WorldWideScience

Sample records for german hospital physicians

  1. Job satisfaction and the work situation of physicians: a survey at a German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Wilfried; Fischbeck, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Job demands and workload of hospital physicians are increasing. The object of this survey was to examine the factors that constitute job satisfaction and to analyse physicians' work situation in the area of in-patient care. 447 physicians at a German University Hospital received questionnaires with regard to work situation, job satisfaction and personal health. Data were analysed by MANOVA and multiple regression models. A first regression model explained 53% of the variance in satisfaction with "work and profession". Among the explanatory variables "superiors and hierarchy" showed the highest beta-weight (beta = -0.49). "Personal health" also determined job satisfaction, for female physicians stronger (beta = -0.31) than for male physicians (beta = -0.11). In a second regression model on satisfaction with "Financial situation" only 18% of the variance was explained, whereby "work condition on the ward", "personal health" and "collaboration between occupational groups" showed the highest beta-weights. Among resident physicians, work conditions, superiors, hierarchy, transparency and participation in decisions are very important variables for job satisfaction. Improvements in these aspects may improve job satisfaction and help to reduce physician shortage in hospitals.

  2. Difficulties experienced by migrant physicians working in German hospitals: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Corinna; Marckmann, Georg

    2016-09-23

    With Germany facing a shortage of doctors, hospitals have been increasingly recruiting physicians from abroad. Studies in other countries have shown that migrant physicians experience various difficulties in their work, which might impact the quality of patient care, physician job satisfaction, and, accordingly, retention. The experiences of migrant doctors in Germany have not been systematically studied so far and will likely differ from experiences migrant physicians make in other contexts. A thorough understanding of challenges faced by this group, however, is needed to develop adequate support structures-as required by the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel. A qualitative study was conducted to give an overview of the multifaceted difficulties migrant physicians might face in German hospitals. Twenty semi-structured interviews with foreign-born and foreign-trained physicians were conducted in German. Participants were recruited via the State Chambers of Physicians and snowballing based on a maximum variation sampling strategy varying purposefully by source country and medical specialty. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Participants described difficulties relating to healthcare institutions, own competencies, and interpersonal interactions. Participants experienced certain legal norms, the regulation of licensure and application for work, and the organization of the hospital environment as inadequate. Most struggled with their lack of setting-specific (language, cultural, clinical, and system) knowledge. Furthermore, behaviour of patients and co-workers was perceived as discriminating or inadequate for other reasons. This is the first study to describe the broad range of issues migrant physicians experience in Germany. Based on this information, institutional actors should devise support structures to ensure quality of care, physician wellbeing, and

  3. Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwappach David

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF – which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April–July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9% participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ, work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF, and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. Results German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74 compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p p Conclusion In our study, work interfering with family conflict (WIF as part of Work-Family Conflict (WFC was highly prevalent among German hospital physicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WIF. Some of these predictors are accessible to alteration by improving work organisation in hospitals.

  4. Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Isabelle; Nübling, Matthias; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin; Schwappach, David; Rieger, Monika A

    2008-10-07

    Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict--namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF)--which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April-July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9%) participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF), and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74) compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p work, elevated number of days at work despite own illness, and consequences of short-notice changes in the duty roster. Good sense of community at work was a protective factor. Compared to the general German population, we observed a significant higher level of quantitative work demands among hospital physicians (mean = 73 vs. mean = 57, p work ability, and higher satisfaction with life in general. Compared to the German general population, physicians showed significantly higher levels of individual stress and quality of life as well as lower levels for well-being. This has to be judged as an alerting finding regarding the state of physicians' health. In our study, work

  5. Children, care, career - a cross-sectional study on the risk of burnout among German hospital physicians at different career stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Astrid; Kostova, Petya; Harth, Volker; Wegner, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of female medical students physicians' need for work-life balanced hospital jobs rises at all career stages. The Working Time Act (Arbeitszeitgesetz, ArbZG), an implementation of the European Working Time Directive into German law in 2004, should have improved the general conditions for creating flexible work. Nevertheless, the vast majority of female physicians still report an incompatibility of work and family. So far, little is known about mothers working on leading positions in the medical field. The presented study focuses on gender differences in the level of emotional exhaustion between child-rearing junior and senior physicians and different predictors of burnout. Three years after the ArbZT-enactment, 994 physicians from the listed hospital physicians in the Medical Register of the city of Hamburg participated in the cross-sectional study and completed a 60-item questionnaire (return rate of 46,5%). The questionnaire included a 22-item version of the German translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory whereat emotional exhaustion was interpreted as the crucial predictor of burnout. Results of an univariate covariance analysis and regression analyses are reported. In the level of emotional exhaustion no gender differences were found between junior and senior physicians with children in the overall analysis. Support by the superior was the only overall predictor of burnout. Female senior physicians having children presented the highest risk of burnout. Only in this group parenting contributed significantly to the risk of burnout. Support by the superior and the relationship to colleagues are generally important predictors of burnout among hospital physicians. Parenthood only gets a crucial influence on psychomental health for female senior physicians. Still conservative role models are common in this group, thus dealing with the triple burden of work, leadership responsibility and child rearing seems to be a special female

  6. Physician-Owned Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 amended section 1877 of the Social Security Act to impose additional requirements for physician-owned hospitals to...

  7. [Poet-physicians in German literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perels, C

    1991-12-17

    Starting with standards arising from the relationship between medicine and art in classical antiquity, biblical tradition and teutonic-pagan antiquity, this article roams through german literature from the Middle Ages up to the 20th century, from Hildegard of Bingen to Gottfried Benn and Alfred Döblin, guided by the question, how strongly medical knowledge and medical practise are reflected in the poetry of writing physicians. Individual dispositions and epoque-specific features are discussed. Special attention is given to Paul Fleming and Angelus Silesius, Albrecht von Haller and Friedrich Schiller, romanticism and Georg Büchner.

  8. Physicians' occupational stress, depressive symptoms and work ability in relation to their working environment: a cross-sectional study of differences among medical residents with various specialties working in German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernburg, Monika; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Mache, Stefanie

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to analyse and compare differences in occupational stress, depressive symptoms, work ability and working environment among residents working in various medical specialties. 435 German hospital residents in medical training working in 6 different medical specialties participated in a cross-sectional survey study. Physicians were asked about their working conditions and aspects of mental health and work ability. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the Work Ability Index, the ICD-10 Symptom Rating and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire were used to measure working conditions, mental health and work ability. Results show that up to 17% of the physicians reported high levels of occupational distress and 9% reported high levels of depressive symptoms. 11% of the hospital physicians scored low in work ability. Significant differences between medical specialties were demonstrated for occupational distress, depressive symptoms, work ability, job demands and job resources. Surgeons showed consistently the highest levels of perceived distress but also the highest levels of work ability and lowest scores for depression. Depressive symptoms were rated with the highest levels by anaesthesiologists. Significant associations between physicians' working conditions, occupational distress and mental health-related aspects are illustrated. Study results demonstrated significant differences in specific job stressors, demands and resources. Relevant relations between work factors and physicians' health and work ability are discussed. These findings should be reinvestigated in further studies, especially with a longitudinal study design. This work suggests that to ensure physicians' health, hospital management should plan and implement suitable mental health promotion strategies. In addition, operational efficiency through resource planning optimisation and work process improvements should be focused by hospital management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  9. Job stress and job satisfaction of physicians in private practice: comparison of German and Norwegian physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltmer, Edgar; Rosta, Judith; Siegrist, Johannes; Aasland, Olaf G

    2012-10-01

    This study examined job satisfaction and job stress of German compared to Norwegian physicians in private practice. A representative sample of physicians in private practice of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany (N = 414) and a nationwide sample of Norwegian general practitioners and private practice specialists (N = 340) were surveyed in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire comprised the standard instruments "Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS)" and a short form of the "Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire (ERI)". Norwegian physicians scored significantly higher (job satisfaction scale compared to German physicians (M 5.57, SD 0.74 vs. M 4.78, SD 1.01). The effect size was highest for the items freedom to choose method (d = 1.012), rate of pay (d = 0.941), and overall job satisfaction (d = 0.931). While there was no significant difference in the mean of the overall effort scale between German and Norwegian physicians, Norwegian physicians scored significantly higher (p job satisfaction. Job satisfaction and reward were significantly higher in Norwegian than in German physicians. An almost threefold higher proportion of German physicians exhibited a high level of work-related stress. Findings call for active prevention and health promotion among stressed practicing physicians, with a special focus on improved working conditions.

  10. The German hospital malnutrition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlich, Matthias; Schütz, Tatjana; Norman, Kristina; Gastell, Sylvia; Lübke, Heinrich Josef; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bolder, Ulrich; Frieling, Thomas; Güldenzoph, Helge; Hahn, Kristian; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Schindler, Karin; Stein, Jürgen; Volkert, Dorothee; Weimann, Arved; Werner, Hansjörg; Wolf, Christiane; Zürcher, Gudrun; Bauer, Peter; Lochs, Herbert

    2006-08-01

    Malnutrition is frequently observed in chronic and severe diseases and associated with impaired outcome. In Germany general data on prevalence and impact of hospital malnutrition are missing. Nutritional state was assessed by subjective global assessment (SGA) and by anthropometric measurements in 1,886 consecutively admitted patients in 13 hospitals (n=1,073, university hospitals; n=813, community or teaching hospitals). Risk factors for malnutrition and the impact of nutritional status on length of hospital stay were analyzed. Malnutrition was diagnosed in 27.4% of patients according to SGA. A low arm muscle area and arm fat area were observed in 11.3% and 17.1%, respectively. Forty-three % of patients 70 years old were malnourished compared to only 7.8% of patients malnutrition was observed in geriatric (56.2%), oncology (37.6%), and gastroenterology (32.6%) departments. Multivariate analysis revealed three independent risk factors: higher age, polypharmacy, and malignant disease (all PMalnutrition was associated with an 43% increase of hospital stay (PMalnutrition is associated with increased length of hospital stay. Higher age, malignant disease and major comorbidity were found to be the main contributors to malnutrition. Adequate nutritional support should be initiated in order to optimize the clinical outcome of these patients.

  11. Overview of physician-hospital ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Kenneth H; Allyn, Thomas R; Rosenfield, Robert H; Schwartz, Richard

    2005-01-01

    An ongoing environment of reimbursement lagging behind escalating expenses has led physicians to explore new sources of revenue. The goal of physician-hospital ventures is to create a valuable entity that benefits patients, physicians, and the hospital. Physicians may choose to invest in healthcare facilities to improve patient care and obtain increased control over daily operations. If so, they should seek counsel to avoid violating Stark laws and anti-kickback laws. Modalities for investing in physician-hospital ventures are joint equity (stock) ventures, participating bond transactions (PBTs), and contractual integration, a new method to align the goals of specialists and hospital management without using joint equity ventures. Physicians and management should invest time in developing a shared vision of the future before beginning contract negotiations. Successful partnering requires transparency and stepwise building of trust. The greatest gain in joint ventures arises when both sides become active owners, rather than passive investors.

  12. Tailoring hospital marketing efforts to physicians' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, J M; Lamb, C W

    1988-12-01

    Marketing has become widely recognized as an important component of hospital management (Kotler and Clarke 1987; Ludke, Curry, and Saywell 1983). Physicians are becoming recognized as an important target market that warrants more marketing attention than it has received in the past (Super 1987; Wotruba, Haas, and Hartman 1982). Some experts predict that hospitals will begin focusing more marketing attention on physicians and less on consumers (Super 1986). Much of this attention is likely to take the form of practice management assistance, such as computer-based information system support or consulting services. The survey results reported here are illustrative only of how one hospital addressed the problem of physician need assessment. Other potential target markets include physicians who admit patients only to competitor hospitals and physicians who admit to multiple hospitals. The market might be segmented by individual versus group practice, area of specialization, or possibly even physician practice life cycle stage (Wotruba, Haas, and Hartman 1982). The questions included on the survey and the survey format are likely to be situation-specific. The key is the process, not the procedure. It is important for hospital marketers to recognize that practice management assistance needs will vary among markets (Jensen 1987). Therefore, hospitals must carefully identify their target physician market(s) and survey them about their specific needs before developing and implementing new physician marketing programs. Only then can they be reasonably confident that their marketing programs match their customers' needs.

  13. The impact of the hospital work environment on social support from physicians in breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Lena; Wirtz, Markus; Kowalski, Christoph; Pfaff, Holger; Visser, Adriaan; Ernstmann, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    Research on determinants of a good patient-physician interaction mainly disregards systemic factors, such as the work environment in healthcare. This study aims to identify stressors and resources within the work environment of hospital physicians that enable or hinder the physicians' provision of social support to patients. Four data sources on 35 German breast cancer center hospitals were matched: structured hospital quality reports and surveys of 348 physicians, 108 persons in hospital leadership, and 1844 patients. Associations between hospital structures, physicians' social resources as well as job demands and control and patients' perceived support from physicians have been studied in multilevel models. Patients feel better supported by their physicians in hospitals with high social capital, a high percentage of permanently employed physicians, and less physically strained physicians. The results highlight the importance of the work environment for a good patient-physician interaction. They can be used to develop interventions for redesigning the hospital work environment, which in turn may improve physician satisfaction, well-being, and performance and consequently the quality of care. Health policy and hospital management could create conditions conducive to better patient-physician interaction by strengthening the social capital and by increasing job security for physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Physician-Hospital Alignment in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-09-01

    The concept of "alignment" between physicians and hospitals is a popular buzzword in the age of health care reform. Despite their often tumultuous histories, physicians and hospitals find themselves under increasing pressures to work together toward common goals. However, effective alignment is more than just simple cooperation between parties. The process of achieving alignment does not have simple, universal steps. Alignment will differ based on individual situational factors and the type of specialty involved. Ultimately, however, there are principles that underlie the concept of alignment and should be a part of any physician-hospital alignment efforts. In orthopedic surgery, alignment involves the clinical, administrative, financial, and even personal aspects of a surgeon's practice. It must be based on the principles of financial interest, clinical authority, administrative participation, transparency, focus on the patient, and mutual necessity. Alignment can take on various forms as well, with popular models consisting of shared governance and comanagement, gainsharing, bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other methods. As regulatory and financial pressures continue to motivate physicians and hospitals to develop alignment relationships, new and innovative methods of alignment will also appear. Existing models will mature and evolve, with individual variability based on local factors. However, certain trends seem to be appearing as time progresses and alignment relationships deepen, including regional and national collaboration, population management, and changes in the legal system. This article explores the history, principles, and specific methods of physician-hospital alignment and its critical importance for the future of health care delivery. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Public Awareness and Use of German Physician Ratings Websites: Cross-Sectional Survey of Four North German Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Stuart; Strech, Daniel; Meyer, Andrea; Kahrass, Hannes

    2017-11-09

    Physician rating websites (PRWs) allow patients to rate, comment, and discuss physicians' quality. The ability of PRWs to influence patient decision making and health care quality is dependent, in part, on sufficient awareness and usage of PRWs. However, previous studies have found relatively low levels of awareness and usage of PRWs, which has raised concerns about the representativeness and validity of information on PRWs. The objectives of this study were to examine (1) participants' awareness, use, and contribution of ratings on PRWs and how this compares with other rating websites; (2) factors that predict awareness, use, and contribution of ratings on PRWs; and (3) participants' attitudes toward PRWs in relation to selecting a physician. A mailed cross-sectional survey was sent to a random sample (N=1542) from four North German cities (Nordhorn, Hildesheim, Bremen, and Hamburg) between April and July 2016. Survey questions explored respondents' awareness, use, and contribution of ratings on rating websites for service (physicians, hospitals, and hotels and restaurants) and products (media and technical) in general and the role of PRWs when searching for a new physician. A total of 280 completed surveys were returned (280/1542, 18.16% response rate), with the following findings: (1) Overall, 72.5% (200/276) of respondents were aware of PRWs. Of the respondents who were aware of PRWs, 43.6% (86/197) had used PRWs. Of the respondents who had used PRWs, 23% (19/83) had rated physicians at least once. Awareness, use, and contribution of ratings on PRWs were significantly lower in comparison with all other rating websites, except for hospital rating websites. (2) Except for the impact of responders' gender and marital status on the awareness of PRWs and responders' age on the use of PRWs, no other predictors had a relevant impact. (3) Whereas 31.8% (85/267) of the respondents reported that PRWs were a very important or somewhat important information source when

  16. Breast cancer patients' trust in physicians: the impact of patients' perception of physicians' communication behaviors and hospital organizational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Christoph; Nitzsche, Anika; Scheibler, Fueloep; Steffen, Petra; Albert, Ute-Susann; Pfaff, Holger

    2009-12-01

    To examine whether patients' perception of a hospital's organizational climate has an impact on their trust in physicians after accounting for physicians' communication behaviors as perceived by the patients and patient characteristics. Patients undergoing treatment in breast centers in the German state of North Rhein-Westphalia in 2006 were asked to complete a standardized postal questionnaire. Disease characteristics were then added by the medical personnel. Multiple linear regressions were performed. 80.5% of the patients responded to the survey. 37% of the variance in patients' trust in physicians can be explained by the variables included in our final model (N=2226; R(2) adj.=0.372; porganizational climate. The impact of their perception of physicians' communication behaviors persists after introducing hospital organizational characteristics. Perceived physician accessibility shows the strongest association with trust. A trusting physician-patient relationship among breast cancer patients is associated with both the perceived quality of the hospital organizational climate and perceived physicians' communication behaviors. With regard to clinical organization, efforts should be put into improving the organizational climate and making physicians more accessible to patients.

  17. Physician recruitment in Ontario Provincial Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, R; Galbraith, D; Frost, B

    1989-11-01

    Recruitment of Physicians/Psychiatrists to staff the Ontario Provincial Psychiatric Hospitals remains an ongoing problem despite the introduction of measures such as University Affiliation and Incentive Grants. Historically there has been heavy reliance upon Foreign Medical Graduates (GOFM's) who have been denied the possibility of professional mobility and advancement because of restrictive licences. Recent changes in regulations have severely restricted the recruitment of GOFM's. During 1987, details of all physicians employed in the provincial hospitals during the preceeding five years were entered into a computerized data base. This paper presents some initial analyses which indicate that Canadian graduates have provided low levels of service, especially outside major urban centres, quite insufficient to replace the GOFM's. These findings raise urgent social and professional concerns.

  18. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a "high" score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout.

  19. Factors driving physician-hospital alignment in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alexandra E; Butler, Craig A; Bozic, Kevin J

    2013-06-01

    The relationships between physicians and hospitals are viewed as central to the proposition of delivering high-quality health care at a sustainable cost. Over the last two decades, major changes in the scope, breadth, and complexities of these relationships have emerged. Despite understanding the need for physician-hospital alignment, identification and understanding the incentives and drivers of alignment prove challenging. Our review identifies the primary drivers of physician alignment with hospitals from both the physician and hospital perspectives. Further, we assess the drivers more specific to motivating orthopaedic surgeons to align with hospitals. We performed a comprehensive literature review from 1992 to March 2012 to evaluate published studies and opinions on the issues surrounding physician-hospital alignment. Literature searches were performed in both MEDLINE(®) and Health Business™ Elite. Available literature identifies economic and regulatory shifts in health care and cultural factors as primary drivers of physician-hospital alignment. Specific to orthopaedics, factors driving alignment include the profitability of orthopaedic service lines, the expense of implants, and issues surrounding ambulatory surgery centers and other ancillary services. Evolving healthcare delivery and payment reforms promote increased collaboration between physicians and hospitals. While economic incentives and increasing regulatory demands provide the strongest drivers, cultural changes including physician leadership and changing expectations of work-life balance must be considered when pursuing successful alignment models. Physicians and hospitals view each other as critical to achieving lower-cost, higher-quality health care.

  20. Referring physician satisfaction: toward a better understanding of hospital referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzurick, T G; France, K R; Logar, C M

    1998-01-01

    Customer satisfaction literature has contributed significantly to the development of marketing strategies in the health-care arena. The research has led to the development of hospital-driven relationship marketing programs. This study examines the inclusion of referring physicians as partners in the hospital's relationship marketing program. In exploring this relationship, medical and hospital facility characteristics that referring physicians find important in making patient referrals to specialty care hospitals are identified and analyzed. The results lead to the development of strategic initiatives which hospital marketers should consider when developing relationship marketing programs designed to satisfy their referring physicians.

  1. ACA Marketplace premiums and competition among hospitals and physician practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, Maria; Bundorf, M Kate; Kessler, Daniel P; Baker, Laurence C

    2018-02-01

    To examine the association between annual premiums for health plans available in Federally Facilitated Marketplaces (FFMs) and the extent of competition and integration among physicians and hospitals, as well as the number of insurers. We used observational data from the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight on the annual premiums and other characteristics of plans, matched to measures of physician, hospital, and insurer market competitiveness and other characteristics of 411 rating areas in the 37 FFMs. We estimated multivariate models of the relationship between annual premiums and Herfindahl-Hirschman indices of hospitals and physician practices, controlling for the number of insurers, the extent of physician-hospital integration, and other plan and rating area characteristics. Premiums for Marketplace plans were higher in rating areas in which physician, hospital, and insurance markets were less competitive. An increase from the 10th to the 90th percentile of physician concentration and hospital concentration was associated with increases of $393 and $189, respectively, in annual premiums for the Silver plan with the second lowest cost. A similar increase in the number of insurers was associated with a $421 decrease in premiums. Physician-hospital integration was not significantly associated with premiums. Premiums for FFM plans were higher in markets with greater concentrations of hospitals and physicians but fewer insurers. Higher premiums make health insurance less affordable for people purchasing unsubsidized coverage and raise the cost of Marketplace premium tax credits to the government.

  2. [Infection control and safety culture in German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sonja; Schwab, Frank; Gropmann, Alexander; Behnke, Michael; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are the most frequent adverse events in the healthcare setting and their prevention is an important contribution to patient safety in hospitals. To analyse to what extent safety cultural aspects with relevance to infection control are implemented in German hospitals. Safety cultural aspects of infection control were surveyed with an online questionnaire; data were analysed descriptively. Data from 543 hospitals with a median of [IQR] 275 [157; 453] beds were analysed. Almost all hospitals (96.6 %) had internal guidelines for infection control (IC) in place; 82 % defined IC objectives, most often regarding hand hygiene (HH) (93 %) and multidrug resistant organisms (72 %) and less frequently for antibiotic stewardship (48 %) or prevention of specific HAI. In 94 % of hospitals, a reporting system for adverse events was in place, which was also used to report low compliance with HH, outbreaks and Clostridium difficile-associated infections. Members of the IC team were most often seen to hold daily responsibility for IC in the hospital, but rarely other hospital staff (94 versus 19 %). Safety cultural aspects are not fully implemented in German hospitals. IC should be more strongly implemented in healthcare workers' daily routine and more visibly supported by hospital management.

  3. Developments in the Frequency of Ratings and Evaluation Tendencies: A Review of German Physician Rating Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Stuart; Strech, Daniel; Reimann, Swantje

    2017-08-25

    Physician rating websites (PRWs) have been developed to allow all patients to rate, comment, and discuss physicians' quality online as a source of information for others searching for a physician. At the beginning of 2010, a sample of 298 randomly selected physicians from the physician associations in Hamburg and Thuringia were searched for on 6 German PRWs to examine the frequency of ratings and evaluation tendencies. The objective of this study was to examine (1) the number of identifiable physicians on German PRWs; (2) the number of rated physicians on German PRWs; (3) the average and maximum number of ratings per physician on German PRWs; (4) the average rating on German PRWs; (5) the website visitor ranking positions of German PRWs; and (6) how these data compare with 2010 results. A random stratified sample of 298 selected physicians from the physician associations in Hamburg and Thuringia was generated. Every selected physician was searched for on the 6 PRWs (Jameda, Imedo, Docinsider, Esando, Topmedic, and Medführer) used in the 2010 study and a PRW, Arztnavigator, launched by Allgemeine Ortskrankenkasse (AOK). The results were as follows: (1) Between 65.1% (194/298) on Imedo to 94.6% (282/298) on AOK-Arztnavigator of the physicians were identified on the selected PRWs. (2) Between 16.4% (49/298) on Esando to 83.2% (248/298) on Jameda of the sample had been rated at least once. (3) The average number of ratings per physician ranged from 1.2 (Esando) to 7.5 (AOK-Arztnavigator). The maximum number of ratings per physician ranged from 3 (Esando) to 115 (Docinsider), indicating an increase compared with the ratings of 2 to 27 in the 2010 study sample. (4) The average converted standardized rating (1=positive, 2=neutral, and 3=negative) ranged from 1.0 (Medführer) to 1.2 (Jameda and Topmedic). (5) Only Jameda (position 317) and Medführer (position 9796) were placed among the top 10,000 visited websites in Germany. Whereas there has been an overall increase in

  4. Hospital employment of physicians does not improve quality

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins RA

    2016-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The Annals of Internal Medicine posted a manuscript online today reporting that the growing trend of physician employment by hospitals does not improve quality (1). In 2003, approximately 29% of hospitals employed members of their physician workforce, a number that rose to 42% by 2012. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of U.S. acute care hospitals between 2003 and 2012 and examined mortality rates, 30-day readmission rate...

  5. The catastrophic collapse of morale among hospital physicians in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Yasunaga

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Hideo YasunagaDepartment of Health Management and Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The past few decades have witnessed bleak pictures of unhappy physicians worldwide. Japanese physicians working in hospitals are particularly distressed. Today, Japan’s healthcare system is near collapse because physicians are utterly demoralized. Their loss of morale is due to budget constraints, excessive demands, physician shortages, poor distribution, long working hours, hostile media, increasing lawsuits, and violence by patients. Severe cost-saving policies, inadequate distribution of healthcare resources, and the failure to communicate risks has damaged physicians’ morale and created conflicts between physicians and society. Physicians should communicate the uncertainty, limitations, and risks of modern medicine to all members of society. No resolution can be achieved unless trust exists between physicians, patients, the public, the media, bureaucrats, politicians and jurists.Keywords: physician’s morale, physician shortages, overwork, health policy

  6. Attitudes of pharmacists and physicians to antibiotic policies in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, A; Simpson, J M; Armour, C L

    1999-06-01

    Antibiotic therapy in hospitals has substantial impact on patient outcome and the pharmacy drug budget. Antibiotic policies have been implemented by some hospitals to improve the quality of patient outcome and cost of antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic policies impose certain requirements on pharmacists and physicians. Pharmacists' and physicians' attitudes to and opinions about antibiotic policies are likely to affect the usefulness of such policies. To determine the attitudes of pharmacists and physicians to antibiotic policies in New South Wales (NSW) hospitals. Pharmacists and physicians in NSW public hospitals were surveyed to determine their attitudes to and opinions on antibiotic policies. A simple one-stage cluster sample of 241 pharmacists and a two-stage cluster sample of 701 physicians were obtained. Factor analysis was used to identify the attitudinal dimensions. General linear modelling was used to investigate the effects of predictor variables on outcome variables. The response rates were 91% and 77% for pharmacists and physicians, respectively. Factor analysis identified three dimensions of attitude to antibiotic policies: that they encourage rational antibiotic use; that they improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing and that they are associated with some problems. The reliability of these factors (Cronbach's alpha) ranged from 0.71 to 0.74, and was 0.90 for the overall attitude scale. Pharmacists and physicians had a positive overall attitude to antibiotic policies. Whereas physicians recognize that antibiotic policies improve the quality of prescribing, this was highly correlated with identification of problems (alpha = 0.71). In urban hospitals, pharmacists were more likely than physicians to associate antibiotics with problems. There was a positive overall attitude to hospital antibiotic policies expressed by pharmacists and physicians.

  7. Current market trends in hospital/physician integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Randy R

    2009-01-01

    This article explores recent trends that are dramatically changing the landscape of typical hospital/physician integration models and provides the reader with useful insights to better evaluate this dynamically changing marketplace.

  8. Physicians and Physician Trainees Rarely Identify or Address Overweight/Obesity in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Marta A; Nkoy, Flory L; Maloney, Christopher G; Mihalopoulos, Nicole L

    2015-10-01

    To determine how frequently physicians identify and address overweight/obesity in hospitalized children and to compare physician documentation across training level (medical student, intern, resident, attending). We conducted a retrospective chart review. Using an administrative database, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention body mass index calculator, and random sampling technique, we identified a study population of 300 children aged 2-18 years with overweight/obesity hospitalized on the general medical service of a tertiary care pediatric hospital. We reviewed admission, progress, and discharge notes to determine how frequently physicians and physician trainees identified (documented in history, physical exam, or assessment) and addressed (documented in hospital or discharge plan) overweight/obesity. Physicians and physician trainees identified overweight/obesity in 8.3% (n = 25) and addressed it in 4% (n = 12) of 300 hospitalized children with overweight/obesity. Interns were most likely to document overweight/obesity in history (8.3% of the 266 patients they followed). Attendings were most likely to document overweight/obesity in physical examination (8.3%), assessment (4%), and plan (4%) of the 300 patients they followed. Medical students were least likely to document overweight/obesity including it in the assessment (0.4%) and plan (0.4%) of the 244 hospitalized children with overweight/obesity they followed. Physicians and physician trainees rarely identify or address overweight/obesity in hospitalized children. This represents a missed opportunity for both patient care and physician trainee education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Clinical risk management in german hospitals - does size really matter?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, S; Jandeck, L M; Zippel, C; Andersen, M; Krummenauer, F

    2011-06-01

    In the last years, German hospitals have implemented different measures to increase patient safety. Special importance has been attached to near miss reporting systems (critical incident reporting system, CIRS) as instruments for risk identification in health care, instruments that promise high potential for organisational learning. To gain insight into the current status of critical incident reporting systems and other instruments for clinical risk management, a survey among 341 hospitals was carried out in 2009. Questions covered a process of six steps: from risk strategy to methods for risk identification, to risk analysis and risk assessment, to risk controlling and risk monitoring. Structured telephone interviews were conducted with 341 German hospitals, featuring in their statutory quality reports certain predefined key terms that indicated the concluded or planned implementation of clinical risk management. The main objective of those interviews was to check the relation between status/organisation of self-reported risk management and both operator (private, public, NPO) and size of hospital. The implementation of near miss reporting systems (CIRS) in German hospitals has been constantly rising since 2004: in 2009, 54 % of the interviewed hospitals reported an implemented CIRS; of these, 72 % reported the system to be hospital-wide. An association between CIRS and private, public or NPO-operator could not be detected (Fisher p = 1.000); however, the degree of CIRS implementation was significantly increasing with the size of the hospital, i.e., the number of beds (Fisher p = 0.008): only 38 % of the hospitals with less than 100 beds reported CIRS implementation against 52 % of those between 100 to 500 beds, and 67 % of those with more than 500 beds. While 62 % of the hospitals interviewed reported the maintenance of a risk management committee, only 14 % reported the implementation of risk analysing techniques. As to clinical risk

  10. [Physicians in the Swedish-German Association 1937-1945, who and why?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils M G; Nilsson, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    The national association Sweden-Germany (In Swedish: Riksföreningen Sverige-Tyskland; RST) was founded in 1937. The headquarters were located in Lund, in southern Sweden. The proclamation for the association gathered more than 400 signatures, among them 40 physicians. The purpose of the RST was to evaluate and eventually support the arguments of contemporary Nazi Germany, mainly in positive words, and to cultivate the ideological homogeneity within Sweden. During its historical boom period 1938-1943, RST had about 5600 members, of which nearly 200 were physicians. As a peak RST activity the summer summit meeting in Jönköping August, 1941, the members gathered and listened to lectures and proclamations mixed with music in a beautiful environment. The association published a periodical paper, in which members published articles on various themes related to German culture and politics, as well as commentaries on war changes. This essay discusses the RST-memberships of Swedish physicians. Reasons relevant for joining RST may be due to scientific contacts in Germany, or because of German relatives and close friends, if not political agreement with the German Nazi government. Some members chose to leave the association in disappointment after the German military attacks on neighbouring countries of Sweden in April 1940 (Denmark and Norway), although the association grew significantly from 1941-1943. The lesson to be learned from RST is that a leading academic profession, such as the Swedish physicians, participated with many prominent members in a friendship organistaion with the once victorious, but later defeated Germany during the turbulent years just before and during the Second World War. Further research efforts will focus on individual biographies and careers of some of these physicians, ranging from common country-side general practitioners to one Nobel laureate.

  11. [Communication between the primary care physician, hospital staff and the patient during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menahem, Sasson; Roitgarz, Ina; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2011-04-01

    HospitaL admission is a crisis for the patient and his family and can interfere with the continuity of care. It may lead to mistakes due to communication problems between the primary care physician and the hospital medical staff. To explore the communication between the primary care physician, the hospital medical staff, the patient and his family during hospitalization. A total of 269 questionnaires were sent to all Clalit Health Services-South District, primary care physicians; 119 of these questionnaires (44.2%) were completed. Half of the primary care physicians thought that they should, always or almost always, have contact with the admitting ward in cases of internal medicine, oncology, surgery or pediatric admissions. However, the actual contact rate, according to their report, was only in a third of the cases. A telephone contact was more common than an actual visit of the patient in the ward. Computer communication between the hospital physicians and the primary care physicians is still insufficiently developed, although 96.6% of the primary care physicians check, with the aid of computer software, for information on their hospitalized patients. The main reasons to visit the hospitalized patient were severe medical conditions or uncertainty about the diagnosis; 79% of the physicians thought that visiting their patients strengthened the level of trust between them and their patients. There are sometimes communication difficulties and barriers between the primary care physicians and the ward's physicians due to partial information delivery and rejection from the hospital physicians. The main barriers for visiting admitted patients were workload and lack of pre-allocated time on the work schedule. No statistically significant differences were found between communication variables and primary care physician's personal and demographic characteristics. The communication between the primary care physician and the hospital physicians should be improved through

  12. Physicians' job satisfaction and motivation in a public academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vasconcelos Filho, Paulo; de Souza, Miriam Regina; Elias, Paulo Eduardo Mangeon; D'Ávila Viana, Ana Luiza

    2016-12-07

    Physician shortage is a global issue that concerns Brazil's authorities. The organizational structure and the environment of a medical institution can hide a low-quality life of a physician. This study examines the relationship between the hospital work environment and physicians' job satisfaction and motivation when working in a large public academic hospital. The study was restricted to one large, multispecialty Brazil's hospital. Six hundred hospital physicians were invited to participate by e-mail. A short version of the Physician Worklife Survey (PWS) was used to measure working satisfaction. Physicians were also asked for socio-demographic information, medical specialty, and the intention to continue working in the hospital. Data from 141 questionnaires were included in the analyses. Forty-five physicians graduated from the hospital's university, and they did not intend to leave the hospital under any circumstance (affective bond). The motivating factor for beginning the career at the hospital and to continue working there were the connection to the medical school and the hospital status as a "prestigious academic hospital"; the physicians were more satisfied with the career than the specialty. Only 30% completely agreed with the statement "If I had to start my career over again, I would choose my current specialty," while 45% completely agreed with the statement "I am not well compensated given my training and experience." The greater point of satisfaction was the relationship with physician colleagues. They are annoyed about the amount of calls they are requested to take and about how work encroaches on their personal time. No significant differences between medical specialties were found in the analysis. The participants were satisfied with their profession. The fact that they remained at the hospital was related to the academic environment, the relationship with colleagues, and the high prestige in which society holds the institution. The points of

  13. [How do Turkish immigrants evaluate cultural sensitivity in a German tertiary hospital?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Arnd; Uyar, Müberra; Henning, Bernhard F; Uslucan, Haci H; Westhoff, Timm; Pagonas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Culturally adequate medical care is a goal in Germany, but quantitative data concerning inpatients is lacking. Inpatients of a German tertiary hospital: Turkish migrants (T) and Germans (G) were interviewed in their respective native language. 121 T and 121 G were interviewed. 97.5% of T were Muslims, 82.6% of G were Christians. 88.5% of T judged religion as "important" or "very important" (G: 35.8%). 50.8% of T saw their opportunity to pray in the hospital as "bad" or "very bad" (G: 0.9%). Keeping to Islamic dietary rules in the hospital was "difficult" or "very difficult" for 90% of T. For 79.0% of female T care by a same-sex staff was "important" or "very important" (female G: 36.3%, male T: 40.0%, male G: 7.7%). The presence of a same-sex person during examinations or treatments was "much" or "very much" appreciated by 69.7% of female T, if same-sex care was impossible (female G: 25.4%, male T: 28.9%, male G: 6.1%). A retrospective analysis revealed that 5.8% of all 8988 hospital admissions during the period of study recruitment were Turkish migrants. To meet the needs of Turkish migrants German hospitals should improve the opportunity for Muslims to pray. Additionally, the cooperation with local imams should be sought. Precise descriptions of food ingredients or an adapted menu could help T to deal with Muslim dietary commandments. A culturally sensitive hospital should take into account that female as well as male T prefer to be cared of by same-sex physicians and nurses. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart.

  14. Determinants of workplace violence against clinical physicians in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jeng-Cheng; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Chen, Peter Y; Chen, Ying-Lin; Lin, Yu-Wen; Chen, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Workplace violence in the health sector is a worldwide concern. Physicians play an essential role in health-care teamwork; thus, understanding how organizational factors influence workplace violence against physicians is critical. A total of 189 physicians from three public hospitals and one private hospital in Northern Taiwan completed a survey, and the response rate was 47.1%. This study was approved by the institutional review board of each participating hospital. The 189 physicians were selected from the Taipei area, Taiwan. The results showed that 41.5% of the respondents had received at least one workplace-related physical or verbal violent threat, and that 9.8% of the respondents had experienced at least one episode of sexual harassment in the 3 months before the survey. Logistic regression analysis revealed that physicians in psychiatry or emergency medicine departments received more violent threats and sexual harassment than physicians in other departments. Furthermore, physicians with a lower workplace safety climate (OR=0.89; 95% CI=0.81-0.98) and more job demands (OR=1.15; 95% CI=1.02-1.30) were more likely to receive violent threats. This study found that workplace violence was associated with job demands and the workplace safety climate. Therefore, determining how to develop a workplace safety climate and ensure a safe job environment for physicians is a crucial management policy issue for health-care systems.

  15. The effects of health information technology adoption and hospital-physician integration on hospital efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Na-Eun; Chang, Jongwha; Atems, Bebonchu

    2014-11-01

    To determine the impact of health information technology (HIT) adoption and hospital-physician integration on hospital efficiency. Using 2010 data from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) annual survey, the AHA IT survey, supplemented by the CMS Case Mix Index, and the US Census Bureau's small area income and poverty estimates, we examined how the adoption of HIT and employment of physicians affected hospital efficiency and whether they were substitutes or complements. The sample included 2173 hospitals. We employed a 2-stage approach. In the first stage, data envelopment analysis was used to estimate technical efficiency of hospitals. In the second stage, we used instrumental variable approaches, notably 2-stage least squares and the generalized method of moments, to examine the effects of IT adoption and integration on hospital efficiency. We found that HIT adoption and hospital-physician integration, when considered separately, each have statistically significant positive impacts on hospital efficiency. Also, we found that hospitals that adopted HIT with employed physicians will achieve less efficiency compared with hospitals that adopted HIT without employed physicians. Although HIT adoption and hospital-physician integration both seem to be key parts of improving hospital efficiency when one or the other is utilized individually, they can hurt hospital efficiency when utilized together.

  16. Participant observation of time allocation, direct patient contact and simultaneous activities in hospital physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupanc Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital physicians' time is a critical resource in medical care. Two aspects are of interest. First, the time spent in direct patient contact – a key principle of effective medical care. Second, simultaneous task performance ('multitasking' which may contribute to medical error, impaired safety behaviour, and stress. There is a call for instruments to assess these aspects. A preliminary study to gain insight into activity patterns, time allocation and simultaneous activities of hospital physicians was carried out. Therefore an observation instrument for time-motion-studies in hospital settings was developed and tested. Methods 35 participant observations of internists and surgeons of a German municipal 300-bed hospital were conducted. Complete day shifts of hospital physicians on wards, emergency ward, intensive care unit, and operating room were continuously observed. Assessed variables of interest were time allocation, share of direct patient contact, and simultaneous activities. Inter-rater agreement of Kappa = .71 points to good reliability of the instrument. Results Hospital physicians spent 25.5% of their time at work in direct contact with patients. Most time was allocated to documentation and conversation with colleagues and nursing staff. Physicians performed parallel simultaneous activities for 17–20% of their work time. Communication with patients, documentation, and conversation with colleagues and nursing staff were the most frequently observed simultaneous activities. Applying logit-linear analyses, specific primary activities increase the probability of particular simultaneous activities. Conclusion Patient-related working time in hospitals is limited. The potential detrimental effects of frequently observed simultaneous activities on performance outcomes need further consideration.

  17. [Do online ratings reflect structural differences in healthcare? The example of German physician-rating websites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszmer, Nina; Jaegers, Lena; Schöffski, Oliver; Emmert, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Previous surveys have shown that patient satisfaction varies with the regional supply of physicians. Online ratings on physician-rating websites represent a relatively new instrument to display patient satisfaction results. The aim of this study was (1) to assess the current state of online ratings for two medical disciplines (dermatologists and ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists), and (2) to analyze online derived patient satisfaction results according to the physician density in Germany. We collected online ratings for 420 dermatologists and 450 ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialists on twelve German physician-rating websites. We analyzed the online ratings according to the physician density (low, medium, high physician density). For this purpose, we collected secondary data from both physician-rating websites and the regional associations of statutory health insurance physicians. Data analysis was performed using Median tests and Chi-square tests. In total, 10,239 online ratings for dermatologists and 8,168 online ratings for ENT specialists were analyzed. Almost all dermatologists (99.3 %) and ENT specialists (98.9 %) were listed on one of the physician-rating websites. A total of 93.5 % of all listed dermatologists and 96.9 % of ENT-specialists were rated on at least one of the physician-rating websites. Significant differences were found in the distribution (i.e., percentage of listed or rated physicians) of the ratings according to the regional physician density on only one physician-rating website (pexample, dermatologist ratings were better in regions with a higher physician density compared to regions with a lower number of physicians (average rating: 2.16 vs. 2.67; p<0.001). Online ratings of dermatologists and ENT specialists hardly differ in terms of regional physician density. Physician-rating websites thus do not appear to be appropriate to mirror differences in the health service delivery structure. Our findings thus do not confirm the

  18. [Strategic planning: an important economic action for German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Christoph H R; Zink, Wolfgang; Russo, Sebastian G

    2011-11-01

    In medical systems, economic issues and means of action are in the course of dwindling human (physicians and nurses) and financial resources are more important. For this reason, physicians must understand basic economic principles. Only in this way, there may be medical autonomy from social systems and hospital administrators. The current work is an approach to present a model for strategic planning of an anesthesia department. For this, a "strengths", "weaknesses", "opportunities", and "threats" (SWOT) analysis is used. This display is an example of an exemplary anaesthetic department. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  19. [Reality of treatment in psychotherapy: Results of a survey of German psychiatric hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, G; Sander, K; Artmann, S; Dreher, J; Lenz, J; Hauth, I

    2015-05-01

    Since the introduction of the qualification as specialist for psychiatry and psychotherapy, in addition to psychopharmacotherapy psychotherapy is an integral component of the treatment of mentally ill people. A survey was carried out to evaluate the reality of clinical routine use of psychotherapy in German psychiatric hospitals. Between October 2011 and March 2012 German hospitals of psychiatry and psychotherapy were contacted by the head organization, the conference of national directors (Bundesdirektorenkonferenz), to participate in a survey regarding the application of psychotherapy in the real clinical world of daily treatment. With an anonymous questionnaire, data were requested as either a printed form or online version. Data from 25 psychiatric hospitals in the year 2010 could be analysed (average number of beds 300 of which 53 were for psychosomatic/psychotherapeutic patients) and a total of 87,000 inpatients were treated whereby 34 % were diagnosed as F1 addictive disorders and 24 % as F3 affective disorders. More than 80 % of the hospitals applied group therapies of relaxation, cognitive behavior therapy, social competence training and specific techniques, such as dialectic-behavior therapy. As individual treatment methods, patients with depressive disorders were treated with cognitive behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy in more than 50 % of the cases. Relaxation techniques were offered in most cases by the nursing staff, behavior therapy by psychologists and physicians and psychodynamic therapy mainly by psychiatrists.

  20. Management of chronic orofacial pain: a survey of general dentists in german university hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Stefan; Ellerkmann, Richard K.; Buecheler, Marcus; Putensen, Christian; Nadstawek, Joachim; Wartenberg, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This survey assessed procedures performed by general dentists in German university hospitals treating patients with chronic orofacial pain (COP). METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to dentists at all 42 German universities. Doctors were asked to describe demographics, diagnoses,

  1. Licensed physicians – competent physicians?: The new German licensure law as a basis for competency-based curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öchsner, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competency-based curricula define their educational goals according to profession-specific roles and competencies. Thus, this type of curricula is outcome-oriented, in contrast to the traditional German curricula, which are mainly procedure-oriented. This study investigates the new licensure legislation in Germany, mandatory for all medical faculties, to see if it allows the development of competency-based curricula.Methods: For the first step we clustered all demands to roles. In step two we transformed the procedure-oriented demands into outcome-oriented competencies, according to the 6 roles found, pursuing strictly the wording of the law.Results: Although the principal goals in the new German licensure law are outcome-oriented, namely three abilities of a certified physician, still the majority of requirements and demands remain procedure-oriented. Clustering resulted in the following six roles: medical expert, health advocate, teamworker, manager, representative of the medical profession and, life-long learner. The relevant competencies for the six roles, we could derive from the standards set by the law.Conclusion: We were able to show that the new German licensure order comprises a useful framework for the development of outcome-oriented, competency-based curricula.

  2. Less work: more burnout? A comparison of working conditions and the risk of burnout by German physicians before and after the implementation of the EU Working Time Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Astrid; Kostova, Petya; Baur, Xaver; Wegner, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    The present study is a 10-year comparison (1997 vs. 2007) of occupational and health aspects before and after the implementation of the European Working Time Directive on German hospital physicians. A major focus is whether the changes in working conditions are accompanied by a lower risk for burnout. Three hundred and twenty-eight physicians from the Medical Register of the city of Hamburg completed the survey in 1997 and 994 physicians in 2007. The response rates were 55.4 and 46.5 %, respectively. All participants filled in a 22-item version of the German translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results of multivariate covariance analyses are reported. The work of physicians has changed significantly within the 10-year period, for example, work time decreased by 4.5 h on average to 55.8 h per week in 2007. Junior physicians profited more from this development, but on-call duties increased for senior physicians in particular. The reduced hours were at the expense of fewer rests. Junior, as well as senior, physicians reported significantly higher rates on the burnout scale for emotional exhaustion (mean 21.8, SD 10.7) in the latter survey and senior physicians also on the depersonalization scale (mean 9.7, SD 6.3). Changes in working conditions in accordance with the European Working Time Directive are not accompanied by reduced strain and risk of burnout for physicians. Rather, our data argue for greater intensification in work, especially for senior physicians. Further studies are suggested in order to explore interventions for a sustainable improvement in the working conditions of physicians.

  3. The organizational commitment of emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval de la Torre, A; Bulchand Gidumal, J; Melián González, S

    2016-12-30

    Background. There are not too many studies that deal with the organizational commitment of emergency physicians. This commitment has been shown to impact organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of commitment of the emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals and the factors that may influence it. Method. Online survey using SurveyMonkey to emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals. Results. Two hundred and five questionnaires were received, 162 from physicians and 43 from heads of the emergency service. Results show an intermediate level of commitment, with affective commitment showing the lowest level and continuance commitment showing the highest level. The capabilities of the physician have an influence on their affective commitment; specific training in emergency procedures and seniority has an influence on their continuance commitment; and the opinion they hold about the organization of their service influences affective commitment. Conclusions. Emergency physicians show an average involvement in the hospital in which they work (average 3.8 on a range of 1 to 5), feel an average affection for it (3.4), and have a high intention to keep working there (4.0). The resources the hospital has due to its level do not have an influence on this commitment, while the training and perceptions of the service do have an influence.

  4. How to govern physician-hospital exchanges: contractual and relational issues in Belgian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Annemans, Lieven

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate contractual mechanisms in physician-hospital exchanges. The concepts of risk-sharing and the nature of physician-hospital exchanges - transactional versus relational - were studied. Two qualitative case studies were performed in Belgium. Hospital executives and physicians were interviewed to develop an in-depth understanding of contractual and relational issues that shape physician-hospital contracting in acute care hospitals. The underlying theoretical concepts of agency theory and social exchange theory were used to analyse the data. Our study found that physician-hospital contracting is highly complex. The contract is far more than an economic instrument governing financial aspects. The effect of the contract on the nature of exchange - whether transactional or relational - also needs to be considered. While it can be argued that contractual governance methods are increasingly necessary to overcome the difficulties that arise from the fragmented payment framework by aligning incentives and sharing financial risk, they undermine the necessary relational governance. Relational qualities such as mutual trust and an integrative view on physician-hospital exchanges are threatened, and may be difficult to sustain, given the current fragmentary payment framework. Since health care policy makers are increasing the financial risk borne by health care providers, it can be argued that this also increases the need to share financial risk and to align incentives between physician and hospital. However, our study demonstrates that while economic alignment is important in determining physician-hospital contracts, the corresponding impact on working relationships should also be considered. Moreover, it is important to avoid a relationship between hospital and physician predominantly characterized by transactional exchanges thereby fostering an unhealthy us-and-them divide and mentality. Relational exchange is a valuable alternative to contractual

  5. The physician as a source of hospital capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, J M

    1984-06-01

    As hospitals search for means of financing renovation during the next decade, physicians will represent a source of capital through tax-shelter financing. Limited partnerships, condominiums , and joint ventures in acquiring medical equipment or syndicating existing facilities are among the most promising investment vehicles for taking advantage of tax benefits that normally do not apply to nonprofit institutions. In a hospital-physician limited partnership, tax deductions are passed through to the partners, of which there are two kinds: general partners and limited partners. Income (or loss) and tax credits from the entire venture can be divided among the partners and reflected on an individual limited partner's tax return. Rather than shouldering the whole cost of renovating a medical office building, thereby losing the potential tax credit, a hospital could carry out the renovation through a limited partnership with physicians. This would reduce the hospital's capital costs and debt requirements, maintain its credit, and enable it to take advantage of the depreciation deduction. In a condominium venture, the individual physician actually owns the office within which he or she works. As with the limited partnership, the hospital will want to restrict physicians' ability to dispose of their ownership interests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Physicians lead the way at America's top hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, D O

    2001-01-01

    The 100 Top hospitals are selected annually based on seven critical parameters for each of the 6,200-plus U.S. hospitals with 25 or more beds. They include the previous year's risk-adjusted patient mortality and complication rates, severity-adjusted average patient lengths of stay, expenses, profitability, proportional outpatient revenue, and asset turnover ratio (a measure of facility and technological pace-keeping ability). The winners are selected from five comparable size groupings--small, medium, large community, teaching, and large academic hospitals. Conspicuous among the winners at every level are physician-led organizations. Even in the majority of hospitals headed by non-physician administrators, however, the managerial capabilities of medical directors are the key to success. The most common characteristic of these award-winning hospitals is that the leadership is working together and communicating the institution's goals effectively to all levels of the organization.

  7. Total expenditures per patient in hospital-owned and physician-owned physician organizations in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Miller, Kelly

    Hospitals are rapidly acquiring medical groups and physician practices. This consolidation may foster cooperation and thereby reduce expenditures, but also may lead to higher expenditures through greater use of hospital-based ambulatory services and through greater hospital pricing leverage against health insurers. To determine whether total expenditures per patient were higher in physician organizations (integrated medical groups and independent practice associations) owned by local hospitals or multihospital systems compared with groups owned by participating physicians. Data were obtained on total expenditures for the care provided to 4.5 million patients treated by integrated medical groups and independent practice associations in California between 2009 and 2012. The patients were covered by commercial health maintenance organization (HMO) insurance and the data did not include patients covered by commercial preferred provider organization (PPO) insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid. Total expenditures per patient annually, measured in terms of what insurers paid to the physician organizations for professional services, to hospitals for inpatient and outpatient procedures, to clinical laboratories for diagnostic tests, and to pharmaceutical manufacturers for drugs and biologics. Annual expenditures per patient were compared after adjusting for patient illness burden, geographic input costs, and organizational characteristics. Of the 158 organizations, 118 physician organizations (75%) were physician-owned and provided care for 3,065,551 patients, 19 organizations (12%) were owned by local hospitals and provided care for 728,608 patients, and 21 organizations (13%) were owned by multihospital systems and provided care for 693,254 patients. In 2012, physician-owned physician organizations had mean expenditures of $3066 per patient (95% CI, $2892 to $3240), hospital-owned physician organizations had mean expenditures of $4312 per patient (95% CI, $3768 to $4857), and

  8. Working conditions and effort-reward imbalance of German physicians in Sweden respective Germany: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlander, Johan; Weigl, Matthias; Petru, Raluca; Angerer, Peter; Radon, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Work stress among physicians is a growing concern in various countries and has led to migration. We compared the working conditions and the work stress between a migrated population of German physicians in Sweden and a population of physicians based in Germany. Additionally, specific risk factors for work stress were examined country wise. Using a cross-sectional design, 85 German physicians employed in Sweden were surveyed on working conditions and effort-reward imbalance and compared with corresponding data on 561 physicians working in Germany. Multiple linear regression analyses were applied on both populations separately to model the associations between working conditions and effort-reward ratio (ERR), adjusted for a priori confounders. German physicians in Sweden had a significantly lower ERR than physicians in Germany: mean (M) = 0.47, standard deviation (SD) = 0.24 vs. M = 0.80, SD = 0.35. Physicians in Sweden worked on average 8 h less per week and reported higher work support and responsibility. Multivariate analyses showed in both populations a negative association between work support and the ERR (β = -0.148, 95% CI -0.215 to (-0.081) for physicians in Sweden and β = -0.174, 95% CI -0.240 to (-0.106) for physicians in Germany). Further significant associations with the ERR were found among physicians in Sweden for daily breaks (β = -0.002, 95% CI -0.004 to (-0.001)) and among physicians in Germany for working hours per week (β = 0.006, 95% CI 0.002-0.009). Our findings show substantial differences in work stress and working conditions in favor of migrated German physicians in Sweden. To confirm our results and to explain demonstrated differences in physicians' work stress, longitudinal studies are recommended.

  9. Human resource crises in German hospitals--an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermuly, Carsten C; Draheim, Michael; Glasberg, Ronald; Stantchev, Vladimir; Tamm, Gerrit; Hartmann, Michael; Hessel, Franz

    2015-05-28

    The complexity of providing medical care in a high-tech environment with a highly specialized, limited labour force makes hospitals more crisis-prone than other industries. An effective defence against crises is only possible if the organizational resilience and the capacity to handle crises become part of the hospitals' organizational culture. To become more resilient to crises, a raised awareness--especially in the area of human resource (HR)--is necessary. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the process robustness against crises through the identification and evaluation of relevant HR crises and their causations in hospitals. Qualitative and quantitative methods were combined to identify and evaluate crises in hospitals in the HR sector. A structured workshop with experts was conducted to identify HR crises and their descriptions, as well as causes and consequences for patients and hospitals. To evaluate the findings, an online survey was carried out to rate the occurrence (past, future) and dangerousness of each crisis. Six HR crises were identified in this study: staff shortages, acute loss of personnel following a pandemic, damage to reputation, insufficient communication during restructuring, bullying, and misuse of drugs. The highest occurrence probability in the future was seen in staff shortages, followed by acute loss of personnel following a pandemic. Staff shortages, damage to reputation, and acute loss of personnel following a pandemic were seen as the most dangerous crises. The study concludes that coping with HR crises in hospitals is existential for hospitals and requires increased awareness. The six HR crises identified occurred regularly in German hospitals in the past, and their occurrence probability for the future was rated as high.

  10. Validation and cultural adaptation of a German version of the Physicians' Reactions to Uncertainty scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joest Katharina

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to examine the validity of a translated and culturally adapted version of the Physicians' Reaction to Uncertainty scales (PRU in primary care physicians. Methods In a structured process, the original questionnaire was translated, culturally adapted and assessed after administering it to 93 GPs. Test-retest reliability was tested by sending the questionnaire to the GPs again after two weeks. Results The principal factor analysis confirmed the postulated four-factor structure underlying the 15 items. In contrast to the original version, item 5 achieved a higher loading on the 'concern about bad outcomes' scale. Consequently, we rearranged the scales. Good item-scale correlations were obtained, with Pearson's correlation coefficient ranging from 0.56–0.84. As regards the item-discriminant validity between the scales 'anxiety due to uncertainty' and 'concern about bad outcomes', partially high correlations (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.02–0.69; p Conclusion Dealing with uncertainty is an important issue in daily practice. The psychometric properties of the rearranged German version of the PRU are satisfying. The revealed floor effects do not limit the significance of the questionnaire. Thus, the German version of the PRU could contribute to the further evaluation of the impact of uncertainty in primary care physicians.

  11. Hospital employment of physicians does not improve quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The Annals of Internal Medicine posted a manuscript online today reporting that the growing trend of physician employment by hospitals does not improve quality (1. In 2003, approximately 29% of hospitals employed members of their physician workforce, a number that rose to 42% by 2012. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of U.S. acute care hospitals between 2003 and 2012 and examined mortality rates, 30-day readmission rates, length of stay, and patient satisfaction scores for common medical conditions for 803 hospitals that switched to the employment model compared with 2085 control hospitals that did not switch. Switching hospitals were more likely to be large (11.6% vs. 7.1% or major teaching hospitals (7.5% vs. 4.5% and less likely to be for-profit institutions (8.8% vs. 19.9% (all p values <0.001. The authors used Medicare Provider Analysis and Review File (MedPAR from 2002 to 2013 to calculate hospital-level risk-adjusted performance on mortality ...

  12. Trends in hospital-physician integration in medical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Jeffrey D; Dinan, Michaela A; Schulman, Kevin A

    2017-10-01

    Hospitals have rapidly acquired medical oncology practices in recent years. Experts disagree as to whether these trends are related to oncology-specific market factors or reflect a general trend of hospital-physician integration. The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence, geographic variation, and trends in physicians billing from hospital outpatient departments in medical oncology with other specialties. Retrospective analysis of Medicare claims data for 2012 and 2013. We calculated the proportion of physicians and practitioners in the 15 highest-volume specialties who billed the majority of evaluation and management visits from hospital outpatient departments in each year, nationally and by state. We included 338,998 and 352,321 providers in 2012 and 2013, respectively, of whom 9715 and 9969 were medical oncologists. Among the 15 specialties examined, medical oncology had the highest proportion of hospital outpatient department billing in 2012 and 2013 (35.0% and 38.3%, respectively). Medical oncology also experienced the greatest absolute change (3.3%) between the years, followed by thoracic surgery (2.4%) and cardiology (2.0%). There was marked state-level variation, with the proportion of medical oncologists based in hospital outpatient departments ranging from 0% in Nevada to 100% in Idaho. Hospital-physician integration has been more pronounced in medical oncology than in other high-volume specialties and is increasing at a faster rate. Policy makers should take these findings into consideration, particularly with respect to recent proposals that may continue to fuel these trends.

  13. Junior physicians' workplace experiences in clinical fields in German-speaking Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Abel, Thomas; Buddeberg, Claus

    2005-01-08

    To date, there have been several prospective cohort studies investigating the workplace experiences of junior physicians, but with limited focus on gender issues. The objective of the present study is to explore the workplace experiences of first-year residents according to gender, type of training hospital, and clinical field. Data reported are from the second assessment of the longitudinal Swiss physicians' career development study, begun in 2001. In 2003, 497 residents (54.7% females, 45.3% males) assessed their workplace conditions, social support at work, and effort-reward imbalance. There are few, but relevant, gender related differences in workplace experiences, with female physicians experiencing less mentoring and higher over-commitment, yet more positive social relationships at work. In a multivariate model, significant differences in some workplace variables with regard to type of training hospital and/or clinical field are found: workplace conditions are rated worse in type "A" hospitals (university and cantonal hospitals) than in type "B"/"C"/"D" hospitals (regional hospitals and highly specialised units), and in surgical fields than in internal medicine. In "A" hospitals mentoring is assessed as better, but positive social relationships as worse. Both scales are rated worse in surgical fields than in internal medicine. The effort-reward imbalance (ERI) is rated significantly higher (unfavourable) in "A" hospitals than in "B"/"C"/"D" hospitals, regardless of gender and clinical field. Significantly more subjects with an ERI quotient above 1 (which is unfavourable) work in "A" hospitals, and in surgical fields regardless of hospital type. Of the total sample, 81 subjects (16.3%), 41 males and 40 females, show an ERI quotient above 1. The greater the workload, the worse the rating of workplace conditions, effort-reward imbalance, and over-commitment. Institutional determinants are crucial factors for the workplace experiences and first career steps of

  14. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the German Armed Forces: a retrospective study in inpatients of a German army hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Bandelow, Borwin; Koch, Manuel; Zimmermann, Peter; Biesold, Karl-Heinz; Wedekind, Dirk; Falkai, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, around 0.4 and 0.7% of all German soldiers involved in missions abroad were registered as suffering from PTSD. The frequency of PTSD in the German Armed Forces was assessed from army records. All soldiers admitted to the German Military Hospital in Hamburg, Germany, with PTSD (n = 117) in the years 2006 and 2007 were assessed by using questionnaires and structure interviews. Risk factors associated with PTSD were identified. Of the 117 soldiers with PTSD, 39.3% were in missi...

  15. Hospital-physician relations: overcoming barriers to cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, S R; Siegal, J T

    1986-01-01

    In the September-October 1986 issue of Physician Executive, we discussed the application of strategic business units (SBUs) to health care. SBUs are those corporate entities that market similar products to one or more target populations with similar characteristics. Examples of SBUs in health care are obstetrics, cardiology, orthopedics, etc. When the services within each SBU are linked together, they might resemble a vertically integrated health care system. In the case of obstetrics, a woman may have contact with physicians, a hospital, home care nurses, house-cleaning services, birthing teachers, and maternity clothing boutiques. Each of these are products/services within the SBU of obstetrics. Strategy development by SBU implies an external focus on the marketplace in terms of the specific mission of the SBU (clinical specialty). It also implies responding to the needs of consumers for whom the historical and present divisiveness between hospitals and physicians is immaterial and irrelevant. In this article, we will focus on ways to stabilize the relationship between hospitals and physicians within an SBU context in order to compete more successfully as a team in today's health care environment.

  16. Hospital restructuring and physician job satisfaction: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Daniele; Morandi, Federica; Cicchetti, Americo

    2014-02-01

    The adoption of clinical directorates through the internal reconfiguration of hospital organizations has been one of the most widespread restructuring interventions in many Western European countries. Despite its extensive adoption, a lack of knowledge remains on the analysis of how this reorganization affects professionals' job satisfaction. This paper contributes to the debate on clinical directorates by exploring how the structural characteristics of newly adopted organizational models influence physician's job satisfaction. More than 300 physicians in 18 clinical directorates in the Italian National Health Service were surveyed regarding their overall job satisfaction following the introduction of departmental arrangements. Survey results were then linked to another survey that classified newly adopted models according to the criteria used to merge hospital wards into directorates, by recognizing "Process-integration", "Specialty-integration" and "Mixed-integration" types of directorates. Our findings show that structural aspects of change significantly influenced overall job satisfaction, and that a physician's openness to experience moderated the adoption and implementation of new clinical directorates. Specifically, results demonstrate that physicians with high openness to experience scores were more receptive to the positive impacts of change on overall job satisfaction. Implications for how these findings may facilitate organizational shifts within hospital settings are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Front-Line Physicians' Satisfaction with Information Systems in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Junttila, Kristiina; Salanterä, Sanna

    2018-01-01

    Day-to-day operations management in hospital units is difficult due to continuously varying situations, several actors involved and a vast number of information systems in use. The aim of this study was to describe front-line physicians' satisfaction with existing information systems needed to support the day-to-day operations management in hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was used and data chosen with stratified random sampling were collected in nine hospitals. Data were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistical methods. The response rate was 65 % (n = 111). The physicians reported that information systems support their decision making to some extent, but they do not improve access to information nor are they tailored for physicians. The respondents also reported that they need to use several information systems to support decision making and that they would prefer one information system to access important information. Improved information access would better support physicians' decision making and has the potential to improve the quality of decisions and speed up the decision making process.

  18. Hospital-physician relations: the relative importance of economic, relational and professional attributes to organizational attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Van Vaerenbergh, Yves; Annemans, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    Background: Belgian hospitals face a growing shortage of physicians and increasingly competitive market conditions. In this challenging environment hospitals are struggling to build effective hospital-physician relationships which are considered to be a critical determinant of organizational success. Methods: Employed physicians of a University hospital were surveyed. Organizational attributes were identified through the literature and two focus groups. Variables were measured using valida...

  19. Maternity Care Services Provided by Family Physicians in Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A

    The purpose of this study was to describe how many rural family physicians (FPs) and other types of providers currently provide maternity care services, and the requirements to obtain privileges. Chief executive officers of rural hospitals were purposively sampled in 15 geographically diverse states with significant rural areas in 2013 to 2014. Questions were asked about the provision of maternity care services, the physicians who perform them, and qualifications required to obtain maternity care privileges. Analysis used descriptive statistics, with comparisons between the states, community rurality, and hospital size. The overall response rate was 51.2% (437/854). Among all identified hospitals, 44.9% provided maternity care services, which varied considerably by state (range, 17-83%; P maternity care, a mean of 271 babies were delivered per year, 27% by cesarean delivery. A mean of 7.0 FPs had privileges in these hospitals, of which 2.8 provided maternity care and 1.8 performed cesarean deliveries. The percentage of FPs who provide maternity care (mean, 48%; range, 10-69%; P maternity care who are FPs (mean, 63%; range, 10-88%; P maternity care services in US rural hospitals, including cesarean deliveries. Some family medicine residencies should continue to train their residents to provide these services to keep replenishing this valuable workforce. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  20. [Subjective job strain and job satisfaction among neurologists in German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Bendels, M H K; Groneberg, D A

    2016-06-01

    The number of sick leaves due to job strain is increasing. This study's scope is to examine working conditions of neurologists in hospitals in regard to job strain and job satisfaction. This study is part of the iCEPT-Study. The iCEPT-Study was conducted as a web based survey among physicians (n = 7090) in German hospitals. The focus was on working conditions regarding job strain. Job strain was measured by a questionnaire consisting of items and scales from the short version of the Effort-Reward-Imbalance (ERI) questionnaire and the short questionnaire for working analysis (KFZA). By calculation ratios of distinct scales according to validated stress models a conclusion could be drawn as to whether or not job strain was present. The total number of n = 354 neurologists were analyzed. The response rate was at 18.2 %. Job strain was encountered by 52.0 % (95 %-KI: 46.7|57.2) of all neurologists and no significant gender difference was present. However, resident neurologists were significantly more often exposed to job strain than attending neurologists (OR = 2.9; 95 %-KI: 1.6-4.7; p job satisfaction, 59.6 % (95 %-KI: 54.5-64.7) of all respondents stated to be satisfied with their job. Significantly more men were satisfied than women (OR = 1.5; 95 %-KI: 1.0-2.4; p job than residents (OR = 2.9; 95 %-KI: 1.7-4.8; p job strain among neurologists in German hospitals. Keeping the negative implications of mental and physical health in mind, the working conditions of neurologists must be improved. As shown in this study, a possible way to do so is to increase job control in order to decrease a major stressor at work.

  1. Assessing the safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ), German language version in Swiss university hospitals - a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving patient safety has become a major focus of clinical care and research over the past two decades. An institution’s patient safety climate represents an essential component of ensuring a safe environment and thereby can be vital to the prevention of adverse events. Covering six patient safety related factors, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) is a validated and widely used instrument to measure the patient safety climate in clinical areas. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the German language version of the SAQ. Methods A survey was carried out in two University Hospitals in Switzerland in autumn 2009 where the SAQ was distributed to a sample of 406 nurses and physicians in medical and surgical wards. Following the American Educational Research Association guidelines, we tested the questionnaire validity by levels of evidence: content validity, internal structure and relations to other variables. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine factor structure. Cronbach’s alphas and inter-item correlations were calculated to examine internal consistency reliability. Results A total of 319 questionnaires were completed representing an overall response rate of 78.6%. For three items, the item content validity index was <0.75. Confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable model fit (RMSEA = 0.045; CFI = 0.944) for the six-factor model. Additional exploratory factor analysis could not identify a better factor model. SAQ factor scores showed positive correlations with the Safety Organizing Scale (r = .56 - .72). The SAQ German version showed moderate to strong internal consistency reliability indices (Cronbach alpha = .65 - .83). Conclusions The German language version of the SAQ demonstrated acceptable to good psychometric properties and therefore shows promise to be a sound instrument to measure patient safety climate in Swiss hospital wards. However, the low item content validity and large number

  2. Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia: German Protestantism, conscience, and the limits of purely ethical reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartmann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In this essay I shall describe and analyse the current debate on physician assisted suicide in contemporary German Protestant church and theology. It will be shown that the Protestant (mainly Lutheran) Church in Germany together with her Roman Catholic sister church has a specific and influential position in the public discussion: The two churches counting the majority of the population in Germany among their members tend to "organize" a social and political consensus on end-of-life questions. This cooperation is until now very successful: Speaking with one voice on end-of-life questions, the two churches function as the guardians of a moral consensus which is appreciated even by many non-believers. Behind this joint service to society the lines of the theological debate have to be ree-discovered. First it will be argued that a Protestant reading of the joint memoranda has to be based on the concept of individual conscience. The crucial questions are then: Whose conscience has the authority to decide? and: Can the physician assisted suicide be desired faithfully? Prominent in the current debate are Ulrich Eibach as a strict defender of the sanctity of life, and on the other side Walter Jens and Hans Kung, who argue for a right to physician assisted suicide under extreme conditions. I shall argue that it will be necessary to go beyond this actual controversy to the works of Gerhard Ebeling and Karl Barth for a clear and instructive account of conscience and a theological analysis of the concepts of life and suicide. On the basis of their considerations, a conscience-related approach to physician assisted suicide is developed.

  3. Modifying Health Behavior to Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Survey among German Primary Care Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Schneider

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are a major public health concern as they are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Primary care is considered to be the ideal setting for CVD prevention. Therefore, more than 4,000 German primary care physicians (PCPs were asked about their attitudes towards and their activities regarding the prevention of CVD in the nationwide ÄSP-kardio Study. The focus of the study was on health behavior modification. Two thirds of the participating PCPs stated that they routinely provided brief inventions to assist patients in reducing both their tobacco (72% and alcohol (61% consumption, to encourage them to increase their levels of physical activity (72%, and to assist them in adjusting to a more healthy diet (66%, and in achieving a healthy body weight (69%. However, only between 23% (quitting smoking and 49% (diet modification of PCPs felt that they had been successful in helping patients modify their lifestyles. Insufficient reimbursement, cultural diversity and a lack of time were reported to be the most problematic barriers to successful intervention in the primary care setting. Despite these obstacles, the majority of German PCPs was engaged in prevention and health behavior intervention to reduce the incidence and progression of CVD.

  4. Physician leadership is essential to the survival of teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R W; Pogge, C

    2000-06-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) face severe financial constraints because they must now compete directly with private providers that focus exclusively on cost-effective healthcare delivery. Educational and research capacities developed at AMCs have been supported by government and third party payers, but government support is diminishing. Physicians are ill-equipped to respond to market pressures. Analyses of cultural change and restructuring in corporate giants such as Greyhound, IBM and FedEx are relevant to teaching hospitals. To succeed, organizations must flatten hierarchy, empower staff, train leaders, and mobilize intellectual capital. Effective leadership is essential. Physicians must educate themselves on forces impacting the AMC, understand changes needed in the structure and processes of AMC governance and acquire competencies for leadership and management if AMCs are to survive and thrive. Surgeons should acquire competencies that will enable them to become leaders in the process of AMC transformation.

  5. Imbalances in the German public health system - numbers of state-certified occupational physicians and relation to socioeconomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyo, Christoph; Boll, Michael; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Quarcoo, David; Groneberg, David A

    2016-01-01

    State-certified occupational physicians who work as civil servants in the Federal Republic of Germany are key players in the German Public Health system. They control i.e. the legal compliance in occupational health and participate in the occupational disease procedures. Despite the role model function of the German Public health system for many developing countries, this area of Public health is debated to have been hampered in the past years by a disregard concerning structural developments. Different databases were screened for occupational health benchmarks. Obtained data were compared to socioeconomic data and indices were calculated. The overall numbers of State-certified occupational physicians decreased in Germany between 1992 and 2012 from 136 to 86 (63 %). On the single state level, the ratios of State-certified occupational physicians per 1 Mio. working population ranged from 8 for the state of Saarland to 0.8 for the state of North Rhine Westphalia. A general difference was found for old versus new German states. Also, large differences were present for the ratios of State-certified occupational physicians per 10 6 employees towards public debt per capita (€) and the ratios of State-certified occupational physicians per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the 16 German states in 2012. In striking contrast to the WHO document on the Occupational safety and health (OSH) system that states in its executive summary that the human and institutional capacities of the German occupational health system are very strong in both quantity and quality, we here show extreme imbalances present at the single state levels that developed over the past 20 years. With a regard to the increasing complexity of the economic system a reversal of this trend should be demanded.

  6. Associations of psychosocial working conditions and working time characteristics with somatic complaints in German resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nina; Degen, Christiane; Li, Jian; Loerbroks, Adrian; Müller, Andreas; Angerer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Somatic complaints (SC) are highly prevalent in working populations and cause suffering and extensive health-care utilization. Adverse psychosocial working conditions as conceptualized in the Job Demand-Control-Support Model (JDC-S) and adverse working time characteristics (WTC) are potential risk factors. This combination is particularly common in hospital physicians. This study examines associations of JDC-S and WTC with SC in resident physicians from Germany. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 405 physicians at the end of residency training. SC were measured using the Giessen Subjective Complaints List (GBB-24) containing the sub-categories exhaustion, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular complaints. Data on working conditions were collected by a self-report method for work analysis in hospitals (TAA-KH-S) and by questions on WTC (i.e., working hours). Multivariable stepwise regression analyses were applied. Workload showed the most pronounced relationship with all sub-categories of SC except gastrointestinal complaints. Job autonomy was not significantly related to any SC sub-category. Social support at work was inversely associated with all SC sub-categories except for cardiovascular complaints. Free weekends were associated with reduced SC except for exhaustion. Shift work was related to an increased SC total score and musculoskeletal complaints. Working hours showed no association with SC. In resident physicians, high workload and shift work are associated with increased SC, while social support at work and free weekends are associated with decreased SC. These insights may inform the development of preventive measures to improve the health of this professional group. Prospective studies are needed though to corroborate our findings.

  7. The Effects of Hospital-Level Factors on Patients' Ratings of Physician Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication influences patient health outcomes and satisfaction with healthcare delivery. Yet, little is known about contextual factors that influence physicians' communication with their patients. The main purpose of this article is to examine organizational-level factors that influence patient perceptions of physician communication in inpatient settings. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and American Hospital Association data to determine patients' ratings of physician communication at the hospital level, and to collect information about hospital-level factors that can potentially influence physician communication. Our sample consisted of 2,756 hospitals. We ran a regression analysis to determine the predictors of poor physician communication, measured as the percentage of patients in a hospital who reported that physicians sometimes or never communicated well. In our sample of hospitals, this percentage ranged between 0% and 21%, with 25% of hospitals receiving poor ratings from more than 6% of patients. Three organizational factors had statistically significant negative associations with physician communication: for-profit ownership, hospital size, and hospitalists providing care in the hospital, On the other hand, the number of full-time-equivalent physicians and dentists per 10,000 inpatient days, physician ownership of the hospital, Medicare share of inpatient days, and public ownership were positively associated with patients' ratings of physician communication. Physician staffing levels are an understudied area in healthcare research. Our findings indicate that physician staffing levels affect the quality of physician communication with patients. Moreover, for-profit and larger hospitals should invest more in physician communication given the role that HCAHPS plays in value-based purchasing.

  8. Predictors of distress in hospital physicians: protective and vulnerability factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín Martínez-Zaragoza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between protective and vulnerability factors affecting health (distréss in medical staff. Participants were 127 doctors from four public hospitals, who were administered the Occupational Stress in Health Professionals Inventory, the Ways of Coping Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Symptom Check-list-90 Revised Questionnaire, and the Flow Trait Scale-2. Following the methodology of Partial Least Squares modeling (PLS, an explanation is given for distréss in hospital physicians, where the avoidance coping strategy produces distréss directly (β = .296 and indirectly (β = .139 th rough its influence on the increase of burnout (β = .314, which in turn is increased by occupational stress (β = .209. Professional flow, measured by professional efficacy and flow, acts as a good protector against distréss (β = -.133, partly compensating the effects of the variables which have an increasing impact on an individual's distréss (GoF = .983. To sum up, when trying to predict a physician's distréss, four key elements should be considered: avoidance coping and its indirect effect through burnout on distréss; the burnout construct itself and professional flow.

  9. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals. 415.162 Section 415.162 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.162 Determining payment for physician services...

  10. [Notifiable infectious diseases: knowledge and notification among hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Cirilo, Laura; Martín-Ríos, M Dolores; de Las Casas-Cámara, Gonzalo; Andrés-Prado, M José; Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil

    2013-12-01

    Notifiable infectious diseases represent a public health hazard, which is why they are under surveillance and must be reported. We tried to assess hospital physicians' knowledge of hospital physicians on notifiable infectious diseases and their self-reported attitudes to notification. An observational study was conducted using a questionnaire with 11 multiple choice questions, two yes/no questions and one short-answer question. It was distributed to all senior doctors and residents in 19 medical and surgical departments. A total of 248 questionnaires were sent out, with a response rate of 79.84%. More than three-quarters (76.3%) of the respondents were senior doctors. As regards specific knowledge about whether a particular disease is a notifiable disease, 29.5% identified correctly 100% of the named diseases, 3.2% could not identify any of them. All urgent named notifiable infectious diseases were correctly identified by 25.3% of physicians. Statistically significant differences were found in the knowledge of notifiable diseases knowledge in medical and surgical departments, as well as for senior doctors (P=.047) and residents (P=.035). A high percentage of medical services (40%) and surgical (70%) department reported never failing to notify. When asked about the causes of under-reporting, 72% did not know whether notification was mandatory or not, and 88% did not know what diseases must be notified. Although many respondents are aware that diseases notification is part of their daily activity, many of them admit under-reporting. There is insufficient knowledge about what diseases are considered notifiable infectious diseases and how to notify them. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Do financial incentives linked to ownership of specialty hospitals affect physicians' practice patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jean M

    2008-07-01

    Although physician-owned specialty hospitals have become increasingly prevalent in recent years, little research has examined whether the financial incentives linked to ownership influence physicians' referral rates for services performed at the specialty hospital. We compared the practice patterns of physician owners of specialty hospitals in Oklahoma, before and after ownership, to the practice patterns of physician nonowners who treated similar cases over the same time period in Oklahoma markets without physician-owned specialty hospitals. We constructed episodes of care for injured workers with a primary diagnosis of back/spine disorders. We used pre-post comparisons and difference-in-differences analysis to evaluate changes in practice patterns for physician owners and nonowners over the time period spanned by the entry of the specialty hospital. Findings suggest the introduction of financial incentives linked to ownership coincided with a significant change in the practice patterns of physician owners, whereas such changes were not evident among physician nonowners. After physicians established ownership interests in a specialty hospital, the frequency of use of surgery, diagnostic, and ancillary services used in the treatment of injured workers with back/spine disorders increased significantly. Physician ownership of specialty hospitals altered the frequency of use for an array of procedures rendered to patients treated at these hospitals. Given the growth in physician-owned specialty hospitals, these findings suggest that health care expenditures will be substantially greater for patients treated at these institutions relative to persons who obtain care from nonself-referral providers.

  12. [Does co-operation research provide approaches to explain the changes in the German hospital market?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, C; Leidl, R

    2004-11-01

    The German hospital market faces an extensive process of consolidation. In this change hospitals consider cooperation as one possibility to improve competitiveness. To investigate explanations of changes in the German hospital market by theoretical approaches of cooperation research. The aims and mechanism of the theories, their relevance in terms of contents and their potential for empirical tests were used as criteria to assess the approaches, with current and future trends in the German hospital market providing the framework. Based on literature review, six theoretical approaches were investigated: industrial organization, transaction cost theory, game theory, resource dependency, institutional theory, and co-operative investment and finance theory. In addition, the data needed to empirically test the theories were specified. As a general problem, some of the theoretical approaches set a perfect market as a precondition. This precondition is not met by the heavily regulated German hospital market. Given the current regulations and the assessment criteria, industrial organization as well as resource-dependency and institutional theory approaches showed the highest potential to explain various aspects of the changes in the hospital market. So far, none of the approaches investigated provides a comprehensive and empirically tested explanation of the changes in the German hospital market. However, some of the approaches provide a theoretical background for part of the changes. As this dynamic market is economically of high significance, there is a need for further development and empirical testing of relevant theoretical approaches.

  13. [Inpatient acute pain management in German hospitals: results from the national survey "Akutschmerzzensus 2012"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Stamer, U; Koschwitz, R; Koppert, W; Quintel, M; Meißner, W; Petzke, F

    2014-04-01

    In 2007, the German national guidelines on "Treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" were published. The aim of this study was to describe current structure and process data for acute pain management in German hospitals and to compare how the guidelines and other initiatives such as benchmarking or certification changed the healthcare landscape in the last decade. All directors of German departments of anesthesiology according to the DGAI ("Deutschen Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin", German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care) were mailed a standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management in their hospitals. A total of 403 completed questionnaires (46 %) could be evaluated. Of hospitals, 81 % had an acute pain service (ASD), whereby only 45 % met defined quality criteria. Written standards for acute pain management were available in 97 % of the hospitals on surgical wards and 51 % on nonsurgical wards. In 96 %, perioperative pain was regularly recorded (generally pain at rest and/or movement, pain-related functional impairment in 16 % only). Beside these routine measurements, only 38 % of hospitals monitored pain for effectiveness after acute medications. Often interdisciplinary working groups and/or pain managers are established for hospital-wide control. As specific therapy, the patient-controlled analgesia and epidural analgesia are largely prevalent (> 90 % of all hospitals). In the last decade, intravenous and oral opioid administration of opioids (including slow release preparations) has become established in acute pain management. The survey was representative by evaluating 20 % of all German hospitals. The organizational requirements for appropriate pain management recommended by the German guidelines for acute pain recommended have been established in the hospital sector in recent years. However, the organizational enforcement for acute pain management in

  14. Improving patient safety and physician accountability using the hospital credentialing process

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Alan J; Turnbull, Jeff; McGuire, Shaun; Ho, Michael L; Worthington, JR

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The lack of systematic oversight of physician performance has led to some serious cases related to physician competence and behaviour. We are currently implementing a hospital-wide approach to improve physician oversight by incorporating it into the hospital credentialing process. Our proposed credentialing method involves four systems: (1) a system for monitoring and reporting clinical performance; (2) a system for evaluating physician behaviour; (3) a complaints management system; ...

  15. Work hours and turnover intention among hospital physicians in Taiwan: does income matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chiou, Shu-Ti

    2016-11-21

    Physician shortage has become an urgent and critical challenge to many countries. According to the workforce dynamic model, long work hours may be one major pressure point to the attrition of physicians. Financial incentive is a common tool to human power retention. Therefore, this large-scale physician study investigated how pay satisfaction may influence the relationship between work hours and hospital physician's turnover intention. Data were obtained from a nationwide survey of full-time hospital staff members working at 100 hospitals in Taiwan. The analysis sample comprised 2423 full-time physicians. Dependent variable was degree of the physicians' turnover intention to leave the current hospital. The pay satisfaction was assessed by physicians themselves. We employed ordinal logistic regression models to analyze the association between the number of work hours and turnover intention. To consider the cluster effect of hospitals, we used the "gllamm" command in the statistical software package Stata Version 12.1. The results show that 351 (14.5%) of surveyed physicians reported strong intention to leave current hospital. The average work hours per week among hospital physicians was 59.8 h. As expected, work hours exhibited an independent relationship with turnover intention. More importantly, pay satisfaction could not effectively moderate the positive relationship between work hours and intentions to leave current hospital. The findings show that overtime work is prevalent among hospital physicians in Taiwan. Both the Taiwanese government and hospitals must take action to address the emerging problem of physician high turnover rate. Furthermore, hospitals should not consider relying solely on financial incentives to solve the problem. This study encouraged tackling work hour problem, which would lead to the possibility of solving high turnover intention among hospital physicians in Taiwan.

  16. How to create a marketing strategy based on hospital characteristics that attract physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, R D; Horton, D E; Hatcher, M E

    1987-03-01

    Through use of multivariate statistical and research techniques, the authors analyzed 30 hospital features that contribute to a physician's image of a hospital as being a good or a poor place for patient admission and in which to practice. Use of the data obtained in this study can enable a hospital administrator to monitor changes in physicians' attitudes, plan strategies to encourage quality physicians to admit their patients, improve aspects perceived to be weak or unresponsive, and capitalize on strengths.

  17. How report cards on physicians, physician groups, and hospitals can have greater impact on consumer choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaiko, Anna D; Eastman, Diana; Rosenthal, Meredith B

    2012-03-01

    Public report cards with quality and cost information on physicians, physician groups, and hospital providers have proliferated in recent years. However, many of these report cards are difficult for consumers to interpret and have had little impact on the provider choices consumers are making. To gain a more focused understanding of why these reports cards have not been more successful and what improvements could be made, we interviewed experts and surveyed registrants at the March 2011 AHRQ National Summit on Public Reporting for Consumers in Health Care. We found broad agreement that public reporting has been disconnected from consumer decisions about providers because of weaknesses in report card content, design, and accessibility. Policy makers have an opportunity to change the landscape of public reporting by taking advantage of advances in measurement, data collection, and information technology to deliver a more consumer-centered report card. Overcoming the constraint of limited public funding, and achieving the acceptance of providers, is critical to realizing future success.

  18. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  19. [German physicians' access to professional knowledge. Acceptance, quality and availability of professional information with special reference to electronic information media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reng, Carl-Michael; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Timmer, Antje; Schölmerich, Jürgen

    2003-11-15

    The growing relevance of continuous medical education is evident. Also information retrieval helping to solve clinical problems yet at the patient's bedside becomes more and more important. This study challenges common and coming methods of information retrieval applied by German physicians. It helps answering the question which advantage or disadvantage due to the chosen method of information acquisition may arise. It also shows which practical relevance and which grade of quality the information seeking doctor may anticipate. A questionnaire was sent out to all registered clinicians in hospital and practice in Germany. Not only traditional means of information retrieval were analyzed. Also, a lot of the questions posed focused on the acceptance and use of new media in the professional context. About 16,000 colleagues answered by filling in the complete form therewith allowing a deep insight into their informational needs and habits. While traditional media like books and scientific papers enjoy wide public confidence, the acceptance and estimated reliability of virtual sources of information today still remain restrained. The lack of transparency of the virtual sources and ways of information within the web according to often imprecise rules for quality assurance lead to major complaint. Information offered directly by the industry has a very low rate of acceptance. To gain higher confidence in electronic media presenting professional knowledge and advanced medical training, the development of technological advantages today seems to be less relevant. Work on the transparency of the informational structures including clear definition of resources and clear indication of possible conflicts of interest are just as important as a comprehensible quality of forthcoming medical content.

  20. Rural Hospital Employment of Physicians and Use of Cesareans and Nonindicated Labor Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Shailendra; Hung, Peiyin; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Casey, Michelle; Kozhimannil, Katy

    2018-02-01

    Workforce issues constrain obstetric care services in rural US hospitals, and one strategy hospitals use is to employ physicians to provide obstetric care. However, little is known about the relationship between hospital employment of maternity care physicians and use of obstetric care procedures in rural hospitals. We examined the association between obstetric physician employment and use of cesareans and nonindicated labor induction. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a telephone survey of all 306 rural hospitals providing obstetric care in 9 states from November 2013 to March 2014 and linked the survey data (N = 263, 86% response rate) to all-payer childbirth data on maternity care utilization from 2013 Statewide Inpatient Database (SID) hospital discharge data. Using logistic regression models, we assessed the proportion of a hospital's maternity care physicians employed by the hospital and estimated its association with utilization of low-risk and nonindicated cesareans, and nonindicated labor induction. Rural hospitals that employed family physicians but not obstetricians had lower cesarean rates among low-risk pregnancies. Rural hospitals that employed only obstetricians did not show a relationship between employment and procedure utilization. Across hospitals with both obstetricians and family physicians, a 10% higher proportion of obstetricians employed was associated with 4.6% higher low-risk cesarean rates (4.6% [0.7%-8.4%]), while no significant relationship was found for the proportion of family physicians employed by a hospital. In rural US hospitals, associations between physician employment and obstetric procedure use differed by physician mix and the types of physicians employed. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Excessive working hours and health complaints among hospital physicians: a study based on a national sample of hospital physicians in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Rosta, Judith; Gerber, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine correlations between excessively long working hours and subjectively experienced somatic health complaints among hospital physicians. Methods: Quantitative data were collected as part of the survey “Working life, Lifestyle and Health of Hospital Physicians in Germany 2006” using self-reporting questionnaires. The individually experienced health was assessed on the basis of Zerssen’s [1] list of somatic complaints. The indicator of excessively long working hours was de...

  2. European guidelines on lifestyle changes for management of hypertension : Awareness and implementation of recommendations among German and European physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolbrinker, J; Zaidi Touis, L; Gohlke, H; Weisser, B; Kreutz, R

    2017-05-22

    In the 2013 European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension, six lifestyle changes for treatment are recommended for the first time with class I, level of evidence A. We initiated a survey among physicians to explore their awareness and consideration of lifestyle changes in hypertension management. The survey included questions regarding demographics as well as awareness and implementation of the recommended lifestyle changes. It was conducted at two German and two European scientific meetings in 2015. In all, 1064 (37.4% female) physicians participated (806 at the European and 258 at the German meetings). Of the six recommended lifestyle changes, self-reported awareness was highest for regular exercise (85.8%) followed by reduction of weight (66.2%). The least frequently self-reported lifestyle changes were the advice to quit smoking (47.3%) and moderation of alcohol consumption (36.3%). Similar frequencies were observed for the lifestyle changes implemented by physicians in their care of patients. A close correlation between awareness of guideline recommendations and their implementation into clinical management was observed. European physicians place a stronger emphasis on regular exercise and weight reduction than on the other recommended lifestyle changes. Moderation of alcohol consumption is the least emphasized lifestyle change.

  3. [Continuity of hospital identifiers in hospital discharge data - Analysis of the nationwide German DRG Statistics from 2005 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimptsch, Ulrike; Wengler, Annelene; Mansky, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    In Germany, nationwide hospital discharge data (DRG statistics provided by the research data centers of the Federal Statistical Office and the Statistical Offices of the 'Länder') are increasingly used as data source for health services research. Within this data hospitals can be separated via their hospital identifier ([Institutionskennzeichen] IK). However, this hospital identifier primarily designates the invoicing unit and is not necessarily equivalent to one hospital location. Aiming to investigate direction and extent of possible bias in hospital-level analyses this study examines the continuity of the hospital identifier within a cross-sectional and longitudinal approach and compares the results to official hospital census statistics. Within the DRG statistics from 2005 to 2013 the annual number of hospitals as classified by hospital identifiers was counted for each year of observation. The annual number of hospitals derived from DRG statistics was compared to the number of hospitals in the official census statistics 'Grunddaten der Krankenhäuser'. Subsequently, the temporal continuity of hospital identifiers in the DRG statistics was analyzed within cohorts of hospitals. Until 2013, the annual number of hospital identifiers in the DRG statistics fell by 175 (from 1,725 to 1,550). This decline affected only providers with small or medium case volume. The number of hospitals identified in the DRG statistics was lower than the number given in the census statistics (e.g., in 2013 1,550 IK vs. 1,668 hospitals in the census statistics). The longitudinal analyses revealed that the majority of hospital identifiers persisted in the years of observation, while one fifth of hospital identifiers changed. In cross-sectional studies of German hospital discharge data the separation of hospitals via the hospital identifier might lead to underestimating the number of hospitals and consequential overestimation of caseload per hospital. Discontinuities of hospital

  4. Work hours and turnover intention among hospital physicians in Taiwan: does income matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Tsai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician shortage has become an urgent and critical challenge to many countries. According to the workforce dynamic model, long work hours may be one major pressure point to the attrition of physicians. Financial incentive is a common tool to human power retention. Therefore, this large-scale physician study investigated how pay satisfaction may influence the relationship between work hours and hospital physician’s turnover intention. Methods Data were obtained from a nationwide survey of full-time hospital staff members working at 100 hospitals in Taiwan. The analysis sample comprised 2423 full-time physicians. Dependent variable was degree of the physicians’ turnover intention to leave the current hospital. The pay satisfaction was assessed by physicians themselves. We employed ordinal logistic regression models to analyze the association between the number of work hours and turnover intention. To consider the cluster effect of hospitals, we used the “gllamm” command in the statistical software package Stata Version 12.1. Results The results show that 351 (14.5% of surveyed physicians reported strong intention to leave current hospital. The average work hours per week among hospital physicians was 59.8 h. As expected, work hours exhibited an independent relationship with turnover intention. More importantly, pay satisfaction could not effectively moderate the positive relationship between work hours and intentions to leave current hospital. Conclusions The findings show that overtime work is prevalent among hospital physicians in Taiwan. Both the Taiwanese government and hospitals must take action to address the emerging problem of physician high turnover rate. Furthermore, hospitals should not consider relying solely on financial incentives to solve the problem. This study encouraged tackling work hour problem, which would lead to the possibility of solving high turnover intention among hospital physicians in

  5. Hospital-physician relations: the relative importance of economic, relational and professional attributes to organizational attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Van Vaerenbergh, Yves; Annemans, Lieven

    2014-05-21

    Belgian hospitals face a growing shortage of physicians and increasingly competitive market conditions. In this challenging environment hospitals are struggling to build effective hospital-physician relationships which are considered to be a critical determinant of organizational success. Employed physicians of a University hospital were surveyed. Organizational attributes were identified through the literature and two focus groups. Variables were measured using validated questionnaires. Descriptive analyses and linear regression were used to test the model and relative importance analyses were performed. The selected attributes predict hospital attractiveness significantly (79.3%). The relative importance analysis revealed that hospital attractiveness is most strongly predicted by professional attributes (35.3%) and relational attributes (29.7%). In particular, professional development opportunities (18.8%), hospital prestige (16.5%), organizational support (17.2%) and leader support (9.3%) were found to be most important. Besides these non-economic aspects, the employed physicians indicated pay and financial benefits (7.4%) as a significant predictor of hospital attractiveness. Work-life balance and job security were not significantly related to hospital attractiveness. This study shows that initiatives aimed at strengthening physicians' positive perceptions of professional and relational aspects of practicing medicine in hospitals, while assuring satisfactory financial conditions, may offer useful avenues for increasing the level of perceived hospital attractiveness. Overall, hospitals are advised to use a differentiated approach to increase their attractiveness to physicians.

  6. The effect of hospital-physician integration on health information technology adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Eric

    2013-10-01

    The US federal government has recently made a substantial investment to enhance the US health information technology (IT) infrastructure. Previous literature on the impact of IT on firm performance across multiple industries has emphasized the importance of a process of co-invention whereby organizations develop complementary practices to achieve greater benefit from their IT investments. In health care, employment of physicians by hospitals can confer greater administrative control to hospitals over physicians' actions and resources and thus enable the implementation of new technology and initiatives aimed at maximizing benefit from use of the technology. In this study, I tested for the relationship between hospital employment of physicians and hospitals' propensity to use health IT. I used state laws that prohibit hospital employment of physicians as an instrument to account for the endogenous relationship with hospital IT use. Hospital employment of physicians is associated with significant increases in the probability of hospital health IT use. Therefore, subsidization of health IT among hospitals not employing physicians may be less efficient. Furthermore, state laws prohibiting hospitals from employing physicians may inhibit adoption of health IT, thus working against policy initiatives aimed at promoting use of the technology. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. 5 CFR 890.905 - Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges. 890.905 Section 890.905 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.905 Limits on inpatient...

  8. Outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--why do physicians withhold resuscitation attempts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Lippert, Freddy K

    2004-01-01

    To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts.......To describe the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a focus on why physicians withhold resuscitation attempts....

  9. IRS proposes ruling on physician recruitment. How a hospital recruits physicians would affect its tax-exempt status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, G M

    1996-01-01

    On March 15, 1995, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced a proposed revenue ruling stating how certain physician recruitment practices could be implemented without threatening hospitals' tax-exemption. As proposed, the IRS ruling would provide flexibility for recruitment incentives rather than a list of strict physician recruitment guidelines. The proposed ruling is not legally binding until issued in final form, and there is no deadline for finalizing it. In the meantime, however, the standards outlined in the proposed ruling reflect arrangements the IRS likely would approve, which should be an incentive for tax-exempt hospitals to follow reasonable physician recruitment practices. Assuming a hospital complies with other legal requirements such as fraud and abuse laws, it must answer two key tax-exempt status questions for its recruitment or retention package: Will the incentives result in a disguised distribution of profits from the operation of the organization? Is the total incentive package reasonable under all the facts and circumstances, both in absolute total value for physician(s) recruited and in relation to services required by the hospital and the community? The proposed ruling also provides guidance on basic documentation requirements and a process for approving recruitment arrangements.

  10. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government.

  11. [On the comprehensibility of German hospital quality reports: systematic evaluation and need for action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann, J; Schubert, H-J; Schwappach, D

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the current resolutions for quality reports of German hospitals as released in 2007 as well as on comprehensibility of these reports for patients. It is meant to analyse the textual information given by these quality reports. Its main objective was to attain a reliable assessment of their comprehensibility for patients on the basis of objective measuring methods. A further goal was to qualify eventual differences between large and small or private and public hospital operators. On the basis of the attained results conclusions on the appropriateness of the current legal situation and the existing criteria for quality reports were to be drawn. The textual system part of 200 German hospital reports was analysed as published in the Internet (latest download 28th May, 2007). The selection took place by means of a controlled sample. The sample structure essentially corresponds to the German hospital system structure in terms of bed numbers and its ratio of public and private operators. The analysis measured all formal text patterns as well as technical terms by means of a computer-aided device. The readability index for each text was calculated according to all known readability formulas for the German language. German hospital quality reports are readable only for those patients who dispose of above-average communicative skills. The analysed reports contain more than 10% technical terms while 17% of the chosen words and 60% of all sentences are too long. 10% of all sentences are too complex and 25% comprise more than three technical terms. To understand these texts at least an entrance qualification for higher education is required in accordance to readability indices. The texts' degree of complexity is comparable to that of philosophical papers. Most textual information given by German hospital quality reports is proven to be unreadable and incomprehensible for most patients. There are no fundamental differences concerning hospital size and

  12. Human resource crises in German hospitals?an explorative study

    OpenAIRE

    Schermuly, Carsten C; Draheim, Michael; Glasberg, Ronald; Stantchev, Vladimir; Tamm, Gerrit; Hartmann, Michael; Hessel, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of providing medical care in a high-tech environment with a highly specialized, limited labour force makes hospitals more crisis-prone than other industries. An effective defence against crises is only possible if the organizational resilience and the capacity to handle crises become part of the hospitals? organizational culture. To become more resilient to crises, a raised awareness?especially in the area of human resource (HR)?is necessary. The aim of this paper is...

  13. IT Decision Making in German Hospitals - Do CEOs Open the Black Box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thye, Johannes; Hübner, Ursula; Hüsers, Jens; Babitsch, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Health IT and communication systems are indispensable in German hospitals for clinical as well as administrative process support. However, IT is often regarded as a "black box" for hospital CEOs. Thus, the question arises how can CEOs decide if they do not know what is in the box? In order to answer this question, half-structured interviews with 14 German hospital CEOs were conducted. They revealed three principle decision processes: the supported decision, the joint decision and the corporate level decision. In all cases, the hospital CEO and the CIO interacted to reach the final decision, most strongly in the joint decision mode and least strongly in the corporate decision mode. Only the joint decision mode definitely forced the CEO to open the "black box" of IT. In the era of digitalisation, however, CEOs must develop better competencies to decide over complex matters.

  14. Hospital-physician relations: the relative importance of economic, relational and professional attributes to organizational attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Belgian hospitals face a growing shortage of physicians and increasingly competitive market conditions. In this challenging environment hospitals are struggling to build effective hospital-physician relationships which are considered to be a critical determinant of organizational success. Methods Employed physicians of a University hospital were surveyed. Organizational attributes were identified through the literature and two focus groups. Variables were measured using validated questionnaires. Descriptive analyses and linear regression were used to test the model and relative importance analyses were performed. Results The selected attributes predict hospital attractiveness significantly (79.3%). The relative importance analysis revealed that hospital attractiveness is most strongly predicted by professional attributes (35.3%) and relational attributes (29.7%). In particular, professional development opportunities (18.8%), hospital prestige (16.5%), organizational support (17.2%) and leader support (9.3%) were found to be most important. Besides these non-economic aspects, the employed physicians indicated pay and financial benefits (7.4%) as a significant predictor of hospital attractiveness. Work-life balance and job security were not significantly related to hospital attractiveness. Conclusions This study shows that initiatives aimed at strengthening physicians’ positive perceptions of professional and relational aspects of practicing medicine in hospitals, while assuring satisfactory financial conditions, may offer useful avenues for increasing the level of perceived hospital attractiveness. Overall, hospitals are advised to use a differentiated approach to increase their attractiveness to physicians. PMID:24884491

  15. Discrimination in waiting times by insurance type and financial soundness of German acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwierz, Christoph; Wübker, Achim; Wübker, Ansgar; Kuchinke, Björn A

    2011-10-01

    This paper shows that patients with private health insurance (PHI) are being offered significantly shorter waiting times than patients with statutory health insurance (SHI) in German acute hospital care. This behavior may be driven by the higher expected profitability of PHI relative to SHI holders. Further, we find that hospitals offering private insurees shorter waiting times when compared with SHI holders have a significantly better financial performance than those abstaining from or with less discrimination.

  16. The relationship between transformational leadership and social capital in hospitals--a survey of medical directors of all German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Antje; Ommen, Oliver; Röttger, Julia; Pfaff, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The German hospital market has been undergoing major changes in recent years. Success in this new market is determined by a multitude of factors. One is the quality of the social relationships between staff and the presence of shared values and rules. This factor can be considered an organization's "social capital." This study investigates the relationship between social capital and leadership style in German hospitals using a written survey of medical directors. In 2008, a cross-sectional representative study was conducted with 1224 medical directors from every hospital in Germany with at least 1 internal medicine unit and 1 surgery unit. Among the scales included in the standardized questionnaire were scales used to assess the medical directors' evaluation of social capital and transformational leadership in the hospital. We used a multiple linear regression model to examine the relationship between social capital and internal coordination. We controlled for hospital ownership, teaching status, and number of beds. In total, we received questionnaires from 551 medical directors, resulting in a response rate of 45.2%. The participating hospitals had an average of 345 beds. The sample included public (41.3%), not-for-profit (46.9%), and for-profit (11.7%) hospitals. The data, which exclusively represent the perceptions of the medical directors, indicate a significant correlation between a transformational leadership style of the executive management and the social capital as perceived by medical directors. A transformational leadership style of the executive management accounted for 36% of variance of the perceived social capital. The perceived social capital in German hospitals is closely related to the leadership style of the executive management. A transformational leadership style of the executive management appears to successfully strengthen the hospital's social capital.

  17. Associations between non-discrimination and training policies and physicians' attitudes and knowledge about sexual and gender minority patients: a comparison of physicians from two hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Mitchell, Jason W; Doty, S Benjamin

    2016-03-12

    Some physicians lack knowledge and awareness about health issues specific to sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals. To help improve this, hospitals have implemented policies that mandate non-discrimination and training to promote sexual and gender minority health. There is limited evidence about how such policies relate to physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and gender and sexual minority affirmative practices. A random sample of 1000 physicians was recruited from a complete list of physicians affiliated with one of two university Hospitals located in Tennessee and 180 physicians completed the survey concerning attitudes and knowledge about SGM individuals. Physicians were affiliated with either Hospital A that had not implemented policies for non-discrimination and training, or Hospital B that did. Physicians held different attitudes about SGM patients than non-patients. Physicians affiliated with Hospital A held more negative attitudes about SGM individuals who were non-patients than physicians affiliated with Hospital B. There were no differences between the two hospitals in physicians' attitudes and knowledge about SGM patients. Policies that mandate non-discrimination and training as they currently exist may not improve physicians' attitudes and knowledge about SGM individuals. Additional research is needed to understand how these policies and trainings relate to physicians' SGM affirmative practices.

  18. Web-based training in German university eye hospitals - Education 2.0?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handzel, Daniel M; Hesse, L

    2011-01-01

    To analyse web-based training in ophthalmology offered by German university eye hospitals. In January 2010 the websites of all 36 German university hospitals were searched for information provided for visitors, students and doctors alike. We evaluated the offer in terms of quantity and quality. All websites could be accessed at the time of the study. 28 pages provided information for students and doctors, one page only for students, three exclusively for doctors. Four pages didn't offer any information for these target groups. The websites offered information on events like congresses or students curricular education, there were also material for download for these events or for other purposes. We found complex e-learning-platforms on 9 pages. These dealt with special ophthalmological topics in a didactic arrangement. In spite of the extensive possibilities offered by the technology of Web 2.0, many conceivable tools were only rarely made available. It was not always possible to determine if the information provided was up-to-date, very often the last actualization of the content was long ago. On one page the date for the last change was stated as 2004. Currently there are 9 functional e-learning-applications offered by German university eye hospitals. Two additional hospitals present links to a project of the German Ophthalmological Society. There was a considerable variation in quantity and quality. No website made use of crediting successful studying, e.g. with CME-points or OSCE-credits. All German university eye hospitals present themselves in the World Wide Web. However, the lack of modern, technical as well as didactical state-of-the-art learning applications is alarming as it leaves an essential medium of today's communication unused.

  19. Risky procedures by nurses in hospitals: problems and (contemplated) refusals of orders by physicians, and views of physicians and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, J.; Cuperus-Bosma, J.M.; van der Jagt, M.A.; Gevers, J.K.M.; van der Wal, G.

    2005-01-01

    Occurrence of problems with, refusals of orders and contemplated refusals of orders for risky procedures by nurses in Dutch hospitals and views on the safety of performance was studied using postal questionnaires (600 physicians and 3200 nurses, response 60-71%). Of the respondents, 11-30%

  20. Hospital employment of physicians and supply chain performance: An empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gary J; Nyaga, Gilbert N; Zepeda, E David

    2016-01-01

    As hospital employment of physicians becomes increasingly common in the United States, much speculation exists as to whether this type of arrangement will promote hospital operating efficiency in such areas as supply chain management. Little empirical research has been conducted to address this question. The aim of this study was to provide an exploratory assessment of whether hospital employment of physicians is associated with better supply chain performance. Drawing from both agency and stewardship theories, we examined whether hospitals with a higher proportion of employed medical staff members have relatively better supply chain performance based on two performance measures, supply chain expenses and inventory costs. We conducted the study using a pooled, cross-sectional sample of hospitals located in California between 2007 and 2009. Key data sources were hospital annual financial reports from California's Office of Statewide Health Policy and Development and the American Hospital Association annual survey of hospitals. To examine the relationship between physician employment and supply chain performance, we specified physician employment as the proportion of total employed medical staff members as well as the proportion of employed medical staff members within key physician subgroups. We analyzed the data using generalized estimating equations. Study results generally supported our hypothesis that hospital employment of physicians is associated with better supply chain performance. Although the results of our study should be viewed as preliminary, the trend in the United States toward hospital employment of physicians may be a positive development for improved hospital operating efficiency. Hospital managers should also be attentive to training and educational resources that medical staff members may need to strengthen their role in supply chain activities.

  1. Evaluating opportunities for direct contracting between employers and physician-hospital organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straley, P F; Swaim, C R

    1994-01-01

    Employers seeking to reduce health care expenditures are turning to direct contracting as a way to control provider cost increases. In a direct contract, the participation of third parties is minimized. The health care provider and a corporate buyer directly negotiate a price agreement for the delivery of health care services. However, as managed care penetration increases, the ability of hospitals and physicians to assume risk while providing high quality, cost effective care will be paramount. Physicians and hospitals who choose to work together may find a physician-hospital organization an effective vehicle to meet the current and future market challenges of direct contracting.

  2. [Instruments of management accounting in german hospitals - potentials for competitive advantage and status quo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, W; Lachmann, M; Wömpener, A

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an analysis of the status quo for the usage of instruments of management accounting in German hospitals. 600 managing directors of German hospitals were asked to answer a questionnaire about the usage of management accounting instruments in their hospitals. We obtained 121 usable datasets, which are evaluated in this study. A significant increase in the usage of management accounting instruments can be observed over time. The respondents have an overall positive perception of the usage of these instruments. Cost accounting and information systems are among the most widely used instruments, while widely discussed concepts like the balanced scorecard or clinical pathways show surprisingly low usage rates. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Fulfillment of administrative and professional obligations of hospitals and mission motivation of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Desmidt, Sebastian; Annemans, Lieven

    2017-01-13

    To be successful, hospitals must increasingly collaborate with their medical staff. One strategic tool that plays an important role is the mission statement of hospitals. The goal of this research was to study the relationship between the fulfillment of administrative and professional obligations of hospitals on physicians' motivation to contribute to the mission of the hospital. Furthermore the mediating role of the physicians' emotional attachment to the hospital and moderation effect of the exchange with the head physicians were considered. Self-employed physicians of six hospitals participated in a survey. Descriptive analyses and linear regression were used to analyse the data. The results indicate that affective commitment mediated the relationship between psychological contract fulfillment and mission statement motivation. In addition, the quality of exchange with the Chief Medical Officer moderated the relationship between the fulfillment of administrative obligations and affective commitment positively. This study extends our understanding of social exchange processes and mission statement motivation of physicians. We showed that when physicians perceive a high level of fulfillment of their psychological contract they are more committed and more motivated to contribute to the mission statement. A high quality relationship between physician and Chief Medical Officer can enhance this reciprocity dynamic.

  4. Validation and cultural adaptation of a German version of the Physicians' Reactions to Uncertainty scales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, A.; Szecsenyi, J.; Barie, S.; Joest, K.; Rosemann, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine the validity of a translated and culturally adapted version of the Physicians' Reaction to Uncertainty scales (PRU) in primary care physicians. METHODS: In a structured process, the original questionnaire was translated, culturally adapted and assessed

  5. Vertical integration: hospital ownership of physician practices is associated with higher prices and spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Kessler, Daniel P

    2014-05-01

    We examined the consequences of contractual or ownership relationships between hospitals and physician practices, often described as vertical integration. Such integration can reduce health spending and increase the quality of care by improving communication across care settings, but it can also increase providers' market power and facilitate the payment of what are effectively kickbacks for inappropriate referrals. We investigated the impact of vertical integration on hospital prices, volumes (admissions), and spending for privately insured patients. Using hospital claims from Truven Analytics MarketScan for the nonelderly privately insured in the period 2001-07, we constructed county-level indices of prices, volumes, and spending and adjusted them for enrollees' age and sex. We measured hospital-physician integration using information from the American Hospital Association on the types of relationships hospitals have with physicians. We found that an increase in the market share of hospitals with the tightest vertically integrated relationship with physicians--ownership of physician practices--was associated with higher hospital prices and spending. We found that an increase in contractual integration reduced the frequency of hospital admissions, but this effect was relatively small. Taken together, our results provide a mixed, although somewhat negative, picture of vertical integration from the perspective of the privately insured.

  6. [Recommendations for problem solving in integrative postgraduate medical training of physicians at anthroposophic hospitals in Germany and Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Sabine; Weinzirl, Johannes; Orlow, Pascale; Berger, Bettina; Heusser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the first-time evaluation of the quality and problems of integrative postgraduate medical training (PGMT) at German and Swiss anthroposophic hospitals, all 240 trainees and all 214 trainers were asked to propose options for problem solutions. The study included a cross-sectional questionnaire survey with sections for further comments. The data were evaluated with qualitative content analysis (Mayring). 56 (51.8%) out of 108 responding trainees and 54 (54%) out of 100 responding trainers had given potential solutions. Both groups were analyzed together. On internal level, recommendations comprised re-orientation on a leadership basis, i.e. elevation of PGMT to a core element of hospital policy in anthroposophic medicine (AM), as well as better personnel policy; trainers with more professional and teaching competency in AM; structured and extended continual education program; coordination of PGMT with ward and hospital organization; and work load reduction for physicians through process optimization and resource planning. Externally, the recommendations embraced financial support; external training programs; networking of anthroposophic hospitals in PGMT; implementation of a common competence center for anthroposophic PGMT; conventional and anthroposophic PGMT curriculums; and improvement of science base and public discourse of AM. The proposed options for problem solving in PGMT at anthroposophic hospitals emerge from concrete problem perceptions of the trainers and trainees. They can serve as a basis for concrete improvements of PGMT in AM that could be implemented professionally and in an international context. The preconditions for this are given through the already existing establishment of AM at universities and through the good international connections of anthroposophic hospitals and anthroposophic physicians' associations.

  7. Assessing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), German language version in Swiss university hospitals--a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Natalie; Küng, Kaspar; Sereika, Susan M; Engberg, Sandra; Sexton, Bryan; Schwendimann, René

    2013-09-10

    Improving patient safety has become a major focus of clinical care and research over the past two decades. An institution's patient safety climate represents an essential component of ensuring a safe environment and thereby can be vital to the prevention of adverse events. Covering six patient safety related factors, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) is a validated and widely used instrument to measure the patient safety climate in clinical areas. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the German language version of the SAQ. A survey was carried out in two University Hospitals in Switzerland in autumn 2009 where the SAQ was distributed to a sample of 406 nurses and physicians in medical and surgical wards. Following the American Educational Research Association guidelines, we tested the questionnaire validity by levels of evidence: content validity, internal structure and relations to other variables. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine factor structure. Cronbach's alphas and inter-item correlations were calculated to examine internal consistency reliability. A total of 319 questionnaires were completed representing an overall response rate of 78.6%. For three items, the item content validity index was <0.75. Confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable model fit (RMSEA = 0.045; CFI = 0.944) for the six-factor model. Additional exploratory factor analysis could not identify a better factor model. SAQ factor scores showed positive correlations with the Safety Organizing Scale (r = .56-.72). The SAQ German version showed moderate to strong internal consistency reliability indices (Cronbach alpha = .65-.83). The German language version of the SAQ demonstrated acceptable to good psychometric properties and therefore shows promise to be a sound instrument to measure patient safety climate in Swiss hospital wards. However, the low item content validity and large number of missing responses for several items suggest

  8. Feasibility and acceptability of a workers' health surveillance program for hospital physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenburg, Martijn M; Plat, Marie-Christine J; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) program is an occupational health strategy used to detect and address the health of individual workers to improve their ability to work. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians. All hospital physicians of the general surgery, radiotherapy and obstetrics and gynecology departments from 1 academic hospital were invited to participate in the WHS by the in-company occupational health service. An occupational physician and a medical assistant were trained to use the protocol. Feasibility was operationalized as the received and delivered dose, observed success factors and potential obstacles. Acceptability was assessed by asking whether the WHS was desirable and feasible for future use and by estimating the effects on health and work ability. Written questions and semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participating physicians, 5 department managers and the 2 occupational health professionals involved in the study. One-third of the hospital physicians (34%) participated in every part of the WHS. The delivered dose was 77/84 (92%). Almost all hospital physicians who received recommendations expected to adhere to this advice. The study participants appreciated the organization of the WHS. This WHS was positively graded (8 out of 10 max) in terms of acceptability. Positive effects of the WHS on health, work functioning and long-term work ability were perceived by 2/3 of the physicians. The new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians showed good feasibility and acceptability among participating hospital physicians, occupational health professionals and medical managers. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  9. Feasibility and acceptability of a workers’ health surveillance program for hospital physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn M. Ruitenburg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A Workers’ Health Surveillance (WHS program is an occupational health strategy used to detect and address the health of individual workers to improve their ability to work. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians. Material and Methods: All hospital physicians of the general surgery, radiotherapy and obstetrics and gynecology departments from 1 academic hospital were invited to participate in the WHS by the in-company occupational health service. An occupational physician and a medical assistant were trained to use the protocol. Feasibility was operationalized as the received and delivered dose, observed success factors and potential obstacles. Acceptability was assessed by asking whether the WHS was desirable and feasible for future use and by estimating the effects on health and work ability. Written questions and semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participating physicians, 5 department managers and the 2 occupational health professionals involved in the study. Results: One-third of the hospital physicians (34% participated in every part of the WHS. The delivered dose was 77/84 (92%. Almost all hospital physicians who received recommendations expected to adhere to this advice. The study participants appreciated the organization of the WHS. This WHS was positively graded (8 out of 10 max in terms of acceptability. Positive effects of the WHS on health, work functioning and long-term work ability were perceived by 2/3 of the physicians. Conclusions: The new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians showed good feasibility and acceptability among participating hospital physicians, occupational health professionals and medical managers.

  10. Physician practice management companies: implications for hospital-based integrated delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, L R; Robinson, J C

    1997-01-01

    Physician practice management companies (PPMCs) are one of the most visible entrants into the industry of managing physician practices, and anywhere from 100-150 are already in operation. Although PPMCs and hospital-based integrated delivery systems (IDSs) differ from each other in many ways, they share a number of common features, including the pursuit of capitation contracts from payors. As a result, PPMCs pose a growing, direct threat to hospital systems in competing for managed care contracts that cover physician service. PPMCs also provide an alternative to hospital-based IDSs at the local market level for physician group consolidation. This article looks at the structure, operation, and strategy of PPMCs and examines what implications their growth will have for hospital-based IDSs.

  11. How to Define the Content of a Job-Specific Worker's Health Surveillance for Hospital Physicians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn M. Ruitenburg

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The process of developing a job-specific WHS for hospital physicians was described and the content presented, which might serve as an example for other jobs. Before implementation, it must first be tested for feasibility and acceptability.

  12. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...

  13. How to Define the Content of a Job-Specific Worker's Health Surveillance for Hospital Physicians?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Martijn M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A job-specific Worker's Health Surveillance (WHS) for hospital physicians is a preventive occupational health strategy aiming at early detection of their diminished work-related health in order to improve or maintain physician's health and quality of care. This study addresses what steps

  14. Business intelligence and information systems in hospitals--distribution and usage of BI and HIS in German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Patrick; Lux, Thomas; Wagner, Alexander; Gabriel, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows the results of a short survey taken place in February 2013 within German Hospitals. The present studies view is bottom-up and the interviews are done directly with the hospitals CIOs. There are some effects like the G-DRG implementation in Germany that are evident in the results. The survey indicates also the different methods of adapting the solutions, either by having an all-in-one solution by a single provider or by using a modular solution from multiple providers.

  15. A cross-national comparison of incident reporting systems implemented in German and Swiss hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Tanja; Imhof, Michael; Lessing, Constanze; Briner, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to empirically compare incident reporting systems (IRS) in two European countries and to explore the relationship of IRS characteristics with context factors such as hospital characteristics and characteristics of clinical risk management (CRM). We performed exploratory, secondary analyses of data on characteristics of IRS from nationwide surveys of CRM practices. The survey was originally sent to 2136 hospitals in Germany and Switzerland. Persons responsible for CRM in 622 hospitals completed the survey (response rate 29%). None. Differences between IRS in German and Swiss hospitals were assessed using Chi2, Fisher's Exact and Freeman-Halton-Tests, as appropriate. To explore interrelations between IRS characteristics and context factors (i.e. hospital and CRM characteristics) we computed Cramer's V. Comparing participating hospitals across countries, Swiss hospitals had implemented IRS earlier, more frequently and more often provided introductory IRS training systematically. German hospitals had more frequently systematically implemented standardized procedures for event analyses. IRS characteristics were significantly associated with hospital characteristics such as hospital type as well as with CRM characteristics such as existence of strategic CRM objectives and of a dedicated position for central CRM coordination. This study contributes to an improved understanding of differences in the way IRS are set up in two European countries and explores related context factors. This opens up new possibilities for empirically informed, strategic interventions to further improve dissemination of IRS and thus support hospitals in their efforts to move patient safety forward. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Much ado about nothing? The financial impact of physician-owned specialty hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sujoy

    2016-06-01

    The U.S. hospital industry has recently witnessed a number of policy changes aimed at aligning hospital payments to costs and these can be traced to significant concerns regarding selection of profitable patients and procedures by physician-owned specialty hospitals. The policy responses to specialty hospitals have alternated between payment system reforms and outright moratoriums on hospital operations including one in the recently enacted Affordable Care Act. A key issue is whether physician-owned specialty hospitals pose financial strain on the larger group of general hospitals through cream-skimming of profitable patients, yet there is no study that conducts a systematic analysis relating such selection behavior by physician-owners to financial impacts within hospital markets. The current paper takes into account heterogeneity in specialty hospital behavior and finds some evidence of their adverse impact on profit margins of competitor hospitals, especially for-profit hospitals. There is also some evidence of hospital consolidation in response to competitive pressures by specialty hospitals. Overall, these findings underline the importance of the payment reforms aimed at correcting distortions in the reimbursement system that generate incentives for risk-selection among providers groups. The identification techniques will also inform empirical analysis on future data testing the efficacy of these payment reforms.

  17. [Attitudes and experiences regarding physician assisted suicide : A survey among members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansky, Maximiliane; Jaspers, Birgit; Radbruch, Lukas; Nauck, Friedemann

    2017-01-01

    The need to regulate physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and organizations offering assisted suicide has been controversially debated in Germany. Before the German parliament voted on various drafts in November 2015, the German Association for Palliative Medicine surveyed its members on their attitudes and experiences regarding PAS. Items for the survey were derived from the literature and consented in a focus group. 2005-2015 - PubMed: PAS [Title/Abstract] UND survey (all countries), grey literature. We invited 5152 members of the DGP to participate in the online/paper survey. Descriptive quantitative and content analytic qualitative analysis of data using SPSS and MaxQDA. We obtained 1811 valid data sets (response rate 36.9%). 33.7% of the participants were male, 43.6% were female, and 0.4% identifed as other. Physicians accounted for 48.5% of the respondents, 17.8% nurses, other professions 14.3%, and about 20% of the data was missing socio-demographic information. More than 90% agreed that "wishes for PAS may be ambivalent" and "are rather a wish to end an unbearable situation". Of the 833 participating physicians, 56% refused participating in PAS and 74.2% had been asked to perform PAS. PAS was actually performed by 3%. Of all participating members, 56% approved of a legal ban of organizations offering assisted suicide. More than 60% of all professions agreed that PAS is not a part of palliative care. The respondents show a broad spectrum of attitudes, only partly supporting statements of relevant bodies, such as DGP. Because many are confronted with the issue, PAS is relevant to professionals in palliative care.

  18. Joint-venture proposals strengthen hospital-physician relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovinsky, M

    2000-12-01

    By proposing the joint-venture development of an ambulatory surgery center and medical office space with a group practice, one hospital succeeded in enhancing its relationship with the practice and paved the way for future collaboration. Although the hospital's proposal to jointly develop an ambulatory surgery center was not accepted, the hospital was able to dissuade the group practice from developing a competing ambulatory surgery facility while increasing the group's trust in and loyalty to the hospital. As a result, the hospital potentially will benefit from increased inpatient admissions.

  19. A survey of workplace violence against physicians in the hospitals, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Yuichi; Mizuno, Tetsutaro; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Thu, Si; Kyaw, Thein Aung; Htun, Kyaw Aung

    2018-02-15

    Workplace violence in hospitals is recently becoming a major global concern in many countries. However, in Myanmar, we have felt that patients and their families have rarely made unreasonable complaints in hospitals, and then, the purpose of this study is to report the current state of workplace violence in hospitals in Myanmar. Participants are 196 physicians (108 males and 88 females) in hospitals in Myanmar. A descriptive survey was conducted in regard to verbal abuse and physical violence from patients or the people concerned. At the results of this study, the percentages of physicians who have encountered verbal abuse and those who have encountered physical violence are markedly low (8.7 and 1.0%, respectively). The present study is the first to report the frequencies of verbal abuse and physical violence against physicians in a least developed country, and the results of the present study are important in terms of discussing workplace violence in hospitals.

  20. Hospital's activity-based financing system and manager-physician [corrected] interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crainich, David; Leleu, Hervé; Mauleon, Ana

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the consequences of the introduction of an activity-based reimbursement system on the behavior of physicians and hospital's managers. We consider a private for-profit sector where both hospitals and physicians are initially paid on a fee-for-service basis. We show that the benefit of the introduction of an activity-based system depends on the type of interaction between managers and physicians (simultaneous or sequential decision-making games). It is shown that, under the activity-based system, a sequential interaction with physician leader could be beneficial for both agents in the private sector. We further model an endogenous timing game à la Hamilton and Slutsky (Games Econ Behav 2: 29-46, 1990) in which the type of interaction is determined endogenously. We show that, under the activity-based system, the sequential interaction with physician leader is the unique subgame perfect equilibrium.

  1. Hospital Readmissions Following Physician Call System Change: A Comparison of Concentrated and Distributed Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Christopher J; Shadowitz, Steven; Redelmeier, Donald A

    2016-07-01

    Physician call schedules are a critical element for medical practice and hospital efficiency. We compared readmission rates prior to and after a change in physician call system at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. We studied patients discharged over a decade (2004 through 2013) and identified whether or not each patient was readmitted within the subsequent 28 days. We excluded patients discharged for a surgical, obstetrical, or psychiatric diagnosis. We used time-to-event analysis and time-series analysis to compare rates of readmission prior to and after the physician call system change (January 1, 2009). A total of 89,697 patients were discharged, of whom 10,001 (11%) were subsequently readmitted and 4280 died. The risk of readmission was increased by about 26% following physician call system change (9.7% vs 12.2%, P system change (95% confidence interval, 22%-31%; P system change persisted across patients with diverse ages, estimated readmission risks, and medical diagnoses. The net effect was equal to 7240 additional patient days in the hospital following call system change. A modest increase was observed at a nearby acute care hospital that did not change physician call system, and no increase in risk of death was observed with increased hospital readmissions. We suggest that changes in physician call systems sometimes increase subsequent hospital readmission rates. Further reductions in readmissions may instead require additional resources or ingenuity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of scanning and eliminating paper-based medical records on hospital physicians' clinical work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerum, Hallvard; Karlsen, Tom H; Faxvaag, Arild

    2003-01-01

    It is not automatically given that the paper-based medical record can be eliminated after the introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) in a hospital. Many keep and update the paper-based counterpart, and this limits the use of the EMR system. The authors have evaluated the physicians' clinical work practices and attitudes toward a system in a hospital that has eliminated the paper-based counterpart using scanning technology. Combined open-ended interviews (8 physicians) and cross-sectional survey (70 physicians) were conducted and compared with reference data from a previous national survey (69 physicians from six hospitals). The hospitals in the reference group were using the same EMR system without the scanning module. The questionnaire (English translation available as an online data supplement at ) covered frequency of use of the EMR system for 19 defined tasks, ease of performing them, and user satisfaction. The interviews were open-ended. The physicians routinely used the system for nine of 11 tasks regarding retrieval of patient data, which the majority of the physicians found more easily performed than before. However, 22% to 25% of the physicians found retrieval of patient data more difficult, particularly among internists (33%). Overall, the physicians were equally satisfied with the part of the system handling the regular electronic data as that of the physicians in the reference group. They were, however, much less satisfied with the use of scanned document images than that of regular electronic data, using the former less frequently than the latter. Scanning and elimination of the paper-based medical record is feasible, but the scanned document images should be considered an intermediate stage toward fully electronic medical records. To our knowledge, this is the first assessment from a hospital in the process of completing such a scanning project.

  3. Physician Acceptance of Pharmacist Recommendations about Medication Prescribing Errors in Iraqi Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI AZEEZ ALI AL-JUMAILI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to measure the incidence and types of medication prescribing errors (MPEs in Iraqi hospitals, to calculate for the first time the percentage of physician agreement with pharmacist medication regimen review (MRR recommendations regarding MPEs, and to identify the factors influencing the physician agreement rate with these recommendations. Methods: Fourteen pharmacists (10 females and 4 males reviewed each hand-written physician order for 1506 patients who were admitted to two public hospitals in Al-Najaf, Iraq during August 2015. The pharmacists identified medication prescribing errors using the Medscape WebMD, LCC phone application as a reference. The pharmacists contacted the physicians (2 females and 34 males in-person to address MPEs that were identified. Results: The pharmacists identified 78 physician orders containing 99 MPEs with an incidence of 6.57 percent of all the physician orders reviewed. The patients with MPEs were taking 4.8 medications on average. The MPEs included drug-drug interactions (65.7%, incorrect doses (16.2%, unnecessary medications (8.1%, contra-indications (7.1%, incorrect drug duration (2%, and untreated conditions (1%. The physicians implemented 37 (37.4% pharmacist recommendations. Three factors were significantly related to physician acceptance of pharmacist recommendations. These were physician specialty, pharmacist gender, and patient gender. Pediatricians were less likely (OR= 0.1 to accept pharmacist recommendations compared to internal medicine physicians. Male pharmacists received more positive responses from physicians (OR=7.11 than female pharmacists. Lastly, the recommendations were significantly more likely to be accepted (OR= 3.72 when the patients were females. Conclusions: The incidence of MPEs is higher in Iraqi hospitalized patients than in the U.S. and U.K, but lower than in Brazil, Ethiopia, India, and Croatia. Drug-drug interactions were the most common type of

  4. Distribution of physicians and hospital beds based on Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satar Rezaei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inequality is prevalent in all sectors, particularly in distribution of and access to resources in the health sector. The aim of current study was to investigate the distribution of physicians and hospital beds in Iran in 2001, 2006 and 2011. Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluated the distribution of physicians and hospital beds in 2001, 2006 and 2011 using Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve. The required data, including the number of physicians (general practitioners and specialists, number of hospital beds and number of hospitalized patients were obtained from the statistical yearbook of Iranian Statistical Center (ISC. The data analysis was performed by DASP software. Results: The Gini Coefficients for physicians and hospital beds based on population in 2001 were 0.19 and 0.16, and based on hospitalized patients, were 0.48 and 0.37, respectively. In 2006, these values were found to be 0.18 and 0.15 based on population, and 0.21 and 0.21 based on hospitalized patients, respectively. In 2011, however, the Gini coefficients were reported to be 0.16 and 0.13 based on population, and 0.47 and 0.37 based on hospitalized patients, respectively. Although distribution status had improved in 2011compared with 2001 in terms of population and number of hospitalized patients, there was more inequality in distribution based on the number of hospitalized patients than based on population. Conclusion: This study indicated that inequality in distribution of physicians and hospital beds was declined in 2011 compared with 2001. This distribution was based on the population, so it is suggested that, in allocation of resource, the health policymakers consider such need indices as the pattern of diseases and illness-prone areas, number of inpatients, and mortality.

  5. Hospital physician payment mechanisms in Austria: do they provide gateways to institutional corruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommersguter-Reichmann, Margit; Stepan, Adolf

    2017-12-01

    Institutional corruption in the health care sector has gained considerable attention during recent years, as it acknowledges the fact that service providers who are acting in accordance with the institutional and environmental settings can nevertheless undermine a health care system's purposes as a result of the (financial) conflicts of interest to which the service providers are exposed. The present analysis aims to contribute to the examination of institutional corruption in the health sector by analyzing whether the current payment mechanism of separately remunerating salaried hospital physicians for treating supplementary insured patients in public hospitals, in combination with the public hospital physician's possibility of taking up dual practice as a self-employed physician with a private practice and/or as an attending physician in private hospitals, has the potential to undermine the primary purposes of the Austrian public health care system. Based on the analysis of the institutional design of the Austrian public hospital sector, legal provisions and directives have been identified, which have the potential to promote conduct on the part of the public hospital physician that systematically undermines the achievement of the Austrian public health system's primary purposes.

  6. [German translation of the syphilis poem by Girolamo Fracastoro by the Essling wound physician Ernst Philipp Heinrich Späth (1809-1856). An unpublished hanwritten document of Dresden historical collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidel, Caris-Petra

    2004-01-01

    In 1840 the Dresden physician and professor at the Chirurgisch-medicinischen Akademie Johann Ludwig Choulant (1791-1861)--at that time one of the most well-known experts in history of medicine--received a German translation of the Fracastoro syphilis poem. This philological piece goes back to the physician and surgeon Ernst Philipp Heinrich Späth (1809-1856) who had already worked on the poem of Girolamo Fracastoro (1478-1553) and its translation in the 1830s. Späth referred to the 1830 Latin publication of Choulant's syphilis poem--which he later used as the literary basis for his adaptation. Späth had acquired his knowledge of philology at a theology seminar in Urach and during his theology studies inTübingen. However, he quit his theology studies to switch to medicine. In 1832 he took the state examination and received a doctorate of medicine and surgery. In the very same year he established a practice as general practitioner, surgeon and obstetrician in Esslingen to eventually be appointed chief surgeon at the Esslingen hospital. Besides his work as a physician Späth was also a publisher, e.g. he also became the editor of the first local Esslingen newspaper. Späth's translation, apparently finished almost completely already in 1837, was sent to Choulant to ask his opinion in 1840. This version seems to be not only one of the rarest but also earliest German adaptations. Although hardly any other medical poem was so often translated into modern languages as Fracastoro's "Syphilidis sive morbi gallici libri III", there are only three German publications mentioned in a 1935 bibliography with the first complete German translation being published in 1858. Späth's script, however, has never been published and has remained in the handwritten estate of Choulant in Dresden ever since.

  7. Depressive symptoms and overwork among physicians employed at a university hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Maruyama

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The excessive workload of Japanese hospital physicians is a serious social problem due to effects on their mental health status, as well as the potential for medical errors and lawsuits. The extent of overwork among resident physicians employed at national university hospitals in Japan is unknown and needs to be investigated. Methods: This study used a questionnaire recommended by the Japanese Ministry of Health for hospital physicians working overtime, administered through an interview carried out by an occupational physician during the health surveillance to evaluate: 1 the severity of chronic fatigue; 2 the burden of work; 3 an overwork score derived from these two measures; and 4 presence of depressive symptoms. After the feasibility of the questionnaire was confirmed, both a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study were performed, while statistics analysis included multiple linear regression analysis and chi-square test set at P < 0.05. Results: Most of the overworked physicians were young medical staffs (48%, whereas postgraduate residents formed a small group (10%. In the cross-sectional study (n = 135; mean age 32.7 years ± 5.6, the histograms of scores for the four factors investigated showed a strong positive skewness, while overtime histograms showed a negative skewness at 4, 3, and 2 months prior to the interview with occupational physician, but positive skewness 1 month prior to the interview. The longitudinal study (n = 26 showed an increase or reduction of overtime respectively having a significant impact on exacerbation or improvement of the overwork score (P = 0.028 and depressive symptoms (P = 0.025. Discussion and Conclusions: A strong positive skewness of the histograms for items related to overwork might indicate fear of stigma of mental illness amongst young physicians. Physicians employed at Japanese national university hospitals should be protected by the institution, and the roles of occupational physician

  8. Prospective-pricing strategies for hospital and departmental effectiveness: the physician's response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapleigh, C

    1985-10-01

    Physician-practice patterns are discussed, and programs of decentralization designed to reduce ancillary use are described. The New England Medical Center (NEMC) conducted a study with two other major hospitals in Boston comparing physician-practice patterns for patients who had had carotid endarterectomies. The indications for surgery for these patients did not appear to be different among the hospitals; however, average charges and length of stay varied considerably. Operating-room time and postoperative management also varied substantially. Strategies to change physician-practice patterns must address the issues of incentives to physicians and hospitals. At NEMC, a program of decentralization is being implemented that involves physician participation in budgeting hospital resources. A program of product pricing has been developed, whereby the NEMC offers an HMO a fixed price for certain kinds of cases upon admission. A daily use report was started to report resource use for specific cases compared with annual medians for that type of case. Case types from many different surgical specialties are involved. The reports show physicians the difference between the actual and expected costs in terms of variances. The NEMC has reoriented its budgeting process to include clinical divisions. Clinical services are planning to budget the use of intermediate products across different cost centers. The clinical budgeting program makes the planning process more objective, lowers the use of ancillary services, and reduces costs.

  9. Satisfaction, motivation, and intent to stay among Ugandan physicians: a survey from 18 national hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboga, Sam; Hagopian, Amy; Ndiku, John; Bancroft, Emily; McQuide, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Uganda faces a colossal shortages of human resources for health. Previous literature has largely focused on those who leave. This paper reports on a study of physicians working in 18 public and private facilities in Uganda as part of a larger study of more than 641 hospital-based health workers in Uganda. We report what could entice physicians to stay longer, satisfaction with current positions, and future career intentions. This study took place in 18 Ugandan hospitals. We describe the 49 physicians who participated in 11 focus groups and the 63 physicians who completed questionnaires, out of a larger sample of 641 health workers overall. Only 37% of physicians said they were satisfied with their jobs, and 46% reported they were at risk of leaving the health sector or the country. After compensation, the largest contributors to dissatisfaction among physicians were quality of management, availability of equipment and supplies (including drugs), quality of facility infrastructure, staffing and workload, political influence, community location, and professional development. Physicians in our study were highly dissatisfied, with almost half the sample reporting a risk to leave the sector or the country. The established link in literature between physician dissatisfaction and departure from the health system suggests national and regional policy makers should consider interventions that address the contributors to dissatisfaction identified in our study. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Association of Financial Integration Between Physicians and Hospitals With Commercial Health Care Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neprash, Hannah T; Chernew, Michael E; Hicks, Andrew L; Gibson, Teresa; McWilliams, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    Financial integration between physicians and hospitals may help health care provider organizations meet the challenges of new payment models but also may enhance the bargaining power of provider organizations, leading to higher prices and spending in commercial health care markets. To assess the association between recent increases in physician-hospital integration and changes in spending and prices for outpatient and inpatient services. Using regression analysis, we estimated the relationship between changes in physician-hospital integration from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2012, in 240 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and concurrent changes in spending. Adjustments were made for patient, plan, and market characteristics, including physician, hospital, and insurer market concentration. The study population included a cohort of 7,391,335 nonelderly enrollees in preferred-provider organizations or point-of-service plans included in the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database during the study period. Data were analyzed from December 1, 2013, through July 13, 2015. Physician-hospital integration, measured using Medicare claims data as the share of physicians in an MSA who bill for outpatient services with a place-of-service code indicating employment or practice ownership by a hospital. Annual inpatient and outpatient spending per enrollee and associated use of health care services, with utilization measured by price-standardized spending (the sum of annual service counts multiplied by the national mean of allowed charges for the service). Among the 240 MSAs, physician-hospital integration increased from 2008 to 2012 by a mean of 3.3 percentage points, with considerable variation in increases across MSAs (interquartile range, 0.8-5.2 percentage points). For our study sample of 7,391,335 nonelderly enrollees, an increase in physician-hospital integration equivalent to the 75th percentile of changes experienced by MSAs was associated with a mean

  11. The Association of German Radiation Protection Physicians: Its origins, pathways and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper highlights three principles which will hold good for future development, too: 1) In terms of the protection of the health of personnel, patients and total population, radiation protection constitutes a primary task for the physician; 2) The association endeavours to make a realistic assessment of the radiation hazard and dismisses both its overestimation and its underestimation; 3) Training and vocational qualification appear to be more important for radiation protection than perfectionist-bureaucratic provisions. (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Physician-hospital relationships: from historical failures to successful "new kids on the block".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Trends in healthcare reveal that increasing numbers of physicians prefer to work directly with hospitals-whether through employment models, new or revived partnership structures, or other such "deals". Meanwhile, hospital executives are vigorously seeking ways to create win-win arrangements that satisfy both parties-models that will ensure medical coverage for the hospital, along with revenue gains and cost savings when possible. Add to this a competitive environment, physician shortages, and high regulatory activity and healthcare reform, and the path to clinical, operational, and financial viability in the context of a hospital/physician partnership can be a challenging one. Models such as The physician enterprise and co-management agreements are gaining popularity, each with distinct benefits. With market forces dynamically changing, along with accountable care, it is time for hospitals, health systems, and physicians to prioritize their partnering relationships, a strategy that is now key to achieving success in the future...and that's a trend that's likely to continue far into the years ahead.

  13. Costs of Planned Home vs. Hospital Birth in British Columbia Attended by Registered Midwives and Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A Janssen

    Full Text Available Home birth is available to women in Canada who meet eligibility requirements for low risk status after assessment by regulated midwives. While UK researchers have reported lower costs associated with planned home birth, there have been no published studies of the costs of home versus hospital birth in Canada.Costs for all women planning home birth with a regulated midwife in British Columbia, Canada were compared with those of all women who met eligibility requirements for home birth and were planning to deliver in hospital with a registered midwife, and with a sample of women of similar low risk status planning birth in the hospital with a physician. We calculated costs of physician service billings, midwifery fees, hospital in-patient costs, pharmaceuticals, home birth supplies, and transport. We compared costs among study groups using the Kruskall Wallis test for independent groups.In the first 28 days postpartum, we report a $2,338 average savings per birth among women planning home birth compared to hospital birth with a midwife and $2,541 compared to hospital birth planned with a physician. In longer term outcomes, similar reductions were observed, with cost savings per birth at $1,683 compared to the planned hospital birth with a midwife, and $1,100 compared to the physician group during the first eight weeks postpartum. During the first year of life, costs for infants of mothers planning home birth were reduced overall. Cost savings compared to planned hospital births with a midwife were $810 and with a physician $1,146. Costs were similarly reduced when findings were stratified by parity.Planned home birth in British Columbia with a registered midwife compared to planned hospital birth is less expensive for our health care system up to 8 weeks postpartum and to one year of age for the infant.

  14. Excessive working hours and health complaints among hospital physicians: a study based on a national sample of hospital physicians in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosta, Judith

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine correlations between excessively long working hours and subjectively experienced somatic health complaints among hospital physicians. Methods: Quantitative data were collected as part of the survey “Working life, Lifestyle and Health of Hospital Physicians in Germany 2006” using self-reporting questionnaires. The individually experienced health was assessed on the basis of Zerssen’s [1] list of somatic complaints. The indicator of excessively long working hours was defined as 10 or more working hours per working day and 6 or more on-call shifts a month among full-time employees. The net sample consisted of 3295 randomly selected physicians from 515 hospitals. Results: The response rate was 58% (n=1917. Physicians with excessively long working hours (19% had significantly higher sum score of health complaints (p=0.0001 and significantly increased mental and physical fatigue symptoms (feeling faint, languor, uneasiness, heavy legs, excessive need for sleep, trembling; p=0.0001 to 0.047, mood changes (irritability, brooding; p=0.008 to 0.014, gastrointestinal (nausea, loss of weight; p=0.0001 to 0.014 and heart disorders (lumpy sensation in the throat, chest pain; p=0.0001 to 0.042. When the sum score of health complaints was controlled for selected confounders, being female (B=-3.44, p=0.0001 and having excessively long working hours (B=2.76, p=0.0001 were significantly correlated with health complaints. In a separate gender analysis, being exposed to excessively long working hours remained a significant predictor for health complaints among both females (B=3.78, p=0.001 and males (B=2.28, p=0.004. Conclusions: Excessively long working hours are associated with an increased risk of health complaints. Reducing working hours may be the first step to improving physicians' health.

  15. THE PREVALENCE OF STRESS AND BURNOUT SYNDROME IN HOSPITAL DOCTORS AND FAMILY PHYSICIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanetic, Kosana D; Savic, Suzana M; Racic, Maja

    2016-11-01

    Introducti on. Burnout syndrome is the result of chronic emotional stress. It is characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and reduced level of personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the level of stress and risk ror burnout syndrome in doctors employed in health centers and hospitals, and to investigate the impact of socio-derrdgraphic characteristics on the level of stress and the o ccurrence of burnout syndrome. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the period from October I to December 31, 2015 in three health centers and in the University Clinical Center of the Republic of Srpska. The survey was anonymous. A socio-demographic questionnaire and a questionnaire for self-assessment of the level of stress and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used as research instruments. Out of 151 doctors included in the study, 49% were family physicians, and 51% were hospital doctors. The analysis of responses to questionnaires for self-assessment of stress level revealed that 51.7% of participants had high levels of stress (52.7% of family physicians, 50.6% of doctors working in hospital). A high degree of emotional exhaustion was found in 27.2% of participants (29.7% of fam ily physicians, 24.6% of doctors working in hospital), high depersonalization was found in 23.8% of participants (25.7% of family physicians, 22. 1% of doctors working in hospital), a low level of personal accomplishment was found in 39.7% of participants (37.8% of family physicians. 41.6% of doctors working in hospital). No statistically significant difference regarding stress degree, emotional exhaustion and depersonalizaion and personal accomplishment was found between hospital doctors and family physicians. The physicians aged over 45 years had a significantly (p = 0.030) higher level of emotional exhaustion than their younger colleagues. This study found that there was a high risk of burnout syndrome in physicians in the Republic of Srpska

  16. [Gens Rulandica-Hungarian connections of a famous German family of physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wix, G

    2000-01-01

    The Ruland family of German origin played an important role both in Hungarian and European medical history. Being a rather numerous family, and moreover, due to their habit of preferring to give the same first names to their children and because they worked in a relatively short period (ca. between 1550 and 1650), researchers often confuse one Ruland with the other. The present paper based on source-criticism, makes successful attempts to put the genealogy in order, presenting the history of the family, giving detailed biographies of each single Ruland and bringing together the bibliography of their works as well. As a result of her efforts the author puts a new light on the biographical data of the best known Ruland, namely of John David and at the same time she revisits the activity of John Ruland, who lived and worked in Hungary.

  17. Physician Acceptance of a Computerized Outpatient Medication System in a Teaching Hospital Group Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Blish, Christi; Proctor, Rita; Fletcher, Suzanne W.; O'Malley, Michael

    1983-01-01

    As part of a new automated ambulatory medical record, a computerized outpatient medication system was developed for a teaching hospital general medicine group practice. Seven months after its implementation, the system was evaluated to determine physician acceptance and approval. Practice physicians were surveyed, and 94% of the respondents approved of the system. Over 90% thought that the computerized system had improved the completeness and accuracy of medication information as well as thei...

  18. Lessons learnt from the MAGNET Malawian-German Hospital Partnership: the German perspective on contributions to patient care and capacity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhann, Florian; Barteit, Sandra

    2017-07-26

    Malawi is a low-income country with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates worldwide (Kendig et al., Trop Med Health 41:163-170, 2013). The health system depends largely on external funding. Official German development aid has supported health care in Malawi for many years (German Embassy Lilongwe, The German Development Cooperation in Malawi), including placing medical doctors in various departments of the Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Lilongwe. In 2008, a hospital partnership called MAGNET (Malawi German Networking for Capacity Building in Treatment, Training and Research at KCH) evolved as part of the German ESTHER network. The partnership was abruptly terminated in 2015. We reviewed 35 partnership documents and conducted an online survey of partnership stakeholders to retrospectively assess the hospital partnership based on the Capacity WORKS model of the German Corporation for International Cooperation (GIZ). This model evaluates systems' management and implementation to understand and support the functioning of cooperation within societies. Based on this model, we considered the five success factors for cooperation management: (1) strategy, (2) cooperation, (3) steering, (4) processes, and (5) learning and innovation. In an online survey, we used an adapted version of the partnership evaluation tool by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 2008 to 2015, the MAGNET partnership contributed to capacity building and improved patient care in the KCH Medical Department through clinical care, technical support, teaching and trainings, and operations research based on mutually agreed upon objectives. The MAGNET partnership was implemented in three phases during which there were changes in leadership in the Medical Department and the hospital, contractual policies, funder priorities and the competing influences of other actors. Communication and follow up among partners worked best during phases when a German doctor was onsite. The partnership

  19. [The Quality of the Family Physician-Patient Relationship. Patient-Related Predictors in a Sample Representative for the German Population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, Andreas; Schneider, Antonius; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar; Henningsen, Peter; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-03-01

    Patient-centeredness and a strong working alliance are core elements of family medicine. Surveys in Germany showed that most people are satisfied with the quality of the family physician-patient relationship. However, factors that are responsible for the quality of the family physician-patient relationship remain unclear. This study aimed at identifying patient-related predictors of the quality of this relationship. Participants of a cross-sectional survey representative for the general German population were assessed using standardized questionnaires. The perceived quality of the family physician-patient relationship was measured with the German version of the Patient-Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Associations of demographic and clinical variables (comorbidity, somatic symptom burden, psychological distress) with the quality of the family physician-patient relationship were assessed by applying hierarchical linear regression. 2278 participants (91,9%) reported having a family physician. The mean total score of the PDRQ-9 was high (M=4,12, SD=0,70). The final regression model showed that higher age, being female, and most notably less somatic and less depressive symptoms predicted a higher quality of the family physician-patient relationship. Comorbidity lost significance when somatic symptom burden was added to the regression model. The final model explained 11% of the variance, indicating a small effect. Experiencing somatic and depressive symptoms emerged as most relevant patient-related predictors of the quality of the family physician-patient relationship. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Reimbursement in hospital-based vascular surgery: Physician and practice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Jennifer L; Zwolak, Robert M; Goodney, Philip P; Rutherford, Gretchen A; Powell, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine change in value of a vascular surgery division to the health care system during 6 years at a hospital-based academic practice and to compare physician vs hospital revenue earned during this period. Total revenue generated by the vascular surgery service line at an academic medical center from 2010 through 2015 was evaluated. Total revenue was measured as the sum of physician (professional) and hospital (technical) net revenue for all vascular-related patient care. Adjustments were made for work performed, case complexity, and inflation. To reflect the effect of these variables, net revenue was indexed to work relative value units (wRVUs), case mix index, and consumer price index, which adjusted for work, case complexity, and inflation, respectively. Differences in physician and hospital net revenue were compared over time. Physician work, measured in RVUs per year, increased by 4%; case complexity, assessed with case mix index, increased by 10% for the 6-year measurement period. Despite stability in payer mix at 64% to 69% Medicare, both physician and hospital vascular-related revenue/wRVU decreased during this period. Unadjusted professional revenue/wRVU declined by 14.1% (P = .09); when considering case complexity, physician revenue/wRVU declined by 20.6% (P = .09). Taking into account both case complexity and inflation, physician revenue declined by 27.0% (P = .04). Comparatively, hospital revenue for vascular surgery services decreased by 13.8% (P = .07) when adjusting for unit work, complexity, and inflation. At medical centers where vascular surgeons are hospital based, vascular care reimbursement decreased substantially from 2010 to 2015 when case complexity and inflation were considered. Physician reimbursement (professional fees) decreased at a significantly greater rate than hospital reimbursement for vascular care. This trend has significant implications for salaried vascular surgeons in hospital

  1. The Ideal Hospital Discharge Summary: A Survey of U.S. Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorita, Atsushi; Robelia, Paul M; Kattel, Sharma B; McCoy, Christopher P; Keller, Allan Scott; Almasri, Jehad; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Newman, James S; Kashiwagi, Deanne T

    2017-09-06

    Hospital discharge summaries enable communication between inpatient and outpatient physicians. Despite existing guidelines for discharge summaries, they are frequently suboptimal. The aim of this study was to assess physicians' perspectives about discharge summaries and the differences between summaries' authors (hospitalists) and readers (primary care physicians [PCPs]). A national survey of 1600 U.S. physicians was undertaken. Primary measures included physicians' preferences in discharge summary standardization, content, format, and audience. A total of 815 physicians responded (response rate = 51%). Eighty-nine percent agreed that discharge summaries "should have a standardized format." Most agreed that summaries should "document everything that was done, found, and recommended in the hospital" (64%) yet "only include details that are highly pertinent to the hospitalization" (66%). Although 74% perceived patients as an important audience of discharge summaries, only 43% agreed that summaries "should be written in language that patients…can easily understand," and 68% agreed that it "should be written solely for provider-to-provider communication." Compared with hospitalists, PCPs preferred comprehensive summaries (68% versus 59%, P = 0.002). More PCPs agreed that separate summaries should be created for patients and for provider-to-provider communication than hospitalists (60% versus 47%, P summary" (44% versus 23%, P summary" (60% versus 38%, P summaries should have a standardized format but do not agree on how comprehensive or in what format they should be. Efforts are necessary to build consensus toward the ideal discharge summary.

  2. Collaboration of Physician, Pharmacist and Director Model Toward the Improvement of Teamwork Effectiveness in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widy S. Abdulkadir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration of physicians and pharmacists is very important in providing treatment to patients. Collaboration includes an exchange of views or ideas that give perspective to all collaborators. In order to make collaborative relationship optimal, all members of the different professions should have a desire to cooperate. Pharmacists and physicians should plan and practice as colleagues, work interdependence within the limits of the scope of practice with a variety of values and knowledge. The role of director in cooperation between doctor and pharmacist takes decision-making which refers to treatment of patients to be decided together between health professionals (physician and pharmacist. The study was a quasi-experimental design with a pre-test-post-test control group design, using paired t-test analysis. The study was conducted from October 2012 until February 2013. The paired t-test results showed that the variable of teamwork effectiveness in M. M. Dunda Hospital increased significantly (p=0.038, which means that the three-party (physician-pharmacist-director collaboration model may increase teamwork effectiveness. Three-party collaboration model can improve physician-pharmacist relationship in the hospital. Leadership has a positive and significant effect on employees’ organizational commitment. Director can be an inspiration in the work and determine the direction and goals of the organization. Therefore, the three-party (physician-pharmacist-director collaboration model can improve the quality of the relationship between the two professions, physician and pharmacist.

  3. An investigation on physicians' acceptance of hospital information systems: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rai-Fu; Hsiao, Ju-Ling

    2012-12-01

    Information technology is used to support a wide range of highly specified healthcare tasks and services. There is, therefore, a need to understand the factors affecting the acceptance of this technology by healthcare professionals. Physicians are key providers of healthcare services and are among the principal users of hospital information systems. Their acceptance of hospital information systems is hence of great significance when evaluating the success of those systems. The survey methodology was employed to targeted physicians in the selected case hospital for investigating factors affecting physicians' acceptance of hospital information systems. A total of 202 questionnaires were sent out, with 124 completed copies returned, indicating a valid response rate of 61.4%. We used structural equation modeling to analyze the data. The results indicated that top management support (γ=0.431, psystem quality (γ=0.369, pinformation systems. Physicians' perceptions of the usefulness (β=0.132, pinformation systems had a significant impact on the acceptance of the systems, accounting for 81.4% of total explained variance. Through the understanding of the identified critical factors affecting physicians' HIS acceptance, the planners and managers should ensure that hospital information systems to be introduced into a hospital are useful and ease to use. Effort should be focuses on providing sufficient top management support, selecting qualified project team members, and delivering higher system quality in addressing physicians' clinical needs. Thus, our research results can help planners and managers understand key considerations affecting HIS development and use, and may be used as a reference for system design, development and implementation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New arrangements, new scrutiny. The IRS reconsiders hospital-physician relationships at tax-exempt facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T J

    1992-01-01

    The pressure to maintain adequate operating margins has forced many not-for-profit hospitals to adopt more overtly competitive behavior than they have in the past. However, in struggling to remain economically viable, these facilities should carefully avoid actions that would threaten their tax-exempt status. Not-for-profit facilities should be particularly careful that their arrangements with physicians, which often appear designed to increase referrals, do not violate the criteria according to which the Internal Revenue Code extends tax exemption to charitable organizations. Section 501(c)(3) of the code exempts organizations "no part of the net earnings of which inures to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual." According to this provision, "insiders" (i.e., those with a personal interest in or opportunity to influence organization activities from the inside) are entitled to no more than reasonable payment for their goods or services. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) takes the position that, as employees or individuals having a close professional working relationship with a hospital, physicians are insiders. Thus a hospital that pays physicians what the IRS judges to be more than fair market value for services (or charges physicians less than fair market value for office rental) may find its exemption in jeopardy. If not-for-profit hospitals want to maintain their tax-exempt status, they must be certain the arrangements they enter into with physicians truly further their exempt purpose: to promote the health of the community.

  5. Measuring clinical management by physicians and nurses in European hospitals: development and validation of two scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plochg, Thomas; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Botje, Daan; Thompson, Caroline A; Klazinga, Niek S; Wagner, Cordula; Mannion, Russell; Lombarts, Kiki

    2014-04-01

    Clinical management is hypothesized to be critical for hospital management and hospital performance. The aims of this study were to develop and validate professional involvement scales for measuring the level of clinical management by physicians and nurses in European hospitals. Testing of validity and reliability of scales derived from a questionnaire of 21 items was developed on the basis of a previous study and expert opinion and administered in a cross-sectional seven-country research project 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe' (DUQuE). A sample of 3386 leading physicians and nurses working in 188 hospitals located in Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey. Validity and reliability of professional involvement scales and subscales. Psychometric analysis yielded four subscales for leading physicians: (i) Administration and budgeting, (ii) Managing medical practice, (iii) Strategic management and (iv) Managing nursing practice. Only the first three factors applied well to the nurses. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency ranged from 0.74 to 0.86 for the physicians, and from 0.61 to 0.81 for the nurses. Except for the 0.74 correlation between 'Administration and budgeting' and 'Managing medical practice' among physicians, all inter-scale correlations were measurement instrument can be used for international research on clinical management.

  6. [Anaesthesia education at german university hospitals: the teachers' perspective -- results of a nationwide survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, K; Steinfeldt, T; Wulf, H

    2006-04-01

    The principle purpose of this study was to collect data on the conditions and practice of anaesthesia education as well as the teaching qualification of consultants at German university hospitals. Based upon the collected data, areas of weakness and strength as well as measures required to improve anaesthesia training are described. A questionnaire containing 26 items was mailed to 607 consultants employed at 41 German university hospitals in June 2003. A total of 255 questionnaires was analysed (response rate: 43 %). Genuine training activities account for 14 % of the working hours of the participating consultants. On average, at the institutions of participating consultants, novices work for a duration of 1 month together with a consultant anaesthetist before they give anaesthetics without direct and constant supervision. When asked to describe the predominant method of training at their institution 71 % indicated "case-oriented teaching"; however, 53 % chose "see one, do one, teach one" and 49 % "learning by doing" as method of training as well (multiple choice). According to 63 % of respondents, departmental educational activities usually happen after their regular working hours. "Daily workload" (96 %), "time pressure" (96 %), "lack of time" (96 %) and "lack of personnel" (90 %) were indicated as the main obstacles of teaching. According to 80 % of respondents, a dedicated financial budget for education does not exist; instead, financial resources of third parties (industry) (58 %), of the state (for research und undergraduate education) (60 %) and of patients service (66 %) are used to ensure training of anaesthesia residents. Due to a lack of a dedicated financial budget for resident training and an increasing economic pressure, "lack of time" and "lack of personnel" are the main factors leading to the situation at German university hospitals that consultants can only spend 14 % of their working hours for teaching purposes despite of sufficient qualification

  7. Nursing practice in the prevention of pressure ulcers: an observational study of German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoviattalab, Khadijeh; Hashemizadeh, Haydeh; D'Cruz, Gibson; Halfens, Ruud J G; Dassen, Theo

    2015-06-01

    The study aimed to establish the range and extent of preventive interventions undertaken by nurses for patients who are at high risk of developing or currently have a pressure ulcer. Since 2000, the German National Expert Standard for the prevention of pressure ulcers has provided evidence-based recommendations, but limited studies have been published on its adherence in hospitals. There are also limited observational studies that investigated whether patients who are at risk of or have pressure ulcers are provided with appropriate preventative measures. A nonparticipant observational descriptive design was used. A sample of 32 adult patients who were at high risk of developing or currently had a pressure ulcer were observed during all shifts in medical and surgical wards in two general hospitals in Germany. A range of preventive interventions that were in line with the German National Expert Standard was observed. The most frequent preventive measures were 'cleaning the patients' skin' and 'minimizing exposure to moisture' that were undertaken in more than 90% of all patients. The least frequent measures were 'patient and relative education', 'assessment and recording of nutritional status'. This study demonstrates that the pressure ulcers preventive interventions as set out in the German National Expert Standard were not fully implemented. The study highlights the need for further studies on the barriers that impede the undertaking of the interventions that may prevent the development or deterioration of pressure ulcers and the delivery of evidence-based preventative care. This study provides an insight into the extent of pressure ulcers preventive practices used by nurses. The results may serve as a basis for developing an effective strategy to improve nursing practice in this area and the promotion of evidence-based practice. However, our results refer to two general hospitals and for a broader population, further studies with larger data samples are needed.

  8. The optimality of hospital financing system: the role of physician-manager interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crainich, David; Leleu, Hervé; Mauleon, Ana

    2008-12-01

    The ability of a prospective payment system to ensure an optimal level of both quality and cost reducing activities in the hospital industry has been stressed by Ma (Ma, J Econ Manage Strategy 8(2):93-112, 1994) whose analysis assumes that decisions about quality and costs are made by a single agent. This paper examines whether this result holds when the main decisions made within the hospital are shared between physicians (quality of treatment) and hospital managers (cost reduction). Ma's conclusions appear to be relevant in the US context (where the hospital managers pay the whole cost of treatment). Nonetheless, when physicians partly reimburse hospitals for the treatment cost as it is the case in many European countries, we show that the ability of a prospective payment system to achieve both objectives is sensitive to the type of interaction (simultaneous, sequential or joint decision-making) between the agents. Our analysis suggests that regulation policies in the hospital sector should not be exclusively focused on the financing system but should also take the interaction between physicians and hospital managers into account.

  9. Transfers from intensive care unit to hospital ward: a multicentre textual analysis of physician progress notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla N; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Kamran, Hasham; Bagshaw, Sean M; Fowler, Rob A; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Soo, Andrea; Stelfox, Henry T

    2018-01-28

    Little is known about documentation during transitions of patient care between clinical specialties. Therefore, we examined the focus, structure and purpose of physician progress notes for patients transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) to hospital ward to identify opportunities to improve communication breaks. This was a prospective cohort study in ten Canadian hospitals. We analyzed physician progress notes for consenting adult patients transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to hospital ward. The number, length, legibility and content of notes was counted and compared across care settings using mixed-effects linear regression models accounting for clustering within hospitals. Qualitative content analyses were conducted on a stratified random sample of 32 patients. A total of 447 patient medical records that included 7052 progress notes (mean 2.1 notes/patient/day 95% CI 1.9-2.3) were analyzed. Notes written by the ICU team were significantly longer than notes written by the ward team (mean lines of text 21 vs. 15, p notes; mean agreement of patient issues was 42% [95% CI 31-53%]. Qualitative analyses identified eight themes related to focus (central point - e.g., problem list), structure (organization, - e.g., note-taking style), and purpose (intention - e.g., documentation of patient course) of the notes that varied across clinical specialties and physician seniority. Important gaps and variations in written documentation during transitions of patient care between ICU and hospital ward physicians are common, and include discrepancies in documentation of patient information.

  10. Impact of HMO market structure on physician-hospital strategic alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, L R; Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Wholey, D R

    2000-04-01

    To assess the impact of HMO market structure on the formation of physician-hospital strategic alliances from 1993 through 1995. The two trends, managed care and physician-hospital integration have been prominent in reshaping insurance and provider markets over the past decade. Pooled cross-sectional data from the InterStudy HMO Census and the Annual Survey conducted by the American Hospital Association (AHA) between 1993 and the end of 1995 to examine the effects of HMO penetration and HMO numbers in a market on the formation of hospital-sponsored alliances with physicians. Because prior research has found nonlinear effects of HMOs on a variety of dependent variables, we operationalized HMO market structure two ways: using a Taylor series expansion and cross-classifying quartile distributions of HMO penetration and numbers into 16 dummy indicators. Alliance formation was operationalized using the presence of any alliance model (IPA, PHO, MSO, and foundation) and the sum of the four models present in the hospital. Because managed care and physician-hospital integration are endogenous (e.g., some hospitals also sponsor HMOs), we used an instrumental variables approach to model the determinants of HMO penetration and HMO numbers. These instruments were then used with other predictors of alliance formation: physician supply characteristics, the extent of hospital competition, hospital-level descriptors, population size and demographic characteristics, and indicators for each year. All equations were estimated at the MSA level using mixed linear models and first-difference models. Contrary to conventional wisdom, alliance formation is shaped by the number of HMOs in the market rather than by HMO penetration. This confirms a growing perception that hospital-sponsored alliances with physicians are contracting vehicles for managed care: the greater the number of HMOs to contract with, the greater the development of alliances. The models also show that alliance formation is

  11. Physicians interrupted by mobile devices in hospitals: understanding the interaction between devices, roles, and duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvoll, Terje; Scholl, Jeremiah; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-03-07

    A common denominator of modern hospitals is a variety of communication problems. In particular, interruptions from mobile communication devices are a cause of great concern for many physicians. To characterize how interruptions from mobile devices disturb physicians in their daily work. The gathered knowledge will be subsequently used as input for the design and development of a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communications suitable for hospitals. This study adheres to an ethnographic and interpretive field research approach. The data gathering consisted of participant observations, non-structured and mostly ad hoc interviews, and open-ended discussions with a selected group of physicians. Eleven physicians were observed for a total of 135 hours during May and June 2009. The study demonstrates to what degree physicians are interrupted by mobile devices in their daily work and in which situations they are interrupted, such as surgery, examinations, and during patients/relatives high-importance level conversations. The participants in the study expected, and also indicated, that wireless phones probably led to more interruptions immediately after their introduction in a clinic, when compared to a pager, but this changed after a short while. The unpleasant feeling experienced by the caller when interrupting someone by calling them differs compared to sending a page message, which leaves it up to the receiver when to return the call. Mobile devices, which frequently interrupt physicians in hospitals, are a problem for both physicians and patients. The results from this study contribute to knowledge being used as input for designing and developing a prototype for a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communication suitable for hospitals. We combined these findings with results from earlier studies and also involved actual users to develop the prototype, CallMeSmart. This system intends to reduce such interruptions and at the same time

  12. Physician Prescribing Practices of Vitamin D in a Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Kimberly B; Trigoboff, Eileen; Opler, Lewis; Demler, Tammie Lee

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D supplementation has become an increasingly popular prescribing practice, despite our limited knowledge of both the definition and degree of deficiency as well as the expected benefits or risks of exogenous administration. Many of the hypothesized benefits of vitamin D supplementation include a variety of improvements in mental health; however, these claims are not consistently or robustly supported by current research. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of what is currently known about vitamin D deficiency and about outcomes of supplementation as well as a summary of the data relative to prescribing practices for inpatients in an urban psychiatric hospital.

  13. The MeSH model for hospital-physician joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J G

    1985-01-01

    The MeSH (Medical Staff-Hospital Joint Venture Company) concept has arisen to meet the perceived need for hospital-physician cooperation in a modern age of prospective payment systems, increased supply of health-care providers, cost conscious consumers, corporate health care organizations, and a general trend toward industrialization of health care. Supply and demand economics have created a situation which threatens the autonomy and financial integrity of both hospitals ans physicians, forcing cooperation or mutual destruction. MeSH seeks to preserve the autonomy and financial integrity of both parties through the creation of a free-standing business entity jointly owned by a hospital and those members of its medical staff who choose to participate. This article presents reasons for the need for cooperation, the objectives of MeSH, a description of its structure and operation, and a list of potential projects the program could include.

  14. Innovative medical devices and hospital decision making: a study comparing the views of hospital pharmacists and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaux, Mathilde; Borget, Isabelle; Prognon, Patrice; Pineau, Judith; Martelli, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Many university hospitals have developed local health technology assessment processes to guide informed decisions about new medical devices. However, little is known about stakeholders' perceptions and assessment of innovative devices. Herein, we investigated the perceptions regarding innovative medical devices of their chief users (physicians and surgeons), as well as those of hospital pharmacists, because they are responsible for the purchase and management of sterile medical devices. We noted the evaluation criteria used to assess and select new medical devices and suggestions for improving local health technology assessment processes indicated by the interviewees. Methods We randomly selected 18 physicians and surgeons (nine each) and 18 hospital pharmacists from 18 French university hospitals. Semistructured interviews were conducted between October 2012 and August 2013. Responses were coded separately by two researchers. Results Physicians and surgeons frequently described innovative medical devices as 'new', 'safe' and 'effective', whereas hospital pharmacists focused more on economic considerations and considered real innovative devices to be those for which no equivalent could be found on the market. No significant difference in evaluation criteria was found between these groups of professionals. Finally, hospital pharmacists considered the management of conflicts of interests in local health technology assessment processes to be an issue, whereas physicians and surgeons did not. Conclusions The present study highlights differences in perceptions related to professional affiliation. The findings suggest several ways in which current practices for local health technology assessment in French university hospitals could be improved and studied. What is known about the topic? Hospitals are faced with ever-growing demands for innovative and costly medical devices. To help hospital management deal with technology acquisition issues, hospital

  15. Do hospital physicians really want to go digital? Acceptance of a picture archiving and communication system in a university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duyck, P.; Pynoo, B.; Devolder, P.; Voet, T.; Adang, L.; Vercruysse, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: radiology departments are making the transition from analog film to digital images by means of PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System). It is critical for the hospital that its physicians adopt and accept the new digital work method regarding radiological information. The aim of this study is to investigate hospital physicians' acceptance of PACS using questionnaires pre- and post-implementation and to identify main influencing factors. Materials and methods: the study was conducted in an 1169 bed university hospital. The UTAUT (Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology) questionnaire was administered at two times: one month pre-implementation (T1) and 1.5 years post-implementation (T2) of PACS, targeting all hospital physicians with the exemption of radiologists. The UTAUT scales (Behavioral Intention BI; Facilitating Conditions FC; Effort Expectancy EE; Performance Expectancy PE; Anxiety ANX; Social Influence SI; System Use USE; Attitude toward technology ATT; Self-Efficacy SE) were used to assess questions regarding: (a) PACS' usefulness, (b) PACS' ease of learning/using, (c) PACS support availability, (d) the perceived pressure to use PACS, (e) physicians' attitude towards PACS and (f) physicians' intention to use and actual use of PACS. Results: at T1 scale ratings were positive toward the PACS implementation. The ratings on all scales with the exception of self-efficacy improved at T2. Regression analysis revealed that the key factor for intention to use PACS at T1 was the usefulness of PACS, while the availability and awareness of support was its most important predictor at T2. Overall, PE was the best predictor of BI, but all four UTAUT-determinants (PE, FC, EE and SI) were salient for its prediction. Variance explained in BI ranged from 31 to 37% while variance explained in USE was very low (3%). (orig.)

  16. Implementing 'self-help friendliness' in German hospitals: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan, Alf; Nickel, Stefan; Kofahl, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    In Germany, the term 'self-help friendliness' (SHF) describes a strategy to institutionalize co-operation of healthcare institutions with mutual aid or self-help groups of chronically ill patients. After a short explanation of the SHF concept and its development, we will present findings from a longitudinal study on the implementation of SHF in three German hospitals. Specifically, we wanted to know (i) to what degree SHF had been put into practice after the initial development phase in the pilot hospitals, (ii) whether it was possible to maintain the level of implementation of SHF in the course of at least 1 year and (iii) which opinions exist about the inclusion of SHF criteria in quality management systems. With only minor restrictions, the findings provide support for the usefulness, practicability, sustainability and transferability of SHF. Limitations of our empirical study are the small number of hospitals, the above average motivation of their staff, the small response rate in the staff-survey and the inability to get enough data from members of self-help groups. The research instrument for measuring SHF was adequate and fulfils the most important scientific quality criteria in a German context. We conclude that the implementation of SHF leads to more patient-centredness in healthcare institutions and thus improves satisfaction, self-management, coping and health literacy of patients. SHF is considered as an adequate approach for reorienting healthcare institutions in the sense of the Ottawa Charta, and particularly suitable for health promoting hospitals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Consumer attitudes toward healthcare marketing practices: a comparison of hospitals vs. physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J S; Zallocco, R

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates consumer attitudes toward the use of marketing practices by the health care industry. The survey results show significant differences in consumers' attitude toward the use and effects of various marketing practices by the two types of provider (hospital and physician). Theoretical and empirical implications are discussed.

  18. Feasibility and acceptability of a workers' health surveillance program for hospital physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Martijn M.; Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2015-01-01

    A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) program is an occupational health strategy used to detect and address the health of individual workers to improve their ability to work. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians. All

  19. Hospital-physician collaboration: landscape of economic integration and impact on clinical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton Robert; Muller, Ralph W

    2008-09-01

    Hospital-physician relationships (HPRs) are an important area of academic research, given their impact on hospitals' financial success. HPRs also are at the center of several federal policy proposals such as gain sharing, bundled payments, and pay-for-performance (P4P). This article analyzes the HPRs that focus on the economic integration of hospitals and physicians and the goals that HPRs are designed to achieve. It then reviews the literature on the impact of HPRs on cost, quality, and clinical integration. The goals of the two parties in HPRs overlap only partly, and their primary aim is not reducing cost or improving quality. The evidence base for the impact of many models of economic integration is either weak or nonexistent, with only a few models of economic integration having robust effects. The relationship between economic and clinical integration also is weak and inconsistent. There are several possible reasons for this weak linkage and many barriers to further integration between hospitals and physicians. Successful HPRs may require better financial conditions for physicians, internal changes to clinical operations, application of behavioral skills to the management of HPRs, changes in how providers are paid, and systemic changes encompassing several types of integration simultaneously.

  20. Quantifying culture gaps between physicians and managers in Dutch hospitals: A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopper-Kes, A.H.J.; Siesling, Sabine; Meerdink, Nienke; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The demands in hospitals for safety and quality, combined with limitations in financing health care require effective cooperation between physicians and managers. The complex relationship between both groups has been described in literature. We aim to add a perspective to literature, by

  1. Taking care of hospital physicians: Development and implementation of a job-specific workers’ health surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    A Workers’ Health Surveillance (WHS) can serve as an occupational health strategy to maintain or promote work-related health and work functioning of employees. The aims of this thesis were to assess the evidence-based content of a job-specific WHS for hospital physicians (medical specialists and

  2. Building a Physician Culture for Healthcare Transformation: A Hospital's Leadership Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, Robert A; Solomon, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Engaging and integrating physicians has become the veritable "brass ring" for many hospital systems: many attempts and few actual wins. This is especially true in California's managed care environment and for public entities such as Palomar Health in Escondido, California. Our commitment to engage and integrate physicians continues to be a vital element of a larger cultural shift toward delivery of care that puts the patients' needs first. A key determinant of success has been the ability to align a diverse medical staff culture with administrative priorities. This alignment involves a carefully executed strategy and a structure to build a collective identity among diverse players. Palomar Health is in the third year of the journey. Some of the critical milestones have been the implementation of a physician leadership development process, creation of a physician onboarding process to codify the desired physician culture, delineation of roles and expectations for physician leadership, and formalization of dyad and triad partnerships between physicians and their clinical and administrative partners.

  3. [Clinical pharmacy: Evaluation of physician's satisfactions and expectations in a French regional hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, P; Lotito, A; Baysson, H; Pineau-Blondel, E; Berlioz, J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate physician's satisfaction with the clinical pharmacy activities in a French regional hospital. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews carried out by a public health intern with physicians from 14 different departments of medicine and surgery. A specifically designed questionnaire was used for this study. This contained 18 closed-ended questions, 3 open-ended questions and 6 questions relating to the multidisciplinary analysis of prescriptions of elderly patients. The questionnaire was proposed to 78 physicians, of which 62 replied (participation rate of 79%). Thirty-seven percent were interns (23/62), 19% were assistants (12/62) and 44% were senior physicians (27/62). Clinical pharmacy satisfaction levels were generally very high. In regard to clinical skills, 87% of the physicians were satisfied with pharmacists' competencies and 91% by the pertinence of transmitted information. Ninety-five percent of the physicians were also satisfied by the logistical aspect and the relationship with pharmacists (reactivity, availability and communication). Analysis of the open-ended questions showed that physicians were in favour of the increased presence of clinical pharmacists on the wards. This study shows a high level of physician satisfaction in relation to the clinical pharmacy activities in our hospital, and should be viewed as a strong endorsement of the work of the clinical pharmacy. This study highlights some areas of improvement such as increase presence of the clinical pharmacists on the wards. In order to assess periodically our activity, this study must be repeated in the future. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Work and Training Conditions of Young German Physicians in Internal Medicine - Results of a Second Nationwide Survey by Young Internists from the German Society of Internal Medicine and the German Professional Association of Internists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspe, Matthias; Vogelgesang, Anja; Fendel, Johannes; Weiß, Cornelius; Schulte, Kevin; Rolling, Thierry

    2018-04-01

     Medical specialty training is the basis for career development of young internists and it is vital for the delivery of high-quality medical care. In 2014 the young internists of two professional bodies in Germany conducted a survey among their young members and described major factors influencing training and working conditions. We present the results of a follow-up survey to describe changes of these factors over time. An additional focus is set on the difficulties of balancing medical career and family.  In the end of 2016 we conducted an online-based survey of all members in training of the German Society of Internal Medicine (DGIM) and the Professional Association of German Internists (BDI). The questionnaire used in the 2014 survey was modified and items investigating the balance between career and family were added.  A total of 1587 questionnaires were returned and analysed. Mayor findings did not change over time. Psychosocial strain remains very high among medical trainees in internal medicine. A structured training curriculum and meaningful feedback are associated with lower psychosocial strain and higher work satisfaction. Internists - and here especially women - with children experience the daily balance of medical career and family as extremely challenging.  These results demonstrate that there is still a serious need for adjusting training and working conditions of young internists in Germany. Especially the role and increasing importance of female physicians has to be recognized by enabling a successful integration of medical career and family. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. The German clinical risk management survey for hospitals: Implementation levels and areas for improvement in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Tanja; Frings, Janina; Heuser, Gregory; Mc Dermott, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing recognition of the need to implement systematic approaches for managing the risks associated with healthcare, few studies have investigated the level of implementation for clinical risk management (CRM) at a national level. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the current level of CRM implementation in German hospitals and to explore differences across hospital types. From March to June 2015, persons responsible for CRM in 2,617 hospitals and rehabilitation clinics in Germany were invited to participate in a voluntary online survey assessing the level of implementation for various aspects of CRM: CRM strategy, structures and processes; risk assessment (risk identification, risk analysis, risk evaluation) with a focus on incident reporting systems; risk mitigation measures; and risk monitoring and reporting. 572 hospitals participated in the survey (response rate 22 %). Most of these hospitals had a formalised, binding CRM strategy (72 %). 66 % had a centralised and 34 % a decentralised CRM structure. We also found that, despite a broad range of risk assessment methods being applied, there was a lack of integration of risk information from different data sources. Hospitals also reported a high level of implementation of critical incident reporting systems with a strong preference for local (74 %) over transorganisational systems. This study provides relevant data to inform targeted interventions concerning CRM implementation at a national level and to consider the specific context of different types of hospitals more carefully in this process. The approach to CRM assessment illustrated in this article could be the basis of a system for monitoring CRM over time and, thus, for evaluating the impact of strategy decisions at the policy level on CRM development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Wide variation in hospital and physician payment rates evidence of provider market power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2010-11-01

    Wide variation in private insurer payment rates to hospitals and physicians across and within local markets suggests that some providers, particularly hospitals, have significant market power to negotiate higher-than-competitive prices, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Looking across eight health care markets--Cleveland; Indianapolis; Los Angeles; Miami; Milwaukee; Richmond, Va.; San Francisco; and rural Wisconsin--average inpatient hospital payment rates of four large national insurers ranged from 147 percent of Medicare in Miami to 210 percent in San Francisco. In extreme cases, some hospitals command almost five times what Medicare pays for inpatient services and more than seven times what Medicare pays for outpatient care. Variation within markets was just as dramatic. For example, the hospital with prices at the 25th percentile of Los Angeles hospitals received 84 percent of Medicare rates for inpatient care, while the hospital with prices at the 75th percentile received 184 percent of Medicare rates. The highest-priced Los Angeles hospital with substantial inpatient claims volume received 418 percent of Medicare. While not as pronounced, significant variation in physician payment rates also exists across and within markets and by specialty. Few would characterize the variation in hospital and physician payment rates found in this study to be consistent with a highly competitive market. Purchasers and public policy makers can address provider market power, or the ability to negotiate higher-than-competitive prices, through two distinct approaches. One is to pursue market approaches to strengthen competitive forces, while the other is to constrain payment rates through regulation.

  7. [Subjective Workload, Job Satisfaction, and Work-Life-Balance of Physicians and Nurses in a Municipal Hospital in a Rural Area Compared to an Urban University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Michael; Schmid, Klaus; Drexler, Hans; Kiesel, Johannes

    2018-05-01

    Medical and nursing shortages in rural areas represent a current serious public health problem. The healthcare of the rural population is at risk. This study compares perceived workload, job satisfaction and work-life balance of physicians and nurses at a clinic in a rural area with two clinics of a University hospital. Physicians and nurses were interviewed anonymously with a standardized questionnaire (paper and pencil), including questions on job satisfaction, subjective workload and work-life balance. The response rate was almost 50% in the University hospital as well as in the municipal hospital. 32 physicians and 54 nurses from the University hospital and 18 physicians and 137 nurses from the municipal hospital participated in the survey. Nurses at the University hospital assessed the organization of the daily routine with 94.1% as better than those at the municipal hospital (82.4%, p=0.03). Physicians at the University hospital were able to better implement acquired knowledge at a University clinic with 87.5% than their counterparts at the municipal hospital (55.5%, p=0.02). In contrast to their colleagues at the municipal hospital, only 50% of the physicians at the University hospital subjectively considered their workload as just right (83.3% municipal, p=0.02). 96.9% of the physicians at the University hospital were "daily" or "several times a week" under time pressure (municipal 50%, pwork and family life (62.9% University hospital, 72.8% Municipal hospital). In contrast, only 20% of the physicians at the University Hospital but 42.9% of the physicians of the municipal hospital had sufficient opportunities to balance workload and family (p=0.13). The return rate of almost 50% can be described as good. Due to the small number of physicians, especially from the municipal hospital, it can be assumed that some interesting differences could not be detected. There were only slight differences between the nurses from the two hospitals. In contrast, subjective

  8. Medical Aid, Repression, and International Relations: The East German Hospital at Metema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowy, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, the German Democratic Republic (GDR) built a hospital in a remote part of Ethiopia, close to the Sudanese border. The project evolved in a complex combination of contexts, including the general foreign policy goals of the GDR, its specific alliance with Ethiopia, the famine of 1984-85, civil war in Ethiopia, and a controversial resettlement program by the government of Mengistu Haile Mariam. Though almost unknown today, it was a high-profile project at the time, which received the personal support both by Erich Honecker in the GDR and Mengistu Haile Mariam in Ethiopia. However, their interest was directed more at the political goals the project was expected to serve than at the hospital itself. Both the preparation and the implementation of the project were extremely difficult and almost failed due to problems of transportation, of red tape, and of security. The operation of the hospital was also not ideal, involving frustrated personnel and less than complete acceptance by the local population. Ironically, for all its practical difficulties, the hospital has outlived both governments and their political goals, surviving as a medical institution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Family Physician's Perceived Role in Preventing and Guiding Hospital Admissions at the End of Life: A Focus Group Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyniers, T.; Houttekier, D.; Pasman, H.R.; Stichele, R.V.; Cohen, J.; Deliens, L.

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS Family physicians face many different and complex roles and difficulties in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life. Enhancing the family physician’s role as a gatekeeper to hospital services, offering the physicians more end-of-life care training, and developing or

  10. Clinical experience and skills of physicians in hospital cardiac arrest teams in Denmark: a nationwide study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauridsen KG

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kasper G Lauridsen,1–3 Anders S Schmidt,1–3 Philip Caap,3,4 Rasmus Aagaard,2,3,5 Bo Løfgren1,3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Clinical Research Unit, Regional Hospital of Randers, Randers, 3Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, 4Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Randers Regional Hospital, Denmark Background: The quality of in-hospital resuscitation is poor and may be affected by the clinical experience and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training. This study aimed to investigate the clinical experience, self-perceived skills, CPR training and knowledge of the guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation among physicians of cardiac arrest teams. Methods: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional study in Denmark. Telephone interviews were conducted with physicians in the cardiac arrest teams in public somatic hospitals using a structured questionnaire. Results: In total, 93 physicians (53% male from 45 hospitals participated in the study. Median age was 34 (interquartile range: 30–39 years. Respondents were medical students working as locum physicians (5%, physicians in training (79% and consultants (16%, and the median postgraduate clinical experience was 48 (19–87 months. Most respondents (92% felt confident in treating a cardiac arrest, while fewer respondents felt confident in performing intubation (41% and focused cardiac ultrasound (39% during cardiac arrest. Median time since last CPR training was 4 (2–10 months, and 48% had attended a European Resuscitation Council (ERC Advanced Life Support course. The majority (84% felt confident in terminating resuscitation; however, only 9% were able to state the ERC guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation. Conclusion: Physicians of Danish cardiac arrest teams are often inexperienced and do not feel competent performing important clinical skills during resuscitation. Less than half have

  11. Measurement equivalence of patient safety climate in Chinese hospitals: can we compare across physicians and nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junya

    2018-06-11

    Self-report instruments have been widely used to better understand variations in patient safety climate between physicians and nurses. Research is needed to determine whether differences in patient safety climate reflect true differences in the underlying concepts. This is known as measurement equivalence, which is a prerequisite for meaningful group comparisons. This study aims to examine the degree of measurement equivalence of the responses to a patient safety climate survey of Chinese hospitals and to demonstrate how the measurement equivalence method can be applied to self-report climate surveys for patient safety research. Using data from the Chinese Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Climate from six Chinese hospitals in 2011, we constructed two groups: physicians and nurses (346 per group). We used multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses to examine progressively more stringent restrictions for measurement equivalence. We identified weak factorial equivalence across the two groups. Strong factorial equivalence was found for Organizational Learning, Unit Management Support for Safety, Adequacy of Safety Arrangements, Institutional Commitment to Safety, Error Reporting and Teamwork. Strong factorial equivalence, however, was not found for Safety System, Communication and Peer Support and Staffing. Nevertheless, further analyses suggested that nonequivalence did not meaningfully affect the conclusions regarding physician-nurse differences in patient safety climate. Our results provide evidence of at least partial equivalence of the survey responses between nurses and physicians, supporting mean comparisons of its constructs between the two groups. The measurement equivalence approach is essential to ensure that conclusions about group differences are valid.

  12. Monitoring technology and firm boundaries: physician-hospital integration and technology utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Jeffrey S; Snir, Eli M

    2010-05-01

    We study the relationship between physician-hospital integration and its relation to monitoring IT utilization. We develop a theoretical model in which monitoring IT may complement or substitute for integration and test these relationships using a novel data source. Physician labor market heterogeneity identifies the empirical model. We find that monitoring IT utilization is increasing in integration, implying that expanded firm boundaries complement monitoring IT adoption. We argue that the relationship between monitoring IT and firm boundaries depends upon the contractibility of the monitored information.

  13. Quantifying culture gaps between physicians and managers in Dutch hospitals: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerdink Nienke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The demands in hospitals for safety and quality, combined with limitations in financing health care require effective cooperation between physicians and managers. The complex relationship between both groups has been described in literature. We aim to add a perspective to literature, by developing a questionnaire which provides an opportunity to quantitatively report and elaborate on the size and content of differences between physicians and managers. Insight gained from use of the questionnaire might enable us to reflect on these differences and could provide practical tools to improve cooperation between physicians and managers, with an aim to enhance hospital performance. Methods The CG-Questionnaire was developed by adjusting, pre-testing, and shortening Kralewski's questionnaire, and appeared suitable to measure culture gaps. It was shortened by exploratory factor analysis, using principal-axis factoring extraction with Varimax rotation. The CG-Questionnaire was sent to all physicians and managers within 37 Dutch general hospitals. ANOVA and paired sample T-tests were used to determine significant differences between perceptions of daily work practices based in both professional cultures; culture gaps. The size and content of culture gaps were determined with descriptive statistics. Results The total response (27% consisted of 929 physicians and 310 managers. The Cronbachs alpha's were 0.70 - 0.79. Statistical analyses showed many differences; culture gaps were found in the present situation; they were even larger in the preferred situation. Differences between both groups can be classified into three categories: (1 culture gaps in the present situation and not in the preferred, (2 culture gaps in the preferred situation and not in the present, and (3 culture gaps in both situations. Conclusions With data from the CG-Questionnaire it is now possible to measure the size and content of culture gaps between physicians and

  14. Scientific activity and working hours of physicians in university hospitals: results from the Innsbruck and Salzburg physician lifestyle assessment (TISPLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Bernhard; Colvin, Hans Peter; Rieder, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Controllable lifestyle has become an important factor influencing career decision-making among physicians. In academic medicine, doctors are required to combine both patient care and research in their daily routine. Insufficient release of clinicians for research during contracted work hours may lead to increased weekly working hours in academic medical centers and deter medical graduates from academia. We tested for an association between numbers of scientific publications and an increased hourly workload among physicians. This was a cross-sectional online survey among all salaried physicians working in the university hospitals of Innsbruck and Salzburg, Austria. The main outcome measures were the self-reported total number of scientific papers published in peer-reviewed medical journals over the past two years and self-reported working hours. Of 590 returned surveys, 393 were fully completed and included in the study. The sample was stratified into three groups according to scientific output in the past two years: Group A, >/= 6 publications; Group B, 1-5 publications; Group C, no publications. Men were more likely than women to have a scientific publication: in Group A there was a male predominance of 75%, whereas in Group C only 48% were men (P = 0.0034). A total of 59% (n = 232) of all participants had not published a scientific article in the past two years (Group C) and worked a mean of 58.3 +/- 12 h/week. Physicians in Group B (n = 113) had published 2.4 +/- 1.4 papers and worked 62.8 +/- 12.9 h/week; those in Group A (n = 48) had published 11.5 +/- 6.6 papers and worked 73 +/- 13.1 h/week (P work time but for 60% of overtime hours, reflecting the fact that research was mainly performed during overtime. Research activity among clinicians in academic medical centers is associated with significantly increased overtime hours. Measures need to be taken to allow medical graduates an academic career at reasonable impairment of personal lifestyle.

  15. Reduction of Hospital Physicians' Workflow Interruptions: A Controlled Unit-Based Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weigl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly interruptive clinical environments may cause work stress and suboptimal clinical care. This study features an intervention to reduce workflow interruptions by re-designing work and organizational practices in hospital physicians providing ward coverage. A prospective, controlled intervention was conducted in two surgical and two internal wards. The intervention was based on physician quality circles - a participative technique to involve employees in the development of solutions to overcome work-related stressors. Outcome measures were the frequency of observed workflow interruptions. Workflow interruptions by fellow physicians and nursing staff were significantly lower after the intervention. However, a similar decrease was also observed in control units. Additional interviews to explore process-related factors suggested that there might have been spill-over effects in the sense that solutions were not strictly confined to the intervention group. Recommendations for further research on the effectiveness and consequences of such interventions for professional communication and patient safety are discussed.

  16. Assessing Hospital Physicians' Acceptance of Clinical Information Systems: A Review of the Relevant Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Pynoo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the tremendous potential benefits of clinical information systems (CIS for the quality of patient care; it is hard to understand why not every CIS is embraced by its targeted users, the physicians. The aim of this study is to propose a framework for assessing hospital physicians' CIS-acceptance that can serve as a guidance for future research into this area. Hereto, a review of the relevant literature was performed in the ISI Web-of-Science database. Eleven studies were withheld from an initial dataset of 797 articles. Results show that just as in business settings, there are four core groups of variables that influence physicians' acceptance of a CIS: its usefulness and ease of use, social norms, and factors in the working environment that facilitate use of the CIS (such as providing computers/workstations, compatibility between the new and existing system.... We also identified some additional variables as predictors of CIS-acceptance.

  17. How to Define the Content of a Job-Specific Worker's Health Surveillance for Hospital Physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenburg, Martijn M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2016-03-01

    A job-specific Worker's Health Surveillance (WHS) for hospital physicians is a preventive occupational health strategy aiming at early detection of their diminished work-related health in order to improve or maintain physician's health and quality of care. This study addresses what steps should be taken to determine the content of a job-specific WHS for hospital physicians and outlines that content. Based on four questions, decision trees were developed for physical and psychological job demands and for biological, chemical, and physical exposures to decide whether or not to include work-related health effects related to occupational exposures or aspects of health reflecting insufficient job requirements. Information was gathered locally through self-reporting and systematic observations at the workplace and from evidence in international publications. Information from the decision trees on the prevalence and impact of the health- or work-functioning effect led to inclusion of occupational exposures (e.g., biological agents, emotionally demanding situations), job requirements (e.g., sufficient vision, judging ability), or health effects (e.g., depressive symptoms, neck complaints). Additionally, following the Dutch guideline for occupational physicians and based on specific job demands, screening for cardiovascular diseases, work ability, drug use, and alcohol consumption was included. Targeted interventions were selected when a health or work functioning problem existed and were chosen based on evidence for effectiveness. The process of developing a job-specific WHS for hospital physicians was described and the content presented, which might serve as an example for other jobs. Before implementation, it must first be tested for feasibility and acceptability.

  18. Medical tourism in India: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadeer, Imrana; Reddy, Sunita

    2013-12-17

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians' however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  19. Vertical Integration of Hospitals and Physicians: Economic Theory and Empirical Evidence on Spending and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Brady; Buchmueller, Tom; Ryan, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    Hospital-physician vertical integration is on the rise. While increased efficiencies may be possible, emerging research raises concerns about anticompetitive behavior, spending increases, and uncertain effects on quality. In this review, we bring together several of the key theories of vertical integration that exist in the neoclassical and institutional economics literatures and apply these theories to the hospital-physician relationship. We also conduct a literature review of the effects of vertical integration on prices, spending, and quality in the growing body of evidence ( n = 15) to evaluate which of these frameworks have the strongest empirical support. We find some support for vertical foreclosure as a framework for explaining the observed results. We suggest a conceptual model and identify directions for future research. Based on our analysis, we conclude that vertical integration poses a threat to the affordability of health services and merits special attention from policymakers and antitrust authorities.

  20. NATO mission in Kosovo: historical backgrounds and informations of working as radiologist in the German field hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelk, M.; Danz, B.

    2005-01-01

    The first part of this article describes how the NATO mission in Kosovo came into existence and focuses on the historical background and ethnical problems. The second part deals with the working conditions of a radiologist in the German field hospital in Prizren and focuses on the personnel and technical equipment in the radiological department. (orig.) [de

  1. Strategies to enhance rational use of antibiotics in hospital : a guideline by the German Society for Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de With, K.; Allerberger, F.; Amann, S.; Apfalter, P.; Brodt, H. -R.; Eckmanns, T.; Fellhauer, M.; Geiss, H. K.; Janata, O.; Krause, R.; Lemmen, S.; Meyer, E.; Mittermayer, H.; Porsche, U.; Presterl, E.; Reuter, S.; Sinha, B.; Strauss, R.; Wechsler-Foerdoes, A.; Wenisch, C.; Kern, W. V.

    In the time of increasing resistance and paucity of new drug development there is a growing need for strategies to enhance rational use of antibiotics in German and Austrian hospitals. An evidence-based guideline on recommendations for implementation of antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programmes was

  2. Physicians reading and writing practices: a cross-sectional study from Civil Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the behavior of physicians regarding medical literature reading and participation in research activities at one of the largest teaching hospitals in Pakistan. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing the house officers, residents and fellows of six major specialties (Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Psychology, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Anesthesia in Civil Hospital, Karachi between August and December, 2011. The questionnaire elicited responses regarding the reading habits of physicians, preferred sources of information, their participation in research activities (publication & supervision and views regarding journal club. SPSS 17.0 was used for data entry and analysis. Result A total of 259 completely filled questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 85.19%. Mean age of the participants was 29.67 ± 7.65 years. Books were selected by 71.4% doctors as their preferred source of information, regardless of their clinical specialties. (p  Conclusion Urgent intervention is required to promote healthcare literature reading and writing practice in our physicians. Easy access to workplace computers with internet and subscription of paid journals will facilitate physicians. Lack of supervisors and busy schedule were reported to be important contributors for not participating in research. Addressing these issues will encourage doctors to participate more in research activities.

  3. Association Between Treatment by Locum Tenens Internal Medicine Physicians and 30-Day Mortality Among Hospitalized Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel M; Olenski, Andrew R; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Jena, Anupam B

    2017-12-05

    Use of locum tenens physicians has increased in the United States, but information about their quality and costs of care is lacking. To evaluate quality and costs of care among hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries treated by locum tenens vs non-locum tenens physicians. A random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized during 2009-2014 was used to compare quality and costs of hospital care delivered by locum tenens and non-locum tenens internal medicine physicians. Treatment by locum tenens general internal medicine physicians. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included inpatient Medicare Part B spending, length of stay, and 30-day readmissions. Differences between locum tenens and non-locum tenens physicians were estimated using multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for beneficiary clinical and demographic characteristics and hospital fixed effects, which enabled comparisons of clinical outcomes between physicians practicing within the same hospital. In prespecified subgroup analyses, outcomes were reevaluated among hospitals with different levels of intensity of locum tenens physician use. Of 1 818 873 Medicare admissions treated by general internists, 38 475 (2.1%) received care from a locum tenens physician; 9.3% (4123/44 520) of general internists were temporarily covered by a locum tenens physician at some point. Differences in patient characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, and reason for admission between locum tenens and non-locum tenens physicians were not clinically relevant. Treatment by locum tenens physicians, compared with treatment by non-locum tenens physicians (n = 44 520 physicians), was not associated with a significant difference in 30-day mortality (8.83% vs 8.70%; adjusted difference, 0.14%; 95% CI, -0.18% to 0.45%). Patients treated by locum tenens physicians had significantly higher Part B spending ($1836 vs $1712; adjusted difference, $124; 95% CI, $93 to $154

  4. Outcomes of planned home birth with registered midwife versus planned hospital birth with midwife or physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Patricia A; Saxell, Lee; Page, Lesley A; Klein, Michael C; Liston, Robert M; Lee, Shoo K

    2009-09-15

    Studies of planned home births attended by registered midwives have been limited by incomplete data, nonrepresentative sampling, inadequate statistical power and the inability to exclude unplanned home births. We compared the outcomes of planned home births attended by midwives with those of planned hospital births attended by midwives or physicians. We included all planned home births attended by registered midwives from Jan. 1, 2000, to Dec. 31, 2004, in British Columbia, Canada (n = 2889), and all planned hospital births meeting the eligibility requirements for home birth that were attended by the same cohort of midwives (n = 4752). We also included a matched sample of physician-attended planned hospital births (n = 5331). The primary outcome measure was perinatal mortality; secondary outcomes were obstetric interventions and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. The rate of perinatal death per 1000 births was 0.35 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00-1.03) in the group of planned home births; the rate in the group of planned hospital births was 0.57 (95% CI 0.00-1.43) among women attended by a midwife and 0.64 (95% CI 0.00-1.56) among those attended by a physician. Women in the planned home-birth group were significantly less likely than those who planned a midwife-attended hospital birth to have obstetric interventions (e.g., electronic fetal monitoring, relative risk [RR] 0.32, 95% CI 0.29-0.36; assisted vaginal delivery, RR 0.41, 95% 0.33-0.52) or adverse maternal outcomes (e.g., third- or fourth-degree perineal tear, RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.28-0.59; postpartum hemorrhage, RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49-0.77). The findings were similar in the comparison with physician-assisted hospital births. Newborns in the home-birth group were less likely than those in the midwife-attended hospital-birth group to require resuscitation at birth (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.14-0.37) or oxygen therapy beyond 24 hours (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.24-0.59). The findings were similar in the comparison with

  5. Physician use of updated anti-virus software in a tertiary Nigerian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabes, E P; Nyango, D D; Ayedima, M M; Ladep, N G

    2010-01-01

    While physicians are becoming increasingly dependent on computers and the internet, highly lethal malware continue to be loaded into cyberspace. We sought to assess the proportion of physicians with updated anti-virus software in Jos University Teaching Hospital Nigeria and to determine perceived barriers to getting updates. We used a pre-tested semi-structured self-administered questionnaire to conduct a cross-sectional survey among 118 physicians. The mean age (+/- SD) of subjects was 34 (+/- 4) years, with 94 male and 24 female physicians. Forty-two (36.5%) of 115 physicians with anti-virus software used an updated program (95% Cl: 27, 45). The top-three antivirus software were: McAfee 40 (33.9%), AVG 37 (31.4%) and Norton 17 (14.4%). Common infections were: Trojan horse 22 (29.7%), Brontok worm 8 (10.8%), and Ravmonlog.exe 5 (6.8%). Internet browsing with a firewall was an independent determinant for use of updated anti-virus software [OR 4.3, 95% CI, 1.86, 10.02; P malware producers and anti-virus software developers.

  6. Physician job satisfaction in Saudi Arabia: insights from a tertiary hospital survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrees, Turki; Al-Eissa, Sami; Badri, Motasim; Aljuhayman, Ahmed; Zamakhshary, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Job satisfaction refers to the extent to which people like or dislike their job. Job satisfaction varies across professions. Few studies have explored this issue among physicians in Saudi Arabia. The objective of this study is to determine the level and factors associated with job satisfaction among Saudi and non-Saudi physicians. In this cross-sectional study conducted in a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, a 5-point Likert scale structured questionnaire was used to collect data on a wide range of socio-demographic, practice environment characteristics and level and consequences of job satisfaction from practicing physicians (consultants or residents) across different medical specialties. Logistic regression models were fitted to determine factors associated with job satisfaction. Of 344 participants, 300 (87.2%) were Saudis, 252 (73%) males, 255 (74%) married, 188 (54.7%) consultants and age [median (IQR)] was 32 (27-42.7) years. Overall, 104 (30%) respondents were dissatisfied with their jobs. Intensive care physicians were the most dissatisfied physicians (50%). In a multiple logistic regression model, income satisfaction (odds ratio [OR]=0.448 95% CI 0.278-0.723, P job satisfaction identified in this study should be addressed in governmental strategic planning aimed at improving the healthcare system and patient care.

  7. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants: preparing new providers for hospital medicine at the mayo clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychalla, Megan T; Heathman, Joanne H; Pearson, Katherine A; Herber, Andrew J; Newman, James S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital medicine is a growing field with an increasing demand for additional healthcare providers, especially in the face of an aging population. Reductions in resident duty hours, coupled with a continued deficit of medical school graduates to appropriately meet the demand, require an additional workforce to counter the shortage. A major dilemma of incorporating nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants (NPPAs) into a hospital medicine practice is their varying academic backgrounds and inpatient care experiences. Medical institutions seeking to add NPPAs to their hospital medicine practice need a structured orientation program and ongoing NPPA educational support. This article outlines an NPPA orientation and training program within the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine (HIM) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. In addition to a practical orientation program that other institutions can model and implement, the division of HIM also developed supplemental learning modalities to maintain ongoing NPPA competencies and fill learning gaps, including a formal NPPA hospital medicine continuing medical education (CME) course, an NPPA simulation-based boot camp, and the first hospital-based NPPA grand rounds offering CME credit. Since the NPPA orientation and training program was implemented, NPPAs within the division of HIM have gained a reputation for possessing a strong clinical skill set coupled with a depth of knowledge in hospital medicine. The NPPA-physician model serves as an alternative care practice, and we believe that with the institution of modalities, including a structured orientation program, didactic support, hands-on learning, and professional growth opportunities, NPPAs are capable of fulfilling the gap created by provider shortages and resident duty hour restrictions. Additionally, the use of NPPAs in hospital medicine allows for patient care continuity that is otherwise missing with resident practice models.

  8. Attitudes on euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide and terminal sedation--a survey of the members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Busch, H C; Oduncu, F S; Woskanjan, S; Klaschik, E

    2004-01-01

    Due to recent legislations on euthanasia and its current practice in the Netherlands and Belgium, issues of end-of-life medicine have become very vital in many European countries. In 2002, the Ethics Working Group of the German Association for Palliative Medicine (DGP) has conducted a survey among its physician members in order to evaluate their attitudes towards different end-of-life medical practices, such as euthanasia (EUT), physician-assisted suicide (PAS), and terminal sedation (TS). An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the 411 DGP physicians, consisting of 14 multiple choice questions on positions that might be adopted in different hypothetical scenarios on situations of "intolerable suffering" in end-of-life care. For the sake of clarification, several definitions and legal judgements of different terms used in the German debate on premature termination of life were included. For statistical analysis t-tests and Pearson-correlations were used. The response rate was 61% (n = 251). The proportions of the respondents who were opposed to legalizing different forms of premature termination of life were: 90% opposed to EUT, 75% to PAS, 94% to PAS for psychiatric patients. Terminal sedation was accepted by 94% of the members. The main decisional bases drawn on for the answers were personal ethical values, professional experience with palliative care, knowledge of alternative approaches, knowledge of ethical guidelines and of the national legal frame. In sharp contrast to similar surveys conducted in other countries, only a minority of 9.6% of the DGP physicians supported the legalization of EUT. The misuse of medical knowledge for inhumane killing in the Nazi period did not play a relevant role for the respondents' negative attitude towards EUT. Palliative care needs to be stronger established and promoted within the German health care system in order to improve the quality of end-of-life situations which subsequently is expected to lead to decreasing requests

  9. ["At times I had to be an allopathic medical officer and then again I was allowed to be a homoeopathic physician." Homoeopathy and war from the Franco-German War (1870/71) to World War I (1914-1918)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    With its focus on the Franco-German War and World War I the present paper constitutes a first approach to the comprehensive topic of "homoeopathy and war". Sources used include articles from homoeopathic magazines, homoeopathic specialist literature, material from the estate of the homoeopathic lay organization "Hahnemannia" and individual testimonies from non-homoeopaths. The paper begins by examining the importance of the two wars for research into the history of homoeopathy compared to previous conflicts and demonstrates the value of the sources used. A brief outline of homoeopathy and the military forces in the decades before 1870 provides insight into the historical context. This is followed by the investigation of homoeopathic war hospitals at home with an analysis of the attitude of the homoeopathic physicians and lay-healers involved. The paper also describes the difficult relationship between homoeopathy and conventional medicine during the two conflicts.

  10. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  11. Medical work Assessment in German hospitals: a Real-time Observation study (MAGRO – the study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mache Stefanie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing economic pressure characterizes the current situation in health care and the need to justify medical decisions and organizational processes due to limited financial resources is omnipresent. Physicians tend to interpret this development as a decimation of their own medical influence. This becomes even more obvious after a change in hospital ownership i.e. from a public to a private profit oriented organization. In this case each work procedure is revised. To date, most research studies have focused mainly on differences between hospitals of different ownership regarding financial outcomes and quality of care, leaving important organizational issues unexplored. Little attention has been devoted to the effects of hospital ownership on physicians' working routines. The aim of this observational real time study is to deliver exact data about physicians' work at hospitals of different ownership. Methods The consequences of different management types on the organizational structures of the physicians' work situation and on job satisfaction in the ward situation are monitored by objective real time studies and multi-level psycho diagnostic measurements. Discussion This study is unique in its focus. To date no results have been found for computer-based real time studies on work activity in the clinical field in order to objectively evaluate a physician's work-related stress. After a complete documentation of the physicians' work processes the daily work flow can be estimated and systematically optimized. This can stimulate an overall improvement of health care services in Germany.

  12. Medical tourism in india: perceptions of physicians in tertiary care hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding of MT, their views of the hospitals they work in, perceptions of the value and place of MT in their hospital and their views on the implications of MT for medical care in the country. An overwhelming majority (90%) of physicians in the private tertiary sector and 74.3 percent in the public tertiary sector see huge scope for MT in the private tertiary sector in India. The private tertiary sector physicians were concerned about their patients alone and felt that health of the poor was the responsibility of the state. The public tertiary sector physicians’ however, were sensitive to the problems of the common man and felt responsible. Even though the glamour of hi-tech associated with MT dazzled them, only 35.8 percent wanted MT in their hospitals and a total of 56 percent of them said MT cannot be a public sector priority. 10 percent in the private sector expressed reservations towards MT while the rest demanded state subsidies for MT. The disconnect between their concern for the common man and professionals views on MT was due to the lack of appreciation of the continuum between commercialisation, the denial of resources to public hospitals and shift of subsidies to the private sector. The paper highlights the differences and similarities in the perceptions and context of the two sets of physicians, presents evidence, that questions the support for MT and finally analyzes some key implications of MT on Indian health services, ethical

  13. Awareness of Stroke Risk after TIA in Swiss General Practitioners and Hospital Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Sven; Baumann, Philippe; Barth, Jürgen; Mattle, Heinrich P; Arnold, Marcel; Bassetti, Claudio L; Meli, Damian N; Fischer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are stroke warning signs and emergency situations, and, if immediately investigated, doctors can intervene to prevent strokes. Nevertheless, many patients delay going to the doctor, and doctors might delay urgently needed investigations and preventative treatments. We set out to determine how much general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians (HPs) knew about stroke risk after TIA, and to measure their referral rates. We used a structured questionnaire to ask GPs and HPs in the catchment area of the University Hospital of Bern to estimate a patient's risk of stroke after TIA. We also assessed their referral behavior. We then statistically analysed their reasons for deciding not to immediately refer patients. Of the 1545 physicians, 40% (614) returned the survey. Of these, 75% (457) overestimated stroke risk within 24 hours, and 40% (245) overestimated risk within 3 months after TIA. Only 9% (53) underestimated stroke risk within 24 hours and 26% (158) underestimated risk within 3 months; 78% (473) of physicians overestimated the amount that carotid endarterectomy reduces stroke risk; 93% (543) would rigorously investigate the cause of a TIA, but only 38% (229) would refer TIA patients for urgent investigations "very often". Physicians most commonly gave these reasons for not making emergency referrals: patient's advanced age; patient's preference; patient was multimorbid; and, patient needed long-term care. Although physicians overestimate stroke risk after TIA, their rate of emergency referral is modest, mainly because they tend not to refer multimorbid and elderly patients at the appropriate rate. Since old and frail patients benefit from urgent investigations and treatment after TIA as much as younger patients, future educational campaigns should focus on the importance of emergency evaluations for all TIA patients.

  14. Awareness of Stroke Risk after TIA in Swiss General Practitioners and Hospital Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Streit

    Full Text Available Transient ischemic attacks (TIA are stroke warning signs and emergency situations, and, if immediately investigated, doctors can intervene to prevent strokes. Nevertheless, many patients delay going to the doctor, and doctors might delay urgently needed investigations and preventative treatments. We set out to determine how much general practitioners (GPs and hospital physicians (HPs knew about stroke risk after TIA, and to measure their referral rates.We used a structured questionnaire to ask GPs and HPs in the catchment area of the University Hospital of Bern to estimate a patient's risk of stroke after TIA. We also assessed their referral behavior. We then statistically analysed their reasons for deciding not to immediately refer patients.Of the 1545 physicians, 40% (614 returned the survey. Of these, 75% (457 overestimated stroke risk within 24 hours, and 40% (245 overestimated risk within 3 months after TIA. Only 9% (53 underestimated stroke risk within 24 hours and 26% (158 underestimated risk within 3 months; 78% (473 of physicians overestimated the amount that carotid endarterectomy reduces stroke risk; 93% (543 would rigorously investigate the cause of a TIA, but only 38% (229 would refer TIA patients for urgent investigations "very often". Physicians most commonly gave these reasons for not making emergency referrals: patient's advanced age; patient's preference; patient was multimorbid; and, patient needed long-term care.Although physicians overestimate stroke risk after TIA, their rate of emergency referral is modest, mainly because they tend not to refer multimorbid and elderly patients at the appropriate rate. Since old and frail patients benefit from urgent investigations and treatment after TIA as much as younger patients, future educational campaigns should focus on the importance of emergency evaluations for all TIA patients.

  15. Youth and young adults with cerebral palsy: their use of physician and hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nancy L; Gilbert, Thomas K; McCormick, Anna; Ayling-Campos, Anne; Boydell, Katherine; Law, Mary; Fehlings, Darcy L; Mukherjee, Shubhra; Wedge, John H; Williams, Jack I

    2007-06-01

    To examine patterns of health care utilization among youth and young adults who have cerebral palsy (CP) and to provide information to guide the development of health services for adults who have CP. This study analyzed health insurance data for outpatient physician visits and hospital admissions for a 4-year period. Six children's treatment centers in Ontario, Canada. The sample included 587 youth and 477 adults with CP identified from health records. Youths were 13 to 17 years of age, and adults were 23 to 32 years of age at the end of the data range. Not applicable. We computed the annual rates of outpatient physician visits and hospitalizations per 1000 persons and compared these with rates for the general population. Annual rates of outpatient physician visits were 6052 for youth and 6404 for adults with CP, 2.2 times and 1.9 times higher, respectively, than rates for age-matched peers (P<.01). Specialists provided 28.4% of youth visits but only 18.8% of adult visits. Annual hospital admission rates were 180 for youth and 98 for adults with CP, 4.3 times and 10.6 times higher, respectively, than rates for age-matched peers (P<.01). It appears that youth and adults with CP continue to have complex care needs and rely heavily on the health care system. Comprehensive services are essential to support their health as they move into youth and adulthood. However, there appear to be gaps in the adult health care system, such as limited access to specialist physicians.

  16. The ties that bind: an integrative framework of physician-hospital alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemmel Paul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alignment between physicians and hospitals is of major importance to the health care sector. Two distinct approaches to align the medical staff with the hospital have characterized previous research. The first approach, economic integration, is rooted in the economic literature, in which alignment is realized by financial means. The second approach, noneconomic integration, represents a sociological perspective emphasizing the cooperative nature of their relationship. Discussion Empirical studies and management theory (agency theory and social exchange theory are used to increase holistic understanding of physician hospital alignment. On the one hand, noneconomic integration is identified as a means to realize a cooperative relationship. On the other hand, economic integration is studied as a way to align financial incentives. The framework is developed around two key antecedent factors which play an important role in aligning the medical staff. First, provider financial risk bearing is identified as a driving force towards closer integration. Second, organizational trust is believed to be important in explaining the causal relation between noneconomic and economic integration. Summary Hospital financial risk bearing creates a greater need for closer cooperation with the medical staff and alignment of financial incentives. Noneconomic integration lies at the very basis of alignment. It contributes directly to alignment through the norm of reciprocity and indirectly by building trust with the medical staff, laying the foundation for alignment of financial incentives.

  17. The ties that bind: an integrative framework of physician-hospital alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Annemans, Lieven

    2011-02-15

    Alignment between physicians and hospitals is of major importance to the health care sector. Two distinct approaches to align the medical staff with the hospital have characterized previous research. The first approach, economic integration, is rooted in the economic literature, in which alignment is realized by financial means. The second approach, noneconomic integration, represents a sociological perspective emphasizing the cooperative nature of their relationship. Empirical studies and management theory (agency theory and social exchange theory) are used to increase holistic understanding of physician hospital alignment. On the one hand, noneconomic integration is identified as a means to realize a cooperative relationship. On the other hand, economic integration is studied as a way to align financial incentives. The framework is developed around two key antecedent factors which play an important role in aligning the medical staff. First, provider financial risk bearing is identified as a driving force towards closer integration. Second, organizational trust is believed to be important in explaining the causal relation between noneconomic and economic integration. Hospital financial risk bearing creates a greater need for closer cooperation with the medical staff and alignment of financial incentives. Noneconomic integration lies at the very basis of alignment. It contributes directly to alignment through the norm of reciprocity and indirectly by building trust with the medical staff, laying the foundation for alignment of financial incentives.

  18. Physician's practices and perspectives regarding tobacco cessation in a teaching hospital in Mysore City, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saud, Mohammed; Madhu, B; Srinath, K M; Ashok, N C; Renuka, M

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco is a leading cause of disease and premature death. Most of the smokers visit a doctor for various health related ailments and thus such clinic visits provide many opportunities for interventions and professional tobacco cessation advice. The primary aim of the following study is to assess the physician practices, perspectives, resources, barriers and education relating to tobacco cessation and their perceived need for training for the same. The secondary aim is to compare the physician's cessation practices from patient's perspective. A descriptive study was conducted in a hospital attached to Medical College in Mysore city, Karnataka. Information about doctor's practices, perspectives and their perceived need for training in tobacco cessation were collected using pre-structured self-administered Questionnaire, which were distributed in person. Patient's practices and perspectives were assessed using a pre-structured Oral Questionnaire. Almost 95% of physicians said that they ask patients about their smoking status and 94% advise them to quit smoking, but only 50% assist the patient to quit smoking and only 28% arrange follow-up visits. Thus, they do not regularly provide assistance to help patients quit, even though 98% of the physicians believed that helping patients to quit was a part of their role. Only 18% and 35% of the physicians said that Undergraduate Medical Education and Post Graduate Medical Education respectively prepared them very well to participate in smoking cessation activities. Tobacco cessation requires repeated and regular assistance. Such assistance is not being provided to patients by attending doctors. Our medical education system is failing to impart the necessary skills to doctors, needed to help patients quit smoking. Reforms in education are needed so as to prepare the physician to effectively address this problem.

  19. [Exposure to limited resources in the gastroenterology - results of a survey of hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkemeyer, L; Reifferscheid, A; Pomorin, N; Wasem, J

    2016-11-01

    Background and research question: The hospital sector is currently characterized by a high economic pressure. As well the DRG system as the investment financing by the federal states imply financial limitations. Hospitals react to this situation by trying to reduce costs and to increase case volume. It is questionable whether and to what extent patient care and the working conditions of the physicians are affected by these circumstances. Especially, gastroenterological patients were considered to be insufficiently covered by the DRG system in the past. Therefore, this study focuses on the gastroenterology. Method: Based on prior studies and several semi-structured interviews with gastroenterologists working in hospitals a discipline-specific questionnaire was developed. Three versions of the questionnaire were differentiated to correspond to the respective experiences of the target population (chief physician, senior physician, assistant physician). All in all, 1751 members of the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gastroenterologie, Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten" (DGVS) were addressed. The questionnaire was answered by 642 participants resulting in a response rate of 36.7 %. The answers were interpreted by using descriptive and multivariate analyses. Results: A significant economic pressure is perceived by the participating gastroenterologists. This pressure manifests itself primary in perceived deficits in nursing care and human attention towards the patients. Moreover, the work satisfaction is negatively affected. Identified difficulties in the personnel recruitment can only be partially attributed to economic reasons. However, rationing of services is relatively seldom. Also, a financially-oriented overprovision is not perceived as a primary concern. In general, assistant physicians were a bit more skeptical about the situation in the gastroenterology, e. g. patient care, than the chief physicians. Conclusions: In total, the situation in the

  20. Differences within the groups of physicians and managers in Dutch hospitals providing leads for intergroup cooperation : Running head: group differences in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Willem H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Effective cooperation between physicians and managers is difficult to achieve but is an important factor in successfully implementing improvement initiatives in hospitals. Intergroup literature suggests that large differences between groups hinder effective cooperation. - Purposes:

  1. Consensus on the leadership of hospital CEOs and its impact on the participation of physicians in improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dückers, Michel L A; Stegeman, Inge; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Wagner, Cordula; Sanders, Karin; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2009-08-01

    The success of a Dutch program to disseminate quality improvement projects depends on the participation of physicians working in program hospitals. The leadership of hospital executives (CEOs) is considered an important explanation. This study aims to determine whether the relation, between the extent to which physicians notice their CEOs stimulate improvement initiatives and the number of projects joined by physicians, is moderated by the consensus among physicians working in the same hospital. Multilevel analyses are applied on data of 286 physicians from eight hospitals to: (1) estimate whether participation depends on noticing if CEOs stimulate improvement, (2) test if an individual's participation differs when more colleagues have the same opinion (effect modification). Significant moderator effects are found. The participation of physicians, noticing that CEOs stimulate improvement is higher when more colleagues share this opinion. For physicians not knowing whether improvement is encouraged, higher consensus coincides with lower participation. Project involvement of physicians depends on their consensus about encouragement by CEOs. This confirms the importance of strategic leaders in dissemination programs. Further research is recommended into causes of CEO leadership visibility and methods to strengthen leadership climate.

  2. Physician' entrepreneurship explained: a case study of intra-organizational dynamics in Dutch hospitals and specialty clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelewijn, Wout T; de Rover, Matthijs; Ehrenhard, Michel L; van Harten, Wim H

    2014-05-19

    Challenges brought about by developments such as continuing market reforms and budget reductions have strained the relation between managers and physicians in hospitals. By applying neo-institutional theory, we research how intra-organizational dynamics between physicians and managers induce physicians to become entrepreneurs by starting a specialty clinic. In addition, we determine the nature of this change by analyzing the intra-organizational dynamics in both hospitals and clinics. For our research, we interviewed a total of fifteen physicians and eight managers in four hospitals and twelve physicians and seven managers in twelve specialty clinics. We found evidence that in becoming entrepreneurs, physicians are influenced by intra-organizational dynamics, including power dependence, interest dissatisfaction, and value commitments, between physicians and managers as well as among physicians' groups. The precise motivation for starting a new clinic can vary depending on the medical or business logic in which the entrepreneurs are embedded, but also the presence of an entrepreneurial nature or nurture. Finally we found that the entrepreneurial process of starting a specialty clinic is a process of sedimented change or hybridized professionalism in which elements of the business logic are added to the existing logic of medical professionalism, leading to a hybrid logic. These findings have implications for policy at both the national and hospital level. Shared ownership and aligned incentives may provide the additional cement in which the developing entrepreneurial values are 'glued' to the central medical logic.

  3. Patient experience with outpatient encounters at public hospitals in Shanghai: Examining different aspects of physician services and implications of overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Fan, Guanrong; Zou, Dongdong; Wang, Tong; Xue, Di

    2017-01-01

    Over 90% of outpatient care in China was delivered at public hospitals, making outpatient experience in this setting an important aspect of quality of care. To assess outpatient experience with different aspects of physician services at China's public hospitals and its association with overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Retrospective analysis of a large survey of outpatient experience in Shanghai, China. We tested the hypotheses that patient experience was poorer with physician-patient communication, education, and shared decision-making and where and when there was greater overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Ordered logistic models were estimated separately for general and specialty hospitals. 7,147 outpatients at 40 public hospitals in Shanghai, China, in 2014. Patient experience with physician services were self-reported based on 12 questions as part of a validated instrument. Indicators of overcrowding included time of visit (morning vs. afternoon, Monday vs. rest of the week) and hospital outpatient volume in the first half of 2014. Overall, patients reported very favorable experience with physician services. Two out of the 12 questions pertaining to both communication and shared decision-making consistently received lower ratings. Hospitals whose outpatient volumes were in the top two quartiles received lower patient ratings, but the relationship achieved statistical significance among specialty hospitals only. Inadequate physician-patient communication and shared decision-making and hospital overcrowding compromise outpatient experience with physician services at Chinese public hospitals. Effective diversion of patients with chronic and less complex conditions to community health centers will be critical to alleviate the extreme workloads at hospitals with high patient volumes and, in turn, improve patient experience.

  4. Hospital Nurses' and Physicians' Use of Information Sources during their Production of Discharge Summaries: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hellesø, Ragnhild; Sogstad, Maren Kristine Raknes

    2014-01-01

    Hospital nurses' and physicians' production and exchange of accurate information between levels of care are crucial for ensuring safe and seamless care for patients in transition. We report on a study in which we explored hospital providers' use of information sources when they prepared discharge information for colleges in the community health-care sector. In this cross-sectional study, 510 nurses and 236 physicians responded through a questionnaire. Our findings show that nurses and physici...

  5. Workplace violence against physicians and nurses in Palestinian public hospitals: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence against healthcare workers in Palestinian hospitals is common. However, this issue is under researched and little evidence exists. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences and possible risk factors for workplace violence against nurses and physicians working in public Palestinian hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional approach was employed. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on different aspects of workplace violence against physicians and nurses in five public hospitals between June and July 2011. The questionnaires were distributed to a stratified proportional random sample of 271 physicians and nurses, of which 240 (88.7%) were adequately completed. Pearson’s chi-square analysis was used to test the differences in exposure to physical and non-physical violence according to respondents’ characteristics. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess potential associations between exposure to violence (yes/no) and the respondents’ characteristics using logistic regression model. Results The majority of respondents (80.4%) reported exposure to violence in the previous 12 months; 20.8% physical and 59.6% non-physical. No statistical difference in exposure to violence between physicians and nurses was observed. Males’ significantly experienced higher exposure to physical violence in comparison with females. Logistic regression analysis indicated that less experienced (OR: 8.03; 95% CI 3.91-16.47), and a lower level of education (OR: 3; 95% CI 1.29-6.67) among respondents meant they were more likely to be victims of workplace violence than their counterparts. The assailants were mostly the patients' relatives or visitors, followed by the patients themselves, and co-workers. Consequences of both physical and non-physical violence were considerable. Only half of victims received any type of treatment. Non-reporting of violence was a concern, main reasons were lack of

  6. Workplace violence against physicians and nurses in Palestinian public hospitals: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitaneh Mohamad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence against healthcare workers in Palestinian hospitals is common. However, this issue is under researched and little evidence exists. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences and possible risk factors for workplace violence against nurses and physicians working in public Palestinian hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional approach was employed. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on different aspects of workplace violence against physicians and nurses in five public hospitals between June and July 2011. The questionnaires were distributed to a stratified proportional random sample of 271 physicians and nurses, of which 240 (88.7% were adequately completed. Pearson’s chi-square analysis was used to test the differences in exposure to physical and non-physical violence according to respondents’ characteristics. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess potential associations between exposure to violence (yes/no and the respondents’ characteristics using logistic regression model. Results The majority of respondents (80.4% reported exposure to violence in the previous 12 months; 20.8% physical and 59.6% non-physical. No statistical difference in exposure to violence between physicians and nurses was observed. Males’ significantly experienced higher exposure to physical violence in comparison with females. Logistic regression analysis indicated that less experienced (OR: 8.03; 95% CI 3.91-16.47, and a lower level of education (OR: 3; 95% CI 1.29-6.67 among respondents meant they were more likely to be victims of workplace violence than their counterparts. The assailants were mostly the patients' relatives or visitors, followed by the patients themselves, and co-workers. Consequences of both physical and non-physical violence were considerable. Only half of victims received any type of treatment. Non-reporting of violence was a concern, main

  7. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  8. [Work engagement of hospital physicians: do social capital and personal traits matter?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanne Lehner, Birgit; Kowalski, Christoph; Wirtz, Markus; Ansmann, Lena; Driller, Elke; Ommen, Oliver; Oksanen, Tuula; Pfaff, Holger

    2013-03-01

    Work engagement has been proven to be a viable indicator of physical and mental well-being at work. Research findings have shown a link between work engagement and both individual and organizational resources. The aim of the present study is to test the hypothesized relationships between personal traits (Big-5), the quality of the social work environment (social capital) and work engagement among hospital (n=35) physicians (n=387) in North-Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Structural equation modeling (SEM), combining confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and path analysis, was employed to conduct the statistical analyses. The results of the SEM indicated that social capital and neuroticism were significantly associated with work engagement. The relationship between agreeableness and work engagement was fully mediated by social capital. Findings suggest that social capital plays a key role in promoting work engagement of physicians. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. A theory of physician-hospital integration: contending institutional and market logics in the health care field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas G; Shortell, Stephen M; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes a theory of physician-hospital integration. The theory is developed by building on three streams of scholarship: "new" institutionalism, "old" institutionalism, and the theory of economic markets. The theory uses several key concepts from these theoretical frameworks, including the notions of environmental demands for legitimacy, market demands for efficiency, and agency. To enhance the predictive power of the theory, two new concepts are introduced: directionality of influence between institutional and market forces at the macro-societal level, and degree of separation of institutional and market domains at the local level--which add important predictive power to the theory. Using these concepts, a number of hypotheses are proposed regarding the ideal types of physician-hospital arrangements that are likely to emerge under different combinations of directionality of influence and institutional and market domain separation. Moreover, the theory generates hypotheses regarding organizational dynamics associated with physician-hospital integration, including the conditions associated with high and low prevalence of physician-hospital integration, the extent to which the integrated organization is physician-centric or hospital-centric, and whether physician-hospital integration is likely to be based on loose contractual arrangements or tight, ownership-based arrangements.

  10. Nasal Carriage of Uncommon Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci in Nurses and Physicians of Tehran University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Salimi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS have been identified as a major cause of nosocomial infections. Nasal carriage of CoNS in nurses and physicians is known to be an important risk factor for potential hospital infections. This study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of nasal carriage of uncommon coagulase-negative staphylococci among nurse and physician staffs of Tehran University Hospitals. A total of 116 CoNS were isolated from anterior nares of the study participants working in different wards of the hospitals. Thirteen uncommon CoNS were identified using phenotypic and biochemical methods, were subsequently confirmed by API kits. Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus capitis species accounted for 53.85%, 30.77%, and 15.38% from the isolates, respectively. Six isolates (46.15% were found to be resistant to methicillin. In conclusion, screening of healthcare workers for uncommon CoNS colonization along with identification and testing for susceptibility of cultured isolates is of paramount importance in strengthening effective nosocomial infection control and prevention measures.

  11. Risky procedures by nurses in hospitals: problems and (contemplated) refusals of orders by physicians, and views of physicians and nurses: a questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, J.; Cuperus-Bosma, J.M.; van der Jagt, M.A.; Gevers, J.K.M.; van der Wal, G.

    2005-01-01

    Occurrence of problems with, refusals of orders and contemplated refusals of orders for risky procedures by nurses in Dutch hospitals and views on the safety of performance was studied using postal questionnaires (600 physicians and 3200 nurses, response 60-71%). Of the respondents, 11-30%

  12. Utilization of Total Joint Arthroplasty in Physician-Owned Specialty Hospitals vs Acute Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Pflug, Emily; O'Brien, Daniel; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2017-07-01

    The recent emergence of physician-owned specialty hospitals has sparked controversy about overutilization. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare utilization patterns of total joint arthroplasty (TJA) between physician-specialty hospitals (PSHs) and acute care hospitals (ACHs). A retrospective study was conducted from January 2010 to August 2014 comparing primary TJA patients between a PSH and an ACH; 103 PSH patients were matched to 103 ACH patients by age, gender, BMI, and ASA classification with similar case distribution between facilities. All surgeons in the study operated at both hospitals and were shareholders of the PSH. Information on nonoperative treatments, and timing to the initial appointment, consent, and surgery were analyzed using univariate analysis. Nonoperative treatments before surgery were similar between hospitals (P = 1.00). The time from the initial appointment to consent was longer for PSH (P = .0001). However, the time from consent to the date of surgery (P = .04) and the timing from symptoms to initial appointment (P = .006) was shorter for PSH. The time from initial appointment to the day of surgery was similar between groups (P = .20). Patients were more likely to be consented for surgery on their first clinic visit when undergoing surgery at ACH (87 of 103, 84.4%) compared to PSH (61 of 103; 59.2%; P total knee arthroplasty (P = .001) and total hip arthroplasty patients (P = .001) at PSH. Facility ownership in PSH resulted in similar conservative treatment before TJA. The time to surgical consent after the initial appointment was longer PSH, whereas the time from consent to the date of surgery was shorter at the PSH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Consumer attitudes about health care acquired infections: a German survey on factors considered important in the choice of a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonberg, Ralf-Peter; Sander, Carsten; Gastmeier, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Most patients are free in their choice of hospital for nonemergency admissions. In a nationwide survey in 1000 German households, we interviewed randomly chosen persons (age 14 and older) by phone about what they consider important when choosing a hospital. A standardized questionnaire was used. Additionally, question order was randomized prior to each interview. Demographic data included age, gender, education, and previous admissions to hospitals. Categories that might influence the choice of hospital included "distance to hospital," "friendly staff," "staff-to-patient ratio," "cleanliness," "nosocomial infection rate," "own experiences," "friend's opinion," and "facility's reputation in public media." General cleanliness, low nosocomial infection rates, and friendly staff proved to be the most important issues in our study. In contrast, the reputation of the health care facility in the public media was much less important. It seems that kindness and basic hygiene measures, both quite inexpensive factors, are key issues for patients.

  14. French hospital nurses' opinion about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: a national phone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiane, M K; Bouhnik, A-D; Galinier, A; Favre, R; Obadia, Y; Peretti-Watel, P

    2009-04-01

    Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient's request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses' opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of 1502 French hospital nurses. We studied factors associated with opinions towards euthanasia and PAS, including contextual factors related to hospital units with random-effects logistic models. Overall, 48% of nurses supported legalisation of euthanasia and 29%, of PAS. Religiosity, training in pallative care/pain management and feeling competent in end-of-life care were negatively correlated with support for legalisation of both euthanasia and PAS, while nurses working at night were more prone to support legalisation of both. The support for legalisation of euthanasia and PAS was also weaker in pain treatment/palliative care and intensive care units, and it was stronger in units not benefiting from interventions of charity/religious workers and in units with more nurses. Many French hospital nurses uphold the legalisation of euthanasia and PAS, but these nurses may be the least likely to perform what proponents of legalisation call "good" euthanasia. Improving professional knowledge of palliative care could improve the management of end-of-life situations and help to clarify the debate over euthanasia.

  15. The impact of professional and organizational identification on the relationship between hospital-physician exchange and customer-oriented behaviour of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; De Caluwé, Gaelle; Verleye, Katrien; Gemmel, Paul; Annemans, Lieven

    2015-02-17

    Hospitals face increasingly competitive market conditions. In this challenging environment, hospitals have been struggling to build high-quality hospital-physician relationships. In the literature, two types of managerial strategies for optimizing relationships have been identified. The first focuses on optimizing the economic relationship; the second focuses on the noneconomic dimension and emphasizes the cooperative structure and collaborative nature of the hospital-physician relationship. We investigate potential spillover effects between the perceptions of physicians of organizational exchange and their customer-oriented behaviors. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 130 self-employed physicians practicing at six Belgian hospitals. Economic exchange was measured using the concept of distributive justice (DJ); noneconomic exchange was measured by the concept of perceived organizational support (POS). Our outcomes consist of three types of customer-oriented behaviours: internal influence (II), external representation (ER), and service delivery (SD). Our results show a positive relationship between DJ and II (adjusted R(2) = 0.038, t = 2.35; p = 0.028) and ER (adjusted R(2) = 0.15, t = 4.59; p relationship between POS and II (adjusted R(2) = 0.032, t = 2.26; p = 0.026) and ER (adjusted R(2) = 0.22, t = 5.81; p relationship was present between DJ (p = 0.54) or POS (p = 0.57) and SD. Organizational identification positively moderates the relationship between POS and ER (p = 0.045) and between DJ and ER (p = 0.056). The relationships between POS and II (p = 0.54) and between DJ and II (p = 0.99) were not moderated by OI. Professional identification did not moderate the studied relationships. Our results demonstrate that both perceptions of economic and noneconomic exchange are important to self-employed physicians' customer-oriented behaviours. Fostering organizational identification could enhance this reciprocity dynamic.

  16. The family physician's perceived role in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Pasman, H Roeline; Stichele, Robert Vander; Cohen, Joachim; Deliens, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Family physicians play a pivotal role in providing end-of-life care and in enabling terminally ill patients to die in familiar surroundings. The purpose of this study was to explore the family physicians' perceptions of their role and the difficulties they have in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life. Five focus groups were held with family physicians (N= 39) in Belgium. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a constant comparative approach. Five key roles in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life were identified: as a care planner, anticipating future scenarios; as an initiator of decisions in acute situations, mostly in an advisory manner; as a provider of end-of-life care, in which competency and attitude is considered important; as a provider of support, particularly by being available during acute situations; and as a decision maker, taking overall responsibility. Family physicians face many different and complex roles and difficulties in preventing and guiding hospital admissions at the end of life. Enhancing the family physician's role as a gatekeeper to hospital services, offering the physicians more end-of-life care training, and developing or expanding initiatives to support them could contribute to a lower proportion of hospital admissions at the end of life. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  17. Family physician-patient relationship and frequent attendance of primary and specialist health care: Results from a German population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, Andreas; Schneider, Antonius; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the association between the quality of the family physician-patient relationship and frequent attendance of primary and specialist health care. Cross-sectional survey of a representative German population sample (N=2.266). Family physician-patient relationship was assessed with the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Determinants of frequent attendance were analyzed using logistic regression. Frequent attendance of family physicians was associated with lower income (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.02-2.00), not being in paid work (OR 1.58, CI 1.08-2.30), psychological distress (OR 1.14, CI 1.07-1.22), somatic symptoms (OR 1.07, CI 1.04-1.11), and physical comorbidity (OR 1.54, CI 1.36-1.74) in the multivariate analysis. Frequent attendance of specialists was related to psychological distress (OR 1.12, CI 1.04-1.20), somatic symptoms (OR 1.08, CI 1.04-1.11), and physical comorbidity (OR 1.69, CI 1.48-1.93) in the multivariate analysis. Quality of the relationship was associated with frequent attendance only in the univariate analyses. A stronger relationship with the family physician was not associated with reduced contact with specialists. The quality of the family physician-patient relationship is not independently associated with frequent attendance. Family physicians should be aware that need factors, i.e. symptom burden and physical comorbidities, are main drivers of frequent attendance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors associated with patients' choice of physician in the Korean population: Database analyses of a tertiary hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidong Kim

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the factors influencing patients' choice of physician at the first visit through database analysis of a tertiary hospital in South Korea. We collected data on the first treatments performed by physicians who had treated patients for at least 3 consecutive years over 10 years (from 2003 to 2012 from the database of Seoul National University's affiliated tertiary hospital. Ultimately, we obtained data on 524,012 first treatments of 319,004 patients performed by 115 physicians. Variables including physicians' age and medical school and patients' age were evaluated as influencing factors for the number of first treatments performed by each physician in each year using a Poisson regression through generalized estimating equations with a log link. The number of first treatments decreased over the study period. Notably, the relative risk for first treatments was lower among older physicians than among younger physicians (relative risk 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 0.98. Physicians graduating from Seoul National University (SNU also had a higher risk for performing first treatments than did those not from SNU (relative risk 1.58; 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 2.10. Finally, relative risk was also higher among older patients than among younger patients (relative risk 1.03; 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.04. This study systematically demonstrated that physicians' age, whether the physician graduated from the highest-quality university, and patients' age all related to patients' choice of physician at the first visit in a tertiary university hospital. These findings might be due to Korean cultural factors.

  19. The trend of pressure ulcer prevalence rates in German hospitals: results of seven cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Wilborn, Doris; Dassen, Theo; Lahmann, Nils

    2009-05-01

    Pressure ulcer prevalence rates provide useful information about the magnitude of this health problem. Only limited information on pressure ulcers in Germany was available before 2001. The purpose of this study was to compare results of seven pressure ulcer prevalence surveys which were conducted annually between 2001 and 2007 and to explore whether pressure ulcer prevalence rates decreased. The second aim was to evaluate if the measured prevalence rates of our sample could be generalised for all German hospitals. Results of seven point pressure ulcer prevalence studies conducted in 225 German hospitals were analysed. Chi-square tests, chi-square trend tests and one-way ANOVA to assess differences and trends across the years were applied. The sample was stratified according to pressure ulcer risk and speciality. Finally, study samples were compared with the potential population. In total data of 40,247 hospital patients were analysed. The overall pressure ulcer prevalence rate in German hospitals was 10.2%. Patient samples of each year were comparable regarding gender, age and pressure ulcer risk. Pressure ulcer prevalence rates decreased from 13.9% (year 2001) to 7.3% (year 2007) (pcare units remained stable. With some limitations our study results are representative for all hospitals within Germany. It is highly probable that the decrease of prevalence rates was due to an increased awareness of the pressure ulcer problem in Germany and subsequent efforts to improve pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. The quality of clinical practice regarding pressure ulcer prevention and treatment has improved. However, pressure ulcers are still relevant and require attention. In 2007, one out of 10 hospital patients who were at pressure ulcer risk had at least one pressure related skin damage.

  20. Variation in hospital length of stay: do physicians adapt their length of stay decisions to what is usual in the hospital where they work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J.D. de; Westert, G.P.; Lagoe, R.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that physicians who work in different hospitals adapt their length of stay decisions to what is usual in the hospital under consideration. DATA SOURCES: Secondary data were used, originating from the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS).

  1. Perceptions of effective and ineffective nurse-physician communication in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, F Patrick; Gorman, Geraldine; Slimmer, Lynda W; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Nurse-physician communication affects patient safety. Such communication has been well studied using a variety of survey and observational methods; however, missing from the literature is an investigation of what constitutes effective and ineffective interprofessional communication from the perspective of the professionals involved. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse and physician perceptions of effective and ineffective communication between the two professions. Using focus group methodology, we asked nurses and physicians with at least 5 years' acute care hospital experience to reflect on effective and ineffective interprofessional communication and to provide examples. Three focus groups were held with 6 participants each (total sample 18). Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded into categories of effective and ineffective communication. The following themes were found. For effective communication: clarity and precision of message that relies on verification, collaborative problem solving, calm and supportive demeanor under stress, maintenance of mutual respect, and authentic understanding of the unique role. For ineffective communication: making someone less than, dependence on electronic systems, and linguistic and cultural barriers. These themes may be useful in designing learning activities to promote effective interprofessional communication.

  2. Workplace physical violence among hospital nurses and physicians in underserved areas in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi; Al Khawaldeh, Abdullah Talal

    2014-07-01

    To: (1) examine the incidence, frequency and contributing factors to workplace violence among nurses and physicians in underserved areas in Jordan, and (2) identify the existing policies and the management modalities to tackle workplace violence. Workplace violence is a major problem in healthcare organisations. An understanding of the nature of violence is essential to implementing successful management. A descriptive exploratory research design. The questionnaire that was developed in 2003 by the International Labor Office, the International Council of Nurses, the World Health Organization, and the Public Services International was used to collect data from a convenience sample of 521 Jordanian physicians and nurses (396 nurses, 125 physicians) who worked in hospitals located in underserved areas. Around 15% of the participants were exposed to physical violence. The factors that contributed to workplace violence were related to absence of policies, inadequate staffing and lack of communication skills. Only 16·9% of participants indicated that there were specific policies available for dealing with physical workplace violence. Strengthening security and providing training were some of the important factors indicated by participants for decreasing violence in the workplace. Workplace violence is a problem in underserved areas that needs attention from administrators. Most participants were very dissatisfied with the way the administrators dealt with the incidents. Instituting firm policies against perpetrators and developing protective violence guidelines to support healthcare staff in managing workplace violence are paramount to tackle the problem of workplace violence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Consensus on the leadership of hospital CEOs and its impact on the participation of physicians in improvement projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, Michel L.A.; Stegeman, Inge; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Wagner, Cordula; Sanders, Karin; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The success of a Dutch program to disseminate quality improvement projects depends on the participation of physicians working in program hospitals. The leadership of hospital executives (CEOs) is considered an important explanation. This study aims to determine whether the relation,

  4. Consensus on the leadership of hospital CEOs and its impact on the participation of physicians in improvement projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duckers, M.L.A.; Stegeman, I.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.; Sanders, K.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The success of a Dutch program to disseminate quality improvement projects depends on the participation of physicians working in program hospitals. The leadership of hospital executives (CEOs) is considered an important explanation. This study aims to determine whether the relation,

  5. Consensus on the leadership of hospital CEO's and its impact on the participation of physicians in improvement projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, M.L.A.; Stegeman, I.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.; Sanders, K.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The success of a Dutch program to disseminate quality improvement projects depends on the participation of physicians working in program hospitals. The leadership of hospital executives (CEOs) is considered an important explanation. This study aims to determine whether the relation,

  6. Preventing dehydration-related hospitalizations: a mixed-methods study of parents, inpatient attendings, and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Leticia; Mittal, Vineeta; Flores, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the proportion of dehydration-related ambulatory care-sensitive condition hospitalizations, the reasons why these hospitalizations were preventable, and factors associated with preventability. A cross-sectional survey of primary care providers (PCPs), inpatient attending physicians, and parents was conducted in a consecutive series of children with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions admitted to an urban hospital over 14 months. Eighty-five children were diagnosed with dehydration. Their mean age was 1.6 years; most had public (74%) or no (17%) insurance, and were nonwhite (91%). The proportion of hospitalizations assessed as preventable varied from 12% for agreement among all 3 sources to 45% for any source. Parents identified inadequate prevention (50%), poor self-education (34%), and poor quality of care (38%) as key factors. PCPs identified parents providing insufficient home rehydration (33%), not visiting the clinic (25%), and not calling earlier (16%) as reasons. Inpatient attending physicians cited home rehydration (40%), delays in seeking care (40%), and lacking a PCP (20%) as contributors. Physicians (PCPs and inpatient attending physicians) were more likely than parents to describe the admission as inappropriate (75% vs 67% vs 0%; P dehydration-related hospitalizations may be preventable. Inadequate parental education by physicians, insufficient home rehydration, deferring clinic visits, insurance and cost barriers, inappropriate admissions, poor quality of care, and parental dissatisfaction with PCPs are the reasons that these hospitalizations might have been prevented.

  7. Physicians' and Nurses' Perceptions of and Attitudes Toward Incident Reporting in Palestinian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Anan; Hamdan, Motasem

    2015-06-22

    Underreporting of incidents that happen in health care services undermines the ability of the systems to improve patient safety. This study assessed the attitudes of physicians and nurses toward incident reporting and the factors influencing reporting in Palestinian hospitals. It also examined clinicians' views about the preferred features of incident reporting system. Cross-sectional self-administered survey of 475 participants, 152 physicians and 323 nurses, from 11 public hospitals in the West Bank; response rate, 81.3%. There was a low level of event reporting among participants in the past year (40.3%). Adjusted for sex and age, physicians were 2.1 times more likely to report incidents than nurses (95% confidence interval, 1.32-3.417; P = 0.002). Perceived main barriers for reporting were grouped under lack of proper structure for reporting, prevalence of blame, and punitive environment. The clinicians indicated fear of administrative sanctions, social and legal liability, and of their competence being questioned (P > 0.05). Getting help for patients, learning from mistakes, and ethical obligation were equally indicated motivators for reporting (P > 0.05). Meanwhile, clinicians prefer formal reporting (77.8%) of all type of errors (65.5%), disclosure of reporters (52.7%), using reports to improve patient safety (80.3%), and willingness to report to immediate supervisors (57.6%). Clinicians acknowledge the importance of reporting incidents; however, prevalence of punitive culture and inadequate reporting systems are key barriers. Improving feedback about reported errors, simplifying procedures, providing clear guidelines on what and who should report, and avoiding blame are essential to enhance reporting. Moreover, health care organizations should consider the opinions of the clinicians in developing reporting systems.

  8. [Inadequate ICU-admissions : A 12-month prospective cohort study at a German University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, K; Borch, J; Ferahli, S; Braune, S A; de Heer, G; Kluge, S

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care medicine (ICM) is increasingly utilized by a growing number of critically ill patients worldwide. The reasons for this are an increasingly ageing and multimorbid population and technological improvements in ICM. Inappropriate patient admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU) can be a threat to rational resource allocation and to patient autonomy. In this study, the incidence, characteristics, and resource utilization of patients inappropriately admitted to ICUs are studied. This prospective study included all consecutive patients admitted from 01 September 2012 to 31 August 2013 to the Department of Intensive Care Medicine of a German university hospital comprised of 10 ICUs and 120 beds. Inappropriate admission was defined according to category 4B of the recommendations of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM; "futility of ICU treatment" or "ICU declined by patient") and was determined in each suspected case by structured group discussions between the study team and all involved care givers including the referring team. In all, 66 of 6452 ICU admissions (1 %) were suspected to have been inappropriate on retrospective evaluation the day after admission. In 50 patients (0.8 %), an interdisciplinary consensus was reached on the inappropriateness of the ICU admission. Of these 50 patients, 41 (82 %) had previously declined ICU treatment in principle. This information was based on the patient's presumed wish as expressed by next of kin (56 %) or in a written advanced directive (26 %). In 9 patients (18 %), ICU treatment was considered futile. In all cases, a lack of information regarding a patient's wishes or clinical prognosis was the reason for inappropriate ICU admission. In this study, patients were regularly admitted to the ICU despite their contrary wish/directive or an unfavorable clinical condition. Although this was registered in only 1 % of all admissions, optimizing preICU admission information flow with regard to

  9. Implementation of HbA1c Point of Care Testing in 3 German Medical Practices: Impact on Workflow and Physician, Staff, and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Karl-Heinz; Ardjomand, Payam; Göhring, Katharina; Klempt, Guido; Patzelt, Andreas; Redzich, Markus; Zebrowski, Mathias; Emmerich, Susanne; Schnell, Oliver

    2018-05-01

    Medical practices face challenges of time and cost pressures with scarce resources. Point-of-care testing (POCT) has the potential to accelerate processes compared to central laboratory testing and can increase satisfaction of physicians, staff members, and patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of introducing HbA1c POCT in practices specialized in diabetes. Three German practices that manage 400, 550, and 950 diabetes patients per year participated in this evaluation. The workflow and required time before and after POCT implementation (device: Alere Afinion AS100 Analyzer) was evaluated in each practice. Physician (n = 5), staff (n = 9), and patient (n = 298) satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and interviews. After POCT implementation the number of required visits scheduled was reduced by 80% (88% vs 17.6%, P < .0001), the number of venous blood collections by 75% (91% vs 23%, P < .0001). Of patients, 82% (vs 13% prior to POCT implementation) were able to discuss their HbA1c values with treating physicians immediately during their first visit ( P < .0001). In two of the practices the POCT process resulted in significant time savings of approximately 20 and 22 working days per 1000 patients per year (95% CI 2-46; 95% CI 10-44). All physicians indicated that POCT HbA1c implementation improved the practice workflow and all experienced a relief of burden for the office and the patients. All staff members indicated that they found the POCT measurement easy to perform and experienced a relief of burden. The majority (61.3%) of patients found the capillary blood collection more pleasant and 83% saw an advantage in the immediate availability of HbA1c results. The implementation of HbA1c POCT leads to an improved practice workflow and increases satisfaction of physicians, staff members and patients.

  10. [Cases and duration of mechanical ventilation in German hospitals : An analysis of DRG incentives and developments in respiratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, A; Geissler, A

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) have been used to reimburse hospitals services in Germany since 2003/04. Like any other reimbursement system, DRGs offer specific incentives for hospitals that may lead to unintended consequences for patients. In the German context, specific procedures and their documentation are suspected to be primarily performed to increase hospital revenues. Mechanical ventilation of patients and particularly the duration of ventilation, which is an important variable for the DRG-classification, are often discussed to be among these procedures. The aim of this study was to examine incentives created by the German DRG-based payment system with regard to mechanical ventilation and to identify factors that explain the considerable increase of mechanically ventilated patients in recent years. Moreover, the assumption that hospitals perform mechanical ventilation in order to gain economic benefits was examined. In order to gain insights on the development of the number of mechanically ventilated patients, patient-level data provided by the German Federal Statistical Office and the German Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System were analyzed. The type of performed ventilation, the total number of ventilation hours, the age distribution, mortality and the DRG distribution for mechanical ventilation were calculated, using methods of descriptive and inferential statistics. Furthermore, changes in DRG-definitions and changes in respiratory medicine were compared for the years 2005-2012. Since the introduction of the DRG-based payment system in Germany, the hours of ventilation and the number of mechanically ventilated patients have substantially increased, while mortality has decreased. During the same period there has been a switch to less invasive ventilation methods. The age distribution has shifted to higher age-groups. A ventilation duration determined by DRG definitions could not be found. Due to advances in respiratory medicine, new

  11. Development of a tripolar model of technology acceptance: Hospital-based physicians' perspective on EHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beglaryan, Mher; Petrosyan, Varduhi; Bunker, Edward

    2017-06-01

    In health care, information technologies (IT) hold a promise to harness an ever-increasing flow of health related information and bring significant benefits including improved quality of care, efficiency, and cost containment. One of the main tools for collecting and utilizing health data is the Electronic Health Record (EHR). EHRs implementation can face numerous barriers to acceptance including attitudes and perceptions of potential users, required effort attributed to their implementation and usage, and resistance to change. Various theories explicate different aspects of technology deployment, implementation, and acceptance. One of the common theories is the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), which helps to study the implementation of different healthcare IT applications. The objectives of this study are: to understand the barriers of EHR implementation from the perspective of physicians; to identify major determinants of physicians' acceptance of technology; and develop a model that explains better how EHRs (and technologies in general) are accepted by physicians. The proposed model derives from a cross-sectional survey of physicians selected through multi-stage cluster sampling from the hospitals of Yerevan, Armenia. The study team designed the survey instrument based on a literature review on barriers of EHR implementation. The analysis employed exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) with a robust weighted least squares (WLSMV) estimator for categorical indicators. The analysis progressed in two steps: appraisal of the measurement model and testing of the structural model. The derived model identifies the following factors as direct determinants of behavioral intention to use a novel technology: projected collective usefulness; personal innovativeness; patient influence; and resistance to change. Other factors (e.g., organizational change, professional relationships, administrative monitoring, organizational support and computer anxiety) exert their

  12. Access, use and preferences of information and communication technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez-Silva, Luis; Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; Ticse, Ray; Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; Guerra-Castañon, Felix; Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% havemobile Internet. Differences were evident in the...

  13. Electronic health record in the internal medicine clinic of a Brazilian university hospital: Expectations and satisfaction of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the satisfaction and expectations of patients and physicians before and after the implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital. We conducted 389 interviews with patients and 151 with physicians before and after the implementation of a commercial EHR at the internal medicine clinic of Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Brazil. The physicians were identified by their connection to the outpatient clinic and categorized by their years since graduation: residents and preceptors (with 10 years or less of graduation) or assistants (with more than 10 years of graduation). The answers to the questionnaire given by the physicians were classified as favorable or against the use of EHR, before and after the implementation of this system in this clinic, receiving 1 or 0 points, respectively. The sum of these points generated a multiple regression score to determine which factors contribute to the acceptance of EHR by physicians. We also did a third survey, after the EHR was routinely established in the outpatient clinic. The degree of patient satisfaction was the same before and after implementation, with more than 90% positive evaluations. They noted the use of the computer during the consultation and valued such use. Resident (younger) physicians had more positive expectations than assistants (older physicians) before EHR implementation. This optimism was reduced after implementation. In the third evaluation the use of EHR was higher among resident physicians. Resident physicians perceived and valued the EHR more and used it more. In 28 of the 57 questions on performance of clinical tasks, resident physicians found it easier to use EHR than assistant physicians with significant differences (pclinical setting should be preceded by careful planning to improve physician's adherence to the use of EHR. Patients do not seem to notice much difference to the

  14. Prevalence and factors associated with pregnancy loss among physicians in King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshora, Weam Bashier I; Mohammad Kalo, Bakr

    2018-04-01

    Medical profession is a stressful occupation as it carries potential risk for pregnancy outcome. There is lack of researches regarding the pregnancy loss among physicians working in hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The current study aims at estimating the prevalence and factors associated with pregnancy loss among female physicians working at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah, September, 2015. A cross sectional study has been conducted, which included all the female physicians working at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah by filling a self-administered online questionnaire. Out of all responding physicians (n = 92), the majority were Saudis (93.5%), who were mostly married (89.1%) and rest were either divorced (8.7%) or widowed (2.2%). Seventeen female physicians had pregnancy loss before (18.5%) with a total of 25 losses, which were mostly occurred during first trimester, especially while working as residents (40%), the average monthly working hours in the first pregnancy loss was (median; IQR, 160, 110-198 h). No statistically significant difference could be detected regarding the variation in pregnancy losses according to nationality marital status nor specialty. Most of the pregnancy losses in physicians occurred in first trimester during residency with a relatively longer monthly working hours. Further researches are needed on a larger sample and wider scale with inclusion of other pertinent factors to enable judging on the independent relationship of pregnancy loss and medical profession. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Physicians' responses to patients' expressions of negative emotions in hospital consultations: a video-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjaaland, Trond A; Finset, Arnstein; Jensen, Bård Fossli; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2011-09-01

    Patients express their negative emotions in medical consultations either implicitly as cue to an underlying unpleasant emotion or explicitly as a clear, unambiguous concern. The health provider's response to such cues and concerns is important for the outcome of consultations. Yet, physicians often neglect patient's negative emotions. Most studies of this subject are from primary health care. We aimed to describe how physicians in a hospital respond to negative emotions in an outpatient setting. Ninety six consultations were videotaped in a general teaching hospital. The Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences was used to identify patients' expression of negative emotions in terms of cue and concern and to code physicians' subsequent responses. Cohen's kappa was used as interrater reliability measure. Acceptable kappa level was set to .60. We observed 163 expressions of negative emotions. In general, the physician responses to patients' cues and concerns did not include follow up or exploration. Concerns more often than cues led to lack of emotional exploration. When patients expressed negative emotions or cues to such, hospital physicians tended to move away from emotional communication, particularly if the emotion was expressed as an explicit concern. Medical training should enable physicians' to explore the patients' emotions in situations where it will improve the medical treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Attitudes and relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry in a public general hospital in Lima, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo De Ferrari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry influences physicians' attitudes and prescribing behavior. Although largely studied in the US, this topic has not been well studied in resource-poor settings, where a close relationship between physicians and industry still exists. OBJECTIVE: To describe physician interactions with and attitudes towards the pharmaceutical industry in a public general hospital in Lima, Peru. DESIGN: Descriptive, cross-sectional study through an anonymous, self-filled questionnaire distributed among faculty and trainee physicians of five different clinical departments working in a Peruvian public general hospital. A transcultural validation of an existing Spanish questionnaire was performed. Exposure to marketing activities, motivations to contact pharmaceutical representatives and attitudes towards industry were studied. Collected data was analyzed by degree of training, clinical department, gender and teaching status. Attitudes were measured on a four-point LIKERT scale. RESULTS: 155 physicians completed the survey, of which 148 were included in the study sample. 94.5% of attending physicians reported ongoing encounters with pharmaceutical representatives. The most common industry-related activities were receiving medical samples (91.2%, promotional material (87.8% and attending meetings in restaurants (81.8%. Respondents considered medical samples and continuing medical education the most ethically acceptable benefits. We found significant differences between attendings and residents, and teaching and non-teaching attendings. An association between the amount of encounters with pharmaceutical representatives, and attitudes towards industry and acceptance of medical samples was found. CONCLUSIONS: A close physician-industry relationship exists in the population under study. The contact is established mainly through pharmaceutical representatives. Medical samples are the most received

  17. Variation in Primary Cesarean Delivery Rates by Individual Physician within a Single Hospital Laborist Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    METZ, Torri D.; ALLSHOUSE, Amanda A.; GILBERT, Sara A Babcock; DOYLE, Reina; TONG, Angie; CAREY, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background Laborist practice models are associated with lower cesarean delivery rates than individual private practice models in several studies; however, this effect is not uniform. Further exploration of laborist models may help us better understand the observed reduction in cesarean delivery rates in some hospitals with implementation of a laborist model. Objective Our objective was to evaluate the degree of variation in primary cesarean delivery rates by individual laborists within a single institution employing a laborist model. In addition, we sought to evaluate whether differences in cesarean delivery rates resulted in different maternal or short-term neonatal outcomes. Study Design At this teaching institution, one laborist (either a generalist or maternal-fetal medicine attending physician) is directly responsible for labor and delivery management during each shift. No patients are followed in a private practice model nor are physicians incentivized to perform deliveries. We retrospectively identified all laborists who delivered nulliparous, term women with cephalic singletons at this institution from 2007-14. Overall and individual primary cesarean delivery rates were reported as percentages with exact Pearson 95% CI. Laborists were grouped by tertile as having low, medium or high cesarean delivery rates. Characteristics of the women delivered, indications for cesarean delivery, and short-term neonatal outcomes were compared between these groups. A binomial regression model of cesarean delivery was estimated, where the relative rates of each laborist compared to the lowest-unadjusted laborist rate were calculated; a second model was estimated to adjust for patient-level maternal characteristics. Results Twenty laborists delivered 2,224 nulliparous, term women with cephalic singletons. The overall cesarean delivery rate was 24.1% (95% CI 21.4-26.8). In an unadjusted binomial model, the overall effect of individual laborist was significant (pcesarean

  18. Avoidable Technical and Clinical Denial Write-Off Management in Hospitals, Physician Offices, and Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Sandra Marlene; Byrne, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the various types of technical and clinical denials that are usually "written off" and proposes strategies to prevent this loss. For purposes of this writing, avoidable technical and clinical denial write-offs are defined as revenue lost from "first-pass" denials rejections. For example, a procedure that requires an authorization is performed without having had an authorization obtained. After appeals and attempts to recoup the revenue, often unsuccessful, the organization ultimately "writes off" the revenue as not collectable. The question to ask is: Are these claims really not collectable or can actionable steps be taken to conserve these dollars and improve the bottom line? Acute care hospitals, physician offices, and clinics. In today's environment, the need to manage costs is ubiquitous. Cost management is on the priority list of all savvy health care executives, even if margins are healthy, revenue is under pressure, and the magnitude of cost reduction needed is greater than what past efforts have achieved. As hospitals and physician clinics prioritize areas for improvement, reduction in lost revenue-especially avoidable lost revenue-should be at the top of the list. Attentively managing claim denial write-offs will significantly reduce lost revenue. There is significant interface between case management and the revenue cycle. Developing core competencies for reducing clinical and technical denials should be a critical imperative in overall cost management strategy. Case managers are well placed to prevent these unnecessary losses through accurate status determination and clinical documentation review. These clinical professionals can also provide insight into work flow and other processes inherent in the preauthorization process.

  19. Youth and young adults with spina bifida: their utilization of physician and hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nancy L; Anselmo, Lianne A; Burke, Tricia A; McCormick, Anna; Mukherjee, Shubhra

    2014-03-01

    To describe current patterns of health care utilization of youth and young adults who have spina bifida (SB) and provide evidence to guide the development of health care for this growing population. We conducted a secondary analysis of health services utilization data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to determine the rates and patterns of health care utilization, because comprehensive health care has been recognized as critical to positive health outcomes. Participants were identified from 6 publicly funded children's treatment centers. Health records from youth (n=164; age range, 13.0-17.9y) and adults (n=120; age range, 23.0-32.9y) with SB contributed to this study. Not applicable. The rates of outpatient physician visits and hospital admissions for the youth and adult groups were calculated. The proportion with a "medical home" was also calculated. The annual rates of outpatient physician visits per 1000 persons were 8031 for youth and 8524 for adults with SB. These rates were approximately 2.9 and 2.2 times higher, respectively, than for their age-matched peers. On average, 12% of youth and 24% of adults with SB had a medical home. The annual rates of hospital admissions per 1000 persons were 329 for youth and 285 for adults with SB. Rates of admissions were 19.4 and 12.4 times higher, respectively, for these groups than for the general population. It appears that persons with SB are accessing health services more often than their age-matched peers, and few have a medical home. We recommend that seamless medical care be provided to all adults with SB, coordinated by a primary care provider, to facilitate comprehensive care. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of vendor computerized physician order entry on patients with renal impairment in community hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alexander A; Schiff, Gordon; Keohane, Carol; Amato, Mary; Simon, Steven R; Cadet, Bismarck; Coffey, Michael; Kaufman, Nathan; Zimlichman, Eyal; Seger, Diane L; Yoon, Catherine; Bates, David W

    2013-10-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are common among hospitalized patients with renal impairment. To determine whether computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems with clinical decision support capabilities reduce the frequency of renally related ADEs in hospitals. Quasi-experimental study of 1590 adult patients with renal impairment who were admitted to 5 community hospitals in Massachusetts from January 2005 to September 2010, preimplementation and postimplementation of CPOE. Varying levels of clinical decision support, ranging from basic CPOE only (sites 4 and 5), rudimentary clinical decision support (sites 1 and 2), and advanced clinical decision support (site 3). Primary outcome was the rate of preventable ADEs from nephrotoxic and/or renally cleared medications. Similarly, secondary outcomes were the rates of overall ADEs and potential ADEs. There was a 45% decrease in the rate of preventable ADEs following implementation (8.0/100 vs 4.4/100 admissions; P < 0.01), and the impact was related to the level of decision support. Basic CPOE was not associated with any significant benefit (4.6/100 vs 4.3/100 admissions; P = 0.87). There was a nonsignificant decrease in preventable ADEs with rudimentary clinical decision support (9.1/100 vs 6.4/100 admissions; P = 0.22). However, substantial reduction was seen with advanced clinical decision support (12.4/100 vs 0/100 admissions; P = 0.01). Despite these benefits, a significant increase in potential ADEs was found for all systems (55.5/100 vs 136.8/100 admissions; P < 0.01). Vendor-developed CPOE with advanced clinical decision support can reduce the occurrence of preventable ADEs but may be associated with an increase in potential ADEs. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Impact of physician specialty on quality care for patients hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lim

    Full Text Available Decompensated cirrhosis is a common precipitant for hospitalization, and there is limited information concerning factors that influence the delivery of quality care in cirrhotic inpatients. We sought to determine the relation between physician specialty and inpatient quality care for decompensated cirrhosis.We reviewed 247 hospital admissions for decompensated cirrhosis, managed by hospitalists or intensivists, between 2009 and 2013. The primary outcome was quality care delivery, defined as adherence to all evidence-based specialty society practice guidelines pertaining to each specific complication of cirrhosis. Secondary outcomes included new complications, length-of-stay, and in-hospital death.Overall, 147 admissions (59.5% received quality care. Quality care was given more commonly by intensivists, compared with hospitalists (71.7% vs. 53.1%, P = .006, and specifically for gastrointestinal bleeding (72% vs. 45.8%, P = .03 and hepatic encephalopathy (100% vs. 63%, P = .005. Involvement of gastroenterology consultation was also more common in admissions in which quality care was administered (68.7% vs. 54.0%, P = .023. Timely diagnostic paracentesis was associated with reduced new complications in admissions for refractory ascites (9.5% vs. 46.6%, P = .02, and reduced length-of-stay in admissions for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (5 days vs. 13 days, P = .02.Adherence to quality indicators for decompensated cirrhosis is suboptimal among hospitalized patients. Although quality care adherence appears to be higher among cirrhotic patients managed by intensivists than by hospitalists, opportunities for improvement exist in both groups. Rational and cost-effective strategies should be sought to achieve this end.

  2. The impact of a proactive chronic care management program on hospital admission rates in a German health insurance society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Rula, Elizabeth Y

    2010-12-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who consented to participate in the chronic care management program. Intervention (n  = 17,319) and Comparison (n  = 5668) groups were defined based on records of participating (or not participating) in telephonic interactions. Changes in admission rates were calculated from the year prior to (Base) and year after program commencement. Comparative analyses were adjusted for age, sex, region of residence, and disease severity (stratification of 3 [least severe] to 1 [most severe]). Overall, the admission rate in the Intervention group decreased by 6.2% compared with a 14.9% increase in the Comparison group (P  management care calls can help reduce hospital admissions among German health insurance members with chronic disease.

  3. Profiling quality of care for patients with chronic headache in three different German hospitals – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legal requirements for quality assurance in German rehabilitation hospitals include comparisons of providers. Objective is to describe and to compare outcome quality of care offered by three hospitals providing in-patient rehabilitative treatment exemplified for patients with chronic headache. Methods We performed a prospective three center observational study on patients suffering from chronic headache. Patients underwent interventions commonly used according to internal guidelines of the hospitals. Measurements were taken at three points in time (at admission, at discharge and 6 months after discharge. Indicators of outcome quality included pain intensity and frequency of pain, functional ability, depression, quality of life and health related behavior. Analyses of differences amongst the hospitals were adjusted by covariates due to case-mix situation. Results 306 patients from 3 hospitals were included in statistical analysis. Amongst the hospitals, patients differed significantly in age, education, diagnostic subgroups, beliefs, and with respect to some pain-related baseline values (covariates. Patients in all three hospitals benefited from intervention to a clinically relevant degree. At discharge from hospital, outcome quality differed significantly after adjustment according to case-mix only in terms of patients' global assessment of treatment results. Six months after discharge, the only detectable significant differences were for secondary outcomes like improved coping with stress or increased use of self-help. The profiles for satisfaction with the hospital stay showed clear differences amongst patients. Conclusion The results of this case study do not suggest a definite overall ranking of the three hospitals that were compared, but outcome profiles offer a multilayer platform of reliable information which might facilitate decision making.

  4. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2012-12-01

    The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physician's rounds as a case study. Empirical implementation issues were derived from a 910-bed tertiary national university hospital that recently launched a VDI system. During the physicians' rounds, we surveyed patient satisfaction levels with the VDI-based mobile consultation service with the iPad and the relationship between these levels of satisfaction and hospital revisits, hospital recommendations, and the hospital brand image. Thirty-five inpatients (including their next-of-kin) and seven physicians participated in the survey. Implementation issues pertaining to the VDI system arose with regard to the highly availability system architecture, wireless network infrastructure, and screen resolution of the system. Other issues were related to privacy and security, mobile device management, and user education. When the system was used in rounds, patients and their next-of-kin expressed high satisfaction levels, and a positive relationship was noted as regards patients' decisions to revisit the hospital and whether the use of the VDI system improved the brand image of the hospital. Mobile hospital environments have the potential to benefit both physicians and patients. The issues related to the implementation of VDI system discussed here should be examined in advance for its successful adoption and implementation.

  5. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Andreas J; Lockey, David; Kurola, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    -staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. METHODS: Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary...... have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care....

  6. Intra-organizational dynamics as drivers of entrepreneurship among physicians and managers in hospitals of western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelewijn, Wout T; Ehrenhard, Michel L; Groen, Aard J; van Harten, Wim H

    2012-09-01

    During the past decade, entrepreneurship in the healthcare sector has become increasingly important. The aging society, the continuous stream of innovative technologies and the growth of chronic illnesses are jeopardizing the sustainability of healthcare systems. In response, many European governments started to reform healthcare during the 1990s, replacing the traditional logic of medical professionalism with business-like logics. This trend is expected to continue as many governments will have to reduce their healthcare spending in response to the current growing budget deficits. In the process, entrepreneurship is being stimulated, yet little is known about intra-hospital dynamics leading to entrepreneurial behavior. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature concerning the influence of intra-organizational dynamics on entrepreneurship among physicians and managers in hospitals of Western countries. Therefore, we conducted a theory-led, systematic review of how intra-organizational dynamics among hospital managers and physicians can influence entrepreneurship. We designed our review using the neo-institutional framework of Greenwood and Hinings (1996). We analyze these dynamics in terms of power dependencies, interest dissatisfaction and value commitments. Our search revealed that physicians' dependence on hospital management has increased along with healthcare reforms and the resulting emphasis on business logics. This has induced various types of responses by physicians. Physicians can be pushed to adopt an entrepreneurial attitude as part of a defensive value commitment toward the business-like healthcare logic, to defend their traditionally dominant position and professional autonomy. In contrast, physicians holding a transformative attitude toward traditional medical professionalism seem more prone to adopt the entrepreneurial elements of business-like healthcare, encouraged by the prospect of increased autonomy and income. Interest

  7. Implementation of computerized physician order entry in National Guard Hospitals: assessment of critical success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuwaijri, Majid M; Bahanshal, Abdullah; Almehaid, Mona

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the needs, process and experience of implementing a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system in a leading healthcare organization in Saudi Arabia. The National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA) deployed the CPOE in a pilot department, which was the intensive care unit (ICU) in order to assess its benefits and risks and to test the system. After the CPOE was implemented in the ICU area, a survey was sent to the ICU clinicians to assess their perception on the importance of 32 critical success factors (CSFs) that was acquired from the literature. The project team also had several meetings to gather lessons learned from the pilot project in order to utilize them for the expansion of the project to other NGHA clinics and hospitals. The results of the survey indicated that the selected CSFs, even though they were developed with regard to international settings, are very much applicable for the pilot area. The top three CSFs rated by the survey respondents were: The "before go-live training", the adequate clinical resources during implementation, and the ordering time. After the assessment of the survey and the lessons learned from the pilot project, NGHA decided that the potential benefits of the CPOE are expected to be greater the risks expected. The project was then expanded to cover all NGHA clinics and hospitals in a phased approach. Currently, the project is in its final stages and expected to be completed by the end of 2011. The role of CPOE systems is very important in hospitals in order to reduce medication errors and to improve the quality of care. In spite of their great benefits, many studies suggest that a high percentage of these projects fail. In order to increase the chances of success and due to the fact that CPOE is a clinical system, NGHA implemented the system first in a pilot area in order to test the system without putting patients at risk and to learn from mistakes before expanding the system to other

  8. Implementation of computerized physician order entry in National Guard hospitals: Assessment of critical success factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid M Altuwaijri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the needs, process and experience of implementing a computerized physician order entry (CPOE system in a leading healthcare organization in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA deployed the CPOE in a pilot department, which was the intensive care unit (ICU in order to assess its benefits and risks and to test the system. After the CPOE was implemented in the ICU area, a survey was sent to the ICU clinicians to assess their perception on the importance of 32 critical success factors (CSFs that was acquired from the literature. The project team also had several meetings to gather lessons learned from the pilot project in order to utilize them for the expansion of the project to other NGHA clinics and hospitals. Results: The results of the survey indicated that the selected CSFs, even though they were developed with regard to international settings, are very much applicable for the pilot area. The top three CSFs rated by the survey respondents were: The "before go-live" training, the adequate clinical resources during implementation, and the ordering time. After the assessment of the survey and the lessons learned from the pilot project, NGHA decided that the potential benefits of the CPOE are expected to be greater the risks expected. The project was then expanded to cover all NGHA clinics and hospitals in a phased approach. Currently, the project is in its final stages and expected to be completed by the end of 2011. Conclusion: The role of CPOE systems is very important in hospitals in order to reduce medication errors and to improve the quality of care. In spite of their great benefits, many studies suggest that a high percentage of these projects fail. In order to increase the chances of success and due to the fact that CPOE is a clinical system, NGHA implemented the system first in a pilot area in order to test the system without putting patients at

  9. Welfare, wellness, and job satisfaction of Chinese physicians: A national survey of public tertiary hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Ma, Jing; Hu, Guangyu; Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Changzheng; Si, Wen; Zhang, Xinqing; Liu, Yuanli

    2017-07-01

    Little national data are available on Chinese physicians' welfare, wellness, and job satisfaction. We conducted a self-administered smartphone-based national survey in early 2016 of 17 945 physicians from 136 tertiary hospitals across 31 provinces in China. In addition to collecting the physicians' basic information, we also measured 5 domains (the ethical and working environments, welfare, wellness, and job satisfaction). Half of the physicians reported a hospital-based annual income of less than RMB 72 000 ($10 300), and 60.31% of them did not think that the current medical pricing system reflects physicians' value. More than half (58.64%) of them did not have or did not know about medical malpractice insurance. These physicians worked long hours (an average of 10 h) and slept short hours (average 6 h). Only 35.78% of them thought that they were in good health, and 51.03% were in good mental health. Approximately, a quarter of them had helped to pay medical bills for patients who could not afford care, and 1 in 7 has been penalised for seeing patients who generated bad debts. Only 33.42% of them thought that their occupation receives social recognition and respect, and 70.98% would not encourage their children to pursue a medical career. The top 3 factors that may influence physician job satisfaction as chosen by the physicians were as follows: (1) the income distribution policy (45.92%), (2) working environment safety (25.86%), and (3) public trust and respect for their job (16.10%). In conclusion, we found that Chinese physicians bear heavy physical, mental, and financial stress, and many of them lack confidence that they receive trust and respect from society. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Reconsidering the Affordable Care Act's Restrictions on Physician-Owned Hospitals: Analysis of CMS Data on Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, P Maxwell; Darrith, Brian; Bohl, Daniel D; Frisch, Nicholas B; Della Valle, Craig J

    2017-11-15

    Concerns about financial incentives and increased costs prompted legislation limiting the expansion of physician-owned hospitals in 2010. Supporters of physician-owned hospitals argue that they improve the value of care by improving quality and reducing costs. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether physician-owned and non-physician-owned hospitals differ in terms of costs, outcomes, and patient satisfaction in the setting of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). With use of the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Inpatient Charge Data, we identified 45 physician-owned and 2,657 non-physician-owned hospitals that performed ≥11 primary TKA and THA procedures in 2014. Cost data, patient-satisfaction scores, and risk-adjusted complication and 30-day readmission scores for knee and hip arthroplasty patients were obtained from the multiyear CMS Hospital Compare database. Physician-owned hospitals received lower mean Medicare payments than did non-physician-owned hospitals for THA and TKA procedures ($11,106 compared with $12,699; p = 0.002). While the 30-day readmission score did not differ significantly between the 2 types of hospitals (4.48 compared with 4.62 for physician-owned and non-physician-owned, respectively; p = 0.104), physician-owned hospitals had a lower risk-adjusted complication score (2.83 compared with 3.04; p = 0.015). Physician-owned hospitals outperformed non-physician-owned hospitals in all patient-satisfaction categories, including mean linear scores for recommending the hospital (93.9 compared with 87.9; p CMS payment methodology. Our findings suggest that physician-owned hospitals are associated with lower mean Medicare costs, fewer complications, and higher patient satisfaction following THA and TKA than non-physician-owned hospitals. Policymakers should consider these data when debating the current moratorium on physician-owned hospital expansion. Therapeutic Level III. See

  11. [Out-of-hospital pediatric emergencies. Perception and assessment by emergency physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, C; Roessler, M; Timmermann, A; Heuer, J F; Gentkow, U; Albrecht, B; Russo, S G

    2009-09-01

    Out-of-hospital (OOH) pediatric emergencies have a relatively low prevalence. In Germany the vast majority of cases are attended by non-specialized emergency physicians (EPs) for whom these are not routine procedures. This may lead to insecurity and fear. However, it is unknown how EPs perceive and assess pediatric emergencies and how they could be better prepared for them. All active EPs (n=50) of the Department of Anaesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine at the University Medical Centre of Göttingen were presented with a structured questionnaire in order to evaluate their perception and assessment of OOH pediatric emergencies. The 43 participating EPs made highly detailed statements on the expected characteristics of OOH pediatric emergencies. Their confidence level grew with the children's age (pemergencies. They felt the greatest deficits were in the care of infrequent but life-threatening emergencies. Three educational groups can be differentiated: knowledge and skills to be gained with children in hospital, clinical experience from adult care also applicable in children and rare diagnoses and interventions to be trained with manikins or simulators.

  12. Correlation of hospital magnet status with the quality of physicians performing neurosurgical procedures in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2018-01-24

    The quality of physicians practicing in hospitals recognized for nursing excellence by the American Nurses Credentialing Center has not been studied before. We investigated whether Magnet hospital recognition is associated with higher quality of physicians performing neurosurgical procedures. We performed a cohort study of patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures from 2009-2013, who were registered in the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database. Propensity score adjusted multivariable regression models were used to adjust for known confounders, with mixed effects methods to control for clustering at the facility level. An instrumental variable analysis was used to control for unmeasured confounding and simulate the effect of a randomized trial. During the study period, 185,277 patients underwent neurosurgical procedures, and met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 66,607 (35.6%) were hospitalized in Magnet hospitals, and 118,670 (64.4%) in non-Magnet institutions. Instrumental variable analysis demonstrated that undergoing neurosurgical operations in Magnet hospitals was associated with a 13.6% higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of mortality (95% CI, 13.2% to 14.1%), and a 4.3% higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of length-of-stay (LOS) (95% CI, 3.8% to 4.7%) in comparison to non-Magnet institutions. The same associations were present in propensity score adjusted mixed effects models. Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of neurosurgical patients in New York State we identified an association of Magnet hospital recognition with superior physician performance.

  13. How to Manage Hospital-Based Palliative Care Teams Without Full-Time Palliative Care Physicians in Designated Cancer Care Hospitals: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Akihiro; Kishino, Megumi; Nakazawa, Yoko; Yotani, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    To clarify how highly active hospital palliative care teams can provide efficient and effective care regardless of the lack of full-time palliative care physicians. Semistructured focus group interviews were conducted, and content analysis was performed. A total of 7 physicians and 6 nurses participated. We extracted 209 codes from the transcripts and organized them into 3 themes and 21 categories, which were classified as follows: (1) tips for managing palliative care teams efficiently and effectively (7 categories); (2) ways of acquiring specialist palliative care expertise (9 categories); and (3) ways of treating symptoms that are difficult to alleviate (5 categories). The findings of this study can be used as a nautical chart of hospital-based palliative care team (HPCT) without full-time PC physician. Full-time nurses who have high management and coordination abilities play a central role in resource-limited HPCTs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. An Investigation About Attitude of Clinical Physicians in the Implementation of Telemedicine Technology in TUMS Hospitals 2003-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Dargahi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This research have presented focuses upon the cultural side of managerial coordination and control as manifested in Telemedicine Technology. Specifically, the research seeks to analyze and determines the attitude of clinical physicians about the role of specific dimensions of organizational culture and organizational structure may have upon effective managerial coordination and control in Telemedicine Technology in TUMS hospitals. Materials and methods: We assessed the attitude of 82 clinical physicians in five randomly selected TUMS teaching hospitals in a mixed method of pooling Quantitative and Qualitative data using unstructured interview technique. Results: For successful telemedicine utilization, most of clinical physicians believed that we need organic organizations that have involved leadership, open and free communication of mistakes and success, desire to experiment with new ideas, support for continuing education, support for new things, clear rules to follow and acknowledge performance goals. Conclusion: The data indicate that organizational is most important to utilize successfur telemedicine technology.

  15. Characteristics of out-of-hospital paediatric emergencies attended by ambulance- and helicopter-based emergency physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eich, Christoph; Russo, Sebastian G.; Heuer, Jan F.; Timmermann, Arnd; Gentkow, Uta; Quintel, Michael; Roessler, Markus

    Background: In Germany, as in many other countries, for the vast majority of cases, critical out-of-hospital (OOH) paediatric emergencies are attended by non-specialised emergency physicians (EPs). As it is assumed that this may lead to deficient service we aimed to gather robust data on the

  16. Physicians' Patient Load per DRG, the Consumption of Hospital Resources, and the Incentives of the DRG Prospective Payment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Eric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between numbers (high or low) of patients per diagnosis-related group (DRG) treated by individual physicians and hospital resource consumption of the patients at a large academic medical center was studied for the period 1985-87. The findings, although a result of many varied factors, suggest a relationship between the two…

  17. Dealing with symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in indonesia: the role of families, nurses, and physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effendy, C.; Vissers, K.; Tejawinata, S.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Engels, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with cancer often face physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and emotional symptoms. Our aim was to study symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in Indonesia, a country with strong family ties, and how family members, nurses, and physicians deal with them.

  18. Resident physicians' attitudes and confidence in communicating with patients: a pilot study at a Japanese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hirono; Eto, Masato; Kitamura, Kiyoshi; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationships among physicians' confidence in conducting medical interviews, their attitudes toward the patient-physician relationship, and undergraduate training in communication skills among resident physicians in Japan. Participants were 63 first-year resident physicians at a university hospital in Tokyo. The Physician Confidence in the Medical Interview scale (PCMI) was constructed based on the framework of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide. Additionally, participants' attitudes toward the patient-physician relationship (Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale; PPOS), undergraduate experience of communication skills training, and demographic characteristics were assessed through a self-reported questionnaire. The internal consistency of the PCMI and PPOS scales were adequate. As expected from the undergraduate curriculum for medical interviews in Japan, residents had relatively higher confidence in their communication skills with respect to gathering information and building the relationship, whereas less confident about sharing information and planning treatment. The PCMI was associated with a more patient-centered attitude as measured by the PPOS. These scales could be useful tools to measure physicians' confidence and attitudes in communicating with patients and to explore their changes through medical education. Residency programs should consider including systematic training and assessment in communication skills related to sharing information and planning treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspects of physicians' attitudes towards the rational use of drugs at a training and research hospital: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiz Basaran, Nesrin; Akici, Ahmet

    2013-08-01

    The rational use of drugs (RUD) is primarily the responsibility of physicians. The aim of this study was to investigate whether physicians are aware of RUD principles and how they apply them in daily medical practice. A total 136 physicians working at the Kartal Training and Research Hospital in Istanbul were enrolled in the study between February and March 2012. A face-to-face interview was conducted with physicians to assess their knowledge and attitude regarding RUD. A large majority of the physicians declared that consultation time was insufficient (84 %). The data obtained from the survey indicate that 54 % of the enrolled physicians monitored the therapeutic outcome and that 27 % found the information given to the patient to be sufficient. Participating physicians stated that the less known characteristics of the drugs they prescribed were drug interactions, traceability in market, and price. The most preferred reference source was Vademecum (a drug guideline prepared by the private sector). Two major factors contributing to prescribing patterns were "self study" and "observation of teachers" at clinical training. There was a significant difference between internists-surgeons and residents-specialists in the number of prescribed drugs per prescription (p change in managerial practices within the healthcare system. The other, more essential explanation is education; consequently, serious consideration should be given to including effective clinical pharmacotherapy training and RUD courses in the medical education curriculum.

  20. CPOE in Iran--a viable prospect? Physicians' opinions on using CPOE in an Iranian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Alireza; Ellenius, Johan; Tofighi, Shahram; Salehi, Aref; Eghbalian, Fatemeh; Fors, Uno G

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, the theory that on-line clinical decision support systems can improve patients' safety among hospitalised individuals has gained greater acceptance. However, the feasibility of implementing such a system in a middle or low-income country has rarely been studied. Understanding the current prescription process and a proper needs assessment of prescribers can act as the key to successful implementation. The aim of this study was to explore physicians' opinions on the current prescription process, and the expected benefits and perceived obstacles to employ Computerised Physician Order Entry in an Iranian teaching hospital. Initially, the interview guideline was developed through focus group discussions with eight experts. Then semi-structured interviews were held with 19 prescribers. After verbatim transcription, inductive thematic analysis was performed on empirical data. Forty hours of on-looker observations were performed in different wards to explore the current prescription process. The current prescription process was identified as a physician-centred, top-down, model, where prescribers were found to mostly rely on their memories as well as being overconfident. Some errors may occur during different paper-based registrations, transcriptions and transfers. Physician opinions on Computerised Physician Order Entry were categorised into expected benefits and perceived obstacles. Confidentiality issues, reduction of medication errors and educational benefits were identified as three themes in the expected benefits category. High cost, social and cultural barriers, data entry time and problems with technical support emerged as four themes in the perceived obstacles category. The current prescription process has a high possibility of medication errors. Although there are different barriers confronting the implementation and continuation of Computerised Physician Order Entry in Iranian hospitals, physicians have a willingness to use them if these systems

  1. Antibiotics susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from American and German cockroaches as potential vectors of microbial pathogens in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Fakoorziba

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the cockroach species, their bacterial flora and antibiotics susceptibility patterns of these bacteria in Shiraz. Methods: In the present descriptive study, only two species of cockroaches were recognized. The washing solutions from the digestion systems and surfaces of 156 American and German cockroaches were cultured. The latter was found to be the commonest (89.7% in all places. Results: Overall, 18 species of bacteria were isolated and identified by standard culture methods. The most frequent bacterium isolated from both species of cockroaches in all places was Pseudomonas (41.7%. The second and third commonest bacteria were Enterobacter (39.7% and Klebsiella (32.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The antibiogram profiles showed full (100% resistance of Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Acinetobacter and Proteus to amoxicillin and ampicillin at both hospitals, while Pseudomonas showed resistance (95.7% to cephalothin. Thus it is concluded that German and American cockroaches carry multidrug resistant bacteria in two hospitals which raises alarm for stricter control measures.

  2. The Application of Standards and Recommendations to Clinical Ethics Consultation in Practice: An Evaluation at German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochow, Maximilian; Rubeis, Giovanni; Steger, Florian

    2017-06-01

    The executive board of the Academy for Ethics in Medicine (AEM) and two AEM working groups formulated standards and recommendations for clinical ethics consultation in 2010, 2011, and 2013. These guidelines comply with the international standards like those set by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. There is no empirical data available yet that could indicate whether these standards and recommendations have been implemented in German hospitals. This desideratum is addressed in the present study. We contacted 1.858 German hospitals between September 2013 and January 2014. A follow-up survey was conducted between October 2014 and January 2015. The data of the initial survey and the follow-up survey were merged and evaluated. The statements of the participants were compared with the standards and recommendations. The standards of the AEM concerning the tasks of clinical ethics consultation (including ethics consultation, ethics training and the establishment of policy guidelines) are employed by a majority of participants of the study. Almost all of these participants document their consultation activities by means of protocols or entries in the patient file. There are deviations from the recommendations of the AEM working groups regarding the drafting of statutes, activity reports, and financial support. The activities of clinical ethics consultation predominantly comply with the standards of the AEM and recommendations for the documentation. The recommendations for evaluation should be improved in practice. This applies particularly for activity reports in order to evaluate the activities. Internal evaluation could take place accordingly.

  3. In-hospital airway management training for non-anesthesiologist EMS physicians: a descriptive quality control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Helmut; Beywinkler, Christoph; Hornung, Sonja; Kreutziger, Janett; Voelckel, Wolfgang G

    2017-04-26

    Pre-hospital airway management is a major challenge for emergency medical service (EMS) personnel. Despite convincing evidence that the rescuer's qualifications determine efficacy of tracheal intubation, in-hospital airway management training is not mandatory in Austria, and often neglected. Thus we sought to prove that airway management competence of EMS physicians can be established and maintained by a tailored training program. In this descriptive quality control study we retrospectively evaluated all in- and pre-hospital airway cases managed by EMS physicians who underwent a structured in-hospital training program in anesthesia at General Hospital Wiener Neustadt. Data was obtained from electronic anesthesia and EMS documentation systems. From 2006 to 2016, 32 EMS physicians with 3-year post-graduate education, but without any prior experience in anesthesia were trained. Airway management proficiency was imparted in three steps: initial training, followed by an ongoing practice schedule in the operating room (OR). Median and interquartile range of number of in-hospital tracheal intubations (TIs) vs. use of supra-glottic airway devices (SGA) were 33.5 (27.5-42.5) vs. 19.0 (15.0-27.0) during initial training; 62.0 (41.8-86.5) vs. 33.5 (18.0-54.5) during the first, and 64.0 (34.5-93.8) vs. 27 (12.5-56.0) during the second year. Pre-hospitaly, every physician performed 9.0 (5.0-14.8) TIs vs. 0.0 (0.0-0.0) SGA cases during the first, and 9.0 (7.0-13.8) TIs vs. 0.0 (0.0-0.3) SGA during the second year. Use of an SGA was mandatory when TI failed after the second attempt, thus accounting for a total of 33 cases. In 8 cases, both TI and SGA failed, but bag mask ventilation was successfully performed. No critical events related to airway management were noted and overall success rate for TI with a max of 2 attempts was 95.3%. Number of TIs per EMS physician is low in the pre-hospital setting. A training concept that assures an additional 60+ TIs per year appears to

  4. The prevalence of common mental disorders among hospital physicians and their association with self-reported work ability: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Martijn M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We studied the prevalence of common mental disorders among Dutch hospital physicians and investigated whether the presence of a mental disorder was associated with insufficient self-reported work ability. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all (n = 958) hospital physicians of one

  5. Hospital-Based Physicians' Intubation Decisions and Associated Mental Models when Managing a Critically and Terminally Ill Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliko, Shannon; Downs, Julie; Mohan, Deepika; Arnold, Robert; Barnato, Amber E

    2018-04-01

    Variation in the intensity of acute care treatment at the end of life is influenced more strongly by hospital and provider characteristics than patient preferences. We sought to describe physicians' mental models (i.e., thought processes) when encountering a simulated critically and terminally ill older patient, and to compare those models based on whether their treatment plan was patient preference-concordant or preference-discordant. Seventy-three hospital-based physicians from 3 academic medical centers engaged in a simulated patient encounter and completed a mental model interview while watching the video recording of their encounter. We used an "expert" model to code the interviews. We then used Kruskal-Wallis tests to compare the weighted mental model themes of physicians who provided preference-concordant treatment with those who provided preference-discordant treatment. Sixty-six (90%) physicians provided preference-concordant treatment and 7 (10%) provided preference-discordant treatment (i.e., they intubated the patient). Physicians who intubated the patient were more likely to emphasize the reversible and emergent nature of the patient situation (z = -2.111, P = 0.035), their own comfort (z = -2.764, P = 0.006), and rarely focused on explicit patient preferences (z = 2.380, P = 0.017). Post-decisional interviewing with audio/video prompting may induce hindsight bias. The expert model has not yet been validated and may not be exhaustive. The small sample size limits generalizability and power. Hospital-based physicians providing preference-discordant used a different mental model for decision making for a critically and terminally ill simulated case. These differences may offer targets for future interventions to promote preference-concordant care for seriously ill patients.

  6. Pediatric computed tomography practice in Japanese university hospitals from 2008–2010: did it differ from German practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Koji; Krille, Lucian; Dreger, Steffen; Hoenig, Lars; Merzenich, Hiltrud; Yasui, Kiyotaka; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Uetani, Masataka; Mildenberger, Peter; Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi; Zeeb, Hajo; Kudo, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in modern medicine and is frequently used to diagnose a wide range of conditions, particularly in industrial countries, such as Japan and Germany. However, markedly higher doses of ionizing radiation are delivered during CT imaging than during conventional X-ray examinations. To assess pediatric CT practice patterns, data from three university hospital databases (two in Japan and one in Germany) were analyzed. Anonymized data for patients aged 0 to 14 years who had undergone CT examinations between 2008 and 2010 were extracted. To assess CT practice, an interdisciplinary classification scheme for CT indications, which incorporated the most common examination types and radiosensitive tissues, was developed. The frequency of CT examinations was determined according to sex, age at examination, and indications. A total of 5182 CT examinations were performed in 2955 children. Overall, the frequency of CT examinations at the Japanese university hospitals did not differ significantly from that at the German hospital. However, differences were detected in the age distribution of the patients who underwent CT examinations (the proportion of patients <5 years of age was significantly higher in Japan than in Germany) and in the indications for CT. Substantial practice differences regarding the use of CT in pediatric health care were detected between the three hospitals. The results of this study point towards a need for approaches such as clinical guidelines to reduce unwarranted medical radiation exposures, particularly abdominal and head CT, in the Japanese health system.

  7. [Caesarean section in german hospitals: validity of hospital quality report data for monitoring C-section rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghänel, K; Renz-Polster, H; Jarczok, M N; Hornemann, A; Böhler, T; De Bock, F

    2015-04-01

    It is not known if "hospital quality reports" (HQR) document Caesarean (C-) section rates at the hospital level accurately enough for use as a reliable data source when it comes to explaining regional variations of C-sections in Germany by factors at the hospital level. We aimed to answer this question using HQR from hospitals in Baden-Württemberg as data source. Diagnostic and procedure codes from HQR for the year 2008 (HQRdata), were used to calculate numbers of births, numbers of C-sections, and rates of births by C-section (CSR) for 94 of 97 hospitals in Baden-Württemberg. These numbers were compared to internal hospital (IH) data delivered upon request by 80 of 97 hospitals and stemming from vital statistics, birth registry forms, or external quality assurance datasets. There was no difference in the number of births between HQR data and IH data, but the number of C-sections and the CSR differed significantly (pCSR calculated using HQR data was 4.9 ± 17.9% higher than CSR from IH data (absolute difference 1.5 ± 5.8%). The correlation between the 2 data sources was moderate (r=0.73). Only 55% of the variance in IH data-based CSR was explained by HQR data. The proportion between highest and lowest CSR in hospitals in Baden-Württemberg was 4.9 for HQR data and 3.6 for IH data. There are significant and relevant differences between C-section rates based on ei-ther HQR or IH data. This questions routine data from HQR for 2008 as a reliable data source for research work. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Associations between non-discrimination and training policies and physicians’ attitudes and knowledge about sexual and gender minority patients: a comparison of physicians from two hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Jabson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some physicians lack knowledge and awareness about health issues specific to sexual and gender minority (SGM individuals. To help improve this, hospitals have implemented policies that mandate non-discrimination and training to promote sexual and gender minority health. There is limited evidence about how such policies relate to physicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and gender and sexual minority affirmative practices. Method A random sample of 1000 physicians was recruited from a complete list of physicians affiliated with one of two university Hospitals located in Tennessee and 180 physicians completed the survey concerning attitudes and knowledge about SGM individuals. Physicians were affiliated with either Hospital A that had not implemented policies for non-discrimination and training, or Hospital B that did. Results Physicians held different attitudes about SGM patients than non-patients. Physicians affiliated with Hospital A held more negative attitudes about SGM individuals who were non-patients than physicians affiliated with Hospital B. There were no differences between the two hospitals in physicians’ attitudes and knowledge about SGM patients. Conclusion Policies that mandate non-discrimination and training as they currently exist may not improve physicians’ attitudes and knowledge about SGM individuals. Additional research is needed to understand how these policies and trainings relate to physicians’ SGM affirmative practices.

  9. The representation of patient experience and satisfaction in physician rating sites. A criteria-based analysis of English- and German-language sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strech Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on patient experience and satisfaction with individual physicians could play an important role for performance measures, improved health care and health literacy. Physician rating sites (PRSs bear the potential to be a widely available source for this kind of information. However, patient experience and satisfaction are complex constructs operationalized by multiple dimensions. The way in which PRSs allow users to express and rate patient experience and satisfaction could likely influence the image of doctors in society and the self-understanding of both doctors and patients. This study examines the extent to which PRSs currently represent the constructs of patient experience and satisfaction. Methods First, a systematic review of research instruments for measuring patient experience and satisfaction was conducted. The content of these instruments was analyzed qualitatively to create a comprehensive set of dimensions for patient experience and patient satisfaction. Second, PRSs were searched for systematically in English-language and German-language search engines of Google and Yahoo. Finally, we classified every structured question asked by the different PRS using the set of dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. Results The qualitative content analysis of the measurement instruments produced 13 dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. We identified a total of 21 PRSs. No PRSs represented all 13 dimensions of patient satisfaction and experience with its structured questions. The 3 most trafficked English-language PRS represent between 5 and 6 dimensions and the 3 most trafficked German language PRSs between 8 and 11 dimensions The dimensions for patient experience and satisfaction most frequently represented in PRSs included diversely operationalized ones such as professional competence and doctor-patient relationship/support. However, other less complex but nevertheless important dimensions

  10. Physician perspectives on collaborative working relationships with team-based hospital pharmacists in the inpatient medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowsky, Mark J; Madill, Helen M; Schindel, Theresa J; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2013-04-01

    Collaborative care between physicians and pharmacists has the potential to improve the process of care and patient outcomes. Our objective was to determine whether team-based pharmacist care was associated with higher physician-rated collaborative working relationship scores than usual ward-based pharmacist care at the end of the COLLABORATE study, a 1 year, multicentre, controlled clinical trial, which associated pharmacist intervention with improved medication use and reduced hospital readmission rates. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all team-based and usual care physicians (attending physicians and medical residents) who worked on the participating clinical teaching unit or primary healthcare teams during the study period. They were invited to complete an online version of the validated Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration Index (PPCI) survey at the end of the study. The main endpoint of interest was the mean total PPCI score. Only three (response rate 2%) of the usual care physicians responded and this prevented us from conducting pre-specified comparisons. A total of 23 team-based physicians completed the survey (36%) and reported a mean total PPCI score of 81.6 ± 8.6 out of a total of 92. Mean domain scores were highest for relationship initiation (14.0 ± 1.4 out of 15), and trustworthiness (38.9 ± 3.7 out of 42), followed by role specification (28.7 ± 4.3 out of 35). Pharmacists who are pursuing collaborative practice in inpatient settings may find the PPCI to be a meaningful tool to gauge the extent of collaborative working relationships with physician team members. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Causal interpretation of correlational studies - Analysis of medical news on the website of the official journal for German physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Buhse

    Full Text Available Media frequently draws inappropriate causal statements from observational studies. We analyzed the reporting of study results in the Medical News section of the German medical journal Deutsches Ärzteblatt (DÄ.Study design: Retrospective quantitative content analysis of randomly selected news reports and related original journal articles and press releases. A medical news report was selected if headlines comprised at least two linked variables. Two raters independently categorized the headline and text of each news report, conclusions of the abstract and full text of the related journal article, and the press release. The assessment instrument comprised five categories from 'neutral' to 'unconditionally causal'. Outcome measures: degree of matching between 1 news headlines and conclusions of the journal article, 2 headlines and text of news reports, 3 text and conclusions, and 4 headlines and press releases. We analyzed whether news headlines rated as unconditionally causal based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs.One-thousand eighty-seven medical news reports were published between April 2015 and May 2016. The final random sample comprised 176 news reports and 100 related press releases. Degree of matching: 1 45% (79/176 for news headlines and journal article conclusions, 2 55% (97/176 for headlines and text, 3 53% (93/176 for text and conclusions, and 4 41% (41/100 for headlines and press releases. Exaggerations were found in 45% (80/176 of the headlines compared to the conclusions of the related journal article. Sixty-five of 137 unconditionally causal statements of the news headlines were phrased more weakly in the subsequent news text body. Only 52 of 137 headlines (38% categorized as unconditionally causal reported RCTs.Reporting of medical news in the DÄ medical journal is misleading. Most headlines that imply causal associations were not based on RCTs. Medical journalists should follow standards of reporting scientific study results.

  12. Causal interpretation of correlational studies - Analysis of medical news on the website of the official journal for German physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhse, Susanne; Rahn, Anne Christin; Bock, Merle; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Media frequently draws inappropriate causal statements from observational studies. We analyzed the reporting of study results in the Medical News section of the German medical journal Deutsches Ärzteblatt (DÄ). Study design: Retrospective quantitative content analysis of randomly selected news reports and related original journal articles and press releases. A medical news report was selected if headlines comprised at least two linked variables. Two raters independently categorized the headline and text of each news report, conclusions of the abstract and full text of the related journal article, and the press release. The assessment instrument comprised five categories from 'neutral' to 'unconditionally causal'. Outcome measures: degree of matching between 1) news headlines and conclusions of the journal article, 2) headlines and text of news reports, 3) text and conclusions, and 4) headlines and press releases. We analyzed whether news headlines rated as unconditionally causal based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). One-thousand eighty-seven medical news reports were published between April 2015 and May 2016. The final random sample comprised 176 news reports and 100 related press releases. Degree of matching: 1) 45% (79/176) for news headlines and journal article conclusions, 2) 55% (97/176) for headlines and text, 3) 53% (93/176) for text and conclusions, and 4) 41% (41/100) for headlines and press releases. Exaggerations were found in 45% (80/176) of the headlines compared to the conclusions of the related journal article. Sixty-five of 137 unconditionally causal statements of the news headlines were phrased more weakly in the subsequent news text body. Only 52 of 137 headlines (38%) categorized as unconditionally causal reported RCTs. Reporting of medical news in the DÄ medical journal is misleading. Most headlines that imply causal associations were not based on RCTs. Medical journalists should follow standards of reporting scientific study results.

  13. Achieving Adherence to Evidence-Based Practices: Are Health IT and Hospital-Physician Integration Complementary or Substitutive Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Jordan; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2016-12-01

    In response to evolving policies and conditions, hospitals have increased health information technology (HIT) adoption and strived to improve hospital-physician integration. While evidence suggests that both HIT and integration confer independent benefits, when combined, they may provide complementary means to achieve high performance or overlap to offset each other's contribution. We explore this relationship in the context of hospital adherence to evidence-based practices (EBPs). Using the American Hospital Association's Annual and IT Supplement surveys, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services's Hospital Compare, we estimate the independent relationships and interactions between HIT and hospital-physician integration with respect to EBP adherence. HIT adoption and tight (but not loose) integration are independently associated with greater adherence to EBPs. The interaction between HIT adoption and tight integration is negative, consistent with an offsetting association between HIT adoption and integration in their relationship to EBP adherence. This finding reveals the need to be aware of potential substitutive effects from simultaneous pursuit of multiple approaches to performance improvement. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. "It's like texting at the dinner table": A qualitative analysis of the impact of electronic health records on patient-physician interaction in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelland, Kimberly D; Baier, Rosa R; Gardner, Rebekah L

    2017-06-30

    nBACKGROUND: Electronic health records (EHRs) may reduce medical errors and improve care, but can complicate clinical encounters. To describe hospital-based physicians' perceptions of the impact of EHRs on patient-physician interactions and contrast these findings against office-based physicians' perceptionsMethods: We performed a qualitative analysis of comments submitted in response to the 2014 Rhode Island Health Information Technology Survey. Office- and hospital-based physicians licensed in Rhode Island, in active practice, and located in Rhode Island or neighboring states completed the survey about their Electronic Health Record use. The survey's response rate was 68.3% and 2,236 (87.1%) respondents had EHRs. Among survey respondents, 27.3% of hospital-based and 37.8% of office-based physicians with EHRs responded to the question about patient interaction. Five main themes emerged for hospital-based physicians, with respondents generally perceiving EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions. We noted the same five themes among office-based physicians, but the rank-order of the top two responses differed by setting: hospital-based physicians commented most frequently that they spend less time with patients because they have to spend more time on computers; office-based physicians commented most frequently on EHRs worsening the quality of their interactions and relationships with patients. In our analysis of a large sample of physicians, hospital-based physicians generally perceived EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions, although they emphasized different reasons than their office-based counterparts. These findings add to the prior literature, which focuses on outpatient physicians, and can shape interventions to improve how EHRs are used in inpatient settings.

  15. Reduction of the nosocomial meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus incidence density by a region-wide search and follow-strategy in forty German hospitals of the EUREGIO, 2009 to 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurke, A; Kock, R; Becker, K; Thole, S; Hendrix, R; Rossen, J; Daniels-Haardt, I; Friedrich, AW

    2013-01-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) disseminates between hospitals serving one patient catchment area. Successful prevention and control requires concerted efforts and regional surveillance. Forty hospitals located in the German EUREGIO have established a network for combating MRSA. In

  16. [Problems in integrative postgraduate medical training of physicians at anthroposophic hospitals in Germany and Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Peter; Eberhard, Sabine; Weinzirl, Johannes; Orlow, Pascale; Berger, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Anthroposophic hospitals provide integrative medical care by complementing conventional (CON) with anthroposophic medicine (AM). They teach integrative medicine in postgraduate medical training (PGMT). In a first evaluation of PGMT quality in AM, we analyzed the problems of this training from the perspectives of trainers and trainees. We conducted an anonymous cross-sectional full survey of all trainee and trainer physicians at the 15 AM hospitals in Germany (DE) and Switzerland (CH) with questionnaires of the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETH) Zürich, complemented by a module for AM. We also conducted descriptive statistics for questions with answering scales as well as calculations of group differences (two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test) and a qualitative content analysis (Mayring) of free text answers related to the problem analysis. The response rate in DE embraced 89 out of 215 (41.39%) surveyed trainees and 78 out of 184 (42.39%) trainers; in CH, the response rate comprised 19 out of 25 (76%) trainees and 22 out of 30 (73.33%) trainers. Free text answers related to problem analysis in DE and CH were given by 16 out of 108 (14.8%) trainees and by 20 out of 100 (20%) trainers, overall. Perceived main problems include work overload; shortcomings in work organization; delimitation of competences; interprofessional cooperation; financial resources (trainers); wages (trainees DE); practical relevance of AM (trainees and trainers in DE); professional or didactic competence of trainers; lack of interest in AM (trainees); problems with learning and practicing AM; no curriculum for postgraduate medical training in AM; tensions between AM and CON. Explanations for the differences between DE and CH include larger departments and the DRG system in DE, but also better structural conditions for AM PGMT in CH. Main problems of PGMT in AM include not only non-specific and systemic aspects, but also AM-specific issues. In order to develop a basis for concrete problem solving

  17. [Access, use and preferences of Information and Communication Technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Silva, Luis; Ticse, Ray; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Guerra-Castañon, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% have mobile Internet. Differences were evident in the frequency of use of ICT in 25-34 year old age group as well as a higher level of skills (pWhatsApp as a means of exchanging images and data related to health, 50% participated in medical blogs, online courses or videoconferences. The use and access of ICT is common among doctors in this hospital and there is positive interest in its use in education.

  18. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes, representations and declared practices of nurses and physicians about obesity in a university hospital: training is essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher Della Torre, S; Courvoisier, D S; Saldarriaga, A; Martin, X E; Farpour-Lambert, N J

    2018-04-01

    In the context of a worldwide obesity epidemic, healthcare providers play a key role in obesity management. Knowledge of current guidelines and attitudes to prevent stigmatization are especially important. This study aimed to assess knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, perception of opportunity for intervention, declared practices and need for training and material of nurses and physicians about obesity in a Swiss University Hospital. A total of 834 physicians and nurses filled an online survey. The questionnaire was based on literature, exploratory interviews and expert committee review. It was pre-tested with 15 physicians and nurses. Participants declared a low level of negative attitudes towards individuals living with obesity. However, the results highlighted a lack of knowledge to diagnose obesity in adults and children, as well as confidence and training to care of patients with obesity. One-third of providers did not know how to calculate body mass index. Half of providers felt it was part of their role to take care of patients with obesity, even if 55% of them had the feeling that they did not have adequate training. Nurses and physicians working in a university hospital showed a low level of negative attitudes but a lack of knowledge and skills on obesity management. Training should be improved in this population to insure adequate and coherent messages and equal access to evidence-based treatment for patients living with obesity. © 2018 World Obesity Federation.

  20. Does Objective Quality of Physicians Correlate with Patient Satisfaction Measured by Hospital Compare Metrics in New York State?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; MacKenzie, Todd A; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick M

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear whether publicly reported benchmarks correlate with quality of physicians and institutions. We investigated the association of patient satisfaction measures from a public reporting platform with performance of neurosurgeons in New York State. This cohort study comprised patients undergoing neurosurgical operations from 2009 to 2013 who were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. The cohort was merged with publicly available data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare website. Propensity-adjusted regression analysis was used to investigate the association of patient satisfaction metrics with neurosurgeon quality, as measured by the neurosurgeon's individual rate of mortality and average length of stay. During the study period, 166,365 patients underwent neurosurgical procedures. Using propensity-adjusted multivariable regression analysis, we demonstrated that undergoing neurosurgical operations in hospitals with a greater percentage of patient-assigned "high" scores was associated with higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of mortality (odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.86-1.95), and a higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of length of stay (odds ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.21-1.27). Similar associations were identified for hospitals with a higher percentage of patients who claimed they would recommend these institutions to others. Merging a comprehensive all-payer cohort of neurosurgery patients in New York State with data from the Hospital Compare website, we observed an association of superior hospital-level patient satisfaction measures with objective performance of individual neurosurgeons in the corresponding hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Characteristics of Personal Order Sets in a Computerized Physician Order Entry System at a Community Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sean M.; Davis, Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    Personal order sets (POS) have been touted as important for the success of a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system1. However, POS may systematize practice variability and are difficult to centrally administer. Few studies have looked at the characteristics and use of POS in a community hospital. We examined how POS are used at the Queen’s Medical Center (QMC). POS are an important part of the success of the QMC CPOE, but have definite disadvantages.

  2. Dealing with symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in indonesia: the role of families, nurses, and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effendy, Christantie; Vissers, Kris; Tejawinata, Sunaryadi; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Engels, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    Patients with cancer often face physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and emotional symptoms. Our aim was to study symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in Indonesia, a country with strong family ties, and how family members, nurses, and physicians deal with them. In 2011, 150 hospitalized cancer patients in 3 general hospitals in Indonesia were invited to fill in a questionnaire, which was based on the validated Problems and Needs of Palliative Care (short version) questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were performed. Of 119 patients (79%) who completed the questionnaire, 85% stated that their symptoms and issues were addressed. According to these patients, financial (56%), autonomy (36%), and psychosocial (34%) issues were most often addressed by the family alone. Physical symptoms (52%) and spiritual issues (33%) were addressed mainly by a combination of family, nurses, and physicians. Hospitalized patients with cancer in Indonesia felt that most of their symptoms and issues had been addressed, and the family was highly involved. The strong family ties in Indonesian culture may have contributed to this family role. More research is needed to clarify how this influences patient outcome, quality of care, and quality of life of both the patients and their families, along with the degree of partnership between families and professionals. This information might help answer the question what advantages and disadvantages the family role in caring for a hospitalized patient with cancer generates for the patient, the family, and professional caregivers. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Shopping in Hospitality: Situational Constructions of Customer-Vendor Relationships among Shopping Tourists at a Bazaar on the German-Polish Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of a short customer-vendor dialogue between a German couple and a Polish vendor at a food bazaar on the Polish border with Germany. In this situation, interactants have to negotiate and construct framings of hospitality abroad, customer-vendor relations, as well as intercultural relations. It is assumed that…

  4. The physician/hospital joint venture. Developing a win/win strategy for success. Part I: The first step: developing the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, A B

    1987-02-01

    This four part series, "The Physician/Hospital Joint Venture: Developing a Win/Win Strategy," will examine the philosophical basis of marketing to physicians, the options for the organization in formulating a strategy for joint venture development, structuring and negotiating the deal, and finally how to build the physician loyalty and commitment essential for the joint venture's continued success. In this first article, the author emphasizes the organization's need to develop a strategic plan that includes a program for attracting physicians. It also points out the need for sensitivity to physicians' concerns and provides examples of successes and failures.

  5. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state

  6. [German ophthalmologists and NSDAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Jens Martin

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 40-45 % of all German physicians joined the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP) until 1945. Reasons for party membership are manifold and still a matter of debate. Very likely, the extraordinary high representation of medical doctors in the NSDAP was rather a result of active entry than recruitment by the party. There are only few data concerning the willingness of ophthalmologists to become a party member ("Parteigenosse", "Pg"). According to the list of University teachers in Germany ("Hochschullehrerkarte"; Federal Archive, Berlin), the list of the members of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG) of 1934 and especially the list of NSDAP-members (Federal Archive, Berlin) the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. Directors of German University eye hospitals (chairmen) were members of the NSDAP with a frequency of 23% in 1933 and 48% in 1938 as well as in 1943. The motivation for joining the party was most likely the perspective of acceleration of the academic career. 2. "Only" 30% of the ophthalmologists working in private praxis were "Pg" (until 1945). 3. Both chairmen and ophthalmologists in private praxis were equally hindered to join the NSDAP between May 1st 1933 and May 1st 1937 when the party temporarily stopped registration. 4. The majority of ophthalmologists who joined the NSDAP were born between 1880 and 1900 and thus had taken part in World War I as soldiers or had experienced the times of need after WW I. Only few ophthalmologists succeeded in the NS-hierarchy and probably only one ophthalmologist, Walther Löhlein from Berlin, came in personal contact with Adolf Hitler who was constantly in fear for his sight after his eye injury in October 1918. The "Law for the prevention of genetically disabled offsprings" ("Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses") from July 14th, 1933 separated ophthalmologists into two parties: those advocating sterilization to a high degree and those recommending sterilization only

  7. [Cost of intensive care in a German hospital: cost-unit accounting based on the InEK matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Neurohr, C; Bauer, M; Weiss, M; Schleppers, A

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the actual cost per intensive care unit (ICU) day in Germany based on routine data from an electronic patient data management system as well as analysis of cost-driving factors. A differentiation between days with and without mechanical ventilation was performed. On the ICU of a German focused-care hospital (896 beds, 12 anesthesiology ICU beds), cost per treatment day was calculated with or without mechanical ventilation from the perspective of the hospital. Costs were derived retrospectively with respect to the period between January and October 2006 by cost-unit accounting based on routine data collected from the ICU patients. Patients with a length of stay of at least 2 days on the ICU were included. Demographic, clinical and economical data were analyzed for patient characterization. Data of 407 patients (217 male and 190 female) were included in the analysis, of which 159 patients (100 male, 59 female) were completely or partially mechanically ventilated. The mean simplified acute physiology (SAPS) II score at the onset of ICU stay was 28.2. Average cost per ICU day was 1,265 EUR and costs for ICU days with and without mechanical ventilation amounted to 1,426 EUR and 1,145 EUR, respectively. Personnel costs (50%) showed the largest cost share followed by drugs plus medicinal products (18%) and infrastructure (16%). For the first time, a cost analysis of intensive care in Germany was performed with routine data based on the matrix of the institute for reimbursement in hospitals (InEK). The results revealed a higher resource use on the ICU than previously expected. The large share of personnel costs on the ICU was evident but is comparable to other medical departments in the hospital. The need for mechanical ventilation increases the daily costs of resources by approximately 25%.

  8. Policy trends and reforms in the German DRG-based hospital payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Hitpaß, Uwe; Scheller-Kreinsen, David

    2015-03-01

    A central structural point in all DRG-based hospital payment systems is the conversion of relative weights into actual payments. In this context policy makers need to address (amongst other things) (a) how the price level of DRG-payments from one period to the following period is changed and (b) whether and how hospital payments based on DRGs are to be differentiated beyond patient characteristics, e.g. by organizational, regional or state-level factors. Both policy problems can be and in international comparison often are empirically addressed. In Germany relative weights are derived from a highly sophisticated empirical cost calculation, whereas the annual changes of DRG-based payments (base rates) as well as the differentiation of DRG-based hospital payments beyond patient characteristics are not empirically addressed. Rather a complex set of regulations and quasi-market negotiations are applied. There were over the last decade also timid attempts to foster the use of empirical data to address these points. However, these reforms failed to increase the fairness, transparency and rationality of the mechanism to convert relative weights into actual DRG-based hospital payments. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Microsatellite Instability Occurs Rarely in Patients with Cholangiocarcinoma: A Retrospective Study from a German Tertiary Care Hospital

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    Ria Winkelmann

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune-modulating therapy is a promising therapy for patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA. Microsatellite instability (MSI might be a favorable predictor for treatment response, but comprehensive data on the prevalence of MSI in CCA are missing. The aim of the current study was to determine the prevalence of MSI in a German tertiary care hospital. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples, obtained in the study period from 2007 to 2015 from patients with CCA undergoing surgical resection with curative intention at Johann Wolfgang Goethe University hospital, were examined. All samples were investigated immunohistochemically for the presence of MSI (expression of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 as well as by pentaplex polymerase chain reaction for five quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats (BAT-25, BAT-26, NR-21, NR-22, and NR-24. In total, 102 patients were included, presenting intrahepatic (n = 35, 34.3%, perihilar (n = 42, 41.2%, and distal CCA (n = 25, 24.5%. In the immunohistochemical analysis, no loss of expression of DNA repair enzymes was observed. In the PCR-based analysis, one out of 102 patients was found to be MSI-high and one out of 102 was found to be MSI-low. Thus, MSI seems to appear rarely in CCA in Germany. This should be considered when planning immune-modulating therapy trials for patients with CCA.

  10. [The frequency of burnout syndrome in physicians in Mostar University Hospital].

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    Vukojević, Mladenka; Brzica, Jerko; Petrov, Bozo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome in clinical physicians in Mostar University Hospital. The study included 94 subjects who were familiar with the purpose of research and were classified into three specialty groups. The first consisted of doctors in the Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Pediatrics, the second group of doctors in the Department of Surgery and Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, while the third group (CL-specialization) were doctors of the Clinic of Dermatology and Venereal Diseases, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Department of Ophthalmology. All subjects were handed anonymous questionnaire to assess burnout. The questionnaire consisted of 18 statements with numbers from 1 to 3, 1 meaning rarely, 2 often and 3 always The task was to circle an appropriate number depending on how the statement described them. Along with these statements the questionnaire contained information on the place of employment, years of work experience and gender. In the studied sample of respondents most (n = 81, 86.2%) didn't have symptoms of burnout syndrome. As for the people who had these symptoms, they all belonged to the moderate intensity (chi2 test = 49.19, df = 1, P syndrome. The intensity of the symptoms in the subjects was not significantly different between males and females (chi2 test = 0.85, df = 1, P = 0.355). Also, the intensity of symptoms in the subjects did not differ significantly depending on the number of working years (exact test, P = 0.888). After the formation of three groups from seven departments involved in the research of so far perceived intensity of stress, no significant differences in the intensity of the symptoms of burnout were found between them (exact test, P = 0.536). Regarding the individual items in the overall survey sample, in five items high intensity symptoms of burnout were most often circled. The most frequently reported high intensity of the symptoms was the sense of inability to change

  11. Physician Acceptance of Gateway to Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-27

    frontier cavalry post once commanded by General George Armstrong Custer. Today it is the home of almost 20,000 soldiers of the Big Red One, First Infantry...especially important for the future. Physicians, as key "players" in healthcare organizations, are also key to the success of Gateway to Care. Kotler and...research (3rd ed.). New York: Holt. Physician Acceptance 32 Kotler , P., & Clarke, R. (1987). Marketing for health care organizations. Englewood Cliffs

  12. Return on investment for vendor computerized physician order entry in four community hospitals: the importance of decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimlichman, Eyal; Keohane, Carol; Franz, Calvin; Everett, Wendy L; Seger, Diane L; Yoon, Catherine; Leung, Alexander A; Cadet, Bismarck; Coffey, Michael; Kaufman, Nathan E; Bates, David W

    2013-07-01

    In-hospital adverse events are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and represent a major cost burden to health care systems. A study was conducted to evaluate the return on investment (ROI) for the adoption of vendor-developed computerized physician oder entry (CPOE) systems in four community hospitals in Massachusetts. Of the four hospitals, two were under one management structure and implemented the same vendor-developed CPOE system (Hospital Group A), while the other two were under a second management structure and implemented another vendor-developed CPOE system (Hospital Group B). Cost savings were calculated on the basis of reduction in preventable adverse drug event (ADE) rates as measured previously. ROI, net cash flow, and the breakeven point during a 10-year cost-and-benefit model were calculated. At the time of the study, none of the participating hospitals had implemented more than a rudimentary decision support system together with CPOE. Implementation costs were lower for Hospital Group A than B ($7,130,894 total or $83/admission versus $19,293,379 total or $113/admission, respectively), as were preventable ADE-related avoided costs ($7,937,651 and $16,557,056, respectively). A cost-benefit analysis demonstrated that Hospital Group A had an ROI of 11.3%, breaking even on the investment eight years following implementation. Hospital Group B showed a negative return, with an ROI of -3.1%. Adoption of vendor CPOE systems in community hospitals was associated with a modest ROI at best when applying cost savings attributable to prevention of ADEs only. The modest financial returns can beattributed to the lack of clinical decision support tools.

  13. “It’s like texting at the dinner table”: A qualitative analysis of the impact of electronic health records on patient-physician interaction in hospitals

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    Kimberly D Pelland

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic health records (EHRs may reduce medical errors and improve care, but can complicate clinical encounters. Objective: To describe hospital-based physicians’ perceptions of the impact of EHRs on patient-physician interactions and contrast these findings against office-based physicians’ perceptions Methods: We performed a qualitative analysis of comments submitted in response to the 2014 Rhode Island Health Information Technology Survey. Office- and hospital-based physicians licensed in Rhode Island, in active practice, and located in Rhode Island or neighboring states completed the survey about their Electronic Health Record use. Results: The survey’s response rate was 68.3% and 2,236 (87.1% respondents had EHRs. Among survey respondents, 27.3% of hospital-based and 37.8% of office-based physicians with EHRs responded to the question about patient interaction. Five main themes emerged for hospital-based physicians, with respondents generally perceiving EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions. We noted the same five themes among office-based physicians, but the rank-order of the top two responses differed by setting: hospital-based physicians commented most frequently that they spend less time with patients because they have to spend more time on computers; office-based physicians commented most frequently on EHRs worsening the quality of their interactions and relationships with patients. Conclusion: In our analysis of a large sample of physicians, hospital-based physicians generally perceived EHRs as negatively altering patient interactions, although they emphasized different reasons than their office-based counterparts. These findings add to the prior literature, which focuses on outpatient physicians, and can shape interventions to improve how EHRs are used in inpatient settings.

  14. The extent of the psychological impairment of prosthodontic outpatients at a German University Hospital

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    Zimmer Stefan

    2008-10-01

    considerations to future German education plans.

  15. Care of cancer patients at the end of life in a German university hospital: A retrospective observational study from 2014.

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    Burkhard Dasch

    Full Text Available Cancer care including aggressive treatment procedures during the last phase of life in patients with incurable cancer has increasingly come under scrutiny, while integrating specialist palliative care at an early stage is regarded as indication for high quality end-of-life patient care.To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics and the medical care provided at the end of life of cancer patients who died in a German university hospital.Retrospective cross-sectional study on the basis of anonymized hospital data for cancer patients who died in the Munich University Hospital in 2014. Descriptive analysis and multivariate logistic regression analyses for factors influencing the administration of aggressive treatment procedures at the end of life.Overall, 532 cancer patients died. Mean age was 66.8 years, 58.5% were men. 110/532 (20.7% decedents had hematologic malignancies and 422/532 (79.3% a solid tumor. Patients underwent the following medical interventions in the last 7/30 days: chemotherapy (7.7%/38.3%, radiotherapy (2.6%/6.4%, resuscitation (8.5%/10.5%, surgery (15.2%/31.0%, renal replacement therapy (12.0%/16.9%, blood transfusions (21.2%/39.5%, CT scan (33.8%/60.9%. In comparison to patients with solid tumors, patients with hematologic malignancies were more likely to die in intensive care (25.4% vs. 49.1%; p = 0.001, and were also more likely to receive blood transfusions (OR 2.21; 95% CI, 1.36 to 3.58; p = 0.001 and renal replacement therapy (OR 2.65; 95% CI, 1.49 to 4.70; p = 0.001 in the last 7 days of life. Contact with the hospital palliative care team had been initiated in 161/532 patients (30.3%. In 87/161 cases (54.0%, the contact was initiated within the last week of the patient's life.Overambitious treatments are still reality at the end of life in cancer patients in hospital but patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies have to be differentiated. More efforts are necessary for the timely inclusion of

  16. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

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    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  17. Medical aspects of renewable energy shown by the example of German hospitals; Umweltmedizinische Gesichtspunkte der regenerativen Energieerzeugung am Beispiel deutscher Krankenhaeuser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waschnewski, R.

    2007-07-01

    To what extend are renewable energy sources used in German hospitals? This is the main objective, this is paper is dealing with. The energy consumption profile is very specific in hospitals. In a questionnaire based study, 79 hospitals have been questioned to elucidate the current situation in German hospitals with respect to energy consumption, and to get an idea of the proportion of alternative energy sources already in use. Our analysis reveals that 14% of the hospitals analysed are already using renewable energy sources. Main sources already utilized are photovoltaic, solar thermal devices, and to a lower extend geothermic energy as well comes into operation. Almost three quarters of the questioned institutions claim, they are aware of funding possibilities and the option of contracting with respect to providing financial support in relation to aquisition of new establishments of alternative energy systems within their institution. Roughly half of the hospital's technical supervisors are aware of the precise energy potential of their institution. The situation about information and awareness with respect to possibilities related to the usage of green energy is deficient and should be improved, but the openness with respect to the topic in general seems to be very positive and advantage of that climate should be taken. Our survey allowed to get an initial estimate on the green energy situation in German hospitals. The focus of the discussion is channeled towards the environmental aspects of the energy production. The survey data allow to conclude that the current information situation is deficient. The data further provide insight into what are the main barriers with respect to the use of renewable energy. Based on our results future analyses can not focus on specific aspects and further evaluate approaches allowing to extend the usage of alternative energy sources in hospitals. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of hospital information systems of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, based on the American College of Physicians Criteria

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    E Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital information system (HIS is a computerized system used for management of hospital information as an electronic device and has an indispensible role in the field of qualified healthcare services. Nevertheless, compared to other industrial and commercial systems, this information system is lagged in using the information technology and applying the controlling standards for satisfying the customers. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate HIS, identify its strength and weak points, and improve it in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Method: The present descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in the 8 teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences which used HIS in 2011. The study data were collected through interview and direct observation using the criteria of American Physician College check-list. Finally, SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data through descriptive statistics. Results: The study results showed that laboratory and medical records had respectively the most %43.5 and the least %21.03 conformity to the criteria of American College of Physicians. Also, Faghihi and Zeinabiye hospitals respectively had the most %41.8 and the least %25.2 conformity to the American College of Physicians’ criteria. In pharmacy, data entrance mechanism and presentation of reports had complete conformity to the scales of American College of Physicians, while drug interactions showed no conformity. In laboratory, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. The possibility of receiving information from centers out of laboratory had no conformity to the desired criteria. In the radiology department, data entrance mechanism had complete conformity to the above-mentioned criteria and keeping the test history had %87.5 conformity. Besides, the possibility

  19. The perception of otolaryngology: Head and neck surgery speciality among physicians at a tertiary care hospital

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    Talal Al-Khatib

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study revealed the awareness of physicians at KAUH in regards to the extent of services provided by OTL-HNS as not fully satisfactory. It is our job as OTLs to raise awareness of our speciality among colleagues of other departments.

  20. Perceived Nurse-Physician Communication in Patient Care and Associated Factors in Public Hospitals of Jimma Zone, South West Ethiopia: Cross Sectional Study.

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    Fikadu Balcha Hailu

    Full Text Available Nurse-physician communication has been shown to have a significant impact on the job satisfaction and retention of staff. In areas where it has been studied, communication failure between nurses and physicians was found to be one of the leading causes of preventable patient injuries, complications, death and medical malpractice claims.The objective of this study is to determine perception of nurses and physicians towards nurse-physician communication in patient care and associated factors in public hospitals of Jimma zone, southwest Ethiopia.Institution based cross-sectional survey was conducted from March 10 to April 16, 2014 among 341 nurses and 168 physicians working in public hospitals in Jimma zone. Data was collected using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire; entered into EpiData version 3.1 and exported to Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. Factor analysis was carried out. Descriptive statistics, independent sample t-test, linear regression and one way analysis of variance were used. Variables with P-value < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant.The response rate of the study was 91.55%. The mean perceived nurse-physician communication scores were 50.88±19.7% for perceived professional respect and satisfaction, and 48.52±19.7% for perceived openness and sharing of patient information on nurse-physician communication. Age, salary and organizational factors were statistically significant predictors for perceived respect and satisfaction. Whereas sex, working hospital, work attitude individual factors and organizational factors were significant predictors of perceived openness and sharing of patient information in nurse-physician communication during patient care.Perceived level of nurse-physician communication mean score was low among nurses than physicians and it is attention seeking gap. Hence, the finding of our study suggests the need for developing and implementing nurse-physician

  1. Educational system factors that engage resident physicians in an integrated quality improvement curriculum at a VA hospital: a realist evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Ercolano, Ellyn; Cohen, Emily S; Harwood, Beth; Baum, Karyn; van Aalst, Robertus; Jones, Anne C; Davies, Louise

    2014-10-01

    Learning about quality improvement (QI) in resident physician training is often relegated to elective or noncore clinical activities. The authors integrated teaching, learning, and doing QI into the routine clinical work of inpatient internal medicine teams at a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital. This study describes the design factors that facilitated and inhibited the integration of a QI curriculum-including real QI work-into the routine work of inpatient internal medicine teams. A realist evaluation framework used three data sources: field notes from QI faculty; semistructured interviews with resident physicians; and a group interview with QI faculty and staff. From April 2011 to July 2012, resident physician teams at the White River Junction VA Medical Center used the Model for Improvement for their QI work and analyzed data using statistical process control charts. Three domains affected the delivery of the QI curriculum and engagement of residents in QI work: setting, learner, and teacher. The constant presence of the QI material on a public space in the team workroom was a facilitating mechanism in the setting. Explicit sign-out of QI work to the next resident team formalized the handoff in the learner domain. QI teachers who were respected clinical leaders with QI expertise provided role modeling and local system knowledge. Integrating QI teaching into the routine clinical and educational systems of an inpatient service is challenging. Identifiable, concrete strategies in the setting, learner, and teacher domains helped integrate QI into the clinical and educational systems.

  2. Anticholinergic burden and cognitive function in a large German cohort of hospitalized geriatric patients.

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    Barbara Pfistermeister

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest an association between use of anticholinergic drugs in elderly patients and cognitive impairment. However, there are still limited data on the association of anticholinergic drug use and cognitive impairment as well as contribution of individual drugs to anticholinergic load using large, well-documented patient cohorts treated in geriatric units from Europe.We investigated 797,440 prescriptions to 89,579 hospitalized patients treated in geriatric units within the GiB-DAT database. Data of all patients discharged between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2015 was included. The Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden (ACB scale was used to classify anticholinergic drugs as definite (score 2 or 3 and possible anticholinergics (score 1. Cognitive function was determined using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and the standardized scale for dementia (4D+S.In two multivariable logistic regression models age, sex, number of drugs and ACB total scores were identified as variables independently associated with cognitive impairment as measured by MMSE (odds ratio per ACB unit 1.114, 95% CI 1.099-1.130 or the diagnosis dementia (odds ratio 1.159 per ACB unit, 95% CI 1.144-1.173, both p < 0.0001. High anticholinergic load was associated with patients with severe cognitive impairment (p < 0.05 for all pairwise comparisons. ACB score 3 anticholinergic drugs contributed 77.9% to the cumulative amount of ACB points in patients with an anticholinergic load of 3 and higher.Using a cross-sectional study design, a significant positive association between anticholinergic drug load and cognitive impairment in European patients treated in specialised geriatric units was found. The most frequently used definitve anticholinergic drugs were quetiapine, amitriptyline and carbamazepine.

  3. Antimicrobial usage in German acute care hospitals: results of the third national point prevalence survey and comparison with previous national point prevalence surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, Seven Johannes Sam; Gastmeier, Petra; Piening, Brar Christian; Behnke, Michael; Peña Diaz, Luis Alberto; Gropmann, Alexander; Rosenbusch, Marie-Luise; Kramer, Tobias Siegfried; Hansen, Sonja

    2018-04-01

    Previous point prevalence surveys (PPSs) revealed the potential for improving antimicrobial usage (AU) in German acute care hospitals. Data from the 2016 German national PPS on healthcare-associated infections and AU were used to evaluate efforts in antimicrobial stewardship (AMS). A national PPS in Germany was organized by the German National Reference Centre for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections in 2016 as part of the European PPS initiated by the ECDC. The data were collected in May and June 2016. Results were compared with data from the PPS 2011. A total of 218 hospitals with 64 412 observed patients participated in the PPS 2016. The prevalence of patients with AU was 25.9% (95% CI 25.6%-26.3%). No significant increase or decrease in AU prevalence was revealed in the group of all participating hospitals. Prolonged surgical prophylaxis was found to be common (56.1% of all surgical prophylaxes on the prevalence day), but significantly less prevalent than in 2011 (P < 0.01). The most frequently administered antimicrobial groups were penicillins plus β-lactamase inhibitors (BLIs) (23.2%), second-generation cephalosporins (12.9%) and fluoroquinolones (11.3%). Significantly more penicillins plus BLIs and fewer second-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones were used in 2016. Overall, an increase in the consumption of broad-spectrum antimicrobials was noted. For 68.7% of all administered antimicrobials, the indication was documented in the patient notes. The current data reaffirm the points of improvement that previous data identified and reveal that recent efforts in AMS in German hospitals require further intensification.

  4. Work stress associated cool down reactions among nurses and hospital physicians and their relation to burnout symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, Arndt; Falkenberg, Zarah; Schoppe, Carina; Recchia, Daniela Rodrigues; Poier, Désirée

    2017-08-10

    Hospital staff experience high level of work stress and they have to find strategies to adapt and react to it. When they perceive emotional exhaustion and job dissatisfaction in response to constant work stress, one reaction might be emotional withdrawal. This emotional distancing can be seen as an adaptive strategy to keep 'functionality' in the job. Both, perception of emotional exhaustion and emotional distancing as a strategy, can be operationalized as 'Cool Down'. We assume that work stress associated variables are positively associated with Cool Down reactions, while internal and external resources are negatively associated and might function as a buffer against emotional distancing. Moreover, we assume that the perception of stress and work burden might be different between nurses and physicians and women and men, but not their cool down reactions as a strategy. Anonymous cross-sectional survey with standardized instruments among 1384 health care professionals (66% nurses, 34% hospital physicians). Analyses of variance, correlation and also stepwise regression analyses were performed to analyze the influence of demands and resources on Cool Down reactions. As measured with the Cool Down Index (CDI), frequency and strength of Cool Down reactions did not significantly differ between women and men, while women and men differ significantly for their burnout symptoms, stress perception and perceived work burden. With respect to profession, Cool Down and stress perception were not significantly different, but burnout and work burden. For nurses, "Emotional Exhaustion" was the best CDI predictor (51% explained variance), while in physicians it was "Depersonalization" (44% explained variance). Among putative resources which might buffer against Cool Down reactions, only team satisfaction and situational awareness had some influence, but not self-efficacy expectation. The perceptions of emotional exhaustion and distancing of nurses and physicians (and women and men

  5. The consumers' social media use in choosing physicians and hospitals: the case study of the province of Izmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Sarp, Nilgün; Yar, Cemre Eda; Bektaş, Meral; Hidir, Mehmet Nil; Korkmaz, Esin

    2017-01-01

    Manifested as a reflection of the Internet technology progress, web 2.0 has transformed communication among people to different dimensions while increasing the social use of Internet. Thus, the concept of social media has entered our lives. Blogs, forums, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube applications are but few of the social media platforms with active users exceeding millions. As in many other subjects, these and others are also environments where people share information and their positive or negative experiential views with respect to healthcare issues and services. Hence, the social media communication and exchange of information are deemed influential on the process of receiving health services. In the present study that aims to determine social media use of individuals in their choice of physicians, dentists and hospitals, a survey, as a data collection instrument, has been carried out to 947 residents of the province of Izmir. Individuals participating in the study have stated that they have used social media in choosing a physician (41.9% of the participants), dentist (34.1% of the participants) and hospitals (41.7% of the participants). The study has revealed that individuals are affected by social media in their healthcare choices. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Knowledge and Attitude of Physicians toward Prescribing Antibiotics and the Risk of Resistance in Two Reference Hospitals

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    Adel Alothman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antibiotics are essential and abundantly prescribed in hospitals because of their effectiveness and lifesaving benefits. However, the unnecessary use of antibiotics has been observed in earlier studies, and it has persisted through recent years as a major issue since it is one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance. The increase in antibiotic resistance nowadays is one of the most critical concerns in global public health around the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions related to antibiotic prescription among physicians at our medical centers. Method A cross-sectional survey of non-infectious diseases specialized physicians. The study was conducted during 2015 at two tertiary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Result Of the 107 returned questionnaires, 93 were complete and valuable. Most respondents (82% perceived antibiotic resistance to be a critical problem globally, and 78% also think that it is a very important national problem. These attitudes did not differ across specialty or level of training. Widespread antibiotic use and inappropriate empirical choices were believed by 81% of the participants to be important general causes of resistance. Only half of respondents thought that antibiotic restriction is a useful intervention to decrease the antibiotic resistance. The physicians believed educational interventions are the most useful and effective way to improve prescription patterns and decrease antibiotic resistance. Complications due to infection with resistant organisms were acknowledged by almost all of the participants, with some differences in their estimations of how often it will occur. Conclusion Antimicrobial resistance, globally and nationally, is considered as a serious threat, and physicians in this survey acknowledged that. Among the most significant factors is antimicrobial misuse, either by overprescribing or providing inappropriate drugs with some

  7. Strategy of health information seeking among physicians, medical residents, and students after introducing digital library and information technology in teaching hospitals of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    kahouei, Mehdi; Alaei, Safollah; Shariat Panahi, Sohaila Sadat Ghazavi; Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi

    2015-05-01

    It is important for physicians, medical students and health care organizations of developing countries to use reliable clinical information in order to deliver the best practice. Therefore, health sector of Iran endeavored to encourage physicians and medical students to integrate research findings into practice since 2005. Several educational interventions in the areas of information technology and databases were performed. Digital library was introduced in the teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these interventions increased the use of evidence-based health information resources among physicians, medical residents and students. This descriptive study involved 315 physicians, assistants and medical students in affiliated hospitals of Semnan University of medical sciences in 2013. A total 52.9% of physicians and 79.5% of medical residents and students always used patient data. 81.3% of physicians and 67.1% of medical residents and students reported using their own experiences, 26.5% of physicians and 16.9% of medical residents and students always used databases such as PubMed and MEDLINE for patient care. Our results revealed that in spite of providing educational and technical infrastructures for accomplishment of research utilization in medical education, the study subjects often identified and used what they regarded as reliable and relevant information from sources that do not truly represent the best evidence that is available. © 2015 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Eliciting views on antibiotic prescribing and resistance among hospital and outpatient care physicians in Berlin, Germany: results of a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Edward; Ziegelmann, Antina; Eckmanns, Tim; Krause, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    To better understand physicians' views on factors of influence for the prescribing of antibiotics and on antibiotic resistance in the Berlin region, Germany. Qualitative study with focus groups. Outpatient care and hospital care practice in the Berlin region, Germany. 7 General practitioners, two urologists, one paediatrician from outpatient care and eight internists, two paediatricians, two ear, nose and throat specialists and two urologists from hospital care. Physicians showed differential interest in topics related to antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance. Outpatient care physicians were interested in topics around their own prescribing, such as being able to diagnose and prescribe precisely, and topics about patient demand and non-compliance. Hospital care physicians were interested in hygiene challenges, limited consult time and multi-resistant pathogens. Physicians considered the development of resistance to be more in the domain of clinical treatment than that of the patient. Major challenges related to antibiotic resistance for this group of physicians are access to and clarity of treatment recommendations, implementation of hygienic measures, as well as increased outsourcing of laboratory services. Results raise questions about whether meeting physicians' expectations should be a focus when developing intervention that aims to influence antibiotic resistance in this and other areas of Germany.

  9. National Survey of Emergency Physicians Concerning Home-Based Care Options as Alternatives to Emergency Department-Based Hospital Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Amy R; Crowley, Christopher; Killeen, James; Castillo, Edward M

    2017-11-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) in the United States play a prominent role in hospital admissions, especially for the growing population of older adults. Home-based care, rather than hospital admission from the ED, provides an important alternative, especially for older adults who have a greater risk of adverse events, such as hospital-acquired infections, falls, and delirium. The objective of the survey was to understand emergency physicians' (EPs) perspectives on home-based care alternatives to hospitalization from the ED. Specific goals included determining how often EPs ordered home-based care, what they perceive as the barriers and motivators for more extensive ordering of home-based care, and the specific conditions and response times most appropriate for such care. A group of 1200 EPs nationwide were e-mailed a six-question survey. Participant response was 57%. Of these, 55% reported ordering home-based care from the ED within the past year as an alternative to hospital admission or observation, with most doing so less than once per month. The most common barrier was an "unsafe or unstable home environment" (73%). Home-based care as a "better setting to care for low-acuity chronic or acute disease exacerbation" was the top motivator (79%). Medical conditions EPs most commonly considered for home-based care were cellulitis, urinary tract infection, diabetes, and community-acquired pneumonia. Results suggest that EPs recognize there is a benefit to providing home-based care as an alternative to hospitalization, provided they felt the home was safe and a process was in place for dispositioning the patient to this setting. Better understanding of when and why EPs use home-based care pathways from the ED may provide suggestions for ways to promote wider adoption. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurse-physician collaboration impacts job satisfaction and turnover among nurses: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Huang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Yan, Hong; Li, Xiue

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to explore the impact of physician-nurse collaboration on nurse job satisfaction and turnover in a dental hospital. Physician-nurse collaboration is important for the stability of the entire nursing team. Few studies have shown the impact on job satisfaction and turnover among nurses working in Chinese dental hospitals. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study and investigated nurses from a tertiary dental hospital in Beijing using convenience non-randomized sampling. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which included general information, the Index of Work Satisfaction, the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale and the Turnover Intention Scale. The scores of physician-nurse collaboration correlated positively with those for job satisfaction and negatively with the stated likelihood of turnover intention. Physician-nurse collaboration scores positively predicted job satisfaction and negatively predicted the likelihood of quitting the current job. In conclusion, improving the level of physician-nurse collaboration is helpful to enhance job satisfaction and reduce turnover among nurses in a dental hospital. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Why should I talk about emotion? Communication patterns associated with physician discussion of patient expressions of negative emotion in hospital admission encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kristen; Cimino, Jenica E W; Arnold, Robert M; Anderson, Wendy G

    2012-10-01

    To describe hospital-based physicians' responses to patients' verbal expressions of negative emotion and identify patterns of further communication associated with different responses. Qualitative analysis of physician-patient admission encounters audio-recorded between August 2008 and March 2009 at two hospitals within a university system. A codebook was iteratively developed to identify patients' verbal expressions of negative emotion. We categorized physicians' responses by their immediate effect on further discussion of emotion - focused away (away), focused neither toward nor away (neutral), and focused toward (toward) - and examined further communication patterns following each response type. In 79 patients' encounters with 27 physicians, the median expression of negative emotion was 1, range 0-14. Physician responses were 25% away, 43% neutral, and 32% toward. Neutral and toward responses elicited patient perspectives, concerns, social and spiritual issues, and goals for care. Toward responses demonstrated physicians' support, contributing to physician-patient alignment and agreement about treatment. Responding to expressions of negative emotion neutrally or with statements that focus toward emotion elicits clinically relevant information and is associated with positive physician-patient relationship and care outcomes. Providers should respond to expressions of negative emotion with statements that allow for or explicitly encourage further discussion of emotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [The Rockefeller Foundation and its efforts toward a reorientation of German medicine and public health in the 1950s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiermacher, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    The Rockefeller Foundation invested substantial funds into promoting the development of public health as a discipline and a re-orientation of medical training in West Germany to support the democratization of German society. Not limiting itself to the simple provision of literature, the Foundation pursued a two-pronged strategy. Firstly, the Foundation organized a program for German university physicians and public health officers to visit various universities and teaching hospitals in the USA and Canada. A second aim was to establish training institutes for postgraduate physicians. However, rather than simply imposing the US model, the Foundation intended to adapt it to the German context, in the form of a postgraduate course for physicians that integrated practical experience with a university setting. My research to date shows that the Foundation's activities did not meet with much enthusiasm from German medical professionals. Intellectual, cultural, cognitive and political differences impaired constructive collaboration between the Foundation's staff and local practitioners and academics.

  13. Genome-based analysis of Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from German hospital patients, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Laura; Kaase, Martin; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Fuchs, Stephan; Reuss, Annicka; von Laer, Anja; Sin, Muna Abu; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Gatermann, Sören; Werner, Guido

    2018-01-01

    By using whole genome sequence data we aimed at describing a population snapshot of carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae isolated from hospitalized patients in Germany between 2008 and 2014. We selected a representative subset of 107 carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae clinical isolates possessing the four most prevalent carbapenemase types in Germany (KPC-2, KPC-3, OXA-48, NDM-1). Isolates were processed via illumina NGS. Data were analysed using different SNP-based mapping and de-novo assembly approaches. Relevant information was extracted from NGS data (antibiotic resistance determinants, wzi gene/ cps type, virulence genes). NGS data from the present study were also compared with 238 genome data from two previous international studies on K. pneumoniae. NGS-based analyses revealed a preferred prevalence of KPC-2-producing ST258 and KPC-3-producing ST512 isolates. OXA-48, being the most prevalent carbapenemase type in Germany, was associated with various K. pneumoniae strain types; most of them possessing IncL/M plasmid replicons suggesting a preferred dissemination of bla OXA-48 via this well-known plasmid type. Clusters ST15, ST147, ST258, and ST512 demonstrated an intermingled subset structure consisting of German and other European K. pneumoniae isolates. ST23 being the most frequent MLST type in Asia was found only once in Germany. This latter isolate contained an almost complete set of virulence genes and a K1 capsule suggesting occurrence of a hypervirulent ST23 strain producing OXA-48 in Germany. Our study results suggest prevalence of "classical" K. pneumonaie strain types associated with widely distributed carbapenemase genes such as ST258/KPC-2 or ST512/KPC-3 also in Germany. The finding of a supposed hypervirulent and OXA-48-producing ST23 K. pneumoniae isolates outside Asia is highly worrisome and requires intense molecular surveillance.

  14. [Acute pain therapy in German hospitals as competitive factor. Do competition, ownership and case severity influence the practice of acute pain therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Hinz, J; Meißner, W; Stamer, U; Bauer, M; Petzke, F

    2015-07-01

    Due to the implementation of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, the competitive pressure on German hospitals increased. In this context it has been shown that acute pain management offers economic benefits for hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the competitive situation, the ownership and the economic resources required on structures and processes for acute pain management. A standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management was mailed to the 885 directors of German departments of anesthesiology listed as members of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin). For most hospitals a strong regional competition existed; however, this parameter affected neither the implementation of structures nor the recommended treatment processes for pain therapy. In contrast, a clear preference for hospitals in private ownership to use the benchmarking tool QUIPS (quality improvement in postoperative pain therapy) was found. These hospitals also presented information on coping with the management of pain in the corporate clinic mission statement more often and published information about the quality of acute pain management in the quality reports more frequently. No differences were found between hospitals with different forms of ownership in the implementation of acute pain services, quality circles, expert standard pain management and the implementation of recommended processes. Hospitals with a higher case mix index (CMI) had a certified acute pain management more often. The corporate mission statement of these hospitals also contained information on how to cope with pain, presentation of the quality of pain management in the quality report, implementation of quality circles and the implementation of the expert standard pain management more frequently. There were no differences in the frequency of using the benchmarking

  15. Does the professional attitude of physicians always affect their professional behaviour? A survey in tertiary hospitals in Nanchang City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Wang, Xuan; Du, Xin; Du, Xin; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Chenxi; Zhang, Xinping; Zhang, Xinping

    2018-03-23

    Objective Understanding the effect of professional attitude on professional behaviour is conducive to the development of targeted measures to promote professionalism. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of professional attitude on professional behaviour. Methods Using a self-reported questionnaire, 212 physicians were surveyed using quota sampling in six tertiary hospitals in Nanchang City. The effect of professional attitude on professional behaviour was analysed through logistic regression analysis. Results Providing necessary care regardless of a patient's ability to pay, working on quality improvement initiatives, informing patients of medical errors and reporting incompetent colleagues had significant positive effects on corresponding professional behaviour (odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) 11.06 (3.78, 32.40), 9.42 (1.93, 46.01), 4.04 (1.29, 12.63) and 5.51 (1.26, 24.08) respectively). However, attitudes towards minimising disparities in care, undergoing periodic recertification examinations and reporting medical errors did not significantly affect corresponding professional behaviour. Conclusions Professional attitude affects professional behaviour, but such an effect varies with different professional norms. These findings imply that improving the professional attitude is useful but insufficient to promote medical professionalism. A management system conducive to the conversion of professional attitude to professional behaviour should be established. What is known about the topic? Several studies have affirmed that Chinese physicians accept most areas of medical professionalism embodied in the Charter on Medical Professionalism. However, only a few published studies have examined the effect of professional attitude on professional behaviour. Understanding the effect of professional attitude on professional behaviour is conducive to the development of targeted measures to promote professionalism. The present study attempted to fill

  16. [Salary and clinical productivity among physicians in Norwegian somatic hospitals 2001-2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Karl-Arne

    2010-09-23

    Analysis of the future need for medical doctors necessitates an assessment of their productivity. The goals of this study were to analyze the relation between doctors' work force and the increased activity in hospitals, and to describe the development of working hours and salary for hospital doctors in a gender perspective. Information about man-labour years, working time and salary for doctors in Norwegian somatic hospitals was retrieved for the period 2001-2008. Number of hospital stays, DRG points and outpatient consultations per man-labour year are used as measures of doctors' clinical productivity. The percentage of female doctors increased from 34.7 % to 42.2 %. The mean annual salary increased more for men (14.4 % higher in 2001 and 16.6 % higher in 2008) than women. Total salary costs for doctors increased by 69.9 % (from 3.66 bill to 6.22 bill. NOK); 42.6 % of this increase was generated by new positions (1 306 man-labour years, + 21.2 %). Labour years from extended working hours increased by 6.8 % (constituting 1043 labour years in 2008; 12.2 % of the total), but the average extended labour time per doctor decreased (-16.7 % for women and -9.6 % for men). The number of hospital stays increased by 13.2 %, DRG points increased by 12.4 % and outpatient consultations increased by 9.3 % per doctor's work year in the period 2001-2008. Higher salaries for men may be explained by age, more men in senior positions and longer working hours than for women. The productivity of Norwegian doctors still increased from 2001 to 2008 (taking into account the increase in salary).

  17. Evaluation of psychometric properties of the German Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and its potential for cross-cultural comparisons: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambashidze, Nikoloz; Hammer, Antje; Brösterhaus, Mareen; Manser, Tanja

    2017-11-09

    To study the psychometric characteristics of German version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and to compare its dimensionality to other language versions in order to understand the instrument's potential for cross-national studies. Cross-sectional multicentre study to establish psychometric properties of German version of the survey instrument. 73 units from 37 departments of two German university hospitals. Clinical personnel (n=995 responses, response rate 39.6%). Psychometric properties (eg, model fit, internal consistency, construct validity) of the instrument and comparison of dimensionality across different language translations. The instrument demonstrated acceptable to good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.64-0.88). Confirmatory factor analysis of the original 12-factor model resulted in marginally satisfactory model fit (root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA)=0.05; standardised root mean residual (SRMR)=0.05; comparative fit index (CFI)=0.90; goodness of fit index (GFI)=0.88; Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI)=0.88). Exploratory factor analysis resulted in an alternative eight-factor model with good model fit (RMSEA=0.05; SRMR=0.05; CFI=0.95; GFI=0.91; TLI=0.94) and good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.73-0.87) and construct validity. Analysis of the dimensionality compared with models from 10 other language versions revealed eight dimensions with relatively stable composition and appearance across different versions and four dimensions requiring further improvement. The German version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties for use in German hospitals. However, our comparison of instrument dimensionality across different language versions indicates limitations concerning cross-national studies. Results of this study can be considered in interpreting findings across national contexts, in further refinement of the instrument for cross-national studies and in better

  18. Evaluation of an inpatient psychiatric hospital physician education program and adherence to American Diabetes Association practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Robin L; Mican, Lisa M; Lopez, Debra A; Barner, Jamie C

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations for diabetes monitoring following an educational intervention for physicians in an inpatient psychiatric hospital. This retrospective chart review was conducted in an inpatient psychiatric institution from July 1, 2010-January 15, 2011. A total of 120 subjects (60 subjects each in the pre- and post-intervention groups) meeting the inclusion criteria served as the study sample. Included subjects were admitted and discharged from an inpatient psychiatric institution within 90 days prior to (pre-intervention) and following (post-intervention) the physician education program. The medical staff was presented an educational program intervention, consisting of a 30 minute overview of the ADA 2010 Standards of Care recommendations and distribution of laminated treatment reminders. Electronic grouped order sets for patients with diabetes were also created and implemented. The primary outcome was change (pre-intervention to post-intervention) in frequency of hemoglobin A1c documentation on admission following the intervention. Secondary outcomes included the change in frequency of documentation of fasting plasma glucose, serum creatinine, urine creatinine/microalbumin ratio (UMA), fasting lipid profile (FLP), and change in days on sliding scale insulin. Regarding change in frequency of documentation of A1c values on admission, chi-square analysis revealed a significant increase from pre-intervention to post-intervention period of 30% (n = 18) to 61.7% (n = 37), respectively (p = 0.0005). Documentation of FLP also significantly increased [73.3% vs. 91.7% (p = 0.0082)]. There were no significant differences in the documentation of fasting plasma glucose, serum creatinine, and UMA or days treated with sliding scale insulin. The physician education program was successful in increasing the assessment of A1c values and lipid profiles for patients with diabetes mellitus in a psychiatric

  19. The effect of a resident-led quality improvement project on improving communication between hospital-based and outpatient physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanithi, Lucy; Coffey, Charles E; Mourad, Michelle; Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Hollander, Harry; Ranji, Sumant R

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a resident-led quality improvement program to improve communication between inpatient internal medicine residents and their patients' primary care physicians (PCPs). The program included education on care transitions, standardization of documentation, audit and feedback of documented PCP communication rates with public reporting of performance, rapid-cycle data analysis and improvement projects, and a financial incentive. At baseline, PCP communication was documented in 55% of patients; after implementation of the intervention, communication was documented in 89.3% (2477 of 2772) of discharges during the program period. The program was associated with a significant increase in referring PCP satisfaction with communication at hospital admission (baseline, 27.7% "satisfied" or "very satisfied"; postintervention, 58.2%; P communication for patient care and audit and feedback of their performance as the principal drivers of their engagement in the project.

  20. The Evolving Relationships Between Hospital, Physician and Patient in Modern American Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C B Garner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the ways in which health care has evolved over the past few years for patients, doctors and hospitals in the United States, and the impact these changes have made on modern American health care. As the amount of money the nation spends on health care continues to increase at alarming rates, patients, doctors, and hospitals all appear to have greater struggles than before.This inherent disconnection between the changes in American health care system and the satisfaction of patients and providers leaves much to be desired and considered. Before a solution can be found, however, we must first understand the problem.

  1. Online detection of potential duplicate medications and changes of physician behavior for outpatients visiting multiple hospitals using national health insurance smart cards in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Min-Huei; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Chien-Hsiang; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2011-03-01

    Doctor shopping (or hospital shopping), which means changing doctors (or hospitals) without professional referral for the same or similar illness conditions, is common in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Japan. Due to the lack of infrastructure for sharing health information and medication history among hospitals, doctor-shopping patients are more likely to receive duplicate medications and suffer adverse drug reactions. The Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards) as health cards in Taiwan. With their NHI-IC cards, patients can freely access different medical institutions. Because an NHI-IC card carries information about a patient's prescribed medications received from different hospitals nationwide, we used this system to address the problem of duplicate medications for outpatients visiting multiple hospitals. A computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system was enhanced with the capability of accessing NHI-IC cards and providing alerts to physicians when the system detects potential duplicate medications at the time of prescribing. Physician responses to the alerts were also collected to analyze changes in physicians' behavior. Chi-square tests and two-sided z-tests with Bonferroni adjustments for multiple comparisons were used to assess statistical significance of differences in actions taken by physicians over the three months. The enhanced CPOE system for outpatient services was implemented and installed at the Pediatric and Urology Departments of Taipei Medical University Wan-Fang Hospital in March 2007. The "Change Log" that recorded physician behavior was activated during a 3-month study period from April to June 2007. In 67.93% of patient visits, the physicians read patient NHI-IC cards, and in 16.76% of the reads, the NHI-IC card contained at least one prescribed medication that was taken by the patient. Among the prescriptions issued by physicians, on average, there were 2.36% prescriptions containing at least one

  2. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  3. Psychopathology of the General Population Referred by Primary Care Physicians for Urgent Assessment in Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith McLenan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the type, severity and progression of psychiatric pathologies in a sample of 372 outpatients (age range 18–65 years referred by their primary general practitioners (GPs to an Urgent Referral Team (URT based in a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. This team offers immediate appointments (1- to 7-day delays for rapid assessments and early interventions to the outpatients referred by their primary family doctors.Method: One-sample t-test and z statistic were used for data analysis. From the total population, a convenience sample of 40 people was selected and assessed to evaluate whether follow-up appointments after the first visit could reduce the severity of suicidal ideation, depression and anxiety in the outpatients seen by the URT. A two-sample t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess the variations in the scores during the follow-up visits.Results: We found a statistically significant prevalence of depressive disorders, comorbid with anxiety at first presentation in people who were females, white, never married, living with a partner, not studying and not in paid employment. The common presentation of borderline personality disorder and dysthymia in this population underscores its vulnerability to major socioeconomic challenges.Conclusion: The data confirmed the impact that primary care cooperation with psychiatric hospitals can have on the psychiatric system, and as a reflection, on the population’s mental health and well-being. In fact, active cooperation and early diagnosis and intervention will help detect cases at risk in the general population and reduce admissions into hospitals.

  4. The current state of physical activity and exercise programs in German-speaking, Swiss psychiatric hospitals: results from a brief online survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Colledge, Flora; Beeler, Nadja; Pühse, Uwe; Kalak, Nadeem; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Mikoteit, Thorsten; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity and exercise programs (PAEPs) are an important factor in increasing and maintaining physical and mental health. This holds particularly true for patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital. To understand whether the benefits reported in the literature are mirrored in current treatment modalities, the aim of the present study was to assess the current state of PAEPs in psychiatric hospitals in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Methods All psychiatric hospitals (N=55) in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were contacted in spring 2014. Staff responsible for PAEPs were asked to complete an online questionnaire covering questions related to PAEPs such as type, frequency, staff training, treatment rationale, importance of PAEPs within the treatment strategy, and possible avenues to increase PAEPs. Results Staff members of 48 different psychiatric hospitals completed the survey. Hospitals provided the following therapeutic treatments: relaxation techniques (100%), sports therapy (97%), activity-related psychotherapeutic interventions (95%), physiotherapy (85%), body therapies (59%), far-east techniques (57%), and hippotherapy (22%). Frequencies ranged from once/week to five times/week. Approximately 25% of patients participated in the PAEPs. Interventions were offered irrespective of psychiatric disorders. PAEP providers wanted and needed more vocational training. Conclusion All participating psychiatric hospitals offer a broad variety of PAEPs in their treatment curricula. However, the majority of inpatients do not participate in PAEPs. Furthermore, those who do participate cannot continue to do so following discharge. PAEP providers need specific extended vocational trainings and believe that the potential of PA should be improved. PMID:27350748

  5. The current state of physical activity and exercise programs in German-speaking, Swiss psychiatric hospitals: results from a brief online survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Br

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Serge Brand,1,2 Flora Colledge,2 Nadja Beeler,2 Uwe Pühse,2 Nadeem Kalak,1 Dena Sadeghi Bahmani,1 Thorsten Mikoteit,1 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,1 Markus Gerber2 1Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, 2Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: Physical activity and exercise programs (PAEPs are an important factor in increasing and maintaining physical and mental health. This holds particularly true for patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital. To understand whether the benefits reported in the literature are mirrored in current treatment modalities, the aim of the present study was to assess the current state of PAEPs in psychiatric hospitals in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Methods: All psychiatric hospitals (N=55 in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were contacted in spring 2014. Staff responsible for PAEPs were asked to complete an online questionnaire covering questions related to PAEPs such as type, frequency, staff training, treatment rationale, importance of PAEPs within the treatment strategy, and possible avenues to increase PAEPs. Results: Staff members of 48 different psychiatric hospitals completed the survey. Hospitals provided the following therapeutic treatments: relaxation techniques (100%, sports therapy (97%, activity-related psychotherapeutic interventions (95%, physiotherapy (85%, body therapies (59%, far-east techniques (57%, and hippotherapy (22%. Frequencies ranged from once/week to five times/week. Approximately 25% of patients participated in the PAEPs. Interventions were offered irrespective of psychiatric disorders. PAEP providers wanted and needed more vocational training. Conclusion: All participating psychiatric hospitals offer a broad variety of PAEPs in their treatment curricula. However, the majority of inpatients do not

  6. Ischaemic stroke management by emergency care physicians at public sector hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luni, F.K.; Hamid, S.A.; Mamji, S.; Baig, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the clinicians management of patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke in the emergency departments of two large state run hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. A questionnaire was filled by 59 registered medical practitioners working at these two government hospitals who would be managing stroke patients presenting in the emergency. It was a descriptive cross sectional study designed to assess the methods used by the doctors for diagnosing and treating stroke patients. The data was collected from October to November 2007 and entered using Epi Data Entry and analyzed by SPSS 13.0. Results: The preferred overall investigation for a suspected stroke patient in an emergency ward was an ECG (98%). 51% of the respondents would prescribe aspirin to most patients (300 mg by 40% respondents). Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was thought to be beneficial by 43% of doctors, low molecular weight heparin by 91%, subcutaneous heparin by 86.5%, intravenous Vitamin B complex by 20% and steroids by 39% of respondents. Regarding elevated blood pressure, 60% answered that they would manage the blood pressure according to the type of stroke and 73% responded that they would lower blood pressure when it reached greater than 150/80. 88% of the doctors answered that they would use cholesterol lowering drugs in the management of stroke patients in an emergency. 97% of the doctors recommended rehabilitation and 88% of the respondents believed that there should be separate stroke units. Conclusion: The development of a standardized protocol and stroke team is recommended which should speed the clinical assessment, decisions for early management and also increase the performance of diagnostic studies. (author)

  7. Death certificate completion skills of hospital physicians in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ahmed Suleman; Shamim, Kanza; Siddiqui, Najm Hasan; Irfan, Muhammad; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2013-06-06

    Death certificates (DC) can provide valuable health status data regarding disease incidence, prevalence and mortality in a community. It can guide local health policy and help in setting priorities. Incomplete and inaccurate DC data, on the other hand, can significantly impair the precision of a national health information database. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of death certificates at a tertiary care teaching hospital in a Karachi, Pakistan. A retrospective study conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan for a period of six months. Medical records and death certificates of all patients who died under adult medical service were studied. The demographic characteristics, administrative details, co-morbidities and cause of death from death certificates were collected using an approved standardized form. Accuracy of this information was validated using their medical records. Errors in the death certificates were classified into six categories, from 0 to 5 according to increasing severity; a grade 0 was assigned if no errors were identified, and 5, if an incorrect cause of death was attributed or placed in an improper sequence. 223 deaths occurred during the study period. 9 certificates were not accessible and 12 patients had incomplete medical records. 202 certificates were finally analyzed. Most frequent errors pertaining to patients' demographics (92%) and cause/s of death (87%) were identified. 156 (77%) certificates had 3 or more errors and 124 (62%) certificates had a combination of errors that significantly changed the death certificate interpretation. Only 1% certificates were error free. A very high rate of errors was identified in death certificates completed at our academic institution. There is a pressing need for appropriate intervention/s to resolve this important issue.

  8. Use of and attitudes to a hospital information system by medical secretaries, nurses and physicians deprived of the paper-based medical record: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsen Tom H

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most hospitals keep and update their paper-based medical records after introducing an electronic medical record or a hospital information system (HIS. This case report describes a HIS in a hospital where the paper-based medical records are scanned and eliminated. To evaluate the HIS comprehensively, the perspectives of medical secretaries and nurses are described as well as that of physicians. Methods We have used questionnaires and interviews to assess and compare frequency of use of the HIS for essential tasks, task performance and user satisfaction among medical secretaries, nurses and physicians. Results The medical secretaries use the HIS much more than the nurses and the physicians, and they consider that the electronic HIS greatly has simplified their work. The work of nurses and physicians has also become simplified, but they find less satisfaction with the system, particularly with the use of scanned document images. Conclusions Although the basis for reference is limited, the results support the assertion that replacing the paper-based medical record primarily benefits the medical secretaries, and to a lesser degree the nurses and the physicians. The varying results in the different employee groups emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating a HIS.

  9. Attitudes of Nurses and Physicians About Clinical Autopsy in Neonatal and Adult Hospital Care: A Survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjörnheim, Berit; Rosendahl, Anders; Eriksson, Lennart C; Takman, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The rate of autopsies has dropped to low levels in Western countries. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences and attitudes of registered nurses (RNs) and physicians (MD) toward clinical autopsies in neonatal and adult hospital care in Sweden. RNs and MDs in neonatal and adult care specialized clinics at a university-affiliated hospital in Sweden were surveyed. Survey responses were tallied, and free-text comments were assessed with qualitative content analysis. Three hundred thirty-six surveys were distributed; the response rate was 35%. Most RNs and 14% of the MDs had limited or no experience participating in an autopsy. Notably, few RNs and approximately one third of the MDs were familiar with the autopsy processes and the treatment of the deceased person's body after an autopsy. More than one third of RNs had experience with talking to relatives regarding autopsy. Most agreed that an autopsy could be supportive for relatives during the grieving process and beneficial for the quality of healthcare. Most MDs (70%) thought that autopsies should be performed more frequently. Qualitative results emphasized that RNs and MDs thought that autopsy information supported the grieving process of relatives-especially parents who had lost a child. The survey data confirm belief in the value of clinical autopsies in neonatal and adult hospital care. RNs and MDs should receive training about the autopsy process and procedures for obtaining consent for an autopsy. RNs are in a position to support the decision making of relatives about providing consent for autopsy and have an opportunity to take a more active role in the autopsy process.

  10. Transfusion practice in anemic, non-bleeding patients: Cross-sectional survey of physicians working in general internal medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Babo, Michelle; Chmiel, Corinne; Müggler, Simon Andreas; Rakusa, Julia; Schuppli, Caroline; Meier, Philipp; Fischler, Manuel; Urner, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Transfusion practice might significantly influence patient morbidity and mortality. Between European countries, transfusion practice of red blood cells (RBC) greatly differs. Only sparse data are available on transfusion practice of general internal medicine physicians in Switzerland. In this cross-sectional survey, physicians working in general medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland were investigated regarding their self-reported transfusion practice in anemic patients without acute bleeding. The definition of anemia, transfusion triggers, knowledge on RBC transfusion, and implementation of guidelines were assessed. 560 physicians of 71 hospitals (64%) responded to the survey. Anemia was defined at very diverging hemoglobin values (by 38% at a hemoglobin Switzerland. Identifying and subsequently correcting this deficit in knowledge translation may have a significant impact on patient care.

  11. Physicians' Job Satisfaction.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    doctors and retention of the existing doctors, in addition to the ... an employee's well-being Examples of job resources are job ..... increase physician job satisfaction for ensuring the .... both pay and benefits physicians at private hospitals.

  12. Evaluation of communication between physicians and patients in Astana City Hospital №1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anara Zhumadilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Communication between patients and health care providers is important for the effective functioning of health care systems. Miscommunication often stems from discrepancies in expectations of both healthcare professionals and patients due to cultural and historical influences. We investigated the degree to which health care providers (doctors and nurses and patients in Kazakhstan believe that interaction between doctors and patients should be doctor- or patient-oriented. Material and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 163 patients and 176 health care providers (71 doctors and 105 nurses in a general hospital in Astana, Kazakhstan. The subjects completed a structured questionnaire containing the Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS, and scales assessing life and job satisfaction, effort-reward balance of healthcare professionals, and the patients’ perceptions of communication practices. Results: An overwhelming majority of doctors (81.7%, nurses (88.1%, and patients (92.3% were doctor-oriented. Among health care providers, PPOS was not associated with age, sex, life and job satisfaction, or effort-reward imbalance. Among patients, PPOS was not associated with age, sex, or specialty of health care provider. However, higher PPOS among patients (indicating preference for patient-oriented interaction was associated with higher satisfaction with communication with health care providers and, less strongly, with their life satisfaction. Conclusion: The main finding of this study is the very small proportion of doctors, nurses and patients who believe that interaction should be patient-oriented. These results highlight the necessity of improvement of communication among health care providers towards patient-oriented approach in order to decrease miscommunication with patients. The fact that most patients prefer doctor-oriented interaction may reflect historical stereotypes; educational/information interventions among

  13. A risk-model for hospital mortality among patients with severe sepsis or septic shock based on German national administrative claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Daniel; Fleischmann-Struzek, Carolin; Rüddel, Hendrik; Reinhart, Konrad; Thomas-Rüddel, Daniel O

    2018-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of preventable deaths in hospitals. Feasible and valid methods for comparing quality of sepsis care between hospitals are needed. The aim of this study was to develop a risk-adjustment model suitable for comparing sepsis-related mortality between German hospitals. We developed a risk-model using national German claims data. Since these data are available with a time-lag of 1.5 years only, the stability of the model across time was investigated. The model was derived from inpatient cases with severe sepsis or septic shock treated in 2013 using logistic regression with backward selection and generalized estimating equations to correct for clustering. It was validated among cases treated in 2015. Finally, the model development was repeated in 2015. To investigate secular changes, the risk-adjusted trajectory of mortality across the years 2010-2015 was analyzed. The 2013 deviation sample consisted of 113,750 cases; the 2015 validation sample consisted of 134,851 cases. The model developed in 2013 showed good validity regarding discrimination (AUC = 0.74), calibration (observed mortality in 1st and 10th risk-decile: 11%-78%), and fit (R2 = 0.16). Validity remained stable when the model was applied to 2015 (AUC = 0.74, 1st and 10th risk-decile: 10%-77%, R2 = 0.17). There was no indication of overfitting of the model. The final model developed in year 2015 contained 40 risk-factors. Between 2010 and 2015 hospital mortality in sepsis decreased from 48% to 42%. Adjusted for risk-factors the trajectory of decrease was still significant. The risk-model shows good predictive validity and stability across time. The model is suitable to be used as an external algorithm for comparing risk-adjusted sepsis mortality among German hospitals or regions based on administrative claims data, but secular changes need to be taken into account when interpreting risk-adjusted mortality.

  14. Success of commonly used operating room management tools in reducing tardiness of first case of the day starts: evidence from German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Christian; Szczesny, Andrea; Soderstrom, Naomi; Siegmund, Frank; Schleppers, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    One of the declared objectives of surgical suite management in Germany is to increase operating room (OR) efficiency by reducing tardiness of first case of the day starts. We analyzed whether the introduction of OR management tools by German hospitals in response to increasing economic pressure was successful in achieving this objective. The OR management tools we considered were the appointment of an OR manager and the development and adoption of a surgical suite governance document (OR charter). We hypothesized that tardiness of first case starts was less in ORs that have adopted one or both of these tools. Using representative 2005 survey data from 107 German anesthesiology departments, we used a Tobit model to estimate the effect of the introduction of an OR manager or OR charter on tardiness of first case starts, while controlling for hospital size and surgical suite complexity. Adoption reduced tardiness of first case starts by at least 7 minutes (mean reduction 15 minutes, 95% confidence interval (CI): 7-22 minutes, P case starts figure prominently the objectives of surgical suite management in Germany. Our results suggest that the appointment of an OR manager or the adoption of an OR charter support this objective. For short-term decision making on the day of surgery, this reduction in tardiness may have economic implications, because it reduced overutilized OR time.

  15. Inpatient iron deficiency detection and management: how do general physicians and gastroenterologists perform in a tertiary care hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Muhammad W; Andrews, Jane M; Thomas, Josephine; Saffouri, Eliana

    2017-08-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is often an indicator of underlying pathology. Early detection and treatment avoids long-term morbidity and allows for prompt iron repletion, avoiding ID anaemia (IDA) and the need for blood transfusion. To evaluate the management of ID in two internal medicine units (general medical (GM) and gastroenterology (GE)) in a large metropolitan hospital and compare it to international guidelines. All consecutive inpatient admissions in the GM and GE units were retrospectively reviewed until 40 patients in each service were identified with anaemia and/or microcytic hypochromic blood counts. Patient records and electronic discharge summaries were then reviewed to assess the recognition, investigation and management of these abnormalities. Overall, only 60% (48/80) of the cases of microcytic hypochromic picture and/or anaemia were recognised. Cases were more likely to be detected under the GE unit, 77.5% (31/40) versus 42% (17/40) in GM (P < 0.002). Of the 31 recognised GE cases, 28 (90%) were investigated further with iron studies and/or endoscopic procedures. ID was confirmed in nearly half (5/11) of those tested; however, only 2 of 5 received iron replacement. Among GM patients, only 11 of the 17 recognised cases (64%) were investigated further. Iron studies were performed in all 11, confirming IDA in 4 (36%), all of whom received intravenous iron. A faecal human haemoglobin test was performed in two GM patients and one GE patient. There remains significant room for improvement in the recognition, investigation and management of ID in hospital practice in Australia. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. [Patient endangerment due to device diversity? : Discussion of a risk factor based on the results of two surveys of German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, K; Brinker, A; Nowak, M; Zöllner, C; Lauer, W

    2018-05-25

    The Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) was notified of an event in which it was not possible to sufficiently ventilate a patient suffering a severe asthma attack. It turned out that the ventilation pressures used by the device for pressure-controlled ventilation were below the values set by the user, which the user was not aware of. The ventilation pressures chosen by the user exceeded the preset alarm limits of the ventilator. This pressure and alarm management significantly differed from that of other ventilators used in the hospital. This and similar incident reports suggest that safely operating medical devices for anesthesia and intensive care may be impaired when different models of a device are used within a hospital. If different models are used, more device information needs to be stored in memory. Existing knowledge on human memory suggests that the more individual memory items (e. g. different operating rules) are stored, the greater the risk of memory interference and hence of impaired retrieval, particularly if the different items are associated with overlapping retrieval cues. This is the case when different devices are used for a single functional purpose under identical or similar circumstances. Based on individual incident reports and theoretical knowledge on an association between device diversity and use problems, this study aimed to determine the organizational conditions regarding device diversity that prevail in German hospitals. Additionally, the anesthetists' perspectives and experiences in defined clinical settings were investigated. For selected groups of medical devices, the biomedical engineers of German hospitals were surveyed about the different makes used in their hospital. Additionally, questionnaires were sent to a department of anesthesiology of a large University Hospital to investigate the personal experiences of working with different makes and models of a device. Using devices by different

  17. The prevalence of common mental disorders among hospital physicians and their association with self-reported work ability: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruitenburg Martijn M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied the prevalence of common mental disorders among Dutch hospital physicians and investigated whether the presence of a mental disorder was associated with insufficient self-reported work ability. Methods A questionnaire was sent to all (n = 958 hospital physicians of one academic medical center, using validated scales to assess burnout, work-related fatigue, stress, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety and depression. Furthermore, respondents were asked to rate their current work ability against the work ability in their own best period (adapted version of the first WAI item. The prevalence of each common mental disorder was calculated. In addition, odds ratios of reporting insufficient work ability for subjects with high complaint scores compared to physicians with low complaint scores were calculated for each mental disorder. Results The response rate was 51%, and 423 questionnaires were eligible for analysis. The mental disorder prevalence rates were as follows: work-related fatigue 42%, depression 29%, anxiety 24%, posttraumatic stress complaints 15%, stress complaints 15% and burnout 6%. The mean score for self-reported work ability was 8.1 (range 0–10, and 4% of respondents rated their own work ability as insufficient. Physicians with high mental health complaints were 3.5- for fatigue, 5.6- for PTSD, 7.1- for anxiety, 9.5- for burnout, 10.8- for depression and 13.6-fold for stress more likely to report their work ability as insufficient. Conclusions The prevalence of common mental disorders among hospital physicians varied from 6% for burnout to 42% for work-related fatigue. Those physicians with high complaints had significantly 4- to 14 times increased odds of reporting their own work ability as insufficient. This work suggests that to ensure future workers health and patients safety occupational health services should plan appropriate intervention strategies.

  18. Can We Do That Here? Establishing the Scope of Surgical Practice at a New Safety-Net Community Hospital Through a Transparent, Collaborative Review of Physician Privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sean M; Seresinghe, Sarah; Sharma, Arun; Russell, Tara A; Crawford, L'Orangerie; Frencher, Stanley K

    2018-01-01

    Stewarding of physician privileges wisely is imperative, but no guidelines exist for how to incorporate system-level factors in privileging decisions. A newly opened, safety-net community hospital tailored the scope of surgical practice through review of physician privileges. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital is a public-private partnership, safety-net institution in South Los Angeles that opened in July 2015. It has 131 beds, including a 28-bed emergency department, a 20-bed ICU, and 5 operating rooms. Staff privileging decisions were initially based only on physicians' training and experience, but this resulted in several cases that tested the boundaries of what a small community hospital was prepared to handle. A collaborative, transparent process to review physician privileges was developed. This began with physician-only review of procedure lists, followed by a larger, multidisciplinary group to assess system-level factors. Specific questions were used to guide discussion, and unanimous approval from all stakeholders was required to include a procedure. An initial list of 558 procedures across 11 specialties was reduced to 321 (57.5%). No new cases that fall outside these new boundaries have arisen. An inclusive process was crucial for obtaining buy-in and establishing cultural norms. Arranging transfer agreements remains a significant challenge. Accumulation of institutional experience continues through regular performance reviews. As this hospital's capabilities mature, a blueprint has been established for expanding surgical scope of practice based explicitly on system-level factors. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Who Do Hospital Physicians and Nurses Go to for Advice About Medications? A Social Network Analysis and Examination of Prescribing Error Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswick, Nerida; Westbrook, Johanna Irene

    2015-09-01

    To measure the weekly medication advice-seeking networks of hospital staff, to compare patterns across professional groups, and to examine these in the context of prescribing error rates. A social network analysis was conducted. All 101 staff in 2 wards in a large, academic teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, were surveyed (response rate, 90%) using a detailed social network questionnaire. The extent of weekly medication advice seeking was measured by density of connections, proportion of reciprocal relationships by reciprocity, number of colleagues to whom each person provided advice by in-degree, and perceptions of amount and impact of advice seeking between physicians and nurses. Data on prescribing error rates from the 2 wards were compared. Weekly medication advice-seeking networks were sparse (density: 7% ward A and 12% ward B). Information sharing across professional groups was modest, and rates of reciprocation of advice were low (9% ward A, 14% ward B). Pharmacists provided advice to most people, and junior physicians also played central roles. Senior physicians provided medication advice to few people. Many staff perceived that physicians rarely sought advice from nurses when prescribing, but almost all believed that an increase in communication between physicians and nurses about medications would improve patient safety. The medication networks in ward B had higher measures for density, reciprocation, and fewer senior physicians who were isolates. Ward B had a significantly lower rate of both procedural and clinical prescribing errors than ward A (0.63 clinical prescribing errors per admission [95%CI, 0.47-0.79] versus 1.81/ admission [95%CI, 1.49-2.13]). Medication advice-seeking networks among staff on hospital wards are limited. Hubs of advice provision include pharmacists, junior physicians, and senior nurses. Senior physicians are poorly integrated into medication advice networks. Strategies to improve the advice-giving networks between senior

  20. [The German physician and pacifist Georg Friedrich Nicolai (1874-1964) as a pupil of the Russian physiologist Ivan Petrovic Pavlov (1849-1936)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kästner, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    In 1906, Dr. med. Georg Friedrich Nicolai, a young specialist in the field of electrocardiography from the university of Berlin, spent some months in the laboratory of Pavlov, where he was one of the first German visitors. Two letters written by Nicolai to Pavlov are a mirror of Nicolai's admiration for the brilliant Russian Nobel prize winner, but also of Nicolai's remarkable insight into the perspectives of Pavlov's physiological method for "objective" psychological investigations. Nicolai regarded himself a pupil of Pavlov until his death in South America, where he was forced to emigrate after World War I due to his pacifist activities.

  1. Infection prevention during anaesthesia ventilation by the use of breathing system filters (BSF): Joint recommendation by German Society of Hospital Hygiene (DGKH) and German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (DGAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Kranabetter, Rainer; Rathgeber, Jörg; Züchner, Klaus; Assadian, Ojan; Daeschlein, Georg; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Dietlein, Edeltrut; Exner, Martin; Gründling, Matthias; Lehmann, Christian; Wendt, Michael; Graf, Bernhard Martin; Holst, Dietmar; Jatzwauk, Lutz; Puhlmann, Birgit; Welte, Thomas; Wilkes, Antony R

    2010-09-21

    An interdisciplinary working group from the German Society of Hospital Hygiene (DGKH) and the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (DGAI) worked out the following recommendations for infection prevention during anaesthesia by using breathing system filters (BSF). The BSF shall be changed after each patient. The filter retention efficiency for airborne particles is recommended to be >99% (II). The retention performance of BSF for liquids is recommended to be at pressures of at least 60 hPa (=60 mbar) or 20 hPa above the selected maximum ventilation pressure in the anaesthetic system. The anaesthesia breathing system may be used for a period of up to 7 days provided that the functional requirements of the system remain unchanged and the manufacturer states this in the instructions for use.THE BREATHING SYSTEM AND THE MANUAL VENTILATION BAG ARE CHANGED IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE RESPECTIVE ANAESTHESIA IF THE FOLLOWING SITUATION HAS OCCURRED OR IT IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE OCCURRED: Notifiable infectious disease involving the risk of transmission via the breathing system and the manual bag, e.g. tuberculosis, acute viral hepatitis, measles, influenza virus, infection and/or colonisation with a multi-resistant pathogen or upper or lower respiratory tract infections. In case of visible contamination e.g. by blood or in case of defect, it is required that the BSF and also the anaesthesia breathing system is changed and the breathing gas conducting parts of the anaesthesia ventilator are hygienically reprocessed.Observing of the appropriate hand disinfection is very important. All surfaces of the anaesthesia equipment exposed to hand contact must be disinfected after each case.

  2. Do hospital physicians really want to go digital? Acceptance of a picture archiving and communication system in a university hospital; Moechten Krankenhausaerzte wirklich auf digitale Systeme umsteigen? Die Akzeptanz gegenueber einem Bildarchivierungs- und Uebermittlungssystem in einer Universitaetsklinik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duyck, P.; Pynoo, B.; Devolder, P.; Voet, T.; Adang, L.; Vercruysse, J. [Radiologie und medizinische Bildgebung, Universitaetsklinik Gent (Belgium)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: radiology departments are making the transition from analog film to digital images by means of PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System). It is critical for the hospital that its physicians adopt and accept the new digital work method regarding radiological information. The aim of this study is to investigate hospital physicians' acceptance of PACS using questionnaires pre- and post-implementation and to identify main influencing factors. Materials and methods: the study was conducted in an 1169 bed university hospital. The UTAUT (Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology) questionnaire was administered at two times: one month pre-implementation (T1) and 1.5 years post-implementation (T2) of PACS, targeting all hospital physicians with the exemption of radiologists. The UTAUT scales (Behavioral Intention BI; Facilitating Conditions FC; Effort Expectancy EE; Performance Expectancy PE; Anxiety ANX; Social Influence SI; System Use USE; Attitude toward technology ATT; Self-Efficacy SE) were used to assess questions regarding: (a) PACS' usefulness, (b) PACS' ease of learning/using, (c) PACS support availability, (d) the perceived pressure to use PACS, (e) physicians' attitude towards PACS and (f) physicians' intention to use and actual use of PACS. Results: at T1 scale ratings were positive toward the PACS implementation. The ratings on all scales with the exception of self-efficacy improved at T2. Regression analysis revealed that the key factor for intention to use PACS at T1 was the usefulness of PACS, while the availability and awareness of support was its most important predictor at T2. Overall, PE was the best predictor of BI, but all four UTAUT-determinants (PE, FC, EE and SI) were salient for its prediction. Variance explained in BI ranged from 31 to 37% while variance explained in USE was very low (3%). (orig.)

  3. Physician Appraisals: Key Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klich Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to identify key criteria being used for physician appraisals and to find how communication skills of physicians are valued in those appraisals. ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost databases were used for this search. The results show that a physician appraisal is underestimated both theoretically and empirically. The particular gap exists with respect to the communication skills of physicians, which are rarely present in medical training syllabi and physician assessments. The article contributes to the theoretical discourse on physician appraisals and points out at the inconsistency between the high status of physicians as a key hospital resource on the one hand and, on the other hand, at inadequate and poorly researched assessment of their performance with a special emphasis on communication skills. The article may inspire health managers to develop and implement up-to-date assessment forms for physicians and good managerial practices in this respect in hospitals and other health care units.

  4. The Role of Learning in Health Technology Assessments: An Empirical Assessment of Endovascular Aneurysm Repairs in German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    Changes in performance due to learning may dynamically influence the results of a technology evaluation through the change in effectiveness and costs. In this study, we estimate the effect of learning using the example of two minimally invasive treatments of abdominal aortic aneurysms: endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (fEVAR). The analysis is based on the administrative data of over 40,000 patients admitted with unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to more than 500 different hospitals over the years 2006 to 2013. We examine two patient outcomes, namely, in-hospital mortality and length of stay using hierarchical regression models with random effects at the hospital level. The estimated models control for patient and hospital characteristics and take learning interdependency between EVAR and fEVAR into account. In case of EVAR, we observe a significant decrease both in the in-hospital mortality and length of stay with experience accumulated at the hospital level; however, the learning curve for fEVAR in both outcomes is effectively flat. To foster the consideration of learning in health technology assessments of medical devices, a general framework for estimating learning effects is derived from the analysis. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [Factors affecting in-hospital mortality in patients with sepsis: Development of a risk-adjusted model based on administrative data from German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Volker; Kolzter, Olaf; Albuszies, Gerd; Thölen, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Inpatient administrative data from hospitals is already used nationally and internationally in many areas of internal and public quality assurance in healthcare. For sepsis as the principal condition, only a few published approaches are available for Germany. The aim of this investigation is to identify factors influencing hospital mortality by employing appropriate analytical methods in order to improve the internal quality management of sepsis. The analysis was based on data from 754,727 DRG cases of the CLINOTEL hospital network charged in 2015. The association then included 45 hospitals of all supply levels with the exception of university hospitals (range of beds: 100 to 1,172 per hospital). Cases of sepsis were identified via the ICD codes of their principal diagnosis. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors influencing in-hospital lethality for this population. The model was developed using sociodemographic and other potential variables that could be derived from the DRG data set, and taking into account current literature data. The model obtained was validated with inpatient administrative data of 2016 (51 hospitals, 850,776 DRG cases). Following the definition of the inclusion criteria, 5,608 cases of sepsis (2016: 6,384 cases) were identified in 2015. A total of 12 significant and, over both years, stable factors were identified, including age, severity of sepsis, reason for hospital admission and various comorbidities. The AUC value of the model, as a measure of predictability, is above 0.8 (H-L test p>0.05, R 2 value=0.27), which is an excellent result. The CLINOTEL model of risk adjustment for in-hospital lethality can be used to determine the mortality probability of patients with sepsis as principal diagnosis with a very high degree of accuracy, taking into account the case mix. Further studies are needed to confirm whether the model presented here will prove its value in the internal quality assurance of hospitals

  6. Transfusion practice in anemic, non-bleeding patients: Cross-sectional survey of physicians working in general internal medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle von Babo

    Full Text Available Transfusion practice might significantly influence patient morbidity and mortality. Between European countries, transfusion practice of red blood cells (RBC greatly differs. Only sparse data are available on transfusion practice of general internal medicine physicians in Switzerland.In this cross-sectional survey, physicians working in general medicine teaching hospitals in Switzerland were investigated regarding their self-reported transfusion practice in anemic patients without acute bleeding. The definition of anemia, transfusion triggers, knowledge on RBC transfusion, and implementation of guidelines were assessed.560 physicians of 71 hospitals (64% responded to the survey. Anemia was defined at very diverging hemoglobin values (by 38% at a hemoglobin <130 g/L for men and by 57% at <120 g/L in non-pregnant women. 62% and 43% respectively, did not define anemia in men and in women according to the World Health Organization. Fifty percent reported not to transfuse RBC according to international guidelines. Following factors were indicated to influence the decision to transfuse: educational background of the physicians, geographical region of employment, severity of anemia, and presence of known coronary artery disease. 60% indicated that their knowledge on Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI did not influence transfusion practice. 50% of physicians stated that no local transfusion guidelines exist and 84% supported the development of national recommendations on transfusion in non-acutely bleeding, anemic patients.This study highlights the lack of adherence to current transfusion guidelines in Switzerland. Identifying and subsequently correcting this deficit in knowledge translation may have a significant impact on patient care.

  7. Effects of Lifetime Unemployment Experience and Job Insecurity on Two-Year Risk of Physician-Diagnosed Incident Depression in the German Working Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wege, Natalia; Angerer, Peter; Li, Jian

    2017-08-11

    Unemployment and job insecurity have been reported to be associated with a higher risk of depression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the separate and combined effects of lifetime unemployment experience and job insecurity on the incidence of depression in an unselected working population in Germany. Data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) study were used, as was a final sample of those currently employed, with complete data at baseline (2009) and follow-up (2011) restricted to those free of depression in 2009 ( n = 7073). Poisson regression analysis was applied to test the prospective associations between unemployment, job insecurity, and a two-year incident of depression. Results showed that the experience of unemployment and perceived job insecurity were significantly associated with a higher risk of depression during the two-year follow-up (risk ratios 1.64; 95% confidence intervals (1.16, 2.31) and risk ratios 1.48; 95% confidence intervals (1.13, 1.92), respectively). Notably, the strongest risk was observed among participants with insecure jobs and past long-term unemployment (risk ratios 2.15; 95% confidence intervals (1.32; 3.52)). In conclusion, even during employment, the experience of lifetime unemployment led to a higher risk of depression. The combination of previous unemployment experience and anticipated job insecurity increased the risk of developing depression. Results support health promotion with special emphasis on unemployment and precarious working conditions.

  8. Association between supplementary private health insurance and visits to physician offices versus hospital outpatient departments among adults with diabetes in the universal public insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chang Hoon; Choi, Ji Heon; Kang, Sungwook; Oh, Eun-Hwan; Kwon, Young Dae

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with a high prevalence across the world as well as in South Korea. Most cases of diabetes can be adequately managed at physician offices, but many diabetes patients receive outpatient care at hospitals. This study examines the relationship between supplementary private health insurance (SPHI) ownership and the use of hospitals among diabetes outpatients within the universal public health insurance scheme. Data from the 2011 Korea Health Panel, a nationally representative sample of Korean individuals, was used. For the study, 6,379 visits for diabetes care were selected while controlling for clustered errors. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine determinants of hospital outpatient services. This study demonstrated that the variables of self-rated health status, comorbidity, unmet need, and alcohol consumption significantly correlated with the choice to use a hospital services. Patients with SPHI were more likely to use medical services at hospitals by 1.71 times (95% CI 1.068-2.740, P = 0.026) compared to patients without SPHI. It was confirmed that diabetic patients insured by SPHI had more use of hospital services than those who were not insured. People insured by SPHI seem to be more likely to use hospital services because SPHI lightens the economic burden of care.

  9. The readiness of German GPs to recommend and conduct cancer screening is associated with patient-physician gender concordance. Results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Jennifer; Dahlhaus, Anne; Güthlin, Corina

    2017-12-01

    Cancer screening participation rates in Germany differ depending on patients' gender. International studies have found that patient-physician gender concordance fosters recommendation and conducting of cancer screening, and especially cancer screening for women. We aimed to ascertain whether gender concordance influences general practitioners' (GPs') rating of the usefulness of cancer screening, as well as their recommendations and readiness to conduct cancer screening in general practice in Germany. For an exploratory cross-sectional survey, 500 randomly selected GPs from all over Germany were asked to fill in a questionnaire on cancer screening in general practice between March and June 2015. We asked them to rate the usefulness of each cancer screening examination, how frequently they recommended and conducted them and whether they viewed GPs or specialists as responsible for carrying them out. We used multiple logistic regression to analyse gender effect size by calculating odds ratios. Our study sample consisted of 139 GPs of which 65% were male. Male and female GPs did not differ significantly in their rating of the general usefulness of any of the specified cancer screening examinations. Male GPs were 2.9 to 6.8 times as likely to consider GPs responsible for recommending and conducting PSA testing and digital rectal examinations and were 3.7 to 7.9 times as likely to recommend and conduct these examinations on a regular basis. Patient-physician gender concordance made it more likely that male-specific cancer screenings would be recommended and conducted, but not female-specific screenings. [Box: see text].

  10. Editor's Choice - High Annual Hospital Volume is Associated with Decreased in Hospital Mortality and Complication Rates Following Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Secondary Data Analysis of the Nationwide German DRG Statistics from 2005 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenner, Matthias; Kuehnl, Andreas; Salvermoser, Michael; Reutersberg, Benedikt; Geisbuesch, Sarah; Schmid, Volker; Eckstein, Hans-Henning

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the association between annual hospital procedural volume and post-operative outcomes following repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in Germany. Data were extracted from nationwide Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) statistics provided by the German Federal Statistical Office. Cases with a diagnosis of AAA (ICD-10 GM I71.3, I71.4) and procedure codes for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR; OPS 5-38a.1*) or open aortic repair (OAR; OPS 5-38.45, 5-38.47) treated between 2005 and 2013 were included. Hospitals were empirically grouped to quartiles depending on the overall annual volume of AAA procedures. A multilevel multivariable regression model was applied to adjust for sex, medical risk, type of procedure, and type of admission. Primary outcome was in hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were complications, use of blood products, and length of stay (LOS). The association between AAA volume and in hospital mortality was also estimated as a function of continuous volume. A total of 96,426 cases, of which 11,795 (12.6%) presented as ruptured (r)AAA, were treated in >700 hospitals (annual median: 501). The crude in hospital mortality was 3.3% after intact (i)AAA repair (OAR 5.3%; EVAR 1.7%). Volume was inversely associated with mortality after OAR and EVAR. Complication rates, LOS, and use of blood products were lower in high volume hospitals. After rAAA repair, crude mortality was 40.4% (OAR 43.2%; EVAR 27.4%). An inverse association between mortality and volume was shown for rAAA repair; the same accounts for the use of blood products. When considering volume as a continuous variate, an annual caseload of 75-100 elective cases was associated with the lowest mortality risk. In hospital mortality and complication rates following AAA repair are inversely associated with annual hospital volume. The use of blood products and the LOS are lower in high volume hospitals. A minimum annual case threshold for AAA procedures might improve

  11. [Employee satisfaction in hospitals - validation of the Picker employee questionnaire: the German version of the "survey of employee perceptions of health care delivery" (Picker Institute Boston)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, M; Stahl, K

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was the validation of a questionnaire specially developed for the German health-care market to measure workplace-related satisfaction of all employees in direct or indirect contact to patients. Beside this, its suitability for use in human resource and quality management was tested. Based on data from a postal survey of 38 054 employees from 37 hospitals a psychometric evaluation was done via exploratory factor analysis and reliability as well as regression analysis. For testing the capability to differentiate, subgroup analyses were conducted. 14 factors (Cronbach's alpha between 0.6 and 0.9) were extracted, explaining 44% of the variance. The factors leadership and organisational culture, conditions of employment, work load and relationship to direct line manager had the strongest influence on overall employee satisfaction. Age, gender, employment status, and senior position influence job satisfaction or relevant satisfaction-related factors. Psychometric properties, the ability to differentiate between employee groups and practicability render the questionnaire well suited for use in human resource and quality management of hospitals. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Process and Outcome Measures among COPD Patients with a Hospitalization Cared for by an Advance Practice Provider or Primary Care Physician.

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    Amitesh Agarwal

    Full Text Available To examine the process and outcomes of care of COPD patients by Advanced Practice Providers (APPs and primary care physicians.We conducted a cross sectional retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries with COPD who had at least one hospitalization in 2010. We examined the process measures of receipt of spirometry evaluation, influenza and pneumococcal vaccine, use of COPD medications, and referral to a pulmonary specialist visit. Outcome measures were emergency department (ER visit, number of hospitalizations and 30-day readmission in 2010.A total of 7,257 Medicare beneficiaries with COPD were included. Of these, 1,999 and 5,258 received primary care from APPs and primary care physicians, respectively. Patients in the APP group were more likely to be white, younger, male, residing in non-metropolitan areas and have fewer comorbidities. In terms of process of care measures, APPs were more likely to prescribe short acting bronchodilators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.18, 95%Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05-1.32, oxygen therapy (aOR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.40 and consult a pulmonary specialist (aOR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.23-1.56, but less likely to give influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. Patients receiving care from APPs had lower rates of ER visits for COPD (aOR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.71-0.98 and had a higher follow-up rate with pulmonary specialist within 30 days of hospitalization for COPD (aOR = 1.25, 95%CI 1.07-1.48 than those cared for by physicians.Compared to patients cared for by physicians, patients cared for by APPs were more likely to receive short acting bronchodilator, oxygen therapy and been referred to pulmonologist, however they had lower rates of vaccination probably due to lower age group. Patients cared for by APPs were less like to visit an ER for COPD compared to patients care for by physicians, conversely there was no differences in hospitalization or readmission for COPD between MDs and APPs.

  13. Orthopedic board certification and physician performance: an analysis of medical malpractice, hospital disciplinary action, and state medical board disciplinary action rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Mininder S; Dichtel, Laura; Kasser, James R; Gebhardt, Mark C; Katz, Jeffery N

    2008-02-01

    Specialty board certification status has become the de facto standard of competency by which the profession and the public recognize physician specialists. However, the relationship between orthopedic board certification and physician performance has not been established. Rates of medical malpractice claims, hospital disciplinary actions, and state medical board disciplinary actions were compared between 1309 board-certified (BC) and 154 non-board-certified (NBC) orthopedic surgeons in 3 states. There was no significant difference between BC and NBC surgeons in medical malpractice claim proportions (BC, 19.1% NBC, 16.9% P = .586) or in hospital disciplinary action proportions (BC, 0.9% NBC, 0.8% P = 1.000). There was a significantly higher proportion of state medical board disciplinary action for NBC surgeons (BC, 7.6% NBC, 13.0% P = .028). An association between board certification status and physician performance is necessary to validate its status as the de facto standard of competency. In this study, BC surgeons had lower rates of state medical board disciplinary action.

  14. The Attitudes of Physicians, Nurses, Physical Therapists, and Midwives Toward Complementary Medicine for Chronic Pain: A Survey at an Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveni, Eléonore; Bauer, Brent; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Kottelat, Yolande; Decosterd, Isabelle; Finti, Guillaume; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Bonvin, Eric; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    To assess the attitudes of physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and midwives toward complementary medicine (CM) at a Swiss academic hospital and toward its use for treating chronic pain. The cross-sectional survey took place from October to December 2013. An e-mail sent to 4925 healthcare professionals (1969 physicians, 2372 nurses, 145 physical therapists, and 111 midwives) working at Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland, invited them to answer a web-based questionnaire. The questionnaire was answered by 1247 healthcare professionals (response rate: 25.3%). Of these, 96.1% strongly agreed or agreed that CM could be useful for the treatment of chronic pain, with more nurses (96.7%) and midwives (100%) than physicians (93.8%) agreeing that CM could be useful (P chronic pain. Respondents listed migraine (74.7%), tension headaches (70.6%), and low back pain (70.1%) as three main conditions for which they would refer patients for acupuncture. The three therapies with which respondents were the most unfamiliar were neuraltherapy (57.2%), mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) (54.1%), and biofeedback (51.9%). Over half of respondents, 58.3%, had never referred a patient to a CM practitioner. A total of 84.3% of the respondents felt that they lacked the knowledge to inform their patients about CM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physicians Experience with and Expectations of the Safety and Tolerability of WHO-Step III Opioids for Chronic (Low Back Pain: Post Hoc Analysis of Data from a German Cross-Sectional Physician Survey

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    Michael A. Ueberall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe physicians’ daily life experience with WHO-step III opioids in the treatment of chronic (low back pain (CLBP. Methods. Post hoc analysis of data from a cross-sectional online survey with 4.283 Germany physicians. Results. With a reported median use in 17% of affected patients, WHO-step III opioids play a minor role in treatment of CLBP in daily practice associated with a broad spectrum of positive and negative effects. If prescribed, potent opioids were reported to show clinically relevant effects (such as ≥50% pain relief in approximately 3 of 4 patients (median 72%. Analgesic effects reported are frequently related with adverse events (AEs. Only 20% of patients were reported to remain free of any AE. Most frequently reported AE was constipation (50%, also graded highest for AE-related daily life restrictions (median 46%. Specific AE countermeasures were reported to be necessary in approximately half of patients (median 45%; nevertheless AE-related premature discontinuation rates reported were high (median 22%. Fentanyl/morphine were the most/least prevalently prescribed potent opioids mentioned (median 20 versus 8%. Conclusion. Overall, use of WHO-step III opioids for CLBP is low. AEs, especially constipation, are commonly reported and interfere significantly with analgesic effects in daily practice. Nevertheless, beneficial effects outweigh related AEs in most patients with CLBP.

  16. Screening and contact precautions – A survey on infection control measures for multidrug-resistant bacteria in German university hospitals

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    Lena M. Biehl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To assess the scope of infection control measures for multidrug-resistant bacteria in high-risk settings, a survey among university hospitals was conducted. Fourteen professionals from 8 sites participated. Reported policies varied largely with respect to the types of wards conducting screening, sample types used for screening and implementation of contact precautions. This variability among sites highlights the need for an evidence-based consensus of current infection control policies.

  17. [The influence of quality management on job satisfaction and work load--exemplary study in a German hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sandra; Lauterbach, Karl W; Plamper, Evelyn; Gerber, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Surveys among employees are getting more and more relevant in hospital settings since an increase in both (1) efficiency and (2) quality in connection with (3) enhanced patient orientation will only be achieved, if at the same time the employees' health status and satisfaction are taken into account. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare the satisfaction of employees in a single hospital enquired in 2002 with that of 2005. Particular consideration was given to their view of quality management. Is there a correlation between employees' satisfaction, their degree of information on quality management, and their assessment of quality management? In the survey of 2005 employees were more satisfied with their work and their working conditions than in the previous inquiry conducted in 2002. They felt less mental stress, despite the declining length of hospitalisation combined with a higher turnover of in-hospital cases and with lower numbers of full-time staff. The employees' satisfaction, however, differed widely among the three departments with regard to the items "involvement with decisions" and "support by the superiors". The overall assessment of quality management is positive. Specific items such as the assessment of the management's commitment to quality management were strongly influenced by the employees' degree of information on quality management, which varies between departments. In the department with the lowest work satisfaction quality management was attributed a high potential for change and improvement. After quality management will have been implemented throughout the hospital, a new survey should be undertaken to evaluate whether quality management affects the employees' satisfaction with their work.

  18. Locum physicians' professional ethos: a qualitative interview study from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloch, Sabine; Apitzsch, Birgit; Wilkesmann, Maximiliane; Ruiner, Caroline

    2018-05-08

    In contrast to other countries, the appearance of locum physicians as independent contractors constitutes a rather new phenomenon in the German health care system and emerged out of a growing economization and shortage of medical staff in the hospital sector. Locums are a special type of self-employed professionals who are only temporally embedded in organisational contexts of hospitals, and this might have consequences for their professional practice. Therefore, questions arise regarding how locums perceive their ethical duties as medical professionals. In this first qualitative study on German locum physicians, the locums' own perspective is complemented by the viewpoint of permanently employed physician colleagues. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2014 to explore the professional practice of locum physicians from both groups' perspectives with respect to doctor-patient-relationship, cooperation with colleagues and physicians' role in society. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, including a deductive application and an inductive development of codes. The results were related to key tenets of medical professionalism with respect to the question: how far do locums fulfil their ethical duties towards patients, colleagues and the society? The study indicates that although ethical requirements are met broadly, difficulties remain with respect to close doctor-patient contact and the sustainability of hiring locums as a remedy in times of staff shortage. Further qualitative and quantitative research on locum physicians' professional practice, including patient perspectives and economic health care system analyses, is needed to better understand the ethical impact of hiring independent contractors in the hospital sector.

  19. Economic burden of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea: a cost-of-illness study from a German tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, S M; Vehreschild, J J; Cornely, O A; Wisplinghoff, H; Hallek, M; Goldbrunner, R; Böttiger, B W; Goeser, T; Hölscher, A; Baldus, S; Müller, F; Jazmati, N; Wingen, S; Franke, B; Vehreschild, M J G T

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) is the most common cause of health-care-associated infectious diarrhoea. In the context of the German health-care system, direct and indirect costs of an initial episode of CDAD and of CDAD recurrence are currently unknown. We defined CDAD as presence of diarrhoea (≥3 unformed stools/day) in association with detection of Clostridium difficile toxin in an unformed faecal sample. Patients treated with metronidazole (PO or IV) and/or vancomycin (PO) were included. Comprehensive data of patients were retrospectively documented into a database using the technology of the Cologne Cohort of Neutropenic Patients (CoCoNut). Patients with CDAD were matched to control patients in a 1:1 ratio. Analysis was split in three groups: incidence group (CDAD patients without recurrence), recurrence group (CDAD patients with ≥1 recurrence) and control group (matched non-CDAD patients). Between 02/2010 and 12/2011, 150 patients with CDAD (114 patients in the incidence and 36 (24 %) in the recurrence group) and 150 controls were analysed. Mean length of stay was: 32 (95 %CI: 30-37), 94 (95 %CI: 76-112) and 24 days (95 %CI: 22-27; P = costs per patient of €18,460 (95 %CI: €14,660-€22,270), €73,900 (95 %CI: €50,340-€97,460) and €14,530 (95 %CI: €11,730-€17,330; P = costs, which were mostly attributable to a significantly longer overall length of stay. Innovative treatment strategies are warranted to reduce treatment costs and prevent recurrence of CDAD.

  20. Patient-Physician Communicative Patterns, Physicians’ Job Satisfaction, and Patients’ Satisfaction: The Case of a Hospital in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yaghoubi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose:Now-a-days, patient satisfaction is increasingly receiving the attention of health-service providers, which is a necessary step to enhance the quality of health services. The present study aimed at exploring patient-physician communicative patterns, physicians’ job satisfaction, and patients’ satisfaction at Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods:This study was a descriptive analytical and cross-sectional survey in the summer of 2010. Simple random sampling was used to select participants. Data were collected through using three self-designed questionnaires on physicians’ job satisfaction, patient-physician relationship patterns (based on Hollander and Szase’ ideas, and patients’ satisfaction. Validity of the questionnaire was checked by a panel of experts. Furthermore, internal consistency reliability of the questionnaires was confirmed by Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.80. Different dimensions of the job satisfaction questionnaire were salary, supervision, setting, promotion, fringe benefits, and working conditions. Data were analyzed by using SPSS for Windows 13.0 software. Results:The mean score of patient-physician relationship was 63. Therefore, the most frequent patient-physician communication pattern was guidance-cooperation. The mean score of physician’ job satisfaction was 50.2. The mean score of patients’ satisfaction was 86.5. Physicians’ job satisfaction was found to be related to patient-physician communication pattern (P < 0.05. Conclusion:Although patient-physician communication patterns are important, different variable such as patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction influence the patterns. Furthermore, improvement communication process between health care providers can be useful in the increasing patient satisfaction and patient quality of care.

  1. [Determination and analysis of cost and production measures in physicians' practices and hospitals for the objective evaluation of medical measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, U; Horisberger, B

    1981-05-01

    The complete data on 7200 practising physicians in Switzerland were analyzed in the first phase of the project. The 2600 GP's and the 4600 specialists (in 18 medical specialties) were categorized as to year of graduation and geographic regions (population centres). The distributions of the practising physician of the different specialties over the population centres (defined by 30-min. catchment area) areas were evaluated. Trends towards specialization in larger settlement areas were analyzed. The results are being used as a basis for formation of samples for further studies. The inventories of medical technical equipment and medical procedures are in the process of systematization.

  2. [Geriatric Trauma Center DGU®: Evaluation of clinical and economic parameters : A pilot study in a german university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, M; Böttcher, B; Coburn, M; Friess, T; Bollheimer, L C; Heppner, H J; Werner, C J; Bach, J-P; Wollgarten, M; Poßelt, S; Bliemel, C; Bücking, B

    2018-04-19

    Previous studies on orthogeriatric models of care suggest that there is substantial variability in how geriatric care is integrated in the patient management and the necessary intensity of geriatric involvement is questionable. The aim of the current prospective cohort study was the clinical and economic evaluation of fragility fracture treatment pathways before and after the implementation of a geriatric trauma center in conformity with the guidelines of the German Trauma Society (DGU). A comparison of three different treatment models (6 months each) was performed: A: Standard treatment in Orthopaedic Trauma; B: Special care pathways with improvement of the quality management system and implementation of standard operating procedures; C: Interdisciplinary treatment with care pathways and collaboration with geriatricians (ward round model). In the 151 examined patients (m/w 47/104; 83.5 (70-100) years; A: n = 64, B: n = 44, C: n = 43) pathways with orthogeriatric comanagement (C) improved frequency of postoperative mobilization (p = 0.021), frequency of osteoporosis prophylaxis (p = 0.001) and the discharge procedure (p = 0.024). In comparison to standard treatment (A), orthogeriatric comanagement (C) was associated with lower rates of mortality (9% vs. 2%; p = 0.147) and cardio-respiratory complications (39% vs. 28%; p = 0.235) by trend. In this context, there were low rates of myocardial infarction (6% vs. 0%), dehydration (6% vs. 0%), cardiac dysrhythmia (8% vs. 0%), pulmonary decompensation (28% vs. 16%), electrolyt dysbalance (34% vs. 19%) and pulmonary edema (11% vs. 2%). Duration of stay in an intensive care unit was 29 h (A) and 18 h (C) respectively (p = 0.205), with consecutive reduction in costs. A sole establishment of a special care pathway for older hip fracture patients (B) showed a lower rate of myocardial infarction (A: 11%, B: 0%, C: 0%; p = 0.035). There was a clear tendency to a better overall

  3. Knowledge and awareness of first aid of avulsed tooth among physicians and nurses of hospital emergency department

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    Sudeep Sreepad Iyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians and nurses of emergency department are often the first line of qualified health-care providers attending the patient in person or parent's query over phone reporting immediately following the dental avulsion. Prompt action by them becomes the decisive factor in survival and prognosis of the tooth. Although a few researchers have evaluated knowledge of emergency room physicians, there is scanty of reports concerning nurses who play a climacteric role. Materials and Methods: A 10-item questionnaire regarding clinical situation apropos dental injury and tooth avulsion, inquiring knowledge of physicians and nurses was administered to 150 each of nursing professionals and physicians of the emergency department. Results: With 100% response rate, the data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results showed lack of knowledge and confidence in both groups. About 66.7% (n = 100 nurses and 74.7% (n = 112 considered reimplantation of avulsed tooth. There was overbalanced confusion regarding storage/transport media and handling of avulsed tooth. Conclusion: The findings from the results suggested a definite inadequacy in knowledge, demanding need for appropriate training for delivering treatment with more predictability and better prognosis.

  4. Knowledge and Awareness of First Aid of Avulsed Tooth among Physicians and Nurses of Hospital Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sudeep Sreepad; Panigrahi, Antarmayee; Sharma, Shalini

    2017-01-01

    Physicians and nurses of emergency department are often the first line of qualified health-care providers attending the patient in person or parent's query over phone reporting immediately following the dental avulsion. Prompt action by them becomes the decisive factor in survival and prognosis of the tooth. Although a few researchers have evaluated knowledge of emergency room physicians, there is scanty of reports concerning nurses who play a climacteric role. A 10-item questionnaire regarding clinical situation apropos dental injury and tooth avulsion, inquiring knowledge of physicians and nurses was administered to 150 each of nursing professionals and physicians of the emergency department. With 100% response rate, the data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results showed lack of knowledge and confidence in both groups. About 66.7% ( n = 100) nurses and 74.7% ( n = 112) considered reimplantation of avulsed tooth. There was overbalanced confusion regarding storage/transport media and handling of avulsed tooth. The findings from the results suggested a definite inadequacy in knowledge, demanding need for appropriate training for delivering treatment with more predictability and better prognosis.

  5. Variation in Hospital Length of Stay : Do Physicians Adapt Their Length of Stay Decisions to What Is Usual in the Hospital Where They Work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Judith D. de; Westert, Gert P.; Lagoe, Ronald; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that physicianswho work in different hospitals adapt their length of stay decisions to what is usual in the hospital under consideration. Data Sources. Secondary data were used, originating from the Statewide Planning and ResearchCooperative System (SPARCS). SPARCS

  6. Effects of inpatient geriatric interventions in a German geriatric hospital: Impact on ADL, mobility and cognitive status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordne, S; Schulz, R-J; Zank, S

    2015-06-01

    Given the demographic changes, the need for effective geriatric intervention is obvious. Geriatric care aims to maintain the highest possible level of independence and quality of life and to reduce the risk of need for care. This study investigated the benefits of geriatric care on functional performance, mobility and cognition. This study involved a retrospective analysis of clinical data from 646 patients. At hospital admission and discharge functional status was assessed using the Barthel index. Mobility was evaluated by means of the Tinetti test and cognition by the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). A follow-up was conducted on 112 patients 2-5 months after hospital discharge. Statistical analysis included t-tests including Cohen's d for effect size and multivariate regression analysis. The mean age of the study population was 81.1 ± 7.1 years including 439 women (68%) and 207 men (32%). There were significant average improvements for activities of daily living (ADL), mobility and cognition comparing discharge and admission scores. For functional and mobility status, effect sizes were medium to high. Regression analyses showed that ADL improvement was predicted by functional, mobile and cognitive status at admission. Follow-up analyses revealed a high percentage of former patients still living at home and an overall maintenance of ADL levels. Geriatric patients seem to experience long-term improvements during geriatric treatment, which appears to fulfill its aim of recovering independence. For a better understanding of relevant factors for the recreation of geriatric patients, further research is needed, e.g. with respect to the impact of the nutritional status.

  7. Emergency medicine physicians' and pediatricians' use of computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Paul Francis

    2014-05-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding emergency department (ED) provider type and computed tomography (CT) scan use in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma. The purpose of this retrospective single community hospital study was to determine if there was a difference in CT use between emergency medicine physicians (EMPs) and pediatricians (PEDs) in all patients younger than 18 years with abdominal pain without trauma who presented to the ED during the study period. The study included 165 patients. EMPs saw 83 patients and used CT in 31 compared with PEDs who saw 82 patients and used CT in 12 (P = .002). EMPs used CT significantly more frequently than PEDs in the designated sample. Economic pressures may cause changes in ED provider type in community and rural hospitals and this study shows that ED provider type may affect medical decision making, including CT use.

  8. Association between hospital procedure volume and early complications after pacemaker implantation: results from a large, unselected, contemporary cohort of the German nationwide obligatory external quality assurance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Bernd; Tasche, Karl; Barnewold, Linda; Heller, Günther; Schmidt, Boris; Bordignon, Stefano; Chun, K R Julian; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Mehta, Rajendra H

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated an inverse relationship between cardioverter-defibrillator implantation volume and complication rates, suggesting better outcomes for higher volume centres. However, the association of institutional procedural volume with patient outcomes for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation remains less known, especially in decentralized implantation systems. We performed retrospective examination of data on patients undergoing PPM from the German obligatory quality assurance programme (2007-12) to evaluate the relationship of hospital PPM volume (categorized into quintiles of their mean annual volume) with risk-adjusted in-hospital surgical complications (composite of pneumothorax, haemothorax, pericardial effusion, or pocket haematoma, all requiring intervention, or device infection) and pacemaker lead dislocation. Overall 430 416 PPM implantations were documented in 1226 hospitals. Systems included dual (72.8%) and single (25.8%) chamber PPM and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices (1.1%). Complications included surgical (0.92%), and ventricular (0.99%), and atrial (1.22%) lead dislocation. Despite an increase in relatively complex procedures (dual chamber, CRT), there was a significant decrease in the procedural and fluoroscopy times and complications from lowest to highest implantation volume quintiles (P for trend <0.0001). The greatest difference was observed between the lowest (1-50 implantations/year-reference group) and the second-lowest (51-90 implantations/year) quintile: surgical complications [odds ratio (OR) 0.69; confidence interval (CI) 0.60-0.78], atrial lead dislocations (OR 0.69; CI 0.59-0.80), and ventricular lead dislocations (OR 0.73; CI 0.63-0.84). Hospital annual PPM volume was directly related to indication-based implantation of relatively more complex PPM and yet inversely with procedural times and rates of early surgical complications and lead dislocations. Thus, our data suggest better performance and lower

  9. Long-Term, Low-Frequency Cluster of a German-Imipenemase-1-Producing Enterobacter hormaechei ssp. steigerwaltii ST89 in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Andreas F; Meyer, Sebastian; Deenen, René; Köhrer, Karl; Kolbe-Busch, Susanne; Pfeffer, Klaus; Willmann, Matthias; Kaasch, Achim J; MacKenzie, Colin R

    2018-05-11

    Enterobacter cloacae complex is a common cause of hospital outbreaks. A retrospective and prospective molecular analysis of carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates in a tertiary care center demonstrated an outbreak of a German-imipenemase-1 (GIM-1) metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter hormaechei ssp. steigerwaltii affecting 23 patients between 2009 and 2016. Thirty-three isolates were sequence type 89 by conventional multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and displayed a maximum difference of 49 out of 3,643 targets in the ad-hoc core-genome MLST (cgMLST) scheme (SeqSphere+ software; Ridom, Münster, Germany). The relatedness of all isolates was confirmed by further maximum-likelihood phylogeny. One clonal complex of highly related isolates (≤15 allele difference in cgMLST) contained 17 patients, but epidemiological data only suggested five transmission events. The bla GIM-1 -gene was embedded in a class-1-integron (In770) and the Tn21-subgroup transposon Tn6216 (KC511628) on a 25-kb plasmid. Environmental screening detected one colonized sink trap in a service room. The outbreak was self-limited as no further bla GIM-1 -positive E. hormaechei has been isolated since 2016. Routine molecular screening of carbapenem-nonsusceptible gram-negative isolates detected a long-term, low-frequency outbreak of a GIM-1-producing E. hormaechei ssp. steigerwaltii clone. This highlights the necessity of molecular surveillance.

  10. An evaluation of adherence to the patient's rights charter among patients and physicians at the emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan Emami Razavi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available It is the cherished goal of the health care providers to observe the patient rights. An official order to install the patient rights charter in all crowded places of hospitals motivated us to evaluate the patient rights both from the patients' and resident points of view. "nThis is a descriptive survey with cross-sectional method. The research was conducted to examine the patients and residents awareness of the contents of "Patients' Rights Charter" in emergency department of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran and their views on the adherence of the cares to the articles of the charter. 140 patients and 70 residents were chosen by simple randomized method by Cochrane formula and the data was gathered by questionnaires. "n57.9% of patients were not aware of this announcement. 78% of patients believed that patients' rights is being carried out relatively. 88.6% of residents believed that they complied with the rights of patients. The patients were relatively satisfied with the nursing cares, medical services and hospital equipments (69% were satisfied with availability of physicians in necessary situations, 47% satisfied with the nursing cares and 93.6% satisfied with the hospital equipments."nTwo years after installation of the charter, patients and residents awareness of installation were low. According to the patient views, patients' rights were relatively adhered. Unawareness of patients of their rights may limit their expectations from physicians and if they become aware of the contents of charter, their satisfaction from current situation may alter.

  11. Continuity of care with physicians and risk of subsequent hospitalization and end-stage renal disease in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Ya; Chien, Li-Nien; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chiou, Hung-Yi

    2018-01-01

    Effective management for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can slow the progression of kidney outcomes and reduce hospital admissions. Better continuity of care (COC) was found to improve patients' adherence and self-management. This study examined the associations between COC, hospitalization, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in DM patients. In the cohort study, data from 1996 to 2012 were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, using inverse probability weighted analysis. A total of 26,063 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 DM who had been treated with antihyperglycemic agents were included. COC is to assess the extent to which a DM patient visited the same physician during the study period. This study categorized COC into 3 groups - low, intermediate, and high, - according to the distribution of scores in our sample. The number of ESRD patients in the high, intermediate, and low COC groups were 92 (22.33%), 130 (31.55%), and 190 (46.12%), respectively, and the mean follow-up periods for the 3 groups were 7.13, 7.12, and 7.27 years, respectively. After using inverse probability weighting, the intermediate and low COC groups were significantly associated with an increased risk of ESRD compared with the high COC group (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.36 [95% CI, 1.03-1.80] and aHR 1.76 [95% CI, 1.35-2.30], respectively). The intermediate and low COC groups were also significantly associated with the subsequent hospitalization compared with the high COC group (aHR 1.15 [95% CI, 0.99-1.33] and aHR 1.72 [95% CI, 1.50-1.97], respectively). COC is related to ESRD onset and subsequent hospitalization among patients with DM. This study suggested that when DM patients keep visiting the same physician for managing their diseases, the progression of renal disease can be prevented.

  12. Patient-Physician Communicative Patterns, Physicians’ Job Satisfaction, and Patients’ Satisfaction: The Case of a Hospital in Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Yaghoubi; Fatemeh Rahmati-Najarkolaei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose:Now-a-days, patient satisfaction is increasingly receiving the attention of health-service providers, which is a necessary step to enhance the quality of health services. The present study aimed at exploring patient-physician communicative patterns, physicians’ job satisfaction, and patients’ satisfaction at Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods:This study was a descriptive analytical and cross-sectional survey in the summer of 2010. Simple random sa...

  13. Availability of emergency contraception: a survey of hospital emergency department gynaecologists and emergency physicians in Piedmont, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Marco; Casagranda, Ivo; Charrier, Lorena; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2012-10-01

    To compare the knowledge and the willingness of emergency physicians and gynaecologists caring for women in Italian emergency departments (EDs) to prescribe levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills (LNG-EC pills). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009; anonymous postal questionnaires were mailed to the medical staff working at the 30 EDs located in Piedmont (Italy). Emergency physicians and gynaecologists have similar knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LNG-EC pills, but do not feel at ease in prescribing these and consider the prescription of LNG-EC pills an inappropriate activity for ED staff. In Italy, unlike in most other European countries, LNG-EC pills are still prescription drugs. Thus it may be useful to further investigate the reasons why Italian ED medical staff do not feel the prescription of LNG-EC pills should be within their remit and whether women can successfully obtain the prescription from physicians working in other services that can be accessed around the clock.

  14. When patients have to pay a share of drug costs: effects on frequency of physician visits, hospital admissions and filling of prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Aslam H; Guh, Daphne P; Lacaille, Diane; Marra, Carlo A; Rashidi, Amir A; Li, Xin; Esdaile, John M

    2005-11-22

    Previous research has shown that patient cost-sharing leads to a reduction in overall health resource utilization. However, in Canada, where health care is provided free of charge except for prescription drugs, the converse may be true. We investigated the effect of prescription drug cost-sharing on overall health care utilization among elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Elderly patients (> or = 65 years) were selected from a population-based cohort with rheumatoid arthritis. Those who had paid the maximum amount of dispensing fees (200 dollars) for the calendar year (from 1997 to 2000) were included in the analysis for that year. We defined the period during which the annual maximum co-payment had not been reached as the "cost-sharing period" and the one beyond which the annual maximum co-payment had been reached as the "free period." We compared health services utilization patterns between these periods during the 4 study years, including the number of hospital admissions, the number of physician visits, the number of prescriptions filled and the number of prescriptions per physician visit. Overall, 2968 elderly patients reached the annual maximum cost-sharing amount at least once during the study periods. Across the 4 years, there were 0.38 more physician visits per month (p filled per month (p = 0.001) and 0.52 fewer prescriptions filled per physician visit (p health care system, the implementation of cost-containment policies such as prescription drug cost-sharing may have the unintended effect of increasing overall health utilization among elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Implementation Issues of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Its Case Study for a Physician's Round at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Taegi; Kim, Jon Soo; Baek, Rong-Min; Suh, Chang Suk; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The cloud computing-based virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) allows access to computing environments with no limitations in terms of time or place such that it can permit the rapid establishment of a mobile hospital environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the empirical issues to be considered when establishing a virtual mobile environment using VDI technology in a hospital setting and to examine the utility of the technology with an Apple iPad during a physici...

  16. German Vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Virginia M.

    This article discusses in general terms derivational aspects of English vocabulary. Citing examples of Anglo-Saxon origin, the author provides a glimpse into the nature of the interrelatedness of English, German, and French vocabulary. (RL)

  17. German Orientalism

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret Olin

    2011-01-01

    Review of: Suzanne L. Marchand, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race and Scholarship, Cambridge and Washington, D.C.: Cambridge University Press, 2009. This analysis of Suzanne L. Marchand’s German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race and Scholarship reads her contribution in part against the background of Edward Said’s path breaking book Orientalism. Differences lie in her more expansive understanding of the term ‘Oriental’ to include the Far East and her conce...

  18. Management and Outcomes of Acute Surgical Patients at a District Hospital in Uganda with Non-physician Emergency Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Caleb; Periyanayagam, Usha; Dreifuss, Brad; Wangoda, Robert; Luyimbaazi, Julius; Bisanzo, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Acute surgical care services in rural Sub-Saharan Africa suffer from human resource and systemic constraints. Developing emergency care systems and task sharing aspects of acute surgical care addresses many of these issues. This paper investigates the degree to which specialized non-physicians practicing in a dedicated Emergency Department contribute to the effective and efficient management of acute surgical patients. This is a retrospective review of an electronic quality assurance database of patients presenting to an Emergency Department in rural Uganda staffed by non-physician clinicians trained in emergency care. Relevant de-identified clinical data on patients admitted directly to the operating theater from 2011 to 2014 were analyzed in Microsoft Excel. Overall, 112 Emergency Department patients were included in the analysis and 96% received some form of laboratory testing, imaging, medication, or procedure in the ED, prior to surgery. 72% of surgical patients referred by ED received preoperative antibiotics, and preoperative fluid resuscitation was initiated in 65%. Disposition to operating theater was accomplished within 3 h of presentation for 73% of patients. 79% were successfully followed up to assess outcomes at 72 h. 92% of those with successful follow-up reported improvement in their clinical condition. The confirmed mortality rate was 5%. Specialized non-physician clinicians practicing in a dedicated Emergency Department can perform resuscitation, bedside imaging and laboratory studies to aid in diagnosis of acute surgical patients and arrange transfer to an operating theater in an efficient fashion. This model has the potential to sustainably address structural and human resources problems inherent to Sub-Saharan Africa's current acute surgical care model and will benefit from further study and expansion.

  19. [The chief surgeon Claude Louis Sommé (1772-1855) French military physician, surgeon of Antwerp hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, Jean-pierre

    2015-01-01

    Claude Louis Sommé was born in Paris in 1772. After surgical studies between 1790 and 1792, he successfully embraced a military career in the armies of Napoleon at different fronts and in several hospitals. In 1806 he submitted his doctoral thesis at the Special Medical School of Strasburg, Dissertation upon Pain. The same year he presented his dismissal from he imperial armies and became chief-surgeon at the St Elisabeth hospital of Antwerp where he stayed on duty until his death in 1855. Sommé wrote a lot of medical books: surgical, anatomical and physiological. After the battle of Waterloo one third of the injured soldiers were transferred to Antwerp and were attended in his department. He also played an important role as a professor at the Primary Medical School of Antwerp. Sommé also created the botanical garden of Antwerp, close to the hospital.

  20. German diabetes management programs improve quality of care and curb costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Stephanie; Drabik, Anna; Büscher, Guido; Graf, Christian; Ullrich, Walter; Gerber, Andreas; Lauterbach, Karl W; Lüngen, Markus

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the results of a large-scale analysis of a nationwide disease management program in Germany for patients with diabetes mellitus. The German program differs markedly from "classic" disease management in the United States. Although it combines important hallmarks of vendor-based disease management and the Chronic Care Model, the German program is based in primary care practices and carried out by physicians, and it draws on their personal relationships with patients to promote adherence to treatment goals and self-management. After four years of follow-up, overall mortality for patients and drug and hospital costs were all significantly lower for patients who participated in the program compared to other insured patients with similar health profiles who were not in the program. These results suggest that the German disease management program is a successful strategy for improving chronic illness care.

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Patients with Schizophreniform and Autism Spectrum Syndromes: A One-Year Cohort Study at a German Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Dominique; Dersch, Rick; Stich, Oliver; Buchwald, Armin; Perlov, Evgeniy; Feige, Bernd; Maier, Simon; Riedel, Andreas; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D has many immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective functions, and previous studies have demonstrated an association between vitamin D deficiency and neuropsychiatric disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a 1-year cohort of adult inpatients with schizophreniform and autism spectrum syndromes in a naturalistic inpatient setting in Germany. Our study was comprised of 60 adult schizophreniform and 23 adult high-functioning autism spectrum patients who were hospitalized between January and December of 2015. We compared our findings with a historical German reference cohort of 3,917 adults using Pearson's two-sided chi-squared test. The laboratory measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2/3 [25(OH)vitamin D] were obtained using a chemiluminescence immunoassay. In the schizophreniform group, we found decreased (vitamin D levels in 48/60 (80.0%) of the patients. In the autism spectrum group, decreased levels were detected in 18/23 (78.3%) of the patients. 25(OH)vitamin D deficiencies were found in 57.3% of the historical control group. Particularly, severe deficiencies (vitamin D values of >30 ng/ml were observed in only 5% of the schizophreniform patients, 8.7% of the autism spectrum patients, and 21.9% of the healthy controls. We found very high rates of 25(OH)vitamin D deficiencies in both patient groups and have discussed whether our findings might be related to alterations in the immunological mechanisms. Irrespective of the possible pathophysiological links between vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia or autism spectrum disorders, a more frequent measurement of vitamin D levels seems to be justified in these patient groups. Further prospective, controlled, blinded, and randomized research should be conducted to analyze the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on the improvement of psychiatric symptoms.

  2. Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Patients with Schizophreniform and Autism Spectrum Syndromes: A One-Year Cohort Study at a German Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Endres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin D has many immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective functions, and previous studies have demonstrated an association between vitamin D deficiency and neuropsychiatric disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a one-year cohort of adult inpatients with schizophreniform and autism-spectrum syndromes in a naturalistic in-patient setting in Germany. Participants and methods: Our study was comprised of 60 adult schizophreniform and 23 adult high-functioning autism spectrum patients who were hospitalized Page: 2between January and December of 2015. We compared our findings with a historical German reference cohort of 3,917 adults using Pearson’s two-sided chi-squared test. The laboratory measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2/3 (25(OHvitamin D were obtained using a chemiluminescence immunoassay. Results: In the schizophreniform group, we found decreased ( 30 ng/ml were observed in only 5% of the schizophreniform patients, 8.7% of the autism spectrum patients, and 21.9% of the healthy controls. Discussion: We found very high rates of 25(OHvitamin D deficiency in both patient groups, and have discussed whether our findings might be related to alterations in the immunological mechanisms. Irrespective of the possible pathophysiological links between vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia or autism spectrum disorders, a more frequent measurement of vitamin D levels seems to be justified in these patient groups. Further prospective, controlled, blinded, and randomized research should be conducted to analyze the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on the improvement of psychiatric symptoms.

  3. Alternative dispute resolution and the physician--the use of mediation to resolve hospital-medical staff conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J L; Stong, R A

    1993-01-01

    The use of adversarial methods to resolve disputes arising out of medical staff matters can be time-consuming, costly, and disruptive to the hospital-medical staff relationship. As this article suggests, mediation is the preferred method of alternative dispute resolution for reaching mutually acceptable solutions with minimal harm to relationships.

  4. Home or hospital? Midwife or physician? Preferences for maternity care provider and place of birth among Western Australian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Kathrin H; Hauck, Yvonne L; Hall, Wendy A

    2016-02-01

    Australian caesarean birth rates have exceeded 30% in most states and are approaching 45%, on average, in private hospitals. Australian midwifery practice occurs almost exclusively in hospitals; less than 3% of women deliver at home or in birthing centres. It is unclear whether the trend towards hospital-based, high interventionist birth reflects preferences of the next generation of maternity care consumers. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional online survey of 760 Western Australian (WA) university students in 2014, to examine their preferences for place of birth, type of maternity care, mode of birth and attitudes towards birth. More students who preferred midwives (35.8%) had vaginal birth intentions, contested statements that birth is unpredictable and risky, and valued patient-provider relationships. More students who preferred obstetricians (21.8%) expressed concerns about childbirth safety, feared birth, held favourable views towards obstetric technology, and expressed concerns about the impact of pregnancy and birth on the female body. One in 8 students preferred out-of-hospital birth settings, supporting consumer demand for midwife-attended births at home and in birthing centres. Stories and experiences of friends and family shaped students' care provider preferences, rather than the media or information learned at school. Students who express preferences for midwives have significantly different views about birth compared to students who prefer obstetricians. Increasing access to midwifery care in all settings (hospital, birthing centre and home) is a cost effective strategy to decrease obstetric interventions for low risk women and a desirable option for the next generation. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Do guidelines on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals and nursing homes reflect the law? A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, B A M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D; Janssen, A J G M; Buiting, H M; Kollau, M; Rietjens, J A C; Pasman, H R W

    2012-01-01

    To describe the content of practice guidelines on euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) and to compare differences between settings and guidelines developed before or after enactment of the euthanasia law in 2002 by means of a content analysis. Most guidelines stated that the attending physician is responsible for the decision to grant or refuse an EAS request. Due care criteria were described in the majority of guidelines, but aspects relevant for assessing these criteria were not always described. Half of the guidelines described the role of the nurse in the performance of euthanasia. Compared with hospital guidelines, nursing home guidelines were more often stricter than the law in excluding patients with dementia (30% vs 4%) and incompetent patients (25% vs 4%). As from 2002, the guidelines were less strict in categorically excluding patients groups (32% vs 64%) and in particular incompetent patients (10% vs 29%). Healthcare institutions should accurately state the boundaries of the law, also when they prefer to set stricter boundaries for their own institution. Only then can guidelines provide adequate support for physicians and nurses in the difficult EAS decision-making process.

  6. [Good clinical practices in clinical trials: the responsibility of the researcher. A survey of 827 hospital physicians (I). Availability. Monitoring. Safety. Contract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Ré, R

    1993-03-06

    The Law of Medicaments establishes that clinical trials (CT) with drugs must be carried out following the of Good Clinical Practice guidelines (GCP). The attitude of hospital physicians to the GCP prior to its implementation as mandatory in accordance with Spanish legislation was considered to be of interest. An anonymous survey was used with closed response questions. Questions referring to the responsibilities of the investigator included in the GCP were included. From December 1988 to February 1990 the survey was distributed among 1,706 hospital medical staff members, of any specialty, who had or had not participated in CT. In this article the results of the questions regarding the availability of the investigative team, CT monitorization, management of adverse reactions, the safety of the participants in the CT and the contract between the sponsor and the researcher are presented. A total of 827 hospital doctors replied to the survey. Fifty-nine percent had intervened in CT with drugs. At least 94% of those surveyed considered that the researcher must have the time and number of eligible patients which the CT requires. There was high acceptance (> or = 78%) of the clinical audits to be performed by the health authorities and the sponsor company of the CT. The need of urgent communication of the severe adverse reactions is admitted by a great majority (> or = 95%) of those surveyed. Eighty-five percent believe that patients should be insured against damage derived from CT with 76% considering that the investigator should sign a contract with the sponsor; 68% and 59% would hand in a copy of the same to the CT committee and the remainder of the research team, respectively. According to the Good Clinical Practice dealt with in this article, the responsibilities of the investigator have been widely accepted by the hospital physicians surveyed, therefore no problems should be expected upon the implementation of the same in this country. However, the economic

  7. Abridged version of the AWMF guideline for the medical clinical diagnostics of indoor mould exposure: S2K Guideline of the German Society of Hygiene, Environmental Medicine and Preventive Medicine (GHUP) in collaboration with the German Association of Allergists (AeDA), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the German Society for Occupational and Environmental Medicine (DGAUM), the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH), the German Society for Pneumology and Respiratory Medicine (DGP), the German Mycological Society (DMykG), the Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the German Federal Association of Pediatric Pneumology (BAPP), and the Austrian Society for Medical Mycology (ÖGMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Heinzow, Birger; Aurbach, Ute; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bufe, Albrecht; Buzina, Walter; Cornely, Oliver A; Engelhart, Steffen; Fischer, Guido; Gabrio, Thomas; Heinz, Werner; Herr, Caroline E W; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Köberle, Martin; Lichtnecker, Herbert; Lob-Corzilius, Thomas; Merget, Rolf; Mülleneisen, Norbert; Nowak, Dennis; Rabe, Uta; Raulf, Monika; Seidl, Hans Peter; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Szewszyk, Regine; Thomas, Peter; Valtanen, Kerttu; Hurraß, Julia

    2017-01-01

    reactions. Whether or not toxin formation occurs in individual cases is determined by environmental and growth conditions, above all the substrate. In the case of indoor moisture/mould damage, everyone can be affected by odour effects and/or mood disorders. However, this is not a health hazard. Predisposing factors for odour effects can include genetic and hormonal influences, imprinting, context and adaptation effects. Predisposing factors for mood disorders may include environmental concerns, anxiety, condition, and attribution, as well as various diseases. Risk groups to be protected particularly with regard to an infection risk are persons on immunosuppression according to the classification of the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention ( Kommission für Krankenhaushygiene und Infektionsprävention, KRINKO ) at the Robert Koch- Institute (RKI) and persons with cystic fibrosis (mucoviscidosis); with regard to an allergic risk, persons with cystic fibrosis (mucoviscidosis) and patients with bronchial asthma should be protected. The rational diagnostics include the medical history, physical examination, and conventional allergy diagnostics including provocation tests if necessary; sometimes cellular test systems are indicated. In the case of mould infections the reader is referred to the AWMF guideline "Diagnosis and Therapy of Invasive Aspergillus Infections". With regard to mycotoxins, there are currently no useful and validated test procedures for clinical diagnostics. From a preventive medicine standpoint it is important that indoor mould infestation in relevant dimension cannot be tolerated for precautionary reasons. With regard to evaluating the extent of damage and selecting a remedial procedure, the reader is referred to the revised version of the mould guideline issued by the German Federal Environment Agency ( Umweltbundesamt, UBA ).

  8. Spatio-temporal dependencies between hospital beds, physicians and health expenditure using visual variables and data classification in statistical table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyńska-Gulij, Beata; Cybulski, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyses the use of table visual variables of statistical data of hospital beds as an important tool for revealing spatio-temporal dependencies. It is argued that some of conclusions from the data about public health and public expenditure on health have a spatio-temporal reference. Different from previous studies, this article adopts combination of cartographic pragmatics and spatial visualization with previous conclusions made in public health literature. While the significant conclusions about health care and economic factors has been highlighted in research papers, this article is the first to apply visual analysis to statistical table together with maps which is called previsualisation.

  9. Spatio-temporal dependencies between hospital beds, physicians and health expenditure using visual variables and data classification in statistical table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medyńska-Gulij Beata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the use of table visual variables of statistical data of hospital beds as an important tool for revealing spatio-temporal dependencies. It is argued that some of conclusions from the data about public health and public expenditure on health have a spatio-temporal reference. Different from previous studies, this article adopts combination of cartographic pragmatics and spatial visualization with previous conclusions made in public health literature. While the significant conclusions about health care and economic factors has been highlighted in research papers, this article is the first to apply visual analysis to statistical table together with maps which is called previsualisation.

  10. The impact of economic rationalization, prioritization and rationing on job satisfaction, motivation and team cohesion in hospitals: a survey among retired physician executives in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Joerg; Braehler, Elmar; Ghanem, Mohamed; Heyde, Christoph E

    2017-01-01

    The growing economization of the health care system and implication of market principles in the medical field have risen new and serious questions on the meaning of the medical profession, the doctor-patient relationship and the orientation of medicine itself. The impact of the dynamic clinical structures on the doctor-doctor and the doctor-patient interaction appear even unpredictable. Therefore, the impact of market-based methods, i.e. rationalization, prioritization and rationing, on job satisfaction, motivation and team cohesion should be quantified. The experiences of former and now retired physician executives in numerous hospitals in Saxony were determined. For this purpose, an anonymously written survey using a standardized questionnaire was conducted in the first quarter of 2016. Rationalization measures were confirmed by 88% of respondents. In more than a third of cases, former executives also experienced prioritization and rationing. The impact of these management techniques on job satisfaction, motivation and team cohesion was carried out in a differentiated manner. There was a tendency to regard rationalization and prioritization measures indifferently to rather disadvantageous, while rationing was predominantly rated negatively. In addition to rationalization, prioritization and rationing measures have now been part of working strategy at the hospitals. On one hand, the conceptual distinction between the terms still seems imprecise; on the other hand, a creeping and imperceptible medico-ethical transgression of the prioritization to rationing seems to have already taken place.

  11. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  12. Attitudes and practices of Irish hospital-based physicians towards hand hygiene and hand rubbing using alcohol-based hand rub: a comparison between 2007 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, L M; Slevin, B L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2017-09-01

    Hand hygiene is the cornerstone of infection prevention and control practices, and reduces healthcare-associated infections significantly. However, international evidence suggests that medical doctors demonstrate poor compliance. To explore and compare practices and attitudes towards hand hygiene, particularly hand rubbing using alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR), among hospital-based physicians in Ireland between 2007 and 2015. In 2007, a random sample of doctors in a large teaching hospital was invited to complete a postal survey using a validated questionnaire. In 2015, the study was replicated among all doctors employed in a university hospital group, including the setting of the original study, using an online survey. Data were analysed using SPSS and Survey Monkey. Predominately positive and improving attitudes and practices were found, with 86% of doctors compliant with hand hygiene before patient contact in 2015, compared with 58% in 2007. Ninety-one percent of doctors were compliant after patient contact in 2015, compared with 76% in 2007. In 2015, only 39% of respondents reported that they 'almost always' used ABHR for hand hygiene. However, this represents 13.5% more than in 2007. Stated barriers to use of ABHR included dermatological issues, poor acceptance, tolerance and poor availability of ABHR products. Greater awareness of hand hygiene guidelines and greater governance appear to have had a positive impact on practice. However, despite this, practice remains suboptimal and there is scope for substantial improvement. Continued and sustained efforts are required in order to build on progress achieved since the World Health Organization hand hygiene guidelines were published in 2009. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Assessment of venous thromboembolism risk in hospitalized medical patients. Concordance between PRETEMED guide and the recommendations of the viii conference of the American College of Chest Physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo Jiménez, Patricia; Guijarro Merino, Ricardo; Vallejo Herrera, Verónica; Sánchez Morales, David; Villalobos Sánchez, Aurora; Perelló González-Moreno, Juan Ignacio; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo

    2012-11-03

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients using 2 clinical practice guidelines and to analyze the agreement between them. Cross-sectional study of medical services in a third level hospital. We calculated the thromboembolic risk and the thromboprophylaxis adequacy by implementing the recommendations of viii conference of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and PRETEMED guide as well as their agreement. One hundred and twenty eight patients were included in the study. According to the PRETEMED guide, 34.4% of patients were low risk, 6.3% moderate and 59.4% high, with appropriate prophylaxis in 72.7% of patients (CI95%: 64.4-79.9), 18.8% (CI95%: 12.7-26.2) were undertreated and 8.6% (CI95%: 4.6-14.4) overtreated. According to ACCP recommendations, 50% of patients were low risk and 50% high, with appropriate prophylaxis in 74.2% of patients (CI95%: 66.1-81.2), 10.9% (CI95%: 6.4-17.3) were undertreated and 14.8% (CI95%: 9.4-21.8) overtreated. When PRETEMED risk was classified into low or moderate-high group versus ACCP risk low or high, the grade of concordance between both guides was 0.68 (CI95%: 0.56-0.81). When PRETEMED risk was classified into low-moderate or high group versus ACCP risk low or high, the grade of concordance between both guides was 0.81 (CI95%: 0.71-0.91). About a quarter of hospitalized medical patients did not receive adequate prophylaxis, showing an important room for improvement. PRETEMED guide and ACCP recommendations differ in risk assessment mainly because PRETEMED guide overestimates the risk of venous thromboembolism since it includes more risk factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [The tragic fate of physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohry, Avi

    2013-10-01

    Physicians and surgeons were always involved in revolutions, wars and political activities, as well as in various medical humanities. Tragic fate met these doctors, whether in the Russian prisons gulags, German labor or concentration camps, pogroms or at the hands of the Inquisition.

  15. Intensified colonisation screening according to the recommendations of the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Diseases Prevention (KRINKO): identification and containment of a Serratia marcescens outbreak in the neonatal intensive care unit, Jena, Germany, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawczynski, Kristin; Proquitté, Hans; Roedel, Jürgen; Edel, Brigit; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Hoyer, Heike; Dobermann, Helke; Hagel, Stefan; Pletz, Mathias W

    2016-12-01

    In 2013, the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Disease Prevention (KRINKO) stated that extending weekly colonisation screening from very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (Serratia marcescens. Strains were typed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Over 6 months, 19 out of 159 infants acquired S. marcescens. Twelve of the nineteen patients with S. marcescens were non-VLBW infants, and they were colonised significantly earlier than were VLBW infants (median 17 vs. 28 days; p marcescens.

  16. [The boycott against German scientists and the German language after World War I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinbothe, R

    2013-12-01

    After the First World War, the Allied academies of sciences staged a boycott against German scientists and the German language. The objective of the boycott was to prevent the re-establishment of the prewar dominance of German scientists, the German language and German publications in the area of international scientific cooperation. Therefore the Allies excluded German scientists and the German language from international associations, congresses and publications, while they created new international scientific organizations under their leadership. Medical associations and congresses were also affected, e. g. congresses on surgery, ophthalmology and tuberculosis. Allied physicians replaced the "International Anti-Tuberculosis Association" founded in Berlin in 1902 with the "Union Internationale contre la Tuberculose"/"International Union against Tuberculosis", founded in Paris in 1920. Only French and English were used as the official languages of the new scientific organizations, just as in the League of Nations. The boycott was based on the fact that the German scientists had denied German war guilt and war crimes and glorified German militarism in a manifesto "To The Civilized World!" in 1914. The boycott first started in 1919 and had to be abolished in 1926, when Germany became a member of the League of Nations. Many German and foreign physicians as well as other scientists protested against the boycott. Some German scientists and institutions even staged a counter-boycott impeding the resumption of international collaboration. The boycott entailed an enduring decline of German as an international scientific language. After the Second World War scientists of the victorious Western Powers implemented a complete reorganization of the international scientific arena, based on the same organizational structures and language restrictions they had built up in 1919/1920. At the same time scientists from the U.S.A. staged an active language and publication policy, in

  17. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among pigs on German farms and import of livestock-related MRSA into hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köck, R; Harlizius, J; Bressan, N; Laerberg, R; Wieler, L H; Witte, W; Deurenberg, R H; Voss, A; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among pigs and estimate the impact of this animal reservoir on human healthcare. Nasal swabs were derived from 1,600 pigs at 40 German farms. The MRSA were

  18. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among pigs on German farms and import of livestock-related MRSA into hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, R.; Harlizius, J.; Bressan, N.; Laerberg, R.; Wieler, L.H.; Witte, W.; Deurenberg, R.H.; Voss, A.; Becker, K.; Friedrich, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among pigs and estimate the impact of this animal reservoir on human healthcare. Nasal swabs were derived from 1,600 pigs at 40 German farms. The MRSA were

  19. Challenges faced by primary care physicians when prescribing for patients with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Malaysia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellappans, Renukha; Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2015-08-27

    The aim of this study was to identify the challenges faced by primary care physicians (PCPs) when prescribing medications for patients with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Malaysia. 3 focus group discussions were conducted between July and August 2012 in a teaching primary care clinic in Malaysia. A topic guide was used to facilitate the discussions which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. PCPs affiliated to the primary care clinic were purposively sampled to include a range of clinical experience. Sample size was determined by thematic saturation of the data. 14 family medicine trainees and 5 service medical officers participated in this study. PCPs faced difficulties in prescribing for patients with chronic diseases due to a lack of communication among different healthcare providers. Medication changes made by hospital specialists, for example, were often not communicated to the PCPs leading to drug duplications and interactions. The use of paper-based medical records and electronic prescribing created a dual record system for patients' medications and became a problem when the 2 records did not tally. Patients sometimes visited different doctors and pharmacies for their medications and this resulted in the lack of continuity of care. PCPs also faced difficulties in addressing patients' concerns, and dealing with patients' medication requests and adherence issues. Some PCPs lacked time and knowledge to advise patients about their medications and faced difficulties in managing side effects caused by the patients' complex medication regimen. PCPs faced prescribing challenges related to patients, their own practice and the local health system when prescribing for patients with chronic diseases. These challenges must be addressed in order to improve chronic disease management in primary care and, more importantly, patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  20. The Physician Tendency in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dose Prescription in Benign Intracranial Tumor at dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS is one of the treatment modalities for benign intra-cranial tumor, especiallyfor the tumor located next to the critical neural structure. The prescribed dose for radiosurgery depends onthe maximal tumor diameter and surrounding normal tissue tolerance dose. This cross sectional study wasconducted to evaluate the physician’s tendency in radiosurgery dose prescription. We observed treatmentplanning data of 32 patients with benign intra-cranial tumor, which had been treated with SRS at Dr. CiptoMangunkusumo National Hospital in 2009-2010. The peripheral dose, organ at risk (OAR dose limitiationand maximum tumor diameter were recorded. We compared our SRS dose with dose limitation, whichallowed safer dosing based on maximal tumor diameter perspective and the nearest OAR dose constraint.From maximal tumor diameter perspective, we prescribed mean±SD radiosurgery doses, which were11.63±2.21Gy, 10.21±1.29Gy and 9.88±1.07Gy for the tumor size ≤2cm, 2.01-3cm and 3,01-4cm respectively.Our radiosurgery dose was the lowest than dose limitation based on the nearest OAR perspective, followedby maximal tumor diameter perspective. It was concluded that radiosurgery dose had the tendency to beinfluenced by surrounding healthy tissue tolerance rather than maximal tumor diameter. Keywords: stereotactic, radiosurgery, benign tumor, dose.   Kecenderungan Dokter dalam Menentukan Dosis StereotacticRadiosurgery untuk Tumor Jinak Intrakranial diRSUP Nasional dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo, Jakarta Abstrak Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS merupakan salah satu modalitas pengobatan tumor jinak intra-kranialterutama untuk tumor yang berdekatan dengan struktur saraf penting. Penentuan dosis pada radiosurgerytergantung pada diameter tumor maksimal dan dosis toleransi jaringan sehat sekitarnya. Penelitian inidilakukan untuk mengevaluasi kecenderungan dokter dalam menentukan dosis radiosurgery. Penelitian crosssectional ini mengevaluasi data

  1. [Empathy, inter-professional collaboration, and lifelong medical learning in Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who start their postgraduate training in hospitals in Spain. Preliminary outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Roig-Carrera, Helena; Villalonga-Vadell, Rosa M; Benito-Sevillano, Carmen; Torres-Salinas, Miquel; Claret-Teruel, Gemma; Robles, Bernabé; Sans-Boix, Antonia; Alcorta-Garza, Adelina; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    To identify similarities and differences in empathy, abilities toward inter-professional collaboration, and lifelong medical learning, between Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who start their posgraduate training in teaching hospitals in Spain. Observational study using self-administered questionnaires. Five teaching hospitals in the province of Barcelona, Spain. Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who started their first year of post-graduate medical training. Empathy was measured using the Jefferson scale of empathy. Abilities for inter-professional collaboration were measured using the Jefferson scale attitudes towards nurse-physician collaboration. Learning was measured using the Jefferson scale of medical lifelong learning scale. From a sample of 156 physicians-in-training, 110 from Spain and 40 from Latin America, the Spanish group showed the highest empathy (pempathy and inter-professional collaboration for the whole sample (r=+0.34; pempathy in the development of inter-professional collaboration abilities. In Latin-American physicians who start posgraduate training programs, lifelong learning abilities have a positive influence on the development of other professional competencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Physician Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Physician Compare, which meets Affordable Care Act of 2010 requirements, helps you search for and select physicians and other healthcare professionals enrolled in...

  3. New German abortion law agreed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, H L

    1995-07-15

    The German Bundestag has passed a compromise abortion law that makes an abortion performed within the first three months of pregnancy an unlawful but unpunishable act if the woman has sought independent counseling first. Article 218 of the German penal code, which was established in 1871 under Otto von Bismarck, had allowed abortions for certain medical or ethical reasons. After the end of the first world war, the Social Democrats tried to legalize all abortions performed in the first three months of pregnancy, but failed. In 1974, abortion on demand during the first 12 weeks was declared legal and unpunishable under the social liberal coalition government of chancellor Willy Brandt; however, the same year, the German Federal Constitution Court in Karlsruhe ruled the bill was incompatible with article 2 of the constitution, which guarantees the right to life and freedom from bodily harm to everyone, including the unborn. The highest German court also ruled that a pregnant woman had to seek a second opinion from an independent doctor before undergoing an abortion. A new, extended article 218, which included a clause giving social indications, was passed by the Bundestag. When Germany was unified, East Germans agreed to be governed by all West German laws, except article 218. The Bundestag was given 2 years to revise the article; however, in 1993, the Federal Constitution Court rejected a version legalizing abortion in the first 3 months of the pregnancy if the woman sought counsel from an independent physician, and suggested the recent compromise passed by the Bundestag, the lower house of the German parliament. The upper house, the Bundesrat, where the Social Democrats are in the majority, still has to pass it. Under the bill passed by the Bundestag, national health insurance will pay for an abortion if the monthly income of the woman seeking the abortion falls under a certain limit.

  4. Assessment of cardiovascular disease risk in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in German psychiatric hospitals: results of the pharmacoepidemiologic CATS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschle, M; Paul, F; Brosz, M; Bergemann, N; Franz, M; Kammerer-Ciernioch, J; Lautenschlager, M; Lederbogen, F; Roesch-Ely, D; Weisbrod, M; Kahl, K G; Reichmann, J; Gross, J; Umbreit, J

    2013-08-01

    Patients with severe mental illness are at high risk for metabolic and cardiac disorders. Thus, monitoring of cardiovascular risks is imperative and schedules for screening for lipids, glucose, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio and blood pressure have been developed. We intended to analyze screening for metabolic disorders in German patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in routine psychiatric care. We included 674 patients with any F2 diagnosis in out- and inpatient settings and analyzed metabolic screening procedures as practiced under conditions of usual care. Except BMI (54 %), all other values were documented only in a minority of patients: waist circumference (23 %), cholesterol (28 %), fasting glucose (19 %), triglycerides (25 %) and blood pressure (37 %). We found evidence for less than perfect quality of blood pressure measures. The group of patients who met the individual metabolic syndrome ATP III criteria was comparable to the US CATIE trial. We conclude that frequency and quality of metabolic monitoring in German in- and outpatients settings are not in accordance with the respective recommendations. Similar to previous reports we found evidence for a high prevalence of metabolic disturbances in German patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  5. Medical professionalism of foreign-born and foreign-trained physicians under close scrutiny: A qualitative study with stakeholders in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Corinna; Ismail, Fatiha; Marckmann, Georg; Kuehlmeyer, Katja

    2018-01-01

    Hospitals in Germany employ increasing numbers of foreign-born and foreign-trained (FB&FT) physicians. Studies have investigated how FB&FT physicians experience their professional integration into the German healthcare system, however, the perspectives of stakeholders working with and shaping the work experiences of FB&FT physicians in German hospitals have so far been neglected. This study explores relevant stakeholders' opinions and attitudes towards FB&FT physicians-which likely influence how these physicians settle in-and how these opinions were formed. We conducted a qualitative interview study with 25 stakeholders working in hospitals or in health policy development. The interviews were analyzed within a constructivist research paradigm using methods derived from Grounded Theory (situational analysis as well as open, axial and selective coding). We found that stakeholders tended to focus on problems in FB&FT physicians' work performance. Participants criticized FB&FT physicians' work for deviating from presumably shared professional standards (skill or knowledge and behavioral standards). The professional standards invoked to justify problem-focused statements comprised the definition of an ideal behavior, attitude or ability and a tolerance range that was adapted in a dynamic process. Behavior falling outside the tolerance range was criticized as unacceptable, requiring action to prevent similar deviations in the future. Furthermore, we derived three strategies (minimization, homogenization and quality management) proposed by participants to manage deviations from assumed professional standards by FB&FT physicians. We critically reflect on the social processes of evaluation and problematization and question the legitimacy of professional standards invoked. We also discuss discriminatory tendencies visible in evaluative statements of some participants as well as in some of the strategies proposed. We suggest it will be key to develop and implement better

  6. Teaching German-Americana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolzmann, Don Heinrich

    1976-01-01

    A university course entitled "The German-Americans" attempted to study and evaluate German culture in the U. S. Lecture topics and term paper theses are listed and a selected annotated bibliography of German-American culture is included. (CHK)

  7. ["Lean management" in hospitals: potentials and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossmann, J P; Schliebusch, O; Diehl, V; Walshe, R

    2000-08-15

    Little attention has yet been payed on establishing modern and competitive organizational structures in German hospitals. In this paper, we attempt to apply elements of lean management to the work of physicians working in an inpatient setting. Traditional ways of communication and their disadvantages are discussed. These include loss of motivation, bureaucratic structures and a lack of interdisciplinary cooperation. Using Maslow's theory of motivation, possible improvements are discussed, such as the reduction of restrictive job characteristics, an increase of physicians' spheres of competence and the use of their innovative potentials. These suggestions are explained using practical examples. The aim of the study is to contribute to quality management in hospitals by increasing personal responsibilities according to lean management.

  8. Addition of generic medication vouchers to a pharmacist academic detailing program: effects on the generic dispensing ratio in a physician-hospital organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Vinay; Greg, Mark E; Shields, Mark C

    2010-01-01

    Generic dispensing ratio (GDR) is an important measure of efficiency in pharmacy benefit management. A few studies have examined the effects of academic detailing or generic drug samples on GDR. On July 1, 2007, a physician-hospital organization (PHO) with a pay-for-performance incentive for generic utilization initiated a pilot generic medication voucher program that augmented its existing pharmacist-led academic detailing efforts. No published studies have examined the role of generic medication vouchers in promoting generic drug utilization. To determine if supplementing an existing academic detailing initiative in a PHO with a generic medication voucher program would be more effective in increasing the GDR compared with academic detailing alone. The intervention took place over the 9-month period from July 1, 2007, through March 31, 2008. Vouchers provided patients with the first fill of a 30-day supply of a generic drug at no cost to the patient for 8 specific generic medications obtained through a national community pharmacy chain. The study was conducted in a PHO composed of 7 hospitals and approximately 2,900 physicians (900 primary care providers [PCPs] and 2,000 specialists). Of the approximately 300 PCP practices, 21 practices with at least 2 physicians each were selected on the basis of high prescription volume (more than 500 pharmacy claims for the practice over a 12-month pre-baseline period) and low GDR (practice GDR less than 55% in the 12-month pre-baseline period). These 21 practices were then randomized to a control group of academic detailing alone or the intervention group that received academic detailing plus generic medication vouchers. One of 10 intervention groups declined to participate, and 2 of 11 control groups dropped out of the PHO. GDR was calculated monthly for all pharmacy claims including the 8 voucher medications. GDR was defined as the ratio of the total number of paid generic pharmacy claims divided by the total number of paid

  9. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology...... focus. It is not enough to consider only the factors of function within architecture, hygiene, economy and logistics. We also need to look at aspects of aesthetics, bringing nature into the building, art, color, acoustics, volume and space as we perceive them. Contemporary methods and advances...... placed, accessible, provided with plenty of greenery, and maximize sensory impressions, providing sounds, smells, sight and the possibility to be touched. This is a very well documented area I can say. Hygiene, in terms of architecture can give attention to hand wash facilities and their positioning...

  10. German Studies in America. German Studies Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Volkmar; Osterle, Heinz D.

    This volume contains two papers, "German Studies in America," by Volkmar Sander, and "Historicism, Marxism, Structuralism: Ideas for German Culture Courses," by Heinz D. Osterle. The first paper discusses the position of German studies in the United States today. The greatest challenge comes from low enrollments; therefore,…

  11. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. In addition, we are making technical corrections to the regulations governing provider administrative appeals and judicial review; updating the reasonable compensation equivalent (RCE) limits, and revising the methodology for determining such limits, for services furnished by physicians to certain teaching hospitals and hospitals excluded from the IPPS; making regulatory revisions to broaden the specified uses of Medicare Advantage (MA) risk adjustment data and to specify the conditions for release of such risk adjustment data to entities outside of CMS; and making changes to the enforcement procedures for organ transplant centers. We are aligning the reporting and submission timelines for clinical quality measures for the Medicare HER Incentive Program for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) with the reporting and submission timelines for the Hospital IQR Program. In addition, we provide guidance and clarification of certain policies for eligible hospitals and CAHs such as our policy for reporting zero denominators on clinical quality measures and our policy for case threshold exemptions. In this document, we are finalizing two interim final rules with comment period relating to criteria for disproportionate share hospital uncompensated care payments and extensions of temporary changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals and of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital (MDH) Program.

  12. Physician-industry relations. Part 1: individual physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Susan L

    2002-03-05

    This is part 1 of a 2-part paper on ethics and physician-industry relationships. Part 1 offers advice to individual physicians; part 2 gives recommendations to medical education providers and medical professional societies. Physicians and industry have a shared interest in advancing medical knowledge. Nonetheless, the primary ethic of the physician is to promote the patient's best interests, while the primary ethic of industry is to promote profitability. Although partnerships between physicians and industry can result in impressive medical advances, they also create opportunities for bias and can result in unfavorable public perceptions. Many physicians and physicians-in-training think they are impervious to commercial influence. However, recent studies show that accepting industry hospitality and gifts, even drug samples, can compromise judgment about medical information and subsequent decisions about patient care. It is up to the physician to judge whether a gift is acceptable. A very general guideline is that it is ethical to accept modest gifts that advance medical practice. It is clearly unethical to accept gifts or services that obligate the physician to reciprocate. Conflicts of interest can arise from other financial ties between physicians and industry, whether to outside companies or self-owned businesses. Such ties include honorariums for speaking or writing about a company's product, payment for participating in clinic-based research, and referrals to medical resources. All of these relationships have the potential to influence a physician's attitudes and practices. This paper explores the ethical quandaries involved and offers guidelines for ethical business relationships.

  13. National survey of the association of depressive symptoms with the number of off duty and on-call, and sleep hours among physicians working in Japanese hospitals: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Aizan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians' mental health may be adversely affected by the number of days of work and time spent on-call, and improved by sleep and days-off. The aim of this study was to determine the associations of depressive symptoms with taking days of off duty, hours of sleep, and the number of days of on-call and overnight work among physicians working in Japanese hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional study as a national survey was conducted by mail. The study population was 10,000 randomly selected physicians working in hospitals who were also members of the Japan Medical Association (response rate 40.5%. Self-reported anonymous questionnaire was sent to assess the number of days off-duty, overnight work, and on-calls, and the average number of sleep hours on days not working overnight in the previous one month. Depressive state was determined by the Japanese version of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the associations between depressive symptoms and the studied variables. Results Among the respondents, 8.3% of men and 10.5% of women were determined to be depressed. For both men and women, depressive state was associated with having no off-duty days and averaging less than 5 hours of sleep on days not doing overnight work. Depressive state was positively associated with being on-call more than 5 days per month for men, and more than 8 days per month for women, and was negatively associated with being off-duty more than 8 days per month for men. Conclusion Some physicians need some support to maintain their mental health. Physicians who do not take enough days-off, who reduced sleep hours, and who have certain number of days on-calls may develop depressive symptoms.

  14. National survey of the association of depressive symptoms with the number of off duty and on-call, and sleep hours among physicians working in Japanese hospitals: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koji; Yoshikawa, Toru; Goto, Takahisa; Hirai, Aizan; Matsushima, Eisuke; Nakashima, Yoshifumi; Akaho, Rie; Kido, Michiko; Hosaka, Takashi

    2010-03-12

    Physicians' mental health may be adversely affected by the number of days of work and time spent on-call, and improved by sleep and days-off. The aim of this study was to determine the associations of depressive symptoms with taking days of off duty, hours of sleep, and the number of days of on-call and overnight work among physicians working in Japanese hospitals. A cross-sectional study as a national survey was conducted by mail. The study population was 10,000 randomly selected physicians working in hospitals who were also members of the Japan Medical Association (response rate 40.5%). Self-reported anonymous questionnaire was sent to assess the number of days off-duty, overnight work, and on-calls, and the average number of sleep hours on days not working overnight in the previous one month. Depressive state was determined by the Japanese version of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the associations between depressive symptoms and the studied variables. Among the respondents, 8.3% of men and 10.5% of women were determined to be depressed. For both men and women, depressive state was associated with having no off-duty days and averaging less than 5 hours of sleep on days not doing overnight work. Depressive state was positively associated with being on-call more than 5 days per month for men, and more than 8 days per month for women, and was negatively associated with being off-duty more than 8 days per month for men. Some physicians need some support to maintain their mental health. Physicians who do not take enough days-off, who reduced sleep hours, and who have certain number of days on-calls may develop depressive symptoms.

  15. [Falling Short of Minimum Volume Standards, Exemptions and Their Consequences from 2018 Onwards. Complex Procedures on Oesophagus and Pancreas in German Hospitals from 2006 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cruppé, Werner; Geraedts, Max

    2018-03-16

    The minimum volume standards for hospitals in Germany, in force since 2004, provide four exemptions for non-complying hospitals. This study investigates the extent and importance of these exemptions for complex procedures on the oesophagus and pancreas for all non-complying hospitals and for the revised minimum volume regulations in force since the beginning of 2018. Longitudinal, descriptive analyses of data on minimum volume standards and their exemptions for complex procedures on the oesophagus and pancreas, as presented by the hospital quality report cards of the reporting years from 2006 to 2014. For each year and both procedures, about 120 hospitals with some 500 cases report non-compliance with the minimum volume standards. Of these a third report no exemptions (with 180 procedures), a third state emergencies (110), and another third report exemptions due to internal hospital restructuring (210). Ensuring geographical access to care as an exemption is of no importance. After the three year exemption period for installation of a new service line, 20% of the hospitals with procedures on the oesophagus and 30% on the pancreas complied with the minimum volume standards. After the two-year period for staff realignment, the figures were 40 and 50%, respectively. Exemptions do not entirely explain all procedures performed by hospitals not complying with the minimum volume standards. The revised minimum volume regulations' restructuring of exemptions to "emergencies" and "new or renewed service lines" with a two year exemption period, are concordant with the empirical findings of this study. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Variations over time in the effects of age and sex on hospitalization rates before and after admission to a nursing home: A German cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Allers, Katharina

    2017-08-01

    We examined hospitalization rates for nursing home residents before and after their entry to the home, stratified by sex and age. A cohort study was conducted using data from a large health insurance fund on 127,227 residents aged 65 years and over newly admitted to a nursing home between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. We assessed hospitalization rates and proportions being hospitalized in 6-month intervals one year before nursing home placement and up to 5 years thereafter. Multiple Poisson regression models were fitted to calculate relative risks (RR). Mean age was 84.0 years and 74.6% of the cohort were females. Hospitalization rates were 194.4 per 100 person-years (PY) in the 12 months before entry to the nursing home and 120.0 per 100 PY thereafter. Rates were highest immediately before entry in both sexes. The influence of age was most pronounced in the 12-7 months before entry (RR: 2.37 for 65-74 vs. 95+ years) and declined thereafter (1.29-1.38 up to month 24 after entry). In contrast, the influence of sex was greater after entry (RR: 1.13 for males vs. females in the 12-7 months before and 1.23-1.31 up to month 24 after entry). Hospitalization rates of nursing home residents are much higher in Germany than in other Western countries. We have provided some insight into the influence of age and sex on hospitalization rates, which varied over the period (time before and after entry to the nursing home) analyzed. We urgently recommend that future studies on the hospitalization of residents stratify their analyses by sex, age and period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Web-based Training an deutschen Universitäts-Augenkliniken – Lehre 2.0? [Web-based Training in German University Eye Hospitals – Education 2.0?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handzel, Daniel M.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Purpose: To analyse web-based training in ophthalmology offered by German university eye hospitals. Methods: In January 2010 the websites of all 36 German university hospitals were searched for information provided for visitors, students and doctors alike. We evaluated the offer in terms of quantity and quality. Results: All websites could be accessed at the time of the study. 28 pages provided information for students and doctors, one page only for students, three exclusively for doctors. Four pages didn’t offer any information for these target groups. The websites offered information on events like congresses or students curricular education, there were also material for download for these events or for other purposes. We found complex e-learning-platforms on 9 pages. These dealt with special ophthalmological topics in a didactic arrangement. In spite of the extensive possibilities offered by the technology of Web 2.0, many conceivable tools were only rarely made available. It was not always possible to determine if the information provided was up-to-date, very often the last actualization of the content was long ago. On one page the date for the last change was stated as 2004. Conclusion: Currently there are 9 functional e-learning-applications offered by German university eye hospitals. Two additional hospitals present links to a project of the German Ophthalmological Society. There was a considerable variation in quantity and quality. No website made use of crediting successful studying, e.g. with CME-points or OSCE-credits. All German university eye hospitals present themselves in the World Wide Web. However, the lack of modern, technical as well as didactical state-of-the-art learning applications is alarming as it leaves an essential medium of today’s communication unused. [german] Zielsetzung: Analyse der webbasierten ophthalmologischen Lernprogramme, welche von den Internetseiten der Universitäts-Augenkliniken in

  18. Physician alignment strategies and real estate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniak, Thomas A

    2012-06-01

    When addressing locations of facilities after acquiring physician practices, hospitals should: Acknowledge the hospital's ambulatory plan is the driver rather than real estate assumed with the physician practices, Review the hospital ambulatory service plan for each submarket, Review the location of facilities within the service area and their proximity to one another, Sublease or sell existing facilities that are not appropriate, Ensure that the size and characteristics of each facility in the market are appropriate and consistent with the hospital's image.

  19. Hospital ownership, decisions on supervisory board characteristics, and financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Pulm, Jannis; Wittland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic and complex transformations in the hospital market increase the relevance of good corporate governance. However, hospital performance and the characteristics of supervisory boards differ depending on ownership. The question therefore arises whether hospital owners can influence performance by addressing supervisory board characteristics. The objective of this study is to explain differences in the financial performance of hospitals with regard to ownership by studying the size and composition of supervisory boards. The AMADEUS database was used to collect information on hospital financial performance in 2009 and 2010. Business and quality reports, hospital websites, and data from health insurer were used to obtain information on hospital and board characteristics. The resulting sample consisted of 175 German hospital corporations. We utilized ANOVA and regression analysis to test a mediation hypothesis that investigated whether decisions regarding board size and composition were associated with financial performance and could explain performance differences. Financial performance and board size and composition depend on ownership. An increase in board size and greater politician participation were negatively associated with all five tested measures of financial performance. Furthermore, an increase in physician participation was positively associated with one dimension of financial performance, whereas one negative relationship was identified for nurse and economist participation. For clerics, no associations were found. Decisions concerning board size and composition are important as they relate to hospital financial performance. We contribute to existing research by showing that, in addition to board size and physician participation, the participation of other professionals can also influence financial performance.

  20. Which Obstacles Prevent Us from Recruiting into Clinical Trials: A Survey about the Environment for Clinical Studies at a German University Hospital in a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straube

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProspective clinical studies are the most important tool in modern medicine. The standard in good clinical practice in clinical trials has constantly improved leading to more sophisticated protocols. Moreover, translational questions are increasingly addressed in clinical trials. Such trials must follow elaborate rules and regulations. This is accompanied by a significant increase in documentation issues which require substantial manpower. Furthermore, university-based clinical centers are interested in increasing the amount of patients treated within clinical trials, and this number has evolved to be a key quality criterion. The present study was initiated to elucidate the obstacles that limit clinical scientists in screening and recruiting for clinical trials.MethodsA specific questionnaire with 28 questions was developed focusing on all aspects of clinical trial design as well as trial management. This included questions on organizational issues, medical topics as well as potential patients’ preferences and physician’s goals. The questionnaire was established to collect data anonymously on a web-based platform. The survey was conducted within the Klinikum rechts der Isar, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University of Munich; physicians of all levels (Department Chairs, attending physicians, residents, as well as study nurses, and other study-related staff were addressed. The answers were analyzed using the Survio analyzing tool (http://www.survio.com/de/.ResultsWe collected 42 complete sets of answers; in total 28 physicians, 11 study nurses, and 3 persons with positions in administration answered our survey. The study centers reported to participate in a range of 3–160 clinical trials with a recruitment rate of 1–80%. Main obstacles were determined: 31/42 (74% complained about limited human resources and 22/42 (52% reported to have a lack on technical resources, too. 30/42 (71% consented to the answer, that the documentation

  1. [Prevention of medical device-related adverse events in hospitals: Specifying the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Zippel, Claus; Siebert, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    The use and organisation of medical technology has an important role to play for patient and user safety in anaesthesia. Specification of the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment, explore opportunities and challenges for the safe use and organisation of anaesthesia devices. We conducted a literature search in Medline/PubMed for studies dealing with the APS recommendations for the prevention of medical device-related risks in the context of anaesthesia. In addition, we performed an internet search for reports and recommendations focusing on the use and organisation of medical devices in anaesthesia. Identified studies were grouped and assigned to the recommendations. The division into users and operators was maintained. Instruction and training in anaesthesia machines is sometimes of minor importance. Failure to perform functional testing seems to be a common cause of critical incidents in anaesthesia. There is a potential for reporting to the federal authority. Starting points for the safe operation of anaesthetic devices can be identified, in particular, at the interface of staff, organisation, and (anaesthesia) technology. The APS recommendations provide valuable information on promoting the safe use of medical devices and organisation in anaesthesia. The focus will be on risks relating to the application as well as on principles and materials for the safe operation of anaesthesia equipment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. [Requirements and reality of the German ordinance for staff in psychiatric hospitals: results of a multi-moment study on a psychiatric ward for acute psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M; Rieger, W

    2010-11-01

    The regulation of personnel in psychiatry (PsychPV) stipulates time requirements for all relevant activities in inpatient psychiatric care as a function of the degree of disease severity of the patients treated. The demands made on employees in psychiatric care have risen substantially in recent years. Our aim was to examine whether the standard requirements of the PsychPV cover the actual work load. With the help of a multi-moment study on a general psychiatric ward we examined which activities are performed to which extent by doctors and nurses. Physicians must spend an inordinate amount of time on documentation and the nursing staff on non-patient-related tasks. The causes are the higher number of external requests and higher clinical documentation requirements. This time is lost to the direct patient contact. The PsychPV requirements must be urgently adapted so that more time is again available for the direct patient contact.

  3. [Economic aspects of anesthesia. I. Health care reform in the German Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, A; Bauer, M

    1998-03-01

    Implications for Hospitals and Departments of Anaesthesiology. This article outlines the new German health care laws and their impact on the statutory health care system, hospitals and anaesthesia departments. The German health care system provides coverage for all citizens, although financial support from the public sector is on the downgrade. Hence, pressure to reduce public sector health care spending is likely to continue in the near future. Hospital costs account for one-third of total health care spending in Germany, and hospitals are facing increasing economic constraints: the volume and the charges for specific medical treatments are negotiated between the hospitals and the insurance agencies (or sickness funds) in advance. Only part of hospital care is still reimbursed on the basis of a per diem rate, and an increasing number of services are based on fixed payments per case or treatment. Reducing the costs for this treatment is therefore of utmost importance for hospitals and hospital departments. The prospective payment system and the pressure to contain costs demand a controlling system that allows for cost accounting per case. However, an economic evaluation must include comparative analysis of alternative therapeutic options in terms of both costs and outcome. Economic aspects challenge the traditional relationship between physicians and patients: doctors are still the advocates of their patients, but also act as agents for their institutions. Nevertheless, not only economic issues, but also ethical priorities and the value of an anaesthetic practice must be considered in the era of cost containment. Anaesthetists must be actively involved in providing high-quality care with its obvious benefits for the patient and be able to resist efforts to cut out expensive treatment modalities regardless of their benefits.

  4. The German Birth Order Register - order-specific data generated from perinatal statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births 2001-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Kreyenfeld; Rembrandt D. Scholz; Frederik Peters; Ines Wlosnewski

    2010-01-01

    Until 2008, Germany’s vital statistics did not include information on the biological order of each birth. This resulted in a dearth of important demographic indicators, such as the mean age at first birth and the level of childlessness. Researchers have tried to fill this gap by generating order-specific birth rates from survey data, and by combining survey data with vital statistics. This paper takes a different approach by using hospital statistics on births to generate birth order-specific...

  5. [Incidence of biological accidents at work and immune status for vaccine-preventable diseases among resident physicians in specialist training at Ferrara University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanati, Armando; Brosio, Federica; Kuhdari, Parvanè; Baccello, Valeria; De Paris, Paola; Nardini, Marco; Boschetto, Piera; Lupi, Silvia; Gabutti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The hospital as a work environment is particularly characterized by various risks for healthcare workers (HCWs). The main risk is represented by biological accidents, associated with the parenteral transmission of pathogens. Biological injuries can occur during the care service and the manipulation of biological fluids. Hepatitis B (and hepatitis D), hepatitis C and HIV are the most common infections transmitted by biological injuries. Physicians should acquire awareness of the risks associated with their professional activity during their training as medical residents (MRs). Some infectious diseases are preventable by vaccination and the "National Immunization Plan 2017-2019" (PNPV) recommends HCWs vaccination against hepatitis B, influenza, measles -mumps -rubella, chicken pox, and pertussis. Besides, not only HCWs' vaccination can prevent the disease in healthcare professionals, but it also may reduce the transmission to patients. Therefore, active immunization of HCWs by recommended vaccinations plays an important role to prevent disease cases, complications and death in patients. An increased awareness of risk behaviors is the first important point to address in order to reduce biological accidents and infectious diseases transmission, so as to reduce their frequency. Besides, HCWs' vaccination is useful to reinforce protection and to prevent the transmission of some infectious diseases in case of exposure. The aim of this five-year incidence study is to investigate the MRs' biological accidents characteristics and to analyze the MRs' immune status at the University of Ferrara in the period 2011-2015. Data on MRs' biological accidents and immune status at Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria of Ferrara in 2011-2015 were analyzed by Microsoft Excel 2007 Software. In this study, the percentage of MRs' biological injuries compared to the total number of MRs showed an annual variability, with a peak in 2011 (11.9%). During the analyzed period, there were 190

  6. [Quality assurance in coding expertise of hospital cases in the German DRG system. Evaluation of inter-rater reliability in MDK expertise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, H; Brambrink, M; Funk, R; Rieger, M

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in the D-DRG results of a hospital case by 2 independently coding MKD raters. Calculation of the 2-inter-rater reliability was performed by examination of the coding of individual hospital cases. The reasons for the non-agreement of the expert evaluations and suggestions to improve the process are discussed. From the expert evaluation pool of the MDK-WL a random sample of 0.7% of the 57,375 expertises was taken. Distribution equality with the basic total was tested by the χ² test or, respectively, Fisher's exact test. For the total of 402 individual hospital cases, the G-DRG case sums of 2 experts of the MDK were determined independently and the results checked for each individual case for agreement or non-agreement. The corresponding confidence intervals with standard errors were analysed to test if certain major diagnosis categories (MDC) were statistically significantly more affected by differing expertise results than others. In 280 of the total 402 tested hospital cases, the 2 MDK raters independently reached the same G-DRG results; in 122 cases the G-DRG case sums determined by the 2 raters differed (agreement 70%; CI 65.2-74.1). Different DRG results between the 2 experts occurred regularly in the entire MDC spectrum. No MDC chapter in which significant differences between the 2 raters arose could be identified. The results of our study demonstrate an almost 70% agreement in the evaluation of hospital cost accounts by 2 independently operating MDK. This result leaves room for improvement. Optimisation potentials can be recognised on the basis of the results. Potential for improvement was established in combination with regular further training and the expansion of binding internal code recommendations as well as exchange of code-relevant information among experts in internal forums. The presented model is in principle suitable for cross-border examinations within the MDK system with the advantage that