfer models for predicting the microwave emission from soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Noncoherent and coherent numerical models for predicting emission from soils are compared. Coherent models use the boundary conditions on the electric fields across the layer boundaries to calculate the radiation intensity, and noncoherent models consider radiation intensities directly. Interference may cause different results in the two approaches when coupling between soil layers in coherent models causes greater soil moisture sampling depths. Calculations performed at frequencies of 1.4 and 19.4 GHz show little difference between the models at 19.4 GHz, although differences are apparent at the lower frequency. A definition for an effective emissivity is also given for when a nonuniform temperature profile is present, and measurements made from a tower show good agreement with calculations from the coherent model.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Characterization of Indoor Millimeter Wave Propagation at 24 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-hwan Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor millimeter wave propagation at the frequency of 24 GHz is studied by experimental methods. Measurements are performed to obtain temporal and spatial channel model using a channel sounder and rotating antennas in a corridor. The measured impulse responses are processed to obtain compact channel model following Saleh-Valenzuela’s model. The responses are compared with those of 5.3 GHz for the same test sites. Angular spread of 24 GHz is found to be smaller than that of 5.3 GHz, while echoes of 24 GHz are found to be longer than those of 5.3 GHz.

  3. Comparison of Stationarity Regions for Wireless Channels From 2 GHz to 30 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Tan; Wang, Chengxiang; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter wave (mmWave) communication works in the frequencies above 6 gigahertz (GHz), with the system bandwidth up to 500 megahertz (MHz) or wider. In this case, the channel situations are dramatically different from the existing wireless channels in Third Generation/Fourth Generation (3G/4G...

  4. Self-consistent description of dipole states taking into account the one-particle continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Ershov, S.N.; Pyatov, N.I.; Fayans, S.A.; Salamov, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    A self-consistent translationally invariant model with separable effective interactions is used to describe the dipole excitations of spherical nuclei. The equations for the effective field are solved in the coordinate representation, taking the one-particle continuum into account exactly. This makes it possible to obtain the escape widths of excitations with energy above the nucleon-emission threshold. We calculate the energies, B(E1), strength functions, escape widths, and transition densities of the dipole states for a number of light and heavy nuclei

  5. Variational principles of continuum mechanics II applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berdichevsky, Victor L

    2009-01-01

    This concise and understandable book about variational principles of continuum mechanics presents the classical models. The book is accessible to applied mathematicians, physicists and engineers who have an interest in continuum mechanics.

  6. Energy Saving Homes and Buildings, Continuum Magazine, Spring 2014 / Issue 6 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-03-01

    This issue of Continuum focuses on NREL's research to improve the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings. Heating, cooling, and lighting our homes and commercial structures account for more than 70% of all electricity used in the United States. That costs homeowners, businesses, and government agencies more than $400 billion annually, about 40% of our nation's total energy costs. Producing that energy contributes almost 40% of our nation's carbon dioxide emissions.By 2030, an estimated 900 billion square feet of new and rebuilt construction will be developed worldwide, providing an unprecedented opportunity to create efficient, sustainable buildings. Increasing the energy performance of our homes alone could potentially eliminate up to 160 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and lower residential energy bills by $21 billion annually by the end of the decade.

  7. Analytical Retrieval of Global Land Surface Emissivity Maps at AMSR-E passive microwave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2009-12-01

    Land emissivity is a crucial boundary condition in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) modeling. Land emissivity is also a key indicator of land surface and subsurface properties. The objective of this study, supported by NOAA-NESDIS, is to develop global land emissivity maps using AMSR-E passive microwave measurements along with several ancillary data. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database has been used to obtain several inputs for the proposed approach such as land surface temperature, cloud mask and atmosphere profile. The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) has been used to estimate upwelling and downwelling atmospheric contributions. Although it is well known that correction of the atmospheric effect on brightness temperature is required at higher frequencies (over 19 GHz), our preliminary results have shown that a correction at 10.7 GHz is also necessary over specific areas. The proposed approach is based on three main steps. First, all necessary data have been collected and processed. Second, a global cloud free composite of AMSR-E data and corresponding ancillary images is created. Finally, monthly composting of emissivity maps has been performed. AMSR-E frequencies at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 36.5 and 89.0 GHz have been used to retrieve the emissivity. Water vapor information obtained from ISCCP (TOVS data) was used to calculate upwelling, downwelling temperatures and atmospheric transmission in order to assess the consistency of those derived from the CRTM model. The frequent land surface temperature (LST) determination (8 times a day) in the ISCCP database has allowed us to assess the diurnal cycle effect on emissivity retrieval. Differences in magnitude and phase between thermal temperature and low frequencies microwave brightness temperature have been noticed. These differences seem to vary in space and time. They also depend on soil texture and thermal inertia. The proposed methodology accounts for these factors and

  8. Emissivity Measurements of Foam-Covered Water Surface at L-Band for Low Water Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Bo Wei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For a foam-covered sea surface, it is difficult to retrieve sea surface salinity (SSS with L-band brightness temperature (1.4 GHz because of the effect of a foam layer with wind speeds stronger than 7 m/s, especially at low sea surface temperature (SST. With foam-controlled experiments, emissivities of a foam-covered water surface at low SST (−1.4 °C to 1.7 °C are measured for varying SSS, foam thickness, incidence angle, and polarization. Furthermore, a theoretical model of emissivity is introduced by combining wave approach theory with the effective medium approximation method. Good agreement is obtained upon comparing theoretical emissivities with those of experiments. The results indicate that foam parameters have a strong influence on increasing emissivity of a foam-covered water surface. Increments of experimental emissivities caused by foam thickness of 1 cm increase from about 0.014 to 0.131 for horizontal polarization and 0.022 to 0.150 for vertical polarization with SSS increase and SST decrease. Contributions of the interface between the foam layer and water surface to the foam layer emissivity increments are discussed for frequencies between 1 and 37 GHz.

  9. ALMA sub-mm maser and dust distribution of VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A. M. S.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Humphreys, E. M.; Vlahakis, C.; Vlemmings, W.; Baudry, A.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Etoka, S.; Gray, M. D.; Harper, G. M.; Hunter, T. R.; Kervella, P.; Kerschbaum, F.; McDonald, I.; Melnick, G.; Muller, S.; Neufeld, D.; O'Gorman, E.; Parfenov, S. Yu.; Peck, A. B.; Shinnaga, H.; Sobolev, A. M.; Testi, L.; Uscanga, L.; Wootten, A.; Yates, J. A.; Zijlstra, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Cool, evolved stars have copious, enriched winds. Observations have so far not fully constrained models for the shaping and acceleration of these winds. We need to understand the dynamics better, from the pulsating stellar surface to ~10 stellar radii, where radiation pressure on dust is fully effective. Asymmetric nebulae around some red supergiants imply the action of additional forces. Methods: We retrieved ALMA Science Verification data providing images of sub-mm line and continuum emission from VY CMa. This enables us to locate water masers with milli-arcsec accuracy and to resolve the dusty continuum. Results: The 658, 321, and 325 GHz masers lie in irregular, thick shells at increasing distances from the centre of expansion. For the first time this is confirmed as the stellar position, coinciding with a compact peak offset to the NW of the brightest continuum emission. The maser shells overlap but avoid each other on scales of up to 10 au. Their distribution is broadly consistent with excitation models but the conditions and kinematics are complicated by wind collisions, clumping, and asymmetries. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Multi-gigabit wireless data transfer at 60 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltveit, H K; Schöning, A; Wiedner, D; Brenner, R

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the status of the first prototype of the 60 GHz wireless Multi-gigabit data transfer topology currently under development at University of Heidelberg using IBM 130 nm SiGe HBT BiCMOS technology. The 60 GHz band is very suitable for high data rate and short distance applications. One application can be a wireless multi Gbps radial data transmission inside the ATLAS silicon strip detector, making a first level track trigger feasible. The wireless transceiver consists of a transmitter and a receiver. The transmitter includes an On-Off Keying (OOK) modulator, a Local Oscillator (LO), a Power Amplifier (PA) and a Band-pass Filter (BPF). The receiver part is composed of a Band-pass Filter (BPF), a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA), a double balanced down-convert Gilbert mixer, a Local Oscillator (LO), then a BPF to remove the mixer introduced noise, an Intermediate Amplifier (IF), an On-Off Keying demodulator and a limiting amplifier. The first prototype would be able to handle a data-rate of about 3.5 Gbps over a link distance of 1 m. The first simulations of the LNA show that a Noise figure (NF) of 5 dB, a power gain of 21 dB at 60 GHz with a 3 dB bandwidth of more than 20 GHz with a power consumption 11 mW are achieved. Simulations of the PA show an output referred compression point P1dB of 19.7 dB at 60 GHz.

  11. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... exceed 3000 microvolts/meter/MHz at 3 meters in any direction. Further, an AVIS, when in its operating position, shall not produce a field strength greater than 400 microvolts/meter/MHz at 3 meters in any... maximum of 100 microvolts/meter/MHz at 3 meters, measured from 30 MHz to 20 GHz for the complete system...

  12. Patients' experiences with continuum of care across hospitals. A multilevel analysis of Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Communication between professionals is essential because it contributes to an optimal continuum of care. Whether patients experience adequate continuum of care is uncertain. To address this, a questionnaire was developed to elucidate this care process from a patients' perspective. In this

  13. Visible continuum measurements on the Alcator C Tokamak: Changes in particle transport during pellet fuelled discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foord, M.E.

    1986-12-01

    A spatially resolving visible light detector system is used to measure continuum radiation near 5360A on the Alcator C Tokamak. For the typically hot plasmas studied, the continuum emission is found to be dominated by bremsstrahlung radiation near this wavelength region. Accurate determinations of Z/sub eff/ are obtained from continuum measurements using independently determined temperature and density measurements. Density profiles during high density, clean pellet fueled discharges, are also determined and are used to study the changes in particle transport after injection. For discharges with sufficiently large pellet density increases, density profiles are found to become more peaked following the injection. In these cases, the profiles are found to remain peaked for the remainder of the discharge, or until a ''giant'' sawtooth or minor disruption abruptly returns the profiles to a flatter pre-pellet condition. Analysis of density profiles after pellet injection yields information about the radial diffusion and convection velocity of the plasma particles. The peakedness in the density profiles, observed after pellet injection, is attributable mostly to increases in inward convection. It is concluded that neoclassical fluxes are too small to account for these changes. 70 refs., 55 figs

  14. Towards low-cost gigabit wireless systems at 60 GHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Haibing

    2008-01-01

    The world-wide availability of the huge amount of license-free spectral space in the 60 GHz band provides wide room for gigabit-per-second (Gb/s) wireless applications. A commercial (read: low-cost) 60-GHz transceiver will, however, provide limited system performance due to the stringent link budget

  15. Ultra-violet recombination continuum electron temperature measurements in a non-equilibrium atmospheric argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, M.H.; Kruger, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Emission measurements of temperature and electron density have been made downstream of a 50 kW induction plasma torch at temperatures and electron densities ranging between 6000 K and 8500 K and 10 to the 20th and 10 to the 21st/cu cm, respectively. Absolute and relative atomic line intensities, and absolute recombination continuum in both the visible and the UV were separately interpreted in order to characterize a recombining atmospheric argon plasma. Continuum measurements made in the UV at 270 nm were used to directly determine the kinetic electron temperature, independent of a Boltzmann equilibrium, assuming only that the electron velocity distribution is Maxwellian. The data indicate that a nonequilibrium condition exists in which the bound-excited and free electrons are nearly in mutual equilibrium down to the 4P level for electron densities as low as 2 x 10 to the 20th/cu m but that both are overpopulated with respect to the ground state due to finite recombination rates. 13 refs

  16. Sparse estimation of model-based diffuse thermal dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Melis O.; Bobin, Jérôme

    2018-03-01

    Component separation for the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data is primarily concerned with the estimation of thermal dust emission, which requires the separation of thermal dust from the cosmic infrared background (CIB). For that purpose, current estimation methods rely on filtering techniques to decouple thermal dust emission from CIB anisotropies, which tend to yield a smooth, low-resolution, estimation of the dust emission. In this paper, we present a new parameter estimation method, premise: Parameter Recovery Exploiting Model Informed Sparse Estimates. This method exploits the sparse nature of thermal dust emission to calculate all-sky maps of thermal dust temperature, spectral index, and optical depth at 353 GHz. premise is evaluated and validated on full-sky simulated data. We find the percentage difference between the premise results and the true values to be 2.8, 5.7, and 7.2 per cent at the 1σ level across the full sky for thermal dust temperature, spectral index, and optical depth at 353 GHz, respectively. A comparison between premise and a GNILC-like method over selected regions of our sky simulation reveals that both methods perform comparably within high signal-to-noise regions. However, outside of the Galactic plane, premise is seen to outperform the GNILC-like method with increasing success as the signal-to-noise ratio worsens.

  17. Multiparty quantum secret sharing based on GHZ states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Hwang, Cheng-Chieh [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701 Taiwan (China); Li, Chuan-Ming, E-mail: hwangtl@ismail.csie.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Information Management, Shu-Zen College of Medicine and Management, Kaohsiung, 821 Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Gao (2009 Commun. Theor. Phys. 52 421-4) has proposed an efficient multiparty quantum secret sharing (MQSS) with two-photon three-dimensional Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs. This work shows that a similar idea can also be used to construct an MQSS using the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. Compared to other MQSSs using GHZ-related states, the newly proposed protocol is more efficient in the aspect of qubit utilization.

  18. The NIKA2 large-field-of-view millimetre continuum camera for the 30 m IRAM telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; André, P.; Andrianasolo, A.; Aussel, H.; Beelen, A.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Bracco, A.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; De Petris, M.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Evans, R.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Lagache, G.; Leclercq, S.; Leggeri, J.-P.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Maury, A.; Monfardini, A.; Navarro, S.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Revéret, V.; Rigby, A.; Ritacco, A.; Romero, C.; Roussel, H.; Ruppin, F.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Millimetre-wave continuum astronomy is today an indispensable tool for both general astrophysics studies (e.g. star formation, nearby galaxies) and cosmology (e.g. cosmic microwave background and high-redshift galaxies). General purpose, large-field-of-view instruments are needed to map the sky at intermediate angular scales not accessible by the high-resolution interferometers (e.g. ALMA in Chile, NOEMA in the French Alps) and by the coarse angular resolution space-borne or ground-based surveys (e.g. Planck, ACT, SPT). These instruments have to be installed at the focal plane of the largest single-dish telescopes, which are placed at high altitude on selected dry observing sites. In this context, we have constructed and deployed a three-thousand-pixel dual-band (150 GHz and 260 GHz, respectively 2 mm and 1.15 mm wavelengths) camera to image an instantaneous circular field-of-view of 6.5 arcmin in diameter, and configurable to map the linear polarisation at 260 GHz. Aims: First, we are providing a detailed description of this instrument, named NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays 2), in particular focussing on the cryogenics, optics, focal plane arrays based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors, and the readout electronics. The focal planes and part of the optics are cooled down to the nominal 150 mK operating temperature by means of an adhoc dilution refrigerator. Secondly, we are presenting the performance measured on the sky during the commissioning runs that took place between October 2015 and April 2017 at the 30-m IRAM telescope at Pico Veleta, near Granada (Spain). Methods: We have targeted a number of astronomical sources. Starting from beam-maps on primary and secondary calibrators we have then gone to extended sources and faint objects. Both internal (electronic) and on-the-sky calibrations are applied. The general methods are described in the present paper. Results: NIKA2 has been successfully deployed and commissioned, performing in-line with expectations. In

  19. Lattice gravity near the continuum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, G.; Friedberg, R.; Lee, T.D.; Ren, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    We prove that the lattice gravity always approaches the usual continuum limit when the link length l -> 0, provided that certain general boundary conditions are satisfied. This result holds for any lattice, regular or irregular. Furthermore, for a given lattice, the deviation from its continuum limit can be expressed as a power series in l 2 . General formulas for such a perturbative calculation are given, together with a number of illustrative examples, including the graviton propagator. The lattice gravity satisfies all the invariance properties of Einstein's theory of general relativity. In addition, it is symmetric under a new class of transformations that are absent in the usual continuum theory. The possibility that the lattice theory (with a nonzero l) may be more fundamental is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Design of a 17.14 GHz quasi-optical pulse compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelin, M. I.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Danilov, Yu. Yu.; Granatstein, V. L.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    A quasi-optical version of the ring cavity pulse compressor is considered. This concept is based on the coupling of the input wave to a whispering gallery mode of a barrel-like cavity due to helical corrugations of the cavity wall. Low-power tests of the prototype were carried out at 11.4 GHz and demonstrated reasonable agree-ment between experimental data and theoretical predictions. The design of a similar pulse compressor at 17.14 GHz compatible with the 17.14 GHz, 100 MW gyroklystron currently under development at the University of Maryland is presented

  1. Continuum Level Density in Complex Scaling Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, R.; Myo, T.; Kato, K.

    2005-01-01

    A new calculational method of continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies is studied in the complex scaling method (CSM). It is shown that the CLD can be calculated by employing the discretization of continuum states in the CSM without any smoothing technique

  2. Analisis Kelayakan Implementasi Teknologi LTE 1.8 GHz Bagi Operator Seluler di Indonesia [Feasibility Analysis of LTE 1.8 GHz for Mobile Operators in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Ariyanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peningkatan kebutuhan layanan data mendorong operator telekomunikasi berusaha mengimplementasikan jaringan akses broadband yang lebih handal.  Teknologi LTE merupakan salah satu teknologi dengan kecepatan mencapai tiga kali dibanding teknologi HSDPA, sehingga diharapkan dapat memenuhi kebutuhan pelanggan data mobile. Refarming frekuensi 1.8 GHz  untuk penerapan teknologi LTE memberikan efisiensi karena tidak perlu membayar BHP lagi untuk menyewa frekuensi baru. Teknologi 2G GSM selama ini juga semakin ditinggalkan, masyarakat di daerah perkotaan cenderung lebih banyak menggunakan layanan data.  Sebelum diterapkannya teknologi LTE pada frekuensi 1.8 GHz perlu adanya kajian untuk mengetahui kelayakan teknologi LTE pada frekuensi 1.8 GHz. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan cost-benefit analysis implementasi LTE pada frekuensi 1.8 GHz.  Metode penelitian menggunakan pendekatan kualitataif yang didukung dengan data kuantitatif.  Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa minimal bandiwdth yang diperlukan agar implementasi LTE layak digunakan adalah 15 MHz.  Meskipun tanpa Global Frequency Returning, penggunaan bandwidth 10 MHz tidak layak digunakan untuk implementasi LTE.      *****The incresing of data demand drives mobile operators to implement more reliable broadband access network. LTE technology has downlink peak rate up to three times than HSDPA,  hence it may fulfill the mobile data user requirement. Frequency 1.8 GHz refarming can be implemented to provide efficiency because They do not need to pay licence fee for leasing new frequency. GSM technology will be abandoned since it is not growing anymore. Besides that, dense urban users tend to use data mobile.  Before implementing LTE technology  on 1.8 GHz frequency, It is necessary to analysis the feasibility such technology. This research used qualitative method supported by quantitative  approach.  The result of this research showed that minimum bandwidth to implement 1.8 GHz LTE

  3. RENEWAL OF BASIC LAWS AND PRINCIPLES FOR POLAR CONTINUUM THEORIES (Ⅱ)-MICROMORPHIC CONTINUUM THEORY AND COUPLE STRESS THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴天民

    2003-01-01

    The purpose is to reestablish the balance laws of momentum, angular momentumand energy and to derive the corresponding local and nonlocal balance equations formicromorphic continuum mechanics and couple stress theory. The desired results formicromorphic continuum mechanics and couple stress theory are naturally obtained via directtransitions and reductions from the coupled conservation law of energy for micropolarcontinuum theory, respectively. The basic balance laws and equation s for micromorphiccontinuum mechanics and couple stress theory are constituted by combining these resultsderived here and the traditional conservation laws and equations of mass and microinertiaand the entropy inequality. The incomplete degrees of the former related continuum theoriesare clarified. Finally, some special cases are conveniently derived.

  4. Quasar Accretion Disk Sizes With Continuum Reverberation Mapping From the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudd, D.; et al.

    2017-11-30

    We present accretion disk size measurements for 15 luminous quasars at $0.7 \\leq z \\leq 1.9$ derived from $griz$ light curves from the Dark Energy Survey. We measure the disk sizes with continuum reverberation mapping using two methods, both of which are derived from the expectation that accretion disks have a radial temperature gradient and the continuum emission at a given radius is well-described by a single blackbody. In the first method we measure the relative lags between the multiband light curves, which provides the relative time lag between shorter and longer wavelength variations. The second method fits the model parameters for the canonical Shakura-Sunyaev thin disk directly rather than solving for the individual time lags between the light curves. Our measurements demonstrate good agreement with the sizes predicted by this model for accretion rates between 0.3-1 times the Eddington rate. These results are also in reasonable agreement with disk size measurements from gravitational microlensing studies of strongly lensed quasars, as well as other photometric reverberation mapping results.

  5. Indoor Corridor Wideband Radio Propagation Measurements and Channel Models for 5G Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications at 19 GHz, 28 GHz, and 38 GHz Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Al-samman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents millimeter wave (mmWave measurements in an indoor environment. The high demands for the future applications in the 5G system require more capacity. In the microwave band below 6 GHz, most of the available bands are occupied; hence, the microwave band above 6 GHz and mmWave band can be used for the 5G system to cover the bandwidth required for all 5G applications. In this paper, the propagation characteristics at three different bands above 6 GHz (19, 28, and 38 GHz are investigated in an indoor corridor environment for line of sight (LOS and non-LOS (NLOS scenarios. Five different path loss models are studied for this environment, namely, close-in (CI free space path loss, floating-intercept (FI, frequency attenuation (FA path loss, alpha-beta-gamma (ABG, and close-in free space reference distance with frequency weighting (CIF models. Important statistical properties, such as power delay profile (PDP, root mean square (RMS delay spread, and azimuth angle spread, are obtained and compared for different bands. The results for the path loss model found that the path loss exponent (PLE and line slope values for all models are less than the free space path loss exponent of 2. The RMS delay spread for all bands is low for the LOS scenario, and only the directed path is contributed in some spatial locations. For the NLOS scenario, the angle of arrival (AOA is extensively investigated, and the results indicated that the channel propagation for 5G using high directional antenna should be used in the beamforming technique to receive the signal and collect all multipath components from different angles in a particular mobile location.

  6. Analysis of 35 GHz Cloud Radar polarimetric variables to identify stratiform and convective precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Emmanuel; Illingworth, Anthony, J.; Stein, Thorwald

    2017-04-01

    This study is performed using vertical profiles of radar measurements at 35GHz, for the period going from 29th of February to 1rst October 2016, at the Chilbolton observatory in United Kingdom. During this period, more than 40 days with precipitation events are investigated. The investigation uses the synergy of radar reflectivity factors, vertical velocity, Doppler spectrum width, and linear depolarization ratio (LDR) to differentiate between stratiform and convective rain events. The depth of the layer with Doppler spectrum width values greater than 0.5 m s-1 is shown to be a suitable proxy to distinguish between convective and stratiform events. Using LDR to detect the radar bright band, bright band characteristics such as depth of the layer and maximum LDR are shown to vary with the amount of turbulence aloft. Profiles of radar measurements are also compared to rain gauge measurements to study the contribution of convective and stratiform rainfall to total rain duration and amount. To conclude, this study points out differences between convective and stratiform rains and quantifies their contributions over a precipitation event, highlighting that convective and stratiform rainfall should be considered as a continuum rather than a dichotomy.

  7. Physics of the continuum of borromean nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaagen, J S; Rogde, T [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Danilin, B V [RRC The Kurchatov Inst., Kurchatov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ershov, S N [JINR, Dubna, Moscow (Russian Federation); Thompson, I J [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Zhukov, M V [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Goeteborg Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); RNBT Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    The continuum states of two-neutron halo nuclei are calculated in the method of hyperspherical harmonics. Using DWIA theory appropriate for dilute halo matter we have probed the structure of the low-lying {sup 6}He continuum via calculations of charge-exchange and inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  8. Gamma-ray continuum spectra from heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Sarantites, D.G.; Westerberg, L.W.; Geoffroy, K.; Woodward, R.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the yrast continuum was attempted by subtracting the underlying statistical continnuum in a way that makes allowance for ignorance of its detailed shape. This procedure makes it possible to obtain the moment of inertia as a function of spin over a wide range of spins. The results of this continuum spectra shape analysis can be used to calculate the first and second moments of the continuum multiplicity distribution. Continuum spectra were taken during the bombardment of 150 Nd by 115- and 130-MeV beams of 20 Ne, also the first and second moments of the γ-ray multiplicity distribution as a function of the gamma energy. The moment of inertia versus spin and the deduced Yrast continuua are shown. 10 references

  9. Theory of X-ray absorption and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical studies on X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy are discussed. Simple expressions for X-ray emission rate and X-ray absorption cross section are presented in the dipole approximation. Various atomic models to obtain realistic wave functions and theoretical calculations for X-ray absorption cross sections and X-ray emission rates are described. In the case of molecules and solids, molecular orbital methods for electronic structures and molecular wave functions are discussed. The emphasis is on the procedures to obtain the excited-state and continuum wave functions for molecules and to calculate the multi-center dipole matrix elements. The examples of the calculated X-ray absorption and emission spectra are shown and compared with the experimental results

  10. A spatially resolved radio spectral index study of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Jonathan; Brinks, Elias; Hindson, Luke; Beswick, Robert; Heesen, Volker

    2018-04-01

    We study the resolved radio continuum spectral energy distribution of the dwarf irregular galaxy, NGC 1569, on a beam-by-beam basis to isolate and study its spatially resolved radio emission characteristics. Utilizing high-quality NRAO Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations that densely sample the 1-34 GHz frequency range, we adopt a Bayesian fitting procedure, where we use H α emission that has not been corrected for extinction as a prior, to produce maps of how the separated thermal emission, non-thermal emission, and non-thermal spectral index vary across NGC 1569's main disc. We find a higher thermal fraction at 1 GHz than is found in spiral galaxies (26^{+2}_{-3} {per cent}) and find an average non-thermal spectral index α = -0.53 ± 0.02, suggesting that a young population of cosmic ray electrons is responsible for the observed non-thermal emission. By comparing our recovered map of the thermal radio emission with literature H α maps, we estimate the total reddening along the line of sight to NGC 1569 to be E(B - V) = 0.49 ± 0.05, which is in good agreement with other literature measurements. Spatial variations in the reddening indicate that a significant portion of the total reddening is due to internal extinction within NGC 1569.

  11. Assessment of tobacco heating product THP1.0. Part 9: The placement of a range of next-generation products on an emissions continuum relative to cigarettes via pre-clinical assessment studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin; Gaҫa, Marianna; Prasad, Krishna; Camacho, Oscar; McAughey, John; Proctor, Christopher

    2018-03-01

    This series of nine papers described the operation and pre-clinical assessment of a tobacco heating product THP1.0. This last paper contextualises the pre-clinical assessment data on THP1.0 with data from other next generation products relative to cigarette smoke. The tobacco and nicotine risk continuum is a concept that ranks products according to their potential harm, with cigarettes at the highest risk extreme and Nicotine Replacement Therapy at the least risky extreme. Data generated in pre-clinical studies on THP1.0 and a range of Next Generation Products (NGPs) may provide some initial indication of potential ranking of these products, although importantly, data from such studies are limited and cannot take into consideration several important aspects for risk such as long term product use patterns. In each of the studies, the responses to the emissions from THP1.0 were substantially reduced relative to cigarette smoke. Additionally, responses from THP1.0 were very similar to those from the other NGP emissions. A comparison of the results clearly showed the emissions from all the NGPs were considerably lower than those from cigarettes and all in around the same emissions level. These results show that THP1.0 could have the potential to be a reduced risk product compared to cigarettes, though further studies assessing the exposure, individual and population risk reduction profile would be required to substantiate this potential. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Loop quantization as a continuum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, Elisa; Oeckl, Robert; Weber, Axel; Zapata, Jose A

    2006-01-01

    We present an implementation of Wilson's renormalization group and a continuum limit tailored for loop quantization. The dynamics of loop-quantized theories is constructed as a continuum limit of the dynamics of effective theories. After presenting the general formalism we show as a first explicit example the 2D Ising field theory, an interacting relativistic quantum field theory with local degrees of freedom quantized by loop quantization techniques

  13. Continuum solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, G.; Pusch, M.; Soff, G.

    1987-10-01

    We construct explicit solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation for continuum states. The role of the energy in the single-particle Klein-Gordon theory is elucidated. Special emphasis is laid on the determination of resonance states in the continuum for overcritical potentials. As examples for long-range interaction we depict solutions for the Coulomb potential of a point-like nucleus as an extended nucleus. The square-well potential and the exponential potential are treated to exemplify pecularities of short-range interactions. We also derive continuum solutions for a scalar interaction of square-well type. Finally we discuss the behaviour of a spin-0 particle in an external homogeneous magnetic field. (orig.)

  14. A Compact UWB Antenna with a Quarter-Wavelength Strip in a Rectangular Slot for 5.5 GHz Band Notch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichet Moeikham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The limitation of the electromagnetic interferences (EMIs caused by UWB radiating sources into WLAN/WiMAX communication systems operating in the frequency band located around 5.5 GHz requires the adoption of appropriate design features. To this purpose, a notch filter integrated into an UWB antenna, which is able to ensure a better electrical insulation between the two mentioned communication systems with respect to that already presented by the authors Moeikham et al. (2011, is proposed in this paper. The proposed filter, consisting in a rectangular slot including a quarter-wavelength strip integrated on the lower inner edge of the UWB radiating patch, is capable of reducing the energy emission in the frequency range between 5.1 and 5.75 GHz resulting in lower EMIs with sensible electronic equipments working in this frequency band. The antenna structure has no need to be tuned after inserting the rectangle slot with a quarter-wavelength strip. The proposed antenna has potential to minimize the EMIs at a frequency range from 5.1 to 5.75 GHz. The radiation patterns are given nearly omnidirectional in plane and likely bidirectional in plane at all frequencies by the proposed antenna. Therefore, this antenna is suitable to apply for various UWB applications.

  15. Handoff Management in Radio over Fiber 60 GHz Indoor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bien, V.Q.

    2014-01-01

    Because of high data rate multimedia applications such as HD and UHDTV, online games, etc., the future home networks are expected to support short-range gigabit transmission. With the worldwide availability of 5 GHz spectrum at the 60 GHz band, it creates the opportunity for a promising air

  16. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  17. Ultraviolet continuum variability and visual flickering in the peculiar object MWC 560

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Perez, M.; Shore, S. N.; Maran, S. P.; Karovska, M.; Sonneborn, G.; Webb, J. R.; Barnes, Thomas G., III; Frueh, Marian L.; Oliversen, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    High-speed U-band photometry of the peculiar emission object MWC 560 obtained with the ground-based instrumentation, and V-band photometry obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer-Fine Error Sensor indicates irregular brightness variations are quasi-periodic. Multiple peaks of relative brightness power indicate statistically significant quasi periods existing in a range of 3-35 minutes, that are superposed on slower hourly varying components. We present a preliminary model that explains the minute and hourly time-scale variations in MWC 560 in terms of a velocity-shear instability that arises because a white dwarf magnetosphere impinges on an accretion disk. We also find evidence for Fe II multiplet pseudocontinuum absorption opacity in far-UV spectra of CH Cygni which is also present in MWC 560. Both CH Cyg and MWC 560 may be in an evolutionary stage that is characterized by strong UV continuum opacity which changes significantly during outburst, occurring before they permanently enter the symbiotic nebular emission phase.

  18. Electron-beam buncher to operate over the frequency range 1-4 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Arthur, A.A.; Flood, W.S.; Voelker, F.

    1983-03-01

    We present a description of an electron buncher to be installed in the terminal of a Van de Graaff, which is to produce a modulated beam over the frequency range 1-4 GHz. The modulator geometry has been optimized so that the modulation amplitude should be nearly constant over the frequency ranges 1-2 GHz and 2-4 GHz. Preliminary results indicate the device works as predicted

  19. GHz Yb:KYW oscillators in time-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changxiu; Krauß, Nico; Schäfer, Gerhard; Ebner, Lukas; Kliebisch, Oliver; Schmidt, Johannes; Winnerl, Stephan; Hettich, Mike; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    A high-speed asynchronous optical sampling system (ASOPS) based on Yb:KYW oscillators with 1-GHz repetition rate is reported. Two frequency-offset-stabilized diode-pumped Yb:KYW oscillators are employed as pump and probe source, respectively. The temporal resolution of this system within 1-ns time window is limited to 500 fs and the noise floor around 10-6 (ΔR/R) close to the shot-noise level is obtained within an acquisition time of a few seconds. Coherent acoustic phonons are investigated by measuring multilayer semiconductor structures with multiple quantum wells and aluminum/silicon membranes in this ASOPS system. A wavepacket-like phonon sequence at 360 GHz range is detected in the semiconductor structures and a decaying sequence of acoustic oscillations up to 200 GHz is obtained in the aluminum/silicon membranes. Coherent acoustic phonons generated from semiconductor structures are further manipulated by a double pump scheme through pump time delay control.

  20. Continuum of active nuclei of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisson, C.; Durret, F.

    1987-01-01

    Most of the luminosity of active galactic nuclei (NAG) is radiated in the form of a continuum extending from radio to X-ray energies. It is important to understand the origin of this continuum in order to explain the relative importance of thermal and non-thermal processes in the different classes of NAG. We present here the observational aspect. A detailed study of the mechanisms will be presented by J.L. Masnou [fr

  1. Astrometrically registered simultaneous observations of the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O and 43 GHz SiO masers toward R Leonis Minoris using KVN and source/frequency phase referencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Richard; Rioja, María J.; Jung, Tae-Hyun; Sohn, Bong-Won; Byun, Do-Young; Cho, Se-Hyung; Lee, Sang-Sung; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Kee-Tae; Oh, Chung-Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Chung, Moon-Hee; Wi, Seog-Oh; Kang, Jiman; Lee, Jung-Won; Chung, Hyunsoo; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Chang-Hoon, E-mail: rdodson@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdae-ro 776, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2014-11-01

    Oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can be intense emitters of SiO (v = 1 and 2, J = 1 → 0) and H{sub 2}O maser lines at 43 and 22 GHz, respectively. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the maser emission provide a unique tool to probe the innermost layers of the circumstellar envelopes in AGB stars. Nevertheless, the difficulties in achieving astrometrically aligned H{sub 2}O and v = 1 and v = 2 SiO maser maps have traditionally limited the physical constraints that can be placed on the SiO maser pumping mechanism. We present phase-referenced simultaneous spectral-line VLBI images for the SiO v = 1 and v = 2, J = 1 → 0, and H{sub 2}O maser emission around the AGB star R LMi, obtained from the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). The simultaneous multi-channel receivers of the KVN offer great possibilities for astrometry in the frequency domain. With this facility, we have produced images with bona fide absolute astrometric registration between high-frequency maser transitions of different species to provide the positions of the H{sub 2}O maser emission and the center of the SiO maser emission, hence reducing the uncertainty in the proper motions for R LMi by an order of magnitude over that from Hipparcos. This is the first successful demonstration of source frequency phase referencing for millimeter VLBI spectral-line observations and also where the ratio between the frequencies is not an integer.

  2. A CMOS frequency generation module for 60-GHz applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunyuan; Zhang Lei; Wang Hongrui; Qian He

    2012-01-01

    A frequency generation module for 60-GHz transceivers and phased array systems is presented in this paper. It is composed of a divide-by-2 current mode logic divider (CML) and a doubler in push-push configuration. Benefiting from the CML structure and push-push configuration, the proposed frequency generation module has a wide operating frequency range to cover process, voltage, and temperature variation. It is implemented in a 90-nm CMOS process, and occupies a chip area of 0.64 × 0.65 mm 2 including pads. The measurement results show that the designed frequency generation module functions properly with input frequency over 15 GHz to 25 GHz. The whole chip dissipates 12.1 mW from a 1.2-V supply excluding the output buffers. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. On the Baldwin effect of He II emission lines in WR (WN) stars

    OpenAIRE

    van Gent, J. I.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; de Koter, A.; Morris, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the equivalent width of He ii emission lines and the monochromatic continuum luminosity at the line wavelength in the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars. Model stellar atmospheres and spectra are used to show that the equivalent width inversely correlates with the monochromatic continuum luminosity. We find the effect in Wolf-Rayet star models over a large range of stellar parameters. The effect is shown to be connected to density differences among Wolf-Rayet star...

  4. Low-redshift Lyman continuum leaking galaxies with high [O III]/[O II] ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Worseck, G.; Schaerer, D.; Guseva, N. G.; Thuan, T. X.; Fricke, K. J.; Verhamme, A.; Orlitová, I.

    2018-05-01

    We present observations with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope of five star-forming galaxies at redshifts z in the range 0.2993 - 0.4317 and with high emission-line flux ratios O32 = [O III]λ5007/[O II]λ3727 ˜ 8 - 27 aiming to detect the Lyman continuum (LyC) emission. We detect LyC emission in all galaxies with the escape fractions fesc(LyC) in a range of 2 - 72 per cent. A narrow Lyα emission line with two peaks in four galaxies and with three peaks in one object is seen in medium-resolution COS spectra with a velocity separation between the peaks Vsep varying from ˜153 km s-1 to ˜ 345 km s-1. We find a general increase of the LyC escape fraction with increasing O32 and decreasing stellar mass M⋆, but with a large scatter of fesc(LyC). A tight anti-correlation is found between fesc(LyC) and Vsep making Vsep a good parameter for the indirect determination of the LyC escape fraction. We argue that one possible source driving the escape of ionizing radiation is stellar winds and radiation from hot massive stars.

  5. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: SPECTROSCOPIC CAMPAIGN AND EMISSION-LINE LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA, 92697-4575 (United States); Bennert, Vardha N. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States); Canalizo, Gabriela [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gates, Elinor L. [Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Malkan, Matthew A.; Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Pancoast, Anna [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Sand, David J. [Texas Tech University, Physics Department, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Woo, Jong-Hak [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Bae, Hyun-Jin [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Brewer, Brendon J. [Department of Statistics, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    In the Spring of 2011 we carried out a 2.5 month reverberation mapping campaign using the 3 m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory, monitoring 15 low-redshift Seyfert 1 galaxies. This paper describes the observations, reductions and measurements, and data products from the spectroscopic campaign. The reduced spectra were fitted with a multicomponent model in order to isolate the contributions of various continuum and emission-line components. We present light curves of broad emission lines and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) continuum, and measurements of the broad Hβ line widths in mean and rms spectra. For the most highly variable AGNs we also measured broad Hβ line widths and velocity centroids from the nightly spectra. In four AGNs exhibiting the highest variability amplitudes, we detect anticorrelations between broad Hβ width and luminosity, demonstrating that the broad-line region “breathes” on short timescales of days to weeks in response to continuum variations. We also find that broad Hβ velocity centroids can undergo substantial changes in response to continuum variations; in NGC 4593, the broad Hβ velocity shifted by ∼250 km s{sup −1} over a 1 month period. This reverberation-induced velocity shift effect is likely to contribute a significant source of confusion noise to binary black hole searches that use multi-epoch quasar spectroscopy to detect binary orbital motion. We also present results from simulations that examine biases that can occur in measurement of broad-line widths from rms spectra due to the contributions of continuum variations and photon-counting noise.

  6. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, P.O. Box 3064350, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States); Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Buder, I. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kusaka, A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monsalve, R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Næss, S. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Newburgh, L. B. [Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Reeves, R. [CePIA, Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gundersen, J. O., E-mail: huffenbe@physics.fsu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  7. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Hategan, Raluca

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94-106% in atomic absorption and 97-103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6-5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9-6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference between the two spectrometric

  8. Feasibility of automotive radar at frequencies beyond 100 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Mike; Hasch, Jürgen; Blöcher, Hans Ludwig; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensors are used widely in modern driver assistance systems. Available sensors nowadays often operate in the 77 GHz band and can accurately provide distance, velocity, and angle information about remote objects. Increasing the operation frequency allows improving the angular resolution and accuracy. In this paper, the technical feasibility to move the operation frequency beyond 100 GHz is discussed, by investigating dielectric properties of radome materials, the attenuation of rain and ...

  9. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popadic, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest...... as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow...

  10. High power, 140 GHz gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.; Mulligan, W.J.; MacCabe, S.; Chaplya, R.

    1982-01-01

    The design and construction of a pulsed 100 kW, 140 GHz gyrotron is described. Initial gyrotron operation is expected in early 1982. Advances in gyrotron theory have also been carried out in support of this experimental research. The application of gyrotrons to plasma diagnostics is also under investigation. (author)

  11. Continuum mechanics for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Mase, G Thomas; Mase, George E

    2009-01-01

    Continuum TheoryContinuum MechanicsStarting OverNotationEssential MathematicsScalars, Vectors and Cartesian TensorsTensor Algebra in Symbolic Notation - Summation ConventionIndicial NotationMatrices and DeterminantsTransformations of Cartesian TensorsPrincipal Values and Principal DirectionsTensor Fields, Tensor CalculusIntegral Theorems of Gauss and StokesStress PrinciplesBody and Surface Forces, Mass DensityCauchy Stress PrincipleThe Stress TensorForce and Moment Equilibrium; Stress Tensor SymmetryStress Transformation LawsPrincipal Stresses; Principal Stress DirectionsMaximum and Minimum Stress ValuesMohr's Circles For Stress Plane StressDeviator and Spherical Stress StatesOctahedral Shear StressKinematics of Deformation and MotionParticles, Configurations, Deformations and MotionMaterial and Spatial CoordinatesLangrangian and Eulerian DescriptionsThe Displacement FieldThe Material DerivativeDeformation Gradients, Finite Strain TensorsInfinitesimal Deformation TheoryCompatibility EquationsStretch RatiosRot...

  12. The spatial extent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission in the Herbig star HD 179218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, A. S.; Labadie, L.; Pantin, E.; Matter, A.; Alvarez, C.; Esquej, P.; Grellmann, R.; Rebolo, R.; Telesco, C.; Wolf, S.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. We investigate, in the mid-infrared, the spatial properties of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emission in the disk of HD 179218, an intermediate-mass Herbig star at 300 pc. Methods: We obtained mid-infrared images in the PAH-1, PAH-2 and Si-6 filters centered at 8.6, 11.3, and 12.5 μm, and N-band low-resolution spectra using CanariCam on the 10-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We compared the point spread function (PSF) profiles measured in the PAH filters to the profile derived in the Si-6 filter, where the thermal continuum emission dominates. We performed radiative transfer modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) and produced synthetic images in the three filters to investigate different spatial scenarios. Results: Our data show that the disk emission is spatially resolved in the PAH-1 and PAH-2 filters, while unresolved in the Si-6 filter. Thanks to very good observing conditions, an average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.232'', 0.280'' and 0.293'' is measured in the three filters, respectively. Gaussian disk fitting and quadratic subtraction of the science and calibrator PSFs suggests a lower-limit characteristic angular diameter of the emission of 100 mas, or 30 au. The photometric and spectroscopic results are compatible with previous findings. Our radiative transfer (RT) modeling of the continuum suggests that the resolved emission should result from PAH molecules on the disk atmosphere being UV-excited by the central star. Simple geometrical models of the PAH component compared to the underlying continuum point to a PAH emission uniformly extended out to the physical limits of the disk model. Furthermore, our RT best model of the continuum requires a negative exponent of the surface density power-law, in contrast with earlier modeling pointing to a positive exponent. Conclusions: We have spatially resolved - for the first time to our knowledge - the PAHs emission in the disk of HD 179218 and set constraints on its

  13. Steganalysis and improvement of a quantum steganography protocol via a GHZ4 state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shu-Jiang; Chen Xiu-Bo; Niu Xin-Xin; Yang Yi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Quantum steganography that utilizes the quantum mechanical effect to achieve the purpose of information hiding is a popular topic of quantum information. Recently, El Allati et al. proposed a new quantum steganography using the GHZ 4 state. Since all of the 8 groups of unitary transformations used in the secret message encoding rule change the GHZ 4 state into 6 instead of 8 different quantum states when the global phase is not considered, we point out that a 2-bit instead of a 3-bit secret message can be encoded by one group of the given unitary transformations. To encode a 3-bit secret message by performing a group of unitary transformations on the GHZ 4 state, we give another 8 groups of unitary transformations that can change the GHZ 4 state into 8 different quantum states. Due to the symmetry of the GHZ 4 state, all the possible 16 groups of unitary transformations change the GHZ 4 state into 8 different quantum states, so the improved protocol achieves a high efficiency

  14. THE IONIZED CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES OF ORION SOURCE I AND THE BECKLIN-NEUGEBAUER OBJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plambeck, R. L.; Wright, M. C. H. [Radio Astronomy Lab, Hearst Field Annex, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A. D.; Pound, M. W.; Teuben, P. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Carpenter, J. M.; Perez, L. M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Eisner, J. A.; Marrone, D. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lamb, J. W.; Leitch, E. M.; Muchovej, S. J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Woody, D. P. [Owens Valley Radio Observatory, California Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 968, Big Pine, CA 93513 (United States); Zauderer, B. A. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The 229 GHz ({lambda}1.3 mm) radio emission from Orion-KL was mapped with up to 0.''14 angular resolution with CARMA, allowing measurements of the flux densities of Source I ({sup S}rcI{sup )} and the Becklin-Neugebauer Object (BN), the two most massive stars in this region. We find integrated flux densities of 310 {+-} 45 mJy for SrcI and 240 {+-} 35 mJy for BN. SrcI is optically thick even at 229 GHz. No trace of the H30{alpha} recombination line is seen in its spectrum, although the v {sub 2} = 1, 5(5,0)-6(4,3) transition of H{sub 2}O, 3450 K above the ground state, is prominent. SrcI is elongated at position angle 140 Degree-Sign , as in 43 GHz images. These results are most easily reconciled with models in which the radio emission from SrcI arises via the H{sup -} free-free opacity in a T < 4500 K disk, as considered by Reid et al. By contrast, the radio spectrum of BN is consistent with p {sup +}/e {sup -} free-free emission from a dense (n{sub e} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}), but otherwise conventional, hypercompact H II region. The source is becoming optically thin at 229 GHz, and the H30{alpha} recombination line, at V {sub LSR} = 23.2 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1}, is prominent in its spectrum. A Lyman continuum flux of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} photons s{sup -1}, consistent with that expected from a B star, is required to maintain the ionization. Supplementary 90 GHz observations were made to measure the H41{alpha} and H42{alpha} recombination lines toward BN. Published 43 and 86 GHz data suggest that SrcI brightened with respect to BN over the 15 year period from 1994 to 2009.

  15. 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation Through Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Abreu, Renato Barbosa; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth was exam......This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth...

  16. TWT design requirements for 30/20 GHz digital communications' satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, N.; Anzic, G.

    1979-01-01

    The rapid growth of communication traffic (voice, data, and video) requires the development of additional frequency bands before the 1990's. The frequencies currently in use for satellite communications at 6/4 GHz are crowded and demands for 14/12 GHz systems are increasing. Projections are that these bands will be filled to capacity by the late 1980's. The next higher frequency band allocated for satellite communications is at 30/20 GHz. For interrelated reasons of efficiency, power level, and system reliability criteria, a candidate for the downlink amplifier in a 30/20 GHz communications' satellite is a dual mode traveling wave tube (TWT) equipped with a highly efficient depressed collector. A summary is given of the analyses which determine the TWT design requirements. The overall efficiency of such a tube is then inferred from a parametric study and from experimental data on multistaged depressed collectors. The expected TWT efficiency at 4 dB below output saturation is 24 percent in the high mode and 22 percent in the low mode.

  17. Blinded by the light: on the relationship between CO first overtone emission and mass accretion rate in massive young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilee, J. D.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Pomohaci, R.

    2018-04-01

    To date, there is no explanation as to why disc-tracing CO first overtone (or `bandhead') emission is not a ubiquitous feature in low- to medium-resolution spectra of massive young stellar objects, but instead is only detected toward approximately 25 per cent of their spectra. In this paper, we investigate the hypothesis that only certain mass accretion rates result in detectable bandhead emission in the near infrared spectra of MYSOs. Using an analytic disc model combined with an LTE model of the CO emission, we find that high accretion rates (≳ 10-4 M⊙yr-1) result in large dust sublimation radii, a larger contribution to the K-band continuum from hot dust at the dust sublimation radius, and therefore correspondingly lower CO emission with respect to the continuum. On the other hand, low accretion rates (≲ 10-6 M⊙yr-1) result in smaller dust sublimation radii, a correspondingly smaller emitting area of CO, and thus also lower CO emission with respect to the continuum. In general, moderate accretion rates produce the most prominent, and therefore detectable, CO first overtone emission. We compare our findings to a recent near-infrared spectroscopic survey of MYSOs, finding results consistent with our hypothesis. We conclude that the detection rate of CO bandhead emission in the spectra of MYSOs could be the result of MYSOs exhibiting a range of mass accretion rates, perhaps due to the variable accretion suggested by recent multi-epoch observations of these objects.

  18. Correcting X-ray spectra obtained from the AXAF VETA-I mirror calibration for pileup, continuum, background and deadtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, G.; Flanagan, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Kellogg, E. M.; Nguyen, D.; Zombek, M.; Joy, M.; Kolodziejezak, J.

    1993-01-01

    The VETA-I mirror was calibrated with the use of a collimated soft X-ray source produced by electron bombardment of various anode materials. The FWHM, effective area and encircled energy were measured with the use of proportional counters that were scanned with a set of circular apertures. The pulsers from the proportional counters were sent through a multichannel analyzer that produced a pulse height spectrum. In order to characterize the properties of the mirror at different discrete photon energies one desires to extract from the pulse height distribution only those photons that originated from the characteristic line emission of the X-ray target source. We have developed a code that fits a modeled spectrum to the observed X-ray data, extracts the counts that originated from the line emission, and estimates the error in these counts. The function that is fitted to the X-ray spectra includes a Prescott function for the resolution of the detector a second Prescott function for a pileup peak and a X-ray continuum function. The continuum component is determined by calculating the absorption of the target Bremsstrahlung through various filters, correcting for the reflectivity of the mirror and convolving with the detector response.

  19. Map of fluid flow in fractal porous medium into fractal continuum flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balankin, Alexander S; Elizarraraz, Benjamin Espinoza

    2012-05-01

    This paper is devoted to fractal continuum hydrodynamics and its application to model fluid flows in fractally permeable reservoirs. Hydrodynamics of fractal continuum flow is developed on the basis of a self-consistent model of fractal continuum employing vector local fractional differential operators allied with the Hausdorff derivative. The generalized forms of Green-Gauss and Kelvin-Stokes theorems for fractional calculus are proved. The Hausdorff material derivative is defined and the form of Reynolds transport theorem for fractal continuum flow is obtained. The fundamental conservation laws for a fractal continuum flow are established. The Stokes law and the analog of Darcy's law for fractal continuum flow are suggested. The pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal metric of fractal continuum flow is derived. The generalization of the pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal topology of fractal continuum flow is proposed. The mapping of fluid flow in a fractally permeable medium into a fractal continuum flow is discussed. It is stated that the spectral dimension of the fractal continuum flow d(s) is equal to its mass fractal dimension D, even when the spectral dimension of the fractally porous or fissured medium is less than D. A comparison of the fractal continuum flow approach with other models of fluid flow in fractally permeable media and the experimental field data for reservoir tests are provided.

  20. The MAT/TOCO Measurement of the Angular Power Spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background at 30 and 40 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolta, M. R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dorwart, W. B.; Miller, A. D.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J.; Torbet, E.; Tran, H. T.

    2003-11-01

    We present a measurement of the angular spectrum of the cosmic microwave background from l=26 to 225 from the 30 and 40 GHz channels of the MAT/TOCO experiment based on two seasons of observations. At comparable frequencies, the data extend to a lower l than the recent Very Small Array and DASI results. After accounting for known foreground emission in a self-consistent analysis, a rise from the Sachs-Wolfe plateau to a peak of δTl~80 μK near l~200 is observed.

  1. Frequency chirpings in Alfven continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Berk, Herb; Breizman, Boris; Zheng, Linjin

    2017-10-01

    We have used a self-consistent mapping technique to describe both the nonlinear wave-energetic particle resonant interaction and its spatial mode structure that depends upon the resonant energetic particle pressure. At the threshold for the onset of the energetic particle mode (EPM), strong chirping emerges in the lower continuum close to the TAE gap and then, driven by strong continuum damping, chirps rapidly to lower frequencies in the Alfven continuum. An adiabatic theory was developed that accurately replicated the results from the simulation where the nonlinearity was only due to the EPM resonant particles. The results show that the EPM-trapped particles have their action conserved during the time of rapid chirping. This adiabaticity enabled wave trapped particles to be confined within their separatrix, and produce even larger resonant structures, that can produce a large amplitude mode far from linearly predicted frequencies. In the present work we describe the effect of additional MHD nonlinearity to this calculation. We studied how the zonal flow component and its nonlinear feedback to the fundamental frequency and found that the MHD nonlinearity doesn't significantly alter the frequency chirping response that is predicted by the calculation that neglects the MHD nonlinearity.

  2. The evolution of interstellar medium mass probed by dust emission: Alma observations at z = 0.3-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoville, N.; Manohar, S.; Aussel, H.; Sheth, K.; Scott, K. S.; Sanders, D.; Ivison, R.; Pope, A.; Capak, P.; Vanden Bout, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Robertson, B.; Lilly, S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of submillimeter dust continuum emission to probe the mass of interstellar dust and gas in galaxies is empirically calibrated using samples of local star-forming galaxies, Planck observations of the Milky Way, and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies. All of these objects suggest a similar calibration, strongly supporting the view that the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the dust emission can be used as an accurate and very fast probe of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. We present ALMA Cycle 0 observations of the Band 7 (350 GHz) dust emission in 107 galaxies from z = 0.2 to 2.5. Three samples of galaxies with a total of 101 galaxies were stellar-mass-selected from COSMOS to have M * ≅ 10 11 M ☉ : 37 at z ∼ 0.4, 33 at z ∼ 0.9, and 31 at z = 2. A fourth sample with six infrared-luminous galaxies at z = 2 was observed for comparison with the purely mass-selected samples. From the fluxes detected in the stacked images for each sample, we find that the ISM content has decreased by a factor ∼6 from 1 to 2 × 10 10 M ☉ at both z = 2 and 0.9 down to ∼2 × 10 9 M ☉ at z = 0.4. The infrared-luminous sample at z = 2 shows a further ∼4 times increase in M ISM compared with the equivalent non-infrared-bright sample at the same redshift. The gas mass fractions are ∼2% ± 0.5%, 12% ± 3%, 14% ± 2%, and 53% ± 3% for the four subsamples (z = 0.4, 0.9, and 2 and infrared-bright galaxies).

  3. Megawatt Power Level 120 GHz Gyrotrons for ITER Start-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, E M; Marchewka, C; Mastovsky, I; Shapiro, M A; Sirigiri, J R; Temkin, R J [MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center, NW16-186, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We report operation of a 110 GHz gyrotron with 1.67 MW of output power measured in short pulses (3{mu}s) at an efficiency of 42% in the TE{sub 22,6} mode. We also present a preliminary design of a 1 MW, 120 GHz gyrotron for ITER start-up with an efficiency greater than 50%.

  4. Megawatt Power Level 120 GHz Gyrotrons for ITER Start-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E M; Marchewka, C; Mastovsky, I; Shapiro, M A; Sirigiri, J R; Temkin, R J

    2005-01-01

    We report operation of a 110 GHz gyrotron with 1.67 MW of output power measured in short pulses (3μs) at an efficiency of 42% in the TE 22,6 mode. We also present a preliminary design of a 1 MW, 120 GHz gyrotron for ITER start-up with an efficiency greater than 50%

  5. Robust random number generation using steady-state emission of gain-switched laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Z. L.; Lucamarini, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Fröhlich, B.; Plews, A.; Shields, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate robust, high-speed random number generation using interference of the steady-state emission of guaranteed random phases, obtained through gain-switching a semiconductor laser diode. Steady-state emission tolerates large temporal pulse misalignments and therefore significantly improves the interference quality. Using an 8-bit digitizer followed by a finite-impulse-response unbiasing algorithm, we achieve random number generation rates of 8 and 20 Gb/s, for laser repetition rates of 1 and 2.5 GHz, respectively, with a ±20% tolerance in the interferometer differential delay. We also report a generation rate of 80 Gb/s using partially phase-correlated short pulses. In relation to the field of quantum key distribution, our results confirm the gain-switched laser diode as a suitable light source, capable of providing phase-randomized coherent pulses at a clock rate of up to 2.5 GHz.

  6. Defining and testing a granular continuum element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Kamrin, Ken; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2007-12-03

    Continuum mechanics relies on the fundamental notion of amesoscopic volume "element" in which properties averaged over discreteparticles obey deterministic relationships. Recent work on granularmaterials suggests a continuum law may be inapplicable, revealinginhomogeneities at the particle level, such as force chains and slow cagebreaking. Here, we analyze large-scale Discrete-Element Method (DEM)simulations of different granular flows and show that a "granularelement" can indeed be defined at the scale of dynamical correlations,roughly three to five particle diameters. Its rheology is rather subtle,combining liquid-like dependence on deformation rate and solid-likedependence on strain. Our results confirm some aspects of classicalplasticity theory (e.g., coaxiality of stress and deformation rate),while contradicting others (i.e., incipient yield), and can guide thedevelopment of more realistic continuum models.

  7. Miniature Packaging Concept for LNAs in the 200-300 GHz Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene; Fung, Andy; Varonen, Mikko; Lin, Robert; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary; Lee, Choonsup; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe new miniaturized low noise amplifier modules which we developed for incorporation in small-scale satellites or Cubesats, and which exhibit similar or better performance compared to previously reported LNAs in the literature. We have targeted the WR4 (170-260 GHz) and WR3 (220-325 GHz) waveguide bands for the module development. The modules include two different methods of E-plane probes which have been developed for low loss, and stability at high frequencies. MMIC LNAs were also developed for these frequency ranges and fabricated in Northrop Grumman Corporation's 35 nm InP HEMT technology, and we have experimentally verified that noise performance is lower than reported in prior work. The best results include a miniature LNA module with 550K noise at 224 GHz, and a wideband LNA module with 15 dB gain from 230-280 GHz.

  8. Development of 24GHz Rectenna for Receiving and Rectifying Modulated Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Naoki; Hatano, Ken

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we show experimental results of RF-DC conversion with modulated 24GHz waves. We have already developed class-F MMIC rectenna with resonators for higher harmonics at no modulated 24GHz microwave for RF energy transfer. Dimensions of the MMIC rectifying circuit is 1 mm × 3 mm on GaAs. Maximum RF-DC conversion efficiency is measured 47.9% for a 210 mW microwave input of 24 GHz with a 120 Ω load. The class-F rectenna is based on a single shunt full-wave rectifier. For future application of a simultaneous energy and information transfer system or an energy harvesting from broadcasting waves, input microwave will be modulated. In this paper, we show an experimental result of RF-DC conversion of the class-F rectenna with 24GHz waves modulated by 16QAM as 1st modulation and OFDM as 2nd modulation

  9. Development of 24GHz Rectenna for Receiving and Rectifying Modulated Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Naoki; Hatano, Ken

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we show experimental results of RF-DC conversion with modulated 24GHz waves. We have already developed class-F MMIC rectenna with resonators for higher harmonics at no modulated 24GHz microwave for RF energy transfer. Dimensions of the MMIC rectifying circuit is 1 mm × 3 mm on GaAs. Maximum RF-DC conversion efficiency is measured 47.9% for a 210 mW microwave input of 24 GHz with a 120 Ω load. The class-F rectenna is based on a single shunt full-wave rectifier. For future application of a simultaneous energy and information transfer system or an energy harvesting from broadcasting waves, input microwave will be modulated. In this paper, we show an experimental result of RF-DC conversion of the class-F rectenna with 24GHz waves modulated by 16QAM as 1st modulation and OFDM as 2nd modulation.

  10. A program of high power microwave source research and development from 8 GHz to 600 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Booske, J.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Kehs, R.A.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Lou, W.R.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Minami, K.; Radack, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    We review research results both on a plasma filled, backward wave oscillator (BWO), and on a free electron laser (FEL) driven by a sheet electron beam. Recently, it was demonstrated that a plasma filled BWO driven by an intense relativistic electron beam can generate hundreds of megawatts of microwave radiation at an unusually high efficiency of 40% compared with a typical efficiency of ∼10% in a BWO without a background plasma. Furthermore, the enhanced efficiency can be maintained even for large electron beam currents approaching the vacuum space charge limiting current, and we anticipate this might hold even for larger current values. Theoretical studies and numerical simulations indicate that the enhanced efficiency as well as a lower value for the start oscillation current in the linear regime may be due to the finite length of the BWO circuit coupled with modification of the dispersion relation due to the background plasma. In the case of our FEL studies, we present designs for a 1 MW, CW, tapered FEL amplifier operating at frequencies of 280 GHz and 560 GHz. A short wiggler period (ell w ∼ 1 cm) is combined with a sheet beam of electrons having energy ∼1 MeV. Depressed collector techniques would allow the main power supply rating to be reduced to ∼200 kV. Efficient sheet beam transport (>99%) has been demonstrated through 10 wiggler periods, and transport through 60 wiggler periods is currently under study. Finally, plans for a proof-of-principle tapered FEL amplifier experiment at 94 GHz are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs

  11. 160 Gbit/s photonics wireless transmission in the 300-500 GHz band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To accommodate the ever increasing wireless traffic in the access networks, considerable efforts have been recently invested in developing photonics-assisted wireless communication systems with very high data rates. Superior to photonic millimeter-wave systems, terahertz (THz band (300 GHz-10 THz provides a much larger bandwidth and thus promises an extremely high capacity. However, the capacity potential of THz wireless systems has by no means been achieved yet. Here, we successfully demonstrate 160 Gbit/s wireless transmission by using a single THz emitter and modulating 25 GHz spaced 8 channels (20 Gbps per channel in the 300-500 GHz band, which is the highest bitrate in the frequency band above 300 GHz, to the best of our knowledge.

  12. Design of a 300 GHZ broadband coupler and RF-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Earley, L.M.; Sigler, F.E.; Potter, J.M.; Schulze, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent LANL activities in millimeter wave structures focus on 95 and 300 GHz structures. They aim at power generation from low power (100W-2kW) with a round electron beam (120kV, 0.1-1.0 A) to high power (2-100 kW) with a sheet beam structure (120 kV, 20 A). Applications cover basic research, radar and secure communications and remote sensing of biological and chemical agents. In this presentation the design of a 300 GHz RF-structure with a broadband (> 6% bandwidth) power coupler is presented. The choice of two input/output waveguides, a special coupling region and the structure parameters are presented. As a benchmark also a scaled up version at 10 GHz was designed and measured. These results will also be presented. We are investigating planar micro-fabricated traveling-wave tube amplifiers as sources for the generation of millimeter waves from 95 to 300 GHz. While for low energy applications narrow structures with pencil beams are proposed, for high energy operation flat, thin sheet beams are required. For the latter vane-loaded rectangular waveguides that operate in a slow-wave mode matched to the velocity of the electron beam are especially well suited. The 300 GHz effort initially is limited to narrow structures for pencil beams. The main emphasis for this work are the study of fabrication issues and the understanding of features that allow a broadband operation (5-10% bandwidth).

  13. A 90 GHz photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.T.; Hogan, M.J.; Ferrario, M.; Serafini, L.

    1999-01-01

    Photocathode rf guns depend on mode locked laser systems to produce an electron beam at a given phase of the rf. In general, the laser pulse is less than σ 2 = 10'' of rf phase in length and the required stability is on the order of Δφ = 1 At 90 GHz (W-band), these requirements correspond to σ 2 = 333 fsec and Δφ = 33 fsec. Laser system with pulse lengths in the fsec regime are commercially available, the timing stability is a major concern. It is proposed a multi-cell W-band photoinjector that does not require a mode locked laser system. Thereby eliminating the stability requirements at W-band. The laser pulse is allowed to be many rf periods long. In principle, the photoinjector can now be considered as a thermionic rf gun. Instead of using an alpha magnet to compress the electron bunch, which would have a detrimental effect on the transverse hase space quality due to longitudinal phase space mixing, it is here proposed to use long pulse laser system and a pair of undulators to produce a low emittance, high current, ultra-short electron bunch for beam dynamics experiments in the 90 GHz regime

  14. Hyperbolic conservation laws in continuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Dafermos, Constantine M

    2016-01-01

    This is a masterly exposition and an encyclopedic presentation of the theory of hyperbolic conservation laws. It illustrates the essential role of continuum thermodynamics in providing motivation and direction for the development of the mathematical theory while also serving as the principal source of applications. The reader is expected to have a certain mathematical sophistication and to be familiar with (at least) the rudiments of analysis and the qualitative theory of partial differential equations, whereas prior exposure to continuum physics is not required. The target group of readers would consist of (a) experts in the mathematical theory of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws who wish to learn about the connection with classical physics; (b) specialists in continuum mechanics who may need analytical tools; (c) experts in numerical analysis who wish to learn the underlying mathematical theory; and (d) analysts and graduate students who seek introduction to the theory of hyperbolic systems of conser...

  15. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.

  16. GHz band frequency hopping PLL-based frequency synthesizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yong; WANG Zhi-gong; GUAN Yu; XU Zhi-jun; QIAO Lu-feng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a full-integrated circuit containing all building blocks of a completed PLL-based synthesizer except for low pass filter(LPF).The frequency synthesizer is designed for a frequency hopping (FH) transceiver operating up to 1.5 GHz as a local oscillator. The architecture of Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) is optimized to get better performance, and a phase noise of -111.85-dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz and a tuning range of 250 MHz are gained at a centre frequency of 1.35 GHz.A novel Dual-Modulus Prescaler(DMP) is designed to achieve a very low jitter and a lower power.The settling time of PLL is 80 μs while the reference frequency is 400 KHz.This monolithic frequency synthesizer is to integrate all main building blocks of PLL except for the low pass filter,with a maximum VCO output frequency of 1.5 GHz,and is fabricated with a 0.18 μm mixed signal CMOS process. Low power dissipation, low phase noise, large tuning range and fast settling time are gained in this design.

  17. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, D D; Austin, M E

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels' IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters' center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a "zoomed-in" analysis of a ∼2-4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  18. Influence of gyroradius and dissipation on the Alfven-wave continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that in ideal magnetohydrodynamics there is a continuous spectrum of real frequencies associated with a singularity of the shear Alfven waves on the surface k/sub parallel to/v/sub A/ = omega. It is also known that the introduction of first-order gyroradius effects eliminates the continuum. In the present work we examine the influence of the full gyroradius response and of dissipation on the continuum. In the absence of dissipation we first confirm that if only first-order gyroradius effects are incorporated, the continuum disappears. However, when the full gyroradius response is included, this discrete spectrum vanishes, and a new continuum (associated with singularities at k/sub parallel to/v/sub A/ = 0) appears. The introduction of collisional dissipation removes the original MHD continuum leaving discrete modes whose frequency tends to zero with the collision rate as ν/sup 1/3/. collisions also remove the new continuum of the full gyroradius model leaving discrete modes whose frequency tends to zero as (log ν) -1 . Collisionless Landau damping has a similar effect

  19. Delayed neutron emission near the shell-closures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borzov Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-consistent Density Functional + Continuum QRPA approach (DF+CQRPA provides a good description of the recent experimental beta-decay half-lives and delayed neutron emission branchings for the nuclei approaching to (and beyond the neutron closed shells N = 28; 50; 82. Predictions of beta-decay properties are more reliable than the ones of standard global approaches traditionally used for the r-process modelling. An impact of the quasi-particle phonon coupling on the delayed multi-neutron emission rates P2n, P3n,… near the closed shells is also discussed.

  20. 47 CFR 25.250 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands. 25.250 Section 25.250 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25...

  1. A Behavioral Continuum: A Look at Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, George; Kirk, Nancy A.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that narcissistic, borderline, and antisocial personality disorders are not discrete diagnostic categories, but that they lie along a continuum and have in common the dimensions of degree of self-centeredness and degree of differentiation. Presents evidence supporting existence of continuum of behavior rather than discrete diagnostic…

  2. High-performance CPW MMIC LNA using GaAs-based metamorphic HEMTs for 94-GHz applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Keun-Kwan; Kim, Sung-Chan; An, Dan; Rhee, Jin-Koo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a high-performance low-noise amplifier (LNA) using metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (MHEMT) technology for 94-GHz applications. The 100 nm x 60 μm MHEMT devices for the coplanar MMIC LNA exhibited DC characteristics with a drain current density of 655 mA/mm and an extrinsic transconductance of 720 mS/mm. The current gain cutoff frequency (f T ) and the maximum oscillation frequency (f max ) were 195 GHz and 305 GHz, respectively. Based on this MHEMT technology, coplanar 94-GHz MMIC LNAs were realized, achieving a small signal gain of more than 13 dB between 90 and 100 GHz and a small signal gain of 14.8 dB and a noise figure of 4.7 dB at 94 GHz.

  3. Teaching Continuum Mechanics in a Mechanical Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a graduate course, continuum mechanics, which is designed for and taught to graduate students in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. The significance of continuum mechanics in engineering education is demonstrated and the course structure is described. Methods used in teaching this course such as topics, class…

  4. FLARE-LIKE VARIABILITY OF THE Mg II {lambda}2800 EMISSION LINE IN THE {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR 3C 454.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon-Tavares, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Chavushyan, V.; Patino-Alvarez, V.; Carraminana, A.; Carrasco, L. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Valtaoja, E. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20100 Turku (Finland); Arshakian, T. G. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Popovic, L. C. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11160 Belgrade 74 (Serbia); Tornikoski, M.; Laehteenmaeki, A. [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, FI-02540 Kylmaelae (Finland); Lobanov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    We report the detection of a statistically significant flare-like event in the Mg II {lambda}2800 emission line of 3C 454.3 during the outburst of autumn 2010. The highest levels of emission line flux recorded over the monitoring period (2008-2011) coincide with a superluminal jet component traversing through the radio core. This finding crucially links the broad emission line fluctuations to the non-thermal continuum emission produced by relativistically moving material in the jet and hence to the presence of broad-line region clouds surrounding the radio core. If the radio core were located at several parsecs from the central black hole, then our results would suggest the presence of broad-line region material outside the inner parsec where the canonical broad-line region is envisaged to be located. We briefly discuss the implications of broad emission line material ionized by non-thermal continuum in the context of virial black hole mass estimates and gamma-ray production mechanisms.

  5. Lightning and 85-GHz MCSs in the Global Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toracinta, E. Richard; Zipser, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous observations of tropical convection show that tropical continental mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are much more prolific lightning producers than their oceanic counterparts. Satellite-based climatologies using 85-GHz passive microwave ice-scattering signatures from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) indicate that MCSs of various size and intensity are found throughout the global tropics. In contrast, global lightning distributions show a strong land bias with an order of magnitude difference between land and ocean lightning. This is somewhat puzzling, since 85-GHz ice-scattering and the charge separation processes that lead to lightning are both thought to depend upon the existence of large graupel particles. The fact that low 85-GHz brightness temperatures are observed in tropical oceanic MCSs containing virtually no lightning leads to the postulate that tropical oceanic and tropical continental MCSs have fundamentally different hydrometeor profiles through the mixed phase region of the cloud (0 C Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), and the first space-borne radar, facilitates high-resolution case studies of MCS structure throughout the global tropics. An important precursor, however, is to better understand the distribution of MCSs and lightning in the tropics. With that objective in mind, this research undertakes a systematic comparison of 85-GHz-defined MCSs and lightning over the global tropics for a full year, as an initial step toward quantifying differences between land and ocean convective systems.

  6. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Incorporation of ancillary terrestrial component base station into an L-band mobile-satellite service system... ancillary terrestrial component (ATC) base stations as defined in § 25.201 at its own risk and subject to... Applications and Licenses Earth Stations § 25.136 Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz...

  7. Analysis of 38 GHz mmWave Propagation Characteristics of Urban Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2015-01-01

    The 38 GHz mm-wave frequency band is a strong candidate for the future deployment of wireless systems. Compared to lower frequency bands, propagation in the 38 GHz band is relatively unexplored for access networks in urban scenarios. This paper presents a detailed measurement-based analysis of ur...

  8. RADIO EMISSION FROM ACCELERATION SITES OF SOLAR FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yixuan; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter takes up the question of what radio emission is produced by electrons at the very acceleration site of a solar flare. Specifically, we calculate incoherent radio emission produced within two competing acceleration models-stochastic acceleration by cascading MHD turbulence and regular acceleration in collapsing magnetic traps. Our analysis clearly demonstrates that radio emission from acceleration sites (1) has sufficiently strong intensity to be observed by currently available radio instruments, and (2) has spectra and light curves that are distinctly different in these two competing models, which makes them observationally distinguishable. In particular, we suggest that some of the narrowband microwave and decimeter continuum bursts may be a signature of the stochastic acceleration in solar flares.

  9. The size of the narrow-line-emitting region in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 from emission-line variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Denney, K. D.; De Rosa, G.; Grier, C. J.; Pogge, R. W.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bentz, M. C.; Vestergaard, M.; Kilerci-Eser, E.; G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 3 I-35122, Padova (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 3 I-35122, Padova (Italy))" >Dalla Bontà, E.; G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 3 I-35122, Padova (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 3 I-35122, Padova (Italy))" >Ciroi, S.

    2013-01-01

    The narrow [O III] λλ4959, 5007 emission-line fluxes in the spectrum of the well-studied Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 are shown to vary with time. From this we show that the narrow-line-emitting region has a radius of only 1-3 pc and is denser (n e ∼ 10 5 cm –3 ) than previously supposed. The [O III] line width is consistent with virial motions at this radius given previous determinations of the black hole mass. Since the [O III] emission-line flux is usually assumed to be constant and is therefore used to calibrate spectroscopic monitoring data, the variability has ramifications for the long-term secular variations of continuum and emission-line fluxes, though it has no effect on shorter-term reverberation studies. We present corrected optical continuum and broad Hβ emission-line light curves for the period 1988-2008.

  10. The size of the narrow-line-emitting region in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 from emission-line variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, B. M.; Denney, K. D.; De Rosa, G.; Grier, C. J.; Pogge, R. W.; Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Suite 610, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Vestergaard, M.; Kilerci-Eser, E. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Dalla Bontà, E.; Ciroi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia " G. Galilei," Università di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3 I-35122, Padova (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    The narrow [O III] λλ4959, 5007 emission-line fluxes in the spectrum of the well-studied Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 are shown to vary with time. From this we show that the narrow-line-emitting region has a radius of only 1-3 pc and is denser (n {sub e} ∼ 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) than previously supposed. The [O III] line width is consistent with virial motions at this radius given previous determinations of the black hole mass. Since the [O III] emission-line flux is usually assumed to be constant and is therefore used to calibrate spectroscopic monitoring data, the variability has ramifications for the long-term secular variations of continuum and emission-line fluxes, though it has no effect on shorter-term reverberation studies. We present corrected optical continuum and broad Hβ emission-line light curves for the period 1988-2008.

  11. Diseño y validación de un radar CW-FM a 94 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Varela Agrelo, David

    2013-01-01

    Diseño y validación de un radar CW-FM a 9g GHz 94 GHz CW-FM radar design and mesurement campaign validation. Desarrollo de un radar CW-FM a 94GHz y verificación de los resultados obtenidos durante la etapa de medidas. Desevolupament d'un radar CW-FM a 94GHz i verificació dels resultat obteinguts durante l'etapa de mesures.

  12. Limits of Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background at 19.2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughn, S. P.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Northern Hemisphere data from the 19.2 GHz full sky survey are analyzed to place limits on the magnitude of Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background implied by a variety of correlation functions. Included among the models tested are the monochromatic and Gaussian-shaped families, and those with power-law spectra for n values between -2 and 1. An upper bound is placed on the quadrupole anisotropy of Delta T/T less than 3.2 x 10 exp -5 rms, and an upper bound on scale-invariant (n = 1) fluctuations of a2 less than 4.5 x 10 exp -5 (95 percent confidence level). There is significant contamination of these data from Galactic emission, and improvement of the modeling of the Galaxy could yield a significant reduction of these upper bounds.

  13. Variability of Fe II Emission Features in the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Peterson, B. M.

    2005-01-01

    We study the low-contrast Fe II emission blends in the ultraviolet (1250--2200A) and optical (4000--6000A) spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 and show that these features vary in flux and that these variations are correlated with those of the optical continuum. The amplitude of variability ...... are correlated indicates that line fluorescence in a photoionized plasma, rather than collisional excitation, is responsible for the Fe II emission. The iron emission templates are available upon request....

  14. FeO "Orange Arc" Emission Detected in Optical Spectrum of Leonid Persistent Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Lacey, Matt; Allan, Beverly J.; Self, Daniel E.; Plane, John M. C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of a broad continuum emission dominating the visual spectrum of a Leonid persistent train. A comparison with laboratory spectra of FeO 1 "orange arc" emission at I mbar shows a general agreement of the band position and shape. The detection of FeO confirms the classical mechanism of metal atom catalyzed recombination of ozone and oxygen atoms as the driving force behind optical emission from persistent trains. Sodium and iron atoms are now confirmed catalysts.

  15. Variations of the Hβ-emission line during a large flare on UV Ceti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffett, T.J.; Evans, D.S.; Ferland, G.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous high-speed photometry and photoelectric scanner observations of the Hβ-line were obtained for five flare events, one a major flare, on UV Ceti on 1975 January 6. The relative increase in the intensity of the Hβ-line during the large flare was much greater than the relative continuum rise as measured both by the scanner and by broad-band photometric observations. In Hβ the flare lasted nearly 30 times as long as in the continuum. Peak intensity in the Hβ-line occurred later than the continuum maximum. The possibility of using emission line observations to detect flare activity on early spectral-type stars (dK - dG) is discussed. Some speculations on the mechanism of flare production are indulged. (author)

  16. RADIO SOURCES FROM A 31 GHz SKY SURVEY WITH THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH ARRAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchovej, Stephen; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James; Woody, David; Leitch, Erik; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas; Greer, Chris; Hennessy, Ryan; Loh, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P.; Pryke, Clem; Sharp, Matthew; Joy, Marshall; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2010-01-01

    We present the first sample of 31 GHz selected sources to flux levels of 1 mJy. From late 2005 to mid-2007, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array observed 7.7 deg 2 of the sky at 31 GHz to a median rms of 0.18 mJy beam -1 . We identify 209 sources at greater than 5σ significance in the 31 GHz maps, ranging in flux from 0.7 mJy to ∼200 mJy. Archival NVSS data at 1.4 GHz and observations at 5 GHz with the Very Large Array are used to characterize the sources. We determine the maximum-likelihood integrated source count to be N(>S) = (27.2 ± 2.5)deg -2 x (S mJy ) -1.18±0.12 over the flux range 0.7-15 mJy. This result is significantly higher than predictions based on 1.4 GHz selected samples, a discrepancy which can be explained by a small shift in the spectral index distribution for faint 1.4 GHz sources. From comparison with previous measurements of sources within the central arcminute of massive clusters, we derive an overdensity of 6.8 ± 4.4, relative to field sources.

  17. The Co-creation Continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ind, Nicholas; Iglesias, Oriol; Markovic, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    -creation - from tactical market research tool to strategic collaborative innovation method, and shows that brands can be positioned along a continuum between these two polarities. This article also presents the implications for those that want to seize the potential of co-creation....

  18. Effects of continuum breakdown on hypersonic aerothermodynamics for reacting flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Timothy D.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of continuum breakdown on the surface aerothermodynamic properties (pressure, stress, and heat transfer rate) of a sphere in a Mach 25 flow of reacting air in regimes varying from continuum to a rarefied gas. Results are generated using both continuum [computational fluid dynamics (CFD)] and particle [direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)] approaches. The DSMC method utilizes a chemistry model that calculates the backward rates from an equilibrium constant. A preferential dissociation model is modified in the CFD method to better compare with the vibrationally favored dissociation model that is utilized in the DSMC method. Tests of these models are performed to confirm their validity and to compare the chemistry models in both numerical methods. This study examines the effect of reacting air flow on continuum breakdown and the surface properties of the sphere. As the global Knudsen number increases, the amount of continuum breakdown in the flow and on the surface increases. This increase in continuum breakdown significantly affects the surface properties, causing an increase in the differences between CFD and DSMC. Explanations are provided for the trends observed.

  19. Fluxon induced resistance and field emission

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2000-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, precursor of electron emission, is observed here for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operated at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect.

  20. Bursts and shocks in a continuum shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We study a burst event, i.e., the evolution of an initial condition having support only in a finite interval of k-space, in the continuum shell model due to Parisi. We show that the continuum equation without forcing or dissipation can be explicitly written in characteristic form and that the right...

  1. 125-GHz Microwave Signal Generation Employing an Integrated Pulse Shaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji

    2017-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an on-chip pulse shaper for 125-GHz microwave waveform generation. The pulse shaper is implemented based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform that has a structure with eight-tap finite impulse response (FIR) and there is an amplitude modulator on each...... of the generated microwave waveforms is larger than 100 GHz, and it has wide bandwidth when changing the time delay of the adjacent taps and compactness, capability for integration with electronics and small power consumption are also its merits.......We propose and experimentally demonstrate an on-chip pulse shaper for 125-GHz microwave waveform generation. The pulse shaper is implemented based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform that has a structure with eight-tap finite impulse response (FIR) and there is an amplitude modulator on each...

  2. 1.4 GHz on the Fundamental Plane of black hole activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Payaswini; Körding, Elmar; Dibi, Salome

    2018-06-01

    The Fundamental Plane (FP) of black hole activity is an empirical relationship between the O III/X-ray luminosity depicting the accretion power, the radio luminosity as a probe of the instantaneous jet power and the mass of the black hole. For the first time, we use the 1.4 GHz FIRST radio luminosities on the optical FP, to investigate whether or not Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimetres (FIRST) fluxes can trace nuclear activity. We use an SDSS-FIRST cross-correlated sample of 10 149 active galaxies and analyse their positioning on the optical FP. We focus on various reasons that can cause the discrepancy between the observed FIRST radio fluxes and the theoretically expected core radio fluxes, and show that FIRST fluxes are heavily contaminated by non-nuclear, extended components and other environmental factors. We show that the subsample of `compact sources', which should have negligible lobe contribution, statistically follow the FP when corrected for relativistic beaming, while all the other sources lie above the plane. The sample of low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), which should have negligible lobe and beaming contribution, also follow the FP. A combined fit of the low-luminosity AGN and the X-ray binaries, with the LINERs, results in the relation log LR = 0.77 log L_{O III} + 0.69 log M. Assuming that the original FP relation is correct, we conclude that 1.4 GHz FIRST fluxes do not trace the pure `core' jet and instantaneous nuclear activity in the AGN, and one needs to be careful while using it on the FP of black hole activity.

  3. Measuring the service level in the 2.4 GHz ISM band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloem, J.W.H.; Schiphorst, Roelof

    2011-01-01

    In this report we provide the findings of the 2.4 GHz service level research. Here service level means the following: can all devices in the 2.4 GHz band fulfill their communication needs. In other words this corresponds to the overall Quality of Service (QoS). The project is a short research

  4. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp; Tchipev, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm

  5. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs

  6. Ultra-wideband and 60 GHz communications for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yuce, Mehmet R

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates the design of devices, systems, and circuits for medical applications using the two recently established frequency bands: ultra-wideband (3.1-10.6 GHz) and 60 GHz ISM band. These two bands provide the largest bandwidths available for communication technologies and present many attractive opportunities for medical applications. The applications of these bands in healthcare are wireless body area network (WBAN), medical imaging, biomedical sensing, wearable and implantable devices, fast medical device connectivity, video data transmission, and vital signs monitoring. The r

  7. Assessing continuum postulates in simulations of granular flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris; Kamrin, Ken; Bazant, Martin

    2008-08-26

    Continuum mechanics relies on the fundamental notion of a mesoscopic volume"element" in which properties averaged over discrete particles obey deterministic relationships. Recent work on granular materials suggests a continuum law may be inapplicable, revealing inhomogeneities at the particle level, such as force chains and slow cage breaking. Here, we analyze large-scale three-dimensional Discrete-Element Method (DEM) simulations of different granular flows and show that an approximate"granular element" defined at the scale of observed dynamical correlations (roughly three to five particle diameters) has a reasonable continuum interpretation. By viewing all the simulations as an ensemble of granular elements which deform and move with the flow, we can track material evolution at a local level. Our results confirm some of the hypotheses of classical plasticity theory while contradicting others and suggest a subtle physical picture of granular failure, combining liquid-like dependence on deformation rate and solid-like dependence on strain. Our computational methods and results can be used to guide the development of more realistic continuum models, based on observed local relationships betweenaverage variables.

  8. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the small Magellanic cloud - part III: Compact Hii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and discuss a new catalogue of 48 compact Hii regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and a newly created deep 1420 MHz (λ=20 cm radio-continuum image of the N19 region located in the southwestern part of the SMC. The new images were created by merging 1420 MHz radiocontinuum archival data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array. The majority of these detected radio compact Hii regions have rather flat spectral indices which indicates, as expected, that the dominant emission mechanism is of thermal nature.

  9. L-Band Microwave Emission of Soil Freeze-Thaw Process in the Third Pole Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Donghai; van der Velde, R.; Su, Z.; Zeng, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Soil freeze-thaw transition monitoring is essential for quantifying climate change and hydrologic dynamics over cold regions, for instance, the Third Pole. We investigate the L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave emission characteristics of soil freeze-thaw cycle via analysis of tower-based brightness

  10. STUDY OF CALIBRATION OF SOLAR RADIO SPECTROMETERS AND THE QUIET-SUN RADIO EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Chengming; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Xu, Guirong [Hubei Key Laboratory for Heavy Rain Monitoring and Warning Research, Institute of Heavy Rain, China Meteorological Administration, Wuhan 430205 (China)

    2015-07-20

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness, and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0–2.0 GHz, 2.6–3.8 GHz, and 5.2–7.6 GHz) during 1997–2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about 10%–20% at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  11. 10 GHz ECRIS for Warsaw Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Sudlitz, K

    1999-01-01

    Cusp type, 10 GHz ECRIS has been built and tested earlier. For obtaining intensive beams, more relevant for cyclotron, cusp geometry has been replaced by hexapole. Discharge chamber (stainless steel, 50 mm diameter, 250 mm long) is an extension of a coaxial line, feeding RF (9,6 GHz, up to 200 W) to the plasma. The NdFeB hexapole (0,52 T on the surface) has been used. The axial magnetic field is created by water cooled coils. The axial injection line dedicated to K160 isochronous heavy ion cyclotron has been constructed. The line consists of Glaser lenses, double focusing magnet, solenoid and mirror type inflector. The system provides sufficient transmission of the beam from ECR ion source to the firsts orbits of the cyclotron for m/q ranging from 7 to 2. After successful initial tests which were done in July 1997 the ECRIS serves as an external source for Warsaw Cyclotron.

  12. A DEEP VERY LARGE ARRAY RADIO CONTINUUM SURVEY OF THE CORE AND OUTSKIRTS OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2009-01-01

    We present deep 1.4 GHz Very Large Array radio continuum observations of two ∼0.5 deg 2 fields in the Coma cluster of galaxies. The two fields, 'Coma 1' and 'Coma 3', correspond to the cluster core and southwest infall region and were selected on account of abundant preexisting multiwavelength data. In their most sensitive regions the radio data reach 22 μJy rms per 4.''4 beam, sufficient to detect (at 5σ) Coma member galaxies with L 1.4 G Hz = 1.3 x 10 20 W Hz -1 . The full catalog of radio detections is presented herein and consists of 1030 sources detected at ≥5σ, 628 of which are within the combined Coma 1 and Coma 3 area. We also provide optical identifications of the radio sources using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The depth of the radio observations allows us to detect active galactic nucleus in cluster elliptical galaxies with M r r r ∼ sun yr -1 .

  13. Characteristics of ocular temperature elevations after exposure to quasi- and millimeter waves (18-40 GHz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Masami; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Sasaki, Kensuke; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Hirata, Akimasa; Sasaki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate changes in ocular temperature in rabbit eyes exposed to different frequencies (18 to 40 GHz) of quasi-millimeter waves, and millimeter waves (MMW). Pigmented rabbits were anesthetized with both general and topical anesthesia, and thermometer probes (0.5 mm in diameter) were inserted into their cornea (stroma), lens (nucleus) and vitreous (center of vitreous). The eyes were exposed unilaterally to 200 mW/cm2 by horn antenna for 3 min at 18, 22 and 26.5 GHz using a K band exposure system or 26.5, 35 and 40 GHz using a Ka band exposure system. Changes in temperature of the cornea, lens and vitreous were measured with a fluoroptic thermometer. Since the ocular temperatures after exposure to 26.5 GHz generated by the K band and Ka band systems were similar, we assumed that experimental data from these 2 exposure systems were comparable. The highest ocular temperature was induced by 40 GHz MMW, followed by 35 GHz. The 26.5 and 22 GHz corneal temperatures were almost the same. The lowest temperature was recorded at 18 GHz. The elevation in ocular temperature in response to exposure to 200 mW/cm2 MMW is dependent on MMW frequency. MMW exposure induced heat is conveyed not only to the cornea but also the crystalline lens.

  14. The HI/OH/Recombination line survey of the inner Milky Way (THOR). Survey overview and data release 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, H.; Bihr, S.; Rugel, M.; Johnston, K.; Wang, Y.; Walter, F.; Brunthaler, A.; Walsh, A. J.; Ott, J.; Stil, J.; Henning, Th.; Schierhuber, T.; Kainulainen, J.; Heyer, M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Anderson, L. D.; Longmore, S. N.; Klessen, R. S.; Glover, S. C. O.; Urquhart, J. S.; Plume, R.; Ragan, S. E.; Schneider, N.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Menten, K. M.; Smith, R.; Roy, N.; Shanahan, R.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Bigiel, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The past decade has witnessed a large number of Galactic plane surveys at angular resolutions below 20''. However, no comparable high-resolution survey exists at long radio wavelengths around 21 cm in line and continuum emission. Aims: We remedy this situation by studying the northern Galactic plane at 20'' resolution in emission of atomic, molecular, and ionized gas. Methods: Employing the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the C-array configuration and a large program, we observe the HI 21 cm line, four OH lines, nineteen Hnα radio recombination lines as well as the continuum emission from 1 to 2 GHz in full polarization over a large part of the first Galactic quadrant. Results: Covering Galactic longitudes from 14.5 to 67.4 deg and latitudes between ± 1.25 deg, we image all of these lines and the continuum at 20'' resolution. These data allow us to study the various components of the interstellar medium (ISM): from the atomic phase, traced by the HI line, to the molecular phase, observed by the OH transitions, to the ionized medium, revealed by the cm continuum and the Hnα radio recombination lines. Furthermore, the polarized continuum emission enables magnetic field studies. In this overview paper, we discuss the survey outline and present the first data release as well as early results from the different datasets. We now release the first half of the survey; the second half will follow later after the ongoing data processing has been completed. The data in fits format (continuum images and line data cubes) can be accessed through the project web-page. Conclusions: The HI/OH/Recombination line survey of the Milky Way (THOR) opens a new window to the different parts of the ISM. It enables detailed studies of molecular cloud formation, conversion of atomic to molecular gas, and feedback from Hii regions as well as the magnetic field in the Milky Way. It is highly complementary to other surveys of our Galaxy, and comparing the different datasets

  15. The 17 GHz active region number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A. [IP and D-Universidade do Vale do Paraíba-UNIVAP, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Costa, J. E. R. [CEA, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A. [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, São Paulo (Brazil); Shibasaki, K., E-mail: caius@univap.br [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  16. Lyman-continuum leakage as dominant source of diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilbacher, Peter M.; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Verhamme, Anne; Sandin, Christer; Steinmetz, Matthias; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krajnović, Davor; Kamann, Sebastian; Roth, Martin M.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Maseda, Michael V.; Wendt, Martin; Bacon, Roland; Dreizler, Stefan; Richard, Johan; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2018-04-01

    The Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39) is the closest major interacting galaxy system and is therefore often studied as a merger prototype. We present the first comprehensive integral field spectroscopic dataset of this system, observed with the MUSE instrument at the ESO VLT. We cover the two regions in this system which exhibit recent star formation: the central galaxy interaction and a region near the tip of the southern tidal tail. In these fields, we detect HII regions and diffuse ionized gas to unprecedented depth. About 15% of the ionized gas was undetected by previous observing campaigns. This newly detected faint ionized gas is visible everywhere around the central merger, and shows filamentary structure. We estimate diffuse gas fractions of about 60% in the central field and 10% in the southern region. We are able to show that the southern region contains a significantly different population of HII regions, showing fainter luminosities. By comparing HII region luminosities with the HST catalog of young star clusters in the central field, we estimate that there is enough Lyman-continuum leakage in the merger to explain the amount of diffuse ionized gas that we detect. We compare the Lyman-continuum escape fraction of each HII region against emission line ratios that are sensitive to the ionization parameter. While we find no systematic trend between these properties, the most extreme line ratios seem to be strong indicators of density bounded ionization. Extrapolating the Lyman-continuum escape fractions to the southern region, we conclude that simply from the comparison of the young stellar populations to the ionized gas there is no need to invoke other ionization mechanisms than Lyman-continuum leaking HII regions for the diffuse ionized gas in the Antennae. FITS images and Table of HII regions are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/611/A95 and at http://muse-vlt.eu/science/antennae/

  17. Millimeter-wave emissivity as a metric for the non-contact diagnosis of human skin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owda, Amani Yousef; Salmon, Neil; Harmer, Stuart William; Shylo, Sergiy; Bowring, Nicholas John; Rezgui, Nacer Ddine; Shah, Mamta

    2017-10-01

    A half-space electromagnetic model of human skin over the band 30-300 GHz was constructed and used to model radiometric emissivity. The model showed that the radiometric emissivity rose from 0.4 to 0.8 over this band, with emission being localized to a layer approximately one millimeter deep in the skin. Simulations of skin with differing water contents associated with psoriasis, eczema, malignancy, and thermal burn wounds indicated radiometry could be used as a non-contact technique to detect and monitor these conditions. The skin emissivity of a sample of 30 healthy volunteers, measured using a 95 GHz radiometer, was found to range from 0.2 to 0.7, and the experimental measurement uncertainty was ±0.002. Men on average were found to have an emissivity 0.046 higher than those of women, a measurement consistent with men having thicker skin than women. The regions of outer wrist and dorsal forearm, where skin is thicker, had emissivities 0.06-0.08 higher than the inner wrist and volar forearms where skin is generally thinner. Recommendations are made to develop a more sophisticated model of the skin and to collect larger data sets to obtain a deeper understanding of the signatures of human skin in the millimeter wave band. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:559-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A 60 GHz Dual-Polarized Probe for Spherical Near-Field Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popa, Paula Irina; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2017-01-01

    to waveguide adapters up to 67 GHz for OMT-switch connection. A 27 dBi gain conical horn is designed by using WIPL-D software and in-house manufactured. The 60 GHz probe system is being assembled and tested in planar near-field (PNF) setup at DTU. The results are validated by comparison with WIPL-D simulations...

  19. On deformation of complex continuum immersed in a plane space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, V. A.; Murashkin, E. V.; Radayev, Y. N.

    2018-05-01

    The present paper is devoted to mathematical modelling of complex continua deformations considered as immersed in an external plane space. The complex continuum is defined as a differential manifold supplied with metrics induced by the external space. A systematic derivation of strain tensors by notion of isometric immersion of the complex continuum into a plane space of a higher dimension is proposed. Problem of establishing complete systems of irreducible objective strain and extrastrain tensors for complex continuum immersed in an external plane space is resolved. The solution to the problem is obtained by methods of the field theory and the theory of rational algebraic invariants. Strain tensors of the complex continuum are derived as irreducible algebraic invariants of contravariant vectors of the external space emerging as functional arguments in the complex continuum action density. Present analysis is restricted to rational algebraic invariants. Completeness of the considered systems of rational algebraic invariants is established for micropolar elastic continua. Rational syzygies for non-quadratic invariants are discussed. Objective strain tensors (indifferent to frame rotations in the external plane space) for micropolar continuum are alternatively obtained by properly combining multipliers of polar decompositions of deformation and extra-deformation gradients. The latter is realized only for continua immersed in a plane space of the equal mathematical dimension.

  20. Continuum gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1981-06-01

    When angular momentum is added to a nucleus, it is, of course, carried by the individual nucleons, but two limiting types of behavior may be distinguished: (1) a small number of high-j particles align with the rotation axis and (2) the nucleus is deformed and rotates as a whole. At high spin all nuclei seem to show a compromise utilizing both motions. The excited nuclei left as products of (HI,xn) reactions have so many pathways down that none of the γ-ray transitions have enough intensity to be seen individually until the population gathers near the yrast line. This occurs usually between spin 20 to 40 h-bar. All our information on the higher states comes from their continuum spectra. With the new techniques that are developing, including the use of multiplicity filters, total-energy spectrometers, energy correlation studies, crystal balls, and observation of giant dipole resonances in the continuum spectra, there is hope to learn much about the nature of the high-spin states

  1. Nonlocal continuum field theories

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Nonlocal continuum field theories are concerned with material bodies whose behavior at any interior point depends on the state of all other points in the body -- rather than only on an effective field resulting from these points -- in addition to its own state and the state of some calculable external field. Nonlocal field theory extends classical field theory by describing the responses of points within the medium by functionals rather than functions (the "constitutive relations" of classical field theory). Such considerations are already well known in solid-state physics, where the nonlocal interactions between the atoms are prevalent in determining the properties of the material. The tools developed for crystalline materials, however, do not lend themselves to analyzing amorphous materials, or materials in which imperfections are a major part of the structure. Nonlocal continuum theories, by contrast, can describe these materials faithfully at scales down to the lattice parameter. This book presents a unif...

  2. Near-infrared water vapour self-continuum at close to room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptashnik, I.V.; Petrova, T.M.; Ponomarev, Yu.N.; Shine, K.P.; Solodov, A.A.; Solodov, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The gaseous absorption of solar radiation within near-infrared atmospheric windows in the Earth's atmosphere is dominated by the water vapour continuum. Recent measurements by Baranov et al. (2011) [17] in 2500 cm −1 (4 μm) window and by Ptashnik et al. (2011) [18] in a few near-infrared windows revealed that the self-continuum absorption is typically an order of magnitude stronger than given by the MT C KD continuum model prior to version 2.5. Most of these measurements, however, were made at elevated temperatures, which makes their application to atmospheric conditions difficult. Here we report new laboratory measurements of the self-continuum absorption at 289 and 318 K in the near-infrared spectral region 1300–8000 cm −1 , using a multipass 30 m base cell with total optical path 612 m. Our results confirm the main conclusions of the previous measurements both within bands and in windows. Of particular note is that we present what we believe to be the first near-room temperature measurement using Fourier Transform Spectrometry of the self-continuum in the 6200 cm −1 (1.6 μm) window, which provides tentative evidence that, at such temperatures, the water vapour continuum absorption may be as strong as it is in 2.1 μm and 4 μm windows and up to 2 orders of magnitude stronger than the MT C KD-2.5 continuum. We note that alternative methods of measuring the continuum in this window have yielded widely differing assessment of its strength, which emphasises the need for further measurements. -- Highlights: ► New lab measurements of the near-infrared water vapour self-continuum absorption. ► First room-temperature data on the self-continuum in the 1.6 μm window. ► In the 1.6 μm window the new data exceed MT C KD-2.5 model by 2 orders of magnitude

  3. Use of the 37-38 GHz and 40-40.5 GHz Ka-bands for Deep Space Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, David; Hastrup, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    This paper covers a wide variety of issues associated with the implementation and use of these frequency bands for deep space communications. Performance issues, such as ground station pointing stability, ground antenna gain, antenna pattern, and propagation effects such as due to atmospheric, charged-particle and space loss at 37 GHz, will be addressed in comparison to the 32 GHz Ka-band deep space allocation. Issues with the use of and competition for this spectrum also will be covered. The state of the hardware developed (or proposed) for operating in this frequency band will be covered from the standpoint of the prospects for achieving higher data rates that could be accommodated in the available bandwidth. Hardware areas to be explored include modulators, digital-to-analog converters, filters, power amplifiers, receivers, and antennas. The potential users of the frequency band will be explored as well as their anticipated methods to achieve the potential high data rates and the implications of the competition for bandwidth.

  4. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, D. D., E-mail: dtruong@wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ∼2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  5. Double-peaked Emission Lines Due to a Radio Outflow in KISSR 1219

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharb, P.; Vaddi, S. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics—Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Postbag 3, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Subramanian, S. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Das, M. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Paragi, Z., E-mail: kharb@ncra.tifr.res.in [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2017-09-01

    We present the results from 1.5 and 5 GHz phase-referenced VLBA and 1.5 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy KISSR 1219, which exhibits double-peaked emission lines in its optical spectrum. The VLA and VLBA data reveal a one-sided core-jet structure at roughly the same position angles, providing evidence of an active galactic nucleus outflow. The absence of dual parsec-scale radio cores puts the binary black-hole picture in doubt for the case of KISSR 1219. The high brightness temperatures of the parsec-scale core and jet components (>10{sup 6} K) are consistent with this interpretation. Doppler boosting with jet speeds of ≳0.55 c to ≳0.25 c , going from parsec to kiloparsec scales, at a jet inclination ≳50° can explain the jet one-sidedness in this Seyfert 2 galaxy. A blueshifted broad emission line component in [O iii] is also indicative of an outflow in the emission line gas at a velocity of ∼350 km s{sup −1}, while the [O i] doublet lines suggest the presence of shock-heated gas. A detailed line ratio study using the MAPPINGS III code further suggests that a shock+precursor model can explain the line ionization data well. Overall, our data suggest that the radio outflow in KISSR 1219 is pushing the emission line clouds, both ahead of the jet and in a lateral direction, giving rise to the double peak emission line spectra.

  6. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We report multi-frequency radio continuum and hydrogen radio recombination line observations of HII regions near = 24.8°, = 0.1° using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope(GMRT) at 1.28 GHz ( = 172), 0.61 GHz ( = 220) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.42 GHz ( = 166). The region consists ...

  7. Continuum modeling investigation of gigahertz oscillators based on a C60 fullerene inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-02-01

    Research concerning the fabrication of nano-oscillators with operating frequency in the gigahertz (GHz) range has become a focal point in recent years. In this paper, a new type of GHz oscillators is introduced based on a C60 fullerene inside a cyclic peptide nanotube (CPN). To study the dynamic behavior of such nano-oscillators, using the continuum approximation in conjunction with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, analytical expressions are derived to determine the van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction force between the two interacting molecules. Employing Newton's second law, the equation of motion is solved numerically to arrive at the telescopic oscillatory motion of a C60 fullerene inside CPNs. It is shown that the fullerene molecule exhibits different kinds of oscillation inside peptide nanotubes which are sensitive to the system parameters. Furthermore, for the precise evaluation of the oscillation frequency, a novel semi-analytical expression is proposed based on the conservation of the mechanical energy principle. Numerical results are presented to comprehensively study the effects of the number of peptide units and initial conditions (initial separation distance and velocity) on the oscillatory behavior of C60 -CPN oscillators. It is found out that for peptide nanotubes comprised of one unit, the maximum achievable frequency is obtained when the inner core oscillates with respect to its preferred positions located outside the tube, while for other numbers of peptide units, such frequency is obtained when the inner core oscillates with respect to the preferred positions situated in the space between the two first or the two last units. It is further found out that four peptide units are sufficient to obtain the optimal frequency.

  8. Accurate Theoretical Methane Line Lists in the Infrared up to 3000 K and Quasi-continuum Absorption/Emission Modeling for Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, Michael; Tyuterev, Vladimir G. [Groupe de Spectrométrie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique, UMR CNRS 7331, BP 1039, F-51687, Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nikitin, Andrei V., E-mail: michael.rey@univ-reims.fr [Laboratory of Theoretical Spectroscopy, Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-01

    Modeling atmospheres of hot exoplanets and brown dwarfs requires high- T databases that include methane as the major hydrocarbon. We report a complete theoretical line list of {sup 12}CH{sub 4} in the infrared range 0–13,400 cm{sup −1} up to T {sub max} = 3000 K computed via a full quantum-mechanical method from ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Over 150 billion transitions were generated with the lower rovibrational energy cutoff 33,000 cm{sup −1} and intensity cutoff down to 10{sup −33} cm/molecule to ensure convergent opacity predictions. Empirical corrections for 3.7 million of the strongest transitions permitted line position accuracies of 0.001–0.01 cm{sup −1}. Full data are partitioned into two sets. “Light lists” contain strong and medium transitions necessary for an accurate description of sharp features in absorption/emission spectra. For a fast and efficient modeling of quasi-continuum cross sections, billions of tiny lines are compressed in “super-line” libraries according to Rey et al. These combined data will be freely accessible via the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru), which provides a user-friendly interface for simulations of absorption coefficients, cross-sectional transmittance, and radiance. Comparisons with cold, room, and high- T experimental data show that the data reported here represent the first global theoretical methane lists suitable for high-resolution astrophysical applications.

  9. Accurate Theoretical Methane Line Lists in the Infrared up to 3000 K and Quasi-continuum Absorption/Emission Modeling for Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Michael; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2017-10-01

    Modeling atmospheres of hot exoplanets and brown dwarfs requires high-T databases that include methane as the major hydrocarbon. We report a complete theoretical line list of 12CH4 in the infrared range 0-13,400 cm-1 up to T max = 3000 K computed via a full quantum-mechanical method from ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Over 150 billion transitions were generated with the lower rovibrational energy cutoff 33,000 cm-1 and intensity cutoff down to 10-33 cm/molecule to ensure convergent opacity predictions. Empirical corrections for 3.7 million of the strongest transitions permitted line position accuracies of 0.001-0.01 cm-1. Full data are partitioned into two sets. “Light lists” contain strong and medium transitions necessary for an accurate description of sharp features in absorption/emission spectra. For a fast and efficient modeling of quasi-continuum cross sections, billions of tiny lines are compressed in “super-line” libraries according to Rey et al. These combined data will be freely accessible via the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru), which provides a user-friendly interface for simulations of absorption coefficients, cross-sectional transmittance, and radiance. Comparisons with cold, room, and high-T experimental data show that the data reported here represent the first global theoretical methane lists suitable for high-resolution astrophysical applications.

  10. Continuum regularized Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadun, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Using the machinery of stochastic quantization, Z. Bern, M. B. Halpern, C. Taubes and I recently proposed a continuum regularization technique for quantum field theory. This regularization may be implemented by applying a regulator to either the (d + 1)-dimensional Parisi-Wu Langevin equation or, equivalently, to the d-dimensional second order Schwinger-Dyson (SD) equations. This technique is non-perturbative, respects all gauge and Lorentz symmetries, and is consistent with a ghost-free gauge fixing (Zwanziger's). This thesis is a detailed study of this regulator, and of regularized Yang-Mills theory, using both perturbative and non-perturbative techniques. The perturbative analysis comes first. The mechanism of stochastic quantization is reviewed, and a perturbative expansion based on second-order SD equations is developed. A diagrammatic method (SD diagrams) for evaluating terms of this expansion is developed. We apply the continuum regulator to a scalar field theory. Using SD diagrams, we show that all Green functions can be rendered finite to all orders in perturbation theory. Even non-renormalizable theories can be regularized. The continuum regulator is then applied to Yang-Mills theory, in conjunction with Zwanziger's gauge fixing. A perturbative expansion of the regulator is incorporated into the diagrammatic method. It is hoped that the techniques discussed in this thesis will contribute to the construction of a renormalized Yang-Mills theory is 3 and 4 dimensions

  11. Spectral Energy Distribution and Radio Halo of NGC 253 at Low Radio Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapińska, A. D.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Meurer, G. R.; For, B.-Q. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, WA 6009 (Australia); Crocker, R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bhandari, S.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Lenc, E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Sydney NSW (Australia); Hurley-Walker, N.; Seymour, N. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Offringa, A. R. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), P.O. Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Hanish, D. J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ekers, R. D.; Bell, M. E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Dwarakanath, K. S. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Hindson, L. [Centre of Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Johnston-Hollitt, M. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); McKinley, B., E-mail: anna.kapinska@uwa.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); and others

    2017-03-20

    We present new radio continuum observations of NGC 253 from the Murchison Widefield Array at frequencies between 76 and 227 MHz. We model the broadband radio spectral energy distribution for the total flux density of NGC 253 between 76 MHz and 11 GHz. The spectrum is best described as a sum of a central starburst and extended emission. The central component, corresponding to the inner 500 pc of the starburst region of the galaxy, is best modeled as an internally free–free absorbed synchrotron plasma, with a turnover frequency around 230 MHz. The extended emission component of the spectrum of NGC 253 is best described as a synchrotron emission flattening at low radio frequencies. We find that 34% of the extended emission (outside the central starburst region) at 1 GHz becomes partially absorbed at low radio frequencies. Most of this flattening occurs in the western region of the southeast halo, and may be indicative of synchrotron self-absorption of shock-reaccelerated electrons or an intrinsic low-energy cutoff of the electron distribution. Furthermore, we detect the large-scale synchrotron radio halo of NGC 253 in our radio images. At 154–231 MHz the halo displays the well known X-shaped/horn-like structure, and extends out to ∼8 kpc in the z -direction (from the major axis).

  12. Continuum of Care (COC) Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The purpose of the Continuum of Care (CoC) Homeless Assistance Programs is to reduce the incidence of homelessness in CoC communities by assisting homeless...

  13. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING CORE MM1 OF W75N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Su, Y.-N.; Liu, S.-Y.; Yan, C.-H.; Chen, H.-R.; Kim, S.-J.

    2010-01-01

    The massive star-forming core MM1 of W75N was observed using the Submillimeter Array with ∼1'' and 2'' spatial resolutions at 217 and 347 GHz, respectively. From the 217 GHz continuum we found that the MM1 core consists of two sources, separated by about 1'': MM1a (∼0.6 M sun ) and MM1b (∼1.4 M sun ), located near the radio continuum sources VLA 2/VLA 3 and VLA 1, respectively. Within MM1b, two gas clumps were found to be expanding away from VLA 1 at about ±3 km s -1 , as a result of the most recent star formation activity in the region. Observed molecular lines show emission peaks at two positions, MM1a and MM1b: sulfur-bearing species have emission peaks toward MM1a, but methanol and saturated species at MM1b. We identified high-temperature (∼200 K) gas toward MM1a and the hot core in MM1b. This segregation may result from the evolution of the massive star-forming core. In the very early phase of star formation, the hot core is seen through the evaporation of dust ice-mantle species. As the mantle species are consumed via evaporation the high-temperature gas species (such as the sulfur-bearing molecules) become bright. The SiO molecule is unique in having an emission peak exactly at the VLA 2 position, probably tracing a shock powered by VLA 2. The observed sulfur-bearing species show similar abundances both in MM1a and MM1b, whereas the methanol and saturated species show significant abundance enhancement toward MM1b, by about an order of magnitude, compared to MM1a.

  14. A Long-Term Space Astrophysics Research Program. The Evolution of the Quasar Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, M.

    1998-01-01

    The grant "The Evolution of the Quasar Continuum" resulted in over 53 published referred papers and conference proceedings. The more significant of these papers are listed below, and abstracts are attached. The papers address a wide range of issues involving the evolution of quasars, their electromagnetic emissions, and their environment, from nearby low luminosity Seyfert galaxies to quasars at the highest redshifts. Primarily observational in content the work nonetheless included theoretical studies of quasar accretion disks that attempt to explain the observed time variability of quasars, and the overall 'demographics' of the quasar population. The work carried out under this grant has laid a strong foundation for ongoing and future research with AXAF, HST and other new facilities.

  15. Frontiers of Radio Astronomy in the 2020s: The Next Generation Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eric Joseph; ngVLA Project Office, ngVLA Science and Technical Advisory Councils, ngVLA Science Working Groups

    2018-01-01

    This talk will describe the current community-driven science goals, design, and planning status of a future large centimeter radio array: the ‘Next Generation Very Large Array’ (ngVLA). The ngVLA is being developed to observe at wavelengths between ALMA at submm wavelengths, and the future SKA-1 at few centimeter and longer wavelengths, opening a new window on the Universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milliarcsecond resolution, and unprecedented broad band continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The current design for the array includes 10x more effective collecting area and 10x higher spatial resolution than the current JVLA or ALMA, carefully optimized for operation in the frequency range 10GHz to 50GHz, while still delivering world-leading sensitivity over the entire 1.2GHz to 116 GHz spectrum.With this array, new frontiers in modern astronomy can be reached, including direct imaging and chemical analysis of planet formation in the terrestrial-zone of nearby stars, studies of dust-obscured star formation and the cosmic baryon cycle down to pc-scales in the local Universe, and detailed imaging of molecular gas and galaxy formation into the epoch of reionization. Novel techniques for exploring temporal phenomena on timescales from milliseconds to years will also be implemented. The ngVLA will be situated in the desert southwest of the United States, centered on the current JVLA infrastructure, with multiple antennas anticipated in states/regions adjacent to NM, and in northern Mexico.A recently formed Project Office is working closely with the U.S. and international research community to design the array, and plan its construction beginning mid next decade. Recent significant funding for design and development brought forward by the NSF will enable detailed science case development and technology prototyping/risk reduction before the next U.S astronomy Decadal Survey.

  16. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere

  17. Diagnostics of pre-breakdown light emission in a helium coplanar barrier discharge: the presence of neutral bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, Zdeněk; Morávek, Tomáš; Ráheľ, Jozef; Čech, Jan; Lalinský, Ondřej; Trunec, David

    2017-05-01

    Weak light emission (˜10-3 of active discharge signal; average count rate ˜ 1 photon s-1 nm-1) associated with surface charge relaxation during the dark phase of a helium diffuse coplanar barrier discharge was studied by optical emission spectroscopy, using a technique of phase-resolved single photon counting. The optical emission spectra of the dark phase contained luminescent bands of the dielectrics used (Al2O3, AlN) and spectral lines from the gas constituents (OH*, {{{N}}}2* , {{{N}}}2+* , He*, He{}2* , O*). During the charge relaxation event, a broad continuum appeared in the optical emission spectra, consisting of bremsstrahlung radiation and amplified luminescence of the dielectric barrier. The analysis presented suggests that the bremsstrahlung radiation originated from slow electrons colliding with neutral helium atoms. The fitting procedure we developed reproduced well the observed shape of the continuum. Moreover, it provided a method for the determination of electric field strength in the discharge during this particular phase. The electric field reached 1 kV cm-1 during the charge relaxation event.

  18. 60 GHz antenna measurement setup using a VNA without external frequency conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popa, Paula Irina; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2014-01-01

    an alternative solution which makes use of a standard wideband VNA without external frequency conversion units. The operational capability of the Planar Near-Field (PNF) Antenna Measurement Facility at the Technical University of Denmark was recently extended to 60 GHz employing an Agilent E8361A VNA (up to 67...... GHz). The upgrade involved procurement of very few additional components: two cables operational up to 65 GHz and an openended waveguide probe for tests in U-band (40-60 GHz). The first tests have shown good performance of the PNF setup: 50-60 dB dynamic range and small thermal drift in magnitude...... and phase, 0.06 dB and 6 degrees peak-to-peak deviations over 4 hours. A PNF measurement of a 25 dBi Standard Gain Horn was carried out and the results were compared to those from the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Facility with a good agreement in the validity region. Uncertainty investigations regarding...

  19. Dielectric and Radiative Properties of Sea Foam at Microwave Frequencies: Conceptual Understanding of Foam Emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Peter W. Gaiser; Magdalena D. Anguelova

    2012-01-01

    Foam fraction can be retrieved from space-based microwave radiometric data at frequencies from 1 to 37 GHz. The retrievals require modeling of ocean surface emissivity fully covered with sea foam. To model foam emissivity well, knowledge of foam properties, both mechanical and dielectric, is necessary because these control the radiative processes in foam. We present a physical description of foam dielectric properties obtained from the foam dielectric constant including foam skin depth; foam ...

  20. An 8–18 GHz broadband high power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lifa; Yang Ruixia; Li Yanlei; Wu Jingfeng

    2011-01-01

    An 8–18 GHz broadband high power amplifier (HPA) with a hybrid integrated circuit (HIC) is designed and fabricated. This HPA is achieved with the use of a 4-fingered micro-strip Lange coupler in a GaAs MMIC process. In order to decrease electromagnetic interference, a multilayer AlN material with good heat dissipation is adopted as the carrier of the power amplifier. When the input power is 25 dBm, the saturated power of the continuous wave (CW) outputted by the power amplifier is more than 39 dBm within the frequency range of 8–13 GHz, while it is more than 38.6 dBm within other frequency ranges. We obtain the peak power output, 39.4 dBm, at the frequency of 11.9 GHz. In the whole frequency band, the power-added efficiency is more than 18%. When the input power is 18 dBm, the small signal gain is 15.7 ± 0.7 dB. The dimensions of the HPA are 25 × 15 × 1.5 mm 3 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  1. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE 31 mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE 11 mode is also discussed

  2. LFI 30 and 44 GHz receivers Back-End Modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artal, E; Aja, B; Fuente, M L de la; Pascual, J P; Mediavilla, A; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Pradell, L; Paco, P de; Bara, M; Blanco, E; GarcIa, E; Davis, R; Kettle, D; Roddis, N; Wilkinson, A; Bersanelli, M; Mennella, A; Tomasi, M; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F

    2009-01-01

    The 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules (BEM) for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument are broadband receivers (20% relative bandwidth) working at room temperature. The signals coming from the Front End Module are amplified, band pass filtered and finally converted to DC by a detector diode. Each receiver has two identical branches following the differential scheme of the Planck radiometers. The BEM design is based on MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers using GaAs P-HEMT devices, microstrip filters and Schottky diode detectors. Their manufacturing development has included elegant breadboard prototypes and finally qualification and flight model units. Electrical, mechanical and environmental tests were carried out for the characterization and verification of the manufactured BEMs. A description of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules of Planck-LFI radiometers is given, with details of the tests done to determine their electrical and environmental performances. The electrical performances of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules: frequency response, effective bandwidth, equivalent noise temperature, 1/f noise and linearity are presented.

  3. A High-Gradient Test of a 30 GHz Molybdenum-Iris Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wuensch, Walter; Braun, H; Carron, G; Corsini, R; Döbert, Steffen; Fandos, R; Grudiev, A; Jensen, E; Mete, Ö; Ramsvik, T; Rodríguez, José Alberto; Sladen, Jonathan P H; Syratchev, I V; Taborelli, M; Tecker, F A; Urschütz, Peter; Wilson, Ian H; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC study is actively investigating a number of different materials in an effort to find ways to increase achievable accelerating gradient. So far a series of rf tests have been made with a set of identical-geometry structures: a W-iris 30 GHz structure, a Mo-iris 30 GHz structure (with pulses as long as 16 ns) and a scaled Mo-iris X-band structure. A second Mo-iris 30 GHz structure of the same geometry has now been tested in CTF3 with pulse lengths up to 350 ns. The structure was conditioned to a gradient of 140 MV/m with a 70 ns pulse length and a breakdown rate slope of 13 MV/m per decade has been measured

  4. High-Capacity 60 GHz and 75–110 GHz Band Links Employing All-Optical OFDM Generation and Digital Coherent Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Sambaraju, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    The performance of wireless signal generation and detection at millimeter-wave frequencies using baseband optical means is analyzed and experimentally demonstrated. Multigigabit wireless signal generation is achieved based on all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and photo......The performance of wireless signal generation and detection at millimeter-wave frequencies using baseband optical means is analyzed and experimentally demonstrated. Multigigabit wireless signal generation is achieved based on all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM...... scalability and bit-rate transparency of our proposed approach, we experimentally demonstrated generation and detection in the 60 GHz and 75–110 GHz band of an all-optical OFDM quadrature phase shift keying, with two and three subcarriers, for a total bit rate over 20 Gb/ s....

  5. Continuum methods of physical modeling continuum mechanics, dimensional analysis, turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Kolumban

    2004-01-01

    The book unifies classical continuum mechanics and turbulence modeling, i.e. the same fundamental concepts are used to derive model equations for material behaviour and turbulence closure and complements these with methods of dimensional analysis. The intention is to equip the reader with the ability to understand the complex nonlinear modeling in material behaviour and turbulence closure as well as to derive or invent his own models. Examples are mostly taken from environmental physics and geophysics.

  6. Continuum Thinking and the Contexts of Personal Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvila, Isto; Eriksen, Jon; Häusner, Eva-Maria; Jansson, Ina-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent personal information management literature has underlined the significance of the contextuality of personal information and its use. The present article discusses the applicability of the records continuum model and its generalisation, continuum thinking, as a theoretical framework for explicating the overlap and evolution of…

  7. Constraints on the outer radius of the broad emission line region of active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landt, Hermine; Ward, Martin J.; Elvis, Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2014-03-01

    Here we present observational evidence that the broad emission line region (BELR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) generally has an outer boundary. This was already clear for sources with an obvious transition between the broad and narrow components of their emission lines. We show that the narrow component of the higher-order Paschen lines is absent in all sources, revealing a broad emission line profile with a broad, flat top. This indicates that the BELR is kinematically separate from the narrow emission line region. We use the virial theorem to estimate the BELR outer radius from the flat top width of the unblended profiles of the strongest Paschen lines, Paα and Paβ, and find that it scales with the ionizing continuum luminosity roughly as expected from photoionization theory. The value of the incident continuum photon flux resulting from this relationship corresponds to that required for dust sublimation. A flat-topped broad emission line profile is produced by both a spherical gas distribution in orbital motion and an accretion disc wind if the ratio between the BELR outer and inner radius is assumed to be less than ˜100-200. On the other hand, a pure Keplerian disc can be largely excluded, since for most orientations and radial extents of the disc the emission line profile is double-horned.

  8. The structure of protostellar dense cores: a millimeter continuum study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Frederique

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical scenario explains low-mass star formation and describes the gravitational collapse of an isolated 'ideal' dense core. The major aim of this thesis is to check the standard model predictions on the structure of protostellar dense cores (or envelopes). The earliest stages of star formation remain poorly known because the protostars are still deeply embedded in massive, opaque circumstellar cocoons. On the one hand, sensitive bolometer arrays very recently allow us to measure the millimeter continuum emission arising from dense cores. Such observations are a powerful tool to constrain the density structure of proto-stellar dense cores (on large length scale). In particular, we studied the structure of isolated proto-stellar envelopes in Taurus and protostars in the ρ Ophiuchi cluster. In order to accurately derive their envelope density power law, we simulated the observation of several envelope models. Then we show that most of the Taurus protostars present a density structure consistent with the standard model predictions. In contrast, dense cores in ρ Ophiuchi main cloud are highly fragmented and protostellar envelope have finite size. Moreover fragmentation appears to be essential in determining the final stellar mass of ρ Oph forming stars. In clusters, fragmentation may thus be at the origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). On the other hand, our interferometric millimeter continuum observations are tracing (with higher angular resolution) the inner part of protostellar envelopes. Our study show that disks during protostellar stages are not yet massive and thus do not perturb the analysis of envelope density structure. (author) [fr

  9. Feasibility Study and Experimental Verification of Simplified Fiber-Supported 60-GHz Picocell Mobile Backhaul Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Pang, Xiaodan; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fiber-wireless transmission system for optimized delivery of 60-GHz radio frequency (RF) signals through picocell mobile backhaul connections. We identify advantages of 60-GHz links for utilization in short-range mobile backhaul through feasibility...... the wireless transmission distance from 4 m to a few hundred meters has been taken into account in the setup design, and the techniques to extend the wireless distance are analyzed....... analysis and comparison with an alternative E-band (60–90 GHz) technology. The 60-GHz fiber-wireless-fiber setup is then introduced: two spans of up to 20 km of optical fiber are deployed and bridged by up to 4 m of wireless distance. The 60-GHz radio-over-fiber technology is utilized in the first span...

  10. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE IN LOCAL GALACTIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN AND IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVED BY PLANCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L., E-mail: gverschu@naic.edu [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) data obtained with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) over 56 square degrees of sky around l = 132°, b = 25° are compared with small-scale structure in the Cosmic Microwave Background observed by PLANCK, specifically at 143 and 857 GHz, as well as with 100 μm observations from the IRIS survey. The analysis uses data in 13 2° × 2° sub-areas found in the IRSA database at IPAC. The results confirm what has been reported previously; nearby galactic HI features and high-frequency continuum sources believed to be cosmological are in fact clearly associated. While several attempts strongly suggest that the associations are statistically significant, the key to understanding the phenomenon lies in the fact that in any given area HI is associated with cirrus dust at certain HI velocities and with 143 GHz features at different velocities. At the same time, for the 13 sub-areas studied, there is very little overlap between the dust and 143 GHz features. The data do not imply that the HI itself gives rise to the high-frequency continuum emission. Rather, they appear to indicate undiagnosed brightness enhancements indirectly associated with the HI. If low density interstellar electrons concentrated into clumps, or observed in directions where their integrated line-of-sight column densities are greater than the background in a manner similar to the phenomena that give rise to structure in diffuse HI structure, they will profoundly affect attempts to create a foreground electron mask used for processing PLANCK as well as WMAP data.

  11. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE IN LOCAL GALACTIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN AND IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVED BY PLANCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) data obtained with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) over 56 square degrees of sky around l = 132°, b = 25° are compared with small-scale structure in the Cosmic Microwave Background observed by PLANCK, specifically at 143 and 857 GHz, as well as with 100 μm observations from the IRIS survey. The analysis uses data in 13 2° × 2° sub-areas found in the IRSA database at IPAC. The results confirm what has been reported previously; nearby galactic HI features and high-frequency continuum sources believed to be cosmological are in fact clearly associated. While several attempts strongly suggest that the associations are statistically significant, the key to understanding the phenomenon lies in the fact that in any given area HI is associated with cirrus dust at certain HI velocities and with 143 GHz features at different velocities. At the same time, for the 13 sub-areas studied, there is very little overlap between the dust and 143 GHz features. The data do not imply that the HI itself gives rise to the high-frequency continuum emission. Rather, they appear to indicate undiagnosed brightness enhancements indirectly associated with the HI. If low density interstellar electrons concentrated into clumps, or observed in directions where their integrated line-of-sight column densities are greater than the background in a manner similar to the phenomena that give rise to structure in diffuse HI structure, they will profoundly affect attempts to create a foreground electron mask used for processing PLANCK as well as WMAP data

  12. Radio synchrotron spectra of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, U.; Lisenfeld, U.; Verley, S.

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the radio continuum spectra of 14 star-forming galaxies by fitting nonthermal (synchrotron) and thermal (free-free) radiation laws. The underlying radio continuum measurements cover a frequency range of 325 MHz to 24.5 GHz (32 GHz in case of M 82). It turns out that most of these synchrotron spectra are not simple power-laws, but are best represented by a low-frequency spectrum with a mean slope αnth = 0.59 ± 0.20 (Sν ∝ ν-α), and by a break or an exponential decline in the frequency range of 1-12 GHz. Simple power-laws or mildly curved synchrotron spectra lead to unrealistically low thermal flux densities, and/or to strong deviations from the expected optically thin free-free spectra with slope αth = 0.10 in the fits. The break or cutoff energies are in the range of 1.5-7 GeV. We briefly discuss the possible origin of such a cutoff or break. If the low-frequency spectra obtained here reflect the injection spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons, they comply with the mean spectral index of Galactic supernova remnants. A comparison of the fitted thermal flux densities with the (foreground-corrected) Hα fluxes yields the extinction, which increases with metallicity. The fraction of thermal emission is higher than believed hitherto, especially at high frequencies, and is highest in the dwarf galaxies of our sample, which we interpret in terms of a lack of containment in these low-mass systems, or a time effect caused by a very young starburst.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method for multi-component, non-continuum mass diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Abhijit S; Peracchio, Aldo A; Grew, Kyle N; Chiu, Wilson K S

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in extending the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to model transport phenomena in the non-continuum regime. Most of these studies have focused on single-component flows through simple geometries. This work examines an ad hoc extension of a recently developed LBM model for multi-component mass diffusion (Joshi et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 2961) to model mass diffusion in the non-continuum regime. In order to validate the method, LBM results for ternary diffusion in a two-dimensional channel are compared with predictions of the dusty gas model (DGM) over a range of Knudsen numbers. A calibration factor based on the DGM is used in the LBM to correlate Knudsen diffusivity to pore size. Results indicate that the LBM can be a useful tool for predicting non-continuum mass diffusion (Kn > 0.001), but additional research is needed to extend the range of applicability of the algorithm for a larger parameter space. Guidelines are given on using the methodology described in this work to model non-continuum mass transport in more complex geometries where the DGM is not easily applicable. In addition, the non-continuum LBM methodology can be extended to three-dimensions. An envisioned application of this technique is to model non-continuum mass transport in porous solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

  14. Limits for an inverse bremsstrahlung origin of the diffuse Galactic soft gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1998-01-01

    origin of the soft Galactic gamma-ray continuum through inverse bremsstrahlung. A flux of low-energy cosmic rays strong enough to produce the observed spectrum of gamma-rays implies substantial gamma-ray emission at a few MeV through nuclear de-excitation. It is shown that the existing limits on excess 3......-7 MeV emission from the Galactic plane, in concert with the constraints from pi(0)-decay gamma-ray emission at higher energies, are in serious conflict with an inverse bremsstrahlung origin of the Galactic soft gamma-ray emission for any physically plausible low-energy cosmic ray spectrum. While...

  15. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ON THE 110 GHz ELECTRON CYCLOTRON INSTATLLATION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PONCE, D.; CALLIS, R.W.; CARY, W.P.; FERRON, J.R.; GREEN, M.; GRUNLOH, H.J.; GORELOV, Y.; LOHR, J.; ELLIS, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ON THE 110 GHZ ELECTRON CYCLOTRON INSTALLATION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Significant improvements are being implement4ed to the capability of the 110 GHz electron cyclotron system on the DIII-D tokamak. Chief among these is the addition of the fifth and sixth 1 MW class gyrotrons, increasing the power available for auxiliary heating and current drive by nearly 60%. These tubes use artificially grown diamond rf output windows to obtain high power with long pulse capability. The beams from these tubes are nearly Gaussian, facilitating coupling to the waveguide. A new fully articulating dual launcher capable of high speed spatial scanning has been designed and tested. The launcher has two axis independent steering for each waveguide. the mirrors can be rotated at up to 100 o /s. A new feedback system linking the DIII-D Plasma Control System (PCS) with the gyrotron beam voltage waveform generators permits real-time feedback control of some plasma properties such as electron temperature. The PCS can use a variety of plasma monitors to generate its control signal, including electron cyclotron emission and Mirnov probes. Electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive (ECH and ECCD) were used during this year's DIII-D experimental campaign to control electron temperature, density, and q profiles, induce an ELM-free H-mode, and suppress the m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode. The new capabilities have expanded the role of EC systems in tokamak plasma control

  16. Microwave sintering of zirconia toughened alumina at 28GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samandi, M.; Ji, H.; Miyake, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave radiation from a 10 kW, CW gyrotron operating at 28 GHz was employed to sinter 10% zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) ceramic samples. It has been established that the use of millimetre wave radiation circumvents the difficulties encountered during the sintering of ceramics, i e. formation of hot spot, by radiation at industrially permissible frequency of 2.45GHz. Further, careful density measurement and microstructural characterisation of mm- wave and conventionally sintered samples by XRD, SEM and TEM has unequivocally demonstrated the effectiveness of mm-wave radiation for obtaining high density ceramics at lower sintering temperatures. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  17. Air–water CO2 and CH4 fluxes along a river–reservoir continuum: Case study in the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Yangtze River in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water surface greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in freshwater reservoirs are closely related to limnological processes in the water column. Affected by both reservoir operation and seasonal changes, variations in the hydro-morphological conditions in the river–reservoir continuum will create distinctiv...

  18. Commissioning of the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS at 18 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, Daniela; Abbott, Steven R.; Dwinell, Roger D.; Leitner, Matthaeus; Taylor, Clyde E.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2004-01-01

    During the last year, the VENUS ECR ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz and preparations for 28 GHz operation are now underway. During the commissioning phase with 18 GHz, tests with various gases and metals have been performed with up to 2000 W RF power. The ion source performance is very promising [1,2]. VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for Nuclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end. The goal of the VENUS ECR ion source project as the RIA R and D injector is the production of 240e(micro)A of U 30+ , a high current medium charge state beam. On the other hand, as an injector ion source for the 88-Inch Cyclotron the design objective is the production of 5e(micro)A of U 48+ , a low current, very high charge state beam. To meet these ambitious goals, VENUS has been designed for optimum operation at 28 GHz. This frequency choice has several design consequences. To achieve the required magnetic confinement, superconducting magnets have to be used. The size of the superconducting magnet structure implies a relatively large plasma volume. Consequently, high power microwave coupling becomes necessary to achieve sufficient plasma heating power densities. The 28 GHz power supply has been delivered in April 2004

  19. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Final report, April 1979-June 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shively, J.F.; Bier, R.E.; Caplan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The original objective of this program was to develop a microwave amplifier or oscillator capable of producing 200 kW CW power output at 110 GHz. The use of cyclotron resonance interaction was pursued, and the design phases of this effort are discussed. Later, however, the program's objective was changed to develop a family of oscillators capable of producing 200 kw of peak output power at 60 GHz. Gyrotron behavior studies were performed at 28 GHz to obtain generic design information as quickly as possible. The first experimental device at 60 GHz produced over 200 kw of peak power at a pulse duration of 20 μs. Heating problems and mode interference were encountered. The second experimental tube incorporated an optimized gun location but also suffered from mode interference. The third experimental tube included modifications that reduced mode interference. It demonstrated 200 kw of peak output at 100 ms pulse duration. The fourth experimental tube, which used an older rf circuit design but in a CW configuration, produced 71.5 kW CW. The fifth experimental tube incorporated a thinner double-disc output window which improved window bandwidth and reduced window loss. This tube also incorporated modifications to the drift tunnel and cavity coupling, which had proven successful in the third experimental pulse tube tests. It produced 123 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz rf load coolant boiling and tube window failure terminated the tests. A new waterload was designed and constructed, and alternative window designs were explored

  20. Continuum mechanics using Mathematica fundamentals, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This textbook's methodological approach familiarizes readers with the mathematical tools required to correctly define and solve problems in continuum mechanics. Covering essential principles and fundamental applications, this second edition of Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica® provides a solid basis for a deeper study of more challenging and specialized problems related to nonlinear elasticity, polar continua, mixtures, piezoelectricity, ferroelectricity, magneto-fluid mechanics, and state changes (see A. Romano, A. Marasco, Continuum Mechanics: Advanced Topics and Research Trends, Springer (Birkhäuser), 2010, ISBN 978-0-8176-4869-5). Key topics and features: * Concise presentation strikes a balance between fundamentals and applications * Requisite mathematical background carefully collected in two introductory chapters and one appendix * Recent developments highlighted through coverage of more significant applications to areas such as wave propagation, fluid mechanics, porous media, linear elasticity....

  1. ICMS Workshop on Differential Geometry and Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Grinfeld, Michael; Knops, R

    2015-01-01

    This book examines the exciting interface between differential geometry and continuum mechanics, now recognised as being of increasing technological significance. Topics discussed include isometric embeddings in differential geometry and the relation with microstructure in nonlinear elasticity, the use of manifolds in the description of microstructure in continuum mechanics, experimental measurement of microstructure, defects, dislocations, surface energies, and nematic liquid crystals. Compensated compactness in partial differential equations is also treated. The volume is intended for specialists and non-specialists in pure and applied geometry, continuum mechanics, theoretical physics, materials and engineering sciences, and partial differential equations. It will also be of interest to postdoctoral scientists and advanced postgraduate research students. These proceedings include revised written versions of the majority of papers presented by leading experts at the ICMS Edinburgh Workshop on Differential G...

  2. Spontaneous radiation emission during penetration of ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraglia, J.E.; Pacher, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, the principal continuum radiative emission processes, which occur during the penetration of ions in solids or gases, are resumed. The characteristics of the following processes are discussed: secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB), atomic bremsstrahlung (AB), and internuclear bremsstrahlung (INB). Recent advances of the ion channeling effects in crystal solids on the spontaneous radiative spectra are exposed. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  3. Cold test of cylindrical open resonator for 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    particular quality factor for TE mode at the frequency 42 GHz. The perturbation tech ... frequency 42 GHz. The good agreement ... see its performance before the final assembly of the device. This paper .... theoretical work was found. The results ...

  4. High-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, P.L.; Share, G.H.; Matz, S.; Chupp, E.L.; Forrest, D.J.; Rieger, E.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss broad-band continuum spectroscopy of 17 gamma-ray bursts above 0.3 MeV. The spectra were fitted by 3 trial functions, none of which provided an adequate fit to all the spectra. Most were too hard for a thermal bremsstarhlung function. Harder functional forms, such as thermal synchrotron or power-law, provide better fits for most of the spectra. The strong emission observed above 1 MeV raises some interesting theoretical questions

  5. Controlled and secure direct communication using GHZ state and teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for controlled and secure direct communication is proposed. The communication is based on GHZ state and controlled quantum teleportation. After insuring the security of the quantum channel (a set of qubits in the GHZ state), alice encodes the secret message directly on a sequence of particle states in the GHZ state and transmits them to Bob, supervised by Charlie using controlled quantum teleportation. Bob can read out the encoded messages directly by the measurement on his qubits. In this scheme, the controlled quantum teleportation transmits alice's message without revealing any information to a potential eavesdropper. Because there is not a transmission of the qubit carrying the secret messages between Alice and Bob in the public channel, it is completely secure for controlled and direct secret communication if a perfect quantum channel is used. The feature of this scheme is that the communication between two sides depends on the agreement of a third side. (orig.)

  6. Ferrite Film Loaded Frequency Selective Metamaterials for Sub-GHz Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic metamaterials are constructed with sub-wavelength structures that exhibit particular electromagnetic properties under a certain frequency range. Because the form-factor of the substructures has to be comparable to the wavelength of the operating frequency, few papers have discussed the metamaterials under GHz frequency. In this paper, we developed an innovative method to reduce the resonant frequency of metamaterals. By integrating the meta-structures with ferrite materials of higher permeability, the cell size of the meta-structure can be scaled down. This paper describes the methodology, design, and development of low-profile GHz ferrite loaded metamaterials. A ferrite film with a permeability of 20 could reduce the resonant frequency of metamaterials by up to 50%. A prototype has been fabricated and the measurement data align well with the simulation results. Because of the lowered operational frequency, the proposed ferrite loaded metamaterials offer more flexibility for various sub-GHz microwave applications, such as cloaks, absorbers, and frequency selective surfaces.

  7. Dynamic Modelling for Planar Extensible Continuum Robot Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    to the OCTARM continuum ma- nipulator. The OCTARM manipulator is a biologically inspired soft robot manipulator resembling an elephant trunk or an... octopus arm [18]. The OCTARM, shown in Figure 1, is a three-section robot with nine degrees of freedom. Aside from two axis bending with constant...increasing interest in designing �biologically inspired � continuum robots . Some of these designs are mimicking trunks [8], [25], tentacles [17], [21], [24

  8. Design of 20-44 GHz broadband doubler MMIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qin; Wang Zhigong; Li Wei

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design and performance of a broadband millimeter-wave frequency doubler MMIC using active 0.15 μm GaAs PHEMT and operating at output frequencies from 20 to 44 GHz. This chip is composed of a single ended-into differential-out active Balun, balanced FETs in push-push configuration, and a distributed amplifier. The MMIC doubler exhibits more than 4 dB conversion gain with 12 dBm of output power, and the fundamental frequency suppression is typically -20 dBc up to 44 GHz. The MMIC works at V DD = 3.5 V, V SS = -3.5 V, I d = 200 mA and the chip size is 1.5 x 1.8 mm 2 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  9. B-mode contamination by synchrotron emission from 3-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Cortiglioni, S.

    2006-01-01

    We study the contamination of the B-mode of the cosmic microwave background polarization (CMBP) by Galactic synchrotron in the lowest emission regions of the sky. The 22.8-GHz polarization map of the 3-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data release is used to identify and analyse such

  10. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  11. Generalized Continuum: from Voigt to the Modeling of Quasi-Brittle Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Salim Fuina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of the generalized continuum theories to incorporate the effects of the microstructure in the nonlinear finite element analysis of quasi-brittle materials and, thus, to solve mesh dependency problems. A description of the problem called numerically induced strain localization, often found in Finite Element Method material non-linear analysis, is presented. A brief historic about the Generalized Continuum Mechanics based models is presented, since the initial work of Voigt (1887 until the more recent studies. By analyzing these models, it is observed that the Cosserat and microstretch approaches are particular cases of a general formulation that describes the micromorphic continuum. After reporting attempts to incorporate the material microstructure in Classical Continuum Mechanics based models, the article shows the recent tendency of doing it according to assumptions of the Generalized Continuum Mechanics. Finally, it presents numerical results which enable to characterize this tendency as a promising way to solve the problem.

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W.A.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B.Rouille; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J.D.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-09

    The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\\ell<600$. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\\ell$ with exponents $\\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of ...

  13. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, Arne

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C 2 ). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed

  14. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtson, Arne [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, Dr. Kristinas vaeg 48, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: arne.bengtson@kimab.com

    2008-09-15

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C{sub 2}). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed.

  15. A novel fast-scanning microwave heterodyne radiometer system for electron cyclotron emission measurements in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Luo, J.R.; Li, J.G.; Kuang, G.L.; Gao, X.; Zhang, X.D.; Wan, B.N.; Wang, K.J.; Mao, J.S.; Gong, X.Z.; Qin, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Two sets of fast-scanning microwave heterodyne radiometer receiver systems employing backward-wave oscillators in the 78-118 GHz and 118-178 GHz ranges were developed for electron cyclotron emission measurements (ECE) on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The double-sideband radiometer in the 78-118 GHz range measures 16 ECE frequency points with a scanning period of 0.65 ms. The novel design of the 2 mm fast-scanning heterodyne radiometer in the 118-178 GHz range enables the unique system to measure 48 ECE frequency points in 0.65 ms periodically. The plasma profile consistency in reproducible ohmic plasmas was used to relatively calibrate each channel by changing the toroidal magnetic field shot-by-shot. The absolute temperature value was obtained by a comparison with the results from the soft x-ray pulse height analysis measurements and Thomson scattering system. A preliminary temperature profile measurement result in pellet injection plasma is presented. (author)

  16. Valve-like behavior of the magnetoimpedance in the GHz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandacci, S.I.; Makhnovskiy, D.P.; Panina, L.V.

    2004-01-01

    High-frequency modification in magneto-impedance (MI) characteristics in the frequency range of 0.5-3 GHz has been investigated in 10 μm diameter amorphous microwires with a circumferential anisotropy. As frequency is increased, the peaks in the MI behavior observed at the anisotropy field reduce and become less sharp, disappearing completely at frequencies higher than 1.6 GHz. This 'valve-like' behavior can be explained by considering the dispersion properties of the effective permeability of the AC linear response combined with the rotational DC magnetization

  17. Nuclear structure investigations with inclusion of continuum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1983-09-01

    The influence of the continuum on the properties of discrete nuclear states is reviewed. It is described on the basis of a continuum shell model. The coupling of the discrete states to the continuum results in an additional term to the Hamiltonian, commonly used in the study of nuclear structure, and an additional term to the wavefunction of the discrete state. These additional terms characterise finite nuclei in contrast to nuclear matter. They result in some symmetry violation of the residual nuclear interaction such as charge symmetry violation, and describe the nuclear surface, respectively. The energies and widths of resonance states result from the complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian. The partial widths are shown to be factorisable into a spectroscopic factor and into a penetration factor if the spectroscopic factor is large. An expression for the S-matrix is derived in which instead of the so-called resonance parameters, functions appear which are calculated in the framework of the model. The line shape of resonances is also influenced by these functions. As an extreme case, a resonance may have the appearance of a cusp. The conclusions drawn are supported by the results of numerical calculations performed in the continuum shell model for light nuclei with realistic shell model wavefunctions. (author)

  18. A star-forming shock front in radio galaxy 4C+41.17 resolved with laser-assisted adaptive optics spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbring, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Steinbring@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of redshifted [O III], Hβ, and optical continuum emission from the z = 3.8 radio galaxy 4C+41.17 is presented, obtained with the laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility on the Gemini North telescope. Employing a specialized dithering technique, a spatial resolution of 0.''10, or 0.7 kpc, is achieved in each spectral element, with a velocity resolution of ∼70 km s{sup –1}. Spectra similar to local starbursts are found for bright knots coincident in archival Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) rest-frame ultraviolet images, which also allows a key line diagnostic to be mapped together with new kinematic information. There emerges a clearer picture of the nebular emission associated with the jet in 8.3 GHz and 15 GHz Very Large Array maps, closely tied to a Lyα-bright shell-shaped structure seen with HST. This supports a previous interpretation of that arc tracing a bow shock, inducing ∼10{sup 10–11} M {sub ☉} star formation regions that comprise the clumpy broadband optical/ultraviolet morphology near the core.

  19. Structured surface reflector design for oblique incidence beam splitter at 610 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrance, F; Casaletti, M; Sarrazin, J; Wiedner, M C; Gibson, H; Gay, G; Lefèvre, R; Delorme, Y

    2016-09-05

    An iterative alternate projection-based algorithm is developed to design structured surface reflectors to operate as beam splitters at GHz and THz frequencies. To validate the method, a surface profile is determined to achieve a reflector at 610 GHz that generates four equal-intensity beams towards desired directions of ±12.6° with respect to the specular reflection axis. A prototype is fabricated and the beam splitter behavior is experimentally demonstrated. Measurements confirm a good agreement (within 1%) with computer simulations using Feko, validating the method. The beam splitter at 610 GHz has a measured efficiency of 78% under oblique incidence illumination that ensures a similar intensity between the four reflected beams (variation of about 1%).

  20. Scalability of GHZ and random-state entanglement in the presence of decoherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Fernando de; Tiersch, Markus; Buchleitner, Andreas [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Aolita, Leandro; Cavalcanti, Daniel [ICFO - Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Spain); Acin, Antonio [ICFO - Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Spain); ICREA - Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (Spain); Salles, Alejo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We derive analytical upper bounds for the entanglement of generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states locally coupled to dephasing, depolarizing, and thermal reservoirs. The derivation is carried out under very weak constraints, and holds for any convex quantifier of entanglement. The obtained bounds reveal an exponential entanglement decay with the number of qubits - the robustness of the generalized GHZ states decreases exponentially with the system size. This poses a severe limitation to many quantum communication protocols. A comparison between the entanglement decay of randomly generated states with the GHZ family shows that the former decays slower, thus violating the previously obtained bounds. Furthermore, the random state's entanglement is more robust against noise for larger system size.

  1. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  2. The geometry of continuum regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, M.B.

    1987-03-01

    This lecture is primarily an introduction to coordinate-invariant regularization, a recent advance in the continuum regularization program. In this context, the program is seen as fundamentally geometric, with all regularization contained in regularized DeWitt superstructures on field deformations

  3. HIV continuum of care in Europe and Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, R S; Rice, B; Rüütel, K; Delpech, V; Attawell, K A; Hales, D K; Velasco, C; Amato-Gauci, A J; Pharris, A; Tavoschi, L; Noori, T

    2017-08-01

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) supports countries to monitor progress in their response to the HIV epidemic. In line with these monitoring responsibilities, we assess how, and to what extent, the continuum of care is being measured across countries. The ECDC sent out questionnaires to 55 countries in Europe and Central Asia in 2014. Nominated country representatives were questioned on how they defined and measured six elements of the continuum. We present our results using three previously described frameworks [breakpoints; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 90-90-90 targets; diagnosis and treatment quadrant]. Forty countries provided data for at least one element of the continuum. Countries reported most frequently on the number of people diagnosed with HIV infection (37; 93%), and on the number in receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (35; 88%). There was little consensus across countries in their approach to defining linkage to, and retention in, care. The most common breakpoint (>19% reduction between two adjacent elements) related to the estimated number of people living with HIV who were diagnosed (18 of 23; 78%). We present continuum data from multiple countries that provide both a snapshot of care provision and a baseline against which changes over time in care provision across Europe and Central Asia may be measured. To better inform HIV testing and treatment programmes, standard data collection approaches and definitions across the HIV continuum of care are needed. If countries wish to ensure an unbroken HIV continuum of care, people living with HIV need to be diagnosed promptly, and ART needs to be offered to all those diagnosed. © 2017 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  4. A Masing Event in NGC 6334I: Contemporaneous Flaring of Hydroxyl, Methanol and Water Masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, G. C.; Smits, D. P.; Goedhart, S.; Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Chibueze, J. O.; van den Heever, S. P.; Thesner, C. J.; Banda, P. J.; Paulsen, J. D.

    2018-04-01

    As a product of the maser monitoring program with the 26 m telescope of the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO), we present an unprecedented, contemporaneous flaring event of 10 maser transitions in hydroxyl, methanol, and water that began in 2015 January in the massive star-forming region NGC 6334I in the velocity range -10 to -2 km s-1. The 6.7 GHz methanol and 22.2 GHz water masers began flaring within 22 days of each other, while the 12.2 GHz methanol and 1665 MHz hydroxyl masers flared 80 and 113 days later respectively. The 1665 MHz, 6.7 GHz, and 22.2 GHz masers have all remained in their flared state for nearly 3 years. The brightest flaring components increased by factors of 66, 21, 26, and 20 in the 12.2 and 6.7 GHz methanol, 1665 MHz hydroxyl and 22.2 GHz water maser transitions respectively; some weaker components increased by up to a factor of 145. We also report new maser emission in the 1720, 6031, and 6035 MHz OH lines and the 23.1 GHz methanol line, along with the detection of only the fifth 4660 MHz OH maser. We note the correlation of this event with the extraordinary (sub)millimeter continuum outburst from the massive protostellar system NGC 6334I-MM1 and discuss the implications of the observed time lags between different maser velocity components on the nature of the outburst. Finally, we identify two earlier epoch maser flaring events likely associated with this object, which suggest a recurring accretive phenomenon that generates powerful radiative outbursts.

  5. Complex Molecules in the Laboratory - a Comparison of Chriped Pulse and Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Marius; Wehres, Nadine; Maßen, Jakob; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Detecting molecules of astrophysical interest in the interstellar medium strongly relies on precise spectroscopic data from the laboratory. In recent years, the advancement of the chirped-pulse technique has added many more options available to choose from. The Cologne emission spectrometer is an additional path to molecular spectroscopy. It allows to record instantaneously broad band spectra with calibrated intensities. Here we present a comparison of both methods: The Cologne chirped-pulse spectrometer as well as the Cologne emission spectrometer both cover the frequency range of 75-110 GHz, consistent with the ALMA Band 3 receivers. High sensitive heterodyne receivers with very low noise temperature amplifiers are used with a typical bandwidth of 2.5 GHz in a single sideband. Additionally the chirped-pulse spectrometer contains a high power amplifier of 200 mW for the excitation of molecules. Room temperature spectra of methyl cyanide and comparison of key features, such as measurement time, sensitivity, limitations and commonalities are shown in respect to identification of complex molecules of astrophysical importance. In addition, future developments for both setups will be discussed.

  6. A 2.4GHz ULP OOK single-chip transceiver for healthcare applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidojkovic, M.; Huang, X.; Harpe, P.J.A.; Rampu, S.; Zhou, C.; Huang, Li; Molengraft, van de J.; Imamura, K.; Büsze, B.; Bouwens, F.; Konijnenburg, M.; Santana, J.; Breeschoten, A.; Huisken, J.; Philips, K.; Dolmans, G.; Groot, de H.W.H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an ultra-low power (ULP) single chip transceiver for wireless body area network (WBAN) applications. It supports on-off keying (OOK) modulation, and it operates in the 2.36–2.4 GHz medical BAN and 2.4–2.485 GHz ISM bands. It is implemented in 90 nm CMOS technology. The direct

  7. Market capture by 30/20 GHz satellite systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, R. B.; Saporta, L.

    1981-01-01

    Demand for 30/20 GHz satellite systems over the next two decades is projected. Topics include a profile of the communications market, switched, dedicated, and packet transmission modes, deferred and real-time traffic, quality and reliability considerations, the capacity of competing transmission media, and scenarios for the growth and development of 30/20 GHz satellite communications.

  8. Continuum Damage Mechanics A Continuum Mechanics Approach to the Analysis of Damage and Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in engineering and technology have brought about serious and enlarged demands for reliability, safety and economy in wide range of fields such as aeronautics, nuclear engineering, civil and structural engineering, automotive and production industry.  This, in turn, has caused more interest in continuum damage mechanics and its engineering applications.   This book aims to give a concise overview of the current state of damage mechanics, and then to show the fascinating possibility of this promising branch of mechanics, and to provide researchers, engineers and graduate students with an intelligible and self-contained textbook.   The book consists of two parts and an appendix.  Part I  is concerned with the foundation of continuum damage mechanics.  Basic concepts of material damage and the mechanical representation of damage state of various kinds are described in Chapters 1 and 2.  In Chapters 3-5, irreversible thermodynamics, thermodynamic constitutive theory and its application ...

  9. An Interferometric Spectral Line and Imaging Survey of VY Canis Majoris in the 345 GHz Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, T.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Young, K. H.; Menten, K. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A spectral line survey of the oxygen-rich red supergiant VY Canis Majoris was made between 279 and 355 GHz with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Two hundred twenty-three spectral features from 19 molecules (not counting isotopic species of some of them) were observed, including the rotational spectra of TiO, TiO2, and AlCl for the first time in this source. The parameters and an atlas of all spectral features are presented. Observations of each line with a synthesized beam of ~0.''9, reveal the complex kinematics and morphology of the nebula surrounding VY CMa. Many of the molecules are observed in high-lying rotational levels or in excited vibrational levels. From these, it was established that the main source of the submillimeter-wave continuum (dust) and the high-excitation molecular gas (the star) are separated by about 0.''15. Apparent coincidences between the molecular gas observed with the SMA, and some of the arcs and knots observed at infrared wavelengths and in the optical scattered light by the Hubble Space Telescope are identified. The observations presented here provide important constraints on the molecular chemistry in oxygen-dominated circumstellar environments and a deeper picture of the complex circumstellar environment of VY CMa.

  10. Experimental study of a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takuji

    A detailed experimental study is presented of a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron oscillator whose design is consistent with the ECH requirements of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) for bulk heating and current drive. This work is the first to demonstrate that megawatt power level at 170 GHz can be achieved in a gyrotron with high efficiency for plasma heating applications. Maximum output power of 1.5 MW is obtained at 170.1 GHz in 85 kV, 50A operation for an efficiency of 35%. Although the experiment at MIT is conducted with short pulses (3 μs), the gyrotron is designed to be suitable for development by industry for continuous wave operation. The peak ohmic loss on the cavity wall for 1 MW of output power is calculated to be 2.3 kW/cm2, which can be handled using present cooling technology. Mode competition problems in a highly over-moded cavity are studied to maximize the efficiency. Various aspects of electron gun design are examined to obtain high quality electron beams with very low velocity spread. A triode magnetron injection gun is designed using the EGUN simulation code. A total perpendicular velocity spread of less than 8% is realized by designing a low- sensitivity, non-adiabatic gun. The RF power is generated in a short tapered cavity with an iris step. The operating mode is the TE28,8,1 mode. A mode converter is designed to convert the RF output to a Gaussian beam. Power and efficiency are measured in the design TE28,8,1 mode at 170.1 GHz as well as the TE27,8,1 mode at 166.6 GHz and TE29,8,1 mode at 173.5 GHz. Efficiencies between 34%-36% are consistently obtained over a wide range of operating parameters. These efficiencies agree with the highest values predicted by the multimode simulations. The startup scenario is investigated and observed to agree with the linear theory. The measured beam velocity ratio is consistent with EGUN simulation. Interception of reflected beam by the mod-anode is measured as a function of velocity ratio

  11. Radio jets and gamma-ray emission in radio-silent narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Järvelä, E.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Tornikoski, M.; Tammi, J.; Vera, R. J. C.; Chamani, W.

    2018-06-01

    We have detected six narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies at 37 GHz that were previously classified as radio silent and two that were classified as radio quiet. These detections reveal the presumption that NLS1 galaxies labelled radio quiet or radio silent and hosted by spiral galaxies are unable to launch jets to be incorrect. The detections are a plausible indicator of the presence of a powerful, most likely relativistic jet because this intensity of emission at 37 GHz cannot be explained by, for example, radiation from supernova remnants. Additionally, one of the detected NLS1 galaxies is a newly discovered source of gamma rays and three others are candidates for future detections. 37 GHz data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/614/L1

  12. Cellular responses to 836 MHz and 1,765 GHz CDMA radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woong Yang; Seo, Jeong Sun; Paik, Jung Ki; Lim, Kye Jae; Yoon, Hyun Bo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of radiofrequency (RF) radiation in the cellular phone communication range (836.5 MHz and 1.765 GHz code division multiple access, CDMA) on tumorigenesis and other health effect was measured using the in vitro cell culture system. To determine whether 836.5 MHz or 1.765 GHz CDMA radiations have any genotoxic effects to induce neoplastic transformation, C3H 10T1/2 cells were exposed to either of the above radiations at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 35.6W/Kg (836.5 MHz) and 38.2 W/kg(1.765 GHz) or sham- exposed at the same time for 7 days. Cells were maintained in incubators and refed with fresh growth medium every 3 days. At this SAR, radiofrequency radiation did not induce neoplastic transformation in vitro. The extent of alteration in the kinetics of cell proliferation indicated no significant differences between RF-radiation- and sham-exposed cells with respect to MTS assay and 8-OHdG. Under this experimental conditions tested, there is no evidence for the induction of genotoxic indices in human and mouse cells exposed in vitro for 7 days to 836.5 MHz or 1.765 GHz RF radiation at SARs of up to 35.6 or 38.2 W/kg

  13. Lyα-Lyman continuum connection in 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 4.3 star-forming galaxies from the VUDS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, F.; Pentericci, L.; Guaita, L.; Schaerer, D.; Verhamme, A.; Castellano, M.; Ribeiro, B.; Garilli, B.; Fèvre, O. Le; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassata, P.; Durkalec, A.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.

    2018-06-01

    Context. To identify the galaxies responsible for the reionization of the Universe, we must rely on the investigation of the Lyman continuum (LyC) properties of z ≲ 5 star-forming galaxies, where we can still directly observe their ionizing radiation. Aims: The aim of this work is to explore the correlation between the LyC emission and some of the proposed indirect indicators of LyC radiation at z 4 such as a bright Lyα emission and a compact UV continuum size. Methods: We selected a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies from the Vimos Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) at 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 4.3 in the COSMOS, ECDFS, and VVDS-2h fields, including only those with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, a clean spectrum in the LyC range and clearly not contaminated by bright nearby sources in the same slit. For all galaxies we measured the Lyα EW, the Lyα velocity shift with respect to the systemic redshift, the Lyα spatial extension and the UV continuum effective radius. We then selected different sub-samples according to the properties predicted to be good LyC emission indicators: in particular we created sub-samples of galaxies with EW(Lyα) ≥ 70 Å, Lyαext ≤ 5.7 kpc, rUV ≤ 0.30 kpc and |ΔvLyα|≤ 200 km s-1. We stacked all the galaxies in each sub-sample and measured the flux density ratio (fλ(895)/fλ(1470)), that we considered to be a proxy for LyC emission. We then compared these ratios to those obtained for the complementary samples. Finally, to estimate the statistical contamination from lower redshift inter-lopers in our samples, we performed dedicated Monte Carlo simulations using an ultradeep U-band image of the ECDFS field. Results: We find that the stacks of galaxies which are UV compact (rUV ≤ 0.30 kpc) and have bright Lyα emission (EW(Lyα) ≥ 70 Å), have much higher LyC fluxes compared to the rest of the galaxy population. These parameters appear to be good indicators of LyC radiation in agreement with theoretical studies and previous observational

  14. Design of a 300 GHz Broadband TWT Coupler and RF-Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, F L

    2004-01-01

    Recent LANL activities in millimeter wave structures focus on 94 and 300 GHz structures. They aim at power generation from low power (100–2000 W) with a round electron beam (120 kV, 0.1–1.0 A) to high power (2–100 kW) with a sheet beam structure (120 kV, 20 A). Applications cover basic research, radar and secure communications and remote sensing of biological and chemical agents. In this presentation the design and cold-test measurements of a 300 GHz RF-structure with a broadband (>6% bandwidth) power coupler are presented. The design choice of two input/output waveguides, a special coupling region and the structure parameters themselves are presented. As a benchmark also a scaled up version at 10 GHz was designed and measured. These results will also be presented.

  15. Cross-Correlations in Quasar Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey

    The main factors forming the complex evolution of the accretive astrophysical systems are nonlinearity, intermittency, nonstationarity and also collective phenomena. To discover the dynamic processes in these objects and to detain understanding their properties we need to use all the applicable analyzing methods. Here we use the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) as a phenomenological approach to analyzing and parameterizing the auto- and cross-correlations in time series of astrophysical objects dynamics. As an example we consider the quasar flux radio spectral density at frequencies 2.7 GHz and 8.1 GHz. Data have been observed by Dr. N. Tanizuka (Laboratory for Complex Systems Analysis, Osaka Prefecture University) in a period of 1979 to 1988 (3 309 days). According to mental habits quasar is a very energetic and distant active galactic nucleus containing a supermassive black hole by size 10-10,000 times the Schwarzschild radius. The quasar is powered by an accretion disc around the black hole. The accretion disc material layers, moving around the black hole, are under the influence of gravitational and frictional forces. It results in raising the high temperature and arising the resonant and collective phenomena reflected in quasar emission dynamics. Radio emission dynamics of the quasar 0215p015 is characterized by three quasi-periodic processes, which are prevalent in considering dynamics. By contrast the 1641p399's emission dynamics have not any distinguish processes. It means the presence of high intermittency in accretive modes. The second difference moment allows comparing the degree of manifesting of resonant and chaotic components in initial time series of the quasar radio emission. The comparative analysis shows the dominating of chaotic part of 1641p399's dynamics whereas the radio emission of 0215p015 has the predominance of resonant component. Analyzing the collective features of the quasar radio emission intensity demonstrates the significant

  16. Effect of microwave (24 GHz) radiation treatment on impurity photoluminescence of CdTe:Cl single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red'ko, R.A.; Budzulyak, S.I.; Vakhnyak, N.D.; Demchina, L.A.; Korbutyak, D.V.; Konakova, R.V.; Lotsko, A.P.; Okhrimenko, O.B.; Berezovskaya, N.I.; Bykov, Yu.V.; Egorov, S.V.; Eremeev, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Effect of microwave radiation (24 GHz) on transformation of impurity-defect complexes in CdTe:Cl single crystals within the spectral range 1.3–1.5 eV was studied using the low-temperature (T=2 K) photoluminescence (PL) technique. The shapes of donor–acceptor pairs (DAP) and Y PL bands were studied in detail. The Huang–Rhys factor was calculated for the DAP luminescence depending on microwave radiation treatment. The increase of the distance between the DAP components responsible for emission at 1.455 eV and the quenching of Y-band due to microwave irradiation were observed. The method to decrease the amount of extended defects in near-surface layers of CdTe:Cl single crystals has been proposed.

  17. Significance of agricultural row structure on the microwave emissivity of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promes, P. M.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P. E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of field experiments was carried out to extend the data base available for verifying agricultural row effect models of emissivity. The row effects model was used to simulate a data base from which an algorithm could be developed to account for row effects when the scene dielectric constant and small-scale roughness are unknown. One objective of the study was to quantify the significance of row structure and to develop a practical procedure for removing the effects of periodic row structure on the microwave emissivity of a soil in order to use the emissivity values to estimate the soil moisture. A second objective was to expand the data set available for model verification through field observations using a truck-mounted 1.4-GHz microwave radiometer.

  18. Discrimination between discrete and continuum scattering from the sub-seafloor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Charles W; Steininger, Gavin; Dosso, Stan E

    2015-08-01

    There is growing evidence that seabed scattering is often dominated by heterogeneities within the sediment volume as opposed to seafloor roughness. From a theoretical viewpoint, sediment volume heterogeneities can be described either by a fluctuation continuum or by discrete particles. In at-sea experiments, heterogeneity characteristics generally are not known a priori. Thus, an uninformed model selection is generally made, i.e., the researcher must arbitrarily select either a discrete or continuum model. It is shown here that it is possible to (acoustically) discriminate between continuum and discrete heterogeneities in some instances. For example, when the spectral exponent γ3>4, the volume scattering cannot be described by discrete particles. Conversely, when γ3≤2, the heterogeneities likely arise from discrete particles. Furthermore, in the range 2discrete vs continuum heterogeneities via acoustic remote sensing may lead to improved observations and concomitant increased understanding of the marine benthic environment.

  19. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Gerbaud, T.; Alper, B.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; de la Luna, E.; Sirinelli, A.; Zerbini, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron

  20. Diffuse infrared emission from the galaxy. I. Solar neighborhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, F.; Perault, M.

    1988-01-01

    A large-scale study of the infrared emission originating in the solar neighborhood based on IRAS data is presented. Away from heating sources and outside molecular clouds, the infrared emission from the ISM is well-correlated with the column density of H I gas. The interstellar radiation field and the dust abundance are roughly uniform on scales of the order of 100 pc. The extinction in the polar caps is discussed, and the origin of the infrared emission from the solar neighborhood is investigated. It is shown that stars younger than a few 100 million yr are responsible for two-thirds of the infrared emission from the solar neighborhood, but that most of this emission comes from interstellar matter not associated with current star formation. The correlation between infrared and radio-continuum fluxes of galaxies breaks down on the scale of a few hundred pc around regions of star formation. 81 references

  1. A 24GHz Radar Receiver in CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the system design and circuit implementation of a 24GHz-band short-range radar receiver in CMOS technology. The propagation and penetration properties of EM wave offer the possibility of non-contact based remote sensing and through-the-wall imaging of distance stationary or

  2. A fully-differential phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Lixue; Chi Baoyong; Chen Lei; Wang Zhihua; Jia Wen

    2014-01-01

    A 40-GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication applications is presented. The electrical characteristics of the passive components in the VCO and LO buffers are accurately extracted with an electromagnetic simulator HFSS. A differential tuning technique is utilized in the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to achieve higher common-mode noise rejection and better phase noise performance. The VCO and the divider chain are powered by a 1.0 V supply while the phase-frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump (CP) are powered by a 2.5 V supply to improve the linearity. The measurement results show that the total frequency locking range of the frequency synthesizer is from 37 to 41 GHz, and the phase noise from a 40 GHz carrier is −97.2 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the synthesizer consumes a DC power of 62 mW, including all the buffers. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. A fully-differential phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixue, Kuang; Baoyong, Chi; Lei, Chen; Wen, Jia; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-12-01

    A 40-GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication applications is presented. The electrical characteristics of the passive components in the VCO and LO buffers are accurately extracted with an electromagnetic simulator HFSS. A differential tuning technique is utilized in the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to achieve higher common-mode noise rejection and better phase noise performance. The VCO and the divider chain are powered by a 1.0 V supply while the phase-frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump (CP) are powered by a 2.5 V supply to improve the linearity. The measurement results show that the total frequency locking range of the frequency synthesizer is from 37 to 41 GHz, and the phase noise from a 40 GHz carrier is -97.2 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the synthesizer consumes a DC power of 62 mW, including all the buffers.

  4. Reconfigurable antenna options for 2.45/5 GHz wireless body area networks in healthcare applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Syed Muzahir; Ranga, Yogesh; Esselle, Karu P

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents electronically reconfigurable antenna options in healthcare applications. They are suitable for wireless body area network devices operating in the industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band at 2.45 GHz and IEEE 802.11 Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) band at 5 GHz (5.15-5.35 GHz, 5.25-5.35 GHz). Two types of antennas are investigated: Antenna-I has a full ground plane and Antenna-II has a partial ground plane. The proposed antennas provide ISM operation in one mode while in another mode they support 5 GHz WLAN band. Their performance is assessed for body centric wireless communication using a simplified human body model. Antenna sensitivity to the gap between the antenna and the human body is investigated for both modes of each antenna. The proposed antennas exhibit a wide radiation pattern along the body surface to provide wide coverage and their small width (14 mm) makes them suitable for on-body communication in healthcare applications.

  5. 200 and 270 GHz SIS receivers development for atmospheric observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, S.; Masuko, H.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting mixers have been developed for observations of atmospheric minor constituents such as ClO and ozone at Communications Research Laboratory. This paper describes the work at development of 200 and 270 GHz SIS mixers. Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions were fabricated at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. The base Nb layer 200 nm, the Al (AlOx) insulation layer, and the counter Nb electrode 150 nm are sputtered. The area outside of a junction defined by etching of the counter electrode is insulated by anodized Nb layer and sputtered SiO 2 . After sputtering thick SiO 2 layer on the whole wafer, a contact hole is made by etching. The thickness of the wiring Nb layer is 500 nm. The junctions are formed on the 250 μm thick fused quartz substrate. After the process of the junction fabrication, the quartz substrate is shaved from the back side until 150 μm thickness. Each junction for 270 GHz mixer has an area of about 1 μm 2 . The normal resistance of the six junctions series array is around 70 Ω. The mixer block has a reduced waveguide (1.2 x 0.1 mm for 200 GHz and 0.98 x 0. 1 mm for 270 GHz). The waveguide has two tuners in addition to a fixed backshort cavity. This configuration can allow to realize the lower embedding impedance, and less sensitive to the position of the tuners. The SIS mixers are cooled in a closed cycle He refrigerator. The LO is optically injected through a Fabry Perot interferometer. The 5--7 GHz IF is fed to a HEMT amplifier cooled at 15 K. The authors have started a preliminary measurement of the noise temperature of the SIS receivers, and comparing with calculated DSB receiver noise temperature assuming 3-port model. They continue to improve the performance of the SIS mixers now. They intend that the receivers shall be utilized for atmospheric monitor from next winter

  6. Continuum gauge fields from lattice gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Schierholz, G.; Wiese, U.J.

    1993-01-01

    On the lattice some of the salient features of pure gauge theories and of gauge theories with fermions in complex representations of the gauge group seem to be lost. These features can be recovered by considering part of the theory in the continuum. The prerequisite for that is the construction of continuum gauge fields from lattice gauge fields. Such a construction, which is gauge covariant and complies with geometrical constructions of the topological charge on the lattice, is given in this paper. The procedure is explicitly carried out in the U(1) theory in two dimensions, where it leads to simple results. (orig.)

  7. The Potential for a Ka-band (32 GHz) Worldwide VLBI Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Bach, U.; Colomer, F.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Gulyaev, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Ichikawa, R.; Kraus, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI) networking has now begun and has tremendous potential for expansion over the next few years. Ka-band VLBI astrometry from NASA's Deep Space Network has already developed a catalog of 470 observable sources with highly accurate positions. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or are considering adding Ka-band VLBI capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide Ka-band network with potential for high resolution imaging and astrometry. With baselines approaching a Giga-lambda, a Ka-band network would be able to probe source structure at the nano-radian (200 as) level ( 100X better than Hubble) and thus gain insight into the astrophysics of the most compact regions of emission in active galactic nuclei. We discuss the advantages of Ka-band, show the known sources and candidates, simulate projected baseline (uv) coverage, and discuss potential radio frequency feeds. The combination of these elements demonstrates the feasibility of a worldwide Ka network within the next few years!

  8. Heterodyne detection at 300 GHz using neon indicator lamp glow discharge detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon Akram, Avihai; Rozban, Daniel; Kopeika, Natan S; Abramovich, Amir

    2013-06-10

    A miniature neon indicator lamp, also known as a glow discharge detector (GDD), costing about 50 cents, was found to be an excellent room temperature terahertz radiation detector. Proof-of-concept 300 GHz heterodyne detection using GDD is demonstrated in this paper. Furthermore, a comparison to direct detection was carried out as well. Previous results with the GDD at 10 GHz showed 40 times better sensitivity using heterodyne detection compared to direct detection. Preliminary results at 300 GHz showed better sensitivity by a factor of 20 with only 56 μW local-oscillator power using heterodyne compared to direct detection. The higher the local-oscillator power (P(lo)), the better the sensitivity of the detector. Further improvement can be achieved by employing better quasi-optical design.

  9. Expansion of continuum functions on resonance wave functions and amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, J.; Gareev, F.A.; Gizzatkulov, M.H.; Goncharov, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    To overcome difficulties encountered with wave functions of continuum spectrum (for example, in a shell model with continuum) the pole expansion (by the Mittag-Leffler theorem) of wave functions, scattering amplitudes and the Green functions with positive energies are considered. It is shown that resonance functions (the Gamov functions) form a complete set over which the continuum functions could be expanded. The general view of these expansions for final potentials and for the Coulomb repulsion potential are obtained and discussed. It is shown that the application of the method to nuclear structure calculations leads to simple algebraic equations

  10. Non-classical solutions of a continuum model for rock descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Guzev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The strain-gradient and non-Euclidean continuum theories are employed for construction of non-classical solutions of continuum models. The linear approximation of both models' results in identical structures in terms of their kinematic and stress characteristics. The solutions obtained in this study exhibit a critical behaviour with respect to the external loading parameter. The conclusions are obtained based on an investigation of the solution for the scalar curvature in the non-Euclidean continuum theory. The proposed analysis enables us to use different theoretical approaches for description of rock critical behaviour under different loading conditions.

  11. Reducing Actuator Requirements in Continuum Robots Through Optimized Cable Routing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jennifer C; White, Edward L; SunSpiral, Vytas; Kramer-Bottiglio, Rebecca

    2018-02-01

    Continuum manipulators offer many advantages compared to their rigid-linked counterparts, such as increased degrees of freedom and workspace volume. Inspired by biological systems, such as elephant trunks and octopus tentacles, many continuum manipulators are made of multiple segments that allow large-scale deformations to be distributed throughout the body. Most continuum manipulators currently control each segment individually. For example, a planar cable-driven system is typically controlled by a pair of cables for each segment, which implies two actuators per segment. In this article, we demonstrate how highly coupled crossing cable configurations can reduce both actuator count and actuator torque requirements in a planar continuum manipulator, while maintaining workspace reachability and manipulability. We achieve highly coupled actuation by allowing cables to cross through the manipulator to create new cable configurations. We further derive an analytical model to predict the underactuated manipulator workspace and experimentally verify the model accuracy with a physical system. We use this model to compare crossing cable configurations to the traditional cable configuration using workspace performance metrics. Our work here focuses on a simplified planar robot, both in simulation and in hardware, with the goal of extending this to spiraling-cable configurations on full 3D continuum robots in future work.

  12. Fast-scanning heterodyne receiver for measurement of the electron cyclotron emission from high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Bitzer, R.; Campbell, L.; Hosea, J.C.

    1979-03-01

    A fast-scanning heterodyne receiver was developed that measures the fundamental cyclotron emission from the PLT plasma and thus ascertains the time evolution of the electron temperature profile. The receiver scans 60 to 90 GHz every 10 milliseconds and is interfaced to a computer for completely automated calibrated temperature measurements

  13. Rain-induced bistatic scattering at 60 GHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van der H.T.; Watson, R.J.; Herben, M.H.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study into the modeling and prediction of rain-induced bistatic scattering at 60 GHz. The bistatic radar equation together withMie theory is applied as the basis for calculating the scattering. Together with the attenuation induced by the medium before and after

  14. Sideband Separating Mixer for 600-720 GHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khudchenko, Andrey; Hesper, Ronald; Barychev, Andrey; Gerlofma, Gerrit; Mena, Patricio; Zijlstra, Tony; Klapwijk, Teun; Spaans, Marco; Kooi, Jacob W.; Zhang, C; Zhang, XC; Siegel, PH; He, L; Shi, SC

    2010-01-01

    The ALMA Band 9 receiver cartridge (600-720 GHz) based on Dual Sideband (DSB) superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer is currently in full production. In the case of spectral line observations, the integration time to reach a certain signal-to-noise level can be reduced by about a factor

  15. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirm, Karl; /CERN; Curt, Stephane; /CERN; Dobert, Steffen; /CERN; McMonagle, Gerard; /CERN; Rossat, Ghislain; /CERN; Syratchev, Igor; /CERN; Timeo, Luca; /CERN; Haase, Andrew /SLAC; Jensen, Aaron; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Nantista, Christopher; /SLAC; Sprehn, Daryl; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Hamdi, Abdallah; /Saclay; Peauger, Franck; /Saclay; Kuzikov, Sergey; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  16. Optoelectronic time-domain characterization of a 100 GHz sampling oscilloscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Füser, H; Baaske, K; Kuhlmann, K; Judaschke, R; Pierz, K; Bieler, M; Eichstädt, S; Elster, C

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out an optoelectronic measurement of the impulse response of an ultrafast sampling oscilloscope with a nominal bandwidth of 100 GHz within a time window of approximately 100 ps. Our experimental technique also considers frequency components above the cut-off frequency of higher order modes of the 1.0 mm coaxial line, which is shown to be important for the specification of the impulse response of ultrafast sampling oscilloscopes. Additionally, we have measured the reflection coefficient of the sampling head induced by the mismatch of the sampling circuit and the coaxial connector which is larger than 0.5 for certain frequencies. The uncertainty analysis has been performed using the Monte Carlo method of Supplement 1 to the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement' and correlations in the estimated impulse response have been determined. Our measurements extend previous work which deals with the characterization of 70 GHz oscilloscopes and the measurement of 100 GHz oscilloscopes up to the cut-off frequency of higher order modes

  17. A 12 GHZ RF Power source for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Curt, S; Doebert, S; McMonagle, G; Rossat, G; Schirm, KM; Syratchev, I; Timeo, L; Kuzikhov, S; Vikharev, AA; Haase, A; Sprehn, D; Jensen, A; Jongewaard, EN; Nantista, CD; Vlieks, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  18. A simple system for 160GHz optical terahertz wave generation and data modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yihan; He, Jingsuo; Sun, Xueming; Shi, Zexia; Wang, Ruike; Cui, Hailin; Su, Bo; Zhang, Cunlin

    2018-01-01

    A simple system based on two cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulators, which can generate 160GHz optical terahertz waves from 40GHz microwave sources, is simulated and tested in this paper. Fiber grating filter is used in the system to filter out optical carrier. By properly adjusting the modulator DC bias voltages and the signal voltages and phases, 4-tupling optical terahertz wave can be generated with fiber grating. This notch fiber grating filter is greatly suitable for terahertz over fiber (TOF) communication system. This scheme greatly reduces the cost of long-distance terahertz communication. Furthermore, 10Gbps digital signal is modulated in the 160GHz optical terahertz wave.

  19. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission associated with Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Negoro, H.

    2009-12-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to ~6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of ~3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. Although such an emission can be originated from multiple background point sources, its possibility is quite low. We hence examined three mechanisms, assuming that the emission is truly diffuse: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon around Jupiter.

  20. Computational Method for Atomistic-Continuum Homogenization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The homogenization method is used as a framework for developing a multiscale system of equations involving atoms at zero temperature at the small scale and continuum mechanics at the very large scale...