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Sample records for gh-1 infecting pseudomonas

  1. The complete genomic sequence of lytic bacteriophage gh-1 infecting Pseudomonas putida--evidence for close relationship to the T7 group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalyova, Irina V.; Kropinski, Andrew M.

    2003-01-01

    The genome of the lytic Pseudomonas putida bacteriophage gh-1 is linear double-stranded DNA containing 37,359 bp with 216-bp direct terminal repeats. Like other members of the T7 group, the gh-1 genome contains regions of high homology to T7 interspersed with nonhomologous regions that contain small open reading frames of unknown function. The genome shares 31 genes in common with other members of the T7 group, including RNA polymerase, and an additional 12 unique putative genes. A major difference between gh-1 and other members of this group is the absence of any open reading frames between the left direct terminal repeat and gene 1. Sequence analysis of the gh-1 genome also revealed the presence of 10 putative phage promoters with a consensus sequence similar to the promoters of T3 and phiYeO3-12 (consensus: TAAAAACCCTCACTRTGGCHSCM). P. putida mutants resistant to gh-1 were demonstrated to have an altered lipopolysaccharide structure, indicating that members of this group use lipopolysaccharide as their cellular receptor

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  4. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  5. Occurrence of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Nwobu, R.A.U.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection. Results: Out of the 60 bacterial isolates found in post-operative wound infection, 20 (33.3%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 13(21.7%), Klebsiella species 10(16.7%), Escherichia coli 7(11.7%), Atypical coliform 4(6.7%), Proteus species 4(6.7%), Streptococcus pyogenes 1(1.7%) and Enterococcus faecalis 1(1.7%) in the order. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was higher in female than male, ratio 3:2 and was found more among young and elderly debilitated patients. The in vitro sensitivity pattern of 20 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed colistin (100%), gentamicin (75%), streptomycin (30%), and tetracycline (10%). Conclusion: The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an agent of nosocomial infection is re-emphasised. (author)

  6. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  7. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  8. 33 original article infections a pseudomonas aeruginosa dans un

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    COPYRIGHT 2014. AFR. J. CLN. EXPER. .... Effective management of P. aeruginosa infections requires good ... a guide for doctors managing patients with. Pseudomonas .... Principles and practice of infectious diseases.5th edition. Edited by ...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  10. [Risk factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, resistant to carbapenem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibu, Laura; Miftode, Egidia; Teodor, Andra; Bejan, Codrina; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    Since their introduction in clinical practice,carbapenems have been among the most powerful antibiotics for treating serious infections cased by Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The emergence of betalactamases with carbapenem-hydrolyzing activity is of major clinical concern. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial infection. Risk factors for colonization with carbapenems-resistant Pseudomonas in hospital are: history of P. aeruginosa infection or colonization within the previous year, (length of hospital stay, being bedridden or in the ICU, mechanical ventilation, malignant disease, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have all been identified as independent risk factors for MDR P. aeruginosa infection. Long-term-care facilities are also reservoirs of resistant bacteria. Risk factors for colonization of LTCF residents with resistant bacteria included age > 86 years, antibiotic treatment in the previous 3 months, indwelling devices, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, physical disability, and the particular LTCF unit.

  11. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic changes...

  12. A lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Collie

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. A new paradigm for managing such infections is needed, as are relevant and translatable animal models to identify and test concepts. We sought to improve on limitations associated with existing models of infection in small animals through developing a lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep.Using local lung instillation of P. aeruginosa suspended in agar beads we were able to demonstrate that such infection led to the development of a suppurative, necrotising and pyogranulomatous pneumonia centred on the instilled beads. No overt evidence of organ or systemic compromise was apparent in any animal during the course of infection. Infection persisted in the lungs of individual animals for as long as 66 days after initial instillation. Quantitative microbiology applied to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid derived from infected segments proved an insensitive index of the presence of significant infection in lung tissue (>10(4 cfu/g.The agar bead model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in sheep is a relevant platform to investigate both the pathobiology of such infections as well as novel approaches to their diagnosis and therapy. Particular ethical benefits relate to the model in terms of refining existing approaches by compromising a smaller proportion of the lung with infection and facilitating longitudinal assessment by bronchoscopy, and also potentially reducing animal numbers through facilitating within-animal comparisons of differential therapeutic approaches.

  13. A lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, David; Govan, John; Wright, Steven; Thornton, Elisabeth; Tennant, Peter; Smith, Sionagh; Doherty, Catherine; McLachlan, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. A new paradigm for managing such infections is needed, as are relevant and translatable animal models to identify and test concepts. We sought to improve on limitations associated with existing models of infection in small animals through developing a lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep. Using local lung instillation of P. aeruginosa suspended in agar beads we were able to demonstrate that such infection led to the development of a suppurative, necrotising and pyogranulomatous pneumonia centred on the instilled beads. No overt evidence of organ or systemic compromise was apparent in any animal during the course of infection. Infection persisted in the lungs of individual animals for as long as 66 days after initial instillation. Quantitative microbiology applied to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid derived from infected segments proved an insensitive index of the presence of significant infection in lung tissue (>10(4) cfu/g). The agar bead model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in sheep is a relevant platform to investigate both the pathobiology of such infections as well as novel approaches to their diagnosis and therapy. Particular ethical benefits relate to the model in terms of refining existing approaches by compromising a smaller proportion of the lung with infection and facilitating longitudinal assessment by bronchoscopy, and also potentially reducing animal numbers through facilitating within-animal comparisons of differential therapeutic approaches.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a known opportunistic pathogen frequently causing serious infections. It exhibits innate resistance to a wide range of antibiotics thus causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Objective: This study was done to determine the distribution and the antibiotic susceptibility ...

  15. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-08-23

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30 March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. The authors independently selected trials, assessed them and extracted data. Six trials were identified. Two trials were excluded since they were not randomised and one old, small trial because it was not possible to assess whether is was randomised. The three included trials comprised 483, 476 and 37 patients, respectively. No data have been published from one of the large trials, but the company stated in a press release that the trial failed to confirm the results from an earlier study and that further clinical development was suspended. In the other large trial, relative risk for chronic infection was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.49), and in the small trial, the risk was also close to one. In the large trial, one patient was reported to have died in the observation period. In that trial, 227 adverse events (4 severe) were registered in the vaccine group and 91 (1 severe) in the control group. In this large trial of a vaccine developed against flagella antigens, antibody titres against the epitopes contained in the vaccine were higher in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group (P Vaccines against

  16. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity o...... treatment strategies where the underlying targets are less prone for resistance development as bacteria, in retrospect, have a unique ability to evade the actions of classic antibiotics.......Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host...

  17. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 567574 Abstract Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates...

  18. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  19. Bacteriophage Infectivity Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saline Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso

    2018-05-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous member of marine biofilm, and reduces thiosulfate to produce toxic hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, lytic bacteriophages were isolated and applied to inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa in planktonic mode at different temperature, pH, and salinity. Bacteriophages showed optimal infectivity at a multiplicity of infection of 10 in saline conditions, and demonstrated lytic abilities over all tested temperature (25, 30, 37, and 45°C) and pH 6–9. Planktonic P. aeruginosa exhibited significantly longer lag phase and lower specific growth rates upon exposure to bacteriophages. Bacteriophages were subsequently applied to P. aeruginosa-enriched biofilm and were determined to lower the relative abundance of Pseudomonas-related taxa from 0.17 to 5.58% in controls to 0.01–0.61% in treated microbial communities. The relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, and Planococcaceae decreased, possibly due to the phage-induced disruption of the biofilm matrix. Lastly, when applied to mitigate biofouling of ultrafiltration membranes, bacteriophages were determined to reduce the transmembrane pressure increase by 18% when utilized alone, and by 49% when used in combination with citric acid. The combined treatment was more effective compared with the citric acid treatment alone, which reported ca. 30% transmembrane pressure reduction. Collectively, the findings demonstrated that bacteriophages can be used as a biocidal agent to mitigate undesirable P. aeruginosa-associated problems in seawater applications.

  20. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S.; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  1. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface.

  2. Why Does the Healthy Cornea Resist Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David J.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To provide our perspective on why the cornea is resistant to infection based on our research results with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Perspective We focus on our current understanding of the interplay between bacteria, tear fluid and the corneal epithelium that determine health as the usual outcome, and propose a theoretical model for how contact lens wear might change those interactions to enable susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. Methods Use of “null-infection” in vivo models, cultured human corneal epithelial cells, contact lens-wearing animal models, and bacterial genetics help to elucidate mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa survive at the ocular surface, adheres, and traverses multilayered corneal epithelia. These models also help elucidate the molecular mechanisms of corneal epithelial innate defense. Results and Discussion Tear fluid and the corneal epithelium combine to make a formidable defense against P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Part of that defense involves the expression of antimicrobials such as β-defensins, the cathelicidin LL-37, cytokeratin-derived antimicrobial peptides, and RNase7. Immunomodulators such as SP-D and ST2 also contribute. Innate defenses of the cornea depend in part on MyD88, a key adaptor protein of TLR and IL-1R signaling, but the basal lamina represents the final barrier to bacterial penetration. Overcoming these defenses involves P. aeruginosa adaptation, expression of the type three secretion system, proteases, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on contact lenses. Conclusion After more than two decades of research focused on understanding how contact lens wear predisposes to P. aeruginosa infection, our working hypothesis places blame for microbial keratitis on bacterial adaptation to ocular surface defenses, combined with changes to the biochemistry of the corneal surface caused by trapping bacteria and tear fluid against the cornea under the lens. PMID:23601656

  3. Prosthetic vascular graft infection and prosthetic joint infection caused by Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonares, Michael J; Vaisman, Alon; Sharkawy, Abdu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is infrequently isolated from clinical specimens, and if isolated, more likely represents colonization or contamination rather than infection. Despite this, there are dozens of case reports which describe clinically significant P. stutzeri infections at variable sites. A 69-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic vascular graft infection, which he received in Panama City. He was successfully treated with a single antipseudomonal agent for 6 weeks and the removal of the infected vascular graft. A 70-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic joint, which was successfully treated with a single anti-pseudomonal agent for 6 weeks. There is only one other documented case of a prosthetic vascular graft infection secondary to P. stutzeri . There are 5 documented cases of P. stutzeri prosthetic joint infections. The previous cases were treated with antibiotics and variably, source control with the removal of prosthetic material. Most cases of P. stutzeri infection are due to exposure in health care settings. Immunocompromised states such as HIV or hematological and solid tumor malignancies are risk factors for P. stutzeri infection. Infections caused by P. stutzeri are far less frequent and less fatal than those caused by P. aeruginosa. The etiology of a P. stutzeri infection could be exposure to soil and water, but also contaminated material in the health care setting or an immunocompromised state. Iatrogenic infections that are secondary to health care tourism are a potential cause of fever in the returned traveler.

  4. Pseudo-outbreak of pseudomonas aeruginosa in HIV-infected patients undergoing fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Lerche, A; Kristoffersen, Kirsten Lydia

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 8 consecutive patients undergoing bronchoscopy at an infectious diseases unit. None of the patients developed signs of respiratory tract infection that could be ascribed to the organism. The source of contamination...

  5. Soil mixture composition alters Arabidopsis susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas syringae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes disease on more than 100 different plant species, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Dissection of the Arabidopsis thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae pathosystem has identified many factors that contribute to successful ...

  6. Redox proteomics of tomato in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmant, Kelly Mayrink; Parker, Jennifer; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mammals with adaptive immunity, plants rely on their innate immunity based on pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) for pathogen defense. Reactive oxygen species, known to play crucial roles in PTI and ETI, can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to changes of redox-sensitive proteins through modification of cysteine sulfhydryl groups. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, little is known about redox proteins and how they function in PTI and ETI. In this study, cysTMT proteomics technology was used to identify similarities and differences of protein redox modifications in tomato resistant (PtoR) and susceptible (prf3) genotypes in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) infection. In addition, the results of the redox changes were compared and corrected with the protein level changes. A total of 90 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, biosynthesis of cysteine, sucrose and brassinosteroid, cell wall biogenesis, polysaccharide/starch biosynthesis, cuticle development, lipid metabolism, proteolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, protein targeting to vacuole, and oxidation–reduction. This inventory of previously unknown protein redox switches in tomato pathogen defense lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the biological significance of protein redox modifications in plant defense responses. PMID:26504582

  7. An Antipersister Strategy for Treatment of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeva, Martina; Gutu, Alina D; Hebert, Wesley; Wager, Jeffrey D; Yonker, Lael M; O'Toole, George A; Ausubel, Frederick M; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial persisters are a quasidormant subpopulation of cells that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment. The combination of the aminoglycoside tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator utilizes an antipersister strategy that is aimed at reducing recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections by enhancing the killing of P. aeruginosa persisters. Stationary-phase cultures of P. aeruginosa were used to generate persister cells. A range of tobramycin concentrations was tested with a range of metabolite concentrations to determine the potentiation effect of the metabolite under a variety of conditions, including a range of pH values and in the presence of azithromycin or cystic fibrosis (CF) patient sputum. In addition, 96-well dish biofilm and colony biofilm assays were performed, and the cytotoxicity of the tobramycin-fumarate combination was determined utilizing a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Enhanced killing of up to 6 orders of magnitude of P. aeruginosa persisters over a range of CF isolates, including mucoid and nonmucoid strains, was observed for the tobramycin-fumarate combination compared to killing with tobramycin alone. Furthermore, significant fumarate-mediated potentiation was seen in the presence of azithromycin or CF patient sputum. Fumarate also reduced the cytotoxicity of tobramycin-treated P. aeruginosa to human epithelial airway cells. Finally, in mucoid and nonmucoid CF isolates, complete eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilm was observed in the colony biofilm assay due to fumarate potentiation. These data suggest that a combination of tobramycin with fumarate as an antibacterial potentiator may be an attractive therapeutic for eliminating recurrent P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients through the eradication of bacterial persisters. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  9. Choosing an Appropriate Infection Model to Study Quorum Sensing Inhibition in Pseudomonas Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Papaioannou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review.

  10. [Pseudomonas infection: biological risk by occupational exposure and results of an environmental monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Francesco; Giorgi, Doriana Antonella; Palmieri, Sabina; Arcangeli, Luca; Ricci, Serafino

    2014-01-01

    The biological risk of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for activities involving exposure to contaminated water, such as, for example, routine maintenance of swimming pools, is related to the availability of effective prophylactic and therapeutic measures. The authors present the data of the microbiological analyzes made on 2349 samples taken from pools in Rome and province. The contamination by Pseudomonas was found in 191 samples with 13 samples that had a level > 100 cfu/100 ml and 5 samples with level > 200 cfu/100 ml. Useful considerations derived from the analysis of the literature about the profile and prophylactic treatment of infection by Pseudomonas, necessarily to be taken into consideration for an adequate risk assessment.

  11. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering

  12. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  13. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial sug...... patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections with a focus on inhalation treatments targeted at prophylaxis and chronic suppressive therapy....

  14. Effect of Garlic Oil on Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Induced in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltablawy, S.Y.; Elhifnawi, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity and other medical benefits of garlic oil have been attributed to the presence of sulphides in it. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a multidrug resistance opportunistic human pathogen that infect many patients .To control these infections, there is a need for other agents with greater antimicrobial activity and less toxicity. In this study, the effect of irradiated and non-irradiated garlic oil has been evaluated. The irradiation of garlic oil at 10.0 kGy decreased slightly its antibacterial activity against the tested Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results revealed that there was no effect of garlic oil either irradiated or non-irradiated on the adherent cells formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa tested organism on tissue culture plate. Garlic oil (irradiated or nonirradiated) was administrated subcutaneously as treatment for a mouse infection model. Bacteriological examination and mortality rate were used as indicators. The treatment with non-irradiated garlic oil decreased the number of bacteria in the infected group in contrast with the placebo group (saline), while, irradiation of garlic oil with 10.0 kGy had no effect on the infected bacteria. Also, the results indicated that, the treatment with non-irradiated garlic oil decreased the mortality in comparison with irradiated garlic oil which did not show any effect. Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that there were morphological changes in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with non- irradiated garlic oil in comparison with untreated one

  15. A case of orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kusunoki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Orbital apex syndrome is commonly been thought to have a poor prognosis. Many cases of this syndrome have been reported to be caused by paranasal sinus mycosis. We encountered a very rare case (60-year-old woman of sinusitis with orbital apex syndrome due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. She had received insulin and dialysis for diabtes and diabetic nephropathy, moreover anticoagulants after heart by-pass surgery. She underwent endoscopic sinus operation and was treated with antibiotics, but her loss of left vision did not improve. Recently, sinusitis cases due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reported to be a increasing. Therefore, we should consider the possibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as mycosis as infections of the sinus, especially inpatients who are immunocompromised body.

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus infection facilitates acute colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Wolfs, Tom F W; Ciofu, Oana

    2009-01-01

    virus infections in facilitating colonization and infection with P. aeruginosa. A study was undertaken to determine whether respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection could facilitate the initiation of an acute infection with P. aeruginosa in vivo. Balb/c mice were infected intranasally with P......Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals and patients ventilated mechanically and is the major pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, in which it causes chronic infections. Epidemiological, in vitro and animal data suggest a role for respiratory....... These results suggest that RSV can facilitate the initiation of acute P. aeruginosa infection without the RSV infection being clinically apparent. This could have implications for treatment strategies to prevent opportunistic P. aeruginosa lung infection....

  17. The impact of nosocomially-acquired resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Shankowsky, Heather A; Swanson, Todd; Lee, Jonathan; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Nosocomially-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. This study was conducted to quantify the impact of nosocomially-transmitted resistant P. aeruginosa in a burn population. Using a TRACS burn database, 48 patients with P. aeruginosa resistant to gentamicin were identified (Pseudomonas group). Thirty-nine were case-matched to controls without resistant P. aeruginosa cultures (control group) for age, total body surface area, admission year, and presence of inhalation injury. Mortality and various morbidity endpoints were examined, as well as antibiotic costs. There was a significantly higher mortality rate in the Pseudomonas group (33% vs. 8%, p products used (packed cells 51.1 +/- 8.0 vs. 21.1 +/- 3.4, p < 0.01; platelets 11.9 +/- 3.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01) were all significantly higher in the Pseudomonas group. Cost of antibiotics was also significantly higher ($2,658.52 +/- $647.93 vs. $829.22 +/- $152.82, p < 0.01). Nosocomial colonization or infection, or both, of burn patients with aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa is associated with significantly higher morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Increased resource consumption did not prevent significantly higher mortality rates when compared with that of control patients. Thus, prevention, identification, and eradication of nosocomial Pseudomonas contamination are critical for cost-effective, successful burn care.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with lasI quorum-sensing deficiency during corneal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, H.; Bandara, R.; Conibear, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    To understand the importance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems in the development of corneal infection, the genotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of seven ocular isolates with low-protease and acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) activity and quorum-sensing mutants of PAO1 deficient...

  19. Multiple roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa TBCF10839 PilY1 in motility, transport and infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Yu-Sing Tammy; Brandes, Gudrun; Rakhimova, Elza

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the most important mammalian host defence cells against infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Screening of a signature tagged mutagenesis library of the non-piliated P. aeruginosa strain TBCF10839 uncovered that transposon inactivation of its pilY1 gene rendere...

  20. Modulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC expression in mouse lung infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radzioch Danuta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa entrapped in agar beads in the mouse lung leads to chronic lung infection in susceptible mouse strains. As the infection generates a strong inflammatory response with some lung edema, we tested if it could modulate the expression of genes involved in lung liquid clearance, such as the α, β and γ subunits of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC and the catalytic subunit of Na+-K+-ATPase. Methods Pseudomonas aeruginosa entrapped in agar beads were instilled in the lung of resistant (BalB/c and susceptible (DBA/2, C57BL/6 and A/J mouse strains. The mRNA expression of ENaC and Na+-K+-ATPase subunits was tested in the lung by Northern blot following a 3 hours to 14 days infection. Results The infection of the different mouse strains evoked regulation of α and β ENaC mRNA. Following Pseudomonas instillation, the expression of αENaC mRNA decreased to a median of 43% on days 3 and 7 after infection and was still decreased to a median of 45% 14 days after infection (p 1Na+-K+-ATPase mRNA, the catalytic subunit of the sodium pump, was recorded. The distinctive expression profiles of the three subunits were not different, between the susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Conclusions These results show that Pseudomonas infection, by modulating ENaC subunit expression, could influence edema formation and clearance in infected lungs.

  1. Carbapenem-resistant-only Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients formerly infected by carbapenem-susceptible strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Han; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Su, Lin-Hui; Lo, Wei-Lin; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Liang, Yi-Hua; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates that were initially carbapenem-susceptible and later became selective carbapenem-resistant following antimicrobial therapy were identified from individual cases during the same hospitalisation. Cross-resistance to other β-lactams was not found and their susceptibilities remained identical in consecutive isolates. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR was performed to investigate the role of OprD, an outer membrane protein regulating the entry of carbapenems, in the appearance of carbapenem-resistant-only P. aeruginosa (CROPA). Fifteen paired isolates of carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CS-PA) and CROPA were identified. All of the cases had carbapenem exposure history within 1 month before the appearance of CROPA (mean 10 days). Reduced OprD expression was found in 93% (14/15) of the isolates, suggesting that oprD inactivation was the major contributor to selective carbapenem resistance. Of the 14 cases with CROPA due to oprD mutation, 71% (10/14) were persistent infection, as genotype analysis revealed that their paired strains were isogenic; 29% (4/14) represented re-infections as they were heterogenic, suggesting that oprD-deficient CROPA existed in the hospital and that carbapenem selective pressure promoted its spread to patients. We conclude that CROPA may occur soon after the use of carbapenems to treat CS-PA infections and that oprD mutation is the major mechanism of resistance in CROPA. Restriction of empirical use of carbapenems by antibiotic stewardship is important to halt the occurrence of CROPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacteriophage Infectivity Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saline Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Scarascia, Giantommaso; Yap, Scott A.; Kaksonen, Anna H.; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2018-01-01

    at different temperature, pH, and salinity. Bacteriophages showed optimal infectivity at a multiplicity of infection of 10 in saline conditions, and demonstrated lytic abilities over all tested temperature (25, 30, 37, and 45°C) and pH 6–9. Planktonic P

  3. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P. Ø.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant......-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology...... and phagocytosis by PMNs, as well as leading to an improved outcome of pulmonary infections....

  4. Challenges with current inhaled treatments for chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greally, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) is the predominant pathogen infecting the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Initial colonization is usually transient and associated with non-mucoid strains, which can be eradicated if identified early. This strategy can prevent, or at least delay, chronic Pa infection, which eventually develops in the majority of patients by their late teens or early adulthood. This article discusses the management and latest treatment developments of Pa lung infection in patients with CF, with a focus on nebulized antibiotic therapy.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  6. Energy homeostasis targets chromosomal reconfiguration of the human GH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Levels of pituitary growth hormone (GH), a metabolic homeostatic factor with strong lipolytic activity, are decreased in obese individuals. GH declines prior to the onset of weight gain in response to excess caloric intake and hyperinsulinemia; however, the mechanism by which GH is reduced is not clear. We used transgenic mice expressing the human GH (hGH) gene, GH1, to assess the effect of high caloric intake on expression as well as the local chromosome structure of the intact GH1 locus. Animals exposed to 3 days of high caloric intake exhibited hyperinsulinemia without hyperglycemia and a decrease in both hGH synthesis and secretion, but no difference in endogenous production of murine GH. Efficient GH1 expression requires a long-range intrachromosomal interaction between remote enhancer sequences and the proximal promoter region through "looping" of intervening chromatin. High caloric intake disrupted this interaction and decreased both histone H3/H4 hyperacetylation and RNA polymerase II occupancy at the GH1 promoter. Incorporation of physical activity muted the effects of excess caloric intake on insulin levels, GH1 promoter hyperacetylation, chromosomal architecture, and expression. These results indicate that energy homeostasis alters postnatal hGH synthesis through dynamic changes in the 3-dimensional chromatin structure of the GH1 locus, including structures required for cell type specificity during development.

  7. Prevalence of local immune response against oral infection in a Drosophila/Pseudomonas infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Liehl

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens have developed multiple strategies that allow them to exploit host resources and resist the immune response. To study how Drosophila flies deal with infectious diseases in a natural context, we investigated the interactions between Drosophila and a newly identified entomopathogen, Pseudomonas entomophila. Flies orally infected with P. entomophila rapidly succumb despite the induction of both local and systemic immune responses, indicating that this bacterium has developed specific strategies to escape the fly immune response. Using a combined genetic approach on both host and pathogen, we showed that P. entomophila virulence is multi-factorial with a clear differentiation between factors that trigger the immune response and those that promote pathogenicity. We demonstrate that AprA, an abundant secreted metalloprotease produced by P. entomophila, is an important virulence factor. Inactivation of aprA attenuated both the capacity to persist in the host and pathogenicity. Interestingly, aprA mutants were able to survive to wild-type levels in immune-deficient Relish flies, indicating that the protease plays an important role in protection against the Drosophila immune response. Our study also reveals that the major contribution to the fly defense against P. entomophila is provided by the local, rather than the systemic immune response. More precisely, our data points to an important role for the antimicrobial peptide Diptericin against orally infectious Gram-negative bacteria, emphasizing the critical role of local antimicrobial peptide expression against food-borne pathogens.

  8. Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Deteriorates Control of Systemic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Merches

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type I interferon (IFN-I predisposes to bacterial superinfections, an important problem during viral infection or treatment with interferon-alpha (IFN-α. IFN-I-induced neutropenia is one reason for the impaired bacterial control; however there is evidence that more frequent bacterial infections during IFN-α-treatment occur independently of neutropenia. Methods: We analyzed in a mouse model, whether Pseudomonas aeruginosa control is influenced by co-infection with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. Bacterial titers, numbers of neutrophils and the gene-expression of liver-lysozyme-2 were determined during a 24 hours systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in wild-type and Ifnar-/- mice under the influence of LCMV or poly(I:C. Results: Virus-induced IFN-I impaired the control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was associated with neutropenia and loss of lysozyme-2-expression in the liver, which had captured P. aeruginosa. A lower release of IFN-I by poly(I:C-injection also impaired the bacterial control in the liver and reduced the expression of liver-lysozyme-2. Low concentration of IFN-I after infection with a virulent strain of P. aeruginosa alone impaired the bacterial control and reduced lysozyme-2-expression in the liver as well. Conclusion: We found that during systemic infection with P. aeruginosa Kupffer cells quickly controlled the bacteria in cooperation with neutrophils. Upon LCMV-infection this cooperation was disturbed.

  9. Diversity of metabolic profiles of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the early stages of lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics and mutat......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of post-operative wound infections was studied over a period of five months in the University College Hospital, Ibadan between February to July, 2003. Two hundred Surgical wounds were collected and routinely processed by Gram staining and culture in the Microbiology Laboratory. Of the 200 samples ...

  11. Production of Quorum Sensing Inhibitors in Growing Onion Bulbs Infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa E (HQ324110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed H; Bashandy, Shymaa R

    2012-01-01

    Eighteen organic compounds were present in growing onion bulbs cultivar Giza 6 infected with P. aeruginosa, but only fourteen of them are present in dry infected onion bulbs; however, four compounds were missing in dry onion. The missing compounds in dry infected onion bulbs are pantolactone, 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(3H)-one, myristic acid, and linoleic acid. All of them were detected in growing onion (living cell) during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, and it is hypothesized that it may be produced by plants and act as defence system. Pantolactone and myristic acid were selected to explore their effects on growth and virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Exogenous application of pantolactone and myristic acid significantly inhibited pyocyanin production, protease, and lipase and polygalacturonase activity but did not have any significant effects on bacterial growth. The inhibition of virulence factors without reduction in bacterial growth may be providing strong support that these chemical molecules are general quorum sensing inhibitors than an antibacterial effect. Disruption of quorum sensing of pathogen indicates that this new approach has potential in fighting bacterial infections in human and plants.

  12. Diabetic foot gangrene patient with multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas putida infection in Karawaci District, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nata Pratama Hardjo Lugito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida is a rod-shaped, non fermenting Gram-negative organism frequently found in the environment that utilizes aerobic metabolism, previously thought to be of low pathogenicity. It had been reported as cause of skin and soft tissue infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A female green grocer, 51 year-old came to internal medicine out-patient clinic with gangrene and osteomyelitis on her 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd digit and wound on the sole of the right foot since 1 month prior. The patient had history of uncontrolled diabetes since a year ago. She was given ceftriaxone 2 grams b.i.d, metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d empirically and then amikacin 250 mg b.i.d, followed by amputation of the digits and wound debridement. The microorganism′s culture from pus revealed multi drug resistant Pseudomonas putida. She recovered well after antibiotics and surgery.

  13. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Pastar

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-09

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation.

  15. Clinical and Morphological Studies on Spontaneous Cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dinev1, S Denev2* and G Beev2

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, pathoanatomical, histological, and bacteriological studies were performed on broiler chickens, growing broiler parents, and growing egg layers, in three different poultry farms, after an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The method of contamination of the birds was established. Several local and systemic clinico-morphological forms of spontaneous P. aeruginosa infections in various categories of stock birds were described: cases of P. aeruginosa infection resulting from injection of contaminated vaccines; case of P. aeruginosa infections through contaminated aerosol vaccine and cases of pododermatitis, periarthritis and arthritis in broiler chickens associated with P. aeruginosa infection. In different cases mortality range between 0.5 and 50%. The results showed that apart from embryonic mortality in hatcheries, and septicemic infections in newly hatched chickens, the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa was associated with localized and systemic lesions in this category, as well as in young and growing birds. On one hand, these results have a theoretical significance, contributing for the confirmation and expansion of the wide array of clinico-morphological forms of P. aeruginosa infections in birds. On the other hand, the knowledge on these forms has a purely practical significance in the diagnostics of P. aeruginosa infections by poultry pathologists and veterinary practitioners.

  16. A peptide of heparin cofactor II inhibits endotoxin-mediated shock and invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kalle

    Full Text Available Sepsis and septic shock remain important medical problems with high mortality rates. Today's treatment is based mainly on using antibiotics to target the bacteria, without addressing the systemic inflammatory response, which is a major contributor to mortality in sepsis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed to counteract these complex sepsis pathologies. Heparin cofactor II (HCII has recently been shown to be protective against Gram-negative infections. The antimicrobial effects were mapped to helices A and D of the molecule. Here we show that KYE28, a 28 amino acid long peptide representing helix D of HCII, is antimicrobial against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Moreover, KYE28 binds to LPS and thereby reduces LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing NF-κB/AP-1 activation in vitro. In mouse models of LPS-induced shock, KYE28 significantly enhanced survival by dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Finally, in an invasive Pseudomonas infection model, the peptide inhibited bacterial growth and reduced the pro-inflammatory response, which lead to a significant reduction of mortality. In summary, the peptide KYE28, by simultaneously targeting bacteria and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses represents a novel therapeutic candidate for invasive infections.

  17. A peptide of heparin cofactor II inhibits endotoxin-mediated shock and invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Martina; Papareddy, Praveen; Kasetty, Gopinath; van der Plas, Mariena J A; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock remain important medical problems with high mortality rates. Today's treatment is based mainly on using antibiotics to target the bacteria, without addressing the systemic inflammatory response, which is a major contributor to mortality in sepsis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed to counteract these complex sepsis pathologies. Heparin cofactor II (HCII) has recently been shown to be protective against Gram-negative infections. The antimicrobial effects were mapped to helices A and D of the molecule. Here we show that KYE28, a 28 amino acid long peptide representing helix D of HCII, is antimicrobial against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida albicans. Moreover, KYE28 binds to LPS and thereby reduces LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by decreasing NF-κB/AP-1 activation in vitro. In mouse models of LPS-induced shock, KYE28 significantly enhanced survival by dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Finally, in an invasive Pseudomonas infection model, the peptide inhibited bacterial growth and reduced the pro-inflammatory response, which lead to a significant reduction of mortality. In summary, the peptide KYE28, by simultaneously targeting bacteria and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses represents a novel therapeutic candidate for invasive infections.

  18. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  19. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer enhances host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection through MAPK signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongwei; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chunxia; Chen, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hu, Yue; Niu, Xiaobin; Pei, Dongxu; He, Zhiqiang; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of extra-cellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the drug resistance of the pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The BALB/c mice were transfected with PA, then the mice were infected with the siRNA of EMMPRIN to silence the EMMPRIN gene. The EMMPRIN mRNA and protein were detected by using RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. In order to examine the function of EMMPRIN in drug resistance of PA, the BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with EMMPRIN s...

  20. Interference of Pseudomonas aeruginosa signalling and biofilm formation for infection control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the best described bacterium with regards to quorum sensing (QS), in vitro biofilm formation and the development of antibiotic tolerance. Biofilms composed of P. aeruginosa are thought to be the underlying cause of many chronic infections, including those in wounds...... and in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in QS, QS-enabled virulence, biofilm formation and biofilm-enabled antibiotic tolerance. We now have substantial knowledge of the multicellular behaviour of P. aeruginosa in vitro. A major...

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared....... The rat model of P. aeruginosa lung infection was used in the present study. The rats were killed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after infection with the P. aeruginosa strains. The results showed that during the early stages of infection, the PAO1 double mutant induced a stronger serum antibody response, higher...... number of lung bacteria, and minor serum IgG and IgG1 responses but increased lung interferon gamma production were detected in the group infected with the PAO1 double mutant when compared with the PAO1-infected group. Delayed immune responses were observed in the PAO1-infected group and they might...

  2. Antibody hyporesponsiveness in resistant BALB/cJ mice intracorneally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, R S; Preston, M; Montgomery, I N; Hazlett, L D; Tse, H Y

    Six- to eight-week-old BALB/cJ (and BALB/cPi) mice were found able to restore corneal clarity within 3 to 4 weeks after intracorneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 19660. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serum immunoglobulins directed specifically against P. aeruginosa indicated that the mice were initially non- or hypo-responsive for IgG and IgA over the 4-week holding period. Low IgM titers could be detected 1 week after infection, but tended to decrease with time. When the mice were re-infected by using the contralateral control eye, then the serum IgG levels began to gradually increase as the time interval following the secondary infection increased from 1 to 3 weeks. Re-infected mice did not show a significantly increased rate of corneal clarity restoration with time, when compared to the corneas of mice receiving only a primary infection despite the presence of serum antibodies specific to P. aeruginosa. When congenic mice of the BALB/c background carrying the DBA/2N Idh/Pep-3 locus found on chromosome 1 were intracorneally infected, they tended to restore corneal clarity at approximately the same rate as the BALB/cJ mice. However, the congenic mice mounted a faster and substantially greater magnitude of serum IgM and IgG response during the primary infection than BALB/cJ mice receiving either a primary and/or secondary infection. IgG subclass studies with the congenic mice indicated that serum IgG1, and IgG2a to a lesser extent, were the primary immunoglobulins produced and no major shift in subclass was noted with time during the primary infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Mechanisms of humoral immune response against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauch, Renan Marrichi; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus

    2018-01-01

    P. aeruginosa chronic lung infection is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and is characterized by a biofilm mode of growth, increased levels of specific IgG antibodies and immune complex formation. However, despite being designed to combat...... this infection, such elevated humoral response is not associated with clinical improvement, pointing to a lack of anti-pseudomonas effectiveness. The mode of action of specific antibodies, as well as their structural features, and even the background involving B-cell production, stimulation and differentiation...... into antibody-producing cells in the CF airways are poorly understood. Thus, the aim of this review is to discuss studies that have addressed the intrinsic features of the humoral immune response and provide new insights regarding its insufficiency in the CF context....

  4. In situ growth rates and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in chronic lung infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, L.; Haagensen, J.A.; Jelsbak, L.

    2008-01-01

    matrix, whereas nonmucoid variants were present mainly as dispersed cells. To obtain estimates of the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in CF lungs, we used quantitative FISH to indirectly measure growth rates of bacteria in sputum samples (reflecting the in vivo lung conditions). The concentration of r......The growth dynamics of bacterial pathogens within infected hosts are a fundamental but poorly understood feature of most infections. We have focused on the in situ distribution and growth characteristics of two prevailing and transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones that have caused chronic lung......RNA in bacteria isolated from sputa was measured and correlated with the rRNA contents of the same bacteria growing in vitro at defined rates. The results showed that most cells were actively growing with doubling times of between 100 and 200 min, with some growing even faster. Only a small stationary...

  5. Mobile genetic elements of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hydrotherapy facility and respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S G; Cardoso, O

    2014-03-01

    The content of mobile genetic elements in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of a pristine natural mineral water system associated with healthcare was compared with clinical isolates from respiratory infections. One isolate, from the therapy pool circuit, presented a class 1 integron, with 100% similarity to a class 1 integron contained in plasmid p4800 of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp4800 strain, which is the first time it has been reported in P. aeruginosa. Class 1 integrons were found in 25.6% of the clinical isolates. PAGI1 orf3 was more prevalent in environmental isolates, while PAGI2 c105 and PAGI3 sg100 were more prevalent in clinical isolates. Plasmids were not observed in either population. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  6. Differential infection properties of three inducible prophages from an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Chloe E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial pathogen infecting the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES is transmissible, capable of superseding other P. aeruginosa populations and is associated with increased morbidity. Previously, multiple inducible prophages have been found to coexist in the LES chromosome and to constitute a major component of the accessory genome not found in other sequenced P. aerugionosa strains. LES phages confer a competitive advantage in a rat model of chronic lung infection and may, therefore underpin LES prevalence. Here the infective properties of three LES phages were characterised. Results This study focuses on three of the five active prophages (LESφ2, LESφ3 and LESφ4 that are members of the Siphoviridae. All were induced from LESB58 by norfloxacin. Lytic production of LESφ2 was considerably higher than that of LESφ3 and LESφ4. Each phage was capable of both lytic and lysogenic infection of the susceptible P. aeruginosa host, PAO1, producing phage-specific plaque morphologies. In the PAO1 host background, the LESφ2 prophage conferred immunity against LESφ3 infection and reduced susceptibility to LESφ4 infection. Each prophage was less stable in the PAO1 chromosome with substantially higher rates of spontaneous phage production than when residing in the native LESB58 host. We show that LES phages are capable of horizontal gene transfer by infecting P. aeruginosa strains from different sources and that type IV pili are required for infection by all three phages. Conclusions Multiple inducible prophages with diverse infection properties have been maintained in the LES genome. Our data suggest that LESφ2 is more sensitive to induction into the lytic cycle or has a more efficient replicative cycle than the other LES phages.

  7. Cystic fibrosis-niche adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduces virulence in multiple infection hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ivan Lorè

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to thrive in diverse ecological niches and to cause serious human infection. P. aeruginosa environmental strains are producing various virulence factors that are required for establishing acute infections in several host organisms; however, the P. aeruginosa phenotypic variants favour long-term persistence in the cystic fibrosis (CF airways. Whether P. aeruginosa strains, which have adapted to the CF-niche, have lost their competitive fitness in the other environment remains to be investigated. In this paper, three P. aeruginosa clonal lineages, including early strains isolated at the onset of infection, and late strains, isolated after several years of chronic lung infection from patients with CF, were analysed in multi-host model systems of acute infection. P. aeruginosa early isolates caused lethality in the three non-mammalian hosts, namely Caenorhabditis elegans, Galleria mellonella, and Drosophila melanogaster, while late adapted clonal isolates were attenuated in acute virulence. When two different mouse genetic background strains, namely C57Bl/6NCrl and Balb/cAnNCrl, were used as acute infection models, early P. aeruginosa CF isolates were lethal, while late isolates exhibited reduced or abolished acute virulence. Severe histopathological lesions, including high leukocytes recruitment and bacterial load, were detected in the lungs of mice infected with P. aeruginosa CF early isolates, while late isolates were progressively cleared. In addition, systemic bacterial spread and invasion of epithelial cells, which were detected for P. aeruginosa CF early strains, were not observed with late strains. Our findings indicate that niche-specific selection in P. aeruginosa reduced its ability to cause acute infections across a broad range of hosts while maintaining the capacity for chronic infection in the CF host.

  8. Early immune response in susceptible and resistant mice strains with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection determines the type of T-helper cell response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Hougen, H P; Song, Z

    1999-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients become chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs. The infection is characterized by a pronounced antibody response and a persistant inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Moreover a high antibody response correlates with a p...

  9. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.S. Zanetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  10. Drosophila melanogaster as an animal model for the study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3 demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo.

  11. Evaluation of Culture Conditions for Tannase Production by Aspergillus niger GH1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cruz-Hernández

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra- and intracellular tannase production by Aspergillus niger GH1 has been evaluated using submerged (SmF and solid-state fermentation (SSF at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50 °C. Effects of initial substrate (tannic acid concentration, incubation time and temperature on tannase production in SSF have been studied. A. niger GH1 produced the highest tannase level (2291 U/L in SSF at 30 °C during the first 20 h of culture at tannic acid concentration of 50 g/L, and under these conditions enzyme production was entirely extracellular. The decline in tannase activity after 20 h of incubation was associated with a concomitant increase in protease activity.

  12. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  13. Large-area burns with pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fang-Gang; Zhao, Xiao-Zhuo; Bian, Jing; Zhang, Guo-An

    2011-02-01

    Infection due to pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PDRPA) has become a challenge in clinical practice. The aim of this research was to summarize the treatment of large-area burns (60% - 80%) with PDRPA infection and respiratory failure in our hospital over the last two years, and to explore a feasible treatment protocol for such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the treatment of five patients with large-area burns accompanied by PDRPA infection and respiratory failure transferred to our hospital from burn units in hospitals in other Chinese cities from January 2008 to February 2010. Before PDRPA infection occurred, all five patients had open wounds with large areas of granulation because of the failure of surgery and dissolving of scar tissue; they had also undergone long-term administration of carbapenems. This therapy included ventilatory support, rigorous repair of wounds, and combined antibiotic therapy targeted at drug-resistance mechanisms, including carbapenems, ciprofloxacin, macrolide antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors. Four patients recovered from burns and one died after therapy. First, compromised immunity caused by delayed healing of burn wounds in patients with large-area burns and long-term administration of carbapenems may be the important factors in the initiation and progression of PDRPA infection. Second, if targeted at drug-resistance mechanisms, combined antibiotic therapy using carbapenems, ciprofloxacin, macrolide antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors could effectively control PDRPA infection. Third, although patients with large-area burns suffered respiratory failure and had high risks from anesthesia and surgery, only aggressive skin grafting with ventilatory support could control the infection and save lives. Patients may not be able to tolerate a long surgical procedure, so the duration of surgery should be minimized, and the frequency of surgery increased.

  14. In Vivo Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Colistin and Imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana; Song, Zhijun; Høiby, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Many Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are sensitive to antibiotics in susceptibility testing, but eradication of the infection is difficult. The main reason is the biofilm formation in the airways of patients with CF. The pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of antimicrobials can reliably be used to predict whether antimicrobial regimens will achieve the maximum bactericidal effect against infections. Unfortunately, however, most PK/PD studies of antimicrobials have been done on planktonic cells and very few PK/PD studies have been done on biofilms, partly due to the lack of suitable models in vivo. In the present study, a biofilm lung infection model was developed to provide an objective and quantitative evaluation of the PK/PD profile of antimicrobials. Killing curves were set up to detect the antimicrobial kinetics on planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. Colistin showed concentration-dependent killing, while imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. The parameter best correlated to the elimination of bacteria in lung by colistin was the area under the curve (AUC) versus MIC (AUC/MIC) for planktonic cells or the AUC versus minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC; AUC/MBIC) for biofilm cells. The best-correlated parameter for imipenem was the time that the drug concentration was above the MIC for planktonic cells (TMIC) or time that the drug concentration was above the MBIC (TMBIC) for biofilm cells. However, the AUC/MIC of imipenem showed a better correlation with the efficacy of imipenem for biofilm infections (R2 = 0.89) than planktonic cell infections (R2 = 0.38). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) of colistin and imipenem was shorter in biofilm infections than planktonic cell infections in this model. PMID:22354300

  15. Corneal Biofilms: From Planktonic to Microcolony Formation in an Experimental Keratitis Infection with Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, Padmanabhan; Beuerman, Roger W

    2015-10-01

    Microbial biofilms commonly comprise part of the infectious scenario, complicating the therapeutic approach. The purpose of this study was to determine in a mouse model of corneal infection if mature biofilms formed and to visualize the stages of biofilm formation. A bacterial keratitis model was established using Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (1 × 10(8) CFU/ml) to infect the cornea of C57BL/6 black mouse. Eyes were examined post-infection (PI) on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and imaged by slit lamp microscopy, and light, confocal, and electron microscopy to identify the stages of biofilm formation and the time of appearance. On PI day 1, Gram staining showed rod-shaped bacteria adherent on the corneal surface. On PI days 2 and 3, bacteria were seen within webs of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and glycocalyx secretion, imaged by confocal microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated microcolonies of active infectious cells bound with thick fibrous material. Transmission electron microscopy substantiated the formation of classical biofilm architecture with P. aeruginosa densely packed within the extracellular polymeric substances on PI days 5 and 7. Direct visual evidence showed that biofilms routinely developed on the biotic surface of the mouse cornea. The mouse model can be used to develop new approaches to deal therapeutically with biofilms in corneal infections. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments. PMID:26422147

  17. The role of crop waste and soil in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar porri infection of leek (Allium porrum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, van L.S.; Nijhuis, E.H.; Koenraadt, H.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri, the causal agent of bacterial blight of leek, is a current threat for leek (Allium porrum) production in the Netherlands. The roles of post-harvest crop waste and plant invasion from soil in leek plant infection was investigated with the purpose to gain better

  18. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; van Gennip, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Moser C, van Gennip M, Bjarnsholt T, Jensen PO, Lee B, Hougen HP, Calum H, Ciofu O, Givskov M, Molin S, Hoiby N. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis. APMIS 2009; 117: 95-107. The dominant cause of premature...... death in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chronic lung infection often lasts for decades with just one clone. However, as a result of inflammation, antibiotic treatment and different niches in the lungs, the clone undergoes...... and 2003) of the chronic lung infection of one CF patient using the seaweed alginate embedment model. The results showed that the non-mucoid clones reduced their virulence over time, resulting in faster clearing of the bacteria from the lungs, improved pathology and reduced pulmonary production...

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alters Staphylococcus aureus Sensitivity to Vancomycin in a Biofilm Model of Cystic Fibrosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Orazi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients have thick mucus, which fosters chronic, polymicrobial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are two of the most prevalent respiratory pathogens in CF patients. In this study, we tested whether P. aeruginosa influences the susceptibility of S. aureus to frontline antibiotics used to treat CF lung infections. Using our in vitro coculture model, we observed that addition of P. aeruginosa supernatants to S. aureus biofilms grown either on epithelial cells or on plastic significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin. Mutant analyses showed that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO, a component of the P. aeruginosa Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS system, protects S. aureus from the antimicrobial activity of vancomycin. Similarly, the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin also contribute to the ability of P. aeruginosa to protect S. aureus from vancomycin, as did growth under anoxia. Under our experimental conditions, HQNO, P. aeruginosa supernatant, and growth under anoxia decreased S. aureus growth, likely explaining why this cell wall-targeting antibiotic is less effective. P. aeruginosa supernatant did not confer additional protection to slow-growing S. aureus small colony variants. Importantly, P. aeruginosa supernatant protects S. aureus from other inhibitors of cell wall synthesis as well as protein synthesis-targeting antibiotics in an HQNO- and siderophore-dependent manner. We propose a model whereby P. aeruginosa causes S. aureus to shift to fermentative growth when these organisms are grown in coculture, leading to reduction in S. aureus growth and decreased susceptibility to antibiotics targeting cell wall and protein synthesis.

  20. Synergistic Interaction Between Phage Therapy and Antibiotics Clears Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Endocarditis and Reduces Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Piccardi, Philippe; Mancini, Stefano; Gabard, Jérôme; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José M; Resch, Gregory; Que, Yok-Ai

    2017-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance warrants therapeutic alternatives. Here we investigated the efficacy of bacteriophage-therapy (phage) alone or combined with antibiotics against experimental endocarditis (EE) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an archetype of difficult-to-treat infection. In vitro fibrin clots and rats with aortic EE were treated with an antipseudomonas phage cocktail alone or combined with ciprofloxacin. Phage pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy, and resistance were determined. In vitro, single-dose phage therapy killed 7 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/g of fibrin clots in 6 hours. Phage-resistant mutants regrew after 24 hours but were prevented by combination with ciprofloxacin (2.5 × minimum inhibitory concentration). In vivo, single-dose phage therapy killed 2.5 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours (P 6 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours and successfully treating 64% (n = 7/11) of rats. Phage-resistant mutants emerged in vitro but not in vivo, most likely because resistant mutations affected bacterial surface determinants important for infectivity (eg, the pilT and galU genes involved in pilus motility and LPS formation). Single-dose phage therapy was active against P. aeruginosa EE and highly synergistic with ciprofloxacin. Phage-resistant mutants had impaired infectivity. Phage-therapy alone or combined with antibiotics merits further clinical consideration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  1. PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility phenotype analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain chronically infecting Cystic Fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Pulcrano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of chronic lung infection and following pulmonary worsening of cystic fibrosis patients. To verify whether bacterial modifications regarding motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility proceeded from an adaptation to chronic infection or a replacement with a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 5 cystic fibrosis patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all isolates was performed by the disc diffusion method. PFGE typing demonstrated that strains dissimilar in colony morphotype and of different antibiotic susceptibility patterns could be of the same genotype. Some patients were colonized with a rather constant P. aeruginosa flora, with strains of different phenotypes but of one genotype. Instead, some patients may be colonized by more than one genotype. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide and acquisition of a new antibiotic susceptibility phenotype in these strain appear to evolve during chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains.

  2. Genes Required for Free Phage Production are Essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Andrée-Ann; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Fothergill, Joanne L; Boyle, Brian; Laroche, Jérôme; Tucker, Nicholas P; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C

    2016-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain LESB58 is highly resistant to antibiotics, transmissible, and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its genome contains 6 prophages and 5 genomic islands. We constructed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based signature-tagged mutagenesis library of 9216 LESB58 mutants and screened the mutants in a rat model of chronic lung infection. A total of 162 mutants were identified as defective for in vivo maintenance, with 11 signature-tagged mutagenesis mutants having insertions in prophage and genomic island genes. Many of these mutants showed both diminished virulence and reduced phage production. Transcription profiling by quantitative PCR and RNA-Seq suggested that disruption of these prophages had a widespread trans-acting effect on the transcriptome. This study demonstrates that temperate phages play a pivotal role in the establishment of infection through modulation of bacterial host gene expression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Experimental Pseudomonas anguilliseptica infection in turbot Psetta maxima (L.: a histopathological and immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Romalde

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infection with Pseudomonas anguilliseptica was performed both by intraperitoneal (i.p. and bath route on juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima in order to evaluate the pathology induced. Turbot was found to be sensitive to i.p. challenge (1.7x106 CFU/fish but no to bath exposure. The i.p. challenge induced septicaemic infection and mortality. Externally, moribund fish showed distended abdomen and pale areas at day 9. The gross pathological internal signs present were abundant ascitic fluid in the peritoneal cavity, pale and enlarged spleen, pale and friable liver, and congestive and dilated gut with yellowish exudates. On histopathological examination, bacterial invasion was common in all the tissues studied but the most prominent pathological changes were observed in gut, spleen and kidney after 7 day with features of necrosis. The immunohistochemical findings support the widespread localization of the bacteria after the i.p. injection since the P. anguilliseptica was detected in spleen from day 1 post injection, in liver, kidney and gut from day 4, in muscle from day 7 and in brain from day 9. The difficulties in infecting healthy fish by bath challenge can be explained by the opportunistic nature of this pathogen.

  4. A Marine Actinomycete Rescues Caenorhabditis elegans from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection through Restitution of Lysozyme 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti N. Fatin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to conventional antimicrobial treatment is a major scourge in healthcare. Therefore, it is crucial that novel potent anti-infectives are discovered. The aim of the present study is to screen marine actinomycetes for chemical entities capable of overcoming P. aeruginosa infection through mechanisms involving anti-virulence or host immunity activities. A total of 18 actinomycetes isolates were sampled from marine sediment of Songsong Island, Kedah, Malaysia. Upon confirming that the methanolic crude extract of these isolates do not display direct bactericidal activities, they were tested for capacity to rescue Caenorhabditis elegans infected with P. aeruginosa strain PA14. A hexane partition of the extract from one isolate, designated as Streptomyces sp. CCB-PSK207, could promote the survival of PA14 infected worms by more than 60%. Partial 16S sequence analysis on this isolate showed identity of 99.79% with Streptomyces sundarbansensis. This partition did not impair feeding behavior of C. elegans worms. Tested on PA14, the partition also did not affect bacterial growth or its ability to colonize host gut. The production of biofilm, protease, and pyocyanin in PA14 were uninterrupted, although there was an increase in elastase production. In lys-7::GFP worms, this partition was shown to induce the expression of lysozyme 7, an important innate immunity defense molecule that was repressed during PA14 infection. GC-MS analysis of the bioactive fraction of Streptomyces sp. CCB-PSK207 revealed the presence of methyl esters of branched saturated fatty acids. In conclusion, this is the first report of a marine actinomycete producing metabolites capable of rescuing C. elegans from PA14 through a lys-7 mediated activity.

  5. Panax ginseng has anti-infective activity against opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting quorum sensing, a bacterial communication process critical for establishing infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Kong, K F; Wu, H

    2010-01-01

    Virulent factors produced by pathogens play an important role in the infectious process, which is regulated by a cell-to-cell communication mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen, which causes infections in patients with compromis...

  6. ZTI-01 Treatment Improves Survival of Animals Infected with Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Matthew B; denDekker, Ashley Eb; Cramer, Daniel E; Gabbard, Jon D; Lafoe, Kathryn M; Pfeffer, Tia L; Sotsky, Julie B; Vanover, Carol D; Ellis-Grosse, Evelyn J; Warawa, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background ZTI-01 (fosfomycin, FOS, for injection) is currently under US development to treat complicated urinary tract infections. ZTI-01 is unique compared with other antimicrobials in that it inhibits an early step in cell wall synthesis via covalent binding to MurA. ZTI-01 demonstrates broad in vitro activity against Gram-negative (GN) and -positive (GP) bacteria, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. Our study goals were to determine the efficacy of ZTI-01 as a monotherapy or in combination with meropenem against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a preclinical model of pulmonary infection. Methods 8 week old neutropenic mice were infected with a MDR strain of P. aeruginosa via intubation-mediated intratracheal (IMIT) instillation. 3 hours after instillation, mice received treatment with ZTI-01, meropenem, or ZTI-01 plus meropenem (combination therapy) q8h for 5 days. Mice were monitored every 8 hours for 7 days for development of disease and moribund animals were humanely euthanized. Lungs and spleens were harvested at euthanasia, or at 7 days for survivors, and processed for bacterial enumeration and development of pathology. Results Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of P. aeruginosa UNC-D. Mock treated animals succumbed to infection within 36 hours post-infection. Animals that received 6 g/kg/day ZTI-01 showed an increase in the MTD (52 hours) and 25% of the cohort were protected from lethal disease. Combining ZTI-01 with meropenem resulted in a significant increase in survival (≥75% of cohorts survived infection). Combination therapy also significantly decreased bacterial numbers in the lungs and inhibited dissemination to the spleens. Furthermore, animals receiving combination therapy were protected from significant inflammation in the lungs and the development of pneumonia. Conclusion Here we report that combination therapy with ZTI-01 and meropenem provides significant improvements in all disease manifestations over treatment with

  7. Role of EGFR transactivation in preventing apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wang, Jinzhao; Dong, Zheng; Mian, Shahzad; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2004-08-01

    To determine the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathways in preventing infection-induced apoptosis in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). Epithelial monolayers of a telomerase-immortalized HCEC line, HUCL, and primary culture of HCECs were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) antagonist CRM197, the HB-EGF neutralizing antibody, or the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The activation of EGFR was analyzed by immunoprecipitation using EGFR antibodies, followed by Western blot analysis with phosphotyrosine antibody. Phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, a major substrate of PI3K, and generation of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were determined by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cells were characterized by positive staining of active caspase-3, loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and condensation of chromosomes. Apoptosis was also confirmed by measuring caspase-3 activity and assessing the generation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. P. aeruginosa infection of HUCL cells resulted in EGFR activation and EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 and PI3K phosphorylation. Inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2, and PI3K activities with kinase-specific inhibitors (AG1478, U0126, and LY294002, respectively) resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, in elevated cellular caspase-3 activity, and/or in increased cleaved PARP in P. aeruginosa-infected HUCL cells or primary culture of HCECs. Blocking HB-EGF ectodomain shedding by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-mediated proteolysis, downregulation of HB-EGF, or neutralization of its activity retarded infection-induced EGFR transactivation and, as a consequence, increased infection-induced HUCL apoptosis. Bacterial infection of HCECs induces

  8. Role of EGFR Transactivation in Preventing Apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa–Infected Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wang, Jinzhao; Dong, Zheng; Mian, Shahzad; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)–mediated signaling pathways in preventing infection-induced apoptosis in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). METHODS Epithelial monolayers of a telomerase-immortalized HCEC line, HUCL, and primary culture of HCECs were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) antagonist CRM197, the HB-EGF neutralizing antibody, or the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The activation of EGFR was analyzed by immunoprecipitation using EGFR antibodies, followed by Western blot analysis with phosphotyrosine antibody. Phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, a major substrate of PI3K, and generation of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were determined by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cells were characterized by positive staining of active caspase-3, loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and condensation of chromosomes. Apoptosis was also confirmed by measuring caspase-3 activity and assessing the generation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. RESULTS P. aeruginosa infection of HUCL cells resulted in EGFR activation and EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 and PI3K phosphorylation. Inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2, and PI3K activities with kinase-specific inhibitors (AG1478, U0126, and LY294002, respectively) resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, in elevated cellular caspase-3 activity, and/or in increased cleaved PARP in P. aeruginosa–infected HUCL cells or primary culture of HCECs. Blocking HB-EGF ectodomain shedding by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase–mediated proteolysis, downregulation of HB-EGF, or neutralization of its activity retarded infection-induced EGFR transactivation and, as a consequence, increased infection-induced HUCL apoptosis

  9. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Kolpen

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O, an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(- and NO2(- in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O. The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(- decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.

  10. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus; Hansen, Christine Rønne; Liengaard, Lars; Kharazmi, Arsalan; Pressler, Tanja; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(-) and NO2(-) in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O). The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(-) decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.

  11. Preventing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum infections by anti-adhesion-active components of edible seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmaninov Ofra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to animal/human cells for infection establishment involves adhesive proteins, including its galactose- and fucose-binding lectins PA-IL (LecA and PA-IIL (LecB. The lectin binding to the target-cell receptors may be blocked by compatible glycans that compete with those of the receptors, functioning as anti-adhesion glycodecoys. The anti-adhesion treatment is of the utmost importance for abrogating devastating antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa infections in immunodeficient and cystic fibrosis (CF patients. This strategy functions in nature in protecting embryos and neonates. We have shown that PA-IL, PA-IIL, and also CV-IIL (a PA-IIL homolog produced in the related pathogen Chromobacterium violaceum are highly useful for revealing natural glycodecoys that surround embryos in diverse avian eggs and are supplied to neonates in milks and royal jelly. In the present study, these lectins were used as probes to search for seed embryo-protecting glycodecoys. Methods The lectin-blocking glycodecoy activities were shown by the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Lectin-binding glycoproteins were detected by Western blotting with peroxidase-labeled lectins. Results The present work reports the finding - by using PA-IL, PA-IIL, and CV-IIL - of rich glycodecoy activities of low ( 10 kDa compounds (including glycoproteins in extracts of cashew, cocoa, coffee, pumpkin, and tomato seeds, resembling those of avian egg whites, mammal milks, and royal jelly. Conclusions Edible seed extracts possess lectin-blocking glycodecoys that might protect their embryos from infections and also might be useful for hampering human and animal infections.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection alters the macrophage phenotype switching process during wound healing in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sinuo; Li, Renren; Cheng, Chun; Xu, Jing-Ying; Jin, Caixia; Gao, Furong; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jieping; Zhang, Jingfa; Wang, Hong; Lu, Lixia; Xu, Guo-Tong; Tian, Haibin

    2018-03-07

    Macrophages play critical roles in wound healing process. They switch from "classically activated" (M1) phenotype in the early inflammatory phase to "alternatively activated" (M2) phenotype in the later healing phase. However, the dynamic process of macrophage phenotype switching in diabetic wounds burdened with bacteria is unclear. In this report, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, frequently detected in diabetic foot ulcers, was inoculated into cutaneous wounds of db/db diabetic mice to mimic bacterium-infected diabetic wound healing. We observed that P. aeruginosa infection impaired diabetic wound healing and quickly promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory genes (M1 macrophage markers) tumor necrosis factor-α (tnf-α), interleukin-1β (il-1β) and il-6 in wounds. The expression of markers of M2 macrophages, including il-10, arginase-1, and ym1 were also upregulated. In addition, similar gene expression patterns were observed in macrophages isolated directly from wounds. Immunostaining showed that P. aeruginosa infection increased both the ratios of M1 and M2 macrophages in wounds compared with that in control groups, which was further confirmed by in vitro culturing macrophages with P. aeruginosa and skin fibroblast conditioned medium. However, the ratios of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory genes to anti-inflammatory gene il-10 was increased markedly in P. aeruginosa infected wounds and macrophages compared with that in control groups, and P. aeruginosa prolonged the presence of M1 macrophages in the wounds. These data demonstrated that P. aeruginosa in diabetic wounds activates a mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotype with an excessive activation of M1 phenotype or relatively inadequate activation of M2 phenotype. © 2018 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. Molybdate transporter ModABC is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périnet, Simone; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Ouellet, Myriam M; Charette, Steve J; Levesque, Roger C

    2016-01-12

    Mechanisms underlying the success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are poorly defined. The modA gene was previously linked to in vivo competitiveness of P. aeruginosa by a genetic screening in the rat lung. This gene encodes a subunit of transporter ModABC, which is responsible for extracellular uptake of molybdate. This compound is essential for molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductases. Since anaerobic growth conditions are known to occur during CF chronic lung infection, inactivation of a molybdate transporter could inhibit proliferation through the inactivation of denitrification enzymes. Hence, we performed phenotypic characterization of a modA mutant strain obtained by signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM_modA) and assessed its virulence in vivo with two host models. The STM_modA mutant was in fact defective for anaerobic growth and unable to use nitrates in the growth medium for anaerobic respiration. Bacterial growth and nitrate usage were restored when the medium was supplemented with molybdate. Most significantly, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence compared to wild-type strain PAO1 according to a competitive index in the rat model of chronic lung infection and a predation assay with Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. As the latter took place in aerobic conditions, the in vivo impact of the mutation in modA appears to extend beyond its effect on anaerobic growth. These results support the modABC-encoded transporter as important for the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that enzymatic machinery implicated in anaerobic growth during chronic lung infection in CF merits further investigation as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Anti-infective properties of Lactobacillus fermentum against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Parvathi; Nisha, N; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Kumar, Anil V; Biswas, Raja

    2011-01-01

    Surgical wounds and implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are often difficult to treat because of limited susceptibility of several of these strains to conventional antibiotics. As a result, there is a constant need for new alternative drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, a probiotic bacterium, which we have isolated from colonic biopsies. The inhibition of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa growth was evaluated by coincubating with L. fermentum strains. Growth inhibition was tested for several of their clinical isolates using agar well diffusion assays. For biofilm assay S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were grown on the glass slides and in 96-well plates in presence of 2.5 μg/ml culture filtrate of L. fermentum. Biofilms were photographed using confocal microscope or stained with 0.1% crystal violet. Reduction in the cytotoxicity of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa was observed in presence of 2.5 μg/ml L. fermentum-spent media. Using in vitroexperiments, we showed that L. fermentum-secreted compound(s) inhibits the growth, cytotoxicity and biofilm formation of several S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains. Compound(s) present in the culture supernatant of L. fermentum may have promising applications in treating hospital-acquired infections. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Direct evaluation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm mediators in a chronic infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Matthew S; Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Waligora, Elizabeth A; Juneau, Richard A; Armbruster, Chelsie E; Weimer, Kristen E D; Murrah, Kyle; Mann, Ethan E; Lu, Haiping; Sprinkle, April; Parsek, Matthew R; Kock, Nancy D; Wozniak, Daniel J; Swords, W Edward

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms contribute to Pseudomonas aeruginosa persistence in a variety of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, burn wounds, and chronic suppurative otitis media. However, few studies have directly addressed P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo. We used a chinchilla model of otitis media, which has previously been used to study persistent Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae infections, to show that structures formed in vivo are biofilms of bacterial and host origin within a matrix that includes Psl, a P. aeruginosa biofilm polysaccharide. We evaluated three biofilm and/or virulence mediators of P. aeruginosa known to affect biofilm formation in vitro and pathogenesis in vivo--bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), flagella, and quorum sensing--in a chinchilla model. We show that c-di-GMP overproduction has a positive impact on bacterial persistence, while quorum sensing increases virulence. We found no difference in persistence attributed to flagella. We conclude from these studies that a chinchilla otitis media model provides a means to evaluate pathogenic mediators of P. aeruginosa and that in vitro phenotypes should be examined in multiple infection systems to fully understand their role in disease.

  16. Effects of Chinese medicinal herbs on a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Moser, C; Høiby, N

    1996-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of two kinds of Chinese medicinal herbs, Isatis tinctoria L (ITL) and Daphne giraldii Nitsche (DGN), on a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF). Compared to the control group, both drugs were able to reduce the incidence of lung abscess (p < 0.05) and to decrease the severity of the macroscopic pathology in lungs (p < 0.05). In the great majority of the rats, the herbs altered the inflammatory response in the lungs from an acute type inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), to a chronic type inflammation, dominated by mononuclear leukocytes (MN). DGN also improved the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs (p < 0.03) compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the control group and the two herbal groups with regard to serum IgG and IgA anti-P. aeruginosa sonicate antibodies. However, the IgM concentration in the ITL group was significantly lower than in the control group (p < 0.03). These results suggest that the two medicinal herbs might be helpful to CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection, DGN being the most favorable.

  17. Cellular responses of A549 alveolar epithelial cells to serially collected Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients at different stages of pulmonary infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawdon, Nicole A; Aval, Pouya Sadeghi; Barnes, Rebecca J

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major cause of chronic pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa lose certain virulence factors, transform into a mucoid phenotype, and develop antibiotic resistance. We hypothesized that these genetic and phenotypic ...

  18. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection impairs murine S100A8/A9 and neutrophil effector cytokines—implications for delayed wound closure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars Jackie

    2017-01-01

    The impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in chronic wounds and clinical implication for healing is receiving increased attention. However, the pathophysiology of host/pathogen interplay is not fully understood. By further revealing the mechanisms, necessary new treatment strategies...

  19. Development of Topical Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Infections by Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors Mediated by Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    dendrimers would provide added benefits as a delivery vehicle of QSI compounds to inhibit PA biofilms, by both increasing the transport of QSI as drug...Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Infections by Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors Mediated by Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Development of Topical Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Infections by Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors Mediated by Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) Dendrimers

  20. Explore the full thick layer of corneal transplantation in the treatment of pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal ulcer infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the feasibility, safety and effect of the full-thickness lamellar keratoplasty for the treatment of pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal ulcer. METHODS: Based on a retrospective non-controlled study, 25 patients were given the full-thickness lamellar keratoplasty for clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and corneal ulcer medication conventional anti-gram-negative bacteria. Routine follow-up were carried out at postoperative 1wk; 1, 3, 6, 12, 18mo to observe the situation of corneal epithelial healing, recurrent infection, immune rejection, graft transparency and best corrected visual acuity, etc. At the 6 and 12mo postoperative, corneal endothelial cell density was reexamined.RESULTS: No patients because of Descemet's membrane rupture underwent penetrating keratoplasty surgery: One only in cases of bacterial infection after 1mo, once again did not cultivate a culture of bacteria pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the remaining 24 cases average follow-up 14±6mo, corneal graft were transparent, the cure rate was 96%. At the sixth month after surgery, there were 16 cases of eye surgery best corrected visual acuity ≥4.5, of which 3 cases ≥4.8. At the sixth month after surgery, the average corneal endothelial cell density 2 425±278/mm2; At 12mo postoperatively, it was 2 257± 326/mm2.CONCLUSION: Full-thickness lamellar keratoplasty is an effective method of pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the treatment of corneal ulcers, corneal drying material glycerol can be achieved by visual effects.

  1. NLF20: an antimicrobial peptide with therapeutic potential against invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kasetty, Gopinath; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing resistance to antibiotics makes antimicrobial peptides interesting as novel therapeutics. Here, we report on studies of the peptide NLF20 (NLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR), corresponding to an epitope of the D helix of heparin cofactor II (HCII), a plasma protein mediating bacterial clearance. Peptide effects were evaluated by a combination of in vitro and in vivo methods, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxicity assays, fluorescence and electron microscopy, and experimental models of endotoxin shock and Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. The results showed that NLF20 displayed potent antimicrobial effects against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and P. aeruginosa, the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and the fungi Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Importantly, this antimicrobial effect was retained in human blood, particularly for P. aeruginosa. Fluorescence and electron microscopy studies showed that the peptide exerted membrane-breaking effects. In an animal model of P. aeruginosa sepsis, NLF20 reduced bacterial levels, resulting in improved survival. Reduced mortality was also observed in experimental animal models of endotoxin shock, which was paralleled with modulated IFN-γ, IL-10 and coagulation responses. Together, these results indicate that functional epitopes of HCII may have therapeutic potential against bacterial infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Defence responses of arabidopsis thaliana to infection by pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock

    KAUST Repository

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav

    2011-10-31

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. © 2011 Bhardwaj et al.

  3. Experimental study of action of autostrains Aerococcus viridans on the model Pseudomonas infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Stepanskyi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a study of the action of Aerococcus autostrains on the model of a chronic blue pus infection. For the study of the action of Aerococcus autosymbiont strains on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, three of the most biochemically and antagonistically active isolates were selected: 1 5m2015 (isolated from mice; 2 3k2015 (isolated from rats; 3 3ch2015 (isolated from humans. Experiments were conducted on 84 white outbred mice weighing 16–17 g, 60 were used as the experimental, and 24 as the control group. In the experimental group of animals, infected wounds were treated by Aerococcus autosymbiont strains once daily (0.2 billion ml–1 till recovery. The drug was administered under the scab with a syringe. In the control animals the wound was treated by isotonic sodium chloride solution (concentration 0.9% with the same route of administration and for the same period of time. It was found that from the very first days of application of Aerococci autosymbiont strains, perifocal inflammation was less severe in most animals in the research group compared with the control group. Starting from the fourth day of usage of Aerococcus autosymbiont strains the number of pseudomonades, contained in secretions from wounds in the experimental group of mice was significantly lower than in the control animals. It was revealed that in case of application of Aerococcus strain (5m2015 isolated from mice, the animals had better indicators of recovery, dynamics of local clinical signs of inflammation and the number of pseudomonades contained in the wound in comparison with other Aerococcus autostrains isolated from rats and humans. The wounds purified from pus and covered with dry scab faster. For example, wounds completely healed with dry scab rejection by the 11th day of observation in 44 of 58 surviving mice (75.9%. In the control group a similar pattern was observed in only 3 of 17 mice (17.6% by that period. The number of Pseudomonas

  4. Fitness of isogenic colony morphology variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in murine airway infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Rakhimova

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with the diversification of the persisting clone into niche specialists and morphotypes, a phenomenon called 'dissociative behaviour'. To explore the potential of P. aeruginosa to change its morphotype by single step loss-of-function mutagenesis, a signature-tagged mini-Tn5 plasposon library of the cystic fibrosis airway isolate TBCF10839 was screened for colony morphology variants under nine different conditions in vitro. Transposon insertion into 1% of the genome changed colony morphology into eight discernable morphotypes. Half of the 55 targets encode features of primary or secondary metabolism whereby quinolone production was frequently affected. In the other half the transposon had inserted into genes of the functional categories transport, regulation or motility/chemotaxis. To mimic dissociative behaviour of isogenic strains in lungs, pools of 25 colony morphology variants were tested for competitive fitness in an acute murine airway infection model. Six of the 55 mutants either grew better or worse in vivo than in vitro, respectively. Metabolic proficiency of the colony morphology variant was a key determinant for survival in murine airways. The most common morphotype of self-destructive autolysis did unexpectedly not impair fitness. Transposon insertions into homologous genes of strain PAO1 did not reproduce the TBCF10839 mutant morphotypes for 16 of 19 examined loci pointing to an important role of the genetic background on colony morphology. Depending on the chosen P. aeruginosa strain, functional genome scans will explore other areas of the evolutionary landscape. Based on our discordant findings of mutant phenotypes in P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA14 and TBCF10839, we conclude that the current focus on few reference strains may miss modes of niche adaptation and dissociative behaviour that are relevant for the microevolution of complex traits in the wild.

  5. Antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with bronchiectasis: prevalence, risk factors and prognostic implications

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    Gao YH

    2018-01-01

    .7% had PA-R isolate at baseline. However, PA-R isolate was not associated with greater all-cause mortality in bronchiectasis.Conclusion: PA-R infection is common among bronchiectasis patients, mainly determined by prior exposure to antibiotics, frequent exacerbations, more pronounced dyspnea and more severe radiologic involvement. However, PA-R isolate is not an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in bronchiectasis. Keywords: bronchiectasis, antibiotic resistance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, risk factors, mortality

  6. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Richard P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77 and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21 were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa. Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64. Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5 than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1. Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally, patients with PPa BSI were not more acutely ill, as judged by APACHE II

  7. Polymorphisms in genes involved in GH1 release and their association with breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Kerstin; Hemminki, Kari; Grzybowska, Ewa; Klaes, Rüdiger; Burwinkel, Barbara; Bugert, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Butkiewicz, Dorota; Pamula, Jolanta; Pekala, Wioletta; Försti, Asta

    2006-09-01

    The regulation of growth hormone 1 (GH1) and insulin-like-growth factor-1 (IGF-1) release is under the influence of three pituitary hormones [growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), ghrelin (GHRL) and somatostatin (SST)], which act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the breast. By binding to their respective receptors, they control cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in a GH1/IGF-1-dependent manner. We investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GHRH, GHRHR, GHRL, GHSR, SST and SSTR2 gene regions in a Polish and a German cohort of 798 breast cancer cases and 1011 controls. Our study revealed an association of a novel TC repeat polymorphism in the SST promoter with a decreased breast cancer risk in the Polish study population [odds ratio (OR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-0.96]. The closely linked SNP IVS1 A+46G showed the same trend. For both polymorphisms the association was stronger in women above the age of 50 (OR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.14-0.76 and OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18-0.87, respectively). The protective effect of these polymorphisms was confirmed in a haplotype analysis among women above 50 years of age and carrying the two variant alleles (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.17-0.80). In the independent German population, we observed slightly decreased ORs among women above the age of 50 years. In the SSTR2 gene, carriers of the promoter 21/21 TG repeat genotype were at a decreased breast cancer risk (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.41-0.94) compared to carriers of the other genotypes in the Polish population. Furthermore, we identified a protective effect of the GHRHR C-261T SNP in both populations (joint analysis CT+TT versus CC: OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99). This effect was carried by a haplotype containing the protective allele. Thus, our study concludes a possible protective influence of distinct polymorphisms in genes involved in GH1 release on breast cancer risk.

  8. The complete genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis strain GH1-13 reveals agriculturally beneficial properties and a unique plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Song, Hajin; Sang, Mee Kyung; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Song, Jaekyeong

    2017-10-10

    The bacterial strain Bacillus velezensis GH1-13, isolated from rice paddy soil in Korea, has been shown to promote plant growth and have strong antagonistic activities against pathogens. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of GH1-13, revealing that it possesses a single 4,071,980-bp circular chromosome with 46.2% GC-content. The chromosome encodes 3,930 genes, and we have also identified a unique plasmid in the strain that encodes a further 104 genes (71,628bp and 31.7% GC-content). The genome was found to contain various enzyme-encoding operons, including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis proteins, 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, various non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, and several polyketide synthases. These properties are responsible for the promotion of plant growth and the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. They therefore have multiple beneficial effects that could be applied to agriculture. Through curing, we found that the unique plasmid of GH1-13 has important roles in the production of phytohormones, such as IAA, and in shaping phenotypic and physiological characteristics. The plasmid therefore likely influences the biological activities of GH1-13. The complete genome sequence of B. velezensis GH1-13 contributes to our understanding of this beneficial strain and will encourage research into its development for agricultural or biotechnological applications, enhancing productivity and crop quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of Risk Factors, Treatment and Hospital Stay in Complicated Urinary Tract Infections in Men Caused by Pseudomonas: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk Özger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is known that Pseudomonas has been isolated more frequently in health care-related urinary tract infections (UTIs. It was aimed to determine the risk factors and empiric therapies due to antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas-related male UTIs, and assess the effect of Pseudomonas isolation on treatment and length of hospital stay. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2011 and January 2013 with 228 male health care-related complicated UTI patients hospitalized in the Urology and Infectious Diseases Inpatient Clinics at Gazi University Faculty of Medicine. Three hundred UTI attacks in 228 patients were evaluated retrospectively with regard to agents. Results: Pseudomonas was isolated in 37 of 300 complicated UTI attacks in 228 male patients. Nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization were determined as the risk factors for Pseudomonas related with health care-related UTI. It was understood that nephrolithiasis increased Pseudomonas isolated UTI risk 3.5 fold and recurrent UTI increased the risk 8.9 fold. The antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas was higher than other agents. Pseudomonas related UTIs prolonged the duration of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment. Conclusion: In the presence of nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization, drugs against Pseudomonas would be appropriate empiric treatment for health care-related complicated UTI. Ciprofloxacin use should be restricted when local antibiotic resistance, which leads empiric treatment, is taken into consideration. Increases in hospital stay and antibiotic treatment duration were thought to be associated with recurrent infection frequency and high antibiotics resistance in Pseudomonas related UTIs.

  10. Effects of quorum-sensing on immunoglobulin G responses in a rat model of chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WU, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2004-01-01

    Levels of serum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed for 106 days in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Significantly weaker responses of serum IgG and IgG1 and a lower ratio of IgGI/IgG2a were found in the rats infected with the quorum-signal-deficient mutant, PAO1 (rhl......I, lasI), compared with the wild-type PAO1. Four out of 15 rats infected with wild-type PAO1 contained bacteria in the lungs on day 106, whereas no bacteria were found in the mutant PAO1 group. The results indicate that quorum signals contribute to the persistence of the infection and influence...

  11. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Questions on causality and responsibility arising from an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Bjørn

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2002, Norway experienced a large outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in hospitals with 231 confirmed cases. This fuelled intense public and professional debates on what were the causes and who were responsible. In epidemiology, other sciences, in philosophy and in law there is a long tradition of discussing the concept of causality. We use this outbreak as a case; apply various theories of causality from different disciplines to discuss the roles and responsibilities of some of the parties involved. Mackie's concept of INUS conditions, Hill's nine viewpoints to study association for claiming causation, deterministic and probabilistic ways of reasoning, all shed light on the issues of causality in this outbreak. Moreover, applying legal theories of causation (counterfactual reasoning and the "but-for" test and the NESS test proved especially useful, but the case also illustrated the weaknesses of the various theories of causation. We conclude that many factors contributed to causing the outbreak, but that contamination of a medical device in the production facility was the major necessary condition. The reuse of the medical device in hospitals contributed primarily to the size of the outbreak. The unintended error by its producer – and to a minor extent by the hospital practice – was mainly due to non-application of relevant knowledge and skills, and appears to constitute professional negligence. Due to criminal procedure laws and other factors outside the discourse of causality, no one was criminally charged for the outbreak which caused much suffering and shortening the life of at least 34 people.

  13. Nano-antibiotics in chronic lung infection therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadinoto, Kunn; Cheow, Wean Sin

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic encapsulation into nanoparticle carriers has emerged as a promising inhaled antibiotic formulation for treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Attributed to their prolonged lung retention, sustained antibiotic release, and mucus penetrating ability, antibiotic nanoparticles, or nano-antibiotics in short, can address the principal weakness of inhaled antibiotic solution, i.e. low antibiotic exposure in the vicinity of P. aeruginosa biofilm colonies resulting in diminished anti-pseudomonal efficacy after repeated uses. This review details the current state of development and limitations of the two most widely studied forms of nano-antibiotics, i.e. liposomes and polymer nanoparticles. Factors in their formulation that influence the anti-pseudomonal efficacy in vitro and in vivo, such as liposome's membrane rigidity, surface charge, size, and polymer hydrophobicity, are discussed. This review reveals that the superior anti-pseudomonal efficacy of liposomal antibiotics to free antibiotics has been clearly established when they are correctly formulated, with several liposomal antibiotic formulations are currently undergoing clinical trials. Liposomal antibiotics, nevertheless, are not without limitation due to their weak physicochemical stability. In contrast, only mucus penetrating ability of the more stable polymeric nano-antibiotics has been established, while their anti-pseudomonal efficacy has only been examined in vitro from which their superiority to free antibiotics has not been ascertained. Lastly, future research needs to bring liposome and polymer-based nano-antibiotics closer to their clinical realization are identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolated growth hormone deficiency in two siblings because of paternal mosaicism for a mutation in the GH1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubahara, Mayuko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Niijima, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Michiyo; Kamijo, Takashi; Murata, Yoshiharu; Haruna, Hidenori; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

      Mutations in the GH1 gene have been identified in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD). Mutations causing aberrant splicing of exon 3 of GH1 that have been identified in IGHD are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, whereas other mutations in GH1 that have been identified in IGHD are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.   Two siblings born from nonconsanguineous healthy parents exhibited IGHD. To elucidate the cause, GH1 in all family members was analysed.   Two novel mutations in GH1, a point mutation in intron 3 and a 16-bp deletion in exon 3, were identified by sequence analyses. The intronic mutation was present in both siblings and was predicted to cause aberrant splicing. The deletion was present in one of the siblings as well as the mother with normal stature and was predicted to cause rapid degradation of mRNA through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The point mutation was not identified in the parents' peripheral blood DNA; however, it was detected in the DNA extracted from the father's sperms. As a trace of the mutant allele was detected in the peripheral blood of the father using PCR-RFLP, the mutation is likely to have occurred de novo at an early developmental stage before differentiation of somatic cells and germline cells.   This is the first report of mosaicism for a mutation in GH1 in a family with IGHD. It is clear that the intronic mutation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of IGHD in this family, as one of the siblings who had only the point mutation was affected. On the other hand, the other sibling was a compound heterozygote for the point mutation and the 16-bp deletion and it may be arguable whether IGHD in this patient should be regarded as autosomal dominant or recessive. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Phylogenomically guided identification of industrially relevant GH1 β-glucosidases through DNA synthesis and nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Richard A; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Nath, Sangeeta; Deng, Kai; Bowen, Benjamin P; Chivian, Dylan C; Datta, Supratim; Friedland, Gregory D; D'Haeseleer, Patrik; Wu, Dongying; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Scullin, Chessa S; Singh, Seema; Shi, Weibing; Hamilton, Matthew G; Bendall, Matthew L; Sczyrba, Alexander; Thompson, John; Feldman, Taya; Guenther, Joel M; Gladden, John M; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Adams, Paul D; Rubin, Edward M; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Northen, Trent R; Deutsch, Samuel

    2014-09-19

    Harnessing the biotechnological potential of the large number of proteins available in sequence databases requires scalable methods for functional characterization. Here we propose a workflow to address this challenge by combining phylogenomic guided DNA synthesis with high-throughput mass spectrometry and apply it to the systematic characterization of GH1 β-glucosidases, a family of enzymes necessary for biomass hydrolysis, an important step in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuels and chemicals. We synthesized and expressed 175 GH1s, selected from over 2000 candidate sequences to cover maximum sequence diversity. These enzymes were functionally characterized over a range of temperatures and pHs using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS), generating over 10,000 data points. When combined with HPLC-based sugar profiling, we observed GH1 enzymes active over a broad temperature range and toward many different β-linked disaccharides. For some GH1s we also observed activity toward laminarin, a more complex oligosaccharide present as a major component of macroalgae. An area of particular interest was the identification of GH1 enzymes compatible with the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), a next-generation biomass pretreatment technology. We thus searched for GH1 enzymes active at 70 °C and 20% (v/v) [C2mim][OAc] over the course of a 24-h saccharification reaction. Using our unbiased approach, we identified multiple enzymes of different phylogentic origin with such activities. Our approach of characterizing sequence diversity through targeted gene synthesis coupled to high-throughput screening technologies is a broadly applicable paradigm for a wide range of biological problems.

  16. Transcriptome changes in the phenylpropanoid pathway of Glycine max in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Delkin O

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of plant molecular responses to pathogenic infections have pinpointed increases in activity of several genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway leading to the synthesis of lignin and flavonoids. The majority of those findings were derived from single gene studies and more recently from several global gene expression analyses. We undertook a global transcriptional analysis focused on the response of genes of the multiple branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway to infection by the Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea with or without the avirulence gene avrB to characterize more broadly the contribution of the multiple branches of the pathway to the resistance response in soybean. Transcript abundance in leaves was determined from analysis of soybean cDNA microarray data and hybridizations to RNA blots with specific gene probes. Results The majority of the genes surveyed presented patterns of increased transcript accumulation. Some increased rapidly, 2 and 4 hours after inoculation, while others started to accumulate slowly by 8 – 12 hours. In contrast, transcripts of a few genes decreased in abundance 2 hours post inoculation. Most interestingly was the opposite temporal fluctuation in transcript abundance between early responsive genes in defense (CHS and IFS1 and F3H, the gene encoding a pivotal enzyme in the synthesis of anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins and flavonols. F3H transcripts decreased rapidly 2 hours post inoculation and increased during periods when CHS and IFS transcripts decreased. It was also determined that all but one (CHS4 family member genes (CHS1, CHS2, CHS3, CHS5, CHS6 and CHS7/8 accumulated higher transcript levels during the defense response provoked by the avirulent pathogen challenge. Conclusion Based on the mRNA profiles, these results show the strong bias that soybean has towards increasing the synthesis of isoflavonoid phytoalexins concomitant with the down regulation of genes required for the

  17. Differential infectivity of two Pseudomonas species and the immune response in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Insecta: Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Dorn, A

    2001-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida show a profound differential infectivity after inoculation in Oncopeltus fasciatus. Whereas P. putida has no significant impact on nymphs, P. aeruginosa kills all experimental animals within 48 h. Both Pseudomonas species, however, induce the same four hemolymph peptides in O. fasciatus. Also injection of saline solution and injury induced these peptides. In general peptide induction was stronger in nymphs than in adult males. A significantly higher number of nymphs survived a challenge with P. aeruginosa when an immunization with P. putida preceded. The antibacterial properties of the hemolymph were demonstrated in inhibition experiments with P. putida. Two of the four inducible peptides (peptides 1 and 4) could be partially sequenced after Edman degradation and were compared with known antibacterial peptides. Peptide 1, of 15 kDa, showed 47.1% identity with the glycine-rich hemiptericin of Pyrrhocoris apterus. Peptide 4, of 2 kDa, had a 77.8% identity with the proline-rich pyrrhocoricin of P. apterus and a 76.9% identity with metalnikowin 1 of Palomena prasina. Peptides 2 and 3 are also small, with molecular weights of 8 and 5 kDa.

  18. The immune response to chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is predominantly of the Th2 type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Kjaergaard, S; Pressler, T

    2000-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection have a persistent acute type lung inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and a pronounced antibody response against P. aeruginosa. We speculated whether this immune response in CF...... is of the Th2 type and whether a change to a Th1 type immune response could improve the prognosis. Therefore, we studied 14 CF patients with (CF +P) and 14 CF patients without (CF -P) chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. The specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4......: Rho=0.524; ptype immune response is most frequent in CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection, and the patients with a Th1-dominated immune response had the best lung function. The clinical implication is that a change to a Th1 type immune response might...

  19. Coexistence and Within-Host Evolution of Diversified Lineages of Hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Long-term Cystic Fibrosis Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliziani, Sofia; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Lujan, Adela M.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has made it possible to follow the genomic evolution of pathogenic bacteria by comparing longitudinally collected bacteria sampled from human hosts. Such studies in the context of chronic airway infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic...... to investigate within-host population diversity or long-term evolution of mutators in CF airways. We sequenced the genomes of 13 and 14 isolates of P. aeruginosa mutator populations from an Argentinian and a Danish CF patient, respectively. Our collection of isolates spanned 6 and 20 years of patient infection...... history, respectively. We sequenced 11 isolates from a single sample from each patient to allow in-depth analysis of population diversity. Each patient was infected by clonal populations of bacteria that were dominated by mutators. The in vivo mutation rate of the populations was similar to 100 SNPs...

  20. Deficiency of mannose-binding lectin greatly increases susceptibility to postburn infection with Pseudomonas aeruignosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Kristensen, Mette; Ip, WK; Shi, L

    2006-01-01

    studies in humans and mice suggests that lack of MBL together with other comorbid factors predisposes the host to infection. In this study we examined whether MBL deficiency increases the risk of P. aeruginosa infection in a burned host. We found that both wild-type and MBL null mice were resistant to a 5......Burn injury disrupts the mechanical and biological barrier that the skin presents against infection by symbionts like the Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacteria. A combination of local factors, antimicrobial peptides, and resident effector cells form the initial response to mechanical...... injury of the skin. This activity is followed by an inflammatory response that includes influx of phagocytes and serum factors, such as complement and mannose-binding lectin (MBL), which is a broad-spectrum pattern recognition molecule that plays a key role in innate immunity. A growing consensus from...

  1. [Epidemiologic diagnostic of nosocomial suppurative-septic infections of Pseudomonas etiology based on intraspecies typing of causative agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fel'dblium, I V; Zakharova, Iu A; Nikolaeva, A M; Fedotova, O S

    2013-01-01

    Scientific justification of optimization of epidemiologic diagnostic of suppurative-septic infection (SSI) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa based on comparability of antibiotic sensitivity and beta-lactamase production. Intraspecies typing of 37 P. aeruginosa strains isolated during microbiological monitoring of 106 patients and 131 objects of clinical environment of surgical and obstetrician hospitals by using a complex ofphenotypic and molecular-biological methods including determination of sensitivity to antibiotics by serial dilutions method and PCR-diagnostics with determination of TEM, SHV, CTX, OXA, MBL, VIM genes was performed. P. aeruginosa strains combined into groups by isolation location during studies turned out to be heterogeneous by sensitivity to antibiotics and beta-lactamase production that allowed to form subgroups of strains by focality attribute. Isolates recovered from different SSI foci had significant differences in minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) reaching 1024 times. MIC parameter within subgroups did not exceed 8 - 16 consequent dilutions. Use of a complex of phenotypic and molecular-biologic methods of causative agent typing including determination of sensitivity to antibiotics by serial dilutions method and evaluation of beta-lactamase production allowed to establish a mechanism of development of SSI epidemic process caused by P. aeruginosa, detect origins and reservoirs of infection in hospital, modes and factors of transmission and reach maximum justification of epidemiologic control and prophylaxis measures of localization of foci of nosocomial infections of pseudomonas etiology.

  2. Distribution and linkage disequilibrium analysis of polymorphisms of GH1 gene in different populations of pigs associated with body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yunyun; Liu, Songcai; Su, Dan; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Qingyan; Li, Siming; Fu, Haoyu; Yu, Hao; Hao, Linlin

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been considered as a candidate gene for growth and body size in pigs. In this study, polymorphisms of the GH1 gene were evaluated for associations with body size traits in 190 pig individuals. Seventeen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in GH1 gene of the large pig breeds and miniature pig breeds using direct sequencing and genotyped by allele-specific PCR approach. Notably, six (g.237A>G, g.283T>C, g.309A>G, g.318A>G, g.540A>G and g.544A>G) of them were significantly associated with body size, of which three loci (g.283T>C, g.309A>G, g.318A>G) located in the signal-peptide coding region of GH1 gene compose a CGG haplotype for large pigs and TAA haplotype for miniature pigs (P G and g.544A>G) located in the second intron of GH1 gene compose a GG haplotype for large pigs and AA haplotype for miniature pigs (P body size of pigs providing genetic basis for pig breeding with the improved economic benefits.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasI and rhlI quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Givskov, Michael

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared....... The rat model of P. aeruginosa lung infection was used in the present study. The rats were killed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after infection with the P. aeruginosa strains. The results showed that during the early stages of infection, the PAO1 double mutant induced a stronger serum antibody response, higher...... number of lung bacteria, and minor serum IgG and IgG1 responses but increased lung interferon gamma production were detected in the group infected with the PAO1 double mutant when compared with the PAO1-infected group. Delayed immune responses were observed in the PAO1-infected group and they might...

  4. Detection of N-acylhomoserine lactones in lung tissues of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Hentzer, Morten

    2000-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with expression of virulence factors, many of which are controlled by two N:-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum-sensing systems. Escherichia coli strains equipped with a luxR-based monitor system expressing green fluorescent protein ...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa RhlR is required to neutralize the cellular immune response in a Drosophila melanogaster oral infection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Stefanie; Haller, Samantha; Drenkard, Eliana; Lee, Janice; Yu, Shen; Kocks, Christine; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth mechanistic understanding of microbial infection necessitates a molecular dissection of host–pathogen relationships. Both Drosophila melanogaster and Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been intensively studied. Here, we analyze the infection of D. melanogaster by P. aeruginosa by using mutants in both host and pathogen. We show that orally ingested P. aeruginosa crosses the intestinal barrier and then proliferates in the hemolymph, thereby causing the infected flies to die of bacteremia. Host defenses against ingested P. aeruginosa included an immune deficiency (IMD) response in the intestinal epithelium, systemic Toll and IMD pathway responses, and a cellular immune response controlling bacteria in the hemocoel. Although the observed cellular and intestinal immune responses appeared to act throughout the course of the infection, there was a late onset of the systemic IMD and Toll responses. In this oral infection model, P. aeruginosa PA14 did not require its type III secretion system or other well-studied virulence factors such as the two-component response regulator GacA or the protease AprA for virulence. In contrast, the quorum-sensing transcription factor RhlR, but surprisingly not LasR, played a key role in counteracting the cellular immune response against PA14, possibly at an early stage when only a few bacteria are present in the hemocoel. These results illustrate the power of studying infection from the dual perspective of host and pathogen by revealing that RhlR plays a more complex role during pathogenesis than previously appreciated. PMID:21987808

  6. Effect of Pseudomonas spp on infection of Peronosporaparasitica (Pers. Fr), the pathogen of downy mildew on Chinese cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiri, N.; Mulawarman; Umayah, A.; Agustin, S. E.; Rahmiyah, M.

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted to study the effect of the application of Pseudomonasspp on infection of Peronosporaparasitica (Pers. Fr), the pathogen of Downy mildew on Chinese cabbage. The research was conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse Department of Plant Pests and Diseases Faculty of Agriculture Sriwijaya University, Inderalaya, OganIlir South Sumatra Indonesia. The research was conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse Department of Plant Pests and Diseases Faculty of Agriculture Sriwijaya University, Inderalaya, Ogan Ilir South Sumatra Indonesia. The research was conducted using Completely Randomized Design with ten treatments including control. ie: isolate A, Isolate B, isolate C, isolate D, isolate E, isolate F, isolate G, isolate H, isolate I and control. Each treatment consists of four replications. Results of the study showed that the application of Pseudomonas spp. can suppress the infection of P. parasitica on Chinese cabbage. The lowest disease intensity was shown by treatment C (isolate Pseudomonas sp.) which was significantly different from control. The best treatment in suppressing disease severity of downy mildew on chinese cabbage was isolate H which had disease severity of 37.07 percent, which was significantly different from control and other treatment.

  7. Immunization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines and adjuvant can modulate the type of inflammatory response subsequent to infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Cryz, S J

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To study the possibility of preventing lung inflammation and decreasing the progression of the infection by vaccination, we have developed a rat model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. Rats were......, 2.0 versus 2.1 to 2.8) pathologic abnormalities were less severe in the control rats injected with sterile saline than in the immunized rats and the IFA group. The more severe lung abnormalities observed in immunized rats could be due to the result of immune complex-mediated lung tissue damage...... an acute-type inflammation to a chronic-type inflammation dominated by mononuclear leukocytes and scattered granulomas. Cross-reacting antibodies were induced by the two alginate vaccines, and most immunized animals developed a significant (P

  8. Poor antioxidant status exacerbates oxidative stress and inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in Guinea Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    , which is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in CF. Guinea pigs are unable to synthesize ascorbate (ASC) or vitamin C, a major antioxidant of the lung, and thus like human beings rely on its presence in the diet. On this basis, guinea pigs receiving ASC-deficient diet have been used as a model...... of oxidative stress. The aim of our study was to investigate the consequences of a 7-day biofilm-grown P. aeruginosa lung infection in 3-month-old guinea pigs receiving either ASC-sufficient or ASC-deficient diet for at least 2 months. The animals receiving ASC-deficient diet showed significantly higher......Considerable evidence supports the presence of oxidative stress in cystic fibrosis (CF). The disease has long been associated with both increased production of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant status, in particular during the chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  9. Assessment of serology and spirometry and the combination of both to complement microbiological isolation for earlier detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik Pirš, Ana; Krivec, Uroš; Simčič, Saša; Seme, Katja

    2016-11-25

    The aim of this study was to assess whether serology and spirometry and the combination of both can complement culture-based detection for earlier recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis. A 4 year longitudinal prospective study that included 67 Slovenian children with cystic fibrosis with a mean age of 10.5 years was conducted. Serology, spirometry and a scoring system combining serology and spirometry were assessed and compared. Infection was confirmed with isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from respiratory samples. There was a significantly positive correlation between serology and the combination of serology and spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry the highest sensitivity (0.90). Both had a high negative predictive value (0.93 and 0.79 respectively). Using serology and the combination of serology and lung function measurement can be beneficial for earlier detection of infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis when done simultaneously with standard culture-based detection from respiratory samples.

  10. In-vivo expression profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections reveals niche-specific and strain-independent transcriptional programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bielecki

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics. To gain insights into the physiology of P. aeruginosa during infection, we assessed the transcriptional programs of three different P. aeruginosa strains directly after isolation from burn wounds of humans. We compared the programs to those of the same strains using two infection models: a plant model, which consisted of the infection of the midrib of lettuce leaves, and a murine tumor model, which was obtained by infection of mice with an induced tumor in the abdomen. All control conditions of P. aeruginosa cells growing in suspension and as a biofilm were added to the analysis. We found that these different P. aeruginosa strains express a pool of distinct genetic traits that are activated under particular infection conditions regardless of their genetic variability. The knowledge herein generated will advance our understanding of P. aeruginosa virulence and provide valuable cues for the definition of prospective targets to develop novel intervention strategies.

  11. N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa PsDAHP1 protects zebrafish against Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoj, Gopalakrishnan; Jayakumar, Rengarajan; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Shanthi, Sathappan; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2015-01-01

    Four strains of N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL)-degrading Pseudomonas spp., named PsDAHP1, PsDAHP2, PsDAHP3, and PsDAHP4 were isolated and identified from the intestine of Fenneropenaeus indicus. PsDAHP1 showed the highest AHL-degrading activity among the four isolates. PsDAHP1 inhibited biofilm-forming exopolysaccharide and altered cell surface hydrophobicity of virulent green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Vibrio parahaemolyticus DAHV2 (GFP-VpDAHV2). Oral administration of PsDAHP1 significantly reduced zebrafish mortality caused by GFP-VpDAHV2 challenge, and inhibited colonisation of GFP-VpDAHV2 in the gills and intestine of zebrafish as evidence by confocal laser scanning microscope and selective plating. Furthermore, zebrafish receiving PsDAHP1-containing feed had increased phagocytic cells of its leucocytes, increased serum activities of superoxide dismutase and lysozyme. The results suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PsDAHP1 could protect zebrafish from V. parahaemolyticus infection by inhibiting biofilm formation and enhancing defence mechanisms of the fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-dose continuous infusion beta-lactam antibiotics for the treatment of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Brad; Henning, Stacey A; Childs, Richard; Holland, Steven M; Anderson, Victoria L; Morris, John C; Wilson, Wyndham H; Drusano, George L; Walsh, Thomas J

    2010-05-01

    To report a case series of high-dose continuous infusion beta-lactam antibiotics for the treatment of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Continuous infusion ceftazidime or aztreonam was administered to achieve target drug concentrations at or above the minimum inhibitory concentration, when possible, in 3 patients with P. aeruginosa infections. The maximal calculated target drug concentration was 100 mg/L. In the first patient, with primary immunodeficiency, neutropenia, and aggressive cutaneous T-cell lymphoma/leukemia, continuous infusion ceftazidime (6.5-9.6 g/day) was used to successfully treat multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia. In the second patient, with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, continuous infusion aztreonam (8.4 g/day) was used to successfully treat multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa wound infections. In the third patient, with severe aplastic anemia, continuous infusion ceftazidime (7-16.8 g/day) was used to treat P. aeruginosa pneumonia and bacteremia. In each patient, bacteremia cleared, infected wounds healed, and pneumonia improved in response to continuous infusion ceftazidime or aztreonam. Treatment strategies for multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections are limited. A novel treatment strategy, when no other options are available, is the continuous infusion of existing beta-lactam antibiotics to maximize their pharmacodynamic activity. High-dose continuous infusion ceftazidime or aztreonam was used for the successful treatment of resistant systemic P. aeruginosa infections in 3 chronically immunocompromised patients. Continuous infusion beta-lactam antibiotics are a potentially useful treatment strategy for resistant P. aeruginosa infections in immunocompromised patients.

  13. In Vitro Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Using Conditions That Mimic the Environment at Specific Infection Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmer-Hamood, J A; Dzvova, N; Kruczek, C; Hamood, A N

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and acute systemic infections in severely burned patients and immunocompromised patients including cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and HIV infected individuals. In response to the environmental conditions at specific infection sites, P. aeruginosa expresses certain sets of cell-associated and extracellular virulence factors that produce tissue damage. Analyzing the mechanisms that govern the production of these virulence factors in vitro requires media that closely mimic the environmental conditions within the infection sites. In this chapter, we review studies based on media that closely resemble three in vivo conditions, the thick mucus accumulated within the lung alveoli of CF patients, the serum-rich wound bed and the bloodstream. Media resembling the CF alveolar mucus include standard laboratory media supplemented with sputum obtained from CF patients as well as prepared synthetic mucus media formulated to contain the individual components of CF sputum. Media supplemented with serum or individual serum components have served as surrogates for the soluble host components of wound infections, while whole blood has been used to investigate the adaptation of pathogens to the bloodstream. Studies using these media have provided valuable information regarding P. aeruginosa gene expression in different host environments as varying sets of genes were differentially regulated during growth in each medium. The unique effects observed indicate the essential role of these in vitro media that closely mimic the in vivo conditions in providing accurate information regarding the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Cassia alata aqueous extract as a bath treatment to control Pseudomonas anguilliseptica infection in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumkhachorn Parichat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extracts of six plants, Andrographis paniculata, Cassia alata, Centella asiatica, Garcinia mangostana, Punica granatum and Psidium guajava, were investigated for their antimicrobial activity and mode of action against Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, an important fish pathogenic bacterium, which is responsible for economic losses in aquaculture worldwide. Among the tested plant extracts, the C. alata aqueous extract had the strongest inhibitory effect and exhibited a bactericidal mode of action against the pathogenic bacterium. When an infection of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus with P. anguilliseptica was induced by intraperitoneal, the median lethal dose (LD50 was determined to be 1.59 x 105 CFU/ml. For the in vivo trial, four different concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of C. alata aqueous extract were used as bath treatment to remedy the infection. The effect of the extract on the infection was dose-dependent and an extract with the concentration of 100 ppm eliminated mortality of the infected fish without producing any adverse effects on the animals. This study suggests that C. alata aqueous extract has the potential to control fish disease caused by P. anguilliseptica.

  15. Diversity, Prevalence, and Longitudinal Occurrence of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infecting Cystic Fibrosis Lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra B. Andersen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are most commonly composed of two genes encoding a stable toxin, which harms the cell, and an unstable antitoxin that can inactivate it. TA systems were initially characterized as selfish elements, but have recently gained attention for regulating general stress responses responsible for pathogen virulence, formation of drug-tolerant persister cells and biofilms—all implicated in causing recalcitrant chronic infections. We use a bioinformatics approach to explore the distribution and evolution of type II TA loci of the opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, across longitudinally sampled isolates from cystic fibrosis lungs. We identify their location in the genome, mutations, and gain/loss during infection to elucidate their function(s in stabilizing selfish elements and pathogenesis. We found (1 26 distinct TA systems, where all isolates harbor four in their core genome and a variable number of the remaining 22 on genomic islands; (2 limited mutations in core genome TA loci, suggesting they are not under negative selection; (3 no evidence for horizontal transmission of elements with TA systems between clone types within patients, despite their ability to mobilize; (4 no gain and limited loss of TA-bearing genomic islands, and of those elements partially lost, the remnant regions carry the TA systems supporting their role in genomic stabilization; (5 no significant correlation between frequency of TA systems and strain ability to establish as chronic infection, but those with a particular TA, are more successful in establishing a chronic infection.

  16. An outbreak of hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection caused by contaminated bottled water in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmanns, T; Oppert, M; Martin, M; Amorosa, R; Zuschneid, I; Frei, U; Rüden, H; Weist, K

    2008-05-01

    This study describes an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections caused by contaminated bottled still water (BSW) in six intensive care units (ICUs) of a German university hospital. Clinical and environmental samples from these units were cultured and genotyped by amplified fragment-length polymorphism and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Microbiological results were reviewed on a weekly basis to determine the number of P. aeruginosa infections and colonisations of ICU patients. Clinical specimens from 19 ICU patients--15 infections and four colonisations--yielded the same strain of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, four of 103 environmental samples also yielded P. aeruginosa. However, only a P. aeruginosa strain isolated from unopened BSW was genetically identical to the P. aeruginosa strain isolated from the patients. In the 42-week period before the outbreak, the mean weekly number of new ICU patients infected or colonised with P. aeruginosa was 46.9 (95% CI 40.7-53.1)/1000 bed-days. During the 6-week period of the outbreak, the weekly number of new patients with P. aeruginosa was 88.9 (95% CI 54.3-122.2)/1000 bed-days. This number returned to the previous level after removal of the BSW. Thus, the microbiological and epidemiological findings revealed that the outbreak was related to BSW contaminated with P. aeruginosa. It was concluded that all untested BSW should be removed from ICUs.

  17. Application of protein typing in molecular epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infection outbreak of aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Tang, Min; Ding, Yinghuan; Wu, Zecai; Xiang, Chengyu; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Zhang; Li, Baolin; Deng, Zhenghua; Liu, Jinbo

    2017-12-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosan has emerged as an important pathogen elated to serious infections and nosocomial outbreaks worldwide. This study was conducted to understand the prevalence of aminoglycoside (AMG)-resistant P. aeruginosa in our hospital and to provide a scientific basis for control measures against nosocomial infections. Eighty-two strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical departments and divided into AMG-resistant strains and AMG-sensitive strains based on susceptibility test results. AMG-resistant strains were typed by drug resistance gene typing (DRGT) and protein typing. Five kinds of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes were detected in the AMG-resistant group. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were classified into three types and six subtypes by DRGT. Four protein peaks, namely, 9900.02, 7600.04, 9101.25 and 10,372.87 Da, were significantly and differentially expressed between the two groups. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were also categorised into three types and six subtypes at the distance level of 10 by protein typing. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa was cloned spread in our hospital; the timely implementation of nosocomial infection prevention and control strategies were needed in preventing outbreaks and epidemic of AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa. SELDI-TOF MS technology can be used for bacterial typing, which provides a new method of clinical epidemiological survey and nosocomial infection control.

  18. Dietary Pectin-Derived Acidic Oligosaccharides Improve the Pulmonary Bacterial Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection in Mice by Modulating Intestinal Microbiota and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernard, H.; Desseyn, J.L.; Bartke, N.; Kleinjans, L.P.J.; Belzer, C.; Knol, J.; Gottrand, F.; Husson, M.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A predominantly T-helper type 2 (Th2) immune response is critical in the prognosis of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. But the mucosal and systemic immune responses can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Methods. We assessed the effect of microbiota compositional

  19. Outbreak of infection in a burns unit due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa originating from contaminated tubing used for irrigation of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Thuesen, B; Nielsen, S V

    1993-01-01

    water used for irrigation of the burns, as part of the first-aid treatment which the patients received when entering the hospital. Contamination was restricted to showers and tubing that were permanently connected to the taps, and the outbreak stopped after they had been disinfected. Tubing and showers...... used for irrigation of burns should be dismantled and heat-disinfected after each patient and not reconnected to the taps until immediately before the next treatment. Taps used for irrigation of burns should be monitored regularly for the presence of P. aeruginosa and other potentially pathogenic......Five patients with extensive deep burns developed septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa serogroup O-7.8 and phage type 21 or 21/188 shortly after they had been admitted to hospital. Four other burned patients became colonized with the same strain. The source of infection was contaminated tap...

  20. Diversity, Prevalence, and Longitudinal Occurrence of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infecting Cystic Fibrosis Lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum Andersen, Sandra; Ghoul, Melanie; Griffin, Ashleigh S.

    2017-01-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are most commonly composed of two genes encoding a stable toxin, which harms the cell, and an unstable antitoxin that can inactivate it. TA systems were initially characterized as selfish elements, but have recently gained attention for regulating general stress...... responses responsible for pathogen virulence, formation of drug-tolerant persister cells and biofilms—all implicated in causing recalcitrant chronic infections. We use a bioinformatics approach to explore the distribution and evolution of type II TA loci of the opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... in their core genome and a variable number of the remaining 22 on genomic islands; (2) limited mutations in core genome TA loci, suggesting they are not under negative selection; (3) no evidence for horizontal transmission of elements with TA systems between clone types within patients, despite their ability...

  1. Investigating the failure of repeated standard cleaning and disinfection of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected pancreatic and biliary endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lijun; Zhou, Zhihui; Liu, Qifang; Ni, Yuhua; Zhao, Feng; Cheng, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Digestive endoscopy is an important technique for the diagnosis and treatment of digestive system disease. To assure medical safety, a digestive endoscope must be cleaned and disinfected before its use in an operation on the next patient. The most common treatment procedure on a digestive endoscope is high-level disinfection. The potential risk associated with digestive endoscopes is always the focus of endoscopic management in clinical practice. In this study, a polluted pancreatic and biliary endoscope after surgery was cleaned and disinfected multiple times with the standard procedure but still tested positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture, which is very rare and has not been reported in China or abroad. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection definition: EuroCareCF Working Group report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressler, T; Bohmova, C; Conway, S

    2011-01-01

    are particularly challenging: the progressive nature of the disease and the wide variation in severity influence considerably the outcome of drug testing. A validated, universally accepted, and clinically useful classification of patients infected with P. aeruginosa, particularly those chronically infected...

  3. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  4. Multitracer Stable Isotope Quantification of Arginase and Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas Lung Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Grasemann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis airways are deficient for L-arginine, a substrate for nitric oxide synthases (NOSs and arginases. The rationale for this study was to quantify NOS and arginase activity in the mouse lung. Anesthetized unventilated mice received a primed constant stable isotope intravenous infusion containing labeled L-arginine, ornithine, and citrulline. The isotopic enrichment of each of the infused isotopomers and its product amino acids were measured in plasma and organ homogenates using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The effect of infection was studied three days after direct tracheal instillation of Pseudomonas-coated agar beads. In the infusion model, lung infection resulted in a significant (28-fold increase in NOS activity in lung but not in trachea, kidney, liver, or plasma. Absolute rates of arginase activity in solid tissues could not be calculated in this model. In an isolated lung perfusion model used for comparison increased NOS activity in infected lungs was confirmed (28.5-fold and lung arginase activity was increased 9.7-fold. The activity of L-arginine metabolizing enzymes can be measured using stable isotope conversion in the mouse. Accumulation of L-ornithine in the whole mouse model hindered the exact quantification of arginase activity in the lung, a problem that was overcome utilizing an isolated lung perfusion model.

  5. The levels of nitrite and nitrate, proline and protein profiles in tomato plants infected with pseudomonas syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berber, I.; Onlu, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the contents of nitrite-nitrate and free L-proline, and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in tomato plants following inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain were examined. The results of the nitrite and nitrate indicated that there was a reduction in the levels of nitrate in the infected tomato plants through 1-8 study days, compared with the healthy plants. On the other hands, when the nitrite amounts increased in the first and second days, the nitrite concentrations reduced in infected plants at subsequent time periods, compared with uninfected plants. The accumulation of free proline increased in the infected plants, according to control plants. The whole-cell protein profiles displayed that the levels of the protein bands of molecular masses 204.6 kDa and 69.9 kDa significantly increased in infected and uninfected plants during 2-10 study days. In additionally, in the quantities of the protein bands of molecular weights 90.3 and 79.4 kDa were observed an increase in the infected and healthy plants after the fourth day. However, the protein band of molecular weight 54.3 kDa was visible only in uninfected plants for the fourth and eighth days. Finally, the study suggest that there were the sophisticate relationships among the proline accumulation, the conversion of nitrate to nitrite and the induction of PR protein genes in the regulation of defense mechanisms toward microbial invaders. Our results also indicated that the increases in nitrite and proline contents might be useful indicator for the response toward pathogen attacks. (author)

  6. Positive signature-tagged mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: tracking patho-adaptive mutations promoting airways chronic infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Bianconi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Persistent lifestyle is established with P. aeruginosa patho-adaptive variants, which are clonal with the initially-acquired strains. Several reports indicated that P. aeruginosa adapts by loss-of-function mutations which enhance fitness in CF airways and sustain its clonal expansion during chronic infection. To validate this model of P. aeruginosa adaptation to CF airways and to identify novel genes involved in this microevolution, we designed a novel approach of positive-selection screening by PCR-based signature-tagged mutagenesis (Pos-STM in a murine model of chronic airways infection. A systematic positive-selection scheme using sequential rounds of in vivo screenings for bacterial maintenance, as opposed to elimination, generated a list of genes whose inactivation increased the colonization and persistence in chronic airways infection. The phenotypes associated to these Pos-STM mutations reflect alterations in diverse aspects of P. aeruginosa biology which include lack of swimming and twitching motility, lack of production of the virulence factors such as pyocyanin, biofilm formation, and metabolic functions. In addition, Pos-STM mutants showed altered invasion and stimulation of immune response when tested in human respiratory epithelial cells, indicating that P. aeruginosa is prone to revise the interaction with its host during persistent lifestyle. Finally, sequence analysis of Pos-STM genes in longitudinally P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients identified signs of patho-adaptive mutations within the genome. This novel Pos-STM approach identified bacterial functions that can have important clinical implications for the persistent lifestyle and disease progression of the airway chronic infection.

  7. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Gidrol, X.; Lemercier, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design. (authors)

  8. Baicalin inhibits biofilm formation, attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence and enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa clearance in a mouse peritoneal implant infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing (QS circuit plays a role in the precise regulation of genes controlling virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. QS-controlled biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings has remained controversial due to emerging drug resistance; therefore, screening diverse compounds for anti-biofilm or anti-QS activities is important. This study demonstrates the ability of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs of baicalin, an active natural compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal Scutellaria baicalensis, to inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance the bactericidal effects of various conventional antibiotics in vitro. In addition, baicalin exerted dose-dependent inhibitory effects on virulence phenotypes (LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, motilities and exotoxin A regulated by QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, the expression levels of QS-regulatory genes, including lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR, pqsR and pqsA, were repressed after sub-MIC baicalin treatment, resulting in significant decreases in the QS signaling molecules 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL, confirming the ability of baicalin-mediated QS inhibition to alter gene and protein expression. In vivo experiments indicated that baicalin treatment reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Greater worm survival in the baicalin-treated group manifested as an increase in the LT50 from 24 to 96 h. In a mouse peritoneal implant infection model, baicalin treatment enhanced the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the implants of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with the control group. Moreover, the combination of baicalin and antibiotics significantly reduced the numbers of colony-forming units in the implants to a significantly greater degree than antibiotic treatment alone. Pathological and histological analyses revealed

  9. Annual Surveillance Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    2017 Section B – Antimicrobial Resistance and Use Regional Multidrug Resistance The 2016 annual incidence rate of P. aeruginosa among all MHS...characteristics, prescription practices, and antibiotic resistance patterns observed for P. aeruginosa infections in calendar year (CY) 2016. Multiple...decreased and the majority of infections occurred in those over 65 years of age. Regional distribution of infections and drug resistance followed the

  10. Tasco®: A Product of Ascophyllum nodosum Enhances Immune Response of Caenorhabditis elegans Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Tasco®, a product made from the brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum were tested for the ability to protect Caenorhabditis elegans against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. A water extract of Tasco® (TWE reduced P. aeruginosa inflicted mortality in the nematode. The TWE, at a concentration of 300 µg/mL, offered the maximum protection and induced the expression of innate immune response genes viz.; zk6.7 (Lypases, lys-1 (Lysozyme, spp-1 (Saponin like protein, f28d1.3 (Thaumatin like protein, t20g5.7 (Matridin SK domain protein, abf-1 (Antibacterial protein and f38a1.5 (Lectin family protein. Further, TWE treatment also affected a number of virulence components of the P. aeuroginosa and reduced its secreted virulence factors such as lipase, proteases and toxic metabolites; hydrogen cyanide and pyocyanin. Decreased virulence factors were associated with a significant reduction in expression of regulatory genes involved in quorum sensing, lasI, lasR, rhlI and rhlR. In conclusion, the TWE-treatment protected the C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection by a combination of effects on the innate immunity of the worms and direct effects on the bacterial quorum sensing and virulence factors.

  11. Effectiveness of netilmicin and tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in an experimental tissue infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, B G; Hoogeterp, J J; Lim, T; Douwes-Idema, A E; Mattie, H

    1993-03-01

    The activity of netilmicin and tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed in vitro in the presence of constant and exponentially declining concentrations, and in mice in an experimental thigh infection. The activity in vitro at constant concentrations was expressed as the maximal killing rate (ER) during 3 h of exposure. On the basis of the quantitative relation between E(R) and the drug concentration, the numbers of cfu expected at consecutive times, at constant as well as at declining concentrations, were predicted. The relationship between observed numbers and predicted values of ERt were similar under both conditions for both drugs. On the same basis the numbers of cfu expected in the experimental thigh infection were predicted. There was indeed a significant linear relationship between observed numbers of cfu in homogenized muscle and the values predicted on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of the aminoglycosides, but the slope of this relationship was only 0.22. There was no difference in this respect between the two antibiotics. It is concluded that the efficacy of netilmicin and tobramycin against P. aeruginosa is considerably less in vivo than in vitro, but the relation is about the same for the two drugs; therefore the slightly higher activity of tobramycin in vitro is relevant in the in-vivo situation.

  12. A proof-of-concept model for the identification of the key events in the infection process with specific reference to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in corneal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Soumpasis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is a common medical practice to characterise an infection based on the causative agent and to adopt therapeutic and prevention strategies targeting the agent itself. However, from an epidemiological perspective, exposure to a microbe can be harmless to a host as a result of low-level exposure or due to host immune response, with opportunistic infection only occurring as a result of changes in the host, pathogen, or surrounding environment. Methods: We have attempted to review systematically the key host, pathogen, and environmental factors that may significantly impact clinical outcomes of exposure to a pathogen, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye infection as a case study. Results and discussion: Extended contact lens wearing and compromised hygiene may predispose users to microbial keratitis, which can be a severe and vision-threatening infection. P. aeruginosa has a wide array of virulence-associated genes and sensing systems to initiate and maintain cell populations at the corneal surface and beyond. We have adapted the well-known concept of the epidemiological triangle in combination with the classic risk assessment framework (hazard identification, characterisation, and exposure to develop a conceptual pathway-based model that demonstrates the overlapping relationships between the host, the pathogen, and the environment; and to illustrate the key events in P. aeruginosa eye infection. Conclusion: This strategy differs from traditional approaches that consider potential risk factors in isolation, and hopefully will aid the identification of data and models to inform preventive and therapeutic measures in addition to risk assessment. Furthermore, this may facilitate the identification of knowledge gaps to direct research in areas of greatest impact to avert or mitigate adverse outcomes of infection.

  13. Experimental chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in rats. Non-specific stimulation with LPS reduces lethality as efficiently as specific immunization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Hougen, H P; Høiby, N

    1995-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis, we investigated the possibility of preventing chronic lung inflammation or decreasing the progression of the infection. We compared the lethality, pathology, bacterial clearance, and immunogenicity after...... with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Four and two weeks prior to challenge other rats were vaccinated with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Controls did not receive any stimulation or vaccination. The lethality after challenge was lower in rats stimulated with E. coli LPS (p = 0...... but not to prevent the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection and inflammation caused by alginate-embedded bacteria....

  14. Effect of Pseudomonas sp. MT5 baths on Flavobacterium columnare infection of rainbow trout and on microbial diversity on fish skin and gills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomalainen, L R; Tiirola, M A; Valtonen, E T

    2005-01-25

    Use of Pseudomonas sp. strain MT5 to prevent and treat Flavobacterium columnare infection was studied in 2 experiments with fingerling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In the first experiment, length heterogeneity analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments (LH-PCR) was used to assess the effect of antagonistic baths on the microbial diversity of healthy and experimentally infected fish. In the 148 samples studied, no difference was found between bathed and unbathed fish, and 3 fragment lengths were detected most frequently: 500 (in 75.7% of the samples), 523 (62.2%) and 517 bp (40.5%). The species contributing to these fragment sizes were Pseudomonas sp., Rhodococcus sp. and F. columnare, respectively. A specific PCR for detection of Pseudomonas sp. MT5 was designed, but none of the tissue samples were found to be positive, most likely indicating poor adhesion of the strain during bathing. LH-PCR was found to be a more powerful tool for detecting F. columnare in fish tissue than traditional culture methods (chi2 = 3.9, df = 1, p < 0.05). Antagonistic baths had no effect on the outbreak of infection or on fish mortality. F. columnare was also detected in healthy fish prior to and after experimental infection, indicating that these fish were carriers of the disease. In the second experiment, intensive Pseudomonas sp. MT5 antagonistic baths were given daily to rainbow trout suffering from a natural columnaris infection. Again, the antagonistic bacteria had no effect on fish mortality, which reached 95 % in both control and antagonist-treated groups in 7 d.

  15. Anatomical changes on coffee leaves infected by Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Mateus Rivero Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAlthough poorly studied, the bacterial halo blight is an important disease in the major coffee-producing states of Brazil. External damage and anatomical changes on leaves were measured in seedlings of Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo, susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae, by using histological sections obtained at 10 and 20 days after inoculation (DAI. The changes on the epidermis were smaller than the lesions measured in the mesophyll, irrespective of the evaluated colonization period, showing that the internal damage caused by the bacterium represent twice the damage observed externally. From the inoculation site, lysis occurred on the epidermal cells and on the palisade and spongy parenchyma cells, with strong staining of their cellular contents, as well as abnormal intercellular spaces in the palisade parenchyma, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of mesophyll cells and partial destruction of chloroplasts. Additionally, this study revealed the presence of inclusion bodies in epidermal and mesophyll cells. Bacterial masses were found in the apoplast between and within mesophyll cells. Bacteria were also observed in the bundle sheath and vascular bundles and were more pronounced at 20 DAI, not only near the inoculation site but also in distant areas, suggesting displacement through the vascular system. These results can be useful to understand this plant-pathogen interaction.

  16. Therapeutic implications in the treatment of aural Pseudomonas infections based on in vitro susceptibility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohar, J E; Kenna, M A; Wadowsky, R M

    1995-09-01

    To examine the in vitro susceptibility patterns of aural isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to identify changes over a 4-year period. Retrospective case series. The outpatient department at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (Pa), a tertiary referral center. Ambulatory children younger than 18 years from whose ears P aeruginosa was isolated. The in vitro susceptibility of aural isolates of P aeruginosa to ampicillin, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, sulfisoxazole, ticarcillin, mezlocillin, gentamicin, tobramycin, cefazolin, tetracycline, piperacillin, nitrofurantoin, cephalexin hydrochloride, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime axetil, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. No changes were found in the trends of the susceptibility patterns over the 4-year study period, with the exception of the semisynthetic penicillins, ticarcillin and mezlocillin. These two agents were found to be relatively ineffective against the strains of P aeruginosa isolated in 1989 (59% and 18% susceptibility, respectively). This finding is in contrast to their effectiveness over the remainder of the study period (96% and 90% susceptibility, respectively), which was excellent. These observations likely reflect a change in the breakpoints for the minimal inhibitory concentrations between these periods. The intravenous agent with the best susceptibility profile was piperacillin (96%). Of the aminoglycosides tested, 94% of the isolates were sensitive to tobramycin, as opposed to only 79% for gentamicin. This finding may have significance when one is empirically selecting ototopical therapy, since both tobramycin and gentamicin are available as topical preparations. Of the oral agents, the combination of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was most effective (46%).

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an effici......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Atorvastatin in Patients With Bronchiectasis Infected With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Pallavi; Chalmers, James D; Graham, Catriona; Clarke, Andrea; Donaldson, Samantha; Doherty, Catherine; Govan, John R W; Davidson, Donald J; Rossi, Adriano G; Hill, Adam T

    2017-08-01

    There are no randomized controlled trials of statin therapy in patients with severe bronchiectasis who are chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thirty-two patients chronically infected with P aeruginosa were recruited in this double-blind cross-over randomized controlled trial. Sixteen patients were recruited in each arm, were given atorvastatin 80 mg or placebo for 3 months followed by a washout period for 6 weeks, and then crossed over and administered the alternative therapy for 3 months. Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Atorvastatin did not significantly improve the primary end point of cough as measured by the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (mean difference, 1.92; 95% CI for difference, -0.57-4.41; P = .12). However, atorvastatin treatment resulted in an improved St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (-5.62 points; P = .016) and reduced serum levels of CXCL8 (P = .04), tumor necrosis factor (P = .01), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (P = .04). There was a trend toward improvement in serum C-reactive protein and serum neutrophil counts (P = .07 and P = .06, respectively). We demonstrated in vitro that atorvastatin 10 μM reduced formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine-induced upregulation of CD11b expression and changes in calcium flux, reflecting an ability to decrease neutrophil activation. We demonstrated that atorvastatin reduced systemic inflammation and improved quality of life in patients with bronchiectasis who were infected with P aeruginosa. These effects may be due to an ability of atorvastatin to modulate neutrophil activation. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01299194; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interplay among Resistance Profiles, High-Risk Clones, and Virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Diener, Irina; Zamorano, Laura; López-Causapé, Carla; Cabot, Gabriel; Mulet, Xavier; Peña, Carmen; Del Campo, Rosa; Cantón, Rafael; Doménech-Sánchez, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Arcos, Susana C; Navas, Alfonso; Oliver, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of nosocomial infections produced by multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently linked to widespread international strains designated high-risk clones. In this work, we attempted to decipher the interplay between resistance profiles, high-risk clones, and virulence, testing a large ( n = 140) collection of well-characterized P. aeruginosa isolates from different sources (bloodstream infections, nosocomial outbreaks, cystic fibrosis, and the environment) in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Consistent with previous data, we documented a clear inverse correlation between antimicrobial resistance and virulence in the C. elegans model. Indeed, the lowest virulence was linked to XDR profiles, which were typically linked to defined high-risk clones. However, virulence varied broadly depending on the involved high-risk clone; it was high for sequence type 111 (ST111) and ST235 but very low for ST175. The highest virulence of ST235 could be attributed to its exoU + type III secretion system (TTSS) genotype, which was found to be linked with higher virulence in our C. elegans model. Other markers, such as motility or pigment production, were not essential for virulence in the C. elegans model but seemed to be related with the higher values of the statistical normalized data. In contrast to ST235, the ST175 high-risk clone, which is widespread in Spain and France, seems to be associated with a particularly low virulence in the C. elegans model. Moreover, the previously described G154R AmpR mutation, prevalent in ST175, was found to contribute to the reduced virulence, although it was not the only factor involved. Altogether, our results provide a major step forward for understanding the interplay between P. aeruginosa resistance profiles, high-risk clones, and virulence. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    Full Text Available Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF. We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146 detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089 was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination

  1. Catalytic and thermodynamic properties of a tannase produced by Aspergillus niger GH1 grown on polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Erika L; Mata-Gómez, Marco A; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V; Belmares, Ruth E; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal Noe

    2011-11-01

    Tannase is an inducible enzyme with important applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. This enzyme was produced by the fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 under solid-state fermentation using polyurethane foam as solid support and tannic acid as sole carbon source and tannase inducer. Physicochemical properties of A. niger tannase were characterized, and the kinetic and thermodynamics parameters on methyl gallate hydrolysis were evaluated. The enzyme was stable in a pH range of 2-8 and a functional temperature range of 25-65 °C. The highest k(cat) value was 2,611.10 s(-1) at 65 °C. Tannase had more affinity for methyl gallate at 45 °C with a K(M) value of 1.82 mM and an efficiency of hydrolysis (k(cat)/K(M)) of 330.01 s(-1) mM(-1). The lowest E(a) value was found to be 21.38 kJ/mol at 4.4 mM of methyl gallate. The lowest free energy of Gibbs (ΔG) and enthalpy (ΔH) were found to be 64.86 and 18.56 kJ/mol, respectively. Entropy (ΔS) was -0.22 kJ/mol K. Results suggest that the A. niger GH1 tannase is an attractive enzyme for industrial applications due its catalytic and thermodynamical properties.

  2. Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates maintain the biofilm formation capacity and the gene expression profiles during the chronic lung infection of CF patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Bao le ri; Schjerling, Charlotte K.; Kirkby, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic diversifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) promote long-term survival of bacteria during chronic lung infection. Twelve clonally related, sequential mucoid and non-mucoid paired P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from three......-mucoid isolates observed in this particular P. aeruginosa clone reflects different adaptation strategies used by these two phenotypes in the different niches of the CF lung environment....

  3. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina S. M.; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2016-01-01

    , the infection is not eradicated and the inflammatory response leads to gradual degradation of the lung tissue. In CF patients, a Th2-dominated adaptive immune response with a pronounced antibody response is correlated with poorer outcome. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in bridging the innate immune system...... with the adaptive immune response. Once activated, the DCs deliver a set of signals to uncommitted T cells that induce development, such as expansion of regulatory T cells and polarization of Th1, Th2 or Th17 subsets. In this study, we characterized DCs in lungs and regional lymph nodes in BALB/c mice infected...... using intratracheal installation of P. aeruginosa embedded in seaweed alginate in the lungs. A significantly elevated concentration of DCs was detected earlier in the lungs than in the regional lymph nodes. To evaluate whether the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection leads to activation of DCs...

  4. INTERAKSI ANTARA Trichoderma Harzianum, Penicillium SP. DAN Pseudomonas SP. SERTA KAPASITAS ANTAGONISMENYA TERHADAP Phytophthora CapsicilN VITRO*[Interaction Among Trichoderma Harzianum, Penicillium SP., Pseudomonas SP. and Antagonism Capacities Against Phy

    OpenAIRE

    Suharna, Nandang

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary study has been done to know antagonism capacities of three isolates of Trichoderma harzianum, two isolates of Penicillium sp.and one isolate of Pseudomonas sp.against Phytophthora capsici in vitro and interaction among those six antagonists.The highest antagonism capacity possessed by Penicillium sp. KN1, respectively followed by Penicillium sp.KN2,Pseudomonas sp. GH1 and the three T. harzianum isolates. Except for those three T. harzianum isolates, the two Penicillium sp.isolat...

  5. In vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistin and imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    ) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of antimicrobials can reliably be used to predict whether antimicrobial regimens will achieve the maximum bactericidal effect against infections. Unfortunately, however, most PK/PD studies of antimicrobials have been done on planktonic cells and very few PK/PD studies have been done...

  6. Risk factors for colonization and infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients hospitalized in intensive care units in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, S.; Georget, A.; Asselineau, J.; Venier, A-G.; Leroyer, C.; Rogues, A. M.; Thiébaut, R.

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.aeruginosa) remains a prominent nosocomial pathogen responsible for high morbi-mortality in intensive care units (ICUs). P.aeruginosa transmission is known to be partly endogenous and exogenous. Main factors have been highlighted but the precise role of environment in regard to antibiotics use remained unclear. Objective To assess the role of environment, medical care and individual risks factors for P. aeruginosa colonization and infection. Study design and setting A French multicentric prospective study involved ten ICUs for a five months period. Every adult patient newly hospitalized in ICUs with no P. aeruginosa carriage up to 48 hours after admission was included and weekly screened before discharge or death. Screening swabs were either rectal, sputum or oropharyngeal samples. Hydric environment was also sampled each week. Data on patient clinical features, environmental and device exposures, and antibiotics supports were regularly collected. Multivariate analysis was performed with a multistate model. Results The overall prevalence of P. aeruginosa carriage was 15.3% (201/1314). Risk factors associated with patient colonization were: use of inactive antibiotics against P. aeruginosa (HR = 1.60 [1.15–2.21] pinfection (HR = 0.64 [0.41–1.01] p = 0.05). Interaction between hydric environment antibiotics support was not statistically associated with patient colonization. Conclusion Hydric contamination and antibiotics pressure seem to remain key independent risk factors in P. aeruginosa colonization. These results advocate the need to carry on preventive and targeted interventions toward healthcare associated infections. PMID:29522559

  7. Inhibition of biofilm formation, quorum sensing and infection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by natural products-inspired organosulfur compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel C Cady

    Full Text Available Using a microplate-based screening assay, the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation of several S-substituted cysteine sulfoxides and their corresponding disulfide derivatives were evaluated. From our library of compounds, S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and its breakdown product, diphenyl disulfide, significantly reduced the amount of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa at levels equivalent to the active concentration of 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide (NPO (1 mM. Unlike NPO, which is an established inhibitor of bacterial biofilms, our active compounds did not reduce planktonic cell growth and only affected biofilm formation. When used in a Drosophila-based infection model, both S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and diphenyl disulfide significantly reduced the P. aeruginosa recovered 18 h post infection (relative to the control, and were non-lethal to the fly hosts. The possibility that the observed biofilm inhibitory effects were related to quorum sensing inhibition (QSI was investigated using Escherichia coli-based reporters expressing P. aeruginosa lasR or rhIR response proteins, as well as an endogenous P. aeruginosa reporter from the lasI/lasR QS system. Inhibition of quorum sensing by S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide was observed in all of the reporter systems tested, whereas diphenyl disulfide did not exhibit QSI in either of the E. coli reporters, and showed very limited inhibition in the P. aeruginosa reporter. Since both compounds inhibit biofilm formation but do not show similar QSI activity, it is concluded that they may be functioning by different pathways. The hypothesis that biofilm inhibition by the two active compounds discovered in this work occurs through QSI is discussed.

  8. Augmented effect of early antibiotic treatment in mice with experimental lung infections due to sequentially adapted mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, M; Moser, Claus; Christensen, Louise D

    2009-01-01

    : A significant reduction in the number of bacteria was observed when initiating treatment 1 h post-infection compared with initiating treatment after 24 h, although the latest isolate avoided complete clearance. Early antibiotic treatment directed at the mucoid phenotype in mice also reduced the inflammation and......Background: Effects of treatment with tobramycin initiated 1 or 24 h post-infection were investigated in a new version of a pulmonary infection model in mice. The model reflects the differentiated behaviour of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strains isolated from the lungs of one chronically infected......, histopathology, and measurement of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Results: There was a significant reduction of bacteria when comparing treatment initiated 1 h post-infection with treatment initiated after 24 h for isolates 1997 and 2003. Treatment...

  9. Novel mouse model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2005-01-01

    (NH57388C) from the mucoid isolate (NH57388A) and a nonmucoid isolate (NH57388B) deficient in AHL were almost cleared from the lungs of the mice. This model, in which P. aeruginosa is protected against the defense system of the lung by alginate, is similar to the clinical situation. Therefore...... pulmonary mouse model without artificial embedding. The model is based on a stable mucoid CF sputum isolate (NH57388A) with hyperproduction of alginate due to a deletion in mucA and functional N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum-sensing systems. Chronic lung infection could be established in both CF...

  10. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  11. Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Rasmussen, Thomas B

    2005-01-01

    to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics, and protects against the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). It has been previously demonstrated that QS is inhibited by garlic extract. In this study, the synergistic effects of garlic and tobramycin, and PMNs activities have been evaluated....... P. aeruginosa was grown in vitro in continuous-culture once-through flow chambers with and without garlic extract. The garlic-treated biofilms were susceptible to both tobramycin and PMN grazing. Furthermore, the PMNs showed an increase in respiratory burst activation, when incubated with the garlic......-treated biofilm. Garlic extract was administered as treatment for a mouse pulmonary infection model. Mice were treated with garlic extract or placebo for 7 days, with the initial 2 days being prophylactic before P. aeruginosa was instilled in the left lung of the mice. Bacteriology, mortality, histopathology...

  12. Genome-wide identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence-related genes using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda L Feinbaum

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of infecting a wide range of organisms including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used a non-redundant transposon mutant library consisting of 5,850 clones corresponding to 75% of the total and approximately 80% of the non-essential PA14 ORFs to carry out a genome-wide screen for attenuation of PA14 virulence in C. elegans. We defined a functionally diverse 180 mutant set (representing 170 unique genes necessary for normal levels of virulence that included both known and novel virulence factors. Seven previously uncharacterized virulence genes (ABC transporters PchH and PchI, aminopeptidase PepP, ATPase/molecular chaperone ClpA, cold shock domain protein PA0456, putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase PA0745, and putative transcriptional regulator PA14_27700 were characterized with respect to pigment production and motility and all but one of these mutants exhibited pleiotropic defects in addition to their avirulent phenotype. We examined the collection of genes required for normal levels of PA14 virulence with respect to occurrence in P. aeruginosa strain-specific genomic regions, location on putative and known genomic islands, and phylogenetic distribution across prokaryotes. Genes predominantly contributing to virulence in C. elegans showed neither a bias for strain-specific regions of the P. aeruginosa genome nor for putatively horizontally transferred genomic islands. Instead, within the collection of virulence-related PA14 genes, there was an overrepresentation of genes with a broad phylogenetic distribution that also occur with high frequency in many prokaryotic clades, suggesting that in aggregate the genes required for PA14 virulence in C. elegans are biased towards evolutionarily conserved genes.

  13. Genome-wide identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence-related genes using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Urbach, Jonathan M; Liberati, Nicole T; Djonovic, Slavica; Adonizio, Allison; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of infecting a wide range of organisms including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used a non-redundant transposon mutant library consisting of 5,850 clones corresponding to 75% of the total and approximately 80% of the non-essential PA14 ORFs to carry out a genome-wide screen for attenuation of PA14 virulence in C. elegans. We defined a functionally diverse 180 mutant set (representing 170 unique genes) necessary for normal levels of virulence that included both known and novel virulence factors. Seven previously uncharacterized virulence genes (ABC transporters PchH and PchI, aminopeptidase PepP, ATPase/molecular chaperone ClpA, cold shock domain protein PA0456, putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase PA0745, and putative transcriptional regulator PA14_27700) were characterized with respect to pigment production and motility and all but one of these mutants exhibited pleiotropic defects in addition to their avirulent phenotype. We examined the collection of genes required for normal levels of PA14 virulence with respect to occurrence in P. aeruginosa strain-specific genomic regions, location on putative and known genomic islands, and phylogenetic distribution across prokaryotes. Genes predominantly contributing to virulence in C. elegans showed neither a bias for strain-specific regions of the P. aeruginosa genome nor for putatively horizontally transferred genomic islands. Instead, within the collection of virulence-related PA14 genes, there was an overrepresentation of genes with a broad phylogenetic distribution that also occur with high frequency in many prokaryotic clades, suggesting that in aggregate the genes required for PA14 virulence in C. elegans are biased towards evolutionarily conserved genes.

  14. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-12-01

    Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran.

  15. Synthetic Peptides to Target Stringent Response-Controlled Virulence in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Murine Cutaneous Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pletzer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms continuously monitor their surroundings and adaptively respond to environmental cues. One way to cope with various stress-related situations is through the activation of the stringent stress response pathway. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa this pathway is controlled and coordinated by the activity of the RelA and SpoT enzymes that metabolize the small nucleotide secondary messenger molecule (pppGpp. Intracellular ppGpp concentrations are crucial in mediating adaptive responses and virulence. Targeting this cellular stress response has recently been the focus of an alternative approach to fight antibiotic resistant bacteria. Here, we examined the role of the stringent response in the virulence of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and the Liverpool epidemic strain LESB58. A ΔrelA/ΔspoT double mutant showed decreased cytotoxicity toward human epithelial cells, exhibited reduced hemolytic activity, and caused down-regulation of the expression of the alkaline protease aprA gene in stringent response mutants grown on blood agar plates. Promoter fusions of relA or spoT to a bioluminescence reporter gene revealed that both genes were expressed during the formation of cutaneous abscesses in mice. Intriguingly, virulence was attenuated in vivo by the ΔrelA/ΔspoT double mutant, but not the relA mutant nor the ΔrelA/ΔspoT complemented with either gene. Treatment of a cutaneous P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection with anti-biofilm peptides increased animal welfare, decreased dermonecrotic lesion sizes, and reduced bacterial numbers recovered from abscesses, resembling the phenotype of the ΔrelA/ΔspoT infection. It was previously demonstrated by our lab that ppGpp could be targeted by synthetic peptides; here we demonstrated that spoT promoter activity was suppressed during cutaneous abscess formation by treatment with peptides DJK-5 and 1018, and that a peptide-treated relA complemented stringent response double mutant strain exhibited reduced peptide

  16. Osteoarticular infection caused by MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the benefits of combination therapy with colistin plus β-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Alba; Benavent, Eva; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Tubau, Fe; Pedrero, Salvador; Cabo, Xavier; Ariza, Javier; Murillo, Oscar

    2015-12-01

    In the era of emergence of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa, osteoarticular infections (OIs) add more difficulties to its treatment. The role of β-lactams (BLs) is questioned and older drugs need to be reconsidered. The objective of this study was to describe our experience in the management of OIs caused by MDR P. aeruginosa and evaluate different therapeutic options. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected cohort (2004-13) of patients with OI caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. We created two groups: (i) Group A (more difficult to treat), prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) and osteoarthritis (OA) managed with device retention; and (ii) Group B (less difficult to treat), OA managed without device retention. Antibiotic treatment was administered according to clinician criteria: monotherapy/combined therapy; and BL used by intermittent bolus (IB)/continuous infusion. Of 34 patients, 15 (44.1%) had PJI and 19 (55.9%) had OA (8 related to an orthopaedic device). Twenty-three cases (68%) were caused by XDR P. aeruginosa. The initial management included removal of an orthopaedic device in 14 cases, together with antibiotic [alone, 19 (55.9%; 4 colistin, 14 BL-IB and 1 BL continuous infusion); and in combination, 15 (44.1%; 5 BL-IB and 10 BL continuous infusion)]. The overall cure rate was 50% (39% and 63% in Groups A and B, respectively), ranging from 31.6% with monotherapy to 73.3% with combined therapy (P = 0.016), with special interest within Group A (cure rate with combined therapy 71.4%, P = 0.049). After rescue therapy, which included removal of remaining devices, the cure rate reached 85.3%. We suggest that the BL/colistin combination is an optimized therapy for OI caused by MDR P. aeruginosa, together with an appropriate surgical treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infections by Ps. aeruginosa is contra-indicated. In our study only 2,3 % of the Ps. aeruginosa strains were resistant to gentamicin (MIC 25 Ilg/ml). In view of the synergy reported for combined gentamicin and carbeni- cillin therapy," a combination of these two drugs may be recommended in the treatment of all Pseudomonas.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas sp. causing infections in trauma patients: A 6 year experience from a south asian country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonika Rajkumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance to Pseudomonas sp. has spread to such a level irrespective of the type of patients, that its pattern of distribution and antibiotic resistance needs to be studied in detail, especially in trauma patients and hence the study. A 6 year study was carried out among trauma patients to see the trend and type of resistance prevalent in the apex hospital for trauma care in India among nonduplicate isolates where multidrug-resistance (MDR, cross-resistance and pan-drug resistance in Pseudomonas sp. were analyzed. Of the total 2,269 isolates obtained, the species, which was maximally isolated was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2,224, 98%. The highest level of resistance was seen in tetracycline (2,166, 95.5%, P < 0.001 and chloramphenicol (2,160, 95.2%, P < 0.001 and least in meropenem (1,739, 76.7%, P < 0.003. Of the total, 1,692 (74.6% isolates were MDR in which P. aeruginosa (75% were maximum. MDR Pseudomonas is slowing increasing since the beginning of the study period. Of 1,797 imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated during the study period, 1,763 (98% showed resistance to ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin, suggesting that cross-resistance may have developed for imipenem due to prior use of fluoroquinolones. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas sp. is fast becoming a problem in trauma patients, especially in those who requires prolong hospital stay, which calls for proper antimicrobial stewardship.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate is refractory to Th1 immune response and impedes host immune clearance in a mouse model of acute lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    . The effect of alginate production on pathogenicity was investigated by using an acute lung infection mouse model that compared a non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strain, PAO1, to its constitutive alginate-overproducing derivative, Alg(+) PAOmucA22, and an alginate-defective strain, Alg(-) PAOalgD. Bacterial......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen that accounts for most of the morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In CF-affected lungs, the bacteria undergo conversion from a non-mucoid to a non-tractable mucoid phenotype, due to overproduction of alginate...... suspensions were instilled into the left bronchus and examined 24 and 48 h post-infection. The highest bacterial loads and the most severe lung pathology were observed with strain Alg(-) PAOalgD at 24 h post-infection, which may have been due to an increase in expression of bacterial elastase by the mutant...

  20. Immobilization of Glycoside Hydrolase Families GH1, GH13, and GH70: State of the Art and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália G. Graebin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycoside hydrolases (GH are enzymes capable to hydrolyze the glycosidic bond between two carbohydrates or even between a carbohydrate and a non-carbohydrate moiety. Because of the increasing interest for industrial applications of these enzymes, the immobilization of GH has become an important development in order to improve its activity, stability, as well as the possibility of its reuse in batch reactions and in continuous processes. In this review, we focus on the broad aspects of immobilization of enzymes from the specific GH families. A brief introduction on methods of enzyme immobilization is presented, discussing some advantages and drawbacks of this technology. We then review the state of the art of enzyme immobilization of families GH1, GH13, and GH70, with special attention on the enzymes β-glucosidase, α-amylase, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase, and dextransucrase. In each case, the immobilization protocols are evaluated considering their positive and negative aspects. Finally, the perspectives on new immobilization methods are briefly presented.

  1. Gallic Acid Production with Mouldy Polyurethane Particles Obtained from Solid State Culture of Aspergillus niger GH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Gómez, Marco; Mussatto, Solange I; Rodríguez, Raul; Teixeira, Jose A; Martinez, Jose L; Hernandez, Ayerim; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2015-06-01

    Gallic acid production in a batch bioreactor was evaluated using as catalytic material the mouldy polyurethane solids (MPS) obtained from a solid-state fermentation (SSF) bioprocess carried out for tannase production by Aspergillus niger GH1 on polyurethane foam powder (PUF) with 5 % (v/w) of tannic acid as inducer. Fungal biomass, tannic acid consumption and tannase production were kinetically monitored. SSF was stopped when tannase activity reached its maximum level. Effects of washing with distilled water and drying on the tannase activity of MPS were determined. Better results were obtained with dried and washed MPS retaining 84 % of the tannase activity. Maximum tannase activity produced through SSF after 24 h of incubation was equivalent to 130 U/gS with a specific activity of 36 U/mg. The methylgallate was hydrolysed (45 %) in an easy, cheap and fast bioprocess (30 min). Kinetic parameters of tannase self-immobilized on polyurethane particles were calculated to be 5 mM and 04.1 × 10(-2) mM/min for K M and V max, respectively. Results demonstrated that the MPS, with tannase activity, can be successfully used for the production of the antioxidant gallic acid from methyl-gallate substrate. Direct use of PMS to produce gallic acid can be advantageous as no previous extraction of enzyme is required, thus reducing production costs.

  2. In-Vivo Expression Profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections Reveals Niche-Specific and Strain-Independent Transcriptional Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielecki, P.; Puchalka, J.; Wos-Oxley, M.L.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics.

  3. A comparative study of histopathological effects of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with sulfadiazine on skin burn wound healing in rats infected with Pseudomonas aeuroginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Valilou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen, is the most common infective agent of burn wounds. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effect of a mixture of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with silver sulfadiazine on the healing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected second grade skin burn wounds in rats. To this end, 60 male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (15 rats in each group. After inducing anesthesia, second grade burn wound with the diameter of 12 mm was created in the dorsal region of rats. Then, 1.5×108 cfu/ml P. aeruginosa PA01was equally bestrewed on the wound of all rats. Every 12 hours, silver sulfadiazine (group 1, honey (group 2 and aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey (group 3 were applied to the wounds and group 4 was kept as control. On days 7, 14, and 21, five rats were selected from each group at each time point and after inducing anesthesia and measuring the diameter of the wound by coliseum, microbial and histopathological samples were taken from the wounds. Microbial studies showed that in all groups except the control group, the growth of the microbe was stopped. Histopathological observations regarding wound healing and diameter showed that there was a significant difference between treatment groups and the control group on days 7, 14 and 21 (p

  4. Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Foreign-Body Biofilm Infections through Reduction of the Cyclic Di-GMP Level in the Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise D.; van Gennip, Maria; Rybtke, Morten Theil

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria can engage in biofilm-based infections that evade immune responses and develop into chronic conditions. Because conventional antimicrobials cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections....... It has recently been established that the secondary messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) functions as a positive regulator of biofilm formation in several different bacteria. In the present study we investigated whether manipulation of the c-di-GMP level in bacteria potentially can...... be used for biofilm control in vivo. We constructed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain in which a reduction in the c-di-GMP level can be achieved via induction of the Escherichia coli YhjH c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Initial experiments showed that induction of yhjH expression led to dispersal...

  5. Improved outcome of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is associated with induction of a Th1-dominated cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O

    2002-01-01

    patients, the lungs of susceptible BALB/c mice were re-infected with P. aeruginosa 14 days after the initial infection. Singly-infected BALB/c mice, as well as non-infected mice, were used as controls. Decreased mortality and milder lung inflammation in re-infected BALB/c mice, as well as a tendency...

  6. D-BMAP18 antimicrobial peptide is active in vitro, resists to pulmonary proteases but loses its activity in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Pompilio, Arianna; Degasperi, Margherita; Runti, Giulia; Pacor, Sabrina; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Scocchi, Marco

    2017-06-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant-pathogens is driving the search for new antimicrobial compounds. Pulmonary infections experienced by cystic fibrosis patients are a dramatic example of this health-care emergency. Antimicrobial peptides could answer the need for new antibiotics but translating them from basic research to the clinic is a challenge. We have previously evaluated the potential of the small membranolytic peptide BMAP-18 to treat CF-related infections, discovering that while this molecule had a good activity in vitro it was not active in vivo because of its rapid degradation by pulmonary proteases. In this study, we synthesized and tested the proteases-resistant all-D enantiomer. In spite of a good antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates and of a tolerable cytotoxicity in vitro, D-BMAP18 was ineffective to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection in mice, in comparison to tobramycin. We observed that different factors other than peptide degradation hampered its efficacy for pulmonary application. These results indicate that D-BMAP18 needs further optimization before being suitable for clinical application and this approach may represent a guide for optimization of other anti-infective peptides eligible for the treatment of pulmonary infections.

  7. Expanding the spectrum of mutations in GH1 and GHRHR: genetic screening in a large cohort of patients with congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Turton, James P; Kelberman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    mutations in GH1 (C182X, G120V, R178H, IVS3+4nt, a>t) and GHRHR (W273S, R94L, R162W). Autosomal dominant, type II IGHD was the commonest form (52.4%), followed by type IB (42.8%) and type IA (4.8%). Patients with type II IGHD had highly variable phenotypes. There was no difference in the endocrinology...... or magnetic resonance imaging appearance between patients with and without mutations, although those with mutations presented with more significant growth failure (height, -4.7 +/- 1.6 SDS vs. -3.4 +/- 1.7 SDS) (P = 0.001). There was no apparent difference between patients with mutations in GH1 and GHRHR...

  8. Successful control of resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using antibiotic stewardship and infection control programs at a Chinese university hospital: a 6-year prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu L

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Lei Liu,1 Bin Liu,1 Yu Li,2 Wei Zhang1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is emerging as a highly multidrug-resistant (MDR nosocomial pathogen. Data on the efficacy of infection control measures in endemic situations are lacking. We investigated the effect of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS and infection control programs (ICPs in controlling the resistance of P. aeruginosa at a tertiary hospital center.Methods: Susceptibility and resistance were investigated using broth microdilution, as per the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Antibiotic use was restricted through AMS, which included a classification management system for antibiotic use. The ICPs included environmental cleaning and disinfection, hand hygiene, active surveillance of P. aeruginosa, and education about infection control.Results: A total of 2,241 P. aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between 2012 and 2017. Sensitivity and resistance of the isolates to the antipseudomonal antimicrobials colistin and tigecycline were stable. The sensitivity and resistance to other antipseudomonal antimicrobials improved after 2014, after the AMS and ICPs were implemented in 2013. The use of alcohol-based hand gel significantly increased from 0.6 to 10.9 L per 1,000 patient-days (PD during the study period (P=0.005. The incidence rates of extensively drug-resistant (XDR and MDR P. aeruginosa showed a sustained decrease from 2013 (4.9 and 22% to 2017 (1 and 15%, respectively. The yearly consumption of antimicrobial agents also showed a sustained and significant decrease from 45 defined daily doses (DDDs per 1,000 PD to 38.15 DDDs per 1,000 PD (P=0.04. A significant correlation was found between the incidence rate of MDR P. aeruginosa and the

  9. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

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    Sonali Singh

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human

  10. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonali; Barr, Helen; Liu, Yi-Chia; Robins, Adrian; Heeb, Stephan; Williams, Paul; Fogarty, Andrew; Cámara, Miguel; Martínez-Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN)-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human macrophages

  11. Treatment Outcomes in Infections Caused by "SPICE" (Serratia, Pseudomonas, Indole-positive Proteus, Citrobacter, and Enterobacter) Organisms: Carbapenem versus Noncarbapenem Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Stanley; Sharma, Roopali

    2017-01-01

    Techniques used to identify AmpC β-lactamases in SPICE (Serratia, Pseudomonas, indole-positive Proteus, Citrobacter, and Enterobacter) organisms are not yet optimized for the clinical laboratory and are not routinely used. Clinicians are often left with an uncertainty on the choice of antibiotic when a SPICE organism is isolated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of carbapenem versus noncarbapenem regimens in treating bacteremia or urinary tract infection from a SPICE organism in clinical practice. This single-center, retrospective, cohort study analyzed data from adult patients who had clinical infection with a SPICE organism isolated from blood or urine cultures. Patients were assigned to a carbapenem- or noncarbapenem-treated group. The primary end point was clinical response, defined as a resolution of signs and symptoms of infection at the end of therapy. A total of 332 patients were assessed, and 145 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. There were 20 patients who received a carbapenem, while 125 received a noncarbapenem regimen. The percentage of patients who were bacteremic was 46.2%. Clinical response overall was achieved in 80% of patients on a carbapenem versus 90.3% of patients on a noncarbapenem regimen (P = 0.24). The rate of microbiologic cure was 90% in patients on a carbapenem versus 91.2% in patients on a noncarbapenem regimen (P = 1). In this study in patients treated for infection with a SPICE organism in clinical practice, the rates of clinical response did not differ significantly between the carbapenem and noncarbapenem groups. Current CLSI breakpoints set for SPICE organisms may still be reliable and may not require additional testing for AmpC β-lactamases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved outcome of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is associated with induction of a Th1-dominated cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O

    2002-01-01

    , resistance to re-infection was paralleled by a shift towards a Th1-dominated response and increased IL-12 production. No significant increase in serum IgG was observed in the re-infected mice. In conclusion, these results indicate a protective role for a Th1-dominated response, independent of antibody...

  13. Cathelicidin host defence peptide augments clearance of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by its influence on neutrophil function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E Beaumont

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are multifunctional cationic host-defence peptides (CHDP; also known as antimicrobial peptides and an important component of innate host defence against infection. In addition to microbicidal potential, these peptides have properties with the capacity to modulate inflammation and immunity. However, the extent to which such properties play a significant role during infection in vivo has remained unclear. A murine model of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection was utilised, demonstrating cathelicidin-mediated enhancement of bacterial clearance in vivo. The delivery of exogenous synthetic human cathelicidin LL-37 was found to enhance a protective pro-inflammatory response to infection, effectively promoting bacterial clearance from the lung in the absence of direct microbicidal activity, with an enhanced early neutrophil response that required both infection and peptide exposure and was independent of native cathelicidin production. Furthermore, although cathelicidin-deficient mice had an intact early cellular inflammatory response, later phase neutrophil response to infection was absent in these animals, with significantly impaired clearance of P. aeruginosa. These findings demonstrate the importance of the modulatory properties of cathelicidins in pulmonary infection in vivo and highlight a key role for cathelicidins in the induction of protective pulmonary neutrophil responses, specific to the infectious milieu. In additional to their physiological roles, CHDP have been proposed as future antimicrobial therapeutics. Elucidating and utilising the modulatory properties of cathelicidins has the potential to inform the development of synthetic peptide analogues and novel therapeutic approaches based on enhancing innate host defence against infection with or without direct microbicidal targeting of pathogens.

  14. Pectin-Derived Acidic Oligosaccharides Improve the Outcome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection in C57BL/6 Mice.

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    Henry Bernard

    Full Text Available The administration of prebiotics as oligosaccharides (OS, by acting on intestinal microbiota, could modulate the immune and inflammatory response and represent a new strategy to improve the outcome of bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether pectin-derived acidic oligosaccharides (pAOS could modulate the outcome of pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA infection in C57BL/6 mice, which develop a Th1 response to PA lung infection. Mice were randomized for 5 weeks to consume a control or a 5% pAOS diet and chronically infected by PA. Resistance to a second PA infection was also analyzed by reinfecting the surviving mice 2 weeks after the first infection. Compared with control mice, mice fed pAOS had reduced mortality (P<0.05. This improvement correlated with a better control of the inflammatory response with a lower neutrophil count on day 1 (P<0.05, a sustained neutrophil and macrophage recruitment on days 2 and 3 (P<0.01 a greater and sustained IL-10 release in lung (P<0.05 and a reduction of the Th1 response and M1 activation with a lower IFN-γ/IL-4 (P<0.01 and nos2/arg1 (P<0.05 ratios. These results coincided with a modulation of the intestinal microbiota as shown by an increased butyric acid concentration in feces (P<0.05. Moreover, pAOS decreased the bacterial load (P<0.01 in mice reinfected 2 weeks after the first infection, suggesting that pAOS could reduce pulmonary exacerbations. In conclusion, pAOS improved the outcome of PA infection in C57BL/6 mice by modulating the intestinal microbiota and the inflammatory and immune responses.

  15. Expansion of plasmid mediated blaACT-2 among Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with postoperative infection and its transcriptional response under cephalosporin stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birson Ingti, Deepjyoti Paul, Anand Prakash Maurya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Organisms harboring multiple plasmid mediated β-lactamases are major concerns in nosocomial infections. Among these plasmid mediated β-lactamases, ACT (EBC family is a clinically important enzyme capable of hydrolyzing broad spectrum cephalosporins. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of ACT determinant along with other co-existing β-lactamase genes in P. aeruginosa strains. Methods: A total of 176 Pseudomonas isolates were phenotypically screened for the presence of AmpC β-lactamase by M3DET Method followed by Molecular detection using PCR assay. Transcriptional evaluation of blaACT-2 gene was analyzed by RT-PCR and its transferability was performed by transformation and conjugation. Results: Present study demonstrates the presence of ACT-2 allele among 12 strains of P. aeruginosa. Co-existence of other β-lactamase genes were encountered among ACT-2 harboring strains which includes CTX-M (n=2, SHV (n=3, TEM (n=2, VEB (n=2, OXA-10 (n=1, CIT (n=2 and DHA (n=3. Fingerprinting by REP PCR revealed the isolates harboring ACT-2 to be distinct and these isolates showed high resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and even to carbapenem group of drugs. This ACT-2 allele was encoded in the plasmid (L/M, FIA, FIB Inc. Group and conjugatively transferable. Transcriptional analysis revealed a significant increase in ACT-2 expression (483 fold when induced by ceftriaxone at 4 µg/ml followed by ceftazidime at 8 µg/ml (31 fold and cefotaxime 4 µg/ml (8 fold. Conclusion: In this study detection of ACT-2 plasmid mediated AmpC β-lactamase along with other β-lactamase genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa represents a serious therapeutic challenge. Therefore, revision in antimicrobial policy is required for effective treatment of patients infected with pathogen expressing this mechanism. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2017; 7(2: 75-82

  16. Case Report: Dual nebulised antibiotics among adults with cystic fibrosis and chronic Pseudomonas infection [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exacerbations in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psae infection are usually treated with dual intravenous antibiotics for 14 days, despite the lack of evidence for best practice. Intravenous antibiotics are commonly associated with various systemic adverse effects, including renal failure and ototoxicity. Inhaled antibiotics are less likely to cause systematic adverse effects, yet can achieve airway concentrations well above conventional minimum inhibitory concentrations. Typically one inhaled antibiotic is used at a time, but dual inhaled antibiotics (i.e. concomitant use of two different inhaled antibiotics may have synergistic effect and achieve better results in the treatment of exacerbations. We presented anecdotal evidence for the use of dual inhaled antibiotics as an acute treatment for exacerbations, in the form of a case report. A female in her early thirties with CF and chronic Psae infection improved her FEV1 by 5% and 2% with two courses of dual inhaled antibiotics to treat exacerbations in 2016. In contrast, her FEV1 changed by 2%, –2%, 0% and 2%, respectively, with four courses of dual intravenous antibiotics in 2016. Baseline FEV1 was similar prior to all six courses of treatments. The greater FEV1 improvements with dual inhaled antibiotics compared to dual intravenous antibiotics suggest the potential role of using dual inhaled antibiotics to treat exacerbations among adults with CF and chronic Psae infection, especially since a greater choice of inhaled anti-pseudomonal antibiotics is now available. A previous study in 1985 has looked at the concomitant administration of inhaled tobramycin and carbenicillin, by reconstituting antibiotics designed for parenteral administration. To our knowledge, this is the first literature to describe the concomitant use of two different antibiotics specifically developed for delivery via the inhaled route.

  17. The Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sams, Thomas; Baker, Ysobel; Hodgkinson, James

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistichuman pathogen that routinely appears near the top ofpublic health threat lists worldwide. P. aeruginosa causes in-fections by secreting a wealth of exceptionally active exo-products, leading to tissue damage. The synthesis of manyof these virulence factors...

  18. Oligomerization as a strategy for cold adaptation: Structure and dynamics of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Fattori, Juliana; Crespim, Elaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-03-01

    Psychrophilic enzymes evolved from a plethora of structural scaffolds via multiple molecular pathways. Elucidating their adaptive strategies is instrumental to understand how life can thrive in cold ecosystems and to tailor enzymes for biotechnological applications at low temperatures. In this work, we used X-ray crystallography, in solution studies and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the structural basis for cold adaptation of the GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7. We discovered that the selective pressure of low temperatures favored mutations that redesigned the protein surface, reduced the number of salt bridges, exposed more hydrophobic regions to the solvent and gave rise to a tetrameric arrangement not found in mesophilic and thermophilic homologues. As a result, some solvent-exposed regions became more flexible in the cold-adapted tetramer, likely contributing to enhance enzymatic activity at cold environments. The tetramer stabilizes the native conformation of the enzyme, leading to a 10-fold higher activity compared to the disassembled monomers. According to phylogenetic analysis, diverse adaptive strategies to cold environments emerged in the GH1 family, being tetramerization an alternative, not a rule. These findings reveal a novel strategy for enzyme cold adaptation and provide a framework for the semi-rational engineering of β-glucosidases aiming at cold industrial processes.

  19. The bean rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 strongly reduces Fusarium culmorum growth and infectiveness of plant roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddoudi, I.; Sendi, Y.; Batnini, M.; Romdhane, S.B.; Mhadhbi, H.; Mrabet, M.

    2017-07-01

    A faba bean rhizospheric Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate RZ9 was used for studying its antifungal activity and protecting effects of faba bean and common bean against the root pathogen Fusarium culmorum strain MZB47. The dual culture tests showed that RZ9 inhibits MZB47 in vitro growth by 56%. When mixing RZ9 cell suspension with MZB47 macroconidia at equal proportion, the macroconidia viability was reduced with 70%. Pathogenicity tests conducted in sterile conditions showed that MZB47 caused an intense root rotting in faba bean ‘Aquadulce’ plantlets and a slight level in common bean ‘Coco blanc’. This was associated to significant decreases in plant growth only in ‘Aquadulce’, reducing shoot dry weight (DW) by 82% and root DW by 70%. In soil samples, MZB47 caused severe root rotting and induced significant decreases in shoot DW (up to 51%) and root DW (up to 60%) for both beans. It was associated to a decrease in nodule number by 73% and 52% for faba bean and common bean, respectively. Biocontrol assays revealed that the inoculation of RZ9 to MZB47-treated plantlets enhanced shoot DWs (25% and 110%) and root DWs (29% and 67%), in faba bean and common bean, respectively. Moreover, root rotting levels decreased and nodule number increased in treated compared to untreated plantlets. Collected data highlighted the disease severity of F. culmorum and demonstrated the potential of using RZ9 in controlling Fusaria root diseases in beans. Thereby, the current study represents the first report on the biocontrol effectiveness of P. aeruginosa against F. culmorum in beans.

  20. The bean rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 strongly reduces Fusarium culmorum growth and infectiveness of plant roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Haddoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A faba bean rhizospheric Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate RZ9 was used for studying its antifungal activity and protecting effects of faba bean and common bean against the root pathogen Fusarium culmorum strain MZB47. The dual culture tests showed that RZ9 inhibits MZB47 in vitro growth by 56%. When mixing RZ9 cell suspension with MZB47 macroconidia at equal proportion, the macroconidia viability was reduced with 70%. Pathogenicity tests conducted in sterile conditions showed that MZB47 caused an intense root rotting in faba bean ‘Aquadulce’ plantlets and a slight level in common bean ‘Coco blanc’. This was associated to significant decreases in plant growth only in ‘Aquadulce’, reducing shoot dry weight (DW by 82% and root DW by 70%. In soil samples, MZB47 caused severe root rotting and induced significant decreases in shoot DW (up to 51% and root DW (up to 60% for both beans. It was associated to a decrease in nodule number by 73% and 52% for faba bean and common bean, respectively. Biocontrol assays revealed that the inoculation of RZ9 to MZB47-treated plantlets enhanced shoot DWs (25% and 110% and root DWs (29% and 67%, in faba bean and common bean, respectively. Moreover, root rotting levels decreased and nodule number increased in treated compared to untreated plantlets. Collected data highlighted the disease severity of F. culmorum and demonstrated the potential of using RZ9 in controlling Fusaria root diseases in beans. Thereby, the current study represents the first report on the biocontrol effectiveness of P. aeruginosa against F. culmorum in beans.

  1. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections by killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth, but resistance to antibiotics can develop readily. The discovery that bacterial quorum-sensing regulates bacterial virulence as well as the formation of biofilms opens up new ways...... to control certain bacterial infections. Furanone compounds capable of inhibiting bacterial quorum-sensing systems have been isolated from the marine macro alga Delisea pulchra. Objectives: Two synthetic furanones were tested for their ability to attenuate bacterial virulence in the mouse models of chronic...

  2. OligoG CF-5/20 disruption of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in a murine lung infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Song, Zhijun; Ciofu, Oana

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm growth is a universal survival strategy for bacteria, providing an effective and resilient approach for survival in an otherwise hostile environment. In the context of an infection, a biofilm provides resistance and tolerance to host immune defenses and antibiotics, allowing the biofilm p...

  3. Anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other obligately anaerobic bacterial biofilms growing in the thick airway mucus of chronically infected cystic fibrosis patients: an emerging paradigm or "Old Hat"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Hassett, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway mucus is an ideal niche in which many bacteria can develop antibiotic- and phagocyte-resistance in unique structures known as "mode II biofilms" where bacteria are embedded within the mucus, yet unattached to airway epithelial cells. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant CF pathogen, yet herein the authors provide burgeoning evidence that obligate anaerobic bacteria (e.g., Prevotella) actually thrive within the CF mucus, a paradigmatic shift that chronic CF is an "aerobic" disease. Interestingly, CF organisms repress virulence factor production (e.g., P. aeruginosa) while others (e.g., S. aureus) increase them under anaerobic conditions. The authors shed additional light on (i) the anoxic nature of the CF airway mucus, (ii) the relative commonality of anaerobic bacteria isolated from CF sputum, (iii) virulence factor production and cross-talk between obligate anaerobes and P. aeruginosa relative to disease progression/remission, (iv) the role of mucoidy in CF, and (v) the role of nitrosative stress in activation of bacteriophage and pyocins within biofilms. The authors conclude with insight as to how we might treat some CF bacteria during mode II biofilm infections that utilizes a metabolite of bacterial anaerobic respiration and an aerobic oxidation product of airway-generated NO, acidified NO(2)(-).

  4. Searching for new strategies against biofilm infections: Colistin-AMP combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus single- and double-species biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jorge

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial research is being pressured to look for more effective therapeutics for the ever-growing antibiotic-resistant infections, and antimicrobial peptides (AMP and antimicrobial combinations are promising solutions. This work evaluates colistin-AMP combinations against two major pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, encompassing non- and resistant strains. Colistin (CST combined with the AMP temporin A (TEMP-A, citropin 1.1 (CIT-1.1 and tachyplesin I linear analogue (TP-I-L was tested against planktonic, single- and double-species biofilm cultures. Overall synergy for planktonic P. aeruginosa and synergy/additiveness for planktonic S. aureus were observed. Biofilm growth prevention was achieved with synergy and additiveness. Pre-established 24 h-old biofilms were harder to eradicate, especially for S. aureus and double-species biofilms; still, some synergy and addictiveness was observed for higher concentrations, including for the biofilms of resistant strains. Different treatment times and growth media did not greatly influence AMP activity. CST revealed low toxicity compared with the other AMP but its combinations were toxic for high concentrations. Overall, combinations reduced effective AMP concentrations, mainly in prevention scenarios. Improvement of effectiveness and toxicity of therapeutic strategies will be further investigated.

  5. Overexpression of Nictaba-Like Lectin Genes from Glycine max Confers Tolerance towards Pseudomonas syringae Infection, Aphid Infestation and Salt Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

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    Sofie Van Holle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system that allows them to recognize invading pathogens by specialized receptors. Carbohydrate-binding proteins or lectins are part of this immune system and especially the lectins that reside in the nucleocytoplasmic compartment are known to be implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. The class of Nictaba-like lectins (NLL groups all proteins with homology to the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum lectin, known as a stress-inducible lectin. Here we focus on two Nictaba homologs from soybean (Glycine max, referred to as GmNLL1 and GmNLL2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein either transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or stably transformed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells revealed a nucleocytoplasmic localization for the GmNLLs under study. RT-qPCR analysis of the transcript levels for the Nictaba-like lectins in soybean demonstrated that the genes are expressed in several tissues throughout the development of the plant. Furthermore, it was shown that salt treatment, Phytophthora sojae infection and Aphis glycines infestation trigger the expression of particular NLL genes. Stress experiments with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the NLLs from soybean yielded an enhanced tolerance of the plant towards bacterial infection (Pseudomonas syringae, insect infestation (Myzus persicae and salinity. Our data showed a better performance of the transgenic lines compared to wild type plants, indicating that the NLLs from soybean are implicated in the stress response. These data can help to further elucidate the physiological importance of the Nictaba-like lectins from soybean, which can ultimately lead to the design of crop plants with a better tolerance to changing environmental conditions.

  6. Diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections and detection of antibiotic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashouf, Rasoul Y.; Farahani, Hadi S.; Zamani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) and detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from culture. We conducted the cross-sectional study in 140 patients with wound infections who admitted to referral burn center of Motahari, Tehran, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2005-2006. Skin biopsy specimens were aseptically taken from each patient, one for PCR and one for bacterial culture. A M-PCR test based on simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL, was used to directly detect fluorescent pseudomonades and P. aeruginosa in skin biopsy specimens. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates to 16 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method. Out of 140 biopsy specimens, M-PCR detected 66 (47.2%) isolates, while culture detected 57 (40.7%) isolates as P. aeruginosa. Positive results for both genes which observed only for P. aeruginosa, while only one gene, oprI, was amplified from other fluorescent pseudomonades (n=12) and all other bacterial tested (n=62) were negative by the amplification test. The most effective antibiotics against isolate of P. aeruginosa were cefepime (79%), azetreonam (76%), ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (68%), tobramycin (62%) and amikacin (61%). Multiplex PCR assay appears promising for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. aeruginosa from the burned skin biopsy specimens. Simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL could detect P. aeruginosa and oprI gene only for other fluorescent pseudomonades. (author)

  7. Inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients: challenges to treatment adherence and strategies to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodnár R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Réka Bodnár,1,2 Ágnes Mészáros,2 Máté Oláh,2 Tamás Ágh3 1Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Heim Pál Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; 2University Pharmacy Department of Pharmacy Administration, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; 3Syreon Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary Background: Inhaled antibiotics (ABs are recommended for use in the therapy of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify level of adherence to inhaled ABs and to determine predictors and consequences of nonadherence in CF. Methods: A systematic literature search of English-language articles was conducted in April 2015 using Medline and Embase. No publication date limit was applied. The literature screening was conducted by two independent reviewers. All of the included studies were assessed for quality. Results: The search yielded 193 publications, of which ten met the inclusion criteria and underwent data extraction. Seven studies focused on inhaled tobramycin, one on inhaled colistimethate, one on inhaled levofloxacin, and one on inhaled aztreonam lysine. Medication adherence to inhaled ABs was analyzed by pharmacy refill history, daily phone diary, parent and child self-reports, vials counting, or electronic monitoring. In randomized controlled trials (n=3, proportion of adherent patients (>75%–80% of required doses taken ranged from 86% to 97%; in prospective cohort studies (n=3, adherence rates ranged between 36% and 92%, and in retrospective studies (n=4 it ranged between 60% and 70%. The adherence to inhaled ABs in CF was found to be associated with the complexity of treatment, time of drug administration, age of patients, treatment burden (adverse events, taste, and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: The high diversity of adherence data was because of the different study designs (randomized controlled trials vs real-world studies and the lack

  8. Evolution and diversification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the paranasal sinuses of cystic fibrosis children have implications for chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Rau, Martin Holm; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2012-01-01

    that the paranasal sinuses constitute an important niche for the colonizing bacteria in many patients. The paranasal sinuses often harbor distinct bacterial subpopulations, and in the early colonization phases there seems to be a migration from the sinuses to the lower airways, suggesting that independent adaptation...... and evolution take place in the sinuses. Importantly, before the onset of chronic lung infection, lineages with mutations conferring a large fitness benefit in CF airways such as mucA and lasR as well as small colony variants and antibiotic-resistant clones are part of the sinus populations. Thus, the paranasal...

  9. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...

  10. Overproduction of active efflux pump and variations of OprD dominate in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with bloodstream infections in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Shu-Sheng; Hung, Kuei-Hsiang; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-06-13

    The emergence of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IRPA) has become a great concern worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate resistance mechanisms associated with bloodstream isolated IRPA strains in Taiwan. A total of 78 non-duplicated IRPA isolates were isolated from patients with bloodstream infection. The average prevalence of imipenem-resistance in those isolates was 5.9 % during a 10-year longitudinal surveillance in Taiwan. PFGE results showed high clonal diversity among the 78 isolates. VIM-2, VIM-3, OXA-10, and OXA-17 β-lactamases were identified in 2 (2.6 %), 3 (3.8 %), 2 (2.6 %), and 1 (1.3 %) isolates, respectively. Active efflux pumps, AmpC β-lactamase overproduction, and extended-spectrum AmpC cephalosporinases (ESACs) were found in 58 (74.4 %), 25 (32.1 %) and 15 (19.2 %) of IRPA isolates, respectively. oprD mutations with amino acid substitution, shortened putative loop L7, premature stop codon caused by point mutation, frameshift by nucleotide insertion or deletion, and interruption by insertion sequence were found in 19 (24.4 %), 18 (23.1 %), 15 (19.2 %), 14 (17.9 %), and 10 (12.8 %) of isolates, respectively. This study suggests that alterations in the OprD protein and having an active efflux pump are the main mechanisms associated with bloodstream isolated IRPA. Overproduction of AmpC, ESACs, and the presence of VIM- and OXA-type β-lactamases play additional roles in reduced susceptibility to imipenem in P. aeruginosa isolates in Taiwan.

  11. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with chronic periodontal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Souto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are important pathogens associated with late nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized and institutionalized individuals. The oral cavity may be a major source of these respiratory pathogens, particularly in the presence of poor oral hygiene and periodontal infection. This study investigated the prevalence of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in subgingival biofilm and saliva of subjects with periodontal disease or health. Samples were obtained from 55 periodontally healthy (PH and 169 chronic periodontitis (CP patients. DNA was obtained from the samples and detection of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. was carried out by multiplex and nested PCR. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were detected in 40% and 45% of all samples, respectively. No significant differences in the distribution of these microorganisms between men and women, subgingival biofilm and saliva samples, patients 35 years of age, and smokers and non-smokers were observed regardless periodontal status (p > 0.05. In contrast, the frequencies of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. in saliva and biofilm samples were significantly greater in CP than PH patients (p < 0.01. Smokers presenting P. aeruginosa and high frequencies of supragingival plaque were more likely to present CP than PH. P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are frequently detected in the oral microbiota of CP. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and the presence of P. aeruginosa are strongly associated with periodontitis.

  12. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels compared to the control. Furthermore, Ag

  13. Dendrimer-based selective autophagy-induction rescues ΔF508-CFTR and inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Mackenzie Brockman

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a genetic disorder caused by mutation(s in the CF-transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr gene. The most common mutation, ΔF508, leads to accumulation of defective-CFTR protein in aggresome-bodies. Additionally, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa, a common CF pathogen, exacerbates obstructive CF lung pathology. In the present study, we aimed to develop and test a novel strategy to improve the bioavailability and potentially achieve targeted drug delivery of cysteamine, a potent autophagy-inducing drug with anti-bacterial properties, by developing a dendrimer (PAMAM-DEN-based cysteamine analogue.We first evaluated the effect of dendrimer-based cysteamine analogue (PAMAM-DENCYS on the intrinsic autophagy response in IB3-1 cells and observed a significant reduction in Ub-RFP and LC3-GFP co-localization (aggresome-bodies by PAMAM-DENCYS treatment as compared to plain dendrimer (PAMAM-DEN control. Next, we observed that PAMAM-DENCYS treatment shows a modest rescue of ΔF508-CFTR as the C-form. Moreover, immunofluorescence microscopy of HEK-293 cells transfected with ΔF508-CFTR-GFP showed that PAMAM-DENCYS is able to rescue the misfolded-ΔF508-CFTR from aggresome-bodies by inducing its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We further verified these results by flow cytometry and observed significant (p<0.05; PAMAM-DEN vs. PAMAM-DENCYS rescue of membrane-ΔF508-CFTR with PAMAM-DENCYS treatment using non-permeabilized IB3-1 cells immunostained for CFTR. Finally, we assessed the autophagy-mediated bacterial clearance potential of PAMAM-DENCYS by treating IB3-1 cells infected with PA01-GFP, and observed a significant (p<0.01; PAMAM-DEN vs. PAMAM-DENCYS decrease in intracellular bacterial counts by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Also, PAMAM-DENCYS treatment significantly inhibits the growth of PA01-GFP bacteria and demonstrates potent mucolytic properties.We demonstrate here the efficacy of dendrimer-based autophagy

  14. On-line monitoring of Aspergillus niger GH1 growth in a bioprocess for the production of ellagic acid and ellagitannase by solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Zárate, Pedro; Wong-Paz, Jorge E; Rodríguez-Duran, Luis V; Buenrostro-Figueroa, Juan; Michel, Mariela; Saucedo-Castañeda, Gerardo; Favela-Torres, Ernesto; Ascacio-Valdés, Juan A; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2018-01-01

    The present work describes the monitoring of CO 2 production by Aspergillus niger GH1 in a bioprocess for the production of ellagitannase (EAH) and ellagic acid by solid state fermentation. Pomegranate ellagitannins, mainly punicalagin, were used as carbon source and EAH inducer. A second condition, using ellagitannins and maltose as growth promoting carbon source, was tested. The ellagic acid production was quantified and the EAH activity was assayed. The accumulated metabolites were identified by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Higher CO 2 production (7.79mg/grams of dry material) was reached in media supplemented with maltose. Short-time lag phase (7.79h) and exponential phase (10.42h) were obtained using only ellagitannins, despite its lower CO 2 production (3.79mg/grams of dry material). Without the use of maltose lower ellagic acid (11.85mg/L/h) and EAH (21.80U/L/h) productivities were reached. The use of maltose enhances the productivity of EA (33.18mg/L/h) and EAH (33.70U/L/h). Besides of punicalin and ellagic acid, two unknown compounds with mass weight of 702 and 290g/mol (ions 701 and 289m/z in negative mode, respectively) were identified and characterized by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring the Degradation of Gallotannins Catalyzed by Tannase Produced by Aspergillus niger GH1 for Ellagic Acid Production in Submerged and Solid-State Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-González, Mónica L; Guyot, Sylvain; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raul; Prado-Barragán, Arely; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2018-06-01

    Due to great interest on producing bioactive compounds for functional foods and biopharmaceuticals, it is important to explore the microbial degradation of potential sources of target biomolecules. Gallotannins are polyphenols present in nature, an example of them is tannic acid which is susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. This hydrolysis is performed by tannase or tannin acyl hydrolase, releasing in this way, biomolecules with high-added value. In the present study, chemical profiles obtained after fungal degradation of tannic acid under two bioprocesses (submerged fermentation (SmF) and solid state fermentation (SSF)) were determined. In both fermentation systems (SmF and SSF), Aspergillus niger GH1 strain and tannic acid as a sole carbon source and inducer were used (the presence of tannic acid promotes production of enzyme tannase). In case of SSF, polyurethane foam (PUF) was used like as support of fermentation; culture medium only was used in case of submerged fermentation. Fermentation processes were monitored during 72 h; samples were taken kinetically every 8 h; and all extracts obtained were partially purified to obtain polyphenolic fraction and then were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Molecules like gallic acid and n-galloyl glucose were identified as intermediates in degradation of tannic acid; during SSF was identified ellagic acid production. The results obtained in this study will contribute to biotechnological production of ellagic acid.

  16. Utilization of molasses and sugar cane bagasse for production of fungal invertase in solid state fermentation using Aspergillus niger GH1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veana, F.; Martínez-Hernández, J.L.; Aguilar, C.N.; Rodríguez-Herrera, R.; Michelena, G.

    2014-01-01

    Agro-industrial wastes have been used as substrate-support in solid state fermentation for enzyme production. Molasses and sugarcane bagasse are by-products of sugar industry and can be employed as substrates for invertase production. Invertase is an important enzyme for sweeteners development. In this study, a xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 isolated of the Mexican semi-desert, previously reported as an invertase over-producer strain was used. Molasses from Mexico and Cuba were chemically analyzed (total and reducer sugars, nitrogen and phosphorous contents); the last one was selected based on chemical composition. Fermentations were performed using virgin and hydrolyzate bagasse (treatment with concentrated sulfuric acid). Results indicated that, the enzymatic yield (5231 U/L) is higher than those reported by other A. niger strains under solid state fermentation, using hydrolyzate bagasse. The acid hydrolysis promotes availability of fermentable sugars. In addition, maximum invertase activity was detected at 24 h using low substrate concentration, which may reduce production costs. This study presents an alternative method for invertase production using a xerophilic fungus isolated from Mexican semi-desert and inexpensive substrates (molasses and sugarcane bagasse). PMID:25242918

  17. Utilization of molasses and sugar cane bagasse for production of fungal invertase in solid state fermentation using Aspergillus niger GH1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Veana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Agro-industrial wastes have been used as substrate-support in solid state fermentation for enzyme production. Molasses and sugarcane bagasse are by-products of sugar industry and can be employed as substrates for invertase production. Invertase is an important enzyme for sweeteners development. In this study, a xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 isolated of the Mexican semi-desert, previously reported as an invertase over-producer strain was used. Molasses from Mexico and Cuba were chemically analyzed (total and reducer sugars, nitrogen and phosphorous contents; the last one was selected based on chemical composition. Fermentations were performed using virgin and hydrolyzate bagasse (treatment with concentrated sulfuric acid. Results indicated that, the enzymatic yield (5231 U/L is higher than those reported by other A. niger strains under solid state fermentation, using hydrolyzate bagasse. The acid hydrolysis promotes availability of fermentable sugars. In addition, maximum invertase activity was detected at 24 h using low substrate concentration, which may reduce production costs. This study presents an alternative method for invertase production using a xerophilic fungus isolated from Mexican semi-desert and inexpensive substrates (molasses and sugarcane bagasse.

  18. Synergistic antibacterial efficacy of early combination treatment with tobramycin and quorum-sensing inhibitors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intraperitoneal foreign-body infection mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim H

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS)-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms formed in vitro are more susceptible to tobramycin than QS-proficient P. aeruginosa biofilms, and combination treatment with a QS inhibitor (QSI) and tobramycin shows synergistic effects on the killing of in vitro biofilms. We extended...

  19. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S.; Hammer, A. S.; Høiby, N.

    2017-01-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable...... in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis....

  20. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  1. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and Pseudomonas keratitis using a thiol-based peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, F R; Paterson, C A; Gray, R D; Wells, J T

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase is a zinc metalloproteinase which is released during P. aeruginosa infections. Pseudomonas keratitis, which occurs following contact lens-induced corneal trauma, can lead to rapid, liquefactive necrosis of the cornea. This destruction has been attributed to the release of both host-derived enzymes and the bacterial products P. aeruginosa elastase, alkaline protease, exotoxin A, and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor, HSCH2 (DL...

  2. In vitro and in vivo effects of Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus sp. on Fusarium acuminatum, Botrytis cinerea and Aspergillus niger infecting cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Zdravković

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L is an important member of the Cucurbitaceae family. Production of healthy nursery is necessary for high-quality production of this crop in greenhouses and in fields. With the idea of minimizing the use of pesticides and mineral fertilizers to preserve soil quality, we investigated the effects of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB on growth promotion and protection of cucumber plants from phytopathogenic fungi. The effects of Pseudomonas spp. strains with different antifungal activities and Bacillus sp. Q10 strain with PGP activity were tested on cucumber plants. Antagonistic activity of Pseudomonas spp. against the growth of several phytopathogenic fungi isolated from cucumber: F. acuminatum, B. cinerea and A. niger, was observed. The influences of overnight cultures, supernatants and heat-stable antifungal factors were tested on the phytopathogenic fungi in vitro. Pseudomonas sp. K35 and K24 strains were more effective than P. chlororaphis Q16 and Pseudomonas sp. K27, showing 70-80% of fungal growth inhibition regardless of culture or fraction applied. The good antagonists that belong to pseudomonads and Bacillus sp. Q10 strain were used as mixtures for estimation of plant growth and health promoting effects on cucumber plants. Growth dynamics differed depending on the applied strain of Pseudomonas sp. The M3 treatment (a mixture of Bacillus sp. Q10 and P. chlororaphis Q16 stimulated the initial phase of growth, while M4 (a mixture of Bacillus sp. Q10 and Pseudomonas sp. K24 resulted in the maximal height at the final measurement. Significant differences in leaf and plant weight (M4, and leaf weight (M5, containing K35 strain were found after the treatments. No significant differences in chlorophyll and NBI level were observed in any of the tested combinations. The obtained results suggested that M3 was suitable for stimulation of the early phase of cucumber growth, while the mixtures M4 and M5 improved plant

  3. CXCR1 regulates pulmonary anti-Pseudomonas host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carevic, M.; Öz, H.; Fuchs, K.; Laval, J.; Schroth, C.; Frey, N.; Hector, A.; Bilich, T.; Haug, M.; Schmidt, A.; Autenrieth, S. E.; Bucher, K.; Beer-Hammer, S.; Gaggar, A.; Kneilling, M.; Benarafa, C.; Gao, J.; Murphy, P.; Schwarz, S.; Moepps, B.; Hartl, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) and other lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the pulmonary host defense mechanisms regulating anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunity remain incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate, by studying an airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model, in vivo bioluminescence imaging, neutrophil effector responses and human airway samples, that the chemokine receptor CXCR1 regulates pulmonary host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mechanistically, CXCR1 regulated anti-Pseudomonas neutrophil responses through modulation of reactive oxygen species and interference with toll-like receptor 5 expression. These studies define CXCR1 as a novel non-canonical chemokine receptor that regulates pulmonary anti-Pseudomonas host defense with broad implications for CF, COPD and other infectious lung diseases. PMID:26950764

  4. Pseudomonas predators: understanding and exploiting phage-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Jeroen; Hendrix, Hanne; Blasdel, Bob G; Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Lavigne, Rob

    2017-09-01

    Species in the genus Pseudomonas thrive in a diverse set of ecological niches and include crucial pathogens, such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The bacteriophages that infect Pseudomonas spp. mirror the widespread and diverse nature of their hosts. Therefore, Pseudomonas spp. and their phages are an ideal system to study the molecular mechanisms that govern virus-host interactions. Furthermore, phages are principal catalysts of host evolution and diversity, which directly affects the ecological roles of environmental and pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. Understanding these interactions not only provides novel insights into phage biology but also advances the development of phage therapy, phage-derived antimicrobial strategies and innovative biotechnological tools that may be derived from phage-bacteria interactions.

  5. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to ...

  6. Novel Path Towards Colistin Resistance In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa During Chronic Infection Involves Polymorphisms In Uncharacterized Glycosyltransferase Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Grith Miriam Maigaard; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic resistance development in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasing problem. The effect of colistin, one of the few last resort drugs commonly given to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, is dependent on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure. We have...... inhibitory concentration by microbroth dilution, virulence in an amoebae model and LPS structure by visualization in a silver-stained gel. Results: Reversion of the SNP to reference genotype resulted in increased colistin susceptibility, reduced virulence in an amoebae model and altered LPS structure...

  7. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches. PMID:26147218

  8. ExoU contributes to late killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa - infected endothelial cells ExoU contribui para a morte tardia de células endoteliais infectadas por Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Mattos Saliba

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain the role of ExoU in late P. aeruginosa cytotoxicity, endothelial cells (EC were exposed to wild type PA103, PA103deltaexoU and PA103::exsA for 1h and to gentamicin in culture medium. After 24h, the viability of PA103-infected cells (33.7 ± 14.3% was significantly lower than the viability of PA103deltaexoU- (77.7 ± 6.3% or PA103::exsA- (79.5 ± 23.3% infected EC. P. aeruginosa cytotoxicity did not depend on the bacterial ability to interact with EC because the percentage of cells with associated PA103 (35.9 ± 15.8% was similar to the percentage in PA103deltaexoU- (34.2 ± 16.0% and lower than the percentage in PA103::exsA-infected cultures (82.9 ± 18.9%. Cell treatment with cytochalasin D reduced the PA103 internalization by EC but did not interfere with its ability to kill host cells.Para determinar o papel de ExoU na citotoxicidade tardia de P. aeruginosa, células endoteliais (CE foram expostas às cepas PA103, PA103deltaxoU e PA103::exsA por 1h e à gentamicina em meio de cultura. Após 24h, a viabilidade das CE infectadas com PA103 (33.7 ± 14.3% foi inferior à de CE infectadas com PA103deltaexoU (77.7 ± 6.3% e PA103::exsA (79.5 ± 23.3%. A citotoxicidade não dependeu da capacidade de interagir com as CE porque o percentual de células com bactérias associadas em culturas expostas a PA103 foi semelhante ao percentual em culturas expostas a PA103deltaexoU e inferior em culturas expostas a PA103::exsA. O tratamento das CE com citocalasina D reduziu a internalização de PA103, mas não interferiu em sua citotoxicidade.

  9. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2016-01-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together......1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology...... host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO...

  10. Potent Antibacterial Antisense Peptide-Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugates Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections in hospital settings, especially with immune compromised patients, and the increasing prevalence of multidrug resistant strains urges search for new drugs with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we introduce...... significantly reduced bacterial survival. These results open the possibility of development of antisense antibacterials for treatment of Pseudomonas infections....

  11. Activity of Bacteriophages in Removing Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fong, Stephanie A.; Drilling, Amanda; Morales, Sandra; Cornet, Marjolein E.; Woodworth, Bradford A.; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Psaltis, Alkis J.; Vreugde, Sarah; Wormald, Peter-John

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are prevalent amongst chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) sufferers. Many P. aeruginosa strains form biofilms, leading to treatment failure. Lytic bacteriophages (phages) are viruses that infect, replicate within, and lyse bacteria, causing bacterial death.

  12. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes consume oxygen in sputum from chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Hansen, C. R.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most severe complication for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This infection is characterised by endobronchial mucoid biofilms surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs). The mucoid phenotype offers protection...

  13. Selective recruitment of Th I cells induced by re-infection of succeptible and resistant mice with Pseudomonas aerugionosa in the lungs indicates protective role of IL-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O

    2002-01-01

    , resistance to re-infection was paralleled by a shift towards a Th1-dominated response and increased IL-12 production. No significant increase in serum IgG was observed in the re-infected mice. In conclusion, these results indicate a protective role for a Th1-dominated response, independent of antibody...

  14. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... lipopetide biosurfactants in pollutant biodegradation and natural roles in biofilm formation. The work presented is a combination of environmental microbiology and exploiting genetic manipulation of pure cultures to achieve insightinto the effects and mechanisms of lipopeptides on microbial processes...

  15. Genetic Detection of Pseudomonas spp. in Commercial Amazonian Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardura, Alba; Linde, Ana R.; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Brazilian freshwater fish caught from large drainages like the River Amazon represent a million ton market in expansion, which is of enormous importance for export to other continents as exotic seafood. A guarantee of bacteriological safety is required for international exports that comprise a set of different bacteria but not any Pseudomonas. However, diarrhoea, infections and even septicaemia caused by some Pseudomonas species have been reported, especially in immune-depressed patients. In this work we have employed PCR-based methodology for identifying Pseudomonas species in commercial fish caught from two different areas within the Amazon basin. Most fish caught from the downstream tributary River Tapajòs were contaminated by five different Pseudomonas species. All fish samples obtained from the River Negro tributary (Manaus markets) contained Pseudomonas, but a less diverse community with only two species. The most dangerous Pseudomonas species for human health, P. aeruginosa, was not found and consumption of these fish (from their Pseudomonas content) can be considered safe for healthy consumers. As a precautionary approach we suggest considering Pseudomonas in routine bacteriological surveys of imported seafood. PMID:24065035

  16. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  17. The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK20 modulates host responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ederli, Luisa; Madeo, Laura; Calderini, Ornella; Gehring, Chris; Moretti, Chiaraluce; Buonaurio, Roberto; Paolocci, Francesco; Pasqualini, Stefania

    2011-10-15

    In plants, the cysteine-rich repeat kinases (CRKs) are a sub-family of receptor-like protein kinases that contain the DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains. It has been shown that in Arabidopsis thaliana, CRK20 is transcriptionally induced by pathogens, salicylic acid and ozone (O(3)). However, its role in responses to biotic and abiotic stress remains to be elucidated. To determine the function of CRK20 in such responses, two CRK20 loss-of-function mutants, crk20-1 and crk20-2, were isolated from public collections of Arabidopsis T-DNA tagged lines and examined for responses to O(3) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. crk20-1 and crk20-2 showed similar O(3) sensitivities and no differences in the expression of defense genes when compared with the wild-type. However, pathogen growth was significantly reduced, while there were no differences in the induction of salicylic acid related defense genes or salicylic acid accumulation. Furthermore, correlation analysis of CRK20 gene expression suggests that it has a role in the control of H(2)O and/or nutrient transport. We therefore propose that CRK20 promotes conditions that are favorable for Pst DC3000 growth in Arabidopsis, possibly through the regulation of apoplastic homeostasis, and consequently, of the environment of this biotrophic pathogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura A; Polanski, Krzysztof; de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Jayaraman, Siddharth; Bowden, Laura; Moore, Jonathan; Penfold, Christopher A; Jenkins, Dafyd J; Hill, Claire; Baxter, Laura; Kulasekaran, Satish; Truman, William; Littlejohn, George; Prusinska, Justyna; Mead, Andrew; Steinbrenner, Jens; Hickman, Richard; Rand, David; Wild, David L; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Smirnoff, Nick; Beynon, Jim; Denby, Katherine; Grant, Murray

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK20 modulates host responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection

    KAUST Repository

    Ederli, Luisa

    2011-10-01

    In plants, the cysteine-rich repeat kinases (CRKs) are a sub-family of receptor-like protein kinases that contain the DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains. It has been shown that in Arabidopsis thaliana, CRK20 is transcriptionally induced by pathogens, salicylic acid and ozone (O3). However, its role in responses to biotic and abiotic stress remains to be elucidated. To determine the function of CRK20 in such responses, two CRK20 loss-of-function mutants, crk20-1 and crk20-2, were isolated from public collections of Arabidopsis T-DNA tagged lines and examined for responses to O3 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. crk20-1 and crk20-2 showed similar O3 sensitivities and no differences in the expression of defense genes when compared with the wild-type. However, pathogen growth was significantly reduced, while there were no differences in the induction of salicylic acid related defense genes or salicylic acid accumulation. Furthermore, correlation analysis of CRK20 gene expression suggests that it has a role in the control of H2O and/or nutrient transport. We therefore propose that CRK20 promotes conditions that are favorable for Pst DC3000 growth in Arabidopsis, possibly through the regulation of apoplastic homeostasis, and consequently, of the environment of this biotrophic pathogen. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae...

  1. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  2. Bead-size directed distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in distinct inflammatory response in a mouse model of chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, L J; Trøstrup, H; Damlund, Dina Silke Malling

    2012-01-01

    or in the peripheral respiratory zone. To study this we produced two distinct sizes of small alginate beads (SB) and large beads (LB) containing P. aeruginosa. In total, 175 BALB/c mice were infected with either SB or LB. At day 1 the quantitative bacteriology was higher in the SB group compared to the LB group (P

  3. Cytokine and surface receptor diversity of NK cells in resistant C3H/HeN and susceptible BALB/c mice with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether NK cells from resistant C3H/HeN mice and susceptible BALB/c mice showed different release of cytokines and expression of surface molecules during chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection using alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa mimicking...... the infection in cystic fibrosis. Lung cell suspensions were depleted of lymphocytes by magnetic cell sorting. The concentrations of IFN-gamma, IL-1beta and GM-CSF were estimated by ELISA at day 1 and 2 after infection. Non-infected mice were used as controls. Flow cytometry was used to estimate the surface...... expression of the LFA-1 and Fc receptors on NK cells. At day 2, IFN-gamma levels increased in C3H/HeN mice but decreased in BALB/c mice. The GM-CSF levels increased only in the C3H/HeN mice at day 1 and 2. Surface expression of LFA-1 on the NK cells was higher in C3H/HeN mice at day 1 and 2. In contrast...

  4. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is more severe in Th2 responding BALB/c mice compared to Th1 responding C3H/HeN mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Johansen, H K; Song, Z

    1997-01-01

    model of this infection was established in two strains of mice: C3H/HeN and BALB/c, generally known as Th1 and Th2 responders, respectively, which were challenged with alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa. Mortality was significantly lower in C3H/HeN compared to BALB/c mice (p ... was cleared more efficiently in C3H/HeN mice and significantly more C3H/HeN mice showed normal lung histopathology (p BALB/c mice (p ... from the two strains of mice, the interferon-(IFN-) gamma levels were higher, whereas IL-4 levels were lower in C3H/HeN mice than in BALB/c mice. The implications of these findings for CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection are discussed....

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreak in a pediatric oncology care unit caused by an errant water jet into contaminated siphons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Henriette; Geginat, Gernot; Hogardt, Michael; Kramer, Alexandra; Dürken, Matthias; Schroten, Horst; Tenenbaum, Tobias

    2012-06-01

    We analyzed an outbreak of invasive infections with an exotoxin U positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain within a pediatric oncology care unit. Environmental sampling and molecular characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains led to identification of the outbreak source. An errant water jet into the sink within patient rooms was observed. Optimized outbreak management resulted in an abundance of further Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections within the pediatric oncology care unit.

  6. Clinical utilization of genomics data produced by the international Pseudomonas aeruginosa consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena

    2015-01-01

    The International Pseudomonas aeruginosa Consortium is sequencing over 1000 genomes and building an analysis pipeline for the study of Pseudomonas genome evolution, antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. Metadata, including genomic and phenotypic data for each isolate of the collection, are a...... implicated in human and animal infections, understand how patients become infected and how the infection evolves over time as well as identify prognostic markers for better evidence-based decisions on patient care....

  7. Detectie en beheersing van bacterierot veroorzaakt door Pseudomonas cattleyae in Phalaenopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludeking, D.J.W.; Hamelink, R.; Kromwijk, J.A.M.; Schenk, M.F.; Vermunt, A.; Woets, F.

    2011-01-01

    Phalaenopsis growers suffer from mayor losses up to 20% due to bacterial spot. This bacterial infection in caused by the Acidovorax avenae subsp. cattleyae. In practice this bacterial disease is also known as Pseudomonas. This bacterium is causing black leaf spots with a yellow border. Pseudomonas

  8. Studies on the sensitivity of guinea pigs and golden hamsters irradiated with different doses of gamma rays to infections with R and S forms of Pseudomonas pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdenski, Kh.M.; Velyanov, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Whole-body gamma irradiation was carried out on guinea pigs of both sexes with 2 Gy (sublethal dose), 2 Gy fractionated (4 x 0.5 Gy a day) and 0.5 Gy, and on golden hamsters with 6 Gy (sublethal dose) and 0.5 Gy. The animals were injected i.p. 24 h after irradiation with bacterial suspensions of P. pseudomallei R 7 and R 15 . The results showed a great increase of sensitivity to infection in the animals irradiated with sublethal dose, both as regards the R and S forms. Susceptibility rose appreciably also in guinea pigs irradiated fractionally with a dose of 2 Gy and to a relatively lower degree upon irradiation with 0.5 Gy. For the golden hamsters the sensitivity toward both investigated strains was extremely high and it remained unchanged upon irradiation with 6 Gy and 0.5 Gy. The data obtained provided grounds for the existence of a certain correlation between the different radioresistance of guinea pigs and golden hamsters and the changes established in their sensitivity to infections with R and S forms of Ps. pseudomallei after whole-body gamma irradiation

  9. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    in the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when......Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... Aspergillus species. Methods: A suspension of fungal spores was streaked onto WATM agar plates. After 24 hours incubation at 37 °C, a P. aeruginosa overnight culture was streaked out perpendicular to the fungal streak. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for five days, examined and plugs were extracted...

  10. Cytokine and surface receptor diversity of NK cells in resistant C3H/HeN and susceptible BALB/c mice with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether NK cells from resistant C3H/HeN mice and susceptible BALB/c mice showed different release of cytokines and expression of surface molecules during chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection using alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa mimicking...... expression of the LFA-1 and Fc receptors on NK cells. At day 2, IFN-gamma levels increased in C3H/HeN mice but decreased in BALB/c mice. The GM-CSF levels increased only in the C3H/HeN mice at day 1 and 2. Surface expression of LFA-1 on the NK cells was higher in C3H/HeN mice at day 1 and 2. In contrast...

  11. Meropenem in cystic fibrosis patients infected with resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Burkholderia cepacia and with hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Jensen, Tim; Pressler, Tacjana

    1996-01-01

    in pulmonary function (as a percentage of the predictive values) was 5.6% for FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) and 8.6% for FVC (forced vital capacity). C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte count decreased significantly. In courses administered...... for chronic infection with B. cepacia the post treatment FEV1 and FVC values were higher than the pre-treatment values, and all the inflammatory parameters decreased. The geometric means of minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs) (microg/mL) for P. aeruginosa (B. cepacia) were: tobramycin 6 (59......), ciprofloxacin 1.2 (9.7), piperacillin 49 (16.3), ceftazidime 26 (23), aztreonam 26 (35), imipenem 6.4 (not determined) and meropenem 5.1 (4.8). No statistically significant increase in the MICs of meropenem for either pathogen occurred during therapy. Of the 124 courses, 115 were tolerated without any clinical...

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and the occurrence of high beta-lactamase producing strains and between the MIC of the beta-lactams and the levels of beta-lactamase expression. Partially derepressed mutants, characterized by high basal levels of beta-lactamase with the possibility...... of induction to even higher levels during treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics, were the most frequent phenotype found among resistant Danish P. aeruginosa CF isolates. We have also shown that the high alginate producing P. aeruginosa isolates, that characterize the chronic lung infection in CF patients......, are more susceptible to antibiotics and produce less beta-lactamase than the non-mucoid paired isolates. We propose that the non-mucoid isolates are exposed to a relatively higher antibiotic pressure than the mucoid isolates and therefore, they become easily antibiotic resistant and in consequence produce...

  13. Effects of quorum sensing system lasR/rhlR gene on the expression of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in tracheal intubation model rat with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-qing XIANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of lasR/rhlR gene on Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10 of lung tissue in rat tracheal intubation model with biofilm infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. aer wild strain (PAO1 and quorum sensing (QS deficient strain (ΔlasRΔrhlR. Methods  Twenty-one SD rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (7 each: ΔlasRΔrhlR-treated group, PAO1-treated group and sterile control group. Biofilms (BF were cultured in vitro, and the BF coated tube (infected respectively with Ps. aer PAO1 strain, ΔlasRΔrhlR strain, or with asepsis was inserted into the trachea to establish the rat model. The rats were sacrificed on the 7th day after intubation. Colony count of lung tissue homogenate (cfu and lung HE staining were performed, and IL-10 content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, TGF-β1 in lung tissue, and the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in lung cells were determined. Results  The bacterial counts were significantly higher in PAO1 and ΔlasRΔrhlR groups than that in sterile control group, and the counts were obviously higher in PAO1 group (10 400.00±6313.70/g lung tissue than that in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (975.00±559.97/g lung tissue, P<0.05. There was no significant pathological changes in lung tissue in sterile control group, while the bronchi and blood vessels in PAO1 group were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells and complicated with alveolar septum thickening and local abscess and necrosis. The pathological changes were milder in ΔlasRΔrhlR group than in PAO1 group; the expression of Foxp3 mRNA was higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than that in sterile control group (0.65±0.32, and it was significantly higher in PAO1 group (4.62±1.07 than in ΔlasRΔrhlR group (2.15±1.43, P<0.05. The accumulated optical density value of TGF-β1 was significantly higher in the two Ps. aer infected groups than in sterile control group (3721.66±1412.95, and significantly higher in PAO1 group (65 090.56±33

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa B3 Strains Isolated from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient Undergoing Antibiotic Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy.......Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy....

  15. Ceftolozane/tazobactam activity against drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing urinary tract and intraabdominal infections in Europe: report from an antimicrobial surveillance programme (2012-15).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Bassetti, Matteo; Duncan, Leonard R; Castanheira, Mariana

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the in vitro activity of ceftolozane/tazobactam and comparators tested against European isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from hospitalized patients with urinary tract infection or intraabdominal infections. A total of 6553 Gram-negative organisms (603 P. aeruginosa and 5950 Enterobacteriaceae) were consecutively collected from 41 hospitals located in 17 European countries plus Israel and Turkey. The organisms were tested for susceptibility by broth microdilution methods and the results interpreted according to EUCAST and CLSI breakpoint criteria. Ceftolozane/tazobactam [MIC 50/90 0.25/1 mg/L; 93.5%/91.3% susceptible (S) (CLSI/EUCAST criteria)] and meropenem [MIC 50/90  ≤0.06/≤0.06 mg/L; 98.1%/98.3% S (CLSI/EUCAST)] were the most active compounds tested against Enterobacteriaceae. Among the Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 1.9% were carbapenem resistant (CRE), 15.2% exhibited an ESBL non-CRE phenotype, 14.6% were MDR, 2.2% were XDR and 32/>32 mg/L; 3.6% S) or PDR (MIC 50  >32 mg/L; 0.0% S) phenotype. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most potent (MIC 50/90 0.5/4 mg/L) β-lactam agent tested against P. aeruginosa isolates, inhibiting 91.7% at an MIC of ≤4 mg/L. P. aeruginosa exhibited high rates of resistance to cefepime (20.6%), ceftazidime (23.1%), meropenem (9.0%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (26.9%) (EUCAST criteria). Among these four P. aeruginosa resistant phenotypes, 61.3%-70.4% were susceptible to ceftolozane/tazobactam. Ceftolozane/tazobactam was the most active β-lactam agent tested against P. aeruginosa and demonstrated higher in vitro activity than currently available cephalosporins and piperacillin/tazobactam when tested against Enterobacteriaceae. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  17. Detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens from broth, water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification is rapid, highly sensitive and specifically developed method for detection of bacterial infections. AprX gene for alkaline metalloprotease of Pseudomonas fluorescens was used to design four primers and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) conditions were standardized for ...

  18. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth c...... could be a major reason for the persistence of this sessile bacterium in chronic infections....

  19. Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Megan; Biberacher, Sonja; Park, Suk-Youl; Rajan, Siji; Korhonen, Pasi; Gasser, Robin B; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Coster, Mark J; Hofmann, Andreas

    2018-04-24

    The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been recognized as an important pathogen of clinical relevance and is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. The presence of a glycolytic enzyme in Pseudomonas, which is known to be inhibited by trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) in other organisms, suggests that these bacteria may be vulnerable to the detrimental effects of intracellular T6P accumulation. In the present study, we explored the structural and functional properties of trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) in P. aeruginosa in support of future target-based drug discovery. A survey of genomes revealed the existence of 2 TPP genes with either chromosomal or extrachromosomal location. Both TPPs were produced as recombinant proteins, and characterization of their enzymatic properties confirmed specific, magnesium-dependent catalytic hydrolysis of T6P. The 3-dimensional crystal structure of the chromosomal TPP revealed a protein dimer arising through β-sheet expansion of the individual monomers, which possess the overall fold of halo-acid dehydrogenases.-Cross, M., Biberacher, S., Park, S.-Y., Rajan, S., Korhonen, P., Gasser, R. B., Kim, J.-S., Coster, M. J., Hofmann, A. Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Antibiotic Sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa of Diabetic Patient’s Foot Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiwi Apridamayanti; Khairunnisa Azani Meilinasary; Rafika Sari

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients are at risk to have the diabetic ulcer. The main reason for DM’s patient with ulcer complication to be treated and healed in hospital is bacterial infection. One of many bacteria that infects diabetic ulcer is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This conditian can be treated by antibiotic. The using antibiotic is often inaccurate causing the microbe resistance. To choose the right antibiotic, it needs to test the antibiotic’s sensitivity towards Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The...

  1. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  2. Ceftolozane-tazobactam activity against drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing healthcare-associated infections in Latin America: report from an antimicrobial surveillance program (2013-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Shortridge, Dee; Sader, Helio S; Gales, Ana; Castanheira, Mariana; Flamm, Robert K

    This study evaluated the in vitro activity of ceftolozane-tazobactam and comparator agents tested against Latin American isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from patients with health care-associated infections. Ceftolozane-tazobactam is an antipseudomonal cephalosporin combined with a well-established β-lactamase inhibitor. A total of 2415 Gram-negative organisms (537 P. aeruginosa and 1878 Enterobacteriaceae) were consecutively collected in 12 medical centers located in four Latin American countries. The organisms were tested for susceptibility by broth microdilution methods as described by the CLSI M07-A10 document and the results interpreted according to EUCAST and CLSI breakpoint criteria. Ceftolozane-tazobactam (MIC 50/90 , 0.25/32μg/mL; 84.2% susceptible) and meropenem (MIC 50/90 , ≤0.06/0.12μg/mL; 92.6% susceptible) were the most active compounds tested against Enterobacteriaceae. Among the Enterobacteriaceae isolates tested, 6.6% were carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and 26.4% exhibited an extended-spectrum β-lactamase non-carbapenem-resistant phenotype. Whereas ceftolozane-tazobactam showed good activity against extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, non-carbapenem-resistant phenotype strains of Enterobacteriaceae (MIC 50/90 , 0.5/>32μg/mL), it lacked useful activity against strains with a (MIC 50/90 , >32/>32μg/mL; 1.6% S) carbapenem-resistant phenotype. Ceftolozane-tazobactam was the most potent (MIC 50//90 , 0.5/16μg/mL) β-lactam agent tested against P. aeruginosa isolates, inhibiting 86.8% at an MIC of ≤4μg/mL. P. aeruginosa exhibited high rates of resistance to cefepime (16.0%), ceftazidime (23.6%), meropenem (28.3%), and piperacillin-tazobactam (16.4%). Ceftolozane-tazobactam was the most active β-lactam agent tested against P. aeruginosa and demonstrated higher in vitro activity than available cephalosporins and piperacillin-tazobactam when tested against Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade

  3. A new specific reference gene based on growth hormone gene (GH1) used for detection and relative quantification of Aquadvantage® GM salmon (Salmo salar L.) in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Ahmed Ben; Nabi, Nesrine; Zellama, Mohamed Salem; Said, Khaled; Chaouachi, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation of fish is mainly oriented towards the improvement of growth for the benefit of the aquaculture. Actually, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is the species most transformed to achieve growth rates quite large compared to the wild. To anticipate the presence of contaminations with GM salmon in fish markets and the lack of labeling regulations with a mandatory threshold, the proper methods are needed to test the authenticity of the ingredients. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) method was used in this study. Ct values were obtained and validated using 15 processed food containing salmon. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.01% and 0.01 ng/μl of genomic DNA, respectively. Results demonstrate that the developed QRT-PCR method is suitable specifically for identification of S. salar in food ingredients based on the salmon growth hormone gene 1 (GH1). The processes used to develop the specific salmon reference gene case study are intended to serve as a model for performing quantification of Aquadvantage® GM salmon on future genetically modified (GM) fish to be commercialized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic significance of measurements of specific IgG antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa by three different serological methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressler, T.; Karpati, F.; Granstrom, M.

    2008-01-01

    to characterize patients with different infection status. Elevated levels of specific anti-Pseudomonas antibodies showed to be the risk factor for developing chronic Pa infection. Due to the specificity of the tests, antibiotic treatment based on serology might be considered in selected cases. There is a window...... of opportunity for suppression and eradication of initial P. aeruginosa infection making measurement of specific anti-Pseudomonas antibodies helpful Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1...

  5. Pseudomonal breast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastall, S; Catchpole, C; Bright-Thomas, R; Thrush, S

    2010-01-01

    Breast infection and breast sepsis secondary to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is uncommon. We report two cases of pseudomonal breast infection leading to septic shock and abscess formation in women with non-responding breast infection. The management of breast infection is broad-spectrum antibiotics and ultrasound with aspiration of any collection. To treat breast infection effectively, the causative organism must be isolated to enable appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:20412664

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  7. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  9. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  10. Carbapenem stewardship: does ertapenem affect Pseudomonas susceptibility to other carbapenems? A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, David P; Carmeli, Yehuda; Crank, Christopher W; Goff, Debra A; Graber, Christopher J; Lima, Ana Lucia L; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2012-01-01

    The group 2 carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem and, more recently, doripenem) have been a mainstay of treatment for patients with serious hospital infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae and other difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens as well as mixed aerobic/anaerobic infections. When ertapenem, a group 1 carbapenem, was introduced, questions were raised about the potential for ertapenem to select for imipenem- and meropenem-resistant Pseudomonas. Results from ten clinical studies evaluating the effect of ertapenem use on the susceptibility of Pseudomonas to carbapenems have uniformly shown that ertapenem use does not result in decreased Pseudomonas susceptibility to these antipseudomonal carbapenems. Here we review these studies evaluating the evidence of how ertapenem use affects P. aeruginosa as well as provide considerations for ertapenem use in the context of institutional stewardship initiatives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Gandee, Leah; Zimmern, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  12. Infection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-16

    characteristic in severe gram-negative sepsis. Hypertriglyceridemia results from an increase in hepatic synthesis in combination with diminished activity of...induced stress, and tissue repair (1). The magnitude and type of nutritional losses caused by an infection reflect both the severity and duration of an... several functional forms of nutrient loss must be anticipated. Functional losses are defined as the within-body losses of nutrients due to infection

  13. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism Francisco G...jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil Abstract A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm -based infections that are difficult to...eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic bronchiectasis isolate reveal differences from cystic fibrosis and laboratory strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, J.J.; Barbier, Mariette; Mulet, Xavier; Bielecki, Piotr; Bartell, J.A.; Owings, J.P.; Martinez-Ramos, Inmaculada; Hittle, L.E.; Davis, M.R.; Damron, F.H.; Liechti, G.W.; Puchałka, Jacek; Martins dos Santos, Vitor; Ernst, R.K.; Papin, J.A.; Albertí, Sebastian; Oliver, Antonio; Goldberg, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an environmentally ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium and important opportunistic human pathogen, causing severe chronic respiratory infections in patients with underlying conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) or bronchiectasis. In order to identify

  15. Occurrence of hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with the oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Riis, Bente; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is characterized by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) liberated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We formulated the hypothesis that oxidation...

  16. Relative contribution of Prevotella intermedia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to lung pathology in airways of patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Martina; Beer, Isabelle; Braitmaier, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections produce endobronchial mucus plugs allowing growth of obligate anaerobes including Prevotella spp. Whether obligate anaerobes contribute to the pathophysiology of CF lung disease is unknown....

  17. Multiple sensors control reciprocal expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa regulatory RNA and virulence genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventre, I.; Goodman, A.L.; Vallet-Gely, I.

    2006-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for a wide range of acute and chronic infections. The transition to chronic infections is accompanied by physiological changes in the bacteria favoring formation of biofilm communities. Here we report the identification of LadS, a h...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and slime excretion on antibiotic-loaded bone cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, D; Hendriks, JGE; van Horn, Jim R.; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    Background Infection is an infrequent but serious complication of prosthetic joint surgery. These infections will usually not clear until the implant is removed and re-implantation has a high failure rate, especially when Pseudomonas aeruginosa is involved. Material and methods We examined

  19. Crystal structure of secretory protein Hcp3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Type VI secretion pathway transports proteins across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen infecting humans, uses the type VI secretion pathway to export specific effector proteins crucial for its pathogenesis. The HSI-I virulence locus encodes for several proteins that has been proposed to participate in protein transport including the Hcp1 protein, which forms hexameric rings that assemble into nanotubes in...

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  1. Vesiculation from Pseudomonas aeruginosa under SOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maredia, Reshma; Devineni, Navya; Lentz, Peter; Dallo, Shatha F; Yu, Jiehjuen; Guentzel, Neal; Chambers, James; Arulanandam, Bernard; Haskins, William E; Weitao, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections can be aggravated by antibiotic treatment that induces SOS response and vesiculation. This leads to a hypothesis concerning association of SOS with vesiculation. To test it, we conducted multiple analyses of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type in which SOS is induced by ciprofloxacin and from the LexA noncleavable (lexAN) strain in which SOS is repressed. The levels of OMV proteins, lipids, and cytotoxicity increased for both the treated strains, demonstrating vesiculation stimulation by the antibiotic treatment. However, the further increase was suppressed in the lexAN strains, suggesting the SOS involvement. Obviously, the stimulated vesiculation is attributed by both SOS-related and unrelated factors. OMV subproteomic analysis was performed to examine these factors, which reflected the OMV-mediated cytotoxicity and the physiology of the vesiculating cells under treatment and SOS. Thus, SOS plays a role in the vesiculation stimulation that contributes to cytotoxicity.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa host-adaptation in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of transition from an environmental lifestyle to a host-associated lifestyle, as exemplified in the life-long airway infection of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Long-term infection is associated with extensive genetic adaptation of P...... the framework upon which this thesis is based. Early P. aeruginosa colonization of the CF airways is the period in which the outcome of infection is determined, i.e. if the bacteria are eventually eradicated or persist. In three patient cases the evolutionary events from initiation of infection were explored...... to unravel the early adaptive processes possibly securing bacterial persistence. In this early stage, clinical isolates displayed few adaptive events however these included phenotypes often observed in late chronic infection isolates including the conversion to a mucoid phenotype and increased antibiotic...

  3. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Trent and zinc homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Corey B; Harrison, Mark D; Huygens, Flavia

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative pathogen and the major cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. The mechanisms that P. aeruginosa strains use to regulate intracellular zinc have an effect on infection, antibiotic resistance and the propensity to form biofilms. However, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa strains of variable infectivity has not been compared. In this study, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa Trent, a highly infectious clinical strain, was compared to that of a laboratory P. aeruginosa strain, ATCC27853. Trent was able to tolerate higher concentrations of additional zinc in rich media than ATCC27853. Further, pre-adaptation to additional zinc enhanced the growth of Trent at non-inhibitory concentrations but the impact of pre-adaption on the growth of ATCC27853 under the same conditions was minimal. The results establish clear differences in zinc-induced responses in Trent and ATCC27853, and how zinc homeostasis can be a promising target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies for P. aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Influence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8% patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3% and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008, greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007, a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03, and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm, a Programmed Bacterial Life for Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-06-28

    A biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabit on surfaces and are encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment and influence our lives tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicate the eradication of the biofilm infection, leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss the history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms on their own or in association with other bacterial species ( i.e. , multispecies biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa diversity in distinct paediatric patient groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G.A.; Ent, C.K. van der; Wolfs, T.F.

    2008-01-01

    the other groups. A group of clonal isolates was observed among patients from the CF-chronic and CF-1 groups. These or different clonal isolates were not encountered among the three other patient groups. No characteristic resistance pattern could be identified among isolates from the distinct patient groups......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that often infects patients who are either immunocompromised or have local defects in host defences. It is known that cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are sometimes infected with certain clonal isolates. It is not clear whether these clonal isolates also infect non......-CF patients and whether clonality of isolates occurs in other patient groups. The aim of this study was to investigate P. aeruginosa diversity and the occurrence of clones within five distinct paediatric patient groups susceptible to P. aeruginosa infection. P. aeruginosa isolates were cultured from 157...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Estrada S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Ramírez-Estrada,1 Bárbara Borgatta,1,2 Jordi Rello3,4 1Critical Care Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, 2CRIPS, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Research (VHIR, 3Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB, Barcelona, 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedad Respiratoria – CIBERES, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. Keywords: multidrug-resistant, ICU, new-antibiotics, adjunctive-therapies, care-bundles

  9. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF PINEAPPLE (ANANAS COMOSUS L. MERR EXTRACT AGAINST MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Sayyid Zharfan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of nosocomial infection which is responsible for 10% of hospital-acquired infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tends to mutate and displays potential for development of antibiotic resistance. Approximately, 10% of global bacterial isolates are found as Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa have a quite tremendous severity index, especially on pneumonia and urinary tract infections, even sepsis, which 50% mortality rate. Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr has antimicrobial properties. The active antimicrobial compounds in Ananas comosus L. Merr include saponin and bromelain. This research aims to find the potency of antimicrobial effect of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr extract towards Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa specimen is obtained from patient’s pus in orthopaedic department, Dr Soetomo Public Hospital, Surabaya. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa specimen is resistant to all antibiotic agents except cefoperazone-sulbactam. This research is conducted by measuring the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC through dilution test with Mueller-Hinton broth medium. Pineapple extract (Ananas comosus L. Merr. is dissolved in aquadest, then poured into test tube at varying concentrations (6 g/ml; 3 g/ml; 1.5 g/ml; 0.75 g/ml, 0.375 g/ml; and 0.1875 g/ml. After 24 hours’ incubation, samples are plated onto nutrient agar plate, to determine the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC. The extract of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr has antimicrobial activities against Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC could not be determined, because turbidity changes were not seen. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC of pineapple extract (Ananas comosus L. Merr to Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is 0.75 g/ml. Further study of in vivo is needed.

  10. Molecular epidemiology and dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Frost, Anne Louise Viborg

    2007-01-01

    The ability to establish lifelong persistent infections is a fundamental aspect of the interactions between many pathogenic microorganisms and their mammalian hosts. One example is chronic lung infections by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients....... This infection process is associated with extensive genetic adaptation and microevolution of the infecting bacteria. Through investigations of P. aeruginosa populations and infection dynamics in a group of CF patients followed at the Danish CF Clinic in Copenhagen, we have identified two distinct and dominant...

  11. Leucaena leucocephala pod seed protein as an alternate to animal protein in fish feed and evaluation of its role to fight against infection caused by Vibrio harveyi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vipin Kumar; Rani, Kumari Vandana; Kumar, Shiva Raj; Prakash, Om

    2018-05-01

    The laboratory acclimatized Clarias gariepinus (80 ± 10 g) were divided into six groups and five subgroups each containing 10 fish. A fish feed was reconstituted by adding 33% powder of Leucaena leucocephala seed in place of fish trash. Group B, C and E were fed on reconstituted feed and group A, D and F were fed on artificial feed containing animal protein for 7 days prior to start of experiments. Then Group B was challenged with BSA while other groups were challenged with Vibrio harveyi (Group C, D) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Group E, F). Group A was used as negative control (not challenged with antigen). The fish were challenged on weekly intervals till 28th day. Blood was collected from one subgroup of each group on day 7, 14, 21 & 28 and finally sacrificed on day 35. Change in body weight, liver function tests (SGOT, SGPT) and serum ALP levels were monitored. The phagocytic index, percentage phagocytosis and nitric oxide levels were measured in macrophages isolated from spleen and head kidney. The levels of total fish immunoglobulin were also measured following indirect ELISA. The results showed improved immune response in fish fed on 33% L. leucocephala pod seed reconstituted feed; however their specific growth rate was low. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The rare codon AGA is involved in regulation of pyoluteorin biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. This capacity to suppress disease is attributed in part to Pf-5’s production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controll...

  13. Inhibition of apoptic cell death induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tabaci and mycotoxin fumonisin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Batchvorova, R.; Kapchina, V.; Popov, T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of programmed cell death (PCD) inhibitors on lesion formation and biochemical events in transgenic (ttr line) and non-transgenic (Nevrokop 1164) tobacco infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci was tested. Programmed cell death in tomato cell culture was induced by Fumonisin B1 (FUM)

  14. Comparison of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from mink by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne Sofie; Pedersen, Karl; Andersen, Thomas Holmen

    2003-01-01

    Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical infections in mink were subjected to serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SpeI. A total of 212 isolates of P aeruginosa from the year 1998 to 2001 were included in this study: 168 isolates from mink obtained from 74 farm out...

  15. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathologic features in patients with cystic fibrosis. Mucoid P. aeruginosa is notorious for its biofilm forming capability and resistance to immune attacks. In this study, the roles of extracellular polymeric substances f...

  16. Within-host microevolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Italian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Dolce, Daniela; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and a more complete understanding of P. aeruginosa within-host genomic evolution, transmission, and population genomics may provide a basis for improving intervention strate...

  17. Reinforcement of the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by hyperbaric oxygen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Mousavi, Nabi; Sams, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in cystic fibrosis patients. It is characterised by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in the endobronchial mucus with zones of oxygen (O2) depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leucocyte activity. Whilst the exact mechan...

  18. Fluorescence-Based Reporter for Gauging Cyclic Di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T.; Borlee, Bradley R.; Murakami, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The increased tolerance toward the host immune system and antibiotics displayed by biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria in chronic infections such as cystic fibrosis bronchopneumonia is of major concern. Targeting of biofilm formation is believed to be a key aspect in the dev...

  19. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  20. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  1. Assessing Pseudomonas virulence with a nonmammalian host: Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Samantha; Limmer, Stefanie; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flies represent an interesting model to study host-pathogen interactions as: (1) they are cheap and easy to raise rapidly and do not bring up ethical issues, (2) available genetic tools are highly sophisticated, for instance allowing tissue-specific alteration of gene expression, e.g., of immune genes, (3) they have a relatively complex organization, with distinct digestive tract and body cavity in which local or systemic infections, respectively, take place, (4) a medium throughput can be achieved in genetic screens, for instance looking for Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants with altered virulence. We present here the techniques used to investigate host-pathogen relationships, namely the two major models of infections as well as the relevant parameters used to monitor the infection (survival, bacterial titer, induction of host immune response).

  2. Isolation of Pseudomonas cepacia in cystic fibrosis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de Andrade Marques

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infection on cystic fibrosis (CF patients are associated with a limited qualitative number of microorganisms. During the colonization process, Staphylococcus aureus usually preceedes Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This latter is at first non-mucoid, being replaced or associated to a mucoid morphotype which is rare in other diseases. In 1980, Pseudomonas cepacia appeared as an important agent in CF pulmonary infections with a mean frequency of about 6.1% isolations in different parts of the world. The primus colonization mainly occurs in the presence of pre-existent tissue lesions and the clinical progress of the disease is variable. In some patients it can be fulminant; in others it can cause a gradual and slow decrease in their pulmonary functions. The concern with this germ isolation is justified by its antibiotic multiple resistence and the possibility of direct transmission from a colonized patient to a non-colonized one. We reported the first case of P. cepacia infection in a CF patient in our area. The microbiological attendance to this patient had been made from 1986 to 1991 and the first positive culture appeared in 1988. The sensitivity profile showed that the primus colonization strain was sensitive to 9 of 17 tested antibiotics, however in the last culture the strain was resistent to all antibiotics. These data corroborate the need for monitoring the bacterial flora on CF patients respiratory system.

  3. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  4. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2011-01-01

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  5. Boolean network model of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallidis, Stylianos E; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G

    2014-09-01

    To coordinate their behavior and virulence and to synchronize attacks against their hosts, bacteria communicate by continuously producing signaling molecules (called autoinducers) and continuously monitoring the concentration of these molecules. This communication is controlled by biological circuits called quorum sensing (QS) circuits. Recently QS circuits and have been recognized as an alternative target for controlling bacterial virulence and infections without the use of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects insects, plants, animals and humans and can cause acute infections. This bacterium has three interconnected QS circuits that form a very complex and versatile QS system, the operation of which is still under investigation. Here we use Boolean networks to model the complete QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and we simulate and analyze its operation in both synchronous and asynchronous modes. The state space of the QS system is constructed and it turned out to be very large, hierarchical, modular and scale-free. Furthermore, we developed a simulation tool that can simulate gene knock-outs and study their effect on the regulons controlled by the three QS circuits. The model and tools we developed will give to life scientists a deeper insight to this complex QS system.

  6. An unusual presentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blebitis following combined surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of blebitis that occurred 3 years later following a combined glaucoma and cataract surgery. It was an atypical presentation, as patient had no classical fiery looking signs of blebitis despite the isolated organism being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Improvized surgical techniques like use of Mitomycin C, releasable flap sutures though considered as part of the recommended procedure for better surgical outcomes, their role as potential risk factors for visually blinding complications like endophthalmitis are often overlooked. This case report throws light on such risk factors for bleb associated infections and recommends removal or trimming of all releasable sutures and the need for a regular postoperative follow-up.

  7. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    . We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect....

  8. Pseudomonas Septic Arthritis | Thanni | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis due to pseudomonas species is unusual and when it occurs, there is often an underlying cause like immune depression, intravenous drug abuse or a penetrating injury. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of pseudomonas septic arthritis complicating cannulation of a leg vein following ...

  9. Pseudomonas species as an uncommon culprit in transbronchial needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdhesh Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinal lymphadenopathy due to various infective agents such as Mycobacterium and fungus, due to sarcoidosis, lymphoma, and metastasis is often seen. Ordinary bacteria have rarely been reported to cause necrotizing, usually suppurative granulomatous reactions. We report a case of mediastinal lymphadenopathy due to Pseudomonas infection, in a patient of chronic kidney disease on maintenance hemodialysis, who presented with fever, breathlessness, and low blood pressure.

  10. Increased concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus sp. in small animals exposed to aerospace environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS in the total bacterial flora of small animals exposed to simulated spacecraft environments were evaluated. Tests to detect changes in infectivity, effects of antibiotic treatments, immune responses to bacterial antigens, and effectiveness of immune responses in the experimental environment were conducted. The most significant results appear to be the differences in immune responses at simulated altitudes and the production of infection in the presence of a specific antibody.

  11. Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by Pseudomonas species: Insight from a post-millennial case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wanhong; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Chow, Kai Ming; Pang, Wing-Fai; Leung, Chi Bon; Li, Philip Kam-To; Szeto, Cheuk Chun

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas peritonitis is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). However, the clinical course of Pseudomonas peritonitis following the adoption of international guidelines remains unclear. We reviewed the clinical course and treatment response of 153 consecutive episodes of PD peritonitis caused by Pseudomonas species from 2001 to 2015. Pseudomonas peritonitis accounted for 8.3% of all peritonitis episodes. The bacteria isolated were resistant to ceftazidime in 32 cases (20.9%), and to gentamycin in 18 cases (11.8%). In 20 episodes (13.1%), there was a concomitant exit site infection (ESI); in another 24 episodes (15.7%), there was a history of Pseudomonas ESI in the past. The overall primary response rate was 53.6%, and complete cure rate 42.4%. There was no significant difference in the complete cure rate between patients who treated with regimens of 3 and 2 antibiotics. Amongst 76 episodes (46.4%) that failed to respond to antibiotics by day 4, 37 had immediate catheter removal; the other 24 received salvage antibiotics, but only 6 achieved complete cure. Antibiotic resistance is common amongst Pseudomonas species causing peritonitis. Adoption of the treatment guideline leads to a reasonable complete cure rate of Pseudomonas peritonitis. Treatment with three antibiotics is not superior than the conventional two antibiotics regimen. When there is no clinical response after 4 days of antibiotic treatment, early catheter removal should be preferred over an attempt of salvage antibiotic therapy.

  12. Efficacy of selected Pseudomonas strains for biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani in potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef MRABET

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty seven bacterial isolates from faba bean (Vicia faba L. root-nodules were screened for their antagonistic activity against eight Rhizoctonia solani strains isolated from infected potato (Solanum tuberosum L. tubers. Two bacterial strains (designated as Kl.Fb14 and S8.Fb11 gave 50% in vitro inhibition of R. solani mycelial growth. 16S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that strain Kl.Fb14 exhibited 99.5% identity with Pseudomonas moraviensis, and that S8.Fb11 exhibited 99.8% identity with Pseudomonas reinekei. Greenhouse trials in soil showed that strain S8.Fb11 reduced the percentage of sclerotia on potato tubers and amounts of tuber infection for the potato cultivars Spunta and Nicola. In a field trial conducted in South Tunisia, infection with R. solani reduced potato yield by approximately 40% for ‘Spunta’ and 17% for ‘Nicola’; about 20% of the total tuber production was severely infected. However, when potato tubers were treated with strain S8.Fb11 prior to sowing, disease incidence was reduced to 6% of total production with low infection levels; potato yield was enhanced by about 6 kg per 10 m row in comparison to R. solani infected plants. The second selected Pseudomonas sp. (strain Kl.Fb14 did not affect either the levels of sclerotia on tubers or potato yield.

  13. Interaction between Pseudomonas and CXC Chemokines Increases Risk of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome and Death in Lung Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Weigt, S. Sam; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ross, David J.; Kubak, Bernard M.; Saggar, Rajan; Fishbein, Michael C.; Ardehali, Abbas; Li, Gang; Elashoff, Robert; Belperio, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly isolated gram-negative bacterium after lung transplantation and has been shown to up-regulate glutamic acid–leucine–arginine–positive (ELR+) CXC chemokines associated with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), but the effect of pseudomonas on BOS and death has not been well defined. Objectives: To determine if the influence of pseudomonas isolation and ELR+ CXC chemokines on the subsequent development of BOS and the occurrence of death is time dependent. Methods: A three-state model was developed to assess the likelihood of transitioning from lung transplant (state 1) to BOS (state 2), from transplant (state 1) to death (state 3), and from BOS (state 2) to death (state 3). This Cox semi-Markovian approach determines state survival rates and cause-specific hazards for movement from one state to another. Measurements and Main Results: The likelihood of transition from transplant to BOS was increased by acute rejection, CXCL5, and the interaction between pseudomonas and CXCL1. The pseudomonas effect in this transition was due to infection rather than colonization. Movement from transplant to death was facilitated by pseudomonas infection and single lung transplant. Transition from BOS to death was affected by the length of time in state 1 and by the interactions between any pseudomonas isolation and CXCL5 and aspergillus, either independently or in combination. Conclusions: Our model demonstrates that common post-transplantation events drive movement from one post-transplantation state to another and influence outcomes differently depending upon when after transplantation they occur. Pseudomonas and the ELR+ CXC chemokines may interact to negatively influence lung transplant outcomes. PMID:23328531

  14. Pseudomonas A1 influences the formation of hydroxyapatite and degrades bioglass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, E.; Papadopoulou, L.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Koidis, P.; Sivropoulou, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infections frequently lead to hard tissue destructions. The purpose of the present study was to address the question as to how the bacteria destroy hard tissues with the use of an in vitro system. A bacterium was isolated from a solution simulating body fluid which was identified as Pseudomonas A1, and is able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate when it grows in IP broth. The presence of Pseudomonas A1 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of the formation of hydroxyapatite layer, on the surface of bioglass specimens immersed in SBF solution, in contrast to the control. When the bioglass specimens were immersed in IP broth without Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , so as to be present the appropriate inorganic ions for the survival of Pseudomonas but the only source of phosphate be derived from bioactive glass specimens, the formation of hydroxyapatite layer was not observed in any specimen. Additionally the presence of Pseudomonas resulted in 93.4% (w/w) and 85.9% (w/w) reduction on the surface composition of Ca and P, respectively, and further the rate of the decrease of specimen's weight was almost 50% higher in the presence of Pseudomonas compared with the control.

  15. Pseudomonas A1 influences the formation of hydroxyapatite and degrades bioglass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, E. [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Section of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Papadopoulou, L. [School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Paraskevopoulos, K.M. [Physics Department Solid State Physics Section, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Koidis, P. [Department of Fixed Prosthesis and Implant Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Sivropoulou, A., E-mail: asivropo@bio.auth.g [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Section of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2009-12-15

    Bacterial infections frequently lead to hard tissue destructions. The purpose of the present study was to address the question as to how the bacteria destroy hard tissues with the use of an in vitro system. A bacterium was isolated from a solution simulating body fluid which was identified as Pseudomonas A1, and is able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate when it grows in IP broth. The presence of Pseudomonas A1 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of the formation of hydroxyapatite layer, on the surface of bioglass specimens immersed in SBF solution, in contrast to the control. When the bioglass specimens were immersed in IP broth without Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, so as to be present the appropriate inorganic ions for the survival of Pseudomonas but the only source of phosphate be derived from bioactive glass specimens, the formation of hydroxyapatite layer was not observed in any specimen. Additionally the presence of Pseudomonas resulted in 93.4% (w/w) and 85.9% (w/w) reduction on the surface composition of Ca and P, respectively, and further the rate of the decrease of specimen's weight was almost 50% higher in the presence of Pseudomonas compared with the control.

  16. Differences in prevalence and treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis centres in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per Kristian; Olesen, Hanne V; Hoiby, Niels

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection causes increased morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). This study aimed to answer the following questions: Does the prevalence of chronic infection with PA differ between the CF centres in Scandinavia? Which differences exist......) (p=0.037). The pulmonary function was similar. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to maintain a very low prevalence of chronic PA infection in CF patients

  17. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  18. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P......Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming...

  19. The resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in relationship to phenotypic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Veronica N; Déraspe, Maxime; McLaughlin, Robert E; Whiteaker, James D; Roy, Paul H; Alm, Richard A; Corbeil, Jacques; Gardner, Humphrey

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause infections that are difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to a wide variety of antibiotics. Key genetic determinants of resistance were identified through genome sequences of 390 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, obtained from diverse geographic locations collected between 2003 and 2012 and were related to microbiological susceptibility data for meropenem, levofloxacin, and amikacin. β-Lactamases and integron cassette arrangements were enriched in the established multidrug-resistant lineages of sequence types ST111 (predominantly O12) and ST235 (O11). This study demonstrates the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) in defining relevant resistance elements and highlights the diversity of resistance determinants within P. aeruginosa. This information is valuable in furthering the design of diagnostics and therapeutics for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 pathogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Cezairliyan, Brent O; Ausubel, Frederick M; Powell, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model host for studying the interaction between bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metazoan innate immune system. Powerful genetic and molecular tools in both C. elegans and P. aeruginosa facilitate the identification and analysis of bacterial virulence factors as well as host defense factors. Here we describe three different assays that use the C. elegans-P. aeruginosa strain PA14 host-pathogen system. Fast Killing is a toxin-mediated death that depends on a diffusible toxin produced by PA14 but not on live bacteria. Slow Killing is due to an active infection in which bacteria colonize the C. elegans intestinal lumen. Liquid Killing is designed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for anti-infective compounds. Each assay has unique features and, interestingly, the PA14 virulence factors involved in killing are different in each assay.

  1. Glyphosate catabolism by Pseudomonas sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinabarger, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The pathway for the degradation of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 has been determined using metabolic radiolabeling experiments. Radiorespirometry experiments utilizing [3- 14 C] glyphosate revealed that approximately 50-59% of the C3 carbon was oxidized to CO 2 . Fractionation of stationary phase cells labeled with [3- 14 C]glyphosate revealed that from 45-47% of the assimilated C3 carbon is distributed to proteins and that amino acids methionine and serine are highly labeled. The nucleic acid bases adenine and guanine received 90% of the C3 label that was incorporated into nucleic acids, and the only pyrimidine base labeled was thymine. Pulse labeling of PG2982 cells with [3- 14 C]glyphosate revealed that [3- 14 C]sarcosine is an intermediate in glyphosate degradation. Examination of crude extracts prepared from PG2982 cells revealed the presence of an enzyme that oxidizes sarcosine to glycine and formaldehyde. These results indicate that the first step in glyphosate degradation by PG2982 is cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond, resulting in the release of sarcosine and a phosphate group. The phosphate group is utilized as a source of phosphorus, and the sarcosine is degraded to glycine and formaldehyde. Phosphonate utilization by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 was investigated. Each of the ten phosphonates tested were utilized as a sole source of phosphorus by PG2982. Representative compounds tested included alkylphosphonates, 1-amino-substituted alkylphosphonates, amino-terminal phosphonates, and an arylphosphonate. PG2982 cultures degraded phenylphosphonate to benzene and produced methane from methylphosphonate. The data indicate that PG2982 is capable of cleaving the carbon-phosphorus bond of several structurally different phosphonates

  2. Predictors of Pseudomonas and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metersky, Mark L; Frei, Christopher R; Mortensen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) are at high risk of infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. Factors discriminating infection with MDR Gram-negative (MDR-GN) organism from infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are not well understood and patients are often treated for both organisms. This study was performed to determine risk factors predicting pneumonia due to Pseudomonas versus MRSA. Veterans age ≥65 hospitalized with HCAP between 2002 and 2012 were identified from the Veterans Affairs administrative databases. Patients were identified with Pseudomonas pneumonia, MRSA pneumonia or neither according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. We assessed unadjusted and adjusted associations of patient characteristics and HCAP due to Pseudomonas or MRSA. Of the 61,651 patients with HCAP, 1156 (1.9%) were diagnosed with Pseudomonas pneumonia, 641 (1.0%) with MRSA pneumonia and 59,854 (97.1%) with neither. MRSA pneumonia was positively associated with male gender, age >74, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), recent nursing home or hospital stay, recent exposure to fluoroquinolone or antibiotics treating Gram-positive organisms, and severe pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia was negatively associated with complicated diabetes. Pseudomonas pneumonia was positively associated with recent hospital stay, immunocompromise, COPD, hemiplegia, recent exposure to inhaled corticosteroids, β-lactam/cephalosporin/carbapenem antibiotics, antibiotics against Gram-positive organisms, 'other antibiotics' and severe pneumonia. Pseudomonas pneumonia was negatively associated with age >84, higher socioeconomic status, drug abuse and diabetes. Patient characteristics may assist in identifying patients at risk for HCAP due to Pseudomonas or MRSA. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Discoloration and tyrosinase activity in Agaricus bisporus fruit bodies infected with various pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler-Rivas, C.; Arpin, N.; Olivier, J.M.; Wichers, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    The discoloration of A. bisporus after infection by Pseudomonas tolaasii, P. gingeri, P. agarici, P. reactans, Verticillium fungicola and Trichoderma harzianum can be distinguished by chromametric measurements. Infection with P. tolaasii caused a specific colour change, independent of the bacterial

  4. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  5. Production and characterization of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further characterization of biosurfactant using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed it as a rhamnolipid. Keywords: Mangrove ecosystems, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biosurfactant, critical micelle concentration (CMC), FT-IR fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). African Journal of Biotechnology, ...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an obligate aerobic, motile, gram negative bacillus.which is able to grow and survive in almost any environment and resistant to temperature extremes. It is involved in the etiology of several diseases i.

  7. Growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Cassava Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The potential of local strains of microorganism (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in polyhydroxbutyrate production ... The demand for the use of biopolymers ... This work therefore investigates the production of polyhydroxybutyrate from.

  8. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from ... skin triggers coagulation and an acute inflammatory response ... agents with anti-pseudomonal activity, life-threatening.

  9. Diversity of Aquatic Pseudomonas Species and Their Activity against the Fish Pathogenic Oomycete Saprolegnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Liu

    Full Text Available Emerging fungal and oomycete pathogens are increasingly threatening animals and plants globally. Amongst oomycetes, Saprolegnia species adversely affect wild and cultivated populations of amphibians and fish, leading to substantial reductions in biodiversity and food productivity. With the ban of several chemical control measures, new sustainable methods are needed to mitigate Saprolegnia infections in aquaculture. Here, PhyloChip-based community analyses showed that the Pseudomonadales, particularly Pseudomonas species, represent one of the largest bacterial orders associated with salmon eggs from a commercial hatchery. Among the Pseudomonas species isolated from salmon eggs, significantly more biosurfactant producers were retrieved from healthy salmon eggs than from Saprolegnia-infected eggs. Subsequent in vivo activity bioassays showed that Pseudomonas isolate H6 significantly reduced salmon egg mortality caused by Saprolegnia diclina. Live colony mass spectrometry showed that strain H6 produces a viscosin-like lipopeptide surfactant. This biosurfactant inhibited growth of Saprolegnia in vitro, but no significant protection of salmon eggs against Saprolegniosis was observed. These results indicate that live inocula of aquatic Pseudomonas strains, instead of their bioactive compound, can provide new (microbiological and sustainable means to mitigate oomycete diseases in aquaculture.

  10. Diversity of Aquatic Pseudomonas Species and Their Activity against the Fish Pathogenic Oomycete Saprolegnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiying; Rzeszutek, Elzbieta; van der Voort, Menno; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Thoen, Even; Skaar, Ida; Bulone, Vincent; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; de Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Emerging fungal and oomycete pathogens are increasingly threatening animals and plants globally. Amongst oomycetes, Saprolegnia species adversely affect wild and cultivated populations of amphibians and fish, leading to substantial reductions in biodiversity and food productivity. With the ban of several chemical control measures, new sustainable methods are needed to mitigate Saprolegnia infections in aquaculture. Here, PhyloChip-based community analyses showed that the Pseudomonadales, particularly Pseudomonas species, represent one of the largest bacterial orders associated with salmon eggs from a commercial hatchery. Among the Pseudomonas species isolated from salmon eggs, significantly more biosurfactant producers were retrieved from healthy salmon eggs than from Saprolegnia-infected eggs. Subsequent in vivo activity bioassays showed that Pseudomonas isolate H6 significantly reduced salmon egg mortality caused by Saprolegnia diclina. Live colony mass spectrometry showed that strain H6 produces a viscosin-like lipopeptide surfactant. This biosurfactant inhibited growth of Saprolegnia in vitro, but no significant protection of salmon eggs against Saprolegniosis was observed. These results indicate that live inocula of aquatic Pseudomonas strains, instead of their bioactive compound, can provide new (micro)biological and sustainable means to mitigate oomycete diseases in aquaculture. PMID:26317985

  11. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  12. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Cabot, Gabriel; Del Barrio-Tofiño, Ester; Oliver, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility) between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  13. Acidosis increases the susceptibility of respiratory epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Iviana M; Demirdjian, Sally; Vargas, Jennifer; Goodale, Britton C; Berwin, Brent

    2017-07-01

    Bacterial infection can lead to acidosis of the local microenvironment, which is believed to exacerbate disease pathogenesis; however, the mechanisms by which changes in pH alter disease progression are poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that acidosis enhances respiratory epithelial cell death in response to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Our findings support the idea that acidosis in the context of P. aeruginosa infection results in increased epithelial cell cytotoxicity due to ExoU intoxication. Importantly, enforced maintenance of neutral pH during P. aeruginosa infection demonstrates that cytotoxicity is dependent on the acidosis. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed that host cell cytotoxicity correlated with increased bacterial survival during an acidic infection that was due to reduced bactericidal activity of host-derived antimicrobial peptides. These findings extend previous reports that the activities of antimicrobial peptides are pH-dependent and provide novel insights into the consequences of acidosis on infection-derived pathology. Therefore, this report provides the first evidence that physiological levels of acidosis increase the susceptibility of epithelial cells to acute Pseudomonas infection and demonstrates the benefit of maintaining pH homeostasis during a bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Serum concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF correlate with the Th1/Th2 cytokine response in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    mobilizing monocytes and PMNs from the bone marrow, GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 select subsets of dendritic cells, which subsequently induce distinct Th responses. Therefore, the present study examines the correlation between the mobilizing cytokines in serum and the Th responses. The IFN-gamma and IL-4...... production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF in serum as well as lung function, were determined in 37 CF patients with and 6 CF patients without chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. The GM-CSF/G-CSF ratio correlated both with the IFN-gamma production and good...... lung function. In addition, an inverse correlation between IL-3 and IFN-gamma was observed. The results indicate involvement of endogenous GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 in the skewed Th response in CF, and change to a Th1-dominated response might be achieved with GM-CSF treatment....

  15. Increased serum concentration of G-CSF in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, C; Kharazmi, A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the major reason for premature death in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Infected patients experience a progressive deterioration of the lung tissue caused by a persistent accumulation of PMNs. We investigated if the pulmonary...... was reduced. CONCLUSION: G-CSF in the sera may contribute to the pulmonary inflammation in CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection by regulating the number of PMNs available for migration and may be considered as an indicator of clinical status....

  16. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for State Health Departments Evaluating an Infection Control Breach Outbreak Toolkit Containment Strategy What can be done ... RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road ...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa from hospital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Davane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired infection is an additional affliction to the patient admitted to the hospital for some serious illness and is caused by pathogens which are prevalent in hospital environment. In the hospital, microbes are ubiquitous; and can reach the sick patient through various sources, such as air, water, food, contaminated equipments, linen, catheters, scopes, ventilators, contaminated disinfectants and other preparations used for treatment, visitors, infected patients, etc.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Cryptococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Antonella; Yang, Mo Wei; Gruber, Jordon; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Luberto, Chiara; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous and opportunistic bacterium that inhibits the growth of different microorganisms, including Gram-positive bacteria and fungi such as Candida spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this study, we investigated the interaction between P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus spp. We found that P. aeruginosa PA14 and, to a lesser extent, PAO1 significantly inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. The inhibition of growth was observed on solid medium by the visualization of a zone of inhibition of yeast growth and in liquid culture by viable cell counting. Interestingly, such inhibition was only observed when P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus were co-cultured. Minimal inhibition was observed when cell-cell contact was prevented using a separation membrane, suggesting that cell contact is required for inhibition. Using mutant strains of Pseudomonas quinoline signaling, we showed that P. aeruginosa inhibited the growth of Cryptococcus spp. by producing antifungal molecules pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine, and 2-heptyl-3,4-dihydroxyquinoline (PQS), an extracellular quorum-sensing signal. Because both P. aeruginosa and Cryptococcus neoformans are commonly found in lung infections of immunocompromised patients, this study may have important implication for the interaction of these microbes in both an ecological and a clinical point of view.

  20. Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas Mycotic Pseudoaneurysm following Cardiac Transplant Bridged by Ventricular Assistant Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Aye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of aorta following cardiac surgery is rare but is highly fatal if it is unrecognized and untreated. Here, we report a case of a 45-year-old male patient who presented with rapidly progressive multiple pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta infected with multidrug resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 5 weeks after cardiac transplantation, on a background of prior bridging therapy with left ventricular assistant device (LVAD. The patient was successfully treated with the newer cephalosporin, Ceftolozane/Tazobactam, in combination with surgery. This is the first reported case of mycotic pseudoaneurysm infected with MDR Pseudomonas. This case also highlights the importance of high vigilance and timely multimodality treatment in the diagnosis and management of mycotic pseudoaneurysm following cardiac transplant, especially in patients who had LVAD.

  1. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia...... respiratory tract (nasal sampling) should be investigated and both infection sites should be treated....

  2. Impact of Pseudomonas H6 surfactant on all external life cycle stages of the fish parasitic ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Jubury, A.; lu, Cao; Walter Kania, P; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, L.; Liu, Yiying; De Bruijn, I.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Buchman, Kurt

    2018-01-01

    A bacterial biosurfactant isolated from Pseudomonas (strain H6) has previously been shown to have a lethal effect on the oomycete Saprolegnia diclina infecting fish eggs. The present work demonstrates that the same biosurfactant has a strong in vitro antiparasitic effect on the fish pathogenic

  3. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, J.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069127077; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain DK1-NH57388A, a Stable Mucoid Cystic Fibrosis Isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Ciofu, Oana; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with chronic pulmonary infections and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of stable mucoid P. aeruginosa strain DK1-NH57388A, a CF isolate which has previously been used...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia in a patient with severe Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Høiby, N; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    This report describes a Danish patient with severe Plasmodium falciparum infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia. The patient had been sailing along the coast of West Africa for ten years without taking any antimalaria prophylaxis and without any apparent previous history of malaria. He...

  6. Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is modulated through the Catabolite Repression Control protein Crc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas syringae (P.s.) infects diverse plant species and several P.s. pathovars have been used in the study of molecular events that occur during plant-microbe interactions. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition and virulence has attracted increasing atten...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  8. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J

    1996-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by intraperitoneal treatment with recombinant rat interferon-gamma (rrIFN-gamma). Rats were treated either before or after intratracheal ch...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya; Prakash, Logambiga; Neelamegam, Sivakumar; Antony, Aju; Alqarawi, Sami; Prajna, Lalitha; Devarajan, Bharanidharan; Mohankumar, Vidyarani

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain

  10. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: A review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Bahmani; Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaei; Hassan Hassanzadazar; Morovat Taherikalani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa.Materials and Methods: ...

  11. RESEARCH IN SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICS IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Nazarchuk; D. V. Paliy; N. I. Osadchuk

    2017-01-01

    Background. Infections caused by Pseudomonas are one of the topical issues of medicine. Objective. The aim of the research was to study sensityvity to antibiotics, antiseptics of P. aeruginosa clinical strains that cause infectious complications in patients with burns. Methods. Microbiological study of biological material, received from 435 patients with burns of the 3rd-4th stages (2011-2015 years). In early terms of burn disease 127 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated fr...

  12. Genotypische diversiteit en rhizosfeerkolonisatie van DAPG-producerende Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma-Vlami, M.

    2009-01-01

    Het antibioticum 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) speelt een belangrijke rol in biologische bestrijding van verschillende plantenpathogenen door fluorescerende Pseudomonas-soorten. DAPG-producerende Pseudomonas-stammen zijn effectief in biologische bestrijding, maar hun saprofytisch vermogen is

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...... metabolism activity and the endogenous formation of reactive O2 radicals (ROS). In this study we aimed to apply hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in order to sensitize anoxic P. aeruginosa agarose-biofilms established to mimic situations with intense O2 consumption by the host response in the cystic...... fibrosis (CF) lung. Application of HBOT resulted in enhanced bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin at clinically relevant durations and was accompanied by indications of restored aerobic respiration, involvement of endogenous lethal oxidative stress and increased bacterial growth. The findings highlight...

  14. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in a haematology department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Christensen, Nikolas; Sørensen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    the outbreak and 12 months later. The audits were conducted by the method of direct observation. RESULTS: Several PFGE types were involved with no clear association to isolates from environmental samples. The audit revealed poor hygiene related to the handling of central venous catheters. After optimising......INTRODUCTION: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In Denmark, an increase in P. aeruginosa isolates from blood cultures from a haematology department prompted a hygienic audit in 2007. METHODS: Blood cultures...... catheter hygiene, the number of P. aeruginosa bacteraemia cases fell significantly. CONCLUSION: Since no clear association between patient and environmental genotype was established, it was suspected that central venous catheters were the main portal of entry. This was further supported by a simultaneous...

  15. The great escape: Pseudomonas breaks out of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections and the focus of much attention due to its resistance to many conventional antibiotics. It harbors a wide range of disease-promoting virulence factors, including a type III secretion system. Here we review our recent study of ExoS, one of the effector proteins exported by this type III secretion system. Using a mouse model of pneumonia, we showed that the ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT activity of ExoS caused formation of “fields of cell injection” (FOCI in the lungs. These FOCI represented ExoS-injected clusters of type I pneumocytes that became compromised, leading to disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and subsequent bacterial dissemination from the lungs to the bloodstream. We discuss the potential mechanisms by which these processes occur as well as the novel techniques used to study ExoS function in vivo.

  16. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria...

  17. T helper cell subsets specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah K Bayes

    Full Text Available We set out to determine the magnitude of antigen-specific memory T helper cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in healthy humans and patients with cystic fibrosis.Peripheral blood human memory CD4(+ T cells were co-cultured with dendritic cells that had been infected with different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The T helper response was determined by measuring proliferation, immunoassay of cytokine output, and immunostaining of intracellular cytokines.Healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis had robust antigen-specific memory CD4(+ T cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa that not only contained a Th1 and Th17 component but also Th22 cells. In contrast to previous descriptions of human Th22 cells, these Pseudomonal-specific Th22 cells lacked the skin homing markers CCR4 or CCR10, although were CCR6(+. Healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis had similar levels of Th22 cells, but the patient group had significantly fewer Th17 cells in peripheral blood.Th22 cells specific to Pseudomonas aeruginosa are induced in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Along with Th17 cells, they may play an important role in the pulmonary response to this microbe in patients with cystic fibrosis and other conditions.

  18. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415 Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents are devices that...

  19. Diagnosis of biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is the best described biofilm infection in medicine. The initial focus can be the paranasal sinuses and then follows repeated colonization and infection of the lungs by aspiration. The matrix of the biofilms is domi...... by other pathogens e.g., Stenotrophomonas, Burkholderia multivorans, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Mycobacterium abscessus complex....

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P

  1. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage...... long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children...... were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate...

  2. Antimicrobial resistance, respiratory tract infections and role of biofilms in lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2015-01-01

    Lung infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis and is mainly dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biofilm mode of growth makes eradication of the infection impossible, and it causes a chronic inflammation in the airways. The general mechanisms...

  3. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs as new antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momen Askoura

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The difficulty in treatment of pseudomonas infections arises from being multidrug resistant (MDR and exhibits resistance to most antimicrobial agents due to the expression of different mechanisms overcoming their effects. Of these resistance mechanisms, the active efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that belong to the resistance nodulation division (RND plays a very important role in extruding the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells providing a protective means against their antibacterial activity. Beside its role against the antimicrobial agents, these pumps can extrude biocides, detergents, and other metabolic inhibitors. It is clear that efflux pumps can be targets for new antimicrobial agents. Peptidomimetic compounds such as phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide (PAβN have been introduced as efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs; their mechanism of action is through competitive inhibition with antibiotics on the efflux pump resulting in increased intracellular concentration of antibiotic, hence, restoring its antibacterial activity. The advantage of EPIs is the difficulty to develop bacterial resistance against them, but the disadvantage is their toxic property hindering their clinical application. The structure activity relationship of these compounds showed other derivatives from PAβN that are higher in their activity with higher solubility in biological fluids and decreased toxicity level. This raises further questions on how can we compact Pseudomonas infections. Of particular importance, the recent resurgence in the use of older antibiotics such as polymyxins and probably applying stricter control measures in order to prevent their spread in clinical sittings.

  4. Nosocomial outbreak of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with aromatherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Astrid; Hinterberger, Guido; Lorenz, Ingo H; Kreidl, Peter; Mutschlechner, Wolfgang; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    An increase of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA) in various clinical specimens among intensive care unit patients (n = 7) initiated an outbreak investigation consisting of patient data analyses, control of adherence to infection control guidelines, microbiologic surveys, and molecular-based studies. XDR-PA was detected in a jointly used aroma-oil nursing bottle for aromatherapy. We implemented the restriction of oil sharing among patients. Hence, the outbreak was controlled successfully. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. and Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov., isolated from raw cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Neubeck, M; Huptas, C; Glück, C; Krewinkel, M; Stoeckel, M; Stressler, T; Fischer, L; Hinrichs, J; Scherer, S; Wenning, M

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of the microbiota of raw cow's milk and semi-finished milk products yielded seven isolates assigned to the genus Pseudomonas that formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis based on partial rpoD and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The two groups could be differentiated from each other and also from their closest relatives as well as from the type species Pseudomonas aeruginosa by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values within the groups were higher than 97.3 %, whereas similarity values to the closest relatives were 85 % or less. The major cellular lipids of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; the major quinone was Q-9 in both strains, with small amounts of Q-8 in strain WS4917T. The DNA G+C contents of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were 58.08 and 57.30 mol%, respectively. Based on these data, strains WS4917T, WS4995 ( = DSM 29141 = LMG 28434), WS4999, WS5001 and WS5002 should be considered as representatives of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas helleri is strain WS4917T ( = DSM 29165T = LMG 28433T). Strains WS4993T and WS4994 ( = DSM 29140 = LMG 28438) should be recognized as representing a second novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis is strain WS4993T ( = DSM 29166T = LMG 28437T).

  6. Hydrogen cyanide, a volatile biomarker of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Gilchrist, F. J.; Lenney, W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2013), 044001 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TUBE MASS-SPECTROMETRY * ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY * EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.590, year: 2013

  7. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial genus Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Razia Alam; Rafique, Mazhar; Rehman, Abdul; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus pesticide commonly used in agriculture. It is noxious to a variety of organisms that include living soil biota along with beneficial arthropods, fish, birds, humans, animals, and plants. Exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause detrimental effects as delayed seedling emergence, fruit deformities, and abnormal cell division. Contamination of chlorpyrifos has been found about 24 km from the site of its application. There are many physico-chemical and biological approaches to remove organophosphorus pesticides from the ecosystem, among them most promising is biodegradation. The 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) as primary products are made when chlorpyrifos is degraded by soil microorganisms which further break into nontoxic metabolites as CO(2), H(2)O, and NH(3). Pseudomonas is a diversified genus possessing a series of catabolic pathways and enzymes involved in pesticide degradation. Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 is reported to be more efficient in chlorpyrifos degradation by a rate of 90% in 24 h among Pseudomonas genus. The current review analyzed the comparative potential of bacterial species in Pseudomonas genus for degradation of chlorpyrifos thus, expressing an ecofriendly approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants like pesticides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Evaluation of gamma irradiation effect and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens and influence of gamma irradiation on the development of Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of postharvest disease on apple fruit was studied. P. fluorescens was originally isolated from rhizosphere of the apple trees. Suspension of P. fluorescens and P. expansum ...

  9. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF...

  10. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... protease production was 37°C at pH 9, with 2% inoculum in the medium for 24 h. .... Positive. Catalase test. Positive ... The enzyme activity gradually decreases from ... Effect of temperature on protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens. 0 .... between RNA polymerase and upstream promotes DNA.

  11. Comparative evaluation of organic formulations of Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted in the laboratory and farm of the Department of Biotechnology, Gauhati University, to explore the potentiality of various organic formulations of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf) and to manage bacterial wilt disease of brinjal (Solanum melongena L.) under local conditions. Different organic ...

  12. Pseudomonas cichorii as the causal agent of midrib rot, an emerging disease of greenhouse-grown butterhead lettuce in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottyn, Bart; Heylen, Kim; Heyrman, Jeroen; Vanhouteghem, Katrien; Pauwelyn, Ellen; Bleyaert, Peter; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Höfte, Monica; De Vos, Paul; Maes, Martine

    2009-05-01

    Bacterial midrib rot of greenhouse-grown butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata) is an emerging disease in Flanders (Belgium) and fluorescent pseudomonads are suspected to play an important role in the disease. Isolations from infected lettuces, collected from 14 commercial greenhouses in Flanders, yielded 149 isolates that were characterized polyphasically, which included morphological characteristics, pigmentation, pathogenicity tests by both injection and spraying of lettuce, LOPAT characteristics, FAME analysis, BOX-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization. Ninety-eight isolates (66%) exhibited a fluorescent pigmentation and were associated with the genus Pseudomonas. Fifty-five of them induced an HR+ (hypersensitive reaction in tobacco leaves) response. The other 43 fluorescent isolates were most probably saprophytic bacteria and about half of them were able to cause rot on potato tuber slices. BOX-PCR genomic fingerprinting was used to assess the genetic diversity of the Pseudomonas midrib rot isolates. The delineated BOX-PCR patterns matched quite well with Pseudomonas morphotypes defined on the basis of colony appearance and variation in fluorescent pigmentation. 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequence analyses allowed most of the fluorescent isolates to be allocated to Pseudomonas, and they belonged to either the Pseudomonas fluorescens group, Pseudomonas putida group, or the Pseudomonas cichorii/syringae group. In particular, the isolates allocated to this latter group constituted the vast majority of HR+ isolates and were identified as P. cichorii by DNA-DNA hybridization. They were demonstrated by spray-inoculation tests on greenhouse-grown lettuce to induce the midrib rot disease and could be re-isolated from lesions of inoculated plants. Four HR+ non-fluorescent isolates associated with one sample that showed an atypical midrib rot were identified as Dickeya sp.

  13. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa necrotizing chondritis complicating high helical ear piercing case report: clinical and public health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amonpreet; Gross, Melissa; Wylie, John; Van Caeseele, Paul; Plourde, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Auricular or high helical ear piercing is an increasingly widespread fashion trend that is associated with an increased risk of potentially serious post-piercing complications such as auricular perichondritis. An 11-year-old girl developed severe auricular perichondritis following piercing of the upper helical cartilage of her ear at a hairdressing salon. Four days post piercing, she returned to the same salon for a haircut during which the pierced site was manipulated. She presented to her family physician and was treated unsuccessfully with oral cephalexin. She was then referred to an infectious diseases consultant and received antipseudomonal intravenous antibiotics with subsequent resolution. She also required debridement and removal of necrotic cartilage. Public health investigation evaluated potential sources of infection including the piercing gun, disinfectant solutions, and hair cutting spray water bottles. Final culture results of the ear helical aspirate grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also cultured from one of the water bottles used to wet her hair during the haircut. Although the pseudomonal strains from the water bottle were different than the infecting one, this contamination presents a potential source of wound infection. Damage to the helical cartilage caused by the piercing gun may also have contributed to this infection. Initial empiric antibiotic therapy for these kinds of infection must include anti-pseudomonal coverage. Auricular or high helical ear piercing using a piercing gun is not recommended.

  15. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2016-01-01

    Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have...... observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  16. Recognition of six additional cystoviruses: Pseudomonas virus phi6 is no longer the sole species of the family Cystoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntynen, Sari; Sundberg, Lotta-Riina; Poranen, Minna M

    2018-04-01

    Cystoviridae is a family of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) with a tri-segmented dsRNA genome. It includes a single genus Cystovirus, which has presently only one recognised virus species, Pseudomonas virus phi6. However, a large number of additional dsRNA phages have been isolated from various environmental samples, indicating that such viruses are more widespread and abundant than previously recognised. Six of the additional dsRNA phage isolates (Pseudomonas phages phi8, phi12, phi13, phi2954, phiNN and phiYY) have been fully sequenced. They all infect Pseudomonas species, primarily plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains. Due to the notable genetic and structural similarities with Pseudomonas phage phi6, we propose that these viruses should be included into the Cystovirus genus (and consequently into the Cystoviridae family). Here, we present an updated taxonomy of the family Cystoviridae and give a short overview of the properties of the type member phi6 as well as the putative new members of the family.

  17. Current therapies for pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamarellou, Helen; Kanellakopoulou, Kyriaki

    2008-04-01

    Based on the worldwide prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomas aeruginosa and the fact that no newer antipseudomonal agents are available, this article aims to investigate therapeutic solutions for combating infections caused by P aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant strains. The article focuses mainly on colistin, the re-emerging old antibiotic that possesses prominent antipseudomonal activity in vitro and on doripenem, a newer carbapenem that seems to be close to its global marketing. Regarding older antipseudomonal antibiotics that have been reviewed extensively, only newer aspects on their use are considered in this article.

  18. Sensitivity patterns of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained from clinical specimens in peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.H.; Khan, M.Z.U.; Naeem, M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a highly virulent opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections.Affected patients are often hospitalized in an intensive care unit, and are immuno-compromised as a result of disease and treatment. Suspected P. aeruginosa require timely, adequate and empirical antibiotic therapy to ensure improved outcomes. The purpose of the study was to find the sensitivity and resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa to various groups of drugs, in clinical isolates collected from two major tertiary care hospitals of Peshawar. Methods: Different clinical isolate were taken from patients admitted in various wards of Khyber Teaching Hospital and Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar. Results: A total of 258 clinical isolates were positive for P. aeruginosa out of 2058 clinical isolates. Pseudomonas showed high degree of resistance to third generation Cephalosporins (Ceftazidime, and Ceftriaxone) and moderate degree of resistance to Quinolones and Aminoglycosides (Ofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin and Amikacin). Low resistance was observed to different combinations (Cefoperazone + Sulbactum, Piperacillin + Tazobactum). Meropenem and Imipenem had negligible resistance. Conclusion: There is growing resistance to different classes of antibiotics. Combination drugs are useful approach for empirical treatment in suspected Pseudomonas infection. Imipenem and Meropenem are extremely effective but should be in reserve. (author)

  19. Pf16 and phiPMW: Expanding the realm of Pseudomonas putida bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Magill

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of two novel Pseudomonas putida phages, pf16 and phiPMW. Pf16 represents a peripherally related T4-like phage, and is the first of its kind infecting a Pseudomonad, with evidence suggesting cyanophage origins. Extensive divergence has resulted in pf16 occupying a newly defined clade designated as the pf16-related phages, lying at the interface of the Schizo T-Evens and Exo T-Evens. Recombination with an ancestor of the P. putida phage AF is likely responsible for the tropism of this phage. phiPMW represents a completely novel Pseudomonas phage with a genome containing substantial genetic novelty through its many hypothetical proteins. Evidence suggests that this phage has been extensively shaped through gene transfer events and vertical evolution. Phylogenetics shows that this phage has an evolutionary history involving FelixO1-related viruses but is in itself highly distinct from this group.

  20. Marine Pseudomonas putida: a potential source of antimicrobial substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palloma Rodrigues Marinho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria isolated from marine sponges found off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. We report a new Pseudomonas putida strain (designated P. putida Mm3 isolated from the sponge Mycale microsigmatosa that produces a powerful antimicrobial substance active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. P. putida Mm3 was identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic tests. Molecular typing for Mm3 was performed by RAPD-PCR and comparison of the results to other Pseudomonas strains. Our results contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  1. Convergent Metabolic Specialization through Distinct Evolutionary Paths in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rosa, Ruggero; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren

    2018-01-01

    fibrosis (CF) infection. In this work, we investigated how and through which trajectories evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs when migrating from the environment to the airways of CF patients, and specifically, we determined reduction of growth rate and metabolic specialization as signatures...... of adaptive evolution. We show that central metabolic pathways of three distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa lineages coevolving within the same environment become restructured at the cost of versatility during long-term colonization. Cell physiology changes from naive to adapted phenotypes resulted in (i......) alteration of growth potential that particularly converged to a slow-growth phenotype, (ii) alteration of nutritional requirements due to auxotrophy, (iii) tailored preference for carbon source assimilation from CF sputum, (iv) reduced arginine and pyruvate fermentation processes, and (v) increased oxygen...

  2. Marine Pseudomonas putida: a potential source of antimicrobial substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Palloma Rodrigues; Moreira, Ana Paula Barbosa; Pellegrino, Flávia Lúcia Piffano Costa; Muricy, Guilherme; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire; Santos, Kátia Regina Netto dos; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Laport, Marinella Silva

    2009-08-01

    Bacteria isolated from marine sponges found off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. We report a new Pseudomonas putida strain (designated P. putida Mm3) isolated from the sponge Mycale microsigmatosa that produces a powerful antimicrobial substance active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. P. putida Mm3 was identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic tests. Molecular typing for Mm3 was performed by RAPD-PCR and comparison of the results to other Pseudomonas strains. Our results contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  3. Pseudomonas lactis sp. nov. and Pseudomonas paralactis sp. nov., isolated from bovine raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Neubeck, Mario; Huptas, Christopher; Glück, Claudia; Krewinkel, Manuel; Stoeckel, Marina; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz; Hinrichs, Jörg; Scherer, Siegfried; Wenning, Mareike

    2017-06-01

    Five strains, designated WS 4672T, WS 4998, WS 4992T, WS 4997 and WS 5000, isolated from bovine raw milk formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis. The most similar species on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences were Pseudomonas azotoformans IAM 1603T, Pseudomonas gessardii CIP 105469T and Pseudomonas libanensis CIP 105460T showing 99.7-99.6 % similarity. Using rpoD gene sequences Pseudomonas veronii LMG 17761T (93.3 %) was most closely related to strain WS 4672T and Pseudomonas libanensis CIP 105460T to strain WS 4992T (93.3 %). The five strains could be differentiated from their closest relatives and from each other by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and ANIb values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values of strains WS 4992T and WS4671T to the closest relatives are lower than 90 %. The major cellular polar lipids of both strains are phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, a phospholipid and diphosphatidylglycerol, and their major quinone is Q-9. The DNA G+C content of strains WS 4992T and WS 4672T were 60.0  and 59.7  mol%, respectively. Based on these genotypic and phenotypic traits two novel species of the genus Pseudomonas are proposed: Pseudomonas lactis sp. nov. [with type strain WS 4992T (=DSM 29167T=LMG 28435T) and the additional strains WS 4997 and WS 5000], and Pseudomonasparalactis sp. nov. [with type strain WS 4672T (=DSM 29164T=LMG 28439T) and additional strain WS 4998].

  4. Detection of bla-IMP-1 and bla-IMP-2 Genes Among Metallo-β-lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Patients in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pourbabaee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nosocomial pathogen which especially causes infections among burn patients. Carbapenems are extensively used for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates. The emergence of carbapenemases producing isolates is an outcome of increased utilization of carbapenems. The aim of this study was to determine the bla-IMP-1 and bla-IMP-2 genes in metallo-β-lactamase (MBL -producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients in Isfahan. Material and Methods: A total of 150 P. aeruginosa were isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Imam-Mousakazem hospital in Isfahan. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using disk diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Double Disk Synergy Test (DDST was carried out for screening of MBL production in imipenem-resistant strains. PCR assays were used for detection of bla-IMP-1 and bla-IMP-2 genes among metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The purified PCR products were sequenced. Results: Of 150 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, %100 identified as multi-drug resistant strains. The most resistance rates were seen against ciprofloxacin, tobromycin, meropenem and imipenem. All of 144 imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were MBL producing by DDST test. Twenty-nine (19.3% and 8(5.3% MBL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates harbored bla-IMP-1 and bla-IMP-2 genes respectively. Conclusions: According to results of this study high level resistance to imipenem and MBl genes carriage was seen among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patient infections in our region.

  5. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  6. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have increased susceptibility to chronic lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the ecophysiology within the CF lung during infections is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the in vivo growth physiology of P. aeruginosa within lungs...... of chronically infected CF patients. A novel, quantitative peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)-based method was used to estimate the in vivo growth rates of P. aeruginosa directly in lung tissue samples from CF patients and the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in infected lungs...... in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also...

  7. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arnoldo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that is a key factor in the mortality of cystic fibrosis patients, and infection represents an increased threat for human health worldwide. Because resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing, new inhibitors of pharmacologically validated targets of this bacterium are needed. Here we demonstrate that a cell-based yeast phenotypic assay, combined with a large-scale inhibitor screen, identified small molecule inhibitors that can suppress the toxicity caused by heterologous expression of selected Pseudomonas aeruginosa ORFs. We identified the first small molecule inhibitor of Exoenzyme S (ExoS, a toxin involved in Type III secretion. We show that this inhibitor, exosin, modulates ExoS ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in vitro, suggesting the inhibition is direct. Moreover, exosin and two of its analogues display a significant protective effect against Pseudomonas infection in vivo. Furthermore, because the assay was performed in yeast, we were able to demonstrate that several yeast homologues of the known human ExoS targets are likely ADP-ribosylated by the toxin. For example, using an in vitro enzymatic assay, we demonstrate that yeast Ras2p is directly modified by ExoS. Lastly, by surveying a collection of yeast deletion mutants, we identified Bmh1p, a yeast homologue of the human FAS, as an ExoS cofactor, revealing that portions of the bacterial toxin mode of action are conserved from yeast to human. Taken together, our integrated cell-based, chemical-genetic approach demonstrates that such screens can augment traditional drug screening approaches and facilitate the discovery of new compounds against a broad range of human pathogens.

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Ariane; Schniederjans, Monika; Pohl, Sarah; Rainer, Roman; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Xia, Boyang; Klawonn, Frank; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Preusse, Matthias; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Dötsch, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Emerging resistance to antimicrobials and the lack of new antibiotic drug candidates underscore the need for optimization of current diagnostics and therapies to diminish the evolution and spread of multidrug resistance. As the antibiotic resistance status of a bacterial pathogen is defined by its genome, resistance profiling by applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies may in the future accomplish pathogen identification, prompt initiation of targeted individualized treatment, and the implementation of optimized infection control measures. In this study, qualitative RNA sequencing was used to identify key genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in 135 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from diverse geographic and infection site origins. By applying transcriptome-wide association studies, adaptive variations associated with resistance to the antibiotic classes fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams were identified. Besides potential novel biomarkers with a direct correlation to resistance, global patterns of phenotype-associated gene expression and sequence variations were identified by predictive machine learning approaches. Our research serves to establish genotype-based molecular diagnostic tools for the identification of the current resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens and paves the way for faster diagnostics for more efficient, targeted treatment strategies to also mitigate the future potential for resistance evolution. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  10. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsor, Geoffrey L; Griffiths, Emma J; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Shay, Julie A; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2016-01-04

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    Cottage cheese is a mixture of cheese curd with pH 4.5-4.8 and an uncultured or cultured cream dressing with a pH as high as 7.0. This results in a final product with microenvironments and a bulk pH of about 4.8 to 5.5. As for other lightly preserved foods microbial contamination and growth...... of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... on product spoilage and shelf-life remains poorly described. The present study used a quantitative microbial ecology approach to model and predict the effect of product characteristics and storage conditions on growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in cottage cheese. The effect of temperature (5-15˚C) and p...

  12. Biodegradation of resorcinol byPseudomonas sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nader Hajizadeh; Najibeh Shirzad; Ali Farzi; Mojtaba Salouti; Azra Momeni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To investigate the ability ofPseudomonas sp. isolated from East Azarbaijan, Iran in bioremediation of resorcinol. Methods: Resorcinol biodegradation was evaluated using spectrophotometry and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Results:This isolate was able to remove up to 37.12% of resorcinol from contaminated water. Reusability experiments had confirmed the biodegradation process which produced seven intermediate compounds. These intermediates were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique. The products of resorcinol biodegradation were apparently 1, 4-cyclohexadiene, nonadecene, 2-heptadecanone, 1-isopropyl-2-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, hexadecanoic acid, 9-octadecenoic acid, phenol and 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl). Conclusions: The findings revealed thatPseudomonas sp. is able to degrade resorcinol. Because of being an indigenous organism, this isolate is more compatible with the climate of the northwest region of Iran and possibly will be used for degradation of other similar aromatic compounds.

  13. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I; Valencia, R; Torres, M J; Cantos, A; Conde, M; Aznar, J

    2006-11-01

    We describe an outbreak of nosocomial endophthalmitis due to a common source, which was determined to be trypan blue solution prepared in the hospital's pharmacy service. We assume that viable bacteria probably gained access to the trypan blue stock solution during cooling after autoclaving. The temporal cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis was readily perceived on the basis of clinical and microbiological findings, and an exogenous source of contamination was unequivocally identified by means of DNA fingerprinting.

  14. Pseudomonas biofilms: possibilities of their control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masák, J.; Čejková, A.; Schreiberová, O.; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 2 (2014), s. 1-14 ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23597S; GA ČR GA14-00227S Grant - others:Ministry of Industry and Trade(CZ) FR-TI1/456; Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports(CZ) LF11016 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : biofilm * pseudomonas * review Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.568, year: 2014

  15. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbertsen, Adam; Williams, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this pr...

  16. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em unidade de cuidados intensivos: desafios que procedem? Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en una unidad de cuidados intensivos: desafíos que proceden? Multi-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa among patients from an intensive care unit: persistent challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica Guilherme Ferrareze

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a ocorrência de infecção hospitalar por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente em pacientes hospitalizados em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo realizado de outubro de 2003 a setembro de 2004 em um hospital de emergências. RESULTADOS: Totalizou-se 68 portadores de bactérias multiresistentes sendo 10 (14,7% de P. aeruginosa. Destes, 8 pacientes eram do sexo masculino, as médias de idade e de internação foram respectivamente de 57 anos a média de idade, 43,7 a média de dias de internação e 7 pacientes morreram. Isolaram-se 8 cepas no sangue, cinco na urina, duas em cateteres venosos e uma no líquor, das quais sete sensíveis somente a polimixina e três ao imipenem. CONCLUSÃO: O perfil microbiológico deve ser avaliado periodicamente visto que é específico de uma unidade ou instituição, e demanda ações correlatas.OBJETIVOS: Evaluar la ocurrencia de infección hospitalaria por Pseudomonas aeruginosa multiresistente en pacientes hospitalizados en una unidad de cuidados intensivos. MÉTODO: estudio retrospectivo realizado de octubre del 2003 a setiembre del 2004 en un hospital de emergencias. RESULTADOS: Se tuvo un total de 68 portadores de bacterias multiresistentes de las cuales 10 (14,7% de P. aeruginosa. De éstos, 8 pacientes eran del sexo masculino, los promedios de edad y de internamiento fueron respectivamente de 57 años y 43,7 de días de internamiento y 7 pacientes murieron. Se aislaron 8 cepas en la sangre, cinco en la orina, dos en catéteres venosos y una en el licor, de ellas siete eran sensibles sólo a la polimixina y tres al imipenem. CONCLUSIÓN: El perfil microbiológico debe ser evaluado periódicamente dado que es específico de una unidad o institución, y demanda acciones correlatas.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence of multi-resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infection among patients from an Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: This retrospective study was

  18. Screening of Gibberellic Acid Production by Pseudomonas SPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khine Zar Wynn Myint; Khin Mya Lwin; Myo Myint

    2010-12-01

    The microbial gibberellic acid (GA3) production of Pseudomonas spp., was studied and qualitatively indentified by UV spectrophotometer. 20 strains of Pseudomonas spp., were isolated and screened the gibberellic acid productivily in King's B medium. Among them, only four strains can produce microbial gibberellic acid. The Rf values and colour appearance under UV were the same as authentic gibberellic acid. Moreover, the gibberellic acid producer strains were identified as Pseudomonas spp., by cultural, biochemical and drug sensitivity pattern.

  19. Evaluation of biocontrol potential of epiphytic fluorescent pseudomonas as associated with healthy fruits and vegetables against root rot and root knot pathogens of mungbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habiba, A.; Noreen, R.; Ali, S. A.; Sultana, V.; Ara, J.

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic and rhizospheric fluorescent Pseudomonas have widely been used as biological control agents against soilborne plant pathogens. In this study, fifteen epiphytic fluorescent Pseudomonas isolated from the surfaces of citrus (grapefruit, orange and lemon) melon and tomato fruits were characterized for their in vitro activity against root rotting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani and nematicidal activity against the second stage juveniles of Meloidogyne javanica. Out of fifteen Pseudomonas isolates HAB-16, HAB-1 and HAB-25 inhibited the growth of all the test fungi and showed maximum nematicidal activity against second stage juvenile of M. javanica. Based on their effective in vitro activity nine epiphytic fluorescent Pseudomonas were evaluated for their growth promoting ability and biocontrol activity in screen house on mungbean. Pseudomonas isolates (HAB-13, HAB-2, HAB-4, HAB-1, HAB-14, HAB-9, HAB-7 and HAB-25) used as soil drench greatly reduced the root rot-root knot infection and thereby enhanced plant growth, root nodulation and yield in mungbean. Besides, rhizospheric and endophytic, epiphytic fluorescent Pseudomonas associated with healthy fruits may be used as biocontrol agent against root rotting fungi, besides, using for the mangemnet of postharvest diseases. (author)

  20. Drug-Driven Phenotypic Convergence Supports Rational Treatment Strategies of Chronic Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamovic, Lejla; Ellabaan, Mostafa Mostafa Hashim; Dantas Machado, Ana Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections evade antibiotic therapy and are associated with mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We find that in vitro resistance evolution of P. aeruginosa toward clinically relevant antibiotics leads to phenotypic convergence toward distinct states. These s...

  1. The Concept of Ecthyma Gangrenosum Illustrated by a Fusarium oxysporum Infection in an Immunocompetent Individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, S.

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) involves necrotic cutaneous lesions caused by bacteria, mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is usually seen in immunocompromised patients with septicemia. However, clinically similar infections have been published with fungi as etiologic agents. We present a case of an

  2. Advances of naphthalene degradation in Pseudomonas putida ND6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fu; Shi, Yifei; Jia, Shiru; Tan, Zhilei; Zhao, Huabing

    2018-03-01

    Naphthalene is one of the most common and simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Degradation of naphthalene has been greatly concerned due to its economic, free-pollution and its fine effect in Pseudomonas putida ND6. This review summarizes the development history of naphthalene degradation, the research progress of naphthalene degrading gene and naphthalene degradation pathway of Pseudomonas putida ND6, and the researching path of this strain. Although the study of naphthalene degradation is not consummate in Pseudomonas putida ND6, there is a potential capability for Pseudomonas putida ND6 to degrade the naphthalene in the further research.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement... killed Pseudomonas fluorescens; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from the...

  4. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  5. Real-Time Monitoring of nfxB Mutant Occurrence and Dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Exposed to Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaborskytė, Greta; Andersen, Jens Bo; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are frequently treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP); however, resistance rapidly develops. One of the primary resistance mechanisms is the overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ pump due to a mutation in nfxB, encoding the transcriptional repressor...

  6. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain DK1-NH57388A, a Stable Mucoid Cystic Fibrosis Isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Ciofu, Oana; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with chronic pulmonary infections and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of stable mucoid P. aeruginosa strain DK1-NH57388A, a CF isolate which has previously been used ...

  7. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide induces CF-like alteration of protein secretion by human tracheal gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammouni, W; Figarella, C; Baeza, N; Marchand, S; Merten, M D

    1997-12-18

    Human tracheal gland (HTG) serous cells are now believed to play a major role in the physiopathology of cystic fibrosis. Because of the persistent inflammation and the specific infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lung, we looked for the action of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of this bacteria on human tracheal gland cells in culture by studying the secretion of the secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) which is a specific serous secretory marker of these cells. Treatment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in the basal production of SLPI (+ 250 +/- 25%) whilst the SLPI transcript mRNA levels remained unchanged. This LPS-induced increase in secretion was inhibited by glucocorticoides. Furthermore, LPS treatment of HTG cells induces a loss of responsiveness to carbachol and isoproterenol but not to adenosine triphosphate. These findings indicate that HTG cells treated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS have the same behavior as those previously observed with CF-HTG cells. Exploration by using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification showed that LPS downregulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA expression in HTG cells indicative of a link between CFTR function and consequent CF-like alteration in protein secretory process.

  9. Investigation of the algT operon sequence in mucoid and non-mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from 115 Scandinavian patients with cystic fibrosis and in 88 in vitro non-mucoid revertants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Lee, Baoleri; Johannesson, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen causing chronic lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). After an initial phase characterized by intermittent colonizations, a chronic infection is established upon conversion of P. aeruginosa from the non-mucoid to the mucoid, alginate...

  10. A Phytoanticipin Derivative, Sodium Houttuyfonate, Induces in Vitro Synergistic Effects with Levofloxacin against Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has become the main deadly factor in infections, as bacteria can protect themselves by hiding in a self-constructed biofilm. Consequently, more attention is being paid to the search for “non-antibiotic drugs” to solve this problem. Phytoanticipins, the natural antibiotics from plants, could be a suitable alternative, but few works on this aspect have been reported. In this study, a preliminary study on the synergy between sodium houttuyfonate (SH and levofloxacin (LFX against the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC of LFX and SH, anti-biofilm formation and synergistic effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and quantification of alginate were determined by the microdilution method, crystal violet (CV assay, checkerboard method, and hydroxybiphenyl colorimetry. The biofilm morphology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed by fluorescence microscope and scanning electric microscope (SEM. The results showed that: (i LFX and SH had an obvious synergistic effect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC values of 0.25 μg/mL and 128 μg/mL, respectively; (ii ½ × MIC SH combined with 2 × MIC LFX could suppress the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa effectively, with up to 73% inhibition; (iii the concentration of alginate decreased dramatically by a maximum of 92% after treatment with the combination of antibiotics; and (iv more dead cells by fluorescence microscope and more removal of extracellular polymeric structure (EPS by SEM were observed after the combined treatment of LFX and SH. Our experiments demonstrate the promising future of this potent antimicrobial agent against biofilm-associated infections.

  11. The phenotypic evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations changes in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassermann, Tina; Meinike Jørgensen, Karin; Ivanyshyn, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a widely used antibiotic, in the class of quinolones, for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The immediate response of P. aeruginosa to subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin has been investigated previously. However, the long-term phenotypic adaptation, which...... populations compared to unexposed populations. Three replicate populations of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its hypermutable mutant ΔmutS were cultured aerobically for approximately 940 generations by daily passages in LB medium with and without subinhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin and aliquots...

  12. HIF-1? Is Essential for Effective PMN Bacterial Killing, Antimicrobial Peptide Production and Apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Elizabeth A.; McClellan, Sharon A.; Vistisen, Kerry S.; Hazlett, Linda D.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, is a transcription factor that controls energy metabolism and angiogenesis under hypoxic conditions, and a potent regulator of innate immunity. The studies described herein examined the role of HIF-1α in disease resolution in BALB/c (resistant, cornea heals) mice after ocular infection with Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa. Furthermore, the current studies focused on the neutrophil (PMN), the predominant cell infiltrate in keratitis. Using both siRNA and an antag...

  13. Herpetic keratouveitis mixed with bilateral Pseudomonas corneal ulcers in vitamin A deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yuan Hsu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman complained of blurred vision and pain in her right eye for several days. Slit lamp examination revealed a large epithelial defect and disciform stromal edema with ring infiltration in her right cornea. Unfortunately, hypopyon and purulent discharge subsequently developed in both eyes. Herpetic keratouveitis and a superimposed pseudomonas infection were diagnosed. A systemic review on the patient showed malnutrition due to her dietary preference and vegetarianism. After the infection was controlled, bilateral epithelial defects persisted for a long time. We performed amniotic membrane transplantation on both eyes and the clinical status improved with administration of vitamin and protein supplements. Although rare in Taiwan, vitamin A deficiency should be kept in mind when conjunctival and corneal xerosis occurred. Vitamin A supplements are suggested because of the increased susceptibility to infection in patients with this clinical status.

  14. Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis airway: an evolutionary perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Jelsbak, Lars; Yang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    evolves from a state of early, recurrent intermittent colonization of the airways of patients with CF to a chronic infection state, and how this process offers opportunities to study bacterial evolution in natural environments. We believe that such studies are valuable not only for our understanding......The airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are nearly always infected with many different microorganisms. This environment offers warm, humid and nutrient-rich conditions, but is also stressful owing to frequent antibiotic therapy and the host immune response. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with CF, where it most often establishes chronic infections that usually persist for the rest of the lives of the patients. This bacterium is a major cause of mortality and morbidity and has therefore been studied intensely. Here, we discuss how P. aeruginosa...

  15. IMPACT OF MICROBIOTA ON RESISTANCE TO OCULAR PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA–INDUCED KERATITIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Sankaranarayanan, Saiprasad

    2016-01-01

    The existence of the ocular microbiota has been reported but functional analyses to evaluate its significance in regulating ocular immunity are currently lacking. We compared the relative contribution of eye and gut commensals in regulating the ocular susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... to be dependent on both eye and gut microbiota with the eye microbiota having a moderate, but significant impact on the resistance to infection. These events were IL-1ß–dependent as corneal IL-1ß levels were decreased in the infected GF and antibiotic-treated mice when compared to the SPF controls...... for microbiota in regulating susceptibility to ocular keratitis. We predict that these results will have significant implications for contact lens wearers, where alterations in the ocular commensal communities may render the ocular surface vulnerable to infections....

  16. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cindy S; Rangel, Stephanie M; Almblad, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Clinical infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a deadly Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, often involve the formation of antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Although biofilm formation has been extensively studied in vitro on glass or plastic surfaces, much less is known...... about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates...... a previously unappreciated function for the type III translocon in the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms at the epithelial barrier and demonstrate that biofilms may form at early time points of infection....

  17. Pseudomonas syringae enhances herbivory by suppressing the reactive oxygen burst in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Simon C; Humphrey, Parris T; Chevasco, Daniela; Ausubel, Frederick M; Pierce, Naomi E; Whiteman, Noah K

    2016-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions have evolved in the presence of plant-colonizing microbes. These microbes can have important third-party effects on herbivore ecology, as exemplified by drosophilid flies that evolved from ancestors feeding on plant-associated microbes. Leaf-mining flies in the genus Scaptomyza, which is nested within the paraphyletic genus Drosophila, show strong associations with bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas, including Pseudomonas syringae. Adult females are capable of vectoring these bacteria between plants and larvae show a preference for feeding on P. syringae-infected leaves. Here we show that Scaptomyza flava larvae can also vector P. syringae to and from feeding sites, and that they not only feed more, but also develop faster on plants previously infected with P. syringae. Our genetic and physiological data show that P. syringae enhances S. flava feeding on infected plants at least in part by suppressing anti-herbivore defenses mediated by reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural characterization of pyoverdines produced by Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baune, Matthias; Qi, Yulin; Scholz, Karen; Volmer, Dietrich A; Hayen, Heiko

    2017-08-01

    The previously unknown sequences of several pyoverdines (PVD) produced by a biotechnologically-relevant bacterium, namely, Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120, were characterized by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The same structural characterization scheme was checked before by analysis of Pseudomonas sp. putida KT2440 samples with known PVDs. A new sample preparation strategy based on solid-phase extraction was developed, requiring significantly reduced sample material as compared to existing methods. Chromatographic separation was performed using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with gradient elution. Interestingly, no signals for apoPVDs were detected in these analyses, only the corresponding aluminum(III) and iron(III) complexes were seen. The chromatographic separation readily enabled separation of PVD complexes according to their individual structures. HPLC-HRMS and complementary fragmentation data from collision-induced dissociation and electron capture dissociation enabled the structural characterization of the investigated pyoverdines. In Pseudomonas sp. putida KT2240 samples, the known pyoverdines G4R and G4R A were readily confirmed. No PVDs have been previously described for Pseudomonas sp. taiwanensis VLB120. In our study, we identified three new PVDs, which only differed in their acyl side chains (succinic acid, succinic amide and malic acid). Peptide sequencing by MS/MS provided the sequence Orn-Asp-OHAsn-Thr-AcOHOrn-Ser-cOHOrn. Of particular interest is the presence of OHAsn, which has not been reported as PVD constituent before.

  19. Quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are toxic to Lucilia sericata maggots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A S; Joergensen, B; Bjarnsholt, T

    2010-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is widely used for debridement of chronic infected wounds; however, for wounds harbouring specific bacteria limited effect or failure of the treatment has been described. Here we studied the survival of Lucilia sericata maggots encountering Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... PAO1 in a simple assay with emphasis on the quorum-sensing (QS)-regulated virulence. The maggots were challenged with GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa wild-type (WT) PAO1 and a GFP-tagged P. aeruginosa DeltalasR rhlR (DeltaRR) QS-deficient mutant in different concentrations. Maggots were killed...

  20. Evolution of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa During Long Time Growth in Human Hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer

    extent these observations relate to natural microbial populations. The focus of this thesis has been to study how regulatory networks evolve in natural systems. By using a particular infectious disease scenario (human associated persistent airway infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... in global regulator genes facilitate the generation of novel phenotypes which again facilitate the shift in life-style of the bacterium from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a human airway specific pathogen. These findings are not only applicable to P. aeruginosa specific studies, but suggest that...

  1. Evolution of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aminoglycoside Mutational Resistome In Vitro and in the Cystic Fibrosis Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Rubio, Rosa; Cabot, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Inhaled administration of high doses of aminoglycosides is a key maintenance treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). We analyzed the dynamics and mechanisms of stepwise high-level tobramycin resistance development in vitro and compared the results with those of isogenic pairs of susceptible and resistant clinical isolates. Resistance development correlated with fusA1 mutations in vitro and in vivo. pmrB mutations, conferring polymyxin resistance, were also frequently selected in vitro In contrast, mutational overexpression of MexXY, a hallmark of aminoglycoside resistance in CF, was not observed in in vitro evolution experiments. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino...... acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm...

  3. Mutations in 23S rRNA Confer Resistance against Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Søndergaard, Mette S. R.; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important concern in the treatment of long-term airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. In this study, we report the occurrence of azithromycin resistance among clinical P. aeruginosa DK2 isolates. We demonstrate that resis...... that resistance is associated with specific mutations (A2058G, A2059G, and C2611T in Escherichia coli numbering) in domain V of 23S rRNA and that introduction of A2058G and C2611T into strain PAO1 results in azithromycin resistance....

  4. Evolution and adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette

    of natural environments, the primary obstacle is re-sampling of the samepopulation over time, especially if the population is small.Nevertheless, it has been accomplished: Chronic airway infections of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have offered a unique view into the adaptationand evolution of Pseudomonas...... to the CF airways. From this analysis we found common clonal lineages among the patients, evidence of patient-to-patient transmission, historic contingencies, and convergent evolution of 52 candidate pathoadaptive genes. By further genome sequencing 26 P. aeruginosa isolates from four Italian CF patients...

  5. Epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and the possible role of contamination by dental equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Giwercman, B; Ojeniyi, B

    1997-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often suffer from Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection yet the source of this organism is not known. In order to determine whether CF patients might be contaminated with P. aeruginosa from dental equipment, a total of 103 water samples from 25 dental sessions...... samples (5.5%) from nine sessions (11%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. In one case, genotypically identical (RFLP, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) P. aeruginosa strains were found both in water from the dental equipment and in the CF patients sputum. This indicates a small risk for acquiring P...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: evaluation of pathogen burden and drug-resistance trends in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.; Hussain, S.; Ahmad, A.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the pathogen burden and antibiotic-resistance trends of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among hospitalised patients at a tertiary care hospital. Study Design:Retrospective, hospital record-based, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study:Microbiology Laboratory, Allama Iqbal Medical College/Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, from January 2014 to December 2016. Methodology:A total of 5,960 samples were collected from clinically suspected cases of bacterial infections, admitted to the hospital. Microbial identification and antibiotic susceptibility pattern were carried out and analysed. Results:Out of a total of 5,960 samples, Pseudomonas aeruginosawas isolated from 1,268 (21.2%) specimens. Department-wise isolation rate was n=600 (42.9%), n=268 (15.4%), n=201 (12.6%), and n=199 (16.0%) from intensive care unit (ICU), surgical units, medical units, and Gynae wards, respectively (p<0.0001). Sample-wise isolation rate was, wound swabs n=448 (35%), urine n=356 (28%), sputum n=187 (14 %), tracheal aspirate n=127 (10%), blood n=99 (7%), and broncho-alveolar lavage n=51 (4%) (p<0.0001). Drug-resistance pattern showed low rates for carbapenems (meropenem n=440 (35%), Imipenem n=436 (34%) and beta-lactam + beta-lactamase inhibitor combination (piperacillin+ tazobactam n=437 (34%) while alarming rates were observed for cephalosporins (ceftazidime n=716 (56%), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin n=690 (54%), cefoperazone+sulbactam n=685 (54%), aminoglycosides (gentamicin, n=669 (53%), amikacin n=608 (48%), and monobactams (aztreonam n=666 (52%). Decreasing trend was observed only for amikacin 63% to 37%, aztreonam showed similar pattern throughout, while there was an increasing trend of drug resistance in all groups of antibiotics. Conclusion:Emerging drug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosaare probably linked to the injudicious use of antibiotics, leading to ineffective empirical therapy. Therefore, we suggest that culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing should

  7. Early aggressive eradication therapy for intermittent Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway colonization in cystic fibrosis patients: 15 years experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.R.; Pressler, T.; Høiby, Niels

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 1989, CF-patients intermittently colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been treated with inhaled colistin and oral ciprofloxacin in the Copenhagen CF-centre. The study evaluates 15 years results of this treatment. METHODS: All isolates of P. aeruginosa from CF-patients inte......BACKGROUND: Since 1989, CF-patients intermittently colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been treated with inhaled colistin and oral ciprofloxacin in the Copenhagen CF-centre. The study evaluates 15 years results of this treatment. METHODS: All isolates of P. aeruginosa from CF......-patients intermittently colonized with P. aeruginosa from 1989 to 2003 were identified All anti-P. aeruginosa treatments were evaluated for antibiotics used, treatment duration, pseudomonas-free interval and development of chronic infection. All P. aeruginosa isolates were assessed for resistance and for non......-mucoid or mucoid phenotype. RESULTS: 146 CF-patients were included in the study (1106 patient-years). 99 patients had first ever isolate during the study period. Median observation time 7 years (0.1-14.9). 12 patients developed chronic infection. A Kaplan Meyer plot showed protection from chronic infection in up...

  8. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs

  9. Extracellular toxins of pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obernesser, H.J.; Doering, G.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive and specific solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) for detection of the elastase (Ela) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) was developed and the RIA was used to assay 10 PA strains of various origin and serotype. A great strain variability of Ela production was found which different from 94.1 to 0.1 μg per ml of culture supernatant fluid (CSF). The Ela and alkaline protease (AP) concentrations were converted to proteolytic activity and combined. The sum of the calculated enzymatic values of Ela and AP correlated well with the experimentally determined values of total proteolytic activity of the CSF. (orig.) [de

  10. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmed Khan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospital-acquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel's skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium difficile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  11. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot

  12. Verspreiding, diversiteit en activiteit van antibioticaproducerende Pseudomonas spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas bacteriën zijn potentiële antagonisten van diverse plantenpathogene schimmels en oömyceten. De productie van antibiotica speelt een belangrijke rol in de activiteit van diverse Pseudomonas isolaten tegen plantenpathogenen. Dit artikel is een samenvatting van het proefschrift getiteld

  13. Interleukin-18 impairs the pulmonary host response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marc J.; Knapp, Sylvia; Florquin, Sandrine; Pater, Jennie; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a potent cytokine with many different proinflammatory activities. To study the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas pneumonia, IL-18-deficient (IL-18(-/-)) and wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-18 deficiency was

  14. Isolation and characterization of a new Pseudomonas-related strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % with Pseudomonas putida ()AB680847). The phylogenetic tree formed by 16S rDNA sequences from both strain SKDP-1 and its most related bacteria also proved strain SKDP-1 to be one member of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain SKDP-1 ...

  15. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial
    genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an
    important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence

  16. Distribution, diversity, and activity of antibiotic-producing Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, de J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas are potential biocontrol agents of plant diseases caused by various fungi and oomycetes. Antibiotic production is an important trait responsible for the activity of several Pseudomonas

  17. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  18. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescence) on phenol chemostat culture was carried out. The data were checked for consistency using carbon and available electron balances. When more than the minimum number of variables are measured, ...

  19. Facial Nerve Paralysis seen in Pseudomonas sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleyman Ozdemir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which is created by pseudomonas auriginosa. Peripheral facial paralysis and mastoiditis as a rare complication of otitis media induced by pseudomonas auriginosa.In this study, 4 months child who has ecthyma gangrenosum and facial nerve paralysis was reported. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 126-130

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoU augments neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Michael A; Lanter, Bernard B; Yonker, Lael M; Eaton, Alex D; Pirzai, Waheed; Gronert, Karsten; Bonventre, Joseph V; Hurley, Bryan P

    2017-08-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration of the lungs is a common contributor to immune-related pathology in many pulmonary disease states. In response to pathogenic infection, airway epithelial cells produce hepoxilin A3 (HXA3), initiating neutrophil transepithelial migration. Migrated neutrophils amplify this recruitment by producing a secondary gradient of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We sought to determine whether this two-step eicosanoid chemoattractant mechanism could be exploited by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ExoU, a P. aeruginosa cytotoxin, exhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity in eukaryotic hosts, an enzyme critical for generation of certain eicosanoids. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neutrophil transepithelial migration, we evaluated the impact of ExoU expression on eicosanoid generation and function. We conclude that ExoU, by virtue of its PLA2 activity, augments and compensates for endogenous host neutrophil cPLA2α function, leading to enhanced transepithelial migration. This suggests that ExoU expression in P. aeruginosa can circumvent immune regulation at key signaling checkpoints in the neutrophil, resulting in exacerbated neutrophil recruitment.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoU augments neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Pazos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Excessive neutrophil infiltration of the lungs is a common contributor to immune-related pathology in many pulmonary disease states. In response to pathogenic infection, airway epithelial cells produce hepoxilin A3 (HXA3, initiating neutrophil transepithelial migration. Migrated neutrophils amplify this recruitment by producing a secondary gradient of leukotriene B4 (LTB4. We sought to determine whether this two-step eicosanoid chemoattractant mechanism could be exploited by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ExoU, a P. aeruginosa cytotoxin, exhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2 activity in eukaryotic hosts, an enzyme critical for generation of certain eicosanoids. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neutrophil transepithelial migration, we evaluated the impact of ExoU expression on eicosanoid generation and function. We conclude that ExoU, by virtue of its PLA2 activity, augments and compensates for endogenous host neutrophil cPLA2α function, leading to enhanced transepithelial migration. This suggests that ExoU expression in P. aeruginosa can circumvent immune regulation at key signaling checkpoints in the neutrophil, resulting in exacerbated neutrophil recruitment.

  2. Crystal structure of secretory protein Hcp3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-03-01

    The Type VI secretion pathway transports proteins across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen infecting humans, uses the type VI secretion pathway to export specific effector proteins crucial for its pathogenesis. The HSI-I virulence locus encodes for several proteins that has been proposed to participate in protein transport including the Hcp1 protein, which forms hexameric rings that assemble into nanotubes in vitro. Two Hcp1 paralogues have been identified in the P. aeruginosa genome, Hsp2 and Hcp3. Here, we present the structure of the Hcp3 protein from P. aeruginosa. The overall structure of the monomer resembles Hcp1 despite the lack of amino-acid sequence similarity between the two proteins. The monomers assemble into hexamers similar to Hcp1. However, instead of forming nanotubes in head-to-tail mode like Hcp1, Hcp3 stacks its rings in head-to-head mode forming double-ring structures.

  3. [Cervical lymphoadenopathy due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following mesotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaladi, Ali Muftah; Crestani, Francesco; Bocchi, Anna; Saltari, Maria Rita; Piva, Bruno; Tartari, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Mesotherapy is a treatment method devised for controlling several diseases by means of subcutaneous microinjections given at or around the affected areas at short time intervals. It is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, amongst which all orthopaedic diseases and rheumatic pain. Mesotherapy is especially indicated for neck pain. The mechanism of action is twofold: a pharmacological effect due to the drug administered, and a reflexogenic effect, the skin containing many nerve endings that are sensitive to the mechanical action of the needle. Although this therapy is safe, like any other medical intervention it cannot be considered free of complications that may occur, such as allergies, haematomas, bruising, wheals, granulomas and telangiectasias. Infective complications are also possible, due to pathogenic bacteria that are inoculated through contamination of products, of the materials used for the procedure or even from germs on the skin. We present the case of a patient who had cervical lymphadenopathy due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after mesotherapy treatment for neck pain.

  4. Adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to orthokeratology and alignment lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jennifer D; Holden, Brien A; Papas, Eric B; Willcox, Mark D P

    2009-02-01

    To determine whether contact lenses designed for orthokeratology (OK) are colonized by greater numbers of bacteria compared with standard (alignment fitted) design rigid gas permeable lenses before and after lens wear. Eighteen 1-year-old cats were randomly fitted with an OK lens in one eye and an alignment fitted (AF) lens in the other eye. Both lenses were made in the same diameter and central thickness and of the same material. Two separate wearing periods of 2 weeks and 6 weeks were used. After each wearing period, lenses were soaked in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6294 or 6206) for 10 min. The lenses were then reinserted onto their respective corneas for a wearing period of 16 hours after which lenses were collected and remaining adhered bacteria quantified. Unworn control lenses were also soaked and bacteria enumerated for comparison. There were no significant differences in the number of bacteria adherent to unworn AF and OK lenses. Analysis of lenses after wear showed OK lenses retained significantly higher numbers of viable bacteria than AF lenses in all studies. OK lenses retain more bacteria than AF rigid gas permeable lenses after bacteria-loaded overnight lens wear. This may increase the risk for an infection in OK patients should suitable conditions be present. Specific education on the cleaning of OK lenses is essential.

  5. Plant-expressed pyocins for control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas Paškevičius

    Full Text Available The emergence, persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant human pathogenic bacteria heralds a growing global health crisis. Drug-resistant strains of gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are especially dangerous and the medical and economic burden they impose underscore the critical need for finding new antimicrobials. Recent studies have demonstrated that plant-expressed bacteriocins of the colicins family can be efficient antibacterials against all major enteropathogenic strains of E. coli. We extended our studies of colicin-like bacteriocins to pyocins, which are produced by strains of P. aeruginosa for ecological advantage against other strains of the same species. Using a plant-based transient expression system, we expressed six different pyocins, namely S5, PaeM, L1, L2, L3 and one new pyocin, PaeM4, and purified them to homogeneity. Among these pyocins, PaeM4 demonstrated the broadest spectrum of activity by controlling 53 of 100 tested clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. The activity of plant-made pyocins was confirmed in the agar drop, liquid culture susceptibility and biofilm assays, and in the Galleria mellonella animal infection model.

  6. Genomics of antibiotic-resistance prediction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeukens, Julie; Freschi, Luca; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Tucker, Nicholas P; Levesque, Roger C

    2017-06-02

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health issue spreading quickly among human and animal pathogens, as well as environmental bacteria. Misuse of antibiotics has an impact on the selection of resistant bacteria, thus contributing to an increase in the occurrence of resistant genotypes that emerge via spontaneous mutation or are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. There is a specific and urgent need not only to detect antimicrobial resistance but also to predict antibiotic resistance in silico. We now have the capability to sequence hundreds of bacterial genomes per week, including assembly and annotation. Novel and forthcoming bioinformatics tools can predict the resistome and the mobilome with a level of sophistication not previously possible. Coupled with bacterial strain collections and databases containing strain metadata, prediction of antibiotic resistance and the potential for virulence are moving rapidly toward a novel approach in molecular epidemiology. Here, we present a model system in antibiotic-resistance prediction, along with its promises and limitations. As it is commonly multidrug resistant, Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infections that are often difficult to eradicate. We review novel approaches for genotype prediction of antibiotic resistance. We discuss the generation of microbial sequence data for real-time patient management and the prediction of antimicrobial resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. [Susceptibility and resistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero Delgado, M C; García-Mayorgas, A D; Rodríguez, F; Ibarra, A; Casal, M

    2007-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism that is frequently the cause of nosocomial infections. Multiple mechanisms are involved in its natural and acquired resistance to many of the antimicrobial agents commonly used in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess the susceptibility and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated in Hospital Reina Sofia between 2000 and 2005, as well as to analyze the differences between intrahospital and extrahospital isolates in 2005 and to compare the results with those obtained in other studies. A total of 3,019 strains of P. aeruginosa from different hospitals and nonhospital settings were evaluated, taking into consideration their degree of sensitivity to different antibiotics. The MICs were determined by means of the Wider I automated system (Soria Melguizo), taking into consideration the criteria of susceptibility and resistance recommended by MENSURA. Results of the analysis showed that P. aeruginosa maintained similar levels of antimicrobial susceptibility during the period 2000-2005, with increased susceptibility to amikacin, gentamicin and tobramycin. There were also important differences in the degree of susceptibility between intrahospital and extrahospital strains, except for imipenem and fosfomycin. The intrahospital difference in susceptibility was also evaluated, emphasizing the importance of periodically studying susceptibility and resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa in each setting in order to evaluate different therapeutic guidelines, as it is not always advisable to extrapolate data from different regions. These differences can be explained by the different use of antibiotics in each center and the geographic variations of the resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa.

  8. Molecular confirmation of shampoo as the putative source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced postgrooming furunculosis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Heng L; Jacob, Megan E; Bizikova, Petra

    2016-08-01

    An acute onset furunculosis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following grooming is a well recognized entity. Although contaminated shampoos have been suspected to be the source of the infection, a molecular confirmation of this association has been missing. This case report describes a dog with postgrooming furunculosis in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an identical genetic fingerprint was isolated from the skin lesions as well as from the shampoo used prior to the disease onset. The dog presented for lethargy, anorexia, pain and rapidly progressing skin lesions consistent with haemorrhagic papules, pustules, coalescing ulcers and crusts localized to the dorsal and lateral aspects of the thorax and gluteal region, which developed within 24 h after a bath. Cytology demonstrated suppurative inflammation with occasional intracellular rod-shaped bacteria. Bacterial culture from skin lesions and the shampoo bottle yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Treatment with oral ciprofloxacin and topical antimicrobial shampoo resulted in a complete resolution of skin lesions within eight weeks. Our clinical investigation suggests a link between Pseudomonas-contaminated shampoo and development of postgrooming furunculosis, and underscores the need for hygienic management of shampoos to help limit this disease. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  9. Quick change: post-transcriptional regulation in Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Lucia; Little, Richard H; Malone, Jacob G

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas species have evolved dynamic and intricate regulatory networks to fine-tune gene expression, with complex regulation occurring at every stage in the processing of genetic information. This approach enables Pseudomonas to generate precise individual responses to the environment in order to improve their fitness and resource economy. The weak correlations we observe between RNA and protein abundance highlight the significant regulatory contribution of a series of intersecting post-transcriptional pathways, influencing mRNA stability, translational activity and ribosome function, to Pseudomonas environmental responses. This review examines our current understanding of three major post-transcriptional regulatory systems in Pseudomonas spp.; Gac/Rsm, Hfq and RimK, and presents an overview of new research frontiers, emerging genome-wide methodologies, and their potential for the study of global regulatory responses in Pseudomonas. © FEMS 2017.

  10. Interaction of bacteria-feeding soil flagellates and Pseudomonas spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Ekelund, Flemming; Johansen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas strains may be used as alternatives to fungicides as some of them produce secondary metabolites, which can inhibit growth of plant pathogenic fungi. Increased knowledge of non-target effects of the antagonistic bacteria on other soil organisms as well as of the survival and predation...... resistance of the antagonistic bacteria is necessary for risk assessment and increased performance of antagonistic bacteria as biological control agents. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the difference between Pseudomonas spp. with respect to their predation resistance to and effects...... on the three different and common soil flagellates Bodo caudatus, Cercomonas longicauda, and Neocercomonas jutlandica. Two antagonistic Pseudomonas: Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and P. fluorescens DR54 and two positive control strains: P. fluorescens DSM 50090T and Pseudomonas chlororaphis ATCC 43928 were...

  11. Pathogenic factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa – the role of biofilm in pathogenicity and as a target for phage therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairoz Al-Wrafy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause several acute and chronic infections in humans, and it has become an important cause of nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance. Biofilm represents an important virulence factor for these bacteria, plays a role in P. aeruginosa infections and avoidance of immune defence mechanisms, and has the ability to protect the bacteria from antibiotics. Alginate, Psl and Pel, three exopolysaccharides, are the main components in biofilm matrix, with many biological functions attributed to them, especially with respect to the protection of the bacterial cell from antibiotics and the immune system. Pseudomonas infections, biofilm formation and development of resistance to antibiotics all require better understanding to achieve the best results using alternative treatment with phage therapy. This review describes the P. aeruginosa pathogenicity and virulence factors with a special focus on the biofilm and its role in infection and resistance to antibiotics and summarizes phage therapy as an alternative approach in treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  12. An altered Pseudomonas diversity is recovered from soil by using nutrient-poor Pseudomonas-selective soil extract media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagot, N.; Nybroe, O.; Nielsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    We designed five Pseudomonas-selective soil extract NAA media containing the selective properties of trimethoprim and sodium lauroyl sarcosine and 0 to 100% of the amount of Casamino Acids used in the classical Pseudomonas-selective Gould's S1 medium. All of the isolates were confirmed to be Pseu......We designed five Pseudomonas-selective soil extract NAA media containing the selective properties of trimethoprim and sodium lauroyl sarcosine and 0 to 100% of the amount of Casamino Acids used in the classical Pseudomonas-selective Gould's S1 medium. All of the isolates were confirmed....... Several of these analyses showed that the amount of Casamino Acids significantly influenced the diversity of the recovered Pseudomonas isolates. Furthermore, the data suggested that specific Pseudomonas subpopulations were represented on the nutrient-poor media. The NAA 1:100 medium, containing ca. 15 mg...... of organic carbon per liter, consistently gave significantly higher Pseudomonas CFU counts than Gould's S1 when tested on four Danish soils. NAA 1:100 may, therefore, be a better medium than Gould's S1 for enumeration and isolation of Pseudomonas from the low-nutrient soil environment....

  13. PAMDB: a comprehensive Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiliang; Brewer, Luke K; Jones, Jace W; Nguyen, Angela T; Marcu, Ana; Wishart, David S; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G; Kane, Maureen A; Wilks, Angela

    2018-01-04

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosaMetabolome Database (PAMDB, http://pseudomonas.umaryland.edu) is a searchable, richly annotated metabolite database specific to P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is a soil organism and significant opportunistic pathogen that adapts to its environment through a versatile energy metabolism network. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is a model organism for the study of biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and bioremediation processes, each of which are dependent on unique pathways and metabolites. The PAMDB is modelled on the Escherichia coli (ECMDB), yeast (YMDB) and human (HMDB) metabolome databases and contains >4370 metabolites and 938 pathways with links to over 1260 genes and proteins. The database information was compiled from electronic databases, journal articles and mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomic data obtained in our laboratories. For each metabolite entered, we provide detailed compound descriptions, names and synonyms, structural and physiochemical information, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MS spectra, enzymes and pathway information, as well as gene and protein sequences. The database allows extensive searching via chemical names, structure and molecular weight, together with gene, protein and pathway relationships. The PAMBD and its future iterations will provide a valuable resource to biologists, natural product chemists and clinicians in identifying active compounds, potential biomarkers and clinical diagnostics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  15. Crystal structure of the flavoenzyme PA4991 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schnell, Robert; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter, E-mail: gunter.schneider@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-01-22

    PA4991 is a FAD-dependent oxidoreductase from the pathogen P. aeruginosa that is essential for virulence and survival in the infected host. The structure of this enzyme, determined to 2.4 Å resolution, reveals that PA4991 belongs to the GR{sub 2} family of flavoenzymes. The locus PA4991 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an open reading frame that has been identified as essential for the virulence and/or survival of this pathogenic organism in the infected host. Here, it is shown that this gene encodes a monomeric FAD-binding protein of molecular mass 42.2 kDa. The structure of PA4991 was determined by a combination of molecular replacement using a search model generated with Rosetta and phase improvement by a low-occupancy heavy-metal derivative. PA4991 belongs to the GR{sub 2} family of FAD-dependent oxidoreductases, comprising an FAD-binding domain typical of the glutathione reductase family and a second domain dominated by an eight-stranded mixed β-sheet. Most of the protein–FAD interactions are via the FAD-binding domain, but the isoalloxazine ring is located at the domain interface and interacts with residues from both domains. A comparison with the structurally related glycine oxidase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase shows that in spite of very low amino-acid sequence identity (<18%) several active-site residues involved in substrate binding in these enzymes are conserved in PA4991. However, enzymatic assays show that PA4991 does not display amino-acid oxidase or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting that it requires different substrates for activity.

  16. Crystal structure of the flavoenzyme PA4991 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schnell, Robert; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    PA4991 is a FAD-dependent oxidoreductase from the pathogen P. aeruginosa that is essential for virulence and survival in the infected host. The structure of this enzyme, determined to 2.4 Å resolution, reveals that PA4991 belongs to the GR 2 family of flavoenzymes. The locus PA4991 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an open reading frame that has been identified as essential for the virulence and/or survival of this pathogenic organism in the infected host. Here, it is shown that this gene encodes a monomeric FAD-binding protein of molecular mass 42.2 kDa. The structure of PA4991 was determined by a combination of molecular replacement using a search model generated with Rosetta and phase improvement by a low-occupancy heavy-metal derivative. PA4991 belongs to the GR 2 family of FAD-dependent oxidoreductases, comprising an FAD-binding domain typical of the glutathione reductase family and a second domain dominated by an eight-stranded mixed β-sheet. Most of the protein–FAD interactions are via the FAD-binding domain, but the isoalloxazine ring is located at the domain interface and interacts with residues from both domains. A comparison with the structurally related glycine oxidase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase shows that in spite of very low amino-acid sequence identity (<18%) several active-site residues involved in substrate binding in these enzymes are conserved in PA4991. However, enzymatic assays show that PA4991 does not display amino-acid oxidase or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting that it requires different substrates for activity

  17. Convergent Metabolic Specialization through Distinct Evolutionary Paths in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Ruggero; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren

    2018-04-10

    Evolution by natural selection under complex and dynamic environmental conditions occurs through intricate and often counterintuitive trajectories affecting many genes and metabolic solutions. To study short- and long-term evolution of bacteria in vivo , we used the natural model system of cystic fibrosis (CF) infection. In this work, we investigated how and through which trajectories evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs when migrating from the environment to the airways of CF patients, and specifically, we determined reduction of growth rate and metabolic specialization as signatures of adaptive evolution. We show that central metabolic pathways of three distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa lineages coevolving within the same environment become restructured at the cost of versatility during long-term colonization. Cell physiology changes from naive to adapted phenotypes resulted in (i) alteration of growth potential that particularly converged to a slow-growth phenotype, (ii) alteration of nutritional requirements due to auxotrophy, (iii) tailored preference for carbon source assimilation from CF sputum, (iv) reduced arginine and pyruvate fermentation processes, and (v) increased oxygen requirements. Interestingly, although convergence was evidenced at the phenotypic level of metabolic specialization, comparative genomics disclosed diverse mutational patterns underlying the different evolutionary trajectories. Therefore, distinct combinations of genetic and regulatory changes converge to common metabolic adaptive trajectories leading to within-host metabolic specialization. This study gives new insight into bacterial metabolic evolution during long-term colonization of a new environmental niche. IMPORTANCE Only a few examples of real-time evolutionary investigations in environments outside the laboratory are described in the scientific literature. Remembering that biological evolution, as it has progressed in nature, has not taken place in test tubes, it is not

  18. Transcriptional profiles of pulmonary innate immune responses to isogenic antibiotic-susceptible and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vincent H; Pérez, Cynthia; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Lewis, Russell E

    2018-04-01

    The virulence of an isogenic pair of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was studied under similar experimental conditions in two animal infection models. The time to death was significantly longer for the multidrug resistant (MDR) than the wild-type strain. The transcriptional profiles of 84 innate immune response genes in the lungs of immune competent Balb/C mice were further compared. Significantly weaker expression of genes involved in production of soluble pattern recognition receptor and complement were observed in animals infected with the MDR strain. Altered patterns of innate immune system activation may explain the attenuated virulence in MDR bacteria. © 2018 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: some like it knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Cayo; Matas, Isabel M; Bardaji, Leire; Aragón, Isabel M; Murillo, Jesús

    2012-12-01

    . Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi. Kingdom Bacteria; Phylum Proteobacteria; Class Gammaproteobacteria; Family Pseudomonadaceae; Genus Pseudomonas; included in genomospecies 2 together with at least P. amygdali, P. ficuserectae, P. meliae and 16 other pathovars from the P. syringae complex (aesculi, ciccaronei, dendropanacis, eriobotryae, glycinea, hibisci, mellea, mori, myricae, phaseolicola, photiniae, sesami, tabaci, ulmi and certain strains of lachrymans and morsprunorum); when a formal proposal is made for the unification of these bacteria, the species name P. amygdali would take priority over P. savastanoi. Gram-negative rods, 0.4-0.8 × 1.0-3.0 μm, aerobic. Motile by one to four polar flagella, rather slow growing, optimal temperatures for growth of 25-30 °C; oxidase negative, arginine dihydrolase negative; elicits the hypersensitive response on tobacco; most isolates are fluorescent and levan negative, although some isolates are nonfluorescent and levan positive. P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi causes tumours in cultivated and wild olive and ash (Fraxinus excelsior). Although strains from olive have been reported to infect oleander (Nerium oleander), this is generally not the case; however, strains of P. savastanoi pv. nerii can infect olive. Pathovars fraxini and nerii are differentiated from pathovar savastanoi mostly in their host range, and were not formally recognized until 1996. Literature before about 1996 generally names strains of the three pathovars as P. syringae ssp. savastanoi or P. savastanoi ssp. savastanoi, contributing to confusion on the host range and biological properties. Symptoms of infected trees include hyperplastic growths (tumorous galls or knots) on the stems and branches of the host plant and, occasionally, on leaves and fruits. The pathogen can survive and multiply on aerial plant surfaces, as well as in knots, from where it can be dispersed by rain, wind, insects and human activities, entering the plant through

  20. Comparison of Neutrophil Apoptosis by the Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Exotoxins between Healthy Individuals and Term Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khazaei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be colonized in different human tissues and result in some infections potentially. Thus, considering that these bacteria are resistance to most of the current antibiotics, an examination on pathogenesis mechanisms of such bacteria can be effective in controlling the infections developed by it.Materials and Methods: In this project, among 40 blood samples (20 healthy persons, 20 infants, an amount of 5 ml (2 ml in the infants heparinized blood was collected form each and then neutrophils were isolated by a standard method and were counted by neubauer lam. After culturing Pseudomonas bacteria in broth medium, some tubes with densities of 1, 2, 3 and 4 McFarland were prepared and the bacteria were isolated by centrifuge method with 3000rpm for 10 minutes and then its exotoxin were exposed to neutrophils of the groups under study. The effect of time and the bacteria count on the amount of the secreted toxin and in adjacency to neutrophils was measured.Results: There were 11 men and 9 women in the health group and the infants group consisted of 12 boys and 8 girls. Death cell percentage of neutrophils was 100% in the health group and 8.90% in the infants group. Percentage of bacterial growth in the medium 1 and 2 McFarland was zero; in the medium 3 McFarland, it was 12.5% in the healthy group and 1% in the infants group (p<0.10. The average rate of cell death in the minute 15th was different in two groups (68.5% in health group vs. 92.5% in the infants (p<0.0005. Conclusion: This study showed the effect of Pseudomonas bacteria on the development of early cell death in the infants very well. As it was shown, this effect is time-dependent and this cell death (apoptosis is occurred in the infants earlier than health people.

  1. Uranium and thorium uptake by live and dead cells of Pseudomonas Sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva Prasath, C.S.; Manikandan, N.; Prakash, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents uptake of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) by live and dead cells of Pseudomonas Sp. Increasing concentration of U and Tb showed decrease in absorption by Pseudomonas Sp. Dead cells of Pseudomonas Sp. exhibited same or more uptake of U and Th than living cells. Increasing temperature promotes uptake of U and Th by Pseudomonas Sp. (author)

  2. Heterogeneity of heat-resistant proteases from milk Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Sophie; Vandriesche, Gonzalez; Coorevits, An; Coudijzer, Katleen; De Jonghe, Valerie; Dewettinck, Koen; De Vos, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Block, Jan

    2009-07-31

    Pseudomonas fragi, Pseudomonas lundensis and members of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group may spoil Ultra High Temperature (UHT) treated milk and dairy products, due to the production of heat-stable proteases in the cold chain of raw milk. Since the aprX gene codes for a heat-resistant protease in P. fluorescens, the presence of this gene has also been investigated in other members of the genus. For this purpose an aprX-screening PCR test has been developed. Twenty-nine representatives of important milk Pseudomonas species and thirty-five reference strains were screened. In 42 out of 55 investigated Pseudomonas strains, the aprX gene was detected, which proves the potential of the aprX-PCR test as a screening tool for potentially proteolytic Pseudomonas strains in milk samples. An extensive study of the obtained aprX-sequences on the DNA and the amino acid level, however, revealed a large heterogeneity within the investigated milk isolates. Although this heterogeneity sets limitations to a general detection method for all proteolytic Pseudomonas strains in milk, it offers a great potential for the development of a multiplex PCR screening test targeting individual aprX-genes. Furthermore, our data illustrated the potential use of the aprX gene as a taxonomic marker, which may help in resolving the current taxonomic deadlock in the P. fluorescens group.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hospital Outbreak Driven by a Contaminated Disinfectant-Soap Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanini, Simone; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Puro, Vincenzo; Martini, Lorena; Imperi, Francesco; Piselli, Pierluca; Montanaro, Marco; Paoletti, Simonetta; Visca, Paolo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection represents a main cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. This study describes a fatal epidemic of P. aeruginosa that occurred in a hematology unit in Italy. Methods Retrospective cohort study, prospective surveillance, auditing, extensive testing on healthcare workers and environmental investigation were performed to define the dynamics and potential causes of transmission. RAPD, macrorestriction analyses and sequence typing were used to define relationships between P. aeruginosa isolates. Results Eighteen cases of infection were identified in the different phases of the investigation. Of these, five constitute a significant molecular cluster of infection. A P. aeruginosa strain with the same genetic fingerprint and sequence type (ST175) as clinical isolates strain was also isolated from a heavily contaminated triclosan soap dispenser. Discussion and Conclusions Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that patients became indirectly infected, e.g., during central venous catheter handling through contaminated items, and that the triclosan soap dispenser acted as a common continuous source of P. aeruginosa infection. Since P. aeruginosa is intrinsically unsusceptible to triclosan, the use of triclosan-based disinfectant formulations should be avoided in those healthcare settings hosting patients at high risk of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:21359222

  4. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morello

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  5. Vaccination promotes TH1-like inflammation and survival in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Cryz, S J

    1995-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF) we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by vaccination. Rats were immunized with either a depolymerized alginate toxin A conjugate (D-ALG toxin A), purified alginate, an O-polysacc......In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF) we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by vaccination. Rats were immunized with either a depolymerized alginate toxin A conjugate (D-ALG toxin A), purified alginate, an O......-polysaccharide toxin A conjugate, or sterile saline. After challenge none of the rats immunized with D-ALG toxin A died, in contrast to the other two vaccine groups combined (p = 0.03). A significant reduction in the severity of the macroscopic lung inflammation was seen in rats immunized with D-ALG toxin A, compared...... predominantly PMNs (TH2-like) to a chronic-type inflammation dominated by mononuclear leukocytes (TH1-like). In accordance, the antibody titers induced by the D-ALG toxin A vaccine were not different from those of the control rats after challenge. This study identifies a possible new way of modifying...

  6. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lo Sciuto

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  7. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willcox MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark DP WillcoxSchool of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms "Pseudomonas" + "Keratitis" limit to "2007–2012", and ["Ulcerative" or "Microbial"] + "Keratitis" + "Contact lenses" limit to "2007–2012". These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin. In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95% were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%.Keywords: Pseudomonas, keratitis, contact lens

  8. Cemaran Staphylococcus aureus dan Pseudomonas aerogenosa Pada Stetoskop dirumah Sakit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leka lutpiatina

    2017-10-01

    The result of the research was found contamination of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aerogenosa on steteskop. The site home condition of the research data was 66.7% cleaned daily, the storage method was placed on the table 70% and the duration of using the set home more than 1 year as much as 70%. The conclusion of stethoscope at Banjarbaru Hospital was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus by 70% and Pseudomonas aerogenosa by 17%. The suggestion of research can be continued by knowing the existence of Staphylococcus aureus resistant antibiotic and Pseudomonas aerogenous antibiotic resistant at steteskop at Hospital.

  9. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  10. Pseudomonas putida as a microbial cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth

    for sustainable production of chemicals, which can be achieved by microbial cell factories. The work presented in this PhD thesis elucidates the application of Pseudomonas putida as a microbial cell factory for production of the biosurfactant rhamnolipid. The rhamnolipid production was achieved by heterologous...... phase. The genomic alterations were identified by genome sequencing and revealed parallel evolution. Glycerol was also shown to be able to support biofilm growth and as a result of this it can be used as an alternative substrate for producing biochemicals in conventional and biofilm reactors. The use...... of biofilm as a production platform and the usage of glycerol as a feedstock show the potential of using microbial cell factories in the transition toward sustainable production of chemicals. Particularly, the applicability of biofilm as a production platform can emerge as a promising alternative...

  11. Small Rna Regulatory Networks In Pseudomonas Putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojanovic, Klara; Long, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    chemicals and has a potential to be used as an efficient cell factory for various products. P. putida KT2240 is a genome-sequenced strain and a well characterized pseudomonad. Our major aim is to identify small RNA molecules (sRNAs) and their regulatory networks. A previous study has identified 37 sRNAs...... in this strain, while in other pseudomonads many more sRNAs have been found so far.P. putida KT2440 has been grown in different conditions which are likely to be encountered in industrial fermentations with the aim of using sRNAs for generation of improved cell factories. For that, cells have been grown in LB......Pseudomonas putida is a ubiquitous Gram-negative soil bacterium with a versatile metabolism and ability to degrade various toxic compounds. It has a high tolerance to different future biobased building blocks and various other stringent conditions. It is used in industry to produce some important...

  12. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... synthesis was restricted to a narrow band in the part of the biofilm adjacent to the source of oxygen. The zone of active GFP expression was approximately 60 Am wide in colony biofilms and 30 Am wide in flow cell biofilms. The region of the biofilm in which cells were capable of elongation was mapped...... by treating colony biofilms with carbenicillin, which blocks cell division, and then measuring individual cell lengths by transmission electron microscopy. Cell elongation was localized at the air interface of the biofilm. The heterogeneous anabolic patterns measured inside these biofilms were likely a result...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septic shock associated with ecthyma gangrenosum in an infant with agammaglobulinemia Choque séptico por Pseudomonas aeruginosa associado a éctima gangrenosa em criança com agamaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fernando Lourenço de ALMEIDA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare and invasive infection that can be associated with agammaglobulinemia. The cornerstone of the treatment is based on prompt recognition with appropriate antibiotic coverage and intravenous immunoglobulin. The authors report a case of EG emphasizing the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this condition.Éctima Gangrenosa (EG por Pseudomonas aeruginosa é uma infecção rara e invasiva que pode ser associada com agamaglobulinemia. O tratamento fundamental é baseado no pronto reconhecimento com cobertura de antibiótico apropriada e imunoglobulina intravenosa. Os autores relatam caso de EG dando ênfase aos aspectos clínicos e terapêuticos desta condição.

  15. Secretory IgA as a diagnostic tool for Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, Kasper; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa sinusitis may be the focus for intermittent lung colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The sinusitis may induce elevated IgA levels in nasal secretion and saliva against P. aeruginosa. METHODS: 120 CF patients chronically infected, intermittently...... colonized or without P. aeruginosa in the lungs participated in this cross-sectional study. IgA and IgG against P. aeruginosa sonicate and alginate were measured in nasal secretions, saliva, and in serum by ELISA. RESULTS: The intermittently colonized patients had significantly higher IgA levels in nasal...... secretions and saliva than those without P. aeruginosa in the lungs, indicating that P. aeruginosa sinusitis may precede intermittent colonization and chronic infection of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: Specific IgA against P. aeruginosa in nasal secretions and saliva can contribute to differentiation between...

  16. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptibility to imipenem and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Flavia Luna; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; Lancellotti, Marcelo; de Hollanda, Luciana Maria; de Araújo Lima, Bruna; Linares, Edlaine; Augusto, Ohara; Brocchi, Marcelo; Giorgio, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The seriousness to treat burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa led us to examine whether the effect of the carbapenem antibiotic imipenem is enhanced by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). The effects of HBO (100% O2, 3 ATA, 5 h) in combination with imipenen on bacterial counts of six isolates of P. aeruginosa and bacterial ultrastructure were investigated. Infected macrophages were exposed to HBO (100% O2, 3 ATA, 90 min) and the production of reactive oxygen species monitored. HBO enhanced the effects of imipenen. HBO increased superoxide anion production by macrophages and likely kills bacteria by oxidative mechanisms. HBO in combination with imipenem can be used to kill P. aeruginosa in vitro and such treatment may be beneficial for the patients with injuries containing the P. aeruginosa.

  18. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Sternberg, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents...... which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea...... epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent...

  19. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation......, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose......Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause...

  20. Detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens from broth, water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sonal

    2015-04-08

    Apr 8, 2015 ... Author(s) agree that this article remains permanently open access under the terms of ... grown in nutrient broth overnight, pond water, mucus and kidney ... a rapid test for detection of Pseudomonas strains in milk is required.

  1. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  2. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...... hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb

  4. Accelerated storage testing of freeze-dried Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accelerated storage testing of freeze-dried Pseudomonas fluorescens BTP1, ... of all P. fluorescens strains were not significantly different and thermal inactivation ... useful to the development of improved reference materials and samples held ...

  5. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen

  6. Crystal Structure of the LasA Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of M23 Metallopeptidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James; Murphy, Loretta M.; Conners, Rebecca; Sessions, Richard B.; Gamblin, Steven J. (Wales); (Bristol Med Sci); (NIMR)

    2010-09-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunist Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections in immunocompromized individuals and is a leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. A number of secreted virulence factors, including various proteolytic enzymes, contribute to the establishment and maintenance of Pseudomonas infection. One such is LasA, an M23 metallopeptidase related to autolytic glycylglycine endopeptidases such as Staphylococcus aureus lysostaphin and LytM, and to DD-endopeptidases involved in entry of bacteriophage to host bacteria. LasA is implicated in a range of processes related to Pseudomonas virulence, including stimulating ectodomain shedding of the cell surface heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-1 and elastin degradation in connective tissue. Here we present crystal structures of active LasA as a complex with tartrate and in the uncomplexed form. While the overall fold resembles that of the other M23 family members, the LasA active site is less constricted and utilizes a different set of metal ligands. The active site of uncomplexed LasA contains a five-coordinate zinc ion with trigonal bipyramidal geometry and two metal-bound water molecules. Using these structures as a starting point, we propose a model for substrate binding by LasA that explains its activity against a wider range of substrates than those used by related lytic enzymes, and offer a catalytic mechanism for M23 metallopeptidases consistent with available structural and mutagenesis data. Our results highlight how LasA is a structurally distinct member of this endopeptidase family, consistent with its activity against a wider range of substrates and with its multiple roles in Pseudomonas virulence.

  7. Psl Produced by Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa Contributes to the Establishment of Biofilms and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher J; Wozniak, Daniel J

    2017-06-20

    Despite years of research and clinical advances, chronic pulmonary infections with mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa remain the primary concern for cystic fibrosis patients. Much of the research on these strains has focused on the contributions of the polysaccharide alginate; however, it is becoming evident that the neutral polysaccharide Psl also contributes to biofilm formation and the maintenance of chronic infections. Here, we demonstrate that Psl produced by mucoid strains has significant roles in biofilm structure and evasion of immune effectors. Though mucoid strains produce less Psl than nonmucoid strains, the Psl that is produced is functional, since it mediates adhesion to human airway cells and epithelial cell death. Additionally, Psl protects mucoid bacteria from opsonization and killing by complement components in human serum. Psl production by mucoid strains stimulates a proinflammatory response in the murine lung, leading to reduced colonization. To determine the relevance of these data to clinical infections, we tested Psl production and biofilm formation of a panel of mucoid clinical isolates. We demonstrated three classes of mucoid isolates, those that produce Psl and form robust biofilms, those that did not produce Psl and have a poor biofilm phenotype, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) redundant strains. Collectively, these experimental results demonstrate that Psl contributes to the biofilm formation and immune evasion of many mucoid strains. This is a novel role for Psl in the establishment and maintenance of chronic pulmonary infections by mucoid strains. IMPORTANCE Cystic fibrosis patients are engaged in an ongoing battle against chronic lung infections by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa One key factor contributing to the maintenance of chronic infections is the conversion to a mucoid phenotype, where the bacteria produce copious amounts of the polysaccharide alginate. Once the bacteria become mucoid, existing treatments are poorly effective. We

  8. Vaginal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ Home Body Your reproductive health Vaginal infections Vaginal infections Help for infections If you have pain, ... infections and how to prevent them. Types of vaginal infections top Two common vaginal infections are bacterial ...

  9. Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Infective Endocarditis Menu Topics Topics FAQs Infective Endocarditis En español Infective endocarditis is an infection of ... time, congestive heart failure (CHF). What causes infective endocarditis? The infection that leads to endocarditis can be ...

  10. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black pepper in Vietnam and promote root and shoot development of the ‘King of Spices’. Biosurfactant-producing P. fluorescens strain SS101 was also effective in controlling tomato late blight caused by P...

  11. Bacteriocinogenicity and production of pyocins from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), P. fluorescens (13) and P. stutzeri (3) were isolated from Nigerian patients with burns, wound and skin infections, UTI, diarrhoea and eye infections. 81.5, 55.6, 76.9 and 33.3% of these species produced pyocins at a range of 410 – 670 g/ml.

  12. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Sommer, Lea M.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Boisen, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage. The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm-1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate output could be possible with a point-of-care SERS device.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses T3SS to inhibit diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldufsky, Josef; Wood, Stephen J; Jayaraman, Vijayakumar; Majdobeh, Omar; Chen, Lin; Qin, Shanshan; Zhang, Chunxiang; DiPietro, Luisa A; Shafikhani, Sasha H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are responsible for more hospitalizations than any other complication of diabetes. Bacterial infection is recognized as an important factor associated with impaired healing in diabetic ulcers. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently detected Gram-negative pathogen in diabetic ulcers. P. aeruginosa infection has been shown to impair healing in diabetic wounds in a manner that correlates with its ability to form biofilm. While the majority of infections in diabetic ulcers are biofilm associated, 33% of infections are nonbiofilm in nature. P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative pathogen in all diabetic wound types, which suggests that the deleterious impact of P. aeruginosa on healing in diabetic wounds goes beyond its ability to form biofilm and likely involves other factors. The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) virulence structure is required for the pathogenesis of all P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, suggesting that it may also play a role in the inhibition of wound repair in diabetic skin ulcers. We evaluated the role of T3SS in mediating P. aeruginosa-induced tissue damage in the wounds of diabetic mice. Our data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa establishes a robust and persistent infection in diabetic wounds independent of its ability to form biofilm and causes severe wound damage in a manner that primarily depends on its T3SS. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. Pseudomonas wadenswilerensis sp. nov. and Pseudomonas reidholzensis sp. nov., two novel species within the Pseudomonas putida group isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, David; Opoku, Michael; Picozzi, Tara; Torossi, Tanja; Balada, Stefanie; Smits, Theo H M; Hilber, Urs

    2017-08-01

    Within the frame of a biotechnological screening, we isolated two Pseudomonas strains from forest soil. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain CCOS 864T shared 99.8 % similarity with Pseudomonas donghuensis HYST, while strain CCOS 865T shared 99.0 % similarity with Pseudomonas putida DSM 291T and lower similarity with other P. putida group type strains. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, the two strains were genotypically distinct from each other, each forming a separate clade. Strains CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T were Gram-stain-negative, motile and rod-shaped, growing at a temperature range of 4-37 °C. Strain CCOS 864T could be phenotypically distinguished from P. putida group species by the combination of gelatinase-positive reaction and positive growth on N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and inosine but lack of fluorescein production on King's B medium, while strain CCOS 865T could be distinguished from P. putida group species by the combination of positive growth with saccharic acid and negative growth with p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and l-pyroglutamic acid. The major polar lipid for both strains was phosphatidylethanolamine; the major quinone was ubiquinone Q-9. DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identities confirmed the novel species status for the two strains. The DNA G+C contents of CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T were 62.1 and 63.8 mol%, respectively. The phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness data support the suggestion that CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T represent two novel Pseudomonas species. The names Pseudomonas wadenswilerensis sp. nov. (type strain CCOS 864T=LMG 29327T) and Pseudomonas reidholzensis sp. nov. (type strain CCOS 865T=LMG 29328T) are proposed.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF SERINE CARBAPENEMASE AND METALLOCARBAPENEMASE ENZYMES IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN GEMS MEDICAL COLLEGE, RAGOLU, SRIKAKULAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Various carbapenems have been reported in Pseudomonas aeruginosa such as VIM, NDM & OXA-48, etc. In addition, carbapenemase producers are usually associated with many other non–β-lactam resistance determinants which give rise to multidrug and pan drug resistant isolates. Detection of these enzymes in infected patients and in carriers are the two main approaches for prevention of their spread. Potential carbapenemase producers are currently screened first by susceptibility testing, using breakpoint values for carbapenems. However, many carbapenemase producers do not confer obvious resistance levels to carbapenems. So there is need for Laboratories to search for carbapenemase producers. In such instance, phenotypic based test such as Modified Hodge Test (MHT is very much useful in confirming in vitro production of carbapenemase enzymes. But this test does not differentiate serine carbapenemase enzyme (i.e. Ambler class A & C from metallocarbapenemase (i.e. Ambler class B. To differentiate these two enzymes, MHT positive isolates can be subjected to Disc Synergy test. These two tests are highly sensitive and specific and adaptable to any laboratory in the world. Out of 100 ceftazidime resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 75(75% were sensitive, 7(7% were intermediate sensitive and 18(18% were resistant to imipenem. When the 18 imipenem resistant strains were subjected to Modified Hodge test, 15 gave positive results. When the 15 MHT positive strains subjected to disc synergy test, 8 were positive and 7 were negative showing that 8 were producing metallocarbapenemases and 7 were producing serine carbapenemases. Out of 7 intermediately imipenem sensitive isolates, 2 were producing metallocarbapenemase and 3 were producing serine carbapenemase. Hence, total number of imipenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were 23.

  16. RESEARCH IN SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICS IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Nazarchuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infections caused by Pseudomonas are one of the topical issues of medicine. Objective. The aim of the research was to study sensityvity to antibiotics, antiseptics of P. aeruginosa clinical strains that cause infectious complications in patients with burns. Methods. Microbiological study of biological material, received from 435 patients with burns of the 3rd-4th stages (2011-2015 years. In early terms of burn disease 127 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients. Standard methods were used to identify clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa by their morphological, tinctirial, culture and biochemical properties. The research of antimicrobial action of antiseptics, antibiotics against Pseudomonas were carried out by means of standard methods according to the Directive of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine (No. 167 from 05.04.2007 р. and guidelines of National Committee of Clinical and Laboratory Study (NCCLS, 2002. Results. It was established that P. aeruginosa caused infectious complications in 23.9% of patients among other pathogens. Clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to be low sensitive to amoxicillin/clavulanate (30.76%, ceftazidime (25.92%, cefoperazonum/sulbactam (46.15%, aztreonam (51.85%, tobramycin (38.46%, amicacin (70.34%, doxiciclini (26.92%, fluoroquinolones (59.26%. The analitical progistic criteria of decrease of sensitivity to ceftazidime, cefepim, meropenem and gatifloxacin were found in P. aeruginosa. This pathogen was determined to be sensitive to decasan ®, antimicrobial composition of decamethoxine ®, iodine pvidone. Conclusions. Clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, being highly resistant to antibiotics, are also very sensitive to antiseptics decasan ®, antimicrobial of decamethoxine®, povidone iodine.

  17. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens Species Group Recovery from Human Homes Varies Seasonally and by Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K Remold

    Full Text Available By shedding light on variation in time as well as in space, long-term biogeographic studies can help us define organisms' distribution patterns and understand their underlying drivers. Here we examine distributions of Pseudomonas in and around 15 human homes, focusing on the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups. We describe recovery from 10,941 samples collected during up to 8 visits per home, occurring on average 2.6 times per year. We collected a mean of 141 samples per visit, from sites in most rooms of the house, from the surrounding yards, and from human and pet occupants. We recovered Pseudomonas in 9.7% of samples, with the majority of isolates being from the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups (approximately 62% and 23% of Pseudomonas samples recovered respectively. Although representatives of both groups were recovered from every season, every house, and every type of environment sampled, recovery was highly variable across houses and samplings. Whereas recovery of P. putida group was higher in summer and fall than in winter and spring, P. fluorescens group isolates were most often recovered in spring. P. putida group recovery from soils was substantially higher than its recovery from all other environment types, while higher P. fluorescens group recovery from soils than from other sites was much less pronounced. Both species groups were recovered from skin and upper respiratory tract samples from healthy humans and pets, although this occurred infrequently. This study indicates that even species that are able to survive under a broad range of conditions can be rare and variable in their distributions in space and in time. For such groups, determining patterns and causes of stochastic and seasonal variability may be more important for understanding the processes driving their biogeography than the identity of the types of environments in which they can be found.

  18. Spoilage potential of Pseudomonas species isolated from goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatamburlo, T M; Yamazi, A K; Cavicchioli, V Q; Pieri, F A; Nero, L A

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are usually associated with spoilage microflora of dairy products due to their proteolytic potential. This is of particular concern for protein-based products, such as goat milk cheeses and fermented milks. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to characterize the proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat milk. Goat milk samples (n=61) were obtained directly from bulk tanks on dairy goat farms (n=12), and subjected to a modified International Organization for Standardization (ISO) protocol to determine the number and proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. Isolates (n=82) were obtained, identified by PCR, and subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with XbaI macro-restriction. Then, the isolates were subjected to PCR to detect the alkaline protease gene (apr), and phenotypic tests were performed to check proteolytic activity at 7°C, 25°C, and 35°C. Mean Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 2.9 to 4.8 log cfu/mL, and proteolytic Pseudomonas spp. counts ranged from 1.9 to 4.6 log cfu/mL. All isolates were confirmed to be Pseudomonas spp., and 41 were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, which clustered into 5 groups sharing approximately 82% similarity. Thirty-six isolates (46.9%) were positive for the apr gene; and 57 (69.5%) isolates presented proteolytic activity at 7°C, 82 (100%) at 25°C, and 64 (78%) at 35°C. The isolates were distributed ubiquitously in the goat farms, and no relationship among isolates was observed when the goat farms, presence of apr, pulsotypes, and proteolytic activity were taken into account. We demonstrated proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas spp. present in goat milk by phenotypic and genotypic tests and indicated their spoilage potential at distinct temperatures. Based on these findings and the ubiquity of Pseudomonas spp. in goat farm environments, proper monitoring and control of Pseudomonas spp. during production are critical. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association

  19. Bioadsorption characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kőnig-Péter Anikó

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions from aqueous solution using lyophilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAOI cells were observed under various experimental conditions. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibration time and temperature on bioadsorption was investigated. The optimum pH value for Pb(II adsorption was found to be 5.0, and for Cd(II 5.0 − 6.0. The Pb(II and Cd(II bioadsorption equilibrium were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir model using nonlinear least-squares estimation. The experimental maximum uptake capacity of Pb(II and Cd(II was estimated to be 164 mg g-1 and 113 mg g-1, respectively. For biosorption kinetic study the pseudo second-order kinetic model was applied at various temperatures. The temperature had no significant effect on Pb(II bioadsorption. In case of Cd(II bioadsorption the adsorbed amount decreased with increasing temperature.

  20. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight.