WorldWideScience

Sample records for gforge cadsr freestyle

  1. Overexpression of CaDSR6 increases tolerance to drought and salt stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Yu; Seo, Young Sam; Park, Ki Youl; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek

    2014-11-15

    The partial CaDSR6 (Capsicum annuum Drought Stress Responsive 6) cDNA was previously identified as a drought-induced gene in hot pepper root tissues. However, the cellular role of CaDSR6 with regard to drought stress tolerance was unknown. In this report, full-length CaDSR6 cDNA was isolated. The deduced CaDSR6 protein was composed of 234 amino acids and contained an approximately 30 amino acid-long Asp-rich domain in its central region. This Asp-rich domain was highly conserved in all plant DSR6 homologs identified and shared a sequence identity with the N-terminal regions of yeast p23(fyp) and human hTCTP, which contain Rab protein binding sites. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CaDSR6 (35S:CaDSR6-sGFP) were tolerant to high salinity, as identified by more vigorous root growth and higher levels of total chlorophyll than wild type plants. CaDSR6-overexpressors were also more tolerant to drought stress compared to wild type plants. The 35S:CaDSR6-sGFP leaves retained their water content and chlorophyll more efficiently than wild type leaves in response to dehydration stress. The expression of drought-induced marker genes, such as RD20, RD22, RD26, RD29A, RD29B, RAB18, KIN2, ABF3, and ABI5, was markedly increased in CaDSR6-overexpressing plants relative to wild type plants under both normal and drought conditions. These results suggest that overexpression of CaDSR6 is associated with increased levels of stress-induced genes, which, in turn, conferred a drought tolerant phenotype in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Overall, our data suggest that CaDSR6 plays a positive role in the response to drought and salt stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The freestyle pedicle perforator flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Jackson, Ian T; Westvik, Tormod S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforating vessels are a consistent anatomical finding and well described in the current literature. Any skin flap can be raised on a subcutaneous pedicle as long as it contains at least one supplying perforator. Perforator flaps have been interlinked with microsurgery and generally...... not widely performed by the general plastic surgeons. The aim of this paper is to present the simplicity of pedicled perforator flap reconstruction of moderate-sized defects of the extremities and torso. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34 patients reconstructed using 34 freestyle pedicled...... perforator flaps for moderate-sized defects of the truncus and extremities. We registered indications, flap size and localization, success rate, and complications. Most importantly, we describe a simple approach to the design of freestyle pedicled perforator flaps and elaborate on technical aspects...

  3. Clinical evaluation of the FreeStyle Precision Pro system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazg, Ronald; Hughes, Kristen; Martin, Pamela; Coard, Julie; Toffaletti, John; McDonnell, Elizabeth; Taylor, Elizabeth; Farrell, Lausanne; Patel, Mona; Ward, Jeanne; Chen, Ting; Alva, Shridhara; Ng, Ronald

    2013-06-05

    A new version of international standard (ISO 15197) and CLSI Guideline (POCT12) with more stringent accuracy criteria are near publication. We evaluated the glucose test performance of the FreeStyle Precision Pro system, a new blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) designed to enhance accuracy for point-of-care testing (POCT). Precision, interference and system accuracy with 503 blood samples from capillary, venous and arterial sources were evaluated in a multicenter study. Study results were analyzed and presented in accordance with the specifications and recommendations of the final draft ISO 15197 and the new POCT12. The FreeStyle Precision Pro system demonstrated acceptable precision (CV FreeStyle Precision Pro system met the tighter accuracy requirements, providing a means for enhancing accuracy for point-of-care blood glucose monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving Technical, Tactical and Psychological Preparation of Freestyle Wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulin Serhij

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1 to justify the ways of improvement of training free style wrestlers to improve the results of their activities and competitive sports skills; 2 to identify the areas of improvement of psychological preparation and the structure of complex psycho-pedagogical methods for optimizing mental condition of free style wrestlers. Material and methods: The following methods were used in the study: analysis and synthesis of the scientific data of methodological literature; pedagogical supervision; survey (interview, questionnaire; analysis of freestyle wrestlers competitive activity; testing of physical and psychological fitness; pedagogical experiment; methods of mathematical and statistical analysis of research results. Results: it has been demonstrated that there is a necessity to improve technical, tactical and psychological preparation of freestyle fighters; the basic problems of the process have been defined. Conclusion: 1 the method of preparation of freestyle wrestlers has been grounded and the feasibility of its use for rapid making the best technical and tactical decisions in a competitive activity has been proved. It is proposed to include specific tactical training methods for each action and various combinations of basic actions into the coach program of wrestling; 2 the directions of improving psychological preparation and the structure of complex psychological and pedagogical methods of optimizing the mental condition of free style wrestlers are substantiated.

  5. Medtronic Freestyle aortic bioprosthesis: a potential option for haemodialysis patients†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Yasser Y; Rayan, Amr; Sodian, Ralf; Hassanein, Wael; Ennker, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    End-stage renal disease patients on regular haemodialysis are at higher risk of calcification. Therefore, many surgeons have concerns regarding the implantation of bioprostheses in such patients. The haemodynamic advantages of stentless aortic bioprostheses support their use; however, these have not been studied yet in end-stage renal disease patients. We studied accordingly the early and mid-term outcomes of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using Medtronic Freestyle stentless aortic bioprostheses in this subset of patients in comparison with stented aortic bioprostheses. We retrospectively studied two groups of consecutive patients on regular haemodialysis who required AVR between 2007 and 2013. Non-Freestyle (NFS) group received stented aortic bioprostheses (36 patients) and Freestyle (FS) group received Medtronic Freestyle aortic bioprostheses (48 patients). Follow-up ranged from 2 to 76 months with a mean follow-up of 36.3 ± 25 months. Patients in both groups showed similar demographic characters regarding age (76.4 ± 8.1 vs 74.9 ± 7.2 years; P = 0.35), male gender (58 vs 60%; P = 0.57) and diabetes mellitus (42 vs 48%; P = 0.57). Smaller aortic bioprostheses were implanted in the NFS (23.3 ± 1.2 vs 25.4 ± 2.1; P < 0.001) with consequently higher postoperative mean gradients (14.1 ± 4.1 vs 11.9 ± 5.3 mmHg; P = 0.004). No significant differences were noted regarding postoperative neurological disorder (8 vs 12%; P = 0.73), deep sternal wound infection (3 vs 4%; P = 0.68), re-exploration (8 vs 8%; P = 0.91) and in-hospital mortality (6 vs 4%; P = 0.92). Mid-term follow-up showed higher prosthetic valve calcification and/or sclerosis in NFS group (25 vs 6%; P = 0.015), whereas no significant differences were noticed between the two groups regarding stroke (0 vs 8%; P = 0.13), endocarditis (0 vs 4%; P = 0.50), 36- and 72-month survival (51 ± 2%, 14 ± 4% vs 55 ± 2%, 19 ± 3%, respectively; P = 0.45). Aortic bioprostheses are a good option for haemodialysis

  6. Variation in heart rate and blood lactate concentration in freestyle kytesurfing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, A; Vercruyssen, F; Brisswalter, J

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the physiological demands of freestyle kitesurfing. Ten elite subjects performed an incremental running test on a treadmill and a three 7 min simulated freestyle heats of kitesurfing in MW (Midwind) condition ranging from 15 to 22 knots. Oxygen uptake (VO(2)) was estimated from the heart rate (HR) recorded during the freestyle trial using the individual HR-VO(2) relationship determined during the incremental test. Blood lactate concentration [Lab] was measured at rest and 3 min after the exercise completion. 3 experienced kitesurfers acted as judges to better simulate competition conditions. Linear relationship was demonstrated between scores and % HR(max) on water (r=-0.764, Pat the end of crossing trial (5.2±0.8 mmol L(-1)). This first analysis of freestyle kitesurfing suggests that the energy demand is sustained by both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism during a MW condition and freestyle event of kitesurfing.

  7. Script-independent text line segmentation in freestyle handwritten documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zheng, Yefeng; Doermann, David; Jaeger, Stefan; Li, Yi

    2008-08-01

    Text line segmentation in freestyle handwritten documents remains an open document analysis problem. Curvilinear text lines and small gaps between neighboring text lines present a challenge to algorithms developed for machine printed or hand-printed documents. In this paper, we propose a novel approach based on density estimation and a state-of-the-art image segmentation technique, the level set method. From an input document image, we estimate a probability map, where each element represents the probability that the underlying pixel belongs to a text line. The level set method is then exploited to determine the boundary of neighboring text lines by evolving an initial estimate. Unlike connected component based methods ( [1], [2] for example), the proposed algorithm does not use any script-specific knowledge. Extensive quantitative experiments on freestyle handwritten documents with diverse scripts, such as Arabic, Chinese, Korean, and Hindi, demonstrate that our algorithm consistently outperforms previous methods [1]-[3]. Further experiments show the proposed algorithm is robust to scale change, rotation, and noise.

  8. DILEMAS AND IDEAS CONNECTED WITH FREE-STYLING WRESTLING IN SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Kasum

    2006-01-01

    By desintegration of Yugoslavia, free-styling wrestling has almost extincted in Serbia and Montenegro. In Montenegro any kind of sports wrestling has never become alive even beside some individual attempts. In Serbia, Greek-Roman style has been nursed and developed and wrestling style has relatively stable results and renawn at the olimpic sports’family. Some tendencies presented at the Internation Olimpic Comitee bring up to date an idea about starting and affirmation of free-styling wrestli...

  9. Free-style puzzle flap: the concept of recycling a perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kuan-Ming; Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Jeng, Seng-Feng

    2013-02-01

    Theoretically, a flap can be supplied by any perforator based on the angiosome theory. In this study, the technique of free-style perforator flap dissection was used to harvest a pedicled or free skin flap from a previous free flap for a second difficult reconstruction. The authors call this a free-style puzzle flap. For the past 3 years, the authors treated 13 patients in whom 12 pedicled free-style puzzle flaps were harvested from previous redundant free flaps and recycled to reconstruct soft-tissue defects at various anatomical locations. One free-style free puzzle flap was harvested from a previous anterolateral thigh flap for buccal cancer to reconstruct a foot defect. Total flap survival was attained in 12 of 13 flaps. One transferred flap failed completely. This patient had received postoperative radiotherapy after the initial cancer ablation and free anterolateral thigh flap reconstruction. Another free flap was used to close and reconstruct the wound. All the donor sites could be closed primarily. The free-style puzzle flap, harvested from a previous redundant free flap and used as a perforator flap to reconstruct a new defect, has proven to be versatile and reliable. When indicated, it is an alternative donor site for further reconstruction of soft-tissue defects.

  10. FREESTYLE: Reducing Barriers to Personal Success by Overcoming Sex-Role Stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Pat

    "Freestyle," a new television series, is designed to expand career awareness of children ages 9 through 12 and reduce the limiting effects of sex role and ethnic stereotyping. The series is a product of the Television Career Awareness Project (TV CAP), a consortium of six agencies funded by a grant from the National Institute of Education (NIE).…

  11. Competitive activity of highly skilled freestyle wrestlers at the present stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.F. Boyko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to compare competitive activity of highly skilled freestyle wrestlers after making adjustments to the wrestling rules. Material: the analysis involved 80 bouts performed by high skilled wrestlers at 2011 World Wrestling Championships (Ankara, Turkey and 2012 Olympic Games in London (weight categories 84 and 96 kg. Results: the resultant technical actions have been analyzed in the standing position performed by highly skilled freestyle wrestlers in major events of the annual cycle for the last three years. The characteristic changes in a competitive activity of highly skilled freestyle wrestlers in the weight categories 84 and 96 kg have been determined. We identified the techniques which were used most frequently in different periods of bout by elite athletes: spurt moving, throwing by knock, pressing, pushing the mat, etc. Conclusions: the competitions in the training of athletes are not only a means of controlling the level of preparedness, the process for deciding the winner, but also an important means of improving fitness and sports mastership. In the future, specialists can use these features of competitive activity in determining the overall training strategy of freestyle wrestlers to competitions at various levels.

  12. A wearable biofeedback control system based body area network for freestyle swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui Li; Zibo Cai; WeeSit Lee; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-08-01

    Wearable posture measurement units are capable of enabling real-time performance evaluation and providing feedback to end users. This paper presents a wearable feedback prototype designed for freestyle swimming with focus on trunk rotation measurement. The system consists of a nine-degree-of-freedom inertial sensor, which is built in a central data collection and processing unit, and two vibration motors for delivering real-time feedback. Theses devices form a fundamental body area network (BAN). In the experiment setup, four recreational swimmers were asked to do two sets of 4 x 25m freestyle swimming without and with feedback provided respectively. Results showed that real-time biofeedback mechanism improves swimmers kinematic performance by an average of 4.5% reduction in session time. Swimmers can gradually adapt to feedback signals, and the biofeedback control system can be employed in swimmers daily training for fitness maintenance.

  13. Acute physiological changes in elite free-style wrestlers during a one-day tournament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafkas, Muhammed E; Taşkiran, Celal; Şahin Kafkas, Armağan; Özen, Gökmen; Taşkapan, Çağatay; Özyalin, Fatma; Skarpańska-Stejnborn, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine free radical production, muscle damage and inflammation responses of well-trained wrestlers to a simulated one-day tournament of free-style wrestling. Twelve elite competitive wrestlers with mean age (±SD) of 24.09±6.20 years, body mass 74.09±11.50 kg, and body height 174.90±8.8 cm and who had competed for national teams completed five matches according to the official Olympic wrestling tournament regulations. Blood sampling was collected before and after fifth match. Baseline blood testing was measured at 10:00 a.m. and then matches started at 12:00. Each match was implemented within one hour. Also, the resting time was 45 minutes following each match. The measurements were analyzed by Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test, which is used to test for significant differences between pre- and post-test. The post-match lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were significantly increased compared with the baseline status. However, baseline malondialdehyde levels were not found significantly different compared with post-match. The current study ensured that one-day Free-Style wrestling tournament brings about significantly increasing on CK, LDH of muscle damage markers. Also, inflammatory status showed a progressive worsening during the course of one-day tournament. The study showed enhanced muscle damage markers and inflammatory status after one-day Free-Style wrestling tournament. Therefore, it appears that one-day free-style wrestling tournament imposes significant physiological demands on wrestlers that may adversely affect their performance and inflammatory status, thereby putting the athletes in a greater risk for injury.

  14. Performance of a new test strip for freestyle blood glucose monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, John Paul; Brazg, Ronald; Bernstein, Robert M; Taylor, Elizabeth; Patel, Mona; Ward, Jeanne; Alva, Shridhara; Chen, Ting; Welsh, Zoë; Amor, Walter; Bhogal, Claire; Ng, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    a new strip, designed to enhance the ease of use and minimize interference of non-glucose sugars, has been developed to replace the current FreeStyle (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) blood glucose test strip. We evaluated the performance of this new strip. laboratory evaluation included precision, linearity, dynamic range, effects of operating temperature, humidity, altitude, hematocrit, interferents, and blood reapplication. System accuracy, lay user performance, and ease of use for finger capillary blood testing and accuracy for venous blood testing were evaluated at clinics. Lay users also compared the speed and ease of use between the new strip and the current FreeStyle strip. for glucose concentrations blood glucose results obtained by lay users fell within ± 5, 10, and 15 mg/dL, respectively, of the reference. For glucose concentrations ≥75 mg/dL, 68%, 95%, 99%, and 99% of the lay user results fell within  ±  5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%, respectively, of the reference. Comparable accuracy was obtained in the venous blood study. Lay users found the new test strip easy to use and faster and easier to use than the current FreeStyle strip. The new strip maintained accuracy under various challenging conditions, including high concentrations of various interferents, sample reapplication up to 60 s, and extremes in hematocrit, altitude, and operating temperature and humidity. our results demonstrated excellent accuracy of the new FreeStyle test strip and validated the improvements in minimizing interference and enhancing ease of use.

  15. Relative accuracy of the BD Logic and FreeStyle blood glucose meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    The BD Logic((R)) (Becton, Dickinson and Co., Franklin Lakes, NJ) and FreeStyle((R)) (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) meters are used to transmit data directly to insulin pumps for calculation of insulin doses and to calibrate continuous glucose sensors as well as to monitor blood glucose levels. The accuracy of the two meters was evaluated in two inpatient studies conducted by the Diabetes Research in Children Network (DirecNet). In both studies, meter glucose measurements made with either venous or capillary blood were compared with reference glucose measurements made by the DirecNet Central Laboratory at the University of Minnesota using a hexokinase enzymatic method. The BD Logic tended to read lower than the laboratory reference regardless of whether venous (median difference = -9 mg/dL) or capillary blood (median difference = -7 mg/dL) was used. This resulted in lower accuracy of the BD Logic compared with the FreeStyle meter based on the median relative absolute difference (RAD) for both venous blood (median RAD, 9% vs. 5%, P blood (median RAD, 11% vs. 6%, P = 0.008). The greatest discrepancy in the performance of the two meters was at higher reference glucose values. Accuracy was not significantly different when the reference was < or = 70 mg/dL. The BD Logic meter is less accurate than the FreeStyle meter.

  16. Features of kinematic structure of motor actions technique in the freestyle wrestlers with different qualification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tupeev Y.V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The sequence of educational steps in teaching basic technique elements in stance for young wrestlers at the initial training stage was determined by the expert assessment method. The biomechanical features of technique of a sprint by an inclination hold of legs for differently qualified wrestlers in freestyle were ascertained by the biomechanical videocomputer analysis. The results of research of kinematic structure of motor actions technique testify that performance duration of phases in sprint by an inclination hold of legs was characterized by the greater values for qualified wrestlers in comparison with highly skilled ones.

  17. The Investigation of the Relationship between Children's 50m Freestyle Swimming Performances and Motor Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktug, Zait Burak; Iri, Ruckan; Top, Elif

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the relationship between children's 50 m freestyle swimming performances and motor performances. There were 32 swimmers (male = 21, female = 11), who had been swimming for at least one and a half year, participated in the study. The motor performances of the participating swimmers were determined through the…

  18. 'Freestyle' - 5.5 kWp photovoltaic roof; Toiture photovoltaique Freestyle de 5,5 kWp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affolter, P. [Solstis, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a photovoltaics installation on a villa in the vineyards above the Lake of Geneva in Switzerland. The 'Freestyle' roofing system used, which allows a roof to be covered with an unglazed, watertight photovoltaic system, is described. This system features aluminium profiles that are fixed to the roof structure, corrugated panels that form a self-draining sub-roof and laminated photovoltaic (PV) cells based on triple-cell amorphous silicon technology. This pilot system with a peak power of 5.5 kW covers an area of 160 m{sup 2}. The active PV area amounts to 100 m{sup 2}. The aesthetics of the installation is discussed. The operation and performance of the system, which was put into service in May 2003, is discussed. The results of measurements made over a period of more than 12 months are presented. The author states that these results are far better than expected.

  19. Neural correlates of lyrical improvisation: an FMRI study of freestyle rap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyuan; Chow, Ho Ming; Xu, Yisheng; Erkkinen, Michael G; Swett, Katherine E; Eagle, Michael W; Rizik-Baer, Daniel A; Braun, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    The neural correlates of creativity are poorly understood. Freestyle rap provides a unique opportunity to study spontaneous lyrical improvisation, a multidimensional form of creativity at the interface of music and language. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize this process. Task contrast analyses indicate that improvised performance is characterized by dissociated activity in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, providing a context in which stimulus-independent behaviors may unfold in the absence of conscious monitoring and volitional control. Connectivity analyses reveal widespread improvisation-related correlations between medial prefrontal, cingulate motor, perisylvian cortices and amygdala, suggesting the emergence of a network linking motivation, language, affect and movement. Lyrical improvisation appears to be characterized by altered relationships between regions coupling intention and action, in which conventional executive control may be bypassed and motor control directed by cingulate motor mechanisms. These functional reorganizations may facilitate the initial improvisatory phase of creative behavior.

  20. Injury situations in Freestyle Ski Cross (SX): a video analysis of 33 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randjelovic, Stefan; Heir, Stig; Nordsletten, Lars; Bere, Tone; Bahr, Roald

    2014-01-01

    Although injury risk in Freestyle Ski Cross (SX) is high, little is known about the situations leading up to time-loss injuries. To describe the situations leading up to time-loss injuries in elite Freestyle SX. Descriptive video analysis. Thirty-three video recordings of SX injuries reported through the International Ski Federation Injury Surveillance System for four World Cup seasons (2006/2007 through 2010) were obtained. Five experts in the fields of sport medicine and SX analysed each case to describe in detail the situation leading up to the injury (skiing situation and skier behaviour). Injuries occurred in four different skiing situations: jumping (n=16), turning (n=8), jumping and turning (n=7) and rollers (n=2). All injured skiers lost control before time of injury (n=33), due to skier-opponent contact (n=13), technical errors (n=8) or inappropriate strategy (n=8), which led to a fall (n=29). Contact occurred in 21 of 33 cases, usually unintentional at landing or take-off, caused by the opponent (n=11) or injured skier (n=8). The technical error cases (n=8) were dominated by bad jumping technique (n=6) and too much inside lean in turning situations (n=2), while inappropriate course line and bad timing at take off (n=7) dominated the inappropriate strategy cases (n=8). We identified four main injury situations in elite SX, dominated by jumping situations. The primary cause of injury was unintentional skier-opponent contact in jumping, bank turning and roller situations. Another common cause of injury was personal errors (inappropriate technique and strategy) at take-off and in turning situations.

  1. Freestyle multiple propeller flap reconstruction (jigsaw puzzle approach) for complicated back defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Woo; Oh, Tae Suk; Eom, Jin Sup; Sun, Yoon Chi; Suh, Hyun Suk; Hong, Joon Pio

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of the posterior trunk remains to be a challenge as defects can be extensive, with deep dead space, and fixation devices exposed. Our goal was to achieve a tension-free closure for complex defects on the posterior trunk. From August 2006 to May 2013, 18 cases were reconstructed with multiple flaps combining perforator(s) and local skin flaps. The reconstructions were performed using freestyle approach. Starting with propeller flap(s) in single or multilobed design and sequentially in conjunction with adjacent random pattern flaps such as fitting puzzle. All defects achieved tensionless primary closure. The final appearance resembled a jigsaw puzzle-like appearance. The average size of defect was 139.6 cm(2) (range, 36-345 cm(2)). A total of 26 perforator flaps were used in addition to 19 random pattern flaps for 18 cases. In all cases, a single perforator was used for each propeller flap. The defect and the donor site all achieved tension-free closure. The reconstruction was 100% successful without flap loss. One case of late infection was noted at 12 months after surgery. Using multiple lobe designed propeller flaps in conjunction with random pattern flaps in a freestyle approach, resembling putting a jigsaw puzzle together, we can achieve a tension-free closure by distributing the tension to multiple flaps, supplying sufficient volume to obliterate dead space, and have reliable vascularity as the flaps do not need to be oversized. This can be a viable approach to reconstruct extensive defects on the posterior trunk. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Applicability of an Indirect VO2max Test: Its Association with the 400 Meters Freestyle Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Veronese da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the VO2max using a previously validated indirect test for non-expert adult swimmers and to verify its connection with the 400 meters freestyle test. A total of 17 non-expert male swimmers (21.5 ± 3.12 years were evaluated. Body composition measurements included body weight (74 ± 9.41 kg, height (172.9 ± 5.21 cm and body fat percentage (15.2 ± 4.15 %. Two tests were conducted on different days; the 400 meters freestyle (400 MF and the Progressive Swim Test (PSwT, respectively. The participant's heart rate frequency before and after the test (BHR and AHR was analyzed, as well as the subjective perception of effort (RPE, the number of laps covered (NLP, and the time of test execution measured in minutes. Significant differences were identified in all variables (p - 0.60 was found between AHR and execution time (r > - 0.70, as well as between the VO2max estimated by the PSwT and the 400 MF performance test (r > - 0.70. The Bland-Altman Plot showed that the values discovered were within the established concordance limits of 95% (±1.96 SD. A negative correlation between a swimming test and a test that estimates the VO2max occurred, and the PSwT showed results of greater approximation of the aerobic power of non-expert swimmers. In conclusion, the PSwT is applicable for non-expert adult swimmers.

  3. Modeling parameters that characterize pacing of elite female 800-m freestyle swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska, Patrycja; Allen, Sian V; Hopkins, Will G

    2016-01-01

    Pacing offers a potential avenue for enhancement of endurance performance. We report here a novel method for characterizing pacing in 800-m freestyle swimming. Websites provided 50-m lap and race times for 192 swims of 20 elite female swimmers between 2000 and 2013. Pacing for each swim was characterized with five parameters derived from a linear model: linear and quadratic coefficients for effect of lap number, reductions from predicted time for first and last laps, and lap-time variability (standard error of the estimate). Race-to-race consistency of the parameters was expressed as intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The average swim was a shallow negative quadratic with slowest time in the eleventh lap. First and last laps were faster by 6.4% and 3.6%, and lap-time variability was ±0.64%. Consistency between swimmers ranged from low-moderate for the linear and quadratic parameters (ICC = 0.29 and 0.36) to high for the last-lap parameter (ICC = 0.62), while consistency for race time was very high (ICC = 0.80). Only ~15% of swimmers had enough swims (~15 or more) to provide reasonable evidence of optimum parameter values in plots of race time vs. each parameter. The modest consistency of most of the pacing parameters and lack of relationships between parameters and performance suggest that swimmers usually compensated for changes in one parameter with changes in another. In conclusion, pacing in 800-m elite female swimmers can be characterized with five parameters, but identifying an optimal pacing profile is generally impractical.

  4. The Relationship Between Lower Extremity Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT and 50m Freestyle Swimming Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül YAPICI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between 50mt freestyle swimming performance and lower extremity Wingate anaerobic power and capacity test. 11 male (age: 13.45 ± 1.0 3 years, height: 166.18 ± 10.12 cm, weight: 55.00 ± 11.13 kg, experience: 6.2 ± 1.1 years swimmers participated in this study voluntarily. The players participated in anthropometric measurements followed by Wingate anaerobic test on the first day. They p erformed 50mt freestyle swimming performance tests on the second day (one days later. In this study, 50mt freestyle swimming performance has not been done from a standart jump. All the swimmers started their performance in the water with a 2 - leg - ged push away from the wall. Also 10mt lap periods were recorded. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Correlation between anaerobic performance tests and swimming performance tests were studied with Pearson correlation analysis. All analysis were exec uted in SPSS 17.0 and the statistical significance was set at p 0.05. The statistically s ignificant relationship between f atigue index and relative average power, relative minumum peak power and minumum peak power (p0.05. On looking at the relationship between the 10 mt lap period time in swimming and wingate anaerobic test performance, a statistically s ignificant relationship between both relative and absolute values maximum swimming speed and paek power, average speed swimming and average power, minimum swimming speed and minumum power (p0.05. The factors like experience, the level of profession, the difference of fricton between activities in water and land, air conditions (moisture, temperature may have effected the re sults.

  5. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Papoti; Ricardo Vitório; Gustavo Gomes Araújo; Luiz Eduardo Barreto Martins; Sérgio Augusto Cunha; Claudio Alexandre Gobatto

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit) with lactate threshold (LLNA) and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max) in tethered swimming (TS), and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400) and 30-min (VT30) freestyle swimming (FS). Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F) corresp...

  6. Freestyle-Like V-Y Flaps of the Eyebrow: A New Outlook and Indication of an Historical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Alberto Leto Barone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The eyebrow region is of utmost importance for facial movement, symmetry, and the overall cosmetic appearance of the face. Trauma or tumor resection often leave scars that may dislocate the eyebrow producing an alteration both in static symmetry of the face and in the dynamic expressivity. The authors present a technique for eyebrow’s defects repair using the remaining eyebrow advancement by means of a “freestyle-like” V-Y flap. In the past two years a total of eight consecutive patients underwent excision of skin lesions in the superciliary region and immediate reconstruction with this technique. On histology, six patients were affected from basal cell carcinomas, one from squamous cell carcinoma, and one from congenital intradermal melanocytic nevus. The pedicle of the flap included perforators from the supratrochlear, supraorbital, or superficial temporalis artery. Advancement of the entire aesthetic subunit that includes the eyebrow using a V-Y perforator flap was performed successfully in all cases achieving full, tension-free closure of defects up to 3.0 cm. “Freestyle-like” V-Y flaps should be considered as a first-line choice for partial defects of the eyebrow. The greater mobility compared to random subcutaneous flaps allows to reconstruct large defects providing an excellent cosmetic result.

  7. Effects of 2 Types of Activation Protocols Based on Postactivation Potentiation on 50-m Freestyle Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-Fernández, Francisco; Ruiz-Teba, Ana; López-Contreras, Gracia; Arellano, Raúl

    2018-06-14

    Cuenca-Fernández, F, Ruiz-Teba, A, López-Contreras, G, and Arellano, R. Effects of 2 types of activation protocols based on postactivation potentiation on 50-m freestyle performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is a phenomenon which improves muscle contractility, strength, and speed in sporting performances through previously applied maximal or submaximal loads on the muscle system. This study aimed to assess the effects of 2 types of activation protocols based on PAP, on sprint swimming performance. A repeated-measures design was used to compare 3 different scenarios before a 50-m race. First, all of the participants performed a standard warm-up (SWU), consisting of a 400-m swim followed by dynamic stretching. This protocol acted as the control. Subsequently, the swimmers were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the swimmers in the first group performed the SWU followed by a PAP one-repetition maximum warm-up (RMWU), consisting of 3 "lunge" and 3 "arm stroke" repetitions, both at 85% of the one-repetition maximum. The swimmers in the second group performed the SWU followed by a PAP eccentric flywheel warm-up (EWU), consisting of one set of 4 repetitions of exercises of both the lower and upper limbs on an adapted eccentric flywheel at the maximal voluntary contraction. The time required for the swimmers to swim 5 and 10 m was shorter with the PAP protocols. The swimming velocity of the swimmers who underwent the EWU and RMWU protocols was faster at 5 and 10 m. The best total swimming time was not influenced by any of the protocols. When isolating swimming (excluding start performance and turn), best time was achieved with the SWU and RMWU compared with EWU (SWU: 20.86 ± 0.95 seconds; EWU: 21.25 ± 1.12 seconds; RMWU: 20.97 ± 1.22 seconds). In conclusion, a warm-up based on PAP protocols might exert an influence on performance in the first meters of a 50-m race. Nevertheless, other factors, such as fatigue, could

  8. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit with lactate threshold (LLNA and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max in tethered swimming (TS, and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400 and 30-min (VT30 freestyle swimming (FS. Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F corresponding to 87%, 104%, 118% and 134% of iVO2max for the calculation of time limits (Tlim. Fcrit corresponded to the linear coefficient of the ratio between F and 1/tlim. The maximal performance in FS corresponded to the mean velocity obtained during maximal exercise of 400-m and 30-min crawl swimming. Fcrit (51.97 ± 4.02 N was significantly lower than iVO2max (60.21 ± 8.73 N but not than LLNA (45.89 ± 8.73. Fcrit was significantly correlated with iVO2max (0.97, LLNA (0.88, V400 (0.85, and VT30 (0.86. These data suggest that Fcrit can be used for the determination of aerobic capacity, prescription of a TS training program, and prediction of performance in FS.

  9. Detection of hypoglycemia with continuous interstitial and traditional blood glucose monitoring using the FreeStyle Navigator Continuous Glucose Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarraugh, Geoffrey; Bergenstal, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the analysis was to compare detection of hypoglycemic episodes (glucose 15 min) with the FreeStyle Navigator Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (FSN-CGM) (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) alarms to detection with traditional finger stick testing at an average frequency of eight tests per day. The performance of FSN-CGM alarms was evaluated in a clinic setting using 58 subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) monitoring interstitial glucose concentration over a 5-day period compared to reference YSI measurements (instrument manufactured by YSI, Yellow Springs, OH) at 15-min intervals. Finger stick glucose testing was evaluated in the home environment with 91 subjects with TIDM monitoring with the blood glucose meter integrated into the FreeStyle Navigator (FSN-BG) over a 20-day period. The reference was FSN-CGM with results masked from the subjects. Blood glucose values glucose was <= 85 mg/dL 77.2% of the time. In the home environment, the average FSN-BG testing frequency was 7.9 tests per day. Hypoglycemia was verified within +/- 30 min by FSN-BG measurements <= 85 mg/dL at a rate of 27.5%. Even with a high rate of FSN-BG testing, hypoglycemia detected by FSN-CGM was verified by patients with T1DM very infrequently. A high rate of hypoglycemia detection with a moderate rate of unnecessary alarms can be attained using FSN-CGM.

  10. Comparison of the clinical information provided by the FreeStyle Navigator continuous interstitial glucose monitor versus traditional blood glucose readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarraugh, Geoffrey V; Clarke, William L; Kovatchev, Boris P

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the analysis was to compare the clinical utility of data from traditional self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) to that of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). A clinical study of the clinical accuracy of the FreeStyle Navigator CGM System (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA), which includes SMBG capabilities, was conducted by comparison to the YSI blood glucose analyzer (YSI Inc., Yellow Springs, OH) using 58 subjects with type 1 diabetes. The Continuous Glucose-Error Grid Analysis (CG-EGA) was used as the analytical tool. Using CG-EGA, the "clinically accurate," "benign errors," and "clinical errors" were 86.8%, 8.7%, and 4.5% for SMBG and 92.7%, 3.7%, and 3.6% for CGM, respectively. If blood glucose is viewed as a process in time, SMBG would provide accurate information about this process 86.8% of the time, whereas CGM would provide accurate information about this process 92.7% of the time (P glucose values than CGM, control of blood glucose involves a system in flux, and CGM provides more detailed insight into the dynamics of that system. In the normal and elevated glucose ranges, the additional information about the direction and rate of glucose change provided by the FreeStyle Navigator CGM System increases the ability to make correct clinical decisions when compared to episodic SMBG tests.

  11. Experience with FreeStyle Libre Flash glucose monitoring system in management of refractory dumping syndrome in pregnancy shortly after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Novodvorsky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is an effective therapy for obesity but is associated with long-term complications such as dumping syndromes and nutritional deficiencies. We report a case of a 26-year-old caucasian female, with history of morbid obesity and gestational diabetes (GDM, who became pregnant 4 months after Roux-en-Y bypass surgery. She developed GDM during subsequent pregnancy, which was initially managed with metformin and insulin. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia causing sleep disturbance and daytime somnolence occured at 19 weeks of pregnancy (19/40. Treatment with rapid-acting carbohydrates precipitated further hypoglycaemia. Laboratory investigations confirmed hypoglycaemia at 2.2 mmol/L with appropriately low insulin and C-peptide, intact HPA axis and negative IgG insulin antibodies. The patient was seen regularly by the bariatric dietetic team but concerns about compliance persisted. A FreeStyle Libre system was used from 21/40 enabling the patient a real-time feedback of changes in interstitial glucose following high or low GI index food intake. The patient declined a trial of acarbose but consented to an intraveneous dextrose infusion overnight resulting in improvement but not complete abolishment of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemias subsided at 34/40 and metformin and insulin had to be re-introduced due to high post-prandial blood glucose readings. An emergency C-section was indicated at 35 + 1/40 and a small-for-gestational-age female was delivered. There have been no further episodes of hypoglycaemia following delivery. This case illustrates challenges in the management of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first use of FreeStyle Libre in dumping syndrome in pregnancy following bariatric surgery with troublesome nocturnal hypoglycaemia.

  12. Effect of self-paced active recovery and passive recovery on blood lactate removal following a 200 m freestyle swimming trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota MR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Márcio Rabelo Mota,1,2 Renata Aparecida Elias Dantas,1,2 Iransé Oliveira-Silva,2 Marcelo Magalhães Sales,2,3 Rafael da Costa Sotero,2 Patrícia Espíndola Mota Venâncio,2 Jairo Teixeira Júnior,2 Sandro Nobre Chaves,4 Filipe Dinato de Lima4 1College of Education and Health Sciences, University Center of Brasília – UniCEUB, Brasília, 2College of Physical Education, UniEVANGÉLICA, Anápolis, Goiás, 3College of Physical Education, Universidade Estadual de Goiás - UEG, Quirinópolis, Goiás, 4College of Physical Education, University of Brasília – UnB, Brasília, Brazil Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of self-paced active recovery (AR and passive recovery (PR on blood lactate removal following a 200 m freestyle swimming trial. Patients and methods: Fourteen young swimmers (with a training frequency of 6–8 sessions per week performed two maximal 200 m freestyle trials followed by 15 minutes of different recovery methods, on separate days. Recovery was performed with 15 minutes of passive rest or 5 minutes of passive rest and 10 minutes of self-paced AR. Performance variables (trial velocity and time, recovery variables (distance covered and AR velocity, and physiological variables (blood lactate production, blood lactate removal, and removal velocity were assessed and compared. Results: There was no difference between trial times in both conditions (PR: 125.86±7.92 s; AR: 125.71±8.21 s; p=0.752. AR velocity was 69.10±3.02% of 200 m freestyle trial velocity in AR. Blood lactate production was not different between conditions (PR: 8.82±2.47 mmol L−1; AR: 7.85±2.05 mmol L−1; p=0.069. However, blood lactate removal was higher in AR (PR: 1.76±1.70 mmol L−1; AR: 4.30±1.74 mmol L−1; p<0.001. The velocity of blood lactate removal was significantly higher in AR (PR: 0.18±0.17 mmol L−1 min−1; AR: 0.43±0.17 mmol L−1 min−1; p<0.001. Conclusion: Self-paced AR shows a higher velocity of blood

  13. Freestyle swimming technique variations using a parachute Variaciones en la técnica de crol durante el nado resistido con paracaídas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. García

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The appearance of new assistance materials like the parachute make it necessary for coaches to know about the impact that such devices have in swimming. To study this theme 16 national and international swimmers between 19 and 24 years old have been selected. The swimmers participated in four tests that consisted in freestyle (crawl stroke swimming for 10 and 45 seconds at maximum intensity, both with and without the parachute. These tests analysed stroke frequency and stroke length. A within-subjects design has been applied and a study of the facts has been made with an AVAR with repeat measures. The results indicate that the stroke frequency decreases (p<0.05 in the parachute swim during the 10 and 45 second tests, compared with the normal swim. It was also observed that the stroke frequency is higher (p<0.01 in the 10 second test than in the 45 second test. The stroke length is higher (p<0.01 in the normal swim test than in the parachute test. With respect to the swim periods of time, the stroke length is higher (p<0.01 in the 45 second test than in the 10 second test. The parachute swim produces important changes in stroke frequency and stroke length in both the 10 and 45 second tests in subjects swimming the freestyle at maximum intensity.
    KEY WORDS: swimming, swim resistance, parachute, crawl, freestyle,. stroke frequency, stroke length.

    La aparición de nuevos materiales auxiliares, como el paracaídas, hace necesario que los entrenadores conozcan las modificaciones que estos producen durante el nado. Para conseguir este objetivo se seleccionaron a 16 nadadores de nivel nacional e internacional comprendidos entre los 19 y 24 años. Éstos realizaron cuatro pruebas que consistieron en nadar a crol durante 10 y 45 segundos a máxima intensidad, utilizando el nado normal (NN y el nado resistido con paracaídas (NRCP. En estas pruebas se analizaron las variables

  14. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n1p14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papoti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit with lactate threshold (LLNA and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max in tethered swimming (TS, and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400 and 30-min (VT30 freestyle swimming (FS. Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F corresponding to 87%, 104%, 118% and 134% of iVO2max for the calculation of time limits (Tlim. Fcrit corresponded to the linear coefficient of the ratio between F and 1/tlim. The maximal performance in FS corresponded to the mean velocity obtained during maximal exercise of 400-m and 30-min crawl swimming. Fcrit (51.97 ± 4.02 N was significantly lower than iVO2max (60.21 ± 8.73 N but not than LLNA (45.89 ± 8.73. Fcrit was significantly correlated with iVO2max (0.97, LLNA (0.88, V400 (0.85, and VT30 (0.86. These data suggest that Fcrit can be used for the determination of aerobic capacity, prescription of a TS training program, and prediction of performance in FS.

  15. Relationship Between Final Performance and Block Times with the Traditional and the New Starting Platforms with A Back Plate in International Swimming Championship 50-M and 100-M Freestyle Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Garcia-Hermoso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between block time and final performance for each sex in 50-m and 100-m individual freestyle, distinguishing between classification (1st to 3rd, 4th to 8th, 9th to 16th and type of starting platform (old and new in international competitions. Twenty-six international competitions covering a 13-year period (2000-2012 were analysed retrospectively. The data corresponded to a total of 1657 swimmers’ competition histories. A two-way ANOVA (sex x classification was performed for each event and starting platform with the Bonferroni post-hoc test, and another two-way ANOVA for sex and starting platform (sex x starting platform. Pearson’s simple correlation coefficient was used to determine correlations between the block time and the final performance. Finally, a simple linear regression analysis was done between the final time and the block time for each sex and platform. The men had shorter starting block times than the women in both events and from both platforms. For 50-m event, medalists had shorter block times than semi- finalists with the old starting platforms. Block times were directly related to performance with the old starting platforms. With the new starting platforms, however, the relationship was inverse, notably in the women’s 50-m event. The block time was related for final performance in the men’s 50- m event with the old starting platform, but with the new platform it was critical only for the women’s 50-m event.

  16. Relationship Between Final Performance and Block Times with the Traditional and the New Starting Platforms with A Back Plate in International Swimming Championship 50-M and 100-M Freestyle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Antonio; Escalante, Yolanda; Arellano, Raul; Navarro, Fernando; Domínguez, Ana M.; Saavedra, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between block time and final performance for each sex in 50-m and 100-m individual freestyle, distinguishing between classification (1st to 3rd, 4th to 8th, 9th to 16th) and type of starting platform (old and new) in international competitions. Twenty-six international competitions covering a 13-year period (2000-2012) were analysed retrospectively. The data corresponded to a total of 1657 swimmers’ competition histories. A two-way ANOVA (sex x classification) was performed for each event and starting platform with the Bonferroni post-hoc test, and another two-way ANOVA for sex and starting platform (sex x starting platform). Pearson’s simple correlation coefficient was used to determine correlations between the block time and the final performance. Finally, a simple linear regression analysis was done between the final time and the block time for each sex and platform. The men had shorter starting block times than the women in both events and from both platforms. For 50-m event, medalists had shorter block times than semi- finalists with the old starting platforms. Block times were directly related to performance with the old starting platforms. With the new starting platforms, however, the relationship was inverse, notably in the women’s 50-m event. The block time was related for final performance in the men’s 50- m event with the old starting platform, but with the new platform it was critical only for the women’s 50-m event. Key Points The men had shorter block times than the women in both events and with both platforms. For both distances, the swimmers had shorter block times in their starts from the new starting platform with a back plate than with the old platform. For the 50-m event with the old starting platform, the medalists had shorter block times than the semi-finalists. The new starting platform block time was only determinant in the women’s 50-m event. In order to improve

  17. Individualization program training in freestyle wrestling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Latyshev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study - the development and verification of the effectiveness of the program individualization of training fighters. The program aims at the establishment of individual style confrontation wrestlers. The experiment involved two groups of fighters: experimental (21 fighter and control group (30 wrestlers, aged 16-17 years. Duration of the experiment was 2.5 years. Model profiles of each of the typical style of confrontation included anthropometry, physical and psychological indicators. The coefficients of correlation between the profile of preparedness wrestler and model profiles of each of the typical style of warfare. The maximum correlation coefficient showed a predisposition to certain typical fighter style confrontation. Found that most of the fighters have a moderate degree of conformity to one of the typical styles of warfare.

  18. Between Formula and Freestyle. Nicolai Abildgaard and Eighteenth-Century Painting Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filtenborg, Troels; Vila Espuna, Anna

    As the most important Danish history painter, Nicolai Abildgaard (1743-1809) worked in a century that saw marked shifts in the styles of painting, from the late Baroque via Rococo to Neoclassicism, as well as the emergence of art academies throughout Europe as the prevalent factor in the training...

  19. The Internal Pudendal Artery Perforator Thigh Flap: A New Freestyle Pedicle Flap for the Ischial Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Hashimoto, MD

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: The perforator vessels of the internal pudendal artery are very close to the ischial tuberosity. Blood flow to the flap is reliable when careful debridement of the pressure sore is performed. The iPap thigh flap is a new option for soft-tissue defects in the ischial region, including ischial pressure sores.

  20. 75 FR 77878 - Determination of Regulatory Review Period for Purposes of Patent Extension; FREESTYLE NAVIGATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    .... Patent No. 5,262,035) from Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., and the Patent and Trademark Office requested FDA's... diabetes mellitus for the purpose of improving diabetes management. Subsequent to this approval, the Patent...

  1. Analysis of the lateral push-off in the freestyle flip turn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Luciana; Pereira, Suzana; Gatti, Roberta; Freitas, Elinai; Jacomel, Gabriel; Roesler, Helio; Villas-Boas, Joao

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contact phase during the lateral push-off in the turn of front crawl swimming to determine which biomechanical variables (maximum normalized peak force, contact time, impulse, angle of knee flexion, and total turn time within 15 m) contribute to the performance of this turn technique. Thirty-four swimmers of state, national, and international competitive standard participated in the study. For data collection, the following equipment was used: an underwater force platform, a 30-Hz VHS video camera, and a MiniDv digital camera within an underwater box. Data are expressed as descriptive statistics. Inferential analyses were performed using Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regressions. All variables studied had a significant relationship with turn performance. We conclude that a turn executed with a knee flexion angle of between 100° and 120° provides optimum peak forces to generate impulses that allow the swimmer to lose less time in the turn without the need for an excessive force application and with less energy lost.

  2. Exertion of forces by children performing a free-style jump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, C.C.M.; Visser, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This research project focuses on the force characteristics and force/time relationships of loads exerted by jumping children. The current study is an experimental research into children jumping on both hard and soft substrates. The hard substrate is obtained by using a force plate. For the soft

  3. Land of a Couple of Dances: Global and Local Influences on Freestyle Play in Dance Dance Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces successful and unsuccessful attempts to shape the meanings of the video game Dance Dance Revolution, specifically with reference to what "dancing" means in this context, as the game moves between various interested parties - game developers, players, Internet forum participants, and other media producers. Drawing on Actor-Network Theory and the network analyses of Manuel Castells, the paper reconstructs the forces shaping players' stylistic decisions through an analysis of dance game machines and software, and of a single forum thread on DDRFreak.com, a major website in the dance game community. The paper asks who decides how DDR players dance and at what times? Are the decisions about play made in the development meeting, the arcade, competitions, online or around the home console? Globally, how do some regions or groups emerge as experts or leaders in play style? Analysis indicates that within the United States, Californian players from major cities dominate discussion, supported by the global flows of people, resources, and capital through the state. The dominant players support their stated norms for play through recourse to mainstream conceptions of masculinity, rap music and associated styles of dance.

  4. High-risk Trans-Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Failed Freestyle Valve with Low Coronary Height: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Dibu, George; Beaver, Thomas M; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-06-01

    A 55-year-old male with a history of two prior cardiac surgeries presented with decompensated heart failure due to severe bioprosthetic aortic valve insufficiency. A third operation was viewed prohibitively high risk and valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was considered. There were however several high-risk features and technically challenging aspects including low coronary ostia height, poor visualization of the aortic sinuses, and difficulty in identification of the coplanar view due to severe aortic insufficiency, and a highly mobile aortic valve mass. After meticulous peri-procedural planning, trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was carried out with a SAPIEN 3 balloon-expandable valve without any complication. Strategies undertaken to navigate the technically challenging aspects of the case are discussed.

  5. High-risk Trans-Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Failed Freestyle Valve with Low Coronary Height: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Dibu, George; Beaver, Thomas M.; Bavry, Anthony A.

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old male with a history of two prior cardiac surgeries presented with decompensated heart failure due to severe bioprosthetic aortic valve insufficiency. A third operation was viewed prohibitively high risk and valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was considered. There were however several high-risk features and technically challenging aspects including low coronary ostia height, poor visualization of the aortic sinuses, and difficulty in identification of the copl...

  6. Peak career in world-ranked swimmers: Age’s analysis of 2008 Beijing Olympic Games participants

    OpenAIRE

    Tiago M. Barbosa; Mário J. Costa; Erik Mejias; Daniel A. Marinho; Hugo Louro; António J. Silva

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to: (i) describe the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games swimmer’s ages and; (ii) compare ages according to swimmer’s gender. It was analyzed 1101 inscriptions (588 men and 513 women) for all swimming events held at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games: 50 meters freestyle (L50), 100 meters freestyle (L100), 200 meters freestyle (L200), 400 meters freestyle (L400), 800 meters freestyle (L800, only women) 1500 meters freestyle (L1500, only men), 100 meters backstroke (C100), 200 met...

  7. Análise dos parâmetros cinemáticos determinantes do desempenho na prova de 200 m nado livre Analysis of the determinant kinematical parameters for performance in the 200-m freestyle swimming event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo foram: i caracterizar o nado submáximo e máximo do ponto de vista cinemático; ii verificar a influência das variáveis cinemáticas na prova máxima de 200 metros crawl. Nove nadadores de elite nacionais realizaram dois testes: um submáximo, descontínuo de intensidade progressiva; outro máximo, que consistiu em uma simulação de uma prova de 200 m crawl. Foram estudados os parâmetros cinemáticos gerais da mecânica da braçada, a duração de cada fase do ciclo gestual, a velocidade do centro de massa e a variação intracíclica da velocidade horizontal. Verificaram-se diferenças cinemáticas significativas da frequência gestual, velocidade de deslocamento do centro de massa, duração total do ciclo gestual, duração da ação subaquática propulsora e da velocidade do centro de massa na fase de recuperação entre os testes. Identificou-se associações significativas entre o teste máximo e algumas variáveis cinemáticas como a velocidade do centro de massa e índice de nado.The main aims of this study were i to perform a kinematic characterization of sub and maximal swimming speed; ii to investigate the associations between the kinematic profiles and the 200 m front crawl style. Nine national level male swimmers performed two speed tests: a submaximal discontinuous speed trial of progressive speed intensity, and a maximal one, simulating a 200 m front crawl style. The stroke general kinematic parameters, the phases duration of the stroke cycle, the velocity of the centre of mass and the intra cyclic variation of the horizontal velocity were herein studied. Significant kinematic differences in relation to stroke rate, horizontal velocity of the centre of mass, total cycle duration, absolute and relative duration of the propulsive sub aquatic action and the velocity of the centre of mass during the arms recovery were compared between the speed tests. Significant correlations between the performance in the maximal speed and some kinematic variables were observed.

  8. Hygroscopicity of secondary organic aerosols formed by oxidation of cycloalkenes, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and related compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Varutbangkul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments has been conducted in the Caltech indoor smog chamber facility to investigate the water uptake properties of aerosol formed by oxidation of various organic precursors. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA from simple and substituted cycloalkenes (C5-C8 is produced in dark ozonolysis experiments in a dry chamber (RH~5%. Biogenic SOA from monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and oxygenated terpenes is formed by photooxidation in a humid chamber (~50% RH. Using the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA, we measure the diameter-based hygroscopic growth factor (GF of the SOA as a function of time and relative humidity. All SOA studied is found to be slightly hygroscopic, with smaller water uptake than that of typical inorganic aerosol substances. The aerosol water uptake increases with time early in the experiments for the cycloalkene SOA, but decreases with time for the sesquiterpene SOA. This behavior could indicate competing effects between the formation of more highly oxidized polar compounds (more hygroscopic, and formation of longer-chained oligomers (less hygroscopic. All SOA also exhibit a smooth water uptake with RH with no deliquescence or efflorescence. The water uptake curves are found to be fitted well with an empirical three-parameter functional form. The measured pure organic GF values at 85% RH are between 1.09–1.16 for SOA from ozonolysis of cycloalkenes, 1.01–1.04 for sesquiterpene photooxidation SOA, and 1.06–1.10 for the monoterpene and oxygenated terpene SOA. The GF of pure SOA (GForg in experiments in which inorganic seed aerosol is used is determined by assuming volume-weighted water uptake (Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson or 'ZSR' approach and using the size-resolved organic mass fraction measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Knowing the water content associated with the inorganic fraction yields GForg values. However, for each precursor, the GForg values computed from different

  9. Peak career in world-ranked swimmers: Age’s analysis of 2008 Beijing Olympic Games participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago M. Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to: (i describe the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games swimmer’s ages and; (ii compare ages according to swimmer’s gender. It was analyzed 1101 inscriptions (588 men and 513 women for all swimming events held at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games: 50 meters freestyle (L50, 100 meters freestyle (L100, 200 meters freestyle (L200, 400 meters freestyle (L400, 800 meters freestyle (L800, only women 1500 meters freestyle (L1500, only men, 100 meters backstroke (C100, 200 meters backstroke (C200, 100 meters breaststroke (B100, 200 meters breaststroke (B200, 100 meters butterfly (M100, 200 meters butterfly (M200. The final result lists was consulted at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games official internet site, collecting the swimmer’s name and chronological age for each event. Afterwards, chronological age was converted into decimal age at the day of the event heats. From the quartile analysis became clear that there was a tendency for the age median and variance to decrease from the shorter to the longest events for both genders. There were significant variations in the age, according to gender at the L400 ( p = .01, L1500/L800 ( p = .02, C100 ( p < .01, C200 ( p < .01, B100 ( p = .02, B200 ( p = .04, M100 ( p = .05 and M200 ( p < .01. For all these events, decimal age was higher for men than for women.

  10. Accuracy evaluation of five blood glucose monitoring systems obtained from the pharmacy: a European multicenter study with 453 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Cornelius; Pohlmeier, Harald; Behnke, Thomas; Schmid, Volkmar; Grenningloh, Marco; Forst, Thomas; Pfützner, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    This multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the performance of five recently introduced blood glucose (BG) monitoring (BGM) devices under daily routine conditions in comparison with the YSI (Yellow Springs, OH) 2300 Stat Plus glucose analyzer. Five hundred one diabetes patients with experience in self-monitoring of BG were randomized to use three of five different BGM devices (FreeStyle Lite® [Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., Alameda, CA], FreeStyle Freedom Lite [Abbott Diabetes Care], OneTouch® UltraEasy® [LifeScan Inc., Milpitas, CA], Accu-Chek® Aviva [Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany], and Contour® [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany]) in a daily routine setting. All devices and strips were purchased from local regular distribution sources (pharmacies, four strip lots per device). The patients performed the finger prick and the glucose measurement on their own. In parallel, a healthcare professional performed the glucose assessment with the reference method (YSI 2300 Stat Plus). The primary objective was the comparison of the mean absolute relative differences (MARD). Secondary objectives were compliance with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria under these routine conditions and Clarke and Parkes Error Grid analyses. MARD ranged from 4.9% (FreeStyle Lite) to 9.7% (OneTouch UltraEasy). The ISO 15197:2003 requirements were fulfilled by the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%), FreeStyle Freedom Lite (97.5%), and Accu-Chek Aviva (97.0%), but not by the Contour (92.4%) and OneTouch UltraEasy (91.1%). The number of values in Zone A of the Clarke Error Grid analysis was highest for the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%) and lowest for the OneTouch Ultra Easy (90.4%). FreeStyle Lite, FreeStyle Freedom Lite, and Accu-Chek Aviva performed very well in this study with devices and strips purchased through regular distribution channels, with the FreeStyle Lite achieving the lowest MARD in this investigation.

  11. The impact of note taking style and note availability at retrieval on mock jurors' recall and recognition of trial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Craig; Baxter, Rebecca E; Lorek, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Jurors forget critical trial information and what they do recall can be inaccurate. Jurors' recall of trial information can be enhanced by permitting them to take notes during a trial onto blank sheets of paper (henceforth called freestyle note taking). A recent innovation is the trial-ordered-notebook (TON) for jurors, which is a notebook containing headings outlining the trial proceedings and which has space beneath each heading for notes. In a direct comparison, TON note takers recalled more trial information than freestyle note takers. This study investigated whether or not note taking improves recall as a result of enhanced encoding or as a result of note access at retrieval. To assess this, mock jurors watched and freely recalled a trial video with one-fifth taking no notes, two-fifths taking freestyle notes and two-fifths using TONs. During retrieval, half of the freestyle and TON note takers could access their notes. Note taking enhanced recall, with the freestyle note takers and TON note takers without note access performing equally as well. Note taking therefore enhances encoding. Recall was greatest for the TON note takers with note access, suggesting a retrieval enhancement unique to this condition. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Injuries among World Cup ski and snowboard athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flørenes, T W; Nordsletten, L; Heir, S; Bahr, R

    2012-02-01

    There is little information available on injuries to World Cup skiers and snowboarders. The aim of this study was to describe and compare the injury risk to World Cup athletes in alpine skiing, freestyle skiing, snowboarding, ski jumping, Nordic combined and cross country skiing. We performed retrospective interviews with the International Ski Federation (FIS) World Cup athletes from selected nations during the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 winter seasons and recorded all acute injuries occurring during the seasons. We interviewed 2121 athletes and recorded 705 injuries. There were 520 (72%) time-loss injuries and 196 (28%) severe injuries (absence >28 days). In freestyle skiing, alpine skiing and snowboarding, there were 27.6, 29.8 and 37.8 time-loss and 14.4, 11.3 and 13.8 severe injuries per 100 athletes per season, respectively. In Nordic combined, ski jumping and cross country skiing, there were 15.8, 13.6 and 6.3 time-loss and 3.3, 5.6 and 0.7 severe injuries per 100 athletes per season, respectively. In conclusion about 1/3 of the World Cup alpine, freestyle and snowboard athletes sustain a time-loss injury each season, while the risk is low in the Nordic disciplines. A particular concern was the high proportion of severe injuries observed among alpine, freestyle and snowboard athletes, which is in contrast to most other sports. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Sex differences in elite swimming with advanced age are less than marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senefeld, J; Joyner, M J; Stevens, A; Hunter, S K

    2016-01-01

    The sex difference in marathon performance increases with finishing place and age of the runner but whether this occurs among swimmers is unknown. The purpose was to compare sex differences in swimming velocity across world record place (1st-10th), age group (25-89 years), and event distance. We also compared sex differences between freestyle swimming and marathon running. The world's top 10 swimming times of both sexes for World Championship freestyle stroke, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly events and the world's top 10 marathon times in 5-year age groups were obtained. Men were faster than women for freestyle (12.4 ± 4.2%), backstroke (12.8 ± 3.0%), and breaststroke (14.5 ± 3.2%), with the greatest sex differences for butterfly (16.7 ± 5.5%). The sex difference in swimming velocity increased across world record place for freestyle (P swimming (P swimming increased with world record place and age, but was less than for marathon running. Collectively, these results suggest more depth in women's swimming than marathon running. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pop / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest : Elton John "Songs From The West Coast". The Cranberries "Wake Up And Smell The Coffee". The White Stripes "White Blood Cells". Ozzy Osbourne "Down To Earth". Erinevad esitajad ". Hut Recordings 1991-2001". Freestylers "Pressure Point". David Bowie "Original Soundtrack: Christiane F. Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo"

  15. Turundustegu 2005 finalistid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Ekspertžürii poolt välja valitud finalistide - Diil, EMT, Eesti Päevaleht, Freestyle, NPNK - turundusstrateegiate tutvustused. Lisa: [Aasta Turundusteo konkursi esimeses voorus osalenud]. Kommenteerivad Agne Vilt, Ranno Pajuri, Jüri Kaljundi ja Mihkel Reinsalu

  16. Tants / Eduard Tido, Janika Sarantshina ; interv. Mel Shiffer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tido, Eduard

    2007-01-01

    Oma harrastusest räägivad hip-hop tantsijad Eduard Tido, Janika Sharantshina, Eva Ottas, show-tantsija Helen Randmäe, club freestyle autor Monika Tuvi, dance hall'i maaletooja Helen Lõhmus ja breikar Marek Vetik

  17. Accuracy and reliability of continuous glucose monitoring systems: a head-to-head comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijf, Yoeri M.; Mader, Julia K.; Doll, Werner; Pieber, Thomas; Farret, Anne; Place, Jerome; Renard, Eric; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Filippi, Alessio; Avogaro, Angelo; Arnolds, Sabine; Benesch, Carsten; Heinemann, Lutz; DeVries, J. Hans

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the accuracy and reliability of three continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. We studied the Animas® (West Chester, PA) Vibe™ with Dexcom® (San Diego, CA) G4™ version A sensor (G4A), the Abbott Diabetes Care (Alameda, CA) Freestyle® Navigator I (NAV), and the Medtronic

  18. caCORE: a common infrastructure for cancer informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covitz, Peter A; Hartel, Frank; Schaefer, Carl; De Coronado, Sherri; Fragoso, Gilberto; Sahni, Himanso; Gustafson, Scott; Buetow, Kenneth H

    2003-12-12

    Sites with substantive bioinformatics operations are challenged to build data processing and delivery infrastructure that provides reliable access and enables data integration. Locally generated data must be processed and stored such that relationships to external data sources can be presented. Consistency and comparability across data sets requires annotation with controlled vocabularies and, further, metadata standards for data representation. Programmatic access to the processed data should be supported to ensure the maximum possible value is extracted. Confronted with these challenges at the National Cancer Institute Center for Bioinformatics, we decided to develop a robust infrastructure for data management and integration that supports advanced biomedical applications. We have developed an interconnected set of software and services called caCORE. Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) provide controlled vocabulary, dictionary and thesaurus services. The Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR) provides a metadata registry for common data elements. Cancer Bioinformatics Infrastructure Objects (caBIO) implements an object-oriented model of the biomedical domain and provides Java, Simple Object Access Protocol and HTTP-XML application programming interfaces. caCORE has been used to develop scientific applications that bring together data from distinct genomic and clinical science sources. caCORE downloads and web interfaces can be accessed from links on the caCORE web site (http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/core). caBIO software is distributed under an open source license that permits unrestricted academic and commercial use. Vocabulary and metadata content in the EVS and caDSR, respectively, is similarly unrestricted, and is available through web applications and FTP downloads. http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/core/publications contains links to the caBIO 1.0 class diagram and the caCORE 1.0 Technical Guide, which provide detailed information on the present caCORE architecture

  19. Is the side with the best masticatory performance selected for chewing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-Lastra, Bernat; Flores-Orozco, Elan Ignacio; Salsench, Juan; Peraire, Maria; Martinez-Gomis, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the degree of relationship between masticatory laterality and lateral asymmetry of masticatory performance using silicon pieces enclosed in a latex bag. Forty-two young adults with natural dentition participated in this cross-sectional, observational study. They performed four different masticatory assays, each consisting of five trials of chewing three pieces of silicon for 20 cycles. In one assay, they were asked to masticate unbagged silicon free-style, whilst in the three other assays they were asked to masticate bagged silicon free-style, unilaterally on the right-hand side and unilaterally on the left-hand side. The preferred chewing side was determined by calculating the asymmetry index for both the free-style assays. Masticatory performance was determined by sieving the silicon particles and the cycle duration was also recorded. Data were analysed using independent samples or paired t-test and linear regression. Masticatory function using the bagged silicon was similar to that using the unbagged silicon. A significant and positive relationship was observed between the preferred chewing side expressed as the asymmetry index and the side with better masticatory performance. Alternate unilateral chewers demonstrated better masticatory performance than unilateral chewers. However, when free-style and unilateral chewing were compared for each subject, unilateral chewing was found to be as efficient as - or even more efficient than - free-style chewing. There is a positive association between the preferred chewing side and the more efficient side. Alternate unilateral mastication per se does not promote better masticatory performance than consistently unilateral mastication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enabling remote access to projects in a large collaborative environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, V.F.; Balme, S.; Akpangny, H.S.; Iannone, F.; Strand, P.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force, a large number of software projects are made available to the task force members, including developers and end-users. This has been achieved through a combination of tools and technologies. The front-end is represented by a Java based portal system exposing a PHP project management system, GForge. These two applications are linked by a single sign-on mechanism, Shibboleth , and through secure HTTP request rewriting, where appropriate. Furthermore, the underlying storage facility is an OpenAFS distributed file system and the user base comes from both a network information server and an LDAP directory. Security mechanisms are those of a distributed system, with multiple access points and protocols used for reading and writing data. The present paper presents the challenges of integrating these different technologies and programming languages into a single, working, application presented to its users as a web portal. Chaining of the tools is explored through the user perspective, with an in-depth overview of the background transitions between the various systems involved with regard to security requirements for the front-end nodes and the policies as seen by the users.

  1. Enabling remote access to projects in a large collaborative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, V. [INFLPR National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele (Romania); Balme, S. [CEA Cadarache, IRFM, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Iannonec, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Strand, P. [Department of Radio and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    In the context of the Integrated Tokamak Modeling Task Force, a large number of software projects are made available to the task force members, including developers and end-users. This has been achieved through a combination of tools and technologies. The front-end is represented by a Java based portal system exposing a PHP project management system, Gforge. These two applications are linked by a single sign-on mechanism, Shibboleth, and through secure HTTP request rewriting, where appropriate. Furthermore, the underlying storage facility is an OpenAFS distributed file system and the user base comes from both a network information server and an LDAP directory. Security mechanisms are those of a distributed system, with multiple access points and protocols used for reading and writing data. This document presents the challenges of integrating these different technologies and programming languages into a single, working, application presented to its users as a web portal. The chaining of the tools is explored through the user perspective, with an in-depth overview of the background transitions between the various systems involved with regard to security requirements for the front-end nodes and the policies as seen by the users. This document is composed of a poster and its abstract. (authors)

  2. Enabling remote access to projects in a large collaborative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, V.F., E-mail: pvf2005@gmail.co [Laser Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest 077125, Association EURATOM/MEdC (Romania); Balme, S.; Akpangny, H.S. [Association EURATOM CEA/IRFM CEA-Cadarache (France); Iannone, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R.ENEA Frascati, via E.Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Strand, P. [Department of Radio and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goteborg (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    In the context of the Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force, a large number of software projects are made available to the task force members, including developers and end-users. This has been achieved through a combination of tools and technologies. The front-end is represented by a Java based portal system exposing a PHP project management system, GForge. These two applications are linked by a single sign-on mechanism, Shibboleth , and through secure HTTP request rewriting, where appropriate. Furthermore, the underlying storage facility is an OpenAFS distributed file system and the user base comes from both a network information server and an LDAP directory. Security mechanisms are those of a distributed system, with multiple access points and protocols used for reading and writing data. The present paper presents the challenges of integrating these different technologies and programming languages into a single, working, application presented to its users as a web portal. Chaining of the tools is explored through the user perspective, with an in-depth overview of the background transitions between the various systems involved with regard to security requirements for the front-end nodes and the policies as seen by the users.

  3. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our...... experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. METHODS: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus...... perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. RESULTS: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted...

  4. Uus plaat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest Marillion "Marbles", "The Prodigy", Massive Attack "Danny The Dog", Metallica "Some Kind Of Monster", Rammstein "Reise, Reise", Ahlee Simpson "Autobiography", Robbie Williams "Greatest Hits", Freestyles "Rawas F**K", "Michael Moore: Fahrenheit 9/11", Marilyn Manson "Lest We Forget", Gregorian "the Dark Side", Kool & The Kang "The Hits", Dream Theater "Live At Budokan", Feist "Let It Die", Compay Segundo, depeche Mode "Remixes", Bryan Adams "Room Service", mark Knopfler "Shangri La", Alfie "Soundtrack", Brian Wilson "Smile"

  5. Passive Dynamics in the Control of Gymnastic Maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-01

    1992 and 1994 winter Olympics, the nal jump performed by the men’s champion freestyle skier was a quadruple twisting, triple somersault. In the per...ltd. The computation of the desired leg length depends upon knowledge of robot pa- rameters such as inertia and leg mass. However, since the process is...Accommodating Landing Time Errors A limitation of the tuck servo strategy is its dependence upon accurate knowledge of the time until landing. With somersault

  6. Start and turn performances of elite sprinters at the 2016 European Championships in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Jorge E; Marinho, Daniel A; Arellano, Raul; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2018-03-26

    The aim of this study was to examine the performance characteristics of male and female finalists in the 100-m distance at the 2016 European Championships in swimming (long-course-metre). The performances of all 64 (32-males and 32-females) were analysed (8 swimmers per event; Freestyle, Backstroke, Breaststroke and Butterfly). A set of start and turn parameters were analysed. In the start main outcome, male swimmers were faster in Butterfly (5.71 ± 0.14s) and females in Freestyle (6.68 ± 0.28s). In the turn main outcome, male and female swimmers were faster in Freestyle (males: 9.55 ± 0.13s; females: 10.78 ± 0.28s). A significant and strong stroke effect was noted in the start and turn main outcome, in both sexes. In the start plus the turn combined, males and females were faster in Freestyle (males: 15.40 ± 0.20s; females: 17.45 ± 0.54s). The start and the turn combined accounted almost one-third of the total race time in all events, and non-significant differences (p > 0.05) were noted across the four swim strokes. Once this research made evident the high relevance of start and turns, it is suggested that coaches and swimmers should dedicate an expressive portion of the training perfecting these actions.

  7. Technical-tactical and physiological demands of wrestling combats

    OpenAIRE

    Bianka Miarka

    2016-01-01

    Technical-tactical and physiological demand analyses of wrestling combats are important because they reveal essential information for the development of contextual training and specific physical preparation of wrestlers. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the characteristics of wrestling combats in freestyle, female and Greco-roman styles. The time-motion analysis presented in this article is the main component to carry out inferences on intensity and effort: pause ratio of comb...

  8. Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation of High Speed Backward Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-30

    Designed using Perform Pro , WHS/DIOR, Oct 94 KINEMATIC AND KINETIC EVALUATION OF HIGH SPEED BACKWARD RUNNING by ALAN WAYNE ARATA A DISSERTATION...Project Manager, Engineering Division, Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, 1983-86 AWARDS AND HONORS: All-American, 50yd Freestyle , 1979 Winner, Rocky...redirection #include <stdlib.h> // for exit #include <iomanip.h> // for set precision #include <string.h> // for string copy const int NUMPOINTS

  9. Biokinematic structure of techniques wrestlers during pre-basic training

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Sinіgovets

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of freestyle wrestlers. Experimentally investigated the structural elements of techniques during pre-basic training. The study involved 28 young fighters. Held video computer analysis techniques. Identified biomechanical characteristics defined kinematic structure of the temporal and spatial-temporal characteristics of the basic techniques. Shown variability of the individual phases of the basic techniques. Structural dynamics of the resulting velocities of the individ...

  10. Test results for the evaluation of a glucometer for use under hyperbaric conditions: Technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouras, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a recently developed equipment test method by assessing the safe and accurate functioning of the Abbott Optium FreeStyle H portable blood glucose monitor for use in the Alfred Hospital's hyperbaric chamber. The results of this study indicate that the test method can be used successfully to evaluate instruments and/or devices for use in the hyperbaric environment. The evaluation initially found that this particular glucose monitor contained a lithium battery which can be hazardous when used in the hyperbaric environment. However, upon further inspection it was determined the battery posed minimal risk for fire and explosion due to its small capacity and design application. The results indicate that the Abbott Optium FreeStyle H blood glucose monitor operated normally when used in the hyperbaric chamber. This glucometer was found to perform within the calibration specification requirements for accuracy at all stages of a typical hyperbaric treatment and as such the Abbott Optium FreeStyle H blood glucose monitor was deemed safe for use in the hyperbaric chamber at the Alfred Hospital. Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

  11. Influence of Competitive-Anxiety on Heart Rate Variability in Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Leonardo S; da Costa, Bruna D V; Paes, Pedro P; do Nascimento Júnior, José R A; Fiorese, Lenamar; Ferreira, Maria E C

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between competitive anxiety and heart rate variability (HRV) in swimming athletes. A total of 66 volunteers (41 male and 27 female) who swam the 400-m freestyle in the Brazilian Swimming Championships participated. Thirty minutes before the 400-m freestyle event, the athletes answered the Competitive Anxiety Inventory (CSAI-2R) questionnaire, then underwent anthropometric (body weight, height, and skinfold thickness) and HRV measurements. Then, at a second meeting, held 3 h after the 400-m freestyle event, the athletes returned to the evaluation room for HRV measurement (Polar ® RS800cx, Kempele, Finland). Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between competitive anxiety and HRV. The multiple linear regression was performed in three blocks (block 1: cognitive anxiety, block 2: somatic anxiety, and block 3: self-confidence), adopting the forward model. The results indicated a significant association between cognitive anxiety (p = 0.001) and HRV. An increased magnitude of the association was observed when somatic anxiety was inserted in the model (p = 0.001). In contrast, self-confidence showed, which was inserted in block 3, no relationship with HRV (p = 0.27). It was concluded that cognitive and somatic anxieties were associated with the HRV of swimmers. Athletes with a high magnitude of cognitive and/or somatic anxiety demonstrated more significant autonomic nervous system disturbance. Practically, psychological interventions are needed to improve anxiety states that are specific to perform well, and to improve HRV.

  12. Assessing performance in pre-season wrestling athletes using biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiriou, Ionas; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe

    2018-06-15

    Although regular training introduces the desired changes in athletes' metabolism towards optimal final performance, literature is rarely focusing on the metabolic responses off-competition. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate biochemical indices during typical preseason training in wrestling athletes. Twenty male freestyle and Greco-roman wrestlers (14 to 31 years) followed a typical session of the preparatory phase. Capillary blood glucose and lactate concentrations were assessed immediately before and after training. Protein, microalbumin, creatinine and their ratio were estimated the next day in the first morning urine. Pre-training lactate concentrations were lower in Greco-roman than in freestyle wrestlers (1.8 (1.4 - 2.1) vs. 2.9 (2.1 - 3.1) mmol/L). Exertion resulted in a significant increase in lactate concentrations, by 3.2 (2.6 - 4.1) mmol/L in Greco-roman wrestlers and 4.5 (3.4 - 5.3) mmol/L in freestylers. These changes were found to correlate with athlete's sport experience (r s = 0.71, P training is associated with mobilization of both lactic and alactic anaerobic energy systems. The regular comprehensive monitoring of biochemical markers would be advantageous in determining the efficiency of the preparatory phase and the long-term physiological adaptations towards the competition phase, or athlete's overtraining.

  13. THE IMPACT OF TECHNICAL ABILITY TO SWIMMING PERFORMANCE OF THE MIXED SWIMMING AT 100m IN COLLEGE FASTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Beganović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of technical ability to swim (the starting point, the techniques and turns, within each of these techniques of swimming (freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly marked as input or predictor variables, the performance of mixed swimming in the 100m, marked as output or criterion variable. The study was conducted on a sample of 31 students, females, aged from 20-24 years, with the help of the testing (assessment, technical skills of swimming (start, the techniques and turns: OCJKSTR, OCJKTEH, OCJKOKR, OCJLSTR, OCJLTEH, OCJLOKR, OCJPSTR, OCJPTEH, OCJPOKR, OCJDSTR, OCJDTEH, OCJDOKR and mixed swimming in the 100m (OCJPM100, the following order: butterfly, back, breaststroke, freestyle. Analyzing the presented results of regression analysis can be stated that after testing (assessment of all predictor system statistically the most significant impact on the criterion variable had the following variables: assessment techniques freestyle (OCJKTEH, evaluation of starting breast stroke (OCJPSTR and assessment of breast stroke turns (OCJPOKR.

  14. Grid-enabled measures: using Science 2.0 to standardize measures and share data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W; Shaikh, Abdul R; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry Y; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-05-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment--a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with two overarching goals: (1) promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. The first is accomplished by creating an online venue where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting on, and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. The second is accomplished by connecting the constructs and measures to an ontological framework with data standards and common data elements such as the NCI Enterprise Vocabulary System (EVS) and the cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories--for data sharing). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Quality Assurance of Cancer Study Common Data Elements Using A Post-Coordination Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Prud'hommeaux, Eric; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Domain-specific common data elements (CDEs) are emerging as an effective approach to standards-based clinical research data storage and retrieval. A limiting factor, however, is the lack of robust automated quality assurance (QA) tools for the CDEs in clinical study domains. The objectives of the present study are to prototype and evaluate a QA tool for the study of cancer CDEs using a post-coordination approach. The study starts by integrating the NCI caDSR CDEs and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data dictionaries in a single Resource Description Framework (RDF) data store. We designed a compositional expression pattern based on the Data Element Concept model structure informed by ISO/IEC 11179, and developed a transformation tool that converts the pattern-based compositional expressions into the Web Ontology Language (OWL) syntax. Invoking reasoning and explanation services, we tested the system utilizing the CDEs extracted from two TCGA clinical cancer study domains. The system could automatically identify duplicate CDEs, and detect CDE modeling errors. In conclusion, compositional expressions not only enable reuse of existing ontology codes to define new domain concepts, but also provide an automated mechanism for QA of terminological annotations for CDEs.

  16. Enumeration of minimal stoichiometric precursor sets in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ricardo; Wannagat, Martin; Klein, Cecilia C; Acuña, Vicente; Marchetti-Spaccamela, Alberto; Milreu, Paulo V; Stougie, Leen; Sagot, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    What an organism needs at least from its environment to produce a set of metabolites, e.g. target(s) of interest and/or biomass, has been called a minimal precursor set. Early approaches to enumerate all minimal precursor sets took into account only the topology of the metabolic network (topological precursor sets). Due to cycles and the stoichiometric values of the reactions, it is often not possible to produce the target(s) from a topological precursor set in the sense that there is no feasible flux. Although considering the stoichiometry makes the problem harder, it enables to obtain biologically reasonable precursor sets that we call stoichiometric. Recently a method to enumerate all minimal stoichiometric precursor sets was proposed in the literature. The relationship between topological and stoichiometric precursor sets had however not yet been studied. Such relationship between topological and stoichiometric precursor sets is highlighted. We also present two algorithms that enumerate all minimal stoichiometric precursor sets. The first one is of theoretical interest only and is based on the above mentioned relationship. The second approach solves a series of mixed integer linear programming problems. We compared the computed minimal precursor sets to experimentally obtained growth media of several Escherichia coli strains using genome-scale metabolic networks. The results show that the second approach efficiently enumerates minimal precursor sets taking stoichiometry into account, and allows for broad in silico studies of strains or species interactions that may help to understand e.g. pathotype and niche-specific metabolic capabilities. sasita is written in Java, uses cplex as LP solver and can be downloaded together with all networks and input files used in this paper at http://www.sasita.gforge.inria.fr.

  17. The performance of flash glucose monitoring in critically ill patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, Paolo; Eastwood, Glenn M; Lucchetta, Luca; Ekinci, Elif I; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mårtensson, Johan

    2017-06-01

    Frequent glucose monitoring may improve glycaemic control in critically ill patients with diabetes. We aimed to assess the accuracy of a novel subcutaneous flash glucose monitor (FreeStyle Libre [Abbott Diabetes Care]) in these patients. We applied the FreeStyle Libre sensor to the upper arm of eight patients with diabetes in the intensive care unit and obtained hourly flash glucose measurements. Duplicate recordings were obtained to assess test-retest reliability. The reference glucose level was measured in arterial or capillary blood. We determined numerical accuracy using Bland- Altman methods, the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) and whether the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Point of Care Testing (CLSI POCT) criteria were met. Clarke error grid (CEG) and surveillance error grid (SEG) analyses were used to determine clinical accuracy. We compared 484 duplicate flash glucose measurements and observed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.97 and a coefficient of repeatability of 1.6 mmol/L. We studied 185 flash readings paired with arterial glucose levels, and 89 paired with capillary glucose levels. Using the arterial glucose level as the reference, we found a mean bias of 1.4 mmol/L (limits of agreement, -1.7 to 4.5 mmol/L). The MARD was 14% (95% CI, 12%-16%) and the proportion of measurements meeting ISO and CLSI POCT criteria was 64.3% and 56.8%, respectively. The proportions of values within a low-risk zone on CEG and SEG analyses were 97.8% and 99.5%, respectively. Using capillary glucose levels as the reference, we found that numerical and clinical accuracy were lower. The subcutaneous FreeStyle Libre blood glucose measurement system showed high test-retest reliability and acceptable accuracy when compared with arterial blood glucose measurement in critically ill patients with diabetes.

  18. Interference studies with two hospital-grade and two home-grade glucose meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Martha E; Baskin, Leland B; Braakman, Sandy; Presti, Steven; Dubois, Jeffrey; Shirey, Terry

    2009-10-01

    Interference studies of four glucose meters (Nova Biomedical [Waltham, MA] StatStrip [hospital grade], Roche Diagnostics [Indianapolis, IN] Accu-Chek Aviva [home grade], Abbott Diabetes Care [Alameda, CA] Precision FreeStyle Freedom [home grade], and LifeScan [Milpitas, CA] SureStep Flexx [hospital grade]) were evaluated and compared to the clinical laboratory plasma hexokinase reference method (Roche Hitachi 912 chemistry analyzer). These meters were chosen to reflect the continuum of care from hospital to home grade meters commonly seen in North America. Within-run precision was determined using a freshly prepared whole blood sample spiked with concentrated glucose to give three glucose concentrations. Day-to-day precision was evaluated using aqueous control materials supplied by each vendor. Common interferences, including hematocrit, maltose, and ascorbate, were tested alone and in combination with one another on each of the four glucose testing devices at three blood glucose concentrations. Within-run precision for all glucose meters was glucose meters. Ascorbate caused differences (percentage change from a sample without added interfering substances) of >5% with pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ)-glucose dehydrogenase-based technologies (Aviva and Freestyle) and the glucose oxidase-based Flexx meter. Maltose strongly affected the PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase-based meter systems. When combinations of interferences (ascorbate, maltose, and hematocrit mixtures) were tested, the extent of the interference was up to 193% (Aviva), 179% (FreeStyle), 25.1% (Flexx), and 5.9% (StatStrip). The interference was most pronounced at low glucose (3.9-4.4 mmol/L). All evaluated glucose meter systems demonstrated varying degrees of interference by hematocrit, ascorbate, and maltose mixtures. PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase-based technologies showed greater susceptibility than glucose oxidase-based systems. However, the modified glucose oxidase-based amperometric method (Nova StatStrip) was

  19. Factors interfering with the accuracy of five blood glucose meters used in Chinese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hong; Zhang, Guo-jun; Kang, Xi-xiong; Yuan, Hui; Lv, Yan-wei; Wang, Wen-wen; Randall, Rollins

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in China. Glucose control is very important in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of five glucose meters used in Chinese hospitals with a reference method, in the absence and presence of various factors that may interfere with the meters. Within-run precision of the meters was evaluated include Roche Accu-Chek Inform®, Abbott Precision PCx FreeStyle®, Bayer Contour®, J&J LifeScan SureStep Flexx®, and Nova Biomedical StatStrip®. The interference of hematocrit level, maltose, ascorbic acid, acetaminophen, galactose, dopamine, and uric acid were tested in three levels of blood glucose, namely low, medium, and high concentrations. Accuracy (bias) of the meters and analytical interference by various factors were evaluated by comparing results obtained in whole blood specimens with those in plasma samples of the whole blood specimens run on the reference method. Impact of oxygen tension on above five blood glucose meters was detected. Precision was acceptable and slightly different between meters. There were no significant differences in the measurements between the meters and the reference method. The hematocrit level significantly interfered with all meters, except StatStrip. Measurements were affected to varying degrees by different substances at different glucose levels, e.g. acetaminophen and ascorbic acid (Freestyle), maltose and galactose (FreeStyle, Accu-Chek), uric acid (FreeStyle, Bayer Contour), and dopamine (Bayer Contour). The measurements with the five meters showed a good correlation with the plasma hexokinase reference method, but most were affected by the hematocrit level. Some meters also showed marked interference by other substances. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Influence of Competitive-Anxiety on Heart Rate Variability in Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo S. Fortes, Bruna D. V. da Costa, Pedro P. Paes, José R.A. do Nascimento Júnior, Lenamar Fiorese, Maria E.C. Ferreira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between competitive anxiety and heart rate variability (HRV in swimming athletes. A total of 66 volunteers (41 male and 27 female who swam the 400-m freestyle in the Brazilian Swimming Championships participated. Thirty minutes before the 400-m freestyle event, the athletes answered the Competitive Anxiety Inventory (CSAI-2R questionnaire, then underwent anthropometric (body weight, height, and skinfold thickness and HRV measurements. Then, at a second meeting, held 3 h after the 400-m freestyle event, the athletes returned to the evaluation room for HRV measurement (Polar® RS800cx, Kempele, Finland. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between competitive anxiety and HRV. The multiple linear regression was performed in three blocks (block 1: cognitive anxiety, block 2: somatic anxiety, and block 3: self-confidence, adopting the forward model. The results indicated a significant association between cognitive anxiety (p = 0.001 and HRV. An increased magnitude of the association was observed when somatic anxiety was inserted in the model (p = 0.001. In contrast, self-confidence showed, which was inserted in block 3, no relationship with HRV (p = 0.27. It was concluded that cognitive and somatic anxieties were associated with the HRV of swimmers. Athletes with a high magnitude of cognitive and/or somatic anxiety demonstrated more significant autonomic nervous system disturbance. Practically, psychological interventions are needed to improve anxiety states that are specific to perform well, and to improve HRV.

  1. The effect of a 6-week land and resistance training of 13-16 years old swimmers groups to lower limb isokinetic strength values and to swimming performance13-16 yaş grubu yüzücülerde 6 haftalık kara ve direnç antrenmanlarının alt ekstremite izokinetik kuvvet performansına ve yüzme derecelerine etkisi

    OpenAIRE

    Yapıcı, Ayşegül; Maden, Barış; Fındıkoğlu, Gülin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of a 6-week land and resistance training of 13-16 year old swimmers groups to lower limb isokinetic strength values and to swimming performance. 22 swimmers participated in this study. The subjects were divided into three groups (A-B-C) according to their 50m swimming degrees. 25m underwater,25m,50m,75m and 100m freestyle swimming degrees of swimmers were recorded. As isokinetic measurements was applied at 60°/s,180°/s and 240°/s speed and th...

  2. Analyzing the attitudes of elite wrestlers related to the use of doping

    OpenAIRE

    TURKCAPAR, Unal; KOC, Mine; KOC, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the attitudes of elite Turkish wrestlers related to the use of doping. The study group of the research included freestyle and Greco-Roman (cadet, junior,and senior) 180 Turkish wrestlers in 2013 wrestling World Championship National Team training camps. In order to measure the attitudes of wrestlers, “The Attitude Scale Related to the Use of Doping” developed by Şapcı (2010) (3), and “Personal Information Form” developed by us were used. According to th...

  3. Longitudinal intra and inter-individual variability in young swimmers performance and determinant factors

    OpenAIRE

    Morais, Jorge; Costa, Mário; Moreira, Marc; Forte, Pedro; Silva, António; Marinho, Daniel; Barbosa, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    The aim of study was to follow-up the intra-individual and inter-individual stability of talented swimmers’ performance and its anthropometrics, kinematics, hydrodynamics and efficiency during two competitive seasons. Thirty talented swimmers (14 boys: 12.33 ± 0.65 years; and 16 girls: 11.15 ± 0.55 years) were followed-up. Performance (100-m freestyle), anthropometrics (body mass, height, arm span, chest perimeter, trunk transverse surface area, hand and foot surface area), kinematics (stroke...

  4. Efficiency increasing of training process on basic technique of wrestler's motor actions in free style at the initial stage with using of computer technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tupeev Y.V.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of use of computer technologies in a system of preparation of fighters on a pioneering stage are exhibited. 10 competent sportsmen, 20 trainers of the maximum grade participated in experiment, 10 fighters of a freestyle of the first grade level. Directions of raise of a learning efficiency base the mechanic of impellent operations of juvenile fighters designated. The frame of the designed informational - methodical program "Champion" is presented. Productivity of information technologies in training base the mechanic of impellent operations in training process of juvenile fighters is defined.

  5. Biokinematic structure of techniques wrestlers during pre-basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Sinіgovets

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical aspects of freestyle wrestlers. Experimentally investigated the structural elements of techniques during pre-basic training. The study involved 28 young fighters. Held video computer analysis techniques. Identified biomechanical characteristics defined kinematic structure of the temporal and spatial-temporal characteristics of the basic techniques. Shown variability of the individual phases of the basic techniques. Structural dynamics of the resulting velocities of the individual body bioelement fighters showed characteristic changes depending on the mode and direction of the motor action. Found that the predominant contribution to the biokinematic structure of technical actions were resulting velocities torso of young fighters.

  6. Numerical Schemes for Charged Particle Movement in PIC Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulhanek, P.

    2001-01-01

    A PIC model of plasma fibers is developed in the Department of Physics of the Czech Technical University for several years. The program code was written in FORTRAN 95, free-style (without compulsory columns). Fortran compiler and linker were used from Compaq Visual Fortran 6.1A embedded in the Microsoft Development studio GUI. Fully three-dimensional code with periodical boundary conditions was developed. Electromagnetic fields are localized on a grid and particles move freely through this grid. One of the partial problems of the PIC model is the numerical particle solver, which will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. Performance of strip-based glucose meters and cassette-based blood gas analyzer for monitoring glucose levels in a surgical intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claerhout, Helena; De Prins, Martine; Mesotten, Dieter; Van den Berghe, Greet; Mathieu, Chantal; Van Eldere, Johan; Vanstapel, Florent

    2016-01-01

    We verified the analytical performance of strip-based handheld glucose meters (GM) for prescription use, in a comparative split-sample protocol using blood gas samples from a surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Freestyle Precision Pro (Abbott), StatStrip Connectivity Meter (Nova), ACCU-CHEK Inform II (Roche) were evaluated for recovery/linearity, imprecision/repeatability. The GMs and the ABL90 (Radiometer) blood gas analyzer (BGA) were tested for relative accuracy vs. the comparator hexokinase glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (HK/G6PDH) assay on a Cobas c702 analyzer (Roche). Recovery of spiked glucose was linear up to 19.3 mmol/L (347 mg/dL) with a slope of 0.91-0.94 for all GMs. Repeatability estimated by pooling duplicate measurements on samples below (n=9), in (n=51) or above (n=80) the 4.2-5.9 mM (74-106 mg/dL) range were for Freestyle Precision Pro: 4.2%, 4.0%, 3.6%; StatStrip Connectivity Meter: 4.0%, 4.3%, 4.5%; and ACCU-CHEK Inform II: 1.4%, 2.5%, 3.5%. GMs were in agreement with the comparator method. The BGA outperformed the GMs, with a MARD of 3.9% compared to 6.5%, 5.8% and 4.4% for the FreeStyle, StatStrip and ACCU-CHEK, respectively. Zero % of the BGA results deviated more than the FDA 10% criterion as compared to 9.4%, 3.7% and 2.2% for the FreeStyle, StatStrip and ACCU-CHEK, respectively. For all GMs, icodextrin did not interfere. Variation in the putative influence factors hematocrit and O2 tension could not explain observed differences with the comparator method. GMs quantified blood glucose in whole blood at about the 10% total error criterion, proposed by the FDA for prescription use.

  8. Isokinetic dynamometry on the internal rotator and adductor muscles of the swimmers' shoulders: no differences between asymmetrical and symmetrical swimming strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Secchi, Leonardo Luiz Barretti; Brech, Guilherme Carlos; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we compare muscular strength of the internal rotators and adductors of the shoulder between asymmetrical (backstroke and freestyle) and symmetrical (breaststroke and butterfly) swimming strokes. METHOD: We evaluated: shoulders of (a) asymmetrical swimmers (aged 21.8 ± 3.8 years), (b) symmetrical swimmers (aged 20.3 ± 4.5 years), (c) recreational swimmers (aged 24.5 ± 4.5 years), and (d) control individuals (aged 25.8 ± 3.5 years). All evaluations were performed on a...

  9. Evaluation of Blood Glucose Meter Efficacy in an Antenatal Diabetes Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Rachel T; Donnelly, Vanessa C; Glastras, Sarah J; Preda, Veronica A; Sheriff, Nisa; Ward, Peter; Hocking, Samantha L; Fulcher, Gregory R

    2016-02-01

    The optimal treatment of diabetes in pregnancy requires accurate measurement of blood glucose levels, in order to minimize adverse outcomes for both mother and neonate. Self-monitoring of blood glucose is routinely used to measure glycemic control and to assess whether treatment targets are being met; however, the accuracy of blood glucose meters in pregnancy is unclear. Pregnant women with gestational, type 1, or type 2 diabetes mellitus were eligible to participate. Nonfasting capillary blood glucose levels were measured in duplicate using the BGStar(®) (Sanofi, Sydney, Australia) and FreeStyle Lite(®) (Abbott, Sydney) blood glucose meters. Venous blood samples were collected and analyzed for plasma glucose, hematocrit, and glycated hemoglobin. Capillary blood glucose was compared with plasma glucose and further assessed according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2013 standards. One hundred ten women were recruited, providing 96 samples suitable for analysis. The mean ± SD laboratory plasma glucose level was 4.6 ± 1.4 mmol/L; the BGStar and FreeStyle Lite capillary blood glucose values were 5.3 ± 1.4 mmol/L and 5.0 ± 1.3 mmol/L, respectively. Both meters showed a positive bias (0.42 mmol/L for the FreeStyle Lite and 0.65 mmol/L for the BGStar). Furthermore, neither meter fulfilled the ISO 15197:2013 standards, and there was a nonsignificant improvement in meter performance at blood glucose levels of ≤4.2 mmol/L. Hematocrit did not affect the results of either blood glucose meter. Clarke Error Grid analysis demonstrated that approximately 70% of the results of both meters would lead to appropriate clinical action. The BGStar and FreeStyle Lite blood glucose meters did not meet ISO 15197:2013 recommendations for blood glucose monitoring systems when assessed in a population of women with diabetes in pregnancy. Clinicians should consider this difference in blood glucose readings when making diabetes

  10. Accuracy of a Flash Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Corradini, S.; Pilosio, B.; Dondi, F.; Linari, G.; Testa, S.; Brugnoli, F.; Gianella, P.; Pietra, M.; Fracassi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background A novel flash glucose monitoring system (FGMS) (FreeStyle Libre, Abbott, UK) was recently developed for humans. It continuously measures the interstitial glucose (IG) concentrations for 14 days. Objectives To assess the clinical and analytical accuracy of the FGMS in diabetic dogs. Animals Ten client?owned diabetic dogs on insulin treatment. Methods Prospective and observational study. The FGMS was placed on the neck for up to 14 days. During the 1st?2nd, 6?7th, and 13?14th days fr...

  11. The Performance and Usability of a Factory-Calibrated Flash Glucose Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Timothy; Bode, Bruce W.; Christiansen, Mark P.; Klaff, Leslie J.; Alva, Shridhara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance and usability of the FreeStyle? Libre? Flash glucose monitoring system (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) for interstitial glucose results compared with capillary blood glucose results. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two study participants with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were enrolled by four U.S. clinical sites. A sensor was inserted on the back of each upper arm for up to 14 days. Three factory-only calibrated s...

  12. Training of referees in wrestling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Ievtyfiiev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the analysis of problems in the training of referees in wrestling. Material & Methods: theoretical analysis and generalization of literary sources, pedagogical observation. Results: the analysis and generalization of the opinions of experts shows that the success of the complex of judicial activities caused by the judges' experience, knowledge of the techniques and tactics of wrestling and a high level of development of professionally important psycho-physiological functions. Conclusions: given the lack of professional officiating freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling, the preference shall be given independent forms of training short-term precompetitive workshops not only for training, but and for testing of individual capabilities of individual judges.

  13. Resultados del recambio valvular pulmonar según el tipo de prótesis implantada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García Vieites

    2017-05-01

    Conclusiones: El RVP en nuestra serie se ha asociado a una baja tasa de mortalidad perioperatoria. Cuando comparamos según el tipo de prótesis, la prótesis Medtronic Freestyle presentó un mayor gradiente inicial y en el grupo Sorin Soprano se observa una degeneración protésica superior a la esperada. Sin embargo, será necesario más seguimiento para definir el comportamiento de la prótesis Carpentier Edwards.

  14. A Comprehensive Examination of the Soviet Naval Infantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-11

    already mentioned, a Marine can participate in classical and free-style wrestling and rugby . Tram- polines are balso availaole lor use.164 Political...following abbreviations are used in this appendix. U = Unit N a Northern Fleet SU = Subunit B = Baltic Fleet Regt = Regiment B1 = Black Sea Fleet Bn...author 1973’D Pushkaresv Ke(engr) author 1976* Soroka, A. Ruthor 1970’ Sysoltatin, I.I. Regt B1 1971 LU 196? su (P) 1965 (Maij) SU 16 141 Baranov, we Lu 1

  15. Pengembangan alat tempo trainer untuk membantu efisiensi gerakan lengan gaya bebas cabang olahraga renang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahtiyar Heru Susanto

    2017-09-01

    This research aimed to develop the tools of Tempo Trainer to help efficiency of arm freestyle movement on the branch of swimming. Small-scale trials were conducted on four coaches and 10 athletes in the swimming association Tirta Alvita and Yuso. Large-scale trial was conducted on 10 coaches and 25 athletes in the swimming association Tirta Alvita, Yuso, Dolphin, Caesar, and Arowana. The instrument used to collect data was a questionnaire based on the analysis PIECES (Performance, Information, Economic, Control, Efficiency, Services. The assessment result of experts, coaches, and athletes toward Tempo Trainer tool shows that the assessment categoryis good, valid and reliable. Based of the resultsthat Tempo Trainer tool developed can count the number of cycles of freestyle movement, a sound that can be heard by coaches and athletes, can be used for more than one athlete, as well as it is more affordable. The coaches assessment shows valid results with every indicator PIECES obtain value rxy > r table = 0.632, with reliable results rxy = 0.908. The assessment of Tempo Trainer draft tool by athletes is good and valid with the result of the rxy > r table = 0.750.

  16. Sodium bicarbonate improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, A M; Peyrebrune, M C; Ingham, S A; Bailey, D M; Folland, J P

    2008-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate ingestion has been shown to improve performance in single-bout, high intensity events, probably due to an increase in buffering capacity, but its influence on single-bout swimming performance has not been investigated. The effects of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on 200 m freestyle swimming performance were investigated in elite male competitors. Following a randomised, double blind counterbalanced design, 9 swimmers completed maximal effort swims on 3 separate occasions: a control trial (C); after ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (SB: NaHCO3 300 mg . kg (-1) body mass); and after ingestion of a placebo (P: CaCO3 200 mg . kg (-1) body mass). The SB and P agents were packed in gelatine capsules and ingested 90 - 60 min prior to each 200 m swim. Mean 200 m performance times were significantly faster for SB than C or P (1 : 52.2 +/- 4.7; 1 : 53.7 +/- 3.8; 1 : 54.0 +/- 3.6 min : ss; p bicarbonate were all elevated pre-exercise in the SB compared to C and P trials (p < 0.05). Post-200 m blood lactate concentrations were significantly higher following the SB trial compared with P and C (p < 0.05). It was concluded that SB supplementation can improve 200 m freestyle performance time in elite male competitors, most likely by increasing buffering capacity.

  17. Technical-tactical and physiological demands of wrestling combats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka Miarka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Technical-tactical and physiological demand analyses of wrestling combats are important because they reveal essential information for the development of contextual training and specific physical preparation of wrestlers. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the characteristics of wrestling combats in freestyle, female and Greco-roman styles. The time-motion analysis presented in this article is the main component to carry out inferences on intensity and effort: pause ratio of combat actions. After rules modification in 2013, wrestling combats showed quicker and more diversified actions, especially in the lighter categories. For Greco-roman wrestling, most studies showed takedowns as the most effective techniques in World competitions for the period 2009-2011. For the same period, foot/leg techniques were the most effective in female and freestyle wrestling, followed by takedown attacks. Recent analyses, developed after 2013 rules modification, showed that the decisive offensive actions were applied on foot and in par terre situations – especially gutwrenches techniques and derivatives of suplex movements. The knowledge on the determinant and predominant actions of wrestling combats can be applied in future research, as well as can be used practically for training, physical preparation and assessments of similar combat actions. It also allows interventions to prevent injuries resulting from technical and tactical wrestling actions.

  18. The influence of stroke mechanics into energy cost of elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Fernandes, R J; Keskinen, K L; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between energy cost (C), swimming velocity (v), stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) in top-level swimmers. Eighteen elite swimmers (four freestylers, five backstrokers, five breaststrokers and four butterflyers) performed an intermittent set of nx200 m swims (nSprings, OH, USA). At Backstroke, Breaststroke and Butterfly strokes, increases of SF were associated to increases of C, even when controlling the v. The increases in SL only promoted significant decreases in the C in Breaststroke. There was a significant and polynomial relationship between v and SF for all competitive swimming techniques. The polynomial relationship between v and SL was significant only in Freestyle and Butterfly stroke. Partial correlations between v and SF controlling the effect of SL and between v and SL controlling the effect of SF, were positive and significant for all techniques. It is concluded that manipulation of stroke mechanics variables (SF and SL) may be one of the factors through which C in competitive swimming can be altered for a given v.

  19. Analysis of the Relationship between Elite Wrestlers’ Leg Strength and Balance Performance, and Injury History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezen Çimen Polat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between leg power and balance performance in elite wrestlers and injury history. In the research group, there are 18 elite freestyle male wrestlers at the ages of 24.27 ± 3.18 years, with a height of 171.86 ± 5.44 cm and a body weight of 79.27 ± 11.16 kg. Information on the injury history of the athletes’ upper legs for the past year was collected via interviews with the club’s physiotherapist. Laboratory tests to measure performance assessed height, body weight, Y balance and isokinetic leg strength. Data obtained from the study are presented as mean and standard deviation. The test of normality was carried out by the Shapiro-Wilk test. The Pearson Correlation Test was performed for all parameters with normal distribution, and significance level was accepted as p < 0.05. It was found that there is a relationship between the wrestlers’ right leg ratio and hamstring strength and injury history. However, there is no statistically significant relationship between left leg hamstring, quadriceps, ratio, right leg quadriceps, or right and left leg balance performance, and injury history. The resulting data shows that the proportioning between hamstring and quadriceps muscles in freestyle wrestlers’ upper leg strength values is not ideal. This finding provides evidence that injury risk increases with the additional impact of loss of strength.

  20. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate in OmniPod, an innovative tubeless insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Mowitz, Martin; Bonardel, Nathalie; Aerts, Olivier; Bruze, Magnus

    2018-04-10

    The frequency of allergic contact dermatitis caused by (meth)acrylates is increasing worldwide, and isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) has been identified as a culprit sensitizer in FreeStyle Libre, a medical device used by diabetic patients. To report on 4 patients sensitized to IBOA contained in OmniPod, a new, tubeless insulin pump, and to describe the clinical and chemical analytical work-up. Four patients with eczematous skin eruptions after using OmniPod, including 2 with previous adverse skin reactions to FreeStyle Libre, were patch tested with a baseline series and additional (meth)acrylates, including IBOA in several concentrations and/or vehicles. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the presence of IBOA in OmniPod. All patients were shown to be sensitized to IBOA. GC-MS identified IBOA in OmniPod, with the highest concentrations being found in the unit itself and not in the adhesive patch. The OmniPod tubeless insulin pump is another source of IBOA, and its use may lead to primary sensitization to this acrylate, or may provoke elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis in previously sensitized patients. Our cases highlight the need to obtain satisfactory cooperation from pharmaceutical companies involved in the manufacture of these widely used medical devices. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Building a semantic web-based metadata repository for facilitating detailed clinical modeling in cancer genome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak K; Solbrig, Harold R; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Chute, Christopher G; Jiang, Guoqian

    2017-06-05

    Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs) have been regarded as the basis for retaining computable meaning when data are exchanged between heterogeneous computer systems. To better support clinical cancer data capturing and reporting, there is an emerging need to develop informatics solutions for standards-based clinical models in cancer study domains. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a cancer genome study metadata management system that serves as a key infrastructure in supporting clinical information modeling in cancer genome study domains. We leveraged a Semantic Web-based metadata repository enhanced with both ISO11179 metadata standard and Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) Reference Model. We used the common data elements (CDEs) defined in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data dictionary, and extracted the metadata of the CDEs using the NCI Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR) CDE dataset rendered in the Resource Description Framework (RDF). The ITEM/ITEM_GROUP pattern defined in the latest CIMI Reference Model is used to represent reusable model elements (mini-Archetypes). We produced a metadata repository with 38 clinical cancer genome study domains, comprising a rich collection of mini-Archetype pattern instances. We performed a case study of the domain "clinical pharmaceutical" in the TCGA data dictionary and demonstrated enriched data elements in the metadata repository are very useful in support of building detailed clinical models. Our informatics approach leveraging Semantic Web technologies provides an effective way to build a CIMI-compliant metadata repository that would facilitate the detailed clinical modeling to support use cases beyond TCGA in clinical cancer study domains.

  2. Creatine supplementation and swim performance: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Melissa J; Graham, Kenneth; Rooney, Kieron B

    2006-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle. Key PointsCreatine supplementation does not improve single sprint

  3. The use of suggestion in sports practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanenko V.I.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive, integrated modified technique of personal psycho-physiological regulation based on a system of Raja Yoga. The study involved candidates and masters of sports of freestyle skiing in the amount of 21 people aged 17 to 23 years. Found that athletes co 2 and stage 3 of the hypnotic state successfully acquired by dhyana and can apply it in preparation for a competition. The proposed method includes a high quality optimal fighting condition, modeling and programming training and competitive processes using deferred units, the correction of motor skills. Athletes in their imagination run program of the second day of competition. Then, the third day of competition modeled, programmed overall health. Are told that in the day of the event will have a good mood, great feeling, a surge of strength, vigor, vitality, desire to show all of their sporting qualities.

  4. We must know. We will know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel

    2011-01-01

    The after-dinner talk has by now become a tradition of this Conference series on Quark Confinement and the Hadron Spectrum. On this occasion, I have tried to combine a free-style and (hopefully) amusing presentation with deep questions of physics especially connected with the dynamics of strong interaction. To this end some masterpieces of classical music (by Beethoven, Mozart, Dvorak, Stravinsky ...) and pop music (by Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton) were employed to illustrate certain aspects of physics. By no means was this presentation (neither this paper) intended as a comprehensive review of the different topics examined during the Conference, but rather as a call for further thinking on the sinergy of different branches of physics and the excitement of foreseen discoveries in a not too distant future.

  5. Musical creativity and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Mónica; Limb, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    On the spot, as great jazz performers expertly improvise solo passages, they make immediate decisions about which musical phrases to invent and to play. Researchers, like authors Mónica López-González and Dana Foundation grantee Charles J. Limb, are now using brain imaging to study the neural underpinnings of spontaneous artistic creativity, from jazz riffs to freestyle rap. So far, they have found that brain areas deactivated during improvisation are also at rest during dreaming and meditation, while activated areas include those controlling language and sensorimotor skills. Even with relatively few completed studies, researchers have concluded that musical creativity clearly cannot be tied to just one brain area or process.

  6. Beginning from the End: Strategies of Composition in Lyrical Improvisation with End Rhyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venla Sykäri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the basic principles of constructing improvised verses with end rhyme in three contemporary cultures: _mandinadhes_, Mallorcan _gloses_, and Finnish freestyle rap. This study is based on ethnographic interviews, in which improvisers analyze their methods of composition. This knowledge is complemented by a textual analysis of examples of performances in the given traditions. Sykäri shows that competent improvisers master complex cognitive methods when they create their lines that end with the poetic device of end rhyme, and in particular when they structure the discourse so that the strong arguments are situated at the end of the structural unit of composition. This “reversed” method witnesses a tendency to use parallel phonic patterns in a way that is largely the opposite of those employed with semantic (or canonical parallelism.

  7. Flash Glucose Monitoring: Differences Between Intermittently Scanned and Continuously Stored Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleus, Stefan; Kamecke, Ulrike; Link, Manuela; Haug, Cornelia; Freckmann, Guido

    2018-03-01

    The flash glucose monitoring system FreeStyle Libre (Abbott Diabetes Care Ltd., Witney, UK) measures interstitial glucose concentrations and continuously stores measurement values every 15 minutes. To obtain a current glucose reading, users have to scan the sensor with the reader. In a clinical trial, 5% of the scanned data showed relative differences of more than ±10% compared with continuously stored data points (median -0.5%). Such differences might impact results of studies using this system. It should be indicated whether scanned or continuously stored data were used for analyses. Health care professionals might have to differentiate between data reports from clinical software and the scanned data their patients are provided with. Additional information on these differences and their potential impact on therapeutic decisions would be helpful.

  8. Relations between Anthropometric Characteristics and Motor Abilities of 14 – 15U Female Swimmers on 50m Result for each Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Dimitrić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In aim of correlation between antropometric characteristics, motor abilities and results of swimming 50m in all swimming techniques, a group of 22 swimmers (girls of Serbian national team, aged 14-15, underwent some anthropometric measurements as well as some motor abilities. Observed longitudinal dimensions were: body height, body mass, arm span and torax circumference and observed motor abilities were: body strength (arms, legs, stomach and flexibility (trunk and arms. Regression analisys showed that arm span corellated with 50m butterfly and free style score as well as strenght of body and legs corellated with 50m backstroke and free style score. Other measures didn΄t corelatted significantly on this sample. Study results confirms importance of arm span and some segments of body strenhgt of swimmers (girls for successful swimm on 50m in butterfly, backstroke and freestyle techniques in the age 14-15 years.

  9. Perspectives for comprehensive biomechanical analyses in Mogul skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpiers, Nicolas; McAlpine, Paul R; Kersting, Uwe G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of using a force measurement device on riding technique in mogul skiing. A mock-up version of such a device was positioned between ski boot and binding. Data on three-dimensional kinematics and perception were collected for eight subjects skiing down a mogul course. Parameters analysed were knee angle, side and forward lean of the trunk and hip, and the path of the body's centre of mass. A perception questionnaire was used on selective aspects to assess the skiers' perception of the performances. Perception ratings showed no significant detrimental effects. All assessed components showed a trend of improvement from the first to last run, thus suggesting familiarisation was achieved. Kinematic analysis revealed that no significant alterations occurred. In conclusion, it is intended to utilise a functional force plate similar to the one presented by Kiefmann et al. (2006) for future studies in freestyle skiing.

  10. Performance Investigation of a Handheld 3d Scanner to Define Good Practices for Small Artefact 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, E.; Landes, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2017-08-01

    Handheld 3D scanners can be used to complete large scale models with the acquisition of occluded areas or small artefacts. This may be of interest for digitization projects in the field of Cultural Heritage, where detailed areas may require a specific treatment. Such sensors present the advantage of being easily portable in the field, and easily usable even without particular knowledge. In this paper, the Freestyle3D handheld scanner launched on the market in 2015 by FARO is investigated. Different experiments are described, covering various topics such as the influence of range or color on the measurements, but also the precision achieved for geometrical primitive digitization. These laboratory experiments are completed by acquisitions performed on engraved and sculpted stone blocks. This practical case study is useful to investigate which acquisition protocol seems to be the more adapted and leads to precise results. The produced point clouds will be compared to photogrammetric surveys for the purpose of their accuracy assessment.

  11. We must know. We will know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel

    2011-05-01

    The after-dinner talk has by now become a tradition of this Conference series on Quark Confinement and the Hadron Spectrum. On this occasion, I have tried to combine a free-style and (hopefully) amusing presentation with deep questions of physics especially connected with the dynamics of strong interaction. To this end some masterpieces of classical music (by Beethoven, Mozart, Dvorak, Stravinsky …) and pop music (by Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton) were employed to illustrate certain aspects of physics. By no means was this presentation (neither this paper) intended as a comprehensive review of the different topics examined during the Conference, but rather as a call for further thinking on the sinergy of different branches of physics and the excitement of foreseen discoveries in a not too distant future.

  12. Assessing the interplay between the shoulders and low back during manual patient handling techniques in a nursing setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbeck, Alicia; Cudlip, Alan C; Dickerson, Clark R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to quantify shoulder demands during freestyle manual patient handling (MPH) tasks and determine whether approaches intended to prevent low back injury increased shoulder demands. Twenty females completed 5 MPH tasks found commonly in hospital settings before and after a training session using current workplace MPH guidelines. Most normalized muscle activity indices and ratings of perceived exertion decreased following training at both the low back and shoulders, but were more pronounced at the low back. There was little evidence to suggest that mechanical demands were transferred from the low back to the shoulders following the training session. The study generally supports continued use of the recommended MPH techniques, but indicates that several tasks generate high muscular demands and should be avoided if possible.

  13. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Peter; Kromann Knudsen, Hans; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    Swim time performance is affected by physiological factors such as muscle strength and power of the upper and lower extremities as well as aerobic capacity (Smith et al., 2002). The association between these factors and swim time performance may plausibly identify some of the determinants...... for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study were firstly to determine the association between muscle strength and power, aerobic capacity and 100 m freestyle time (FT) in young, competitive...... swimmers, and secondly to determine reference values for these physiological factors. Methods In total, 119 competitive swimmers aged 11-15 years were assessed with Grip Strength (GS), Vertical Jump (VJ) and an intermittent running test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, the Andersen Test (AT). Swim time...

  14. The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Peter; Knudsen, Hans Kromann; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    The association of muscle strength, aerobic capacity and swim time performance in young, competitive swimmers Introduction Swim time performance is affected by physiological factors such as muscle strength and power of the upper and lower extremities as well as aerobic capacity (Smith et al., 2002......). The association between these factors and swim time performance may plausibly identify some of the determinants for performance enhancement in swimming (Smith et al., 2002). In order to detail the individual training programme, reference values are needed. The aims of this study were firstly to determine...... the association between muscle strength and power, aerobic capacity and 100 m freestyle time (FT) in young, competitive swimmers, and secondly to determine reference values for these physiological factors. Methods In total, 119 competitive swimmers aged 11-15 years were assessed with Grip Strength (GS), Vertical...

  15. Effectiveness of social behaviors for autonomous wheelchair robot to support elderly people in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Shiomi

    Full Text Available We developed a wheelchair robot to support the movement of elderly people and specifically implemented two functions to enhance their intention to use it: speaking behavior to convey place/location related information and speed adjustment based on individual preferences. Our study examines how the evaluations of our wheelchair robot differ when compared with human caregivers and a conventional autonomous wheelchair without the two proposed functions in a moving support context. 28 senior citizens participated in the experiment to evaluate three different conditions. Our measurements consisted of questionnaire items and the coding of free-style interview results. Our experimental results revealed that elderly people evaluated our wheelchair robot higher than the wheelchair without the two functions and the human caregivers for some items.

  16. Pedicled perforator flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Ozturk, Nuray; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap...... to reconstruct the defect. The perforators are marked with a hand-held Doppler probe and multiple flaps are designed. The appropriate flap is elevated after identifying the perforator(s). Dissection of the perforator(s) or complete incision of the flap margins are not mandatory if the flap is mobilized...... adequately to cover the defect. Defects measuring 3 x 3 cm up to 20 x 20 cm at diverse locations were successfully reconstructed in 20 of 21 patients with 26 flaps. Pedicled perforator flaps offer us reliable and satisfactory results of reconstruction at different anatomic territories of the body. It sounds...

  17. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  18. HARDINESS, WORLD ASSUMPTIONS, MOTIVATION OF ATHLETES OF CONTACT AND NOT CONTACT KINDS OF SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vladimirovna Molchanova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of personal psychological specificity of athletes of contact (freestyle wrestling and not contact (archery kinds of sport were carried out. Pronounced deviation in hardiness, world assumptions, motives for sport doing were obtained. In particularly, archery athletes possess higher values of hardiness and positively view the world, than wrestlers, while possess less motives for sport doing as “successful for life quality and skills” and “physical perfection”. Thus for athletes not contact kinds of sports rather coping in permanent stressed conditions are predicted. The obtained results are practically important for counseling work of sport psychologists and moreover they could be a basement for training teach programs and challenge stress overcoming programs.

  19. Aortic distensibility after aortic root replacement assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melina, Giovanni; Rajappan, Kim; Amrani, Mohamed; Khaghani, Asghar; Pennell, Dudley J; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2002-01-01

    The changes in geometry of the aortic root during the cardiac cycle are thought to be essential for optimal valve function, both in terms of leaflet stress and dynamic behavior. Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), the study aim was to determine aortic root distensibility of the homograft (group H) and the Medtronic Freestyle xenograft (group F) after aortic root replacement, from a prospective randomized trial. CMR was performed in 15 patients (six homografts, nine Freestyle) at six months and one year after surgery. Percentage change in aortic radius (PCR) and pressure strain elastic modulus (PSEM) were measured as indices of distensibility, and results related to left ventricular mass (LVM). At six months after surgery, mean PCR was 12+/-2.5 in group H and 12.9+/-6.1 in group F (p = NS), and PSEM was 428.5+/-69.8 and 493.5+/-72.7 g/cm2, respectively (p = NS). PCR was reduced to 10+/-1.7% in group H, and by 8.5+/-2.8% in group F (p = NS), while PSEM was increased to 520.5+/-87.3 and 825+/-420.4, respectively (p = NS) at the one-year follow up. Regression analysis showed a correlation between PCR and LVM (r = 0.52, p = 0.08) and LVM index (r = 0.46, p = 0.14), respectively. In addition, there was a relationship between PSEM, LVM and LVM index, suggesting that the stiffer the root wall, the higher the postoperative LVM. Up to one year after aortic root replacement, the wall of both the allogenic and xenogenic valves retained near-normal distensibility. For the first time, a correlation was demonstrated between the elastic properties of the aortic root and LVM. The longer-term behavior and clinical implications of these findings require further investigation.

  20. Sports injuries and illnesses during the Granada Winter Universiade 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Vallejo, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz-Márquez, Juan Carlos; de la Cruz-Campos, Adrián; de la Cruz-Campos, Juan Carlos; Pestaña-Melero, Francisco Luis; Carmona-Ruiz, Ginés; Gallo-Galán, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the incidence of diseases and injuries suffered by athletes participating in the 27th Winter Sports Universiade held in Granada, Spain. Methods The daily occurrence of injuries and diseases was registered at the point of first aid (Borreguiles, 2665 metres above sea level (masl)) and in the clinic of Pradollano (2017 masl), both in Sierra Nevada, as well as in medical services provided by the organising committee of Granada 2015 Universiade and located in sport pavilions in which indoor competitions are held. Results A total of 1109 athletes (650 men, 58.61%; 459 women, 41.39%). Nine diseases and 68 injuries were recorded. In total, the rate of injury was 6.13% (7.07% for men and 4.79% for women). The percentage of injury was highest in alpine skiing (10.34%) followed by freestyle skiing (8.62%). In relation to the time of exposure, freestyle skiing showed the shortest time of exposure (0.31 hours) before suffering an injury. Short track speed skating showed the longest exposure (9.80 hours), before suffering an injury. The most common anatomical areas of injury were the head, shoulder and knee (13.23%). Only nine diseases were suffered (four women and five men) of which six were infections, one was a friction burn, one was a lipothymy and one a cluster headache due to height. Conclusion In general, 6.13% of the athletes sustained at least one injury and 0.81% a disease, which is a much lower percentage than that recorded in similar events. The incidence of injuries and diseases varied among sport specialities. PMID:28879023

  1. Sports injuries and illnesses during the Winter Olympic Games 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretsen, Lars; Steffen, Kathrin; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Aubry, Mark; Dvorak, Jiri; Junge, Astrid; Meeuwisse, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Renström, Per; Wilkinson, Mike

    2010-09-01

    Identification of high-risk sports, including their most common and severe injuries and illnesses, will facilitate the identification of sports and athletes at risk at an early stage. To analyse the frequencies and characteristics of injuries and illnesses during the XXI Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver 2010. All National Olympic Committees' (NOC) head physicians were asked to report daily the occurrence (or non-occurrence) of newly sustained injuries and illnesses on a standardised reporting form. In addition, the medical centres at the Vancouver and Whistler Olympic clinics reported daily on all athletes treated for injuries and illnesses. Physicians covering 2567 athletes (1045 females, 1522 males) from 82 NOCs participated in the study. The reported 287 injuries and 185 illnesses resulted in an incidence of 111.8 injuries and 72.1 illnesses per 1000 registered athletes. In relation to the number of registered athletes, the risk of sustaining an injury was highest for bobsleigh, ice hockey, short track, alpine freestyle and snowboard cross (15-35% of registered athletes were affected in each sport). The injury risk was lowest for the Nordic skiing events (biathlon, cross country skiing, ski jumping, Nordic combined), luge, curling, speed skating and freestyle moguls (less than 5% of registered athletes). Head/cervical spine and knee were the most common injury locations. Injuries were evenly distributed between training (54.0%) and competition (46.0%; p=0.18), and 22.6% of the injuries resulted in an absence from training or competition. In skeleton, figure and speed skating, curling, snowboard cross and biathlon, every 10th athlete suffered from at least one illness. In 113 illnesses (62.8%), the respiratory system was affected. At least 11% of the athletes incurred an injury during the games, and 7% of the athletes an illness. The incidence of injuries and illnesses varied substantially between sports. Analyses of injury mechanisms in high-risk Olympic winter

  2. CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION AND SWIM PERFORMANCE: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Hopwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle

  3. Blood glucose meters employing dynamic electrochemistry are stable against hematocrit interference in a laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Musholt, Petra B; Schipper, Christina; Demircik, Filiz; Hengesbach, Carina; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen; Forst, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Hematocrit (HCT) is known to be a confounding factor that interferes with many blood glucose (BG) measurement technologies, resulting in wrong readings. Dynamic electrochemistry has been identified as one possible way to correct for these potential deviations. The purpose of this laboratory investigation was to assess the HCT stability of four BG meters known to employ dynamic electrochemistry (BGStar and iBGStar, Sanofi; Wavesense Jazz, AgaMatrix; Wellion Linus, MedTrust) in comparison with three other devices (GlucoDock, Medisana; OneTouch Verio Pro, LifeScan; FreeStyle Freedom InsuLinx, Abbott-Medisense). Venous heparinized blood was immediately aliquoted after draw and manipulated to contain three different BG concentrations (60-90, 130-160, and 280-320 mg/dl) and five different HCT levels (25%, 35%, 45%, 55%, and 60%). After careful oxygenation to normal blood oxygen pressure, each of the resulting 15 different samples was measured six times with three devices and three strip lots of each meter. The YSI Stat 2300 served as laboratory reference method. Stability to HCT influence was assumed when less than 10% difference occurred between the highest and lowest mean glucose deviations in relation to HCT concentrations [hematocrit interference factor (HIF)]. Five of the investigated self-test meters showed a stable performance with the different HCT levels tested in this investigation: BGStar (HIF 4.6%), iBGStar (6.6%), Wavesense Jazz (4.1%), Wellion Linus (8.5%), and OneTouch Verio Pro (6.2%). The two other meters were influenced by HCT (FreeStyle InsuLinx 17.8%; GlucoDock 46.5%). In this study, meters employing dynamic electrochemistry, as used in the BGStar and iBGStar devices, were shown to correct for potential HCT influence on the meter results. Dynamic electrochemistry appears to be an effective way to handle this interfering condition. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. SEARCHING FOR CRITERIA IN EVALUATING THE MONOFIN SWIMMING TURN FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF COACHING AND IMPROVING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rejman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analysise the selected kinematic parameters of the monofin swimming turn. The high complexity of performing turns is hindered by the large surface of the monofin, which disturbs control and sense of the body in water. A lack of objective data available on monofin swimming turns has resulted in field research connected with the specification of parameters needed for the evaluation of the technique. Therefore, turns observed in elite swimmers contain underlying conclusions for objective criteria, ensuring the highest level of coaching and the improving of turns in young swimmers. Six, high level, male swimmers participated in the study. The subject of the analysis was the fastest turn, from one out of three trial turns made after swimming a distance of 25 m. Images of the turns were collected from two cameras located under water in accordance with the procedures of the previous analyses of freestyle turns. The images were digitized and analysed by the SIMI®- Movement Analysis System. The interdependency of the total turn time and the remaining recorded parameters, constituted the basis for analysis of the kinematic parameters of five turn phases. The interdependency was measured using r- Pearson's correlation coefficients. The novel character of the subject covered in this study, forced interpretation of the results on the basis of turn analyses in freestyle swimming. The results allow for the creation of a diagram outlinig area of search for an effective and efficient monofin swimming turn mechanism. The activities performed from the moment of wall contact until the commencement of stroking seem to be crucial for turn improvement. A strong belief has resulted that, the correct monofin swimming turn, is more than just a simple consequence of the fastest performance of all its components. The most important criteria in evaluating the quality of the monofin swimming turn are: striving for the optimal extension of wall contact

  5. Performance of a glucose meter with a built-in automated bolus calculator versus manual bolus calculation in insulin-using subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Allen; Taylor, Elizabeth J; Patel, Mona; Ward, Jeanne; Alva, Shridhara; Lawrence, Andrew; Ng, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Patients consider multiple parameters in adjusting prandial insulin doses for optimal glycemic control. Difficulties in calculations can lead to incorrect doses or induce patients to administer fixed doses, rely on empirical estimates, or skip boluses. A multicenter study was conducted with 205 diabetes subjects who were on multiple daily injections of rapid/ short-acting insulin. Using the formula provided, the subjects manually calculated two prandial insulin doses based on one high and one normal glucose test result, respectively. They also determined the two doses using the FreeStyle InsuLinx Blood Glucose Monitoring System, which has a built-in, automated bolus calculator. After dose determinations, the subjects completed opinion surveys. Of the 409 insulin doses manually calculated by the subjects, 256 (63%) were incorrect. Only 23 (6%) of the same 409 dose determinations were incorrect using the meter, and these errors were due to either confirmed or potential deviations from the study instructions by the subjects when determining dose with meter. In the survey, 83% of the subjects expressed more confidence in the meter-calculated doses than the manually calculated doses. Furthermore, 87% of the subjects preferred to use the meter than manual calculation to determine prandial insulin doses. Insulin-using patients made errors in more than half of the manually calculated insulin doses. Use of the automated bolus calculator in the FreeStyle InsuLinx meter minimized errors in dose determination. The patients also expressed confidence and preference for using the meter. This may increase adherence and help optimize the use of mealtime insulin. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Comparison of portable oxygen concentrators in a simulated airplane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rainald; Wanka, Eva R; Einhaeupl, Franziska; Voll, Klaus; Schiffl, Helmut; Lang, Susanne M; Gruss, Martin; Ferrari, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Portable oxygen concentrators (POC) are highly desirable for patients with lung disease traveling by airplane, as these devices allow theoretically much higher travel times if additional batteries can be used. However, it is unclear whether POCs produce enough oxygen in airplanes at cruising altitude, even if complying with aviation regulations. We evaluated five frequently used POCs (XPO2 (Invacare, USA), Freestyle (AirSep C., USA), Evergo (Philipps Healthcare, Germany), Inogen One (Inogen, USA), Eclipse 3 (Sequal, USA)) at an altitude of 2650 m (as simulated airplane environment) in 11 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and compared theses POCs with the standard oxygen system (WS120, EMS Ltd., Germany) used by Lufthansa. Oxygen was delivered by each POC for 30 min to each patient at rest, blood gases were then drawn from the arterialized ear lobe. All POCs were able to deliver enough oxygen to increase the PaO(2) of our subjects by at least 1.40 kPa (10 mmHg). However, to achieve this increase, the two most lightweight POCs (Freestyle and Invacare XPO2) had to be run at their maximum level. This causes a significant reduction of battery life. The three other POCs (EverGo, Inogen One, Eclipse 3) and the WS120 were able to increase the PaO(2) by more than 2.55 kPa (20 mmHg), which provides extra safety for patients with more severe basal hypoxemia. When choosing the right oxygen system for air travel in patients in COPD, not only weight, but also battery life and maximum possible oxygen output must be considered carefully. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Talent identification and early development of elite water-polo players: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bareket; Lidor, Ronnie; Lander, Yael; Lang, Benny

    2004-04-01

    The processes of talent detection and early development are critical in any sport programme. However, not much is known about the appropriate strategies to be implemented during these processes, and little scientific inquiry has been conducted in this area. The aim of this study was to identify variables of swimming, ball handling and physical ability, as well as game intelligence, which could assist in the selection process of young water-polo players. Twenty-four players aged 14-15 years underwent a battery of tests three times during a 2-year period, before selection to the junior national team. The tests included: freestyle swim for 50, 100, 200 and 400 m, 100-m breast-stroke, 100-m 'butterfly' (with breast-stroke leg motion), 50-m dribbling, throwing at the goal, throw for distance in the water, vertical 'jump' from the water, and evaluation of game intelligence by two coaches. A comparison of those players eventually selected to the team and those not selected demonstrated that, 2 years before selection, selected players were already superior on most of the swim tasks (with the exception of breast-stroke and 50-m freestyle), as well as dribbling and game intelligence. This superiority was maintained throughout the 2 years. Two-way tabulation revealed that, based on baseline scores, the prediction for 67% of the players was in agreement with the final selection to the junior national team. We recommend that fewer swim events be used in the process of selecting young water-polo players, and that greater emphasis should be placed on evaluation of game intelligence.

  8. Blood lactate recovery measurements, training, and performance during a 23-week period of competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, P; Mujika, I; Sidney, M; Chatard, J C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to relate measurements of blood lactate concentration, performance during a maximal anaerobic lactic test (MANLT) and training loads during a 23-week swimming season. Six elite 200-m freestyle male swimmers [mean age 19.5 (SD 1.6) years, height 184 (SD 5) cm and body mass 77.7 (SD 9.0) kg], participated in the study. The MANLT consisted of four all-out 50-m swims interspersed with 10-s recovery periods. Blood lactate concentrations were determined at 3 and 12-min post-exercise and were performed on weeks 2,6,10,14,18 and 21. Swimmers participated in 200-m freestyle competitions on weeks 1,7,13 and 23 (national championships). During weeks 1-10, training mostly involved aerobic exercise, while during weeks, 11-23, it involved anaerobic exercise. At 3-min and 12-min post-MANLT lactate concentrations varied throughout the season [range from 14.9 (SD 1.2) to 18.7 (SD 1.0) mmol.l-1] but demonstrated non-systematic variations. In contrast, the percentage of mean blood lactate decrease (% [La-]recovery) between min 3 and min 12 of the passive recovery post-MANLT increased from week 2 to 10 with aerobic training and decreased from week 10 to 21 with anaerobic training. The MANLT performance improved continuously throughout the season, while competition performance improved during the first three competitions but declined in the final championships, coinciding with the lowest % [La-]recovery and signs of overtraining, such as bad temper and increased sleeping heart rate. The results of this study indicated that % [La-]recovery could be an efficient marker for monitoring the impact of aerobic and anaerobic training and avoiding overtraining in elite 200-m swimmers.

  9. Blood Glucose Meters Employing Dynamic Electrochemistry Are Stable against Hematocrit Interference in a Laboratory Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Musholt, Petra B.; Schipper, Christina; Demircik, Filiz; Hengesbach, Carina; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen; Forst, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematocrit (HCT) is known to be a confounding factor that interferes with many blood glucose (BG) measurement technologies, resulting in wrong readings. Dynamic electrochemistry has been identified as one possible way to correct for these potential deviations. The purpose of this laboratory investigation was to assess the HCT stability of four BG meters known to employ dynamic electrochemistry (BGStar and iBGStar, Sanofi; Wavesense Jazz, AgaMatrix; Wellion Linus, MedTrust) in comparison with three other devices (GlucoDock, Medisana; OneTouch Verio Pro, LifeScan; FreeStyle Freedom InsuLinx, Abbott-Medisense). Methods Venous heparinized blood was immediately aliquoted after draw and manipulated to contain three different BG concentrations (60–90, 130–160, and 280–320 mg/dl) and five different HCT levels (25%, 35%, 45%, 55%, and 60%). After careful oxygenation to normal blood oxygen pressure, each of the resulting 15 different samples was measured six times with three devices and three strip lots of each meter. The YSI Stat 2300 served as laboratory reference method. Stability to HCT influence was assumed when less than 10% difference occurred between the highest and lowest mean glucose deviations in relation to HCT concentrations [hematocrit interference factor (HIF)]. Results Five of the investigated self-test meters showed a stable performance with the different HCT levels tested in this investigation: BGStar (HIF 4.6%), iBGStar (6.6%), Wavesense Jazz (4.1%), Wellion Linus (8.5%), and OneTouch Verio Pro (6.2%). The two other meters were influenced by HCT (FreeStyle InsuLinx 17.8%; GlucoDock 46.5%). Conclusions In this study, meters employing dynamic electrochemistry, as used in the BGStar and iBGStar devices, were shown to correct for potential HCT influence on the meter results. Dynamic electrochemistry appears to be an effective way to handle this interfering condition. PMID:24351179

  10. [caCORE: core architecture of bioinformation on cancer research in America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qin; Zhang, Yan-lei; Xie, Zhi-yun; Zhang, Qi-peng; Hu, Zhang-zhi

    2006-04-18

    A critical factor in the advancement of biomedical research is the ease with which data can be integrated, redistributed and analyzed both within and across domains. This paper summarizes the Biomedical Information Core Infrastructure built by National Cancer Institute Center for Bioinformatics in America (NCICB). The main product from the Core Infrastructure is caCORE--cancer Common Ontologic Reference Environment, which is the infrastructure backbone supporting data management and application development at NCICB. The paper explains the structure and function of caCORE: (1) Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS). They provide controlled vocabulary, dictionary and thesaurus services, and EVS produces the NCI Thesaurus and the NCI Metathesaurus; (2) The Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). It provides a metadata registry for common data elements. (3) Cancer Bioinformatics Infrastructure Objects (caBIO). They provide Java, Simple Object Access Protocol and HTTP-XML application programming interfaces. The vision for caCORE is to provide a common data management framework that will support the consistency, clarity, and comparability of biomedical research data and information. In addition to providing facilities for data management and redistribution, caCORE helps solve problems of data integration. All NCICB-developed caCORE components are distributed under open-source licenses that support unrestricted usage by both non-profit and commercial entities, and caCORE has laid the foundation for a number of scientific and clinical applications. Based on it, the paper expounds caCORE-base applications simply in several NCI projects, of which one is CMAP (Cancer Molecular Analysis Project), and the other is caBIG (Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid). In the end, the paper also gives good prospects of caCORE, and while caCORE was born out of the needs of the cancer research community, it is intended to serve as a general resource. Cancer research has historically

  11. The caCORE Software Development Kit: Streamlining construction of interoperable biomedical information services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warzel Denise

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robust, programmatically accessible biomedical information services that syntactically and semantically interoperate with other resources are challenging to construct. Such systems require the adoption of common information models, data representations and terminology standards as well as documented application programming interfaces (APIs. The National Cancer Institute (NCI developed the cancer common ontologic representation environment (caCORE to provide the infrastructure necessary to achieve interoperability across the systems it develops or sponsors. The caCORE Software Development Kit (SDK was designed to provide developers both within and outside the NCI with the tools needed to construct such interoperable software systems. Results The caCORE SDK requires a Unified Modeling Language (UML tool to begin the development workflow with the construction of a domain information model in the form of a UML Class Diagram. Models are annotated with concepts and definitions from a description logic terminology source using the Semantic Connector component. The annotated model is registered in the Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR using the UML Loader component. System software is automatically generated using the Codegen component, which produces middleware that runs on an application server. The caCORE SDK was initially tested and validated using a seven-class UML model, and has been used to generate the caCORE production system, which includes models with dozens of classes. The deployed system supports access through object-oriented APIs with consistent syntax for retrieval of any type of data object across all classes in the original UML model. The caCORE SDK is currently being used by several development teams, including by participants in the cancer biomedical informatics grid (caBIG program, to create compatible data services. caBIG compatibility standards are based upon caCORE resources, and thus the caCORE SDK has

  12. Warm-up for Sprint Swimming: Race-Pace or Aerobic Stimulation? A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Viana, João L; Teixeira, Ana M; Marinho, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    Neiva, HP, Marques, MC, Barbosa, TM, Izquierdo, M, Viana, JL, Teixeira, AM, and Marinho, DA. Warm-up for sprint swimming: race-pace or aerobic stimulation? A randomized study. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2423-2431, 2017-The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 2 different warm-up intensities on 100-m swimming performance in a randomized controlled trial. Thirteen competitive swimmers performed two 100-m freestyle time-trials on separate days after either control or experimental warm-up in a randomized design. The control warm-up included a typical race-pace set (4 × 25 m), whereas the experimental warm-up included an aerobic set (8 × 50 m at 98-102% of critical velocity). Cortisol, testosterone, blood lactate ([La]), oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), heart rate, core (Tcore and Tcorenet) and tympanic temperatures, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Stroke length (SL), stroke frequency (SF), stroke index (SI), and propelling efficiency (ηp) were assessed for each 50-m lap. We found that V[Combining Dot Above]O2, heart rate, and Tcorenet were higher after experimental warm-up (d > 0.73), but only the positive effect for Tcorenet was maintained until the trial. Performance was not different between conditions (d = 0.07). Experimental warm-up was found to slow SF (mean change ±90% CL = 2.06 ± 1.48%) and increase SL (1.65 ± 1.40%) and ηp (1.87 ± 1.33%) in the first lap. After the time-trials, this warm-up had a positive effect on Tcorenet (d = 0.69) and a negative effect on [La] (d = 0.56). Although the warm-ups had similar outcomes in the 100-m freestyle, performance was achieved through different biomechanical strategies. Stroke length and efficiency were higher in the first lap after the experimental warm-up, whereas SF was higher after control warm-up. Physiological adaptations were observed mainly through an increased Tcore after experimental warm-up. In this condition, the lower [La] after the trial suggests lower

  13. Exercise-training intervention studies in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Karlsen, Trine

    2012-06-01

    Competitive swimming has a long history and is currently one of the largest Olympic sports, with 16 pool events. Several aspects separate swimming from most other sports such as (i) the prone position; (ii) simultaneous use of arms and legs for propulsion; (iii) water immersion (i.e. hydrostatic pressure on thorax and controlled respiration); (iv) propulsive forces that are applied against a fluctuant element; and (v) minimal influence of equipment on performance. Competitive swimmers are suggested to have specific anthropometrical features compared with other athletes, but are nevertheless dependent on physiological adaptations to enhance their performance. Swimmers thus engage in large volumes of training in the pool and on dry land. Strength training of various forms is widely used, and the energetic systems are addressed by aerobic and anaerobic swimming training. The aim of the current review was to report results from controlled exercise training trials within competitive swimming. From a structured literature search we found 17 controlled intervention studies that covered strength or resistance training, assisted sprint swimming, arms-only training, leg-kick training, respiratory muscle training, training the energy delivery systems and combined interventions across the aforementioned categories. Nine of the included studies were randomized controlled trials. Among the included studies we found indications that heavy strength training on dry land (one to five repetitions maximum with pull-downs for three sets with maximal effort in the concentric phase) or sprint swimming with resistance towards propulsion (maximal pushing with the arms against fixed points or pulling a perforated bowl) may be efficient for enhanced performance, and may also possibly have positive effects on stroke mechanics. The largest effect size (ES) on swimming performance was found in 50 m freestyle after a dry-land strength training regimen of maximum six repetitions across three

  14. Recording injuries among World Cup skiers and snowboarders: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flørenes, T W; Nordsletten, L; Heir, S; Bahr, R

    2011-04-01

    No long-term injury surveillance programs exist for competitive skiing or snowboarding. The objective of this study was, therefore, to compare different methods to record injuries among World Cup athletes in alpine, freestyle, and cross-country skiing, snowboarding, ski jumping and Nordic combined. Information regarding injuries sustained during the 2006-2007 winter season was recorded through three separate and independent systems: prospective injury reports by technical delegates (TD) from the International Ski Federation, prospective medical team registration by selected teams, and retrospective athlete interviews at the end of the season. A total of 100 unique injuries to 602 World Cup athletes were identified from any of the three recording methods. Of these, 91% were registered through the athlete interviews, 47% by the medical team registration and 27% by the TD reports. Only 20 injuries (20%) were captured by all three methods. A total of 64 time-loss injuries were registered. The interviews captured 60 (94%), the medical team registration 39 (61%), and the TD reports 23 (36%) time-loss injuries, while 18 (28%) were registered by all three systems. Retrospective interviews with athletes/coaches regarding injuries during the last 6 months gave the most complete picture of injuries to World Cup skiers and snowboarders. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Home advantage in the Winter Olympics (1908-1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, N J; Nevill, A M; Williams, A M

    2001-02-01

    We obtained indices of home advantage, based on the medals won by competing nations, for each event held at the Winter Olympics from 1908 to 1998. These indices were designed to assess home advantage while controlling for nation strength, changes in the number of medals on offer and the performance of 'non-hosting' nations. Some evidence of home advantage was found in figure skating, freestyle skiing, ski jumping, alpine skiing and short track speed skating. In contrast, little or no home advantage was observed in ice hockey, Nordic combined, Nordic skiing, bobsled, luge, biathlon or speed skating. When all events were combined, a significant home advantage was observed (P = 0.029), although no significant differences in the extent of home advantage were found between events (P > 0.05). When events were grouped according to whether they were subjectively assessed by judges, significantly greater home advantage was observed in the subjectively assessed events (P = 0.037). This was a reflection of better home performances, suggesting that judges were scoring home competitors disproportionately higher than away competitors. Familiarity with local conditions was shown to have some effect, particularly in alpine skiing, although the bobsled and luge showed little or no advantage over other events. Regression analysis showed that the number of time zones and direction of travel produced no discernible trends or differences in performance.

  16. High-rise Buildings versus Outdoor Thermal Environment in Chongqing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-sha Wang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of the over quick urbanization sinceChongqing, one of the biggest cities in China, has been a municipality directly under theCentral Government in 1997, excessive development and exceeding increase of high-risebuildings because of its special geographical position which finally leads to the worseningof the urban outdoor thermal environment. Then, this paper makes a bright balance to thefield measurement and simulated results of the wind speed field, temperature field of onemultifunctional high-rise building in Chongqing university located in the city center, andthe contrasted results validate the correctness of CFD in the outdoor thermal environmentalsimulation, expose the disadvantages of high-rise buildings on the aspects of blocking thewind field, decreasing wind speed which results in accumulation of the air-conditioningheat revolving around and periscian region where sunshine can not rip into. Finally, inorder to improve the urban outdoor thermal environment near the high-rise buildingsespecially for the angle of natural ventilation, this paper simulates the wind environment indifferent architectural compositions and architectural layouts by CFD, and the simulatedresults show that freestyle and tower buildings which can guarantee the wind speed andtake the air-conditioning heat away are much suitable and reasonable for the specialChongqing geography. These conclusions can also be used as a reference in othermountain cities, especially for the one with a great number of populations.

  17. Immediate effect of passive static stretching versus resistance exercises on postprandial blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudut, Peeyoosha; Rajan, Abey P

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly rising all over the globe at an alarming rate. In India, more than 61.3 million people have been presently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is possible to control the circulating blood glucose levels by reducing life style risk factors through physical activities comprising of muscle stretches, aerobic training, resistance exercises (REs), yoga, etc. The aim of this study is to identify and compare the immediate effect of passive static stretching (PSS) versus RE on blood glucose level in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study included 51 participants between the age of 40-65 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to study the immediate effect of 60-min PSS (n=25) and 60-min RE (n=26). The outcome measure was blood glucose level which was checked by glucometer (free-style neo). Blood sugar was assessed at 3 points of time that included fasting blood sugar level, 2 hr after the meal and immediately after the exercise regimen. Results of this study showed significant reduction in blood glucose level in subjects according to glucometer with PSS ( P =0.000) and RE ( P =0.00). However, both groups demonstrated equal effect in terms of lowering blood sugar level immediately after the exercise. The conclusion is both PSS and RE are effective in reducing postprandial blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mellitus and must be prescribed for the patients who demonstrate difficulty in controlling post prandial spike.

  18. Key parameters of the swimming start and their relationship to start performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor, Elaine; Pease, David L; Ball, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    The swimming start is typically broken into three sub-phases; on-block, flight, and underwater phases. While overall start performance is highly important to elite swimming, the contribution of each phase and important technical components within each phase, particularly with the new kick-start technique, has not been established. The aim of this study was to identify technical factors associated with overall start performance, with a particular focus on the underwater phase. A number of parameters were calculated from 52 starts performed by elite freestyle and butterfly swimmers. These parameters were split into above-water and underwater groupings, before factor analysis was used to reduce parameter numbers for multiple regression. For the above-water phases, 81% of variance in start performance was accounted for by take-off horizontal velocity. For the underwater water phase, 96% of variance was accounted for with time underwater in descent, time underwater in ascent and time to 10 m. Therefore, developing greater take-off horizontal velocity and focussing on the underwater phase by finding the ideal trajectory will lead to improved start performance.

  19. Mathematical and empirical proof of principle for an on-body personal lift augmentation device (PLAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli-Eramaki, Mohammad; Stevenson, Joan M; Reid, Susan A; Bryant, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    In our laboratory, we have developed a prototype of a personal lift augmentation device (PLAD) that can be worn by workers during manual handling tasks involving lifting or lowering or static holding in symmetric and asymmetric postures. Our concept was to develop a human-speed on-body assistive device that would reduce the required lumbar moment by 20-30% without negative consequences on other joints or lifting kinematics. This paper provides mathematical proof using simplified free body diagrams and two-dimensional moment balance equations. Empirical proof is also provided based on lifting trials with nine male subjects who executed sagittal plane lifts using three lifting styles (stoop, squat, free) and three different loads (5, 15, and 25kg) under two conditions (PLAD, No-PLAD). Nine Fastrak sensors and six in-line strap force sensors were used to estimate the reduction of compressive and shear forces on L4/L5 as well as estimate the forces transferred to the shoulders and knees. Depending on lifting technique, the PLAD applied an added 23-36Nm of torque to assist the back muscles during lifting tasks. The peak pelvic girdle contact forces were estimated and their magnitudes ranged from 221.3+/-11.2N for stoop lifting, 324.3+/-17.2N for freestyle lifts to 468.47+/-23.2N for squat lifting. The PLAD was able to reduce the compression and shear forces about 23-29% and 7.9-8.5%, respectively.

  20. Longitudinal intra- and inter-individual variability in young swimmers' performance and determinant competition factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Estrela Morais

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to follow-up the intra- and inter-individual variability of young swimmers' performance and determinant factors over two competitive seasons. Thirty young swimmers (14 boys: 12.33±0.65 years-old; 16 girls: 11.15±0.55 years-old were followed-up throughout two consecutive seasons (seven evaluation moments. Performance (100m freestyle, anthropometric, kinematic, hydrodynamic and efficiency features were evaluated. A gender and skill-level effect was observed. Boys improved in a higher amount (% comparing to girls. Overall, swimmers in skill-level 2 (both genders presented a higher intra-individual variability. Performance and anthropometrics showed a significant inter-individual variability in most moments, but hydrodynamics, kinematics and efficiency did not. Within each skill-level hydrodynamics, kinematics and efficiency were the variables that showed a high inter-individual variability. As a gender and skill-level effect was noticed in an age-group of young swimmers, coaches and practitioners should put the focus in specific and customized training plans for each skill-level of swimmers.

  1. Determinant Factors of Technical-Tactical Combinations Frequency in standing position during Womens World Senior Championships 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eduardo López González

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective. To classify the perfomance  of world class women wrestlers as the frequency and characteristics of their Technical-Tactical Combinations (TTC with effectiveness in the standing position during the most important competition on the international calendar 2009.Methods.  In the TTC were characterized all standing position effectives by a sample of 70 wrestlers, occupants of the top 10 in each of the 7 weight categories convened. Descriptive variables were used 5 of effectiveness, technical group, and characteristics of its phases. Variables were obtained determining the effectiveness, measured the "success rate" achieved by each fighter, all through factor analysis. Later wrestlers were classified by cluster analysis by Ward's method.Results. The most important factor related to get a medal  was the execution of legs attacks of with several possible endings started with almost no contact with the opponent, followed by the use of low-risk attacks launched from a firm grip. The wrestlers opted mostly for defense and counter low risk. Most of the competitors who had good results using several and alternative projections also managed to end their attacks.Conclusions. Characterization Model used and the factors of effectiveness in the fight standing obtained provided detailed explanations of the performance characteristics of the best wrestlers in the Senior World Championships 2009. The design of this research can be applied year after year in both freestyle and women's.Key words: Technical - Tactical Combinations, Rules, Fighting Women, Factor Analysis and Effectiveness

  2. Determinant Factors of Technical-Tactical Combinations Frequency in standing position during Womens World Senior Championships 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eduardo López González

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  Objective. To classify the perfomance  of world class women wrestlers as the frequency and characteristics of their Technical-Tactical Combinations (TTC with effectiveness in the standing position during the most important competition on the international calendar 2009. Methods.  In the TTC were characterized all standing position effectives by a sample of 70 wrestlers, occupants of the top 10 in each of the 7 weight categories convened. Descriptive variables were used 5 of effectiveness, technical group, and characteristics of its phases. Variables were obtained determining the effectiveness, measured the "success rate" achieved by each fighter, all through factor analysis. Later wrestlers were classified by cluster analysis by Ward's method. Results. The most important factor related to get a medal  was the execution of legs attacks of with several possible endings started with almost no contact with the opponent, followed by the use of low-risk attacks launched from a firm grip. The wrestlers opted mostly for defense and counter low risk. Most of the competitors who had good results using several and alternative projections also managed to end their attacks. Conclusions. Characterization Model used and the factors of effectiveness in the fight standing obtained provided detailed explanations of the performance characteristics of the best wrestlers in the Senior World Championships 2009. The design of this research can be applied year after year in both freestyle and women's. Key words: Technical - Tactical Combinations, Rules, Fighting Women, Factor Analysis and Effectiveness

  3. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amador García-Ramos

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1% and 15 m (+4.0% were observed (P 0.05. Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: < 0.20. Based on these results we can conclude that a traditional training high-living high strategy concurrent training of 3 weeks does not adversely affect swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance in high level swimmers, but further studies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions.

  4. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Calderón, Carmen; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Tomazin, Katja; Strumbelj, Boro; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1%) and 15 m (+4.0%) were observed (P 0.05). Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: training high-living high strategy concurrent training of 3 weeks does not adversely affect swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance in high level swimmers, but further studies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions.

  5. [The development of a new marker of the training status in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statsenko, E A; Kovkova, A V; Nekhaĭ, E V

    2012-01-01

    The present study was based on the mathematical modeling of the middle molecular weight peptides (MMWP) concentration in the blood. On the one hand, MMWP are the products of partial protein catabolism, on the other hand, they act as inductors of protein synthesis. We have developed a complex hormonal marker that allows estimating the adaptive reactions in the organism of the athletes. The marker integrates the known hormonal indices, such as testosterone to cortisol ratio and aldosterone to cortisol ratio (-1,271 + 0,206 x 1n(testosterone) + 1,108 x 1n(aldosterone))/1n(cortisol). The use of a mathematical model for the prediction of MMWP levels in the rowers' blood provides a basis for the application of the new marker for the evaluation of physical conditions of the high-class athletes engaged in other sports. By way of example, the estimation of its informative value for the examination of swimmers has demonstrated significant positive correlation between the predicted and observed MMWP levels (r = 0,4187; p = 0,050). Practicability of applying the newly proposed hormonal marker for monitoring adaptative reactions in athletes is confirmed by significant correlation of calculated values with the real time the freestyle swimmers spend to cover a 50 m distance (r = - 0,4454; p = 0,001).

  6. The neuroscience of musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Roger E

    2015-04-01

    Researchers have recently begun to examine the neural basis of musical improvisation, one of the most complex forms of creative behavior. The emerging field of improvisation neuroscience has implications not only for the study of artistic expertise, but also for understanding the neural underpinnings of domain-general processes such as motor control and language production. This review synthesizes functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) studies of musical improvisation, including vocal and instrumental improvisation, with samples of jazz pianists, classical musicians, freestyle rap artists, and non-musicians. A network of prefrontal brain regions commonly linked to improvisatory behavior is highlighted, including the pre-supplementary motor area, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and dorsal premotor cortex. Activation of premotor and lateral prefrontal regions suggests that a seemingly unconstrained behavior may actually benefit from motor planning and cognitive control. Yet activation of cortical midline regions points to a role of spontaneous cognition characteristic of the default network. Together, such results may reflect cooperation between large-scale brain networks associated with cognitive control and spontaneous thought. The improvisation literature is integrated with Pressing's theoretical model, and discussed within the broader context of research on the brain basis of creative cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. User Performance Evaluation of Four Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Applying ISO 15197:2013 Accuracy Criteria and Calculation of Insulin Dosing Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freckmann, Guido; Jendrike, Nina; Baumstark, Annette; Pleus, Stefan; Liebing, Christina; Haug, Cornelia

    2018-04-01

    The international standard ISO 15197:2013 requires a user performance evaluation to assess if intended users are able to obtain accurate blood glucose measurement results with a self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) system. In this study, user performance was evaluated for four SMBG systems on the basis of ISO 15197:2013, and possibly related insulin dosing errors were calculated. Additionally, accuracy was assessed in the hands of study personnel. Accu-Chek ® Performa Connect (A), Contour ® plus ONE (B), FreeStyle Optium Neo (C), and OneTouch Select ® Plus (D) were evaluated with one test strip lot. After familiarization with the systems, subjects collected a capillary blood sample and performed an SMBG measurement. Study personnel observed the subjects' measurement technique. Then, study personnel performed SMBG measurements and comparison measurements. Number and percentage of SMBG measurements within ± 15 mg/dl and ± 15% of the comparison measurements at glucose concentrations performed by lay-users. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02916576). Ascensia Diabetes Care Deutschland GmbH.

  8. Accuracy of a cow-side test for the diagnosis of hyperketonemia and hypoglycemia in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, K; López Helguera, I; Behrouzi, A; Gobikrushanth, M; Hoff, B; Colazo, M G

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a cow-side device (FreeStyle Precision Neo™) to diagnose ketosis and hypoglycemia based on measures of blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) and glucose. Eleven commercial dairy farms were visited and blood samples were taken from Holstein cows between 2 and 14days in milk, yielding 441 samples for BHBA analysis and 308 samples for glucose analysis. Concentrations of BHBA and glucose were measured in two ways, 1) using the cow-side device with whole blood immediately after sampling and 2) serum samples analyzed with a standard laboratory assay (Animal Health Laboratory, University of Guelph, Canada). The accuracy of the device was determined by comparing the results to the laboratory method as well as the ability to diagnose ketosis (BHBA ≥1.2mmol/L) and hypoglycemia (glucose cow-side device is accurate for rapid measurement of blood BHBA and diagnosis of ketosis on farms but is not accurate for measurement of blood glucose concentrations and diagnosis of hypoglycemia. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. "Real Language": Combining Intermediate Spanish Language Learners and ESOL/Native Speakers for Vernacular Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe LaValle

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the possibilities of combining Spanish language learners and English language learners in high school and post-secondary institutions for mutual benefit to learn authentic language. Academic or "classroom" Spanish is insufficient to empower students for today's workplace. The concept behind "Real Language" is illustrated by an example of an interdisciplinary activity to facilitate communicative interaction in genuine language and promote cultural understanding between intermediate Spanish students and ESOL/native speakers at the high school and post-secondary level. Students are asked to utilize their life skills in interactive, freestyle conversation without the intervention of an instructor. The learning space for language exchange is an out-of-class venue for a non-intimidating, more authentic setting. This simple qualitative study investigates the potential value of this sort of interdisciplinary activity. The intent is to evaluate attitudes of the participants in relation to confidence in their ability to use the target language, and their willingness to use it in social and professional environments and, in addition, to facilitate cultural understanding. The positive result of the project is validated by the voice of the student participants as they reflect on their experience in "Real Language". Could this concept facilitate evolving strategies for interdisciplinary contemporary foreign language learning?

  10. Breaking the Myth That Relay Swimming Is Faster Than Individual Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, Sabrina; Etxebarria, Naroa; Thompson, Kevin G

    2016-04-01

    To investigate if swimming performance is better in a relay race than in the corresponding individual race. The authors analyzed 166 elite male swimmers from 15 nations in the same competition (downloaded from www.swimrankings.net). Of 778 observed races, 144 were Olympic Games performances (2000, 2004, 2012), with the remaining 634 performed in national or international competitions. The races were 100-m (n = 436) and 200-m (n = 342) freestyle events. Relay performance times for the 2nd-4th swimmers were adjusted (+ 0.73 s) to allow for the "flying start." Without any adjustment, mean individual relay performances were significantly faster for the first 50 m and overall time in the 100-m events. Furthermore, the first 100 m of the 200-m relay was significantly faster (P > .001). During relays, swimmers competing in 1st position did not show any difference compared with their corresponding individual performance (P > .16). However, swimmers competing in 2nd-4th relay-team positions demonstrated significantly faster times in the 100-m (P individual events (P team positions were adjusted for the flying start no differences were detected between relay and individual race performance for any event or split time (P > .17). Highly trained swimmers do not swim (or turn) faster in relay events than in their individual races. Relay exchange times account for the difference observed in individual vs relay performance.

  11. Frequency and direction of competitive anger in contact sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, B; Bertollo, M; Bortoli, L

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether athletes involved in physical contact sports may interpret their feelings of anger as facilitative of performance, and to examine differences in the interpretation of anger as a function of the type of sport (team vs individual) or the competitive skill level (high vs low). A modified version of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was administered to 100 Italian adult male athletes practicing rugby or individual combat sports (judo, freestyle wrestling, or Greco-Roman wrestling). The questionnaire was intended to measure the frequency and the direction (i.e., the facilitative-debilitative interpretation) of competitive anger. Many athletes engaged in contact sports tended interpret their competitive anger as facilitative of performance rather than debilitative. The type of sport and the athlete's standard level can mediate the individual's interpretation of the effects of anger symptoms upon performance. Competitors can interpret their anger as helpful to energize behavior and channel physical and mental resources for skill execution. Practitioners should assist athletes in gaining control over anger rather than attempting to suppress it.

  12. Text-independent writer identification and verification using textural and allographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulacu, Marius; Schomaker, Lambert

    2007-04-01

    The identification of a person on the basis of scanned images of handwriting is a useful biometric modality with application in forensic and historic document analysis and constitutes an exemplary study area within the research field of behavioral biometrics. We developed new and very effective techniques for automatic writer identification and verification that use probability distribution functions (PDFs) extracted from the handwriting images to characterize writer individuality. A defining property of our methods is that they are designed to be independent of the textual content of the handwritten samples. Our methods operate at two levels of analysis: the texture level and the character-shape (allograph) level. At the texture level, we use contour-based joint directional PDFs that encode orientation and curvature information to give an intimate characterization of individual handwriting style. In our analysis at the allograph level, the writer is considered to be characterized by a stochastic pattern generator of ink-trace fragments, or graphemes. The PDF of these simple shapes in a given handwriting sample is characteristic for the writer and is computed using a common shape codebook obtained by grapheme clustering. Combining multiple features (directional, grapheme, and run-length PDFs) yields increased writer identification and verification performance. The proposed methods are applicable to free-style handwriting (both cursive and isolated) and have practical feasibility, under the assumption that a few text lines of handwritten material are available in order to obtain reliable probability estimates.

  13. Methodical basis of training of cadets for the military applied heptathlon competitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Anatskyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to develop methodical bases of training of cadets for the military applied heptathlon competitions. Material and methods: Cadets of 2-3 courses at the age of 19-20 years (n=20 participated in researches. Cadets were selected by the best results of exercises performing included into the program of military applied heptathlon competitions (100 m run, 50 m freestyle swimming, Kalashnikov rifle shooting, pull-up, obstacle course, grenade throwing, 3000 m run. Preparation took place on the basis of training center. All trainings were organized and carried out according to the methodical basics: in a week preparation microcycle five days cadets had two trainings a day (on Saturday was one training, on Sunday they had rest. The selected exercises with individual loads were performed, Results : Sport scores demonstrated top results in the performance of 100 m run, 3000 m run and pull-up. The indices of performing exercise "obstacle course" were much lower than expected. Rather low results were demonstrated in swimming and shooting. Conclusions . Results of researches indicate the necessity of quality improvement: cadets’ weapons proficiency; physical readiness to perform the exercises requiring complex demonstration of all physical qualities.

  14. Confirming the Value of Swimming-Performance Models for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormehl, Shilo J; Robertson, Samuel J; Barker, Alan R; Williams, Craig A

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of existing performance models to assess the progression of male and female adolescent swimmers through a quantitative and qualitative mixed-methods approach. Fourteen published models were tested using retrospective data from an independent sample of Dutch junior national-level swimmers from when they were 12-18 y of age (n = 13). The degree of association by Pearson correlations was compared between the calculated differences from the models and quadratic functions derived from the Dutch junior national qualifying times. Swimmers were grouped based on their differences from the models and compared with their swimming histories that were extracted from questionnaires and follow-up interviews. Correlations of the deviations from both the models and quadratic functions derived from the Dutch qualifying times were all significant except for the 100-m breaststroke and butterfly and the 200-m freestyle for females (P motivation appeared to be synonymous with higher-level career performance. This mixed-methods approach helped confirm the validity of the models that were found to be applicable to adolescent swimmers at all levels, allowing coaches to track performance and set goals. The value of the models in being able to account for the expected performance gains during adolescence enables quantification of peripheral factors that could affect performance.

  15. The CERN Canoe and Kayak Club has a swimming time

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The new Canoe and Kayak Club, which was formed at the start of the 2006 winter season, already has around twenty members, including some former top-level sportsmen. Catharine Noble, of the IT Department was ranked 13th overall in women’s British freestyle in 1997. Here she is performing a flat loop, a position that can be held for several seconds.Would you be interested in a spot of lunchtime canoeing or kayaking to break up a long working day? Or are you more of an evening sports enthusiast? The CERN Canoe and Kayak Club offers both options, as well as a choice of flat-water and white-water activities to suit all temperaments. With its calm waters and easy access for boats, the Peney nature reserve is ideal for beginners. Outings comprise a few exercises to acquire the techniques, as well as games to make the learning experience more fun and spontaneous. These waters are not only frequented by beginners, however, but also by thos...

  16. Practical implementation, education and interpretation guidelines for continuous glucose monitoring: A French position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot, S; Benhamou, P Y; Atlan, C; Bismuth, E; Bonnemaison, E; Catargi, B; Charpentier, G; Farret, A; Filhol, N; Franc, S; Gouet, D; Guerci, B; Guilhem, I; Guillot, C; Jeandidier, N; Joubert, M; Melki, V; Merlen, E; Penfornis, A; Picard, S; Renard, E; Reznik, Y; Riveline, J P; Rudoni, S; Schaepelynck, P; Sola-Gazagnes, A; Tubiana-Rufi, N; Verier-Mine, O; Hanaire, H

    2018-02-01

    The use by diabetes patients of real-time continuous interstitial glucose monitoring (CGM) or the FreeStyle Libre ® (FSL) flash glucose monitoring (FGM) system is becoming widespread and has changed diabetic practice. The working group bringing together a number of French experts has proposed the present practical consensus. Training of professionals and patient education are crucial for the success of CGM. Also, institutional recommendations must pay particular attention to the indications for and reimbursement of CGM devices in populations at risk of hypoglycaemia. The rules of good practice for CGM are the precursors of those that need to be enacted, given the oncoming emergence of artificial pancreas devices. It is necessary to have software combining user-friendliness, multiplatform usage and average glucose profile (AGP) presentation, while integrating glucose and insulin data as well as events. Expression of CGM data must strive for standardization that facilitates patient phenotyping and their follow-up, while integrating indicators of variability. The introduction of CGM involves a transformation of treatment support, rendering it longer and more complex as it also includes specific educational and technical dimensions. This complexity must be taken into account in discussions of organization of diabetes care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Commentary on "Performance of a glucose meter with a built-in automated bolus calculator versus manual bolus calculation in insulin-using subjects".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Paolo; Vehí, Josep; Revert, Ana; Calm, Remei; Bondia, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    Since the early 2000s, there has been an exponentially increasing development of new diabetes-applied technology, such as continuous glucose monitoring, bolus calculators, and "smart" pumps, with the expectation of partially overcoming clinical inertia and low patient compliance. However, its long-term efficacy in glucose control has not been unequivocally proven. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Sussman and colleagues evaluated a tool for the calculation of the prandial insulin dose. A total of 205 insulin-treated patients were asked to compute a bolus dose in two simulated conditions either manually or with the bolus calculator built into the FreeStyle InsuLinx meter, revealing the high frequency of wrong calculations when performed manually. Although the clinical impact of this study is limited, it highlights the potential implications of low diabetesrelated numeracy in poor glycemic control. Educational programs aiming to increase patients' empowerment and caregivers' knowledge are needed in order to get full benefit of the technology. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. Clinical Use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, David; Choudhary, Pratik

    2017-05-01

    With the emphasis on intensive management of type 1 diabetes, data from studies support frequent monitoring of glucose levels to improve glycemic control and reduce glucose variability, which can be related to an increase in macro and microvascular complications. However, few perform capillary blood glucose that frequently. There are currently two available alternatives that this review will discuss, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and flash glucose monitoring. CGM has become an important diagnostic and therapeutic option in optimizing diabetes management. CGM systems are now more accurate, smaller, and easier to use compared to original models. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated that CGM can improve Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C) and reduce glucose variability in both continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injection users. When used in an automated "insulin-suspend" system, reduced frequency of hypoglycemia and shorter time spent in hypoglycemic range have been demonstrated. Despite the potential benefits CGM has to offer in clinical practice, concerns exist on the accuracy of these devices and patient compliance with therapy, which may prevent the true clinical benefit of CGM being achieved, as observed in RCTs. Flash glucose monitoring systems FreeStyle ® Libre™ (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) are as accurate as many CGM systems available and have the added benefit of being factory calibrated. Studies have shown that flash glucose monitoring systems are very well tolerated by patients and effectively reduce glucose variability, increasing time in range.

  19. Evaluation of subcutaneous glucose monitoring systems under routine environmental conditions in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberer, Felix; Hajnsek, Martin; Rumpler, Markus; Zenz, Sabine; Baumann, Petra M; Elsayed, Hesham; Puffing, Adelheid; Treiber, Gerlies; Pieber, Thomas R; Sourij, Harald; Mader, Julia K

    2017-07-01

    Continuous and flash glucose monitoring (GM) systems have been established in diabetes care. We compared the sensor performance of 3 commercially available GM systems. A total of 12 patients with type 1 diabetes were included in a single-centre, open-label study in which the sensor performance of the Abbott FreeStyle libre (Abbott), Dexcom G4 Platinum (Dexcom) and Medtronic MiniMed 640G (Medtronic) systems over 12 hours was compared during mimicked real-life conditions (meals, exercise, hypo- and hyperglycaemia). Sensor performance was determined by fulfilment of ISO 15197:2013 criteria, calculating mean absolute relative difference (MARD), and was also illustrated using Parkes error grid and Bland-Altman plots. Sensor performance during changes in metabolic variables (lactate, betahydroxybutyrate, glucagon, non-esterified-fatty-acids) was determined by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient testing. The systems fulfilled ISO 15197:2013 criteria by 73.2% (Abbott), 56.1% (Dexcom) and 52.0% (Medtronic). The MARDs ± standard deviation in the entire glycaemic range were 13.2% ± 10.9% (Abbott), 16.8% ± 12.3% (Dexcom) and 21.4% ± 17.6% (Medtronic), respectively. All sensors performed less accurately during hypoglycaemia and best during hyperglycaemia. We did not observe an influence of metabolic variables on sensor performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Continuous glucose monitoring in subcutaneous tissue using factory-calibrated sensors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoss, Udo; Jeddi, Iman; Schulz, Mark; Budiman, Erwin; Bhogal, Claire; McGarraugh, Geoffrey

    2010-08-01

    Commercial continuous subcutaneous glucose monitors require in vivo calibration using capillary blood glucose tests. Feasibility of factory calibration, i.e., sensor batch characterization in vitro with no further need for in vivo calibration, requires a predictable and stable in vivo sensor sensitivity and limited inter- and intra-subject variation of the ratio of interstitial to blood glucose concentration. Twelve volunteers wore two FreeStyle Navigator (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) continuous glucose monitoring systems for 5 days in parallel for two consecutive sensor wears (four sensors per subject, 48 sensors total). Sensors from a prototype sensor lot with a low variability in glucose sensitivity were used for the study. Median sensor sensitivity values based on capillary blood glucose were calculated per sensor and compared for inter- and intra-subject variation. Mean absolute relative difference (MARD) calculation and error grid analysis were performed using a single calibration factor for all sensors to simulate factory calibration and compared to standard fingerstick calibration. Sensor sensitivity variation in vitro was 4.6%, which increased to 8.3% in vivo (P glucose monitoring is feasible with similar accuracy to standard fingerstick calibration. Additional data are required to confirm this result in subjects with diabetes.

  1. Accuracy of a Flash Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, S; Pilosio, B; Dondi, F; Linari, G; Testa, S; Brugnoli, F; Gianella, P; Pietra, M; Fracassi, F

    2016-07-01

    A novel flash glucose monitoring system (FGMS) (FreeStyle Libre, Abbott, UK) was recently developed for humans. It continuously measures the interstitial glucose (IG) concentrations for 14 days. To assess the clinical and analytical accuracy of the FGMS in diabetic dogs. Ten client-owned diabetic dogs on insulin treatment. Prospective and observational study. The FGMS was placed on the neck for up to 14 days. During the 1st-2nd, 6-7th, and 13-14th days from application, the IG measurements were compared with the plasma (EDTA) glucose (PG) concentrations analyzed by a reference hexokinase based method. The application and the use of the FGMS were apparently painless, easy, and well tolerated by all dogs. Mild erythema at the site of the application was found in 5/10 dogs at the end of the wearing period. A good correlation between IG and PG concentrations (rho = 0.94; P blood glucose concentrations. Mean ± standard deviation difference from the reference method was 2.3 ± 46.8 mg/dL. The FGMS is easy to use and is accurate for IG glucose measurement in diabetic dogs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Relationship between different push-off variables and start performance in experienced swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Feriche, Belén; de la Fuente, Blanca; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; Strojnik, Vojko; Strumbelj, Boro; Štirn, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between different variables measured with a force plate during the swimming start push-off phase and start performance presented by times to 5, 10 and 15 m. Twenty-one women from the Slovenian national swimming team performed two different swim starts (freestyle and undulatory) on a portable force plate to a distance further than 15 m. Correlations between push-off variables and times to 5, 10 and 15 m were quantified through Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient (r). The variables that significantly correlated (p  .05). Based on the results of this study, we can conclude that horizontal take-off velocity and average horizontal acceleration (calculated as the average horizontal force divided by swimmer's body mass) are the variables most related to swimming start performance in experienced swimmers, and therefore could be the preferred measures to monitor swimmers' efficiency during the push-off phase.

  3. WOMEN AND MEN IN SPORT PERFORMANCE: THE GENDER GAP HAS NOT EVOLVED SINCE 1983

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Thibault

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sex is a major factor influencing best performances and world records. Here the evolution of the difference between men and women's best performances is characterized through the analysis of 82 quantifiable events since the beginning of the Olympic era. For each event in swimming, athletics, track cycling, weightlifting and speed skating the gender gap is fitted to compare male and female records. It is also studied through the best performance of the top 10 performers in each gender for swimming and athletics. A stabilization of the gender gap in world records is observed after 1983, at a mean difference of 10.0% ± 2.94 between men and women for all events. The gender gap ranges from 5.5% (800-m freestyle, swimming to 18.8% (long jump. The mean gap is 10.7% for running performances, 17.5% for jumps, 8.9% for swimming races, 7.0% for speed skating and 8.7% in cycling. The top ten performers' analysis reveals a similar gender gap trend with a stabilization in 1982 at 11.7%, despite the large growth in participation of women from eastern and western countries, that coincided with later- published evidence of state-institutionalized or individual doping. These results suggest that women will not run, jump, swim or ride as fast as men

  4. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  5. Effect of fastskin suits on performance, drag, and energy cost of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatard, Jean-Claude; Wilson, Barry

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the effect of fastskin suits on 25- to 800-m performances, drag, and energy cost of swimming. The performances, stroke rate and distance per stroke, were measured for 14 competitive swimmers in a 25-m pool, when wearing a normal suit (N) and when wearing a full-body suit (FB) or a waist-to-ankle suit (L). Passive drag, oxygen uptake, blood lactate, and the perceived exertion were measured in a flume. There was a 3.2% +/- 2.4% performance benefit for all subjects over the six distances covered at maximal speed wearing FB and L when compared with N. When wearing L, the gain was significantly lower (1.8% +/- 2.5%, P energy cost of swimming was significantly reduced when wearing FB and L by 4.5% +/- 5.4% and 5.5% +/- 3.1%, respectively (P energy cost of submaximal swimming and an increased distance per stroke, at the same stroke rates, and reduced freestyle performance time.

  6. The Relationship Between the Lower-Body Muscular Profile and Swimming Start Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Ramos Amador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the correlation of different dry land strength and power tests with swimming start performance. Twenty international level female swimmers (age 15.3 ± 1.6 years, FINA point score 709.6 ± 71.1 performed the track freestyle start. Additionally, dry land tests were conducted: a squat (SJ and countermovement jumps (CMJ, b squat jumps with additional resistance equivalent to 25, 50, 75 and 100% of swimmers’ body weight [BW], and c leg extension and leg flexion maximal voluntary isometric contractions. Correlations between dry land tests and start times at 5, 10 and 15 m were quantified through Pearson’s linear correlation coefficients (r. The peak bar velocity reached during the jumps with additional resistance was the variable most correlated to swimming start performance (r = -0.57 to -0.66 at 25%BW; r = -0.57 to -0.72 at 50%BW; r = -0.59 to -0.68 at 75%BW; r = -0.50 to - 0.64 at 100%BW. A few significant correlations between the parameters of the SJ and the CMJ with times of 5 and 10 m were found, and none with the isometric variables. The peak velocity reached during jumps with external loads relative to BW was found a good indicator of swimming start performance.

  7. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES AND ENDOCRINE RESPONSES IN PRE-COMPETITION TRAINING IN ELITE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe biochemical changes and endocrine responses to low-volume pre-competition swimming training for elite swimmers. Twelve sprint swimmers (6 males and 6 females participated in 3-week pre-competition training. Measures of velocity anaerobic threshold (VAT, creatine kinase (CK, blood urea (BU, haemoglobin (Hb and testosterone/cortisol ratio (TC were obtained before and after the 1st, 2nd and 3rd week of training. The training load decreased from 27.3 to 13.7 km per week within 3 weeks. The VAT tested the load with an increased training protocol of 200 m×4 freestyle swimming and initial loads were 85, 90, 95, and 100 percent of the individual load. There were changes in the values of VAT, CK, BU, Hb and TC ratio during the training, and the changes corresponded to the changes of the training stimuli in time. There were also differences between the male and female swimmers. The most significant finding in this study was that such training stimulated the enginery of the swimmers and helped the swimmers recover enginery and indicated improved velocity in the competition with the following adjusting exercise after pre-competition training.

  8. ["Me? I'm just here, part of the world". A field experience on endemic disease control in Cansanção, Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, R B

    1998-01-01

    This free-style article reports an experience with Chagas' disease control involving community participation in the Jequitinhonha Valley (Minas Gerais, Brazil) implemented during the 1980s and recently reevaluated. As an action-based participant research project, it was supported by the Socioeconomic TDR Committee (WHO/WB/UNDP) in the area of Popular Education. The main objective was to investigate the meaning of Chagas' disease from the community's perspective, seeking alternative control measures with their participation. Despite the extremely high prevalence of the disease, it was no perceived as a priority by the population, who were living in destitution and simply fighting for their very survival. Given this situation, Chagas' disease control was performed in an integrated manner, taking other community needs into account. The article suggests some forms of participation in the control of endemic diseases, taking into account the people's knowledge, focused on the "here and now" in an integrated vision of both their problems and their ability to mobilize behind concrete interests. Changes are also needed in the relationship between outside agents and the community, reciprocity in the involvement with community, a permanent attitude of listening and solidarity, a "self-diagnosis", and organization of population.

  9. Shakespeare in the “Gangsta’s Paradise”. Akala and the empowering potential of the Bard’s poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Canani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the work of British rapper Akala from the viewpoint of literary theory and literature as a social practice, discussing to what extent Shakespeare's work can inspire unprivileged audiences in meaningful new ways. Born Kingslee James Daley, Akala's work is rooted in his Afro-Caribbean background, drama, and the black hip-hop culture of the 1990s. Having founded his independent music label in 2003, in his breakthrough single "Shakespeare" (2006 Akala invited his audience to challenge stereotypical assumptions on hip-hop and rap, provocatively defining himself "like Shakespeare with a nigger twist". Inspired by a freestyle challenge, the pastiche "Comedy Tragedy History" (2007 further appropriates the Shakespearean legacy, dispelling canonical distinctions between high and low culture. After mapping Akala's ideas on music and poetry, this article explores his reworking of Shakespearean texts in the context of Todorov's argument on the plasticity of literary genres, with a specific focus on Akala's appropriation of Shakespeare's language. It then argues that Akala's appropriation strategies also surface in the activity of The Hip-Hop Shakespeare Company, discussing Akala's workshop at Milan's Juvenile Detention Centre Cesare Beccaria as a case study. As a last point, the article purports to re-contextualise the role of classic literature in contemporary society in the wake of such thinkers as Bourdieu and Nussbaum.

  10. [Vitamin-antioxidant sufficiency of winter sports athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketova, N A; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Solntseva, T N; Khanfer'ian, R A

    2013-01-01

    The sufficiency of 169 athletes (six disciplines: bullet shooting, biathlon, bobsleigh, skeleton, freestyle skiing, snowboarding) with vitamins A, E, C, B2, and beta-carotene has been investigated in April-September 2013. All athletes (102 juniors, mean age--18.5 +/- 0.3 years, and 67 adult high-performance athletes, mean age--26.8 +/- 0.7 years) were sufficiently supplied with vitamin A (70.7 +/- 1.7 mcg/dl). Mean blood serum retinol level was 15% higher the upper limit of the norm (80 mcg/dl) in biathletes while median reached 90.9 mcg/dl. Blood serum level of tocopherols (1.22 +/- 0.03 mg/dl), ascorbic acid (1.06 +/- 0.03 mg/dl), riboflavin (7.1 +/- 0.4 ng/ml), and beta-carotene (25.1 +/- 1.7 mcg/dl) was in within normal range, but the incidence of insufficiency of vitamins E, C, B2, and carotenoid among athletes varied in the range of 0-25, 0-17, 15-67 and 42-75%, respectively. 95% of adults and 80% of younger athletes were sufficiently provided with vitamin E. Vitamin E level in blood serum of juniors involved in skeleton and biathlon was lower by 51 and 72% (p antioxidants (beta-carotene and vitamins E and C). In other sports, the relative quantity of athletes sufficiently supplied with these essential nutrients did not exceed 56%. The quota of supplied with all antioxidants among bullet shooters (31.1%) and bobsledders (23.5%) was significantly (p antioxidant (mainly beta-carotene) was most often recorded among persons engaged in bullet shooting (67%). The simultaneous lack of all three antioxidants was found only in freestylers and bobsledders (about 5%). Decreased level of antioxidants in blood serum in 40% of athletes was combined with vitamin B2 deficiency. The data obtained suggest the necessity to optimize diet vitamin content of all athletes, taking into account the age and gender differences. Contrary to prevailing stereotypes the optimization must involve not only an increase in the consumption of vitamins (vitamins E, B group) and carotenoids, but

  11. Searching for Criteria in Evaluating the Monofin Swimming Turn from the Perspective of Coaching and Improving Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejman, Marek; Borowska, Grażyna

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to analysise the selected kinematic parameters of the monofin swimming turn. The high complexity of performing turns is hindered by the large surface of the monofin, which disturbs control and sense of the body in water. A lack of objective data available on monofin swimming turns has resulted in field research connected with the specification of parameters needed for the evaluation of the technique. Therefore, turns observed in elite swimmers contain underlying conclusions for objective criteria, ensuring the highest level of coaching and the improving of turns in young swimmers. Six, high level, male swimmers participated in the study. The subject of the analysis was the fastest turn, from one out of three trial turns made after swimming a distance of 25 m. Images of the turns were collected from two cameras located under water in accordance with the procedures of the previous analyses of freestyle turns. The images were digitized and analysed by the SIMI®- Movement Analysis System. The interdependency of the total turn time and the remaining recorded parameters, constituted the basis for analysis of the kinematic parameters of five turn phases. The interdependency was measured using r- Pearson’s correlation coefficients. The novel character of the subject covered in this study, forced interpretation of the results on the basis of turn analyses in freestyle swimming. The results allow for the creation of a diagram outlinig area of search for an effective and efficient monofin swimming turn mechanism. The activities performed from the moment of wall contact until the commencement of stroking seem to be crucial for turn improvement. A strong belief has resulted that, the correct monofin swimming turn, is more than just a simple consequence of the fastest performance of all its components. The most important criteria in evaluating the quality of the monofin swimming turn are: striving for the optimal extension of wall contact time, push-off time

  12. Transient Relative Age Effects across annual age groups in National level Australian Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, Stephen; Abbott, Shaun; Dogramaci, Sera; Kable, Adam; Salter, James; Hintermann, Mirjam; Romann, Michael

    2017-12-29

    To determine the prevalence, magnitude and transient patterning of Relative Age Effects (RAEs) according to sex and stroke event across all age-groups at the Australian National age swimming Championships. Repeated years of cross-sectional participation data were examined. Participants were 6014 unique male (3185) and female (2829) swimmers (aged 12-18 years) who participated in Freestyle (50, 400m) and/or Breaststroke (100, 200m) at the National age swimming Championships between 2000-2014 (inclusive). RAE prevalence, magnitude and transience were determined using Chi-square tests and Cramer's V estimates for effect size. Odds Ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) examined relative age quartile discrepancies. These steps were applied across age-groups and according to sex and each stroke event. Consistent RAEs with large-medium effect sizes were evident for males at 12-15 years of age respectively, and with large-medium effects for females at 12-14 respectively across all four swimming strokes. RAE magnitude then consistently reduced with age across strokes (e.g., Q1 vs. Q4 OR range 16year old males=0.94-1.20; females=0.68-1.41). With few exceptions, by 15-16 years RAEs had typically dissipated; and by 17-18 years, descriptive and significant inverse RAEs emerged, reflecting overrepresentation of relatively younger swimmers. Performance advantages associated with relative age (and thereby likely growth and maturation) are transient. Greater consideration of transient performance and participation in athlete development systems is necessary. This may include revising the emphasis of sport programmes according to developmental stages and delaying forms of athlete selection to improve validity. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The transfer of strength and power into the stroke biomechanics of young swimmers over a 34-week period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Jorge E; Silva, António J; Garrido, Nuno D; Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2018-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to learn the interplay between dry-land strength and conditioning, and stroke biomechanics in young swimmers, during a 34-week training programme. Twenty-seven swimmers (overall: 13.33 ± 0.85 years old; 11 boys: 13.5 ± 0.75 years old; 16 girls: 13.2 ± 0.92 years old) competing at regional- and national-level competitions were evaluated. The swimmers were submitted to a specific in-water and dry-land strength training over 34 weeks (and evaluated at three time points: pre-, mid-, and post-test; M1, M2, and M3, respectively). The 100-m freestyle performance was chosen as the main outcome (i.e. dependent variable). The arm span (AS; anthropometrics), throwing velocity (TV; strength), stroke length (SL), and stroke frequency (SF; kinematics) were selected as independent variables. There was a performance enhancement over time (M1 vs. M3: 68.72 ± 5.57 s, 66.23 ± 5.23 s; Δ = -3.77%; 95% CI: -3.98;-3.56) and an overall improvement of the remaining variables. At M1 and M2, all links between variables presented significant effects (p biomechanics parameters (SL and SF) increased. The model predicted 89%, 88%, and 92% of the performance at M1, M2, and M3, respectively, with a reasonable adjustment (i.e. goodness-of-fit M1: χ 2 /df = 3.82; M2: χ 2 /df = 3.08; M3: χ 2 /df = 4.94). These findings show that strength and conditioning parameters have a direct effect on the stroke biomechanics, and the latter one on the swimming performance.

  14. Introducción de las artes marciales asiáticas en Portugal = The introduction of asian martial arts in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gutiérrez García

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio analiza la introducción del jujutsu en Portugal, sucedida a principios del siglo XX. Para su realización se ha consultado fundamentalmente prensa histórica portuguesa, tanto general como específica del ámbito deportivo. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que la introducción del jujutsu en Portugal se produjo fundamentalmente a través del mundo del espectáculo, mediante actuaciones de expertos japoneses. Las notables diferencias técnicas y corporales entre estos luchadores japoneses y los luchadores profesionales de lucha libre y grecorromana de la época, a los que habitualmente solían derrotar, contribuyeron a generar un potente imaginario de las artes de combate orientales como sistemas superiores de cultura física y defensa personal. No obstante, a pesar del éxito del jujutsu este no logró afianzarse sólidamente en Portugal, desapareciendo progresivamente de la escena pública desde principios de la segunda década del siglo XX.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------The present study analyzes the introduction of jujutsu in Portugal at the beginning of the 20th century. Mainly, historical Portuguese newspapers were reviewed, both general and specific from sports field. Results show that the introduction of jujutsu in Portugal was principally conduced via the show business through exhibitions performed by Japanese experts. Significant technical and physical differences between the Japanese fighters and the professional Freestyle and Greco-roman fighters, who were usually defeated by the former, contributed to create a powerful imaginary of the eastern fighting arts as superior systems of physical culture and self-defence. However, in spite of jujutsu’s success, it did not come to be strongly established in Portugal, vanishing progressively off the public scene since the beginning of the 1910s.

  15. Sports injury and illness epidemiology: Great Britain Olympic Team (TeamGB) surveillance during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Green, Debbie; Elliott, Niall

    2015-01-01

    Sports injury and illness surveillance is the first step in injury and illness prevention, and is important for the protection of both athlete health and performance in major competitions. To identify the prevalence, severity nature and causes of athlete injuries and illnesses in the Great Britain Olympic Team (TeamGB) during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games. The observational prospective cohort study followed the Great Britain Injury/Illness Performance Project surveillance methodology and obtained information on injuries and illnesses that occurred during the Games between 30 January and 23 February 2014 in TeamGB athletes (n=56). Among the 56 TeamGB athletes, there were 27 injuries and 11 illnesses during the Olympic Games period. This equated to 39% sustaining at least one injury and 18% at least one illness, with an incidence of 48.2 injuries and 19.6 illnesses per 100 athletes, respectively. Of all injuries and illnesses, 9% and 7%, respectively, resulted in time loss. The risk of sustaining an injury was highest for freestyle skiing, skeleton and snowboarding; and lowest for curling, biathlon and Alpine skiing (with no reported injuries); with the lower limb being the most commonly injured location. Respiratory system illnesses were most frequently reported overall, and older female athletes were the ones most affected by illness. The risk of injury was double the risk of illness for TeamGB athletes. Overall, the rate of time-loss issues was low. Methodological considerations are important when interpreting data, and prevention strategies should focus on those issues causing the greatest risk, in terms of prevalence and severity, to athlete health and performance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Recommending blood glucose monitors, a pharmacy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alan

    2007-03-01

    Selection of what blood glucose monitoring system to utilize has become an issue for physicians, diabetes educators, pharmacists, and patients. The field of competing makes and models of blood glucose monitoring systems has become crowded, with manufacturers touting improvements in accuracy, ease of use/alternate site options, stored results capacity, software evaluation tools, and/or price point. Personal interviews of 12 pharmacists from community and academic practice settings about monitor preference, as well as results from a national survey of pharmacist recommendations, were compared to actual wholesale sales data to estimate the impact of such recommendations on final monitor selection by the patient. Accu-Chek monitors were recommended 34.65% of the time and represented 28.58% of sales, with a success rate of 82.48% of being the monitor selected. OneTouch monitors had 27.72% of recommendations but represented 31.43% of sales, indicating possible patient brand loyalty or formulary preference for that product. FreeStyle(R) monitors came in third for pharmacist recommendations and were selected by the patient 61.68% of the time when recommended. The category of "other monitor" choices was selected 60.89% of the time by patients given those suggestions. Included in the "other monitor" category was the new disposable monitor marketed as the Sidekick. Based on sales data provided, the Sidekick made up 2.87% of "other monitor" category sales, representing 68% of the "other monitor" segment. While patients frequently follow pharmacist monitoring system suggestions, the ultimate deciding factor is most often the final out-of-pocket cost to the patient. As a result, cost of supplies often becomes the most important determining factor in final monitor selection at the patient level. If the patient cannot afford to perform the recommended daily testing intervals, all other determining factors and suggestions become moot.

  17. Peripheral, functional and postural asymmetries related to the preferred chewing side in adults with natural dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-Lastra, B; Flores-Orozco, E I; Ayuso-Montero, R; Peraire, M; Martinez-Gomis, J

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the preferred chewing side and whether chewing side preference is related to peripheral, functional or postural lateral preferences. One hundred and forty-six adults with natural dentition performed three masticatory assays, each consisting of five trials of chewing three pieces of silicon placed into a latex bag for 20 cycles, either freestyle or unilaterally on the right- or left-hand side. Occlusal contact area in the intercuspal position, maximum bite force, masticatory performance and cycle duration were measured and the lateral asymmetry of these variables was calculated. Laterality tests were performed to determine handedness, footedness, earedness and eyedness as functional preferences, and hand-clasping, arm-folding and leg-crossing as postural lateral preferences. The preferred chewing side was determined using three different methods: assessment of the first chewing cycle for each trial, calculation of the asymmetry index from all cycles and application of a visual analogue scale. Bivariate relationship and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Among unilateral chewers, 77% of them preferred the right side for chewing. The factors most closely related to the preferred chewing side were asymmetry of bite force, asymmetry of masticatory performance and earedness, which explained up to 16% of the variance. Although several functional or postural lateral preferences seem to be related to the preferred chewing side, peripheral factors such as asymmetry of bite force and of masticatory performance are the most closely related to the preferred chewing side in adults with natural dentition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Accuracy and precision of flash glucose monitoring sensors inserted into the abdomen and upper thigh compared with the upper arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleer, Sara; Mathieu, Chantal; Nobels, Frank; Gillard, Pieter

    2018-06-01

    Nowadays, most Belgian patients with type 1 diabetes use flash glucose monitoring (FreeStyle Libre [FSL]; Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, California) to check their glucose values, but some patients find the sensor on the upper arm too visible. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy and precision of FSL sensors when placed on different sites. A total of 23 adults with type 1 diabetes used three FSL sensors simultaneously for 14 days on the upper arm, abdomen and upper thigh. FSL measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose (BG) measurements obtained with a built-in FSL BG meter. The aggregated mean absolute relative difference was 11.8 ± 12.0%, 18.5 ± 18.4% and 12.3 ± 13.8% for the arm, abdomen (P = .002 vs arm) and thigh (P = .5 vs arm), respectively. Results of Clarke error grid analysis for the arm and thigh were similar (zone A: 84.9% vs 84.5%; P = .6), while less accuracy was seen for the abdomen (zone A: 69.4%; P = .01). Apart from the first day, the accuracy of FSL sensors on the arm and thigh was more stable across the 14-day wear duration than accuracy of sensors on the abdomen, which deteriorated mainly during week 2 (P < .0005). The aggregated precision absolute relative difference was markedly lower for the arm/thigh (10.9 ± 11.9%) compared with the arm/abdomen (20.9 ± 22.8%; P = .002). Our results indicate that the accuracy and precision of FSL sensors placed on the upper thigh are similar to the upper arm, whereas the abdomen performed unacceptably poorly. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Modelling of optimal training load patterns during the 11 weeks preceding major competition in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellard, Philippe; Scordia, Charlotte; Avalos, Marta; Mujika, Inigo; Pyne, David B

    2017-10-01

    Periodization of swim training in the final training phases prior to competition and its effect on performance have been poorly described. We modeled the relationships between the final 11 weeks of training and competition performance in 138 elite sprint, middle-distance, and long-distance swimmers over 20 competitive seasons. Total training load (TTL), strength training (ST), and low- to medium-intensity and high-intensity training variables were monitored. Training loads were scaled as a percentage of the maximal volume measured at each intensity level. Four training periods (meso-cycles) were defined: the taper (weeks 1 to 2 before competition), short-term (weeks 3 to 5), medium-term (weeks 6 to 8), and long-term (weeks 9 to 11). Mixed-effects models were used to analyze the association between training loads in each training meso-cycle and end-of-season major competition performance. For sprinters, a 10% increase between ∼20% and 70% of the TTL in medium- and long-term meso-cycles was associated with 0.07 s and 0.20 s faster performance in the 50 m and 100 m events, respectively (p training yielded faster competition performance (e.g., a 10% increase in TTL was associated with improvements of 0.1-1.0 s in 200 m events and 0.3-1.6 s in 400 m freestyle, p < 0.01). For sprinters, a 60%-70% maximal ST load 6-8 weeks before competition induced the largest positive effects on performance (p < 0.01). An increase in TTL during the medium- and long-term preparation (6-11 weeks to competition) was associated with improved performance. Periodization plans should be adapted to the specialty of swimmers.

  20. A retrospective study: Multivariate logistic regression analysis of the outcomes after pressure sores reconstruction with fasciocutaneous, myocutaneous, and perforator flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Jen; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Tien-Hsiang; Shih, Yu-Chung; Ma, Hsu; Lin, Chih-Hsun; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Perng, Cherng-Kang

    2017-08-01

    Despite significant advances in medical care and surgical techniques, pressure sore reconstruction is still prone to elevated rates of complication and recurrence. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate not only complication and recurrence rates following pressure sore reconstruction but also preoperative risk stratification. This study included 181 ulcers underwent flap operations between January 2002 and December 2013 were included in the study. We performed a multivariable logistic regression model, which offers a regression-based method accounting for the within-patient correlation of the success or failure of each flap. The overall complication and recurrence rates for all flaps were 46.4% and 16.0%, respectively, with a mean follow-up period of 55.4 ± 38.0 months. No statistically significant differences of complication and recurrence rates were observed among three different reconstruction methods. In subsequent analysis, albumin ≤3.0 g/dl and paraplegia were significantly associated with higher postoperative complication. The anatomic factor, ischial wound location, significantly trended toward the development of ulcer recurrence. In the fasciocutaneous group, paraplegia had significant correlation to higher complication and recurrence rates. In the musculocutaneous flap group, variables had no significant correlation to complication and recurrence rates. In the free-style perforator group, ischial wound location and malnourished status correlated with significantly higher complication rates; ischial wound location also correlated with significantly higher recurrence rate. Ultimately, our review of a noteworthy cohort with lengthy follow-up helped identify and confirm certain risk factors that can facilitate a more informed and thoughtful pre- and postoperative decision-making process for patients with pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  1. Pharmspresso: a text mining tool for extraction of pharmacogenomic concepts and relationships from full text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Yael; Altman, Russ B

    2009-02-05

    Pharmacogenomics studies the relationship between genetic variation and the variation in drug response phenotypes. The field is rapidly gaining importance: it promises drugs targeted to particular subpopulations based on genetic background. The pharmacogenomics literature has expanded rapidly, but is dispersed in many journals. It is challenging, therefore, to identify important associations between drugs and molecular entities--particularly genes and gene variants, and thus these critical connections are often lost. Text mining techniques can allow us to convert the free-style text to a computable, searchable format in which pharmacogenomic concepts (such as genes, drugs, polymorphisms, and diseases) are identified, and important links between these concepts are recorded. Availability of full text articles as input into text mining engines is key, as literature abstracts often do not contain sufficient information to identify these pharmacogenomic associations. Thus, building on a tool called Textpresso, we have created the Pharmspresso tool to assist in identifying important pharmacogenomic facts in full text articles. Pharmspresso parses text to find references to human genes, polymorphisms, drugs and diseases and their relationships. It presents these as a series of marked-up text fragments, in which key concepts are visually highlighted. To evaluate Pharmspresso, we used a gold standard of 45 human-curated articles. Pharmspresso identified 78%, 61%, and 74% of target gene, polymorphism, and drug concepts, respectively. Pharmspresso is a text analysis tool that extracts pharmacogenomic concepts from the literature automatically and thus captures our current understanding of gene-drug interactions in a computable form. We have made Pharmspresso available at http://pharmspresso.stanford.edu.

  2. New, small, fast acting blood glucose meters--an analytical laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Hofmann, Manuela; Gappmayer, Brigitta; Garstenauer, Christa

    2007-09-22

    Patients and medical personnel are eager to use blood glucose meters that are easy to handle and fast acting. We questioned whether accuracy and precision of these new, small and light weight devices would meet analytical laboratory standards and tested four meters with the above mentioned conditions. Approximately 300 capillary blood samples were collected and tested using two devices of each brand and two different types of glucose test strips. Blood from the same samples was used for comparison. Results were evaluated using maximum deviation of 5% and 10% from the comparative method, the error grid analysis, the overall deviation of the devices, the linear regression analysis as well as the CVs for measurement in series. Of all 1196 measurements a deviation of less than 5% resp. 10% from the reference method was found for the FreeStyle (FS) meter in 69.5% and 96%, the Glucocard X Meter (GX) in 44% and 75%, the One Touch Ultra (OT) in 29% and 60%, the Wellion True Track (WT) in 28.5% and 58%. The error grid analysis gave 99.7% for FS, 99% for GX, 98% for OT and 97% for WT in zone A. The remainder of the values lay within zone B. Linear regression analysis resembled these results. CVs for measurement in series showed higher deviations for OT and WT compared to FS and GX. The four new, small and fast acting glucose meters fulfil clinically relevant analytical laboratory requirements making them appropriate for use by medical personnel. However, with regard to the tight and restrictive limits of the ADA recommendations, the devices are still in need of improvement. This should be taken into account when the devices are used by primarily inexperienced persons and is relevant for further industrial development of such devices.

  3. A comparative effectiveness analysis of three continuous glucose monitors: the Navigator, G4 Platinum, and Enlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Edward R; McKeon, Katherine; El-Khatib, Firas H; Zheng, Hui; Nathan, David M; Russell, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The effectiveness and safety of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) is dependent on their accuracy and reliability. The objective of this study was to compare 3 CGMs in adult and pediatric subjects with type 1 diabetes under closed-loop blood-glucose (BG) control. Twenty-four subjects (12 adults) with type 1 diabetes each participated in one 48-hour closed-loop BG control experiment. Venous plasma glucose (PG) measurements obtained every 15 minutes (4657 values) were paired in time with corresponding CGM glucose (CGMG) measurements obtained from 3 CGMs (FreeStyle Navigator, Abbott Diabetes Care; G4 Platinum, Dexcom; Enlite, Medtronic) worn simultaneously by each subject. The Navigator and G4 Platinum (G4) had the best overall accuracy, with an aggregate mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of all paired points of 12.3 ± 12.1% and 10.8 ± 9.9%, respectively. Both had lower MARDs of all paired points than Enlite (17.9 ± 15.8%, P 50%) were less common with the G4 (0.5%) than with the Enlite (4.3%, P = .0001) while the number of very large errors with the Navigator (1.4%) was intermediate between the G4 and Enlite (P = .1 and P = .06, respectively). The average MARD for experiments in adolescent subjects were lower than in adult subjects for the Navigator and G4, while there was no difference for Enlite. All 3 devices had similar reliability. A comprehensive head-to-head-to-head comparison of 3 CGMs revealed marked differences in both accuracy and precision. The Navigator and G4 were found to outperform the Enlite in these areas. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. The Performance and Usability of a Factory-Calibrated Flash Glucose Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Timothy; Bode, Bruce W; Christiansen, Mark P; Klaff, Leslie J; Alva, Shridhara

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance and usability of the FreeStyle(®) Libre™ Flash glucose monitoring system (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) for interstitial glucose results compared with capillary blood glucose results. Seventy-two study participants with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were enrolled by four U.S. clinical sites. A sensor was inserted on the back of each upper arm for up to 14 days. Three factory-only calibrated sensor lots were used in the study. Sensor glucose measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose (BG) results (approximately eight per day) obtained using the BG meter built into the reader (BG reference) and with the YSI analyzer (Yellow Springs Instrument, Yellow Springs, OH) reference tests at three clinic visits (32 samples per visit). Sensor readings were masked to the participants. The accuracy of the results was demonstrated against capillary BG reference values, with 86.7% of sensor results within Consensus Error Grid Zone A. The percentage of readings within Consensus Error Grid Zone A on Days 2, 7, and 14 was 88.4%, 89.2%, and 85.2%, respectively. The overall mean absolute relative difference was 11.4%. The mean lag time between sensor and YSI reference values was 4.5±4.8 min. Sensor accuracy was not affected by factors such as body mass index, age, type of diabetes, clinical site, insulin administration, or hemoglobin A1c. Interstitial glucose measurements with the FreeStyle Libre system were found to be accurate compared with capillary BG reference values, with accuracy remaining stable over 14 days of wear and unaffected by patient characteristics.

  5. Use of continuous glucose monitoring as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Roy W; Calhoun, Peter; Kollman, Craig

    2012-10-01

    Although developed to be a management tool for individuals with diabetes, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) also has potential value for the assessment of outcomes in clinical studies. We evaluated using CGM as such an outcome measure. Data were analyzed from six previously completed inpatient studies in which both CGM (Freestyle Navigator™ [Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA] or Guardian(®) [Medtronic, Northridge, CA]) and reference glucose measurements were available. The analyses included 97 days of data from 93 participants with type 1 diabetes (age range, 5-57 years; mean, 18 ± 12 years). Mean glucose levels per day were similar for the CGM and reference measurements (median, 148 mg/dL vs. 143 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.92), and the correlation of the two was high (r = 0.89). Similarly, most glycemia metrics showed no significant differences comparing CGM and reference values, except that the nadir glucose tended to be slightly lower and peak glucose slightly higher with reference measurements than CGM measurements (respective median, 59 mg/dL vs. 66 mg/dL [P = 0.05] and 262 mg/dL vs. 257 mg/dL [P = 0.003]) and glucose variability as measured with the coefficient of variation was slightly lower with CGM than reference measurements (respective median, 31% vs. 35%; Pblood glucose measurements. CGM inaccuracy and underestimation of the extremes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia can be accounted for in a clinical trial's study design. Thus, in appropriate settings, CGM can be a very meaningful and feasible outcome measure for clinical trials.

  6. Cook and Chill: Effect of Temperature on the Performance of Nonequilibrated Blood Glucose Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Sherine; Steele, Dominic; Clarke, Sarah; Gribben, Cathryn; Bexley, Anne-Marie; Laan, Remmert; Kerr, David

    2015-08-20

    Exposure to extreme temperature can affect the performance of blood glucose monitoring systems. The aim was to determine the non-equilibrated performance of these systems at extreme high and low temperatures that can occur in daily life. The performances of 5 test systems, (1) Abbott FreeStyle Freedom Lite, (2) Roche AccuChek Aviva, (3) Bayer Contour, (4) LifeScan OneTouch Verio, and (5) Sanofi BG Star, were compared after "cooking" (50°C for 1 hour) or "chilling" (-5°C for 1 hour) with room temperature controls (23°C) using whole blood with glucose concentrations of 50, 100, and 200 mg/dl. The equilibration period (time from the end of incubation to when the test system is operational) was between 1 and 8 minutes, and each test system took between 15 and 30 minutes after incubation to obtain stable measurements at room temperature. Incubating the strips at -5°C or 50°C had little effect on the glucose measurement, whereas incubating the meters introduced bias in performance between 0 and 15 minutes but not subsequently, compared to room temperature controls and at all 3 glucose levels. Compensating technologies embedded within blood glucose monitoring systems studied here perform well at extreme temperatures. People with diabetes need to be alerted to this feature to avoid perceptions of malperformance of their devices and the possible inability to get blood glucose readings on short notice (eg, during time of suspected rapid change or before an unplanned meal). © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. UNDERWATER STROKE KINEMATICS DURING BREATHING AND BREATH-HOLDING FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickos Vezos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of breathing on the three - dimensional underwater stroke kinematics of front crawl swimming. Ten female competitive freestyle swimmers participated in the study. Each subject swam a number of front crawl trials of 25 m at a constant speed under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater motion of each subject's right arm was filmed using two S-VHS cameras, operating at 60 Hz, which were positioned behind two underwater viewing windows. The spatial coordinates of selected points were calculated using the DLT procedure with 30 control points and after the digital filtering of the raw data with a cut-off frequency of 6 Hz, the hand's linear displacements and velocities were calculated. The results revealed that breathing caused significantly increases in the stroke duration (t9 = 2.764; p < 0.05, the backward hand displacement relative to the water (t9 = 2.471; p<0.05 and the lateral displacement of the hand in the X - axis during the downsweep (t9 = 2.638; p < 0.05. On the contrary, the peak backward hand velocity during the insweep (t9 = 2.368; p < 0.05 and the displacement of the hand during the push phase (t9 = -2.297; p < 0.05 were greatly reduced when breathing was involved. From the above, it was concluded that breathing action in front crawl swimming caused significant modifications in both the basic stroke parameters and the overall motor pattern were, possibly due to body roll during breathing

  8. Relation between efficiency and energy cost with coordination in aquatic locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Toussaint, Huub M; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the relationships between the intracycle velocity variation (IVV) and Froude efficiency (η(T)), energy cost (C), and index of coordination (IdC) throughout a 200-m freestyle race. Ten male international level swimmers performed a maximum 200 m front crawl swim. Performance was recorded with four below- and two above-water synchronized cameras. Oxygen consumption was measured continuously during the effort, and blood samples were collected before and after the test. IdC, body center of mass' IVV (x, y and z), and η(T) were also calculated. For assessing C swimmers performed also 50, 100 and 150 m at the same pace as in the 200-m splits to capture blood lactate samples after each 50-m lap of the 200-m effort. Swimmers attained a stable IVV (x, y, and z), as fatigue development along the 200-m effort induced a decrease in velocity, stroke length, stroke frequency, η(T), and an increase of IdC. Direct relationships between C and IdC for the second and fourth lap were found: R = 0.63 and R = 0.69 (P < 0.05), respectively. Computing partial correlation, also IdC and η(T) in the first lap were significantly correlated (R = -0.63, P < 0.05). IdC and η(T) showed to be significant for the within-subjects correlation (R = -0.45, P = 0.01), and IdC and C for the between-subjects correlation (R = 0.66, P = 0.04). Patterns of coordination modified during the 200-m event in response to the task constraints, observed by the changes in the other studied parameters, and allowing the IVV stability along the effort.

  9. Effect of swimming suit design on the energy demands of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, R D; Costill, D L; Trappe, T A; Jozsi, A C; Trappe, S W; Goodpaster, B H

    1995-07-01

    Eight competitive male swimmers completed a standardized 365.8 m (400 yd) freestyle swimming trial at a fixed pace (approximately 90% of maximal effort) while wearing a torso swim suit (TOR) or a standard racing suit (STD). Oxygen uptake (VO2), blood lactate, heart rate (HR), and distance per stroke (DPS) measurements were obtained. In addition, a video-computer system was used to collect velocity data during a prone underwater glide following a maximal leg push-off from the side of the pool while wearing the TOR and STD suits. These data were used to calculate the total distance covered during the glides. VO2 (3.76 +/- 0.16 vs 3.92 +/- 0.18 l.min-1) and lactate (8.08 +/- 0.53 vs, 9.66 +/- 0.66 mM) were significantly (P 0.05) between the TOR (170.1 +/- 5.1 b.min-1) and STD (173.5 +/- 5.7 b.min-1) trials. DPS was significantly greater during the TOR (2.70 +/- 0.066 m.stroke-1) versus STD (2.58 +/- 0.054 m.stroke-1) trial. A significantly greater total distance was covered during the prone glide while wearing the TOR (2.05 +/- 0.067 m) compared to the STD (2.00 +/- 0.080 m) suit. These findings demonstrate that a specially designed torso suit reduces the energy demand of swimming compared to a standard racing suit which may be due to a reduction in body drag.

  10. A model for the training effects in swimming demonstrates a strong relationship between parasympathetic activity, performance and index of fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Chalencon

    Full Text Available Competitive swimming as a physical activity results in changes to the activity level of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. However, the precise relationship between ANS activity, fatigue and sports performance remains contentious. To address this problem and build a model to support a consistent relationship, data were gathered from national and regional swimmers during two 30 consecutive-week training periods. Nocturnal ANS activity was measured weekly and quantified through wavelet transform analysis of the recorded heart rate variability. Performance was then measured through a subsequent morning 400 meters freestyle time-trial. A model was proposed where indices of fatigue were computed using Banister's two antagonistic component model of fatigue and adaptation applied to both the ANS activity and the performance. This demonstrated that a logarithmic relationship existed between performance and ANS activity for each subject. There was a high degree of model fit between the measured and calculated performance (R(2=0.84±0.14,p<0.01 and the measured and calculated High Frequency (HF power of the ANS activity (R(2=0.79±0.07, p<0.01. During the taper periods, improvements in measured performance and measured HF were strongly related. In the model, variations in performance were related to significant reductions in the level of 'Negative Influences' rather than increases in 'Positive Influences'. Furthermore, the delay needed to return to the initial performance level was highly correlated to the delay required to return to the initial HF power level (p<0.01. The delay required to reach peak performance was highly correlated to the delay required to reach the maximal level of HF power (p=0.02. Building the ANS/performance identity of a subject, including the time to peak HF, may help predict the maximal performance that could be obtained at a given time.

  11. COMBINED STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE TRAINING IN COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stian Aspenes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A combined intervention of strength and endurance training is common practice in elite swimming training, but the scientific evidence is scarce. The influences between strength and endurance training have been investigated in other sports but the findings are scattered. Some state the interventions are negative to each other, some state there is no negative relationship and some find bisected and supplementary benefits from the combination when training is applied appropriately. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a combined intervention among competitive swimmers. 20 subjects assigned to a training intervention group (n = 11 or a control group (n = 9 from two different teams completed the study. Anthropometrical data, tethered swimming force, land strength, performance in 50m, 100m and 400m, work economy, peak oxygen uptake, stroke length and stroke rate were investigated in all subjects at pre- and post-test. A combined intervention of maximal strength and high aerobic intensity interval endurance training 2 sessions per week over 11 weeks in addition to regular training were used, while the control group continued regular practice with their respective teams. The intervention group improved land strength, tethered swimming force and 400m freestyle performance more than the control group. The improvement of the 400m was correlated with the improvement of tethered swimming force in the female part of the intervention group. No change occurred in stroke length, stroke rate, performance in 50m or 100m, swimming economy or peak oxygen uptake during swimming. Two weekly dry-land strength training sessions for 11 weeks increase tethered swimming force in competitive swimmers. This increment further improves middle distance swimming performance. 2 weekly sessions of high- intensity interval training does not improve peak oxygen uptake compared with other competitive swimmers

  12. Determinant factors on children in sport Um estudo sobre os fatores influenciadores na iniciação esportiva precoce da criança

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    Arli Ramos de Oliveira

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available This study has the purpose of analyzing the possible factors that early sport practice can develop on children especially without pedagogical and scientific based. The lack of a specific subject concentrated on child development studies in most physical education courses in Parana l according to Sports and Tourism Secretary. Presents different degrees of competency levels in the field. The more meaningful the Physical Education teaching is the greater the respect to the principles of age, growth, maturation and development. It is necessary to improve sport skills, and to respect children's individual differences. The child learns when he/she is ready to learn, and excessive emphasis on winning should be avoided before the age of twelve, especially for injuries prevention. The awareness of child development changes and the modification of the curriculum in the Physical Education Schools are suggested. Physical activities for children should be meaningful, according to children age level and motivation, stimulating an active and healthy freestyle. Este estudo tem o objetivo de analisar os possíveis fatores que a prática desportiva precoce pode desenvolver nas crianças, especialmente sem base pedagógica e científica. A falta de um assunto específico concentrou-se em estudos do desenvolvimento infantil na maioria dos cursos de educação física no Estado do Paraná. l de acordo com a Secretaria de Turismo e Desporto. Apresenta diferentes graus de níveis de competência no campo. O mais significativo o ensino de Educação Física é o maior do respeito aos princípios de idade, o crescimento, maturação e desenvolvimento. É necessário melhorar habilidades esportivas, e de respeitar as diferenças individuais das crianças. A criança aprende quando ele / ela está pronta para aprender, e uma ênfase excessiva na conquista deve ser evitado antes da idade de doze anos, especialmente para a prevenção de lesões. A consciência das mudan

  13. Reliability of the Radiographic Sagittal and Frontal Tibiotalar Alignment after Ankle Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willegger, Madeleine; Holinka, Johannes; Nemecek, Elena; Bock, Peter; Wanivenhaus, Axel Hugo; Windhager, Reinhard; Schuh, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the tibiotalar alignment is important in radiographic outcome assessment of ankle arthrodesis (AA). In studies, various radiological methods have been used to measure the tibiotalar alignment leading to facultative misinterpretation of results. However, to our knowledge, no previous study has investigated the reliability of tibiotalar alignment measurement in AA. We aimed to investigate the reliability of four different methods of measurement of the frontal and sagittal tibiotalar alignment after AA, and to further clarify the most reliable method for determining the longitudinal axis of the tibia. Thirty-eight weight bearing anterior to posterior and lateral ankle radiographs of thirty-seven patients who had undergone AA with a two screw fixation technique were selected. Three observers measured the frontal tibiotalar angle (FTTA) and the sagittal tibiotalar angle (STTA) using four different methods. The methods differed by the definition of the longitudinal tibial axis. Method A was defined by a line drawn along the lateral tibial border in anterior to posterior radiographs and along the posterior tibial border in lateral radiographs. Method B was defined by a line connecting two points in the middle of the proximal and the distal tibial shaft. Method C was drawn "freestyle"along the longitudinal axis of the tibia, and method D was defined by a line connecting the center of the tibial articular surface and a point in the middle of the proximal tibial shaft. Intra- and interobserver correlation coefficients (ICC) and repeated measurement ANOVA were calculated to assess measurement reliability and accuracy. All four methods showed excellent inter- and intraobserver reliability for the FTTA and the STTA. When the longitudinal tibial axis is defined by connecting two points in the middle of the proximal and the distal tibial shaft, the highest interobserver reliability for the FTTA (ICC: 0.980; CI 95%: 0.966-0.989) and for the STTA (ICC: 0

  14. [CLINICAL APPLICATION AND EXPERIENCE IN RECONSTRUCTION OF SOFT TISSUE DEFECTS FOLLOWING MALIGNANT TUMOR REMOVAL OF LIMBS USING PERFORATOR PROPELLER FLAPS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shan; Liu, Yuanbo; Yu, Shengji; Zang, Mengqing; Zhao, Zhenguo; Xu, Libin; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Bo; Ding, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    To explore the feasibility and technical essentials of soft tissue defect reconstruction following malignant tumor removal of limbs using perforator propeller flaps. Between July 2008 and July 2015, 19 patients with malignant limb tumor underwent defect reconstruction following tumor removal using the perforator propeller flaps. There were 13 males and 6 females with an average age of 53.4 years (range, 20-82 years). The disease duration ranged from 1 to 420 months (mean, 82 months). The tumors located at the thigh in 10 cases, at the leg in 2 cases, at the arm in 1 case, at the forearm in 1 case, around the knee in 2 cases, and around the elbow joint in 3 cases. Totally 23 flaps (from 8 cm x 3 cm to 30 cm x 13 cm in size) were used to reconstruct defects (from 4 cm x 4 cm to 24 cm x 16 cm in size). The potential source arteries included the femoral artery (n = 2), profunda femoral artery (n = 3), superficial circumflex iliac artery (n = 1), lateral circumflex femoral artery (n = 6), superior lateral genicular artery (n = 2), peroneal artery (n = 2), anterior tibial artery (n = 1), brachial artery (n = 4), and radial artery (n = 1). The remaining one was a free style perforator flap. Partial distal flap necrosis occurred in 3 cases after surgery with rotation angles of 180, 150, and 100 degrees respectively, which were reconstructed after debridement using a free-style perforator flap in 1 case and using free skin grafting in the other 2 cases. The other 20 flaps survived completely after surgery. Primary healing of incisions was obtained at the donor and recipient sites. There was no severe complication such as infection, hematoma, and total flap failure. All patients were followed up 3 months to 5 years (mean, 19 months). One patient with malignant melanoma around the elbow joint had tumor recurrence, and underwent secondary tumor resection. The appearance, texture, and color of the flaps were similar to those at the recipient site. For patients with malignant

  15. Relations Between Lower Body Isometric Muscle Force Characteristics and Start Performance in Elite Male Sprint Swimmers

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    Igor Beretić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was twofold. The first aim was to examine the influence of absolute and relative lower body muscle force on kinematic component which determine the start performance. The second aim was to create multiregressional model which could use as a tool for swimming coaches with the purpose to start performance control and improvement. Twenty seven high-level trained male competitive swimmers all members of the Serbian National Youth and Senior Swimming Team (Age = 21.1 ± 4.3 yrs., Height = 1. 89 ± 0.10 m, Weight = 81.6 ± 8.4 kg, 50m freestyle - long course = 24.36 ± 0.86 s performed two trials of standing leg extensors isometric muscle force testing and three swimming start trials corresponding to 10m distance. The average start time significantly correlated with variables of leg extensors maximum voluntary force (Fmax, r = -0.559, p = 0.002, leg extensors relative muscle voluntary force (Frel, r = -0.727, p < 0.001, leg extensors specific rate of force development (RFD50%, r = -0.338, p = 0.047 and leg extensors relative value of specific rate of force development (RFD50%rel, r = -0.402, p = 0.040. Regression equation for t10m prediction was defined by following variables: maximum voluntary isometric force of leg extensors muscles at absolute and relative level (Fmax and Frel, as well as a specific rate of force development of the same muscle groups (RFD50% and RFD50%rel at absolute and relative level too with 74.4% of explained variance. Contractile abilities indicators of the leg extensors muscles included consideration: Fmax, RFD50%, Frel and RFD50%rel showed significant correlation with swimming start times on 10m. Additionally, the results suggest that swimmers, who possess greater isometric maximum force and specific rate of force development at absolute and relative levels, tend to be able to swim faster on initial 10m swim start perforamnce.

  16. Reliability of the Radiographic Sagittal and Frontal Tibiotalar Alignment after Ankle Arthrodesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Willegger

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of the tibiotalar alignment is important in radiographic outcome assessment of ankle arthrodesis (AA. In studies, various radiological methods have been used to measure the tibiotalar alignment leading to facultative misinterpretation of results. However, to our knowledge, no previous study has investigated the reliability of tibiotalar alignment measurement in AA. We aimed to investigate the reliability of four different methods of measurement of the frontal and sagittal tibiotalar alignment after AA, and to further clarify the most reliable method for determining the longitudinal axis of the tibia.Thirty-eight weight bearing anterior to posterior and lateral ankle radiographs of thirty-seven patients who had undergone AA with a two screw fixation technique were selected. Three observers measured the frontal tibiotalar angle (FTTA and the sagittal tibiotalar angle (STTA using four different methods. The methods differed by the definition of the longitudinal tibial axis. Method A was defined by a line drawn along the lateral tibial border in anterior to posterior radiographs and along the posterior tibial border in lateral radiographs. Method B was defined by a line connecting two points in the middle of the proximal and the distal tibial shaft. Method C was drawn "freestyle"along the longitudinal axis of the tibia, and method D was defined by a line connecting the center of the tibial articular surface and a point in the middle of the proximal tibial shaft. Intra- and interobserver correlation coefficients (ICC and repeated measurement ANOVA were calculated to assess measurement reliability and accuracy.All four methods showed excellent inter- and intraobserver reliability for the FTTA and the STTA. When the longitudinal tibial axis is defined by connecting two points in the middle of the proximal and the distal tibial shaft, the highest interobserver reliability for the FTTA (ICC: 0.980; CI 95%: 0.966-0.989 and for the

  17. Underwater Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: Muscle Oxygen Changes in the Upper and Lower Extremities in Club Level Swimmers and Triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B; Cooper, C E

    2016-01-01

    To date, measurements of oxygen status during swim exercise have focused upon systemic aerobic capacity. The development of a portable, waterproof NIRS device makes possible a local measurement of muscle hemodynamics and oxygenation that could provide a novel insight into the physiological changes that occur during swim exercise. The purpose of this study was to observe changes in muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis (VL) and latissimus dorsi (LD) of club level swimmers and triathletes. Ten subjects, five club level swimmers and five club level triathletes (three men and seven women) were used for assessment. Swim group; mean±SD=age 21.2±1.6 years; height 170.6±7.5 cm; weight 62.8±6.9 kg; vastus lateralis skin fold 13.8±5.6 mm; latissimus dorsi skin fold 12.6±3.7. Triathlete group; mean±SD=age 44.0±10.5 years; height 171.6±7.0 cm; weight 68.6±12.7 kg; vastus lateralis skin fold 11.8±3.5 mm; latissimus dorsi skin fold 11.2±3.1. All subjects completed a maximal 200 m freestyle swim, with the PortaMon, a portable NIR device, attached to the subject's dominant side musculature. ΔTSI% between the vastus lateralis and latissimus dorsi were analysed using either paired (2-tailed) t-tests or Wilcoxon signed rank test. The level of significance for analysis was set at pswim significantly faster (p=0.04) than club level triathletes. Club level swimmers use both the upper and lower muscles to a similar extent during a maximal 200 m swim. Club level triathletes predominately use the upper body for propulsion during the same exercise. The data produced by NIRS in this study are the first of their kind and provide insight into muscle oxygenation changes during swim exercise which can indicate the contribution of one muscle compared to another. This also enables a greater understanding of the differences in swimming techniques seen between different cohorts of swimmers and potentially within individual swimmers.

  18. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors

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    Andrea Bink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting.MethodsA structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: “congruent,” “partially congruent,” “incongruent,” or “not mentioned in free-style report.”ResultsTumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17 with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7–43% per item. Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12–17:06 min.ConclusionFirst results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the

  19. Evaluating the clinical accuracy of two continuous glucose sensors using continuous glucose-error grid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, William L; Anderson, Stacey; Farhy, Leon; Breton, Marc; Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Cox, Daniel; Kovatchev, Boris

    2005-10-01

    To compare the clinical accuracy of two different continuous glucose sensors (CGS) during euglycemia and hypoglycemia using continuous glucose-error grid analysis (CG-EGA). FreeStyle Navigator (Abbott Laboratories, Alameda, CA) and MiniMed CGMS (Medtronic, Northridge, CA) CGSs were applied to the abdomens of 16 type 1 diabetic subjects (age 42 +/- 3 years) 12 h before the initiation of the study. Each system was calibrated according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Each subject underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (blood glucose goal 110 mg/dl) for 70-210 min followed by a 1-mg.dl(-1).min(-1) controlled reduction in blood glucose toward a nadir of 40 mg/dl. Arterialized blood glucose was determined every 5 min using a Beckman Glucose Analyzer (Fullerton, CA). CGS glucose recordings were matched to the reference blood glucose with 30-s precision, and rates of glucose change were calculated for 5-min intervals. CG-EGA was used to quantify the clinical accuracy of both systems by estimating combined point and rate accuracy of each system in the euglycemic (70-180 mg/dl) and hypoglycemic (<70 mg/dl) ranges. A total of 1,104 data pairs were recorded in the euglycemic range and 250 data pairs in the hypoglycemic range. Overall correlation between CGS and reference glucose was similar for both systems (Navigator, r = 0.84; CGMS, r = 0.79, NS). During euglycemia, both CGS systems had similar clinical accuracy (Navigator zones A + B, 88.8%; CGMS zones A + B, 89.3%, NS). However, during hypoglycemia, the Navigator was significantly more clinically accurate than the CGMS (zones A + B = 82.4 vs. 61.6%, Navigator and CGMS, respectively, P < 0.0005). CG-EGA is a helpful tool for evaluating and comparing the clinical accuracy of CGS systems in different blood glucose ranges. CG-EGA provides accuracy details beyond other methods of evaluation, including correlational analysis and the original EGA.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of insufficient blood volume samples on the performance of blood glucose self-test meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Schipper, Christina; Ramljak, Sanja; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen; Forst, Thomas; Musholt, Petra B

    2013-11-01

    Accuracy of blood glucose readings is (among other things) dependent on the test strip being completely filled with sufficient sample volume. The devices are supposed to display an error message in case of incomplete filling. This laboratory study was performed to test the performance of 31 commercially available devices in case of incomplete strip filling. Samples with two different glucose levels (60-90 and 300-350 mg/dl) were used to generate three different sample volumes: 0.20 µl (too low volume for any device), 0.32 µl (borderline volume), and 1.20 µl (low but supposedly sufficient volume for all devices). After a point-of-care capillary reference measurement (StatStrip, NovaBiomedical), the meter strip was filled (6x) with the respective volume, and the response of the meters (two devices) was documented (72 determinations/meter type). Correct response was defined as either an error message indicating incomplete filling or a correct reading (±20% compared with reference reading). Only five meters showed 100% correct responses [BGStar and iBGStar (both Sanofi), ACCU-CHEK Compact+ and ACCU-CHEK Mobile (both Roche Diagnostics), OneTouch Verio (LifeScan)]. The majority of the meters (17) had up to 10% incorrect reactions [predominantly incorrect readings with sufficient volume; Precision Xceed and Xtra, FreeStyle Lite, and Freedom Lite (all Abbott); GlucoCard+ and GlucoMen GM (both Menarini); Contour, Contour USB, and Breeze2 (all Bayer); OneTouch Ultra Easy, Ultra 2, and Ultra Smart (all LifeScan); Wellion Dialog and Premium (both MedTrust); FineTouch (Terumo); ACCU-CHEK Aviva (Roche); and GlucoTalk (Axis-Shield)]. Ten percent to 20% incorrect reactions were seen with OneTouch Vita (LifeScan), ACCU-CHEK Aviva Nano (Roche), OmniTest+ (BBraun), and AlphaChek+ (Berger Med). More than 20% incorrect reactions were obtained with Pura (Ypsomed), GlucoCard Meter and GlucoMen LX (both Menarini), Elite (Bayer), and MediTouch (Medisana). In summary, partial and

  1. Glucose concentration in capillary blood of dairy cows obtained by a minimally invasive lancet technique and determined with three different hand-held devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, B; Drillich, M; Klein-Jöbstl, D; Kanz, P; Borchardt, S; Meyer, L; Schwendenwein, I; Iwersen, M

    2016-02-24

    Dairy cows have a massive demand for glucose at the onset of lactation. A poor adaption to this period leads to an excessive negative energy balance with an increased risk for ketosis and impaired animal health and production. Besides the measurement of ketones, analysing the glucose concentration in blood is reported as helpful instrument for diagnosis and differentiation of ketosis. Monitoring metabolic parameters requires multiple blood sampling. In other species, new blood sampling techniques have been introduced in which small amounts of blood are rapidly analysed using electronic hand-held devices. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of capillary blood for blood glucose measurement in dairy cows using the hand-held devices FreeStyle Precision (FSP, Abbott), GlucoMen LX Plus (GLX, A. Menarini) and the WellionVet GLUCO CALEA, (WGC, MED TRUST). In total, 240 capillary blood samples were obtained from dry and fresh lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Blood was collected from the skin of the exterior vulva by using a lancet. For method comparison, additional blood samples were taken from a coccygeal vessel and analyzed in a laboratory. Glucose concentrations measured by a standard laboratory method were defined as the criterion standard. The Pearson correlation coefficients between the glucose concentrations analyzed in capillary blood with the devices and the reference were 73% for the FSP, 81% for the GLX and 41% for the WGC. Bland-Altman plots showed biases of -18.8 mg/dL for the FSP, -11.2 mg/dL for the GLX and +20.82 mg/dL for the WGC. The optimized threshold determined by a Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis to detect hyperglycemia using the FSP was 43 mg/dL with a sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of 76 and 80%. Using the GLX and WGC optimized thresholds were 49 mg/dL (Se = 92%, Sp = 85%) and 95 mg/dL (Se = 39%, Sp = 92%). The results of this study demonstrate good performance characteristics for the GLX

  2. Clinical assessment of the accuracy of blood glucose measurement devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Mitri, Michael; Musholt, Petra B; Sachsenheimer, Daniela; Borchert, Marcus; Yap, Andrew; Forst, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Blood glucose meters for patient self-measurement need to comply with the accuracy standards of the ISO 15197 guideline. We investigated the accuracy of the two new blood glucose meters BG*Star and iBG*Star (Sanofi-Aventis) in comparison to four other competitive devices (Accu-Chek Aviva, Roche Diagnostics; FreeStyle Freedom Lite, Abbott Medisense; Contour, Bayer; OneTouch Ultra 2, Lifescan) at different blood glucose ranges in a clinical setting with healthy subjects and patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. BGStar and iBGStar are employ dynamic electrochemistry, which is supposed to result in highly accurate results. The study was performed on 106 participants (53 female, 53 male, age (mean ± SD): 46 ± 16 years, type 1: 32 patients, type 2: 34 patients, and 40 healthy subjects). Two devices from each type and strips from two different production lots were used for glucose assessment (∼200 readings/meter). Spontaneous glucose assessments and glucose or insulin interventions under medical supervision were applied to perform measurements in the different glucose ranges in accordance with the ISO 15197 requirements. Sample values 400 mg/dL were prepared by laboratory manipulations. The YSI glucose analyzer (glucose oxidase method) served as the standard reference method which may be considered to be a limitation in light of glucose hexokinase-based meters. For all devices, there was a very close correlation between the glucose results compared to the YSI reference method results. The correlation coefficients were r = 0.995 for BGStar and r = 0.992 for iBGStar (Aviva: 0.995, Freedom Lite: 0.990, Contour: 0.993, Ultra 2: 0.990). Error-grid analysis according to Parkes and Clarke revealed both 100% of the readings to be within the clinically acceptable areas (Clarke: A + B with BG*Star (100 + 0), Aviva (97 + 3), and Contour (97 + 3); and 99.5% with iBG*Star (97.5 + 2), Freedom Lite (98 + 1.5), and Ultra 2 (97.5 + 2

  3. Underwater dolphin kicks of young swimmers – evaluation of effectiveness based on kinematic analysis

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    Wądrzyk Łukasz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to distinguish the kinematic indicators influencing the average horizontal velocity of swimming (vCOM with underwater dolphin kicks (UDK. Methods. The study involved 15 boys and 20 girls (mean age, 11.5 ± 1.00 years; height, 1.57 ± 0.09 m; training experience, 2.5 ± 1.00 years practicing swimming 7 times a week. We determined the body height (H, the length of the body with the arms lifted (Lb, and the best result in the 50-m freestyle (pbt; characteristic anthropological points were marked on the body. The subjects performed UDK after a water-start for a distance of ca. 8 m (without a push-off from the wall. Movements were recorded with an underwater camera. The recordings were kinematically analysed with the SkillSpector program. On this basis, we calculated vCOM, frequency of movement (f, amplitude of movement (A, horizontal displacement in one cycle (Dpk, maximum flexion in the knee joints (KFmax, the product of f and A (IAf, the Strouhal number (St, and relative amplitude of toe movement (AREL. Results. The movements of the subjects were characterized as follows: vCOM = 1.08 ± 0.13 m/s, f = 2.00 ± 0.39 Hz, A = 0.46 ± 0.08 m, Dpk = 0.58 ± 0.10 m, IAf = 0.90 ± 0.11, KFmax = 71.37 ± 9.15°, St = 0.83 ± 0.08, AREL = 0.22 ± 0.04. A statistically significant correlation was found between vCOM and: H (r = 0.35, pbt (r = -0.52, f (r = 0.47, IAf (r = 0.72, KFmax (r = -0.53, and St (r = -0.36. Conclusions. UDK of young swimmers is characterized by low-speed swimming. This is effected by low swimming efficiency (low values of IAf and St, high value of KFmax. The proper amplitude and frequency of movements should be a priority in improving UDK. The UDK technique should be particularly enhanced among short competitors.

  4. Combined strength and endurance training in competitive swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenes, Stian; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Hoff, Jan; Helgerud, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A combined intervention of strength and endurance training is common practice in elite swimming training, but the scientific evidence is scarce. The influences between strength and endurance training have been investigated in other sports but the findings are scattered. Some state the interventions are negative to each other, some state there is no negative relationship and some find bisected and supplementary benefits from the combination when training is applied appropriately. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a combined intervention among competitive swimmers. 20 subjects assigned to a training intervention group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 9) from two different teams completed the study. Anthropometrical data, tethered swimming force, land strength, performance in 50m, 100m and 400m, work economy, peak oxygen uptake, stroke length and stroke rate were investigated in all subjects at pre- and post-test. A combined intervention of maximal strength and high aerobic intensity interval endurance training 2 sessions per week over 11 weeks in addition to regular training were used, while the control group continued regular practice with their respective teams. The intervention group improved land strength, tethered swimming force and 400m freestyle performance more than the control group. The improvement of the 400m was correlated with the improvement of tethered swimming force in the female part of the intervention group. No change occurred in stroke length, stroke rate, performance in 50m or 100m, swimming economy or peak oxygen uptake during swimming. Two weekly dry-land strength training sessions for 11 weeks increase tethered swimming force in competitive swimmers. This increment further improves middle distance swimming performance. 2 weekly sessions of high- intensity interval training does not improve peak oxygen uptake compared with other competitive swimmers. Key pointsTwo weekly sessions of dry land strength training improves the

  5. Diurnal variation and reliability of the urine lactate concentration after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kosmidis, Ioannis; Sougioultzis, Michail; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Mougios, Vassilis

    2018-01-01

    The postexercise urine lactate concentration is a novel valid exercise biomarker, which has exhibited satisfactory reliability in the morning hours under controlled water intake. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diurnal variation of the postexercise urine lactate concentration and its reliability in the afternoon hours. Thirty-two healthy children (11 boys and 21 girls) and 23 adults (13 men and 10 women) participated in the study. All participants performed two identical sessions of eight 25 m bouts of maximal freestyle swimming executed every 2 min with passive recovery in between. These sessions were performed in the morning and afternoon and were separated by 3-4 days. Adults performed an additional afternoon session that was also separated by 3-4 days. All swimmers drank 500 mL of water before and another 500 mL after each test. Capillary blood and urine samples were collected before and after each test for lactate determination. Urine creatinine, urine density and body water content were also measured. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used as a reliability index between the morning and afternoon tests, as well as between the afternoon test and retest. Swimming performance and body water content exhibited excellent reliability in both children and adults. The postexercise blood lactate concentration did not show diurnal variation, showing a good reliability between the morning and afternoon tests, as well as high reliability between the afternoon test and retest. The postexercise urine density and lactate concentration were affected by time of day. However, when lactate was normalized to creatinine, it exhibited excellent reliability in children and good-to-high reliability in adults. The postexercise urine lactate concentration showed high reliability between the afternoon test and retest, independent of creatinine normalization. The postexercise blood and urine lactate concentrations were significantly correlated in all

  6. Determining Changes in Electromyography Indices when Measuring Maximum Acceptable Weight of Lift in Iranian Male Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi Sahl Abadi, A; Mazloumi, A; Nasl Saraji, G; Zeraati, H; Hadian, M R; Jafari, A H

    2018-03-01

    In spite of the increasing degree of automation in industry, manual material handling (MMH) is still performed in many occupational settings. The aim of the current study was to determine the maximum acceptable weight of lift using psychophysical and electromyography indices. This experimental study was conducted among 15 male students recruited from Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Each participant performed 18 different lifting tasks which involved three lifting frequencies, three lifting heights and two box sizes. Each set of experiments was conducted during the 20 min work period using free-style lifting technique and subjective as well as objective assessment methodologies. SPSS version 18 software was used for descriptive and analytical analyses by Friedman, Wilcoxon and Spearman correlation techniques. The results demonstrated that muscle activity increased with increasing frequency, height of lift and box size (P<0.05). Meanwhile, MAWLs obtained in this study are lower than those in Snook table (P<0.05). In this study, the level of muscle activity in percent MVC in relation to the erector spine muscles in L3 and T9 regions as well as left and right abdominal external oblique muscles were at 38.89%, 27.78%, 11.11% and 5.55% in terms of muscle activity is more than 70% MVC, respectively. The results of Wilcoxon test revealed that for both small and large boxes under all conditions, significant differences were detected between the beginning and end of the test values for MPF of erector spine in L3 and T9 regions, and left and right abdominal external oblique muscles (P<0.05). The results of Spearman correlation test showed that there was a significant relation between the MAWL, RMS and MPF of the muscles in all test conditions (P<0.05). Based on the results of this study, it was concluded if muscle activity is more than 70% of MVC, the values of Snook tables should be revisited. Furthermore, the biomechanical perspective should receive special attention

  7. Can fMRI help optimise lifestyle behaviour change feedback from wearable technologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Whelan

    2015-10-01

    and water-based activities and are valid measures of activity (Santos-Lozano et al., 2013 and sedentary behaviour (Rosenberger, Buman, Haskell, McConnell & Carstensen, 2015. Continuous (15 minute epochs interstitial glucose levels will be measured through a minimally-invasive 5mm flexible fibre (Freestyle Libre inserted into the posterior brachium. This device will be worn throughout the whole day, including sleep and water-based activities, and has been validated against venous sampling (Bailey, Bode, Christiansen, Klaff & Alva, 2015. All devices will be returned using internal mail or freepost services after 14 days of wear. Personalised feedback messages will be extracted from the devices. Accelerometry will generate feedback in relation to time spent in activity intensities (e.g. moderate-to-vigorous in the context of current UK physical activity guidelines and frequently used goal setting targets (e.g. 10,000 steps per day. The LUMO will generate feedback on time spent sitting and the number of sit-to-stand transitions in the context of international sedentary behaviour guidelines. The Freestyle Libre will generate feedback in relation to time spent in the normal glucose range (4.0-6.0mmol/L; average glucose concentration; number of hyperglycaemic and hypoglycaemic events; and level of daily glycaemic variation. Participants will then attend a one-off appointment to undergo task-based fMRI. Imaging data of the whole-brain will be acquired via a 32-channel phased-array head coil on a Discovery MR750w 3.0T MR system. The fMRI investigation will monitor brain activation whilst messages are presented to each participant in a counterbalanced blocked design. Exposure to each stimulus (5 seconds will be compared to the reference stimulus (5 seconds; shown between each block of stimuli. Following the fMRI, participants will provide self-reported effectiveness scores via a four-point Likert scale (1-4; higher the number, higher the perceived level of effectiveness for

  8. Comparison of 2 electronic cowside tests to detect subclinical ketosis in dairy cows and the influence of the temperature and type of blood sample on the test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwersen, M; Klein-Jöbstl, D; Pichler, M; Roland, L; Fidlschuster, B; Schwendenwein, I; Drillich, M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of 2 electronic hand-held devices [FreeStyle Precision (FSP), Abbott GmbH & Co. KG, Wiesbaden, Germany and GlucoMen LX Plus (GLX), A. Menarini GmbH, Vienna, Austria] for measuring β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) in dairy cows. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate (1) the diagnostic performance of the devices, (2) the effect of the type of blood sample, and (3) the influence of the ambient temperature on the determined results. A total of 415 blood samples from lactating Holstein and Simmental cows were collected and analyzed with both devices (whole blood) and in a laboratory (serum). Correlation coefficients between whole-blood and serum BHBA concentrations were highly significant, with 94% for the FSP and 80% for the GLX device. Based on thresholds for subclinical ketosis of 1.2 and 1.4 mmol of BHBA/L, results obtained with the hand-held devices were evaluated by receiver operating characteristics analyses. This resulted in adjusted thresholds of 1.2 and 1.4 mmol/L for the FSP and 1.1 and 1.3 mmol/L for the GLX device. Applying these thresholds, sensitivities were 98 and 100% for the FSP and 80 and 86% for the GLX device, respectively. Corresponding specificities were 90 and 97% for the FSP and 87 and 96% for the GLX device, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of BHBA were tested with both devices in whole blood, EDTA-added whole blood, and in their resulting serum and plasma, collected from 65 animals. Determined BHBA concentrations were similar within each device for whole and EDTA-added blood, and in serum and plasma, but differed between whole blood and serum and between EDTA-added blood and plasma. Blood samples with low (0.4 mmol/L), medium (1.1 mmol/L), and high (1.6 mmol/L) BHBA concentrations were stored between +5 to +32°C and analyzed repeatedly at temperature levels differing by 4°C. Additionally, devices and test strips were stored at equal conditions and used for measurement

  9. Suitability of capillary blood obtained by a minimally invasive lancet technique to detect subclinical ketosis in dairy cows by using 3 different electronic hand-held devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanz, P; Drillich, M; Klein-Jöbstl, D; Mair, B; Borchardt, S; Meyer, L; Schwendenwein, I; Iwersen, M

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of capillary blood obtained by a minimally invasive lancet technique to detect subclinical ketosis in 49 prepartum and 191 postpartum Holstein-Friesian cows using 3 different electronic hand-held devices [FreeStyle Precision (FSP, Abbott), GlucoMen LX Plus (GLX, A. Menarini), NovaVet (NOV, Nova Biomedical)]. The β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentration in serum harvested from coccygeal blood samples was analyzed in a laboratory and used as a reference value. Capillary samples were obtained from the skin of the exterior vulva by using 1 of 3 different lancets. In all samples, the concentration of BHBA was immediately analyzed with all 3 hand-held devices used in random order. All lancets used in the study were eligible for capillary blood collection but differed in the total number of incisions needed. Spearman correlation coefficients between the BHBA concentrations in capillary blood and the reference test were highly significant with 83% for the FSP, 73% for the NOV, and 63% for the GLX. Using capillary blood, the FSP overestimated the mean BHBA concentration compared with the reference test (+0.08 mmol/L), whereas the GLX and NOV underestimated the mean concentration (-0.07 and -0.01 mmol/L). When a BHBA concentration of 1.2 mmol/L in serum was used to define subclinical ketosis, the corresponding analyses of receiver operating characteristics resulted in optimized thresholds for capillary blood of 1.1 mmol/L for the NOV and GLX devices, and of 1.0 mmol/L for the FSP. Based on these thresholds, sensitivities (Se) and specificities (Sp) were 89 and 84% for the NOV, 80 and 89% for the GLX, and 100 and 76% for the FSP. Based on a serum BHBA concentration of 1.4 mmol/L, analyses of receiver operating characteristics resulted in optimized cut-offs of 1.4 mmol/L for the FSP (Se 100%, Sp 92%), 1.3 mmol/L for the NOV (Se 80%, Sp 95%), and 1.1 mmol/L (Se 90%, Sp 85%) for the GLX. Using these optimized thresholds

  10. Dinamometria isocinética de tronco em nadadores de diferentes estilos Isokinetic trunk dynamometry in diferent swimming strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Luiz Barretti Secchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Comparar a atividade muscular dos músculos flexores e extensores de tronco entre estilos de nado assimétrico e nado simétrico. MÉTODO: Catorze nadadores da elite, velocistas e especialistas em um dos quatro estilos da natação sem história prévia de lesões.. Divididos em dois grupos de sete atletas: 1. Grupo nado assimétrico (GNA: constituído por cinco atletas que nadam o estilo crawl e dois atletas que nadam o estilo costas. 2. Grupo nado simétrico (GNS formado por sete atletas: quatro atletas nadadores no estilo peito e três nadadores no estilo borboleta. Todos foram avaliados no dinamômetro isocinético Cybex 6000. RESULTADOS: O tempo de aceleração na velocidade de 120º/ s do grupo flexor do tronco foi maior no GNS (p=0,054. A potência do grupo extensor nas velocidades de 90 e 120º/ segundo foi maior no GNA que no GNS (p=0,053 e 0,052 respectivamente. Não houve diferença estatística significante nas demais variáveis analisadas. CONCLUSÃO: Os nados assimétricos (crawl e costas proporcionam uma resposta muscular (recrutamento mais eficiente nos grupo dos flexores do tronco, possivelmente pela manutenção constante da contração isométrica dos músculos abdominais.OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of asymmetric and symmetric swimming strokes on muscle activity of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles. METHODS: Fourteen elite speed swimmers, specialists in one of four swimming styles, all without any history of spinal cord injury, were divided in two groups: 1 asymmetric group, consisting of five athletes specializing in the freestyle stroke and three in the backstroke; and 2 symmetric group, consisting of four athletes specializing in the butterfly stroke and three in the breaststroke. All the swimmers were assessed using a Cybex 6000 isokinetic dynamometer. RESULTS: The acceleration time for the trunk flexor group at a speed of 120º per second was greater in the symmetric group (p=0.054. The power of the

  11. METODOLOGÍAS Y EFECTOS DE LAS CAÍDAS DE PESO EN LUCHA OLÍMPICA: UNA REVISIÓN Methodologies and effects of weight cutting approaches in Olympic Wrestling: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Díaz Suárez

    2011-03-01

    cutting approaches before the official weighing. In this review the authors aim to perform a detailed description of these weight cutting strategies and their effects on the physical fitness performance of the wrestlers. Furthermore, and based on scientific data, there will be proposals for adapting and updating these official rules, considered by most scientists and coaches as partially outdated and sometimes irrational. Key words: Weighing; freestyle; Greco-roman, combat. 

  12. Biomechanical factors influencing the performance of elite Alpine ski racers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-04-01

    Alpine ski racing is a popular international winter sport that is complex and challenging from physical, technical, and tactical perspectives. Despite the vast amount of scientific literature focusing on this sport, including topical reviews on physiology, ski-snow friction, and injuries, no review has yet addressed the biomechanics of elite alpine ski racers and which factors influence performance. In World Cup events, winning margins are often mere fractions of a second and biomechanics may well be a determining factor in podium place finishes. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the scientific literature to identify the biomechanical factors that influence the performance of elite alpine ski racers, with an emphasis on slalom, giant slalom, super-G, and downhill events. Four electronic databases were searched using relevant medical subject headings and key words, with an additional manual search of reference lists, relevant journals, and key authors in the field. Articles were included if they addressed human biomechanics, elite alpine skiing, and performance. Only original research articles published in peer-reviewed journals and in the English language were reviewed. Articles that focused on skiing disciplines other than the four of primary interest were excluded (e.g., mogul, ski-cross and freestyle skiing). The articles subsequently included for review were quality assessed using a modified version of a validated quality assessment checklist. Data on the study population, design, location, and findings relating biomechanics to performance in alpine ski racers were extracted from each article using a standard data extraction form. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria, were reviewed, and scored an average of 69 ± 13% (range 40-89%) upon quality assessment. Five of the studies focused on giant slalom, four on slalom, and three on downhill disciplines, although these latter three articles were also relevant to super-G events

  13. Creating an engaging and stimulating anatomy lecture environment using the Cognitive Load Theory-based Lecture Model: Students' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti N.H. Hadie, PhD

    2018-04-01

    بير في نطاق التحفيز الذاتي. بالإضافة إلى ذلك، لمست مجموعة التدخل تجربة تعلم جيدة من المحاضرات. الاستنتاجات: حفزت القواعد الإرشادية بنجاح المشاركة المعرفية للطلبة وخبرة التعلم، مما يدل على التحفيز الناجح للموارد ذات الصلة للطلبة. تحفيز هذه الموارد المعرفية ضروري لنجاح المعالجة المعرفية خصوصا عند تعلم موضوع صعب كعلم التشريح. Abstract: Objective: There is a need to create a standard interactive anatomy lecture that can engage students in their learning process. This study investigated the impact of a new lecturing guideline, the Cognitive Load Theory-based Lecture Model (CLT-bLM, on students' cognitive engagement and motivation. Methods: A randomised controlled trial involving 197 participants from three institutions was conducted. The control group attended a freestyle lecture on the gross anatomy of the heart, delivered by a qualified anatomist from each institution. The intervention group attended a CLT-bLM-based lecture on a similar topic, delivered by the same lecturer, three weeks thereafter. The lecturers had attended a CLT-bLM workshop that allowed them to prepare for the CLT-bLM-based lecture over the course of three weeks. The students' ratings on their cognitive engagement and internal motivation were evaluated immediately after the lecture using a validated Learners' Engagement and Motivation Questionnaire. The differences between variables were analysed and the results were triangulated with the focus group discussion findings that explored students' experience while attending the lecture. Results: The intervention group has a significantly higher level of cognitive engagement than the control group; however, no significant difference in internal motivation score was found. In addition, the